Handbook AS-805-C - Information Security Requirements for All Personnel

Handbook AS-805-C - Information Security Requirements for ...

Handbook AS-805-C May 2020 Transmittal Letter A. ™Explanation: The appropriate use of the resources that the Postal Service provides is important. It can affect the efficiency of our day-to-day business activities, the success of new business opportunities, and the preservation of the trust and security represented by the Postal Service brand.

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Information Security Requirements for All Personnel
Handbook AS-805-C May 2020
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Information Security Requirements for All Personnel Handbook AS-805-C

May 2020 Transmittal Letter

A. Explanation: The appropriate use of the resources that the Postal ServiceTM provides is important. It can affect the efficiency of our day-to-day business activities, the success of new business opportunities, and the preservation of the trust and security represented by the Postal Service brand.
This handbook summarizes what you need to know about protecting Postal Service information resources; the information security policies that govern their use; and the protection of sensitive, sensitive-enhanced (including personal identifiable information and payment cardholder information), and critical information.
By understanding your role, responsibilities, and significance to protect this information, you become a major contributor to a successful information security program.
Follow the instructions on the last page of this handbook to complete the Acknowledgement of Information Security Awareness Training.
B. Comments: Submit questions or comments about this handbook to: CORPORATE INFORMATION SECURITY OFFICE UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE 8111 GATEHOUSE ROAD SUITE 600 FALLS CHURCH VA 22042
Comments may also be sent by e-mail to: cpst@usps.gov. Use "AS-805-C, Information Security Requirements for All Personnel" as the subject header.
D. Effective Date: This handbook is effective immediately.

Gregory S. Crabb Vice President Chief Information Security Officer

Information Security Requirements for All Personnel
Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1 What This Handbook Covers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1
2. Logon IDs, Passwords, PINs, and Tokens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Getting Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1 Creating a Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2 Using Logon IDs and Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2 Using Screensaver Time-Out and Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3 Using PINs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4 Using Tokens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4 Resetting Passwords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
3. Use of Information Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4 E-mail Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6 Internet Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7 Remote Access and Telework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8 Domestic Travel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9 International Travel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9 Wireless Technologies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
4. Protection of Sensitive and Critical Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11 Sensitive Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11 Sensitive-Enhanced Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11 Critical (Moderate) Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16 Critical (High) Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
5. Protection Against Viruses and Malicious Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17 Worms, Trojan Horses, and Trap Doors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17 Preventing Infection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17 Responding to Infections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
6. Hardware and Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18 Using and Adding Hardware and Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
7. Information Security Incidents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19 Recognizing Incidents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19 Preventing Incidents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20 Responding to Incidents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
8. Monitoring of Information Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21 Why the Postal Service Monitors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21 How You Are Notified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
We Are Interested in Hearing From You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
Acknowledgement of Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22 Security Awareness Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22

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1. Introduction

Information Security Requirements for All Personnel

What This Handbook Covers

HBK AS-805 Available at
http://about.usps. com/handbooks/
as805.pdf

This handbook summarizes information security requirements for all personnel, including designated personnel handling payment card information. For a complete explanation of information security policies, please refer to HBK AS-805, Information Security.

2. Logon IDs, Passwords, PINs, and Tokens

Getting Access

Logon ID A unique identifier assigned to a user
when access is authorized.
Temporary Information
Services Active directory account, e-mail,
office suite of services, and intranet browser
access.
eAccess Online computer
request application at https://eaccess.
usps.gov.

The Postal Service uses logon identifications (IDs), passwords, personal identification numbers (PINS), and tokens to manage access to its information resources.
Need access to basic computer services?
If you don't have access to computer services but need it to do your job, ask your supervisor or manager. Information Technology will notify you when you have been granted access to computer services.
Need additional access?
If you already have access to basic computer services but need to add services, then you or your manager can request it using eAccess.

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Creating a Password
What to do when you create a password...

Password A string of characters you `know' that can be used for authentication, i.e., provides proof that you are who you say you are when using a given logon ID.

 Use alphanumeric passwords with at least fifteen (15) characters.
 Choose a password that is hard for others to guess, such as phrases or word strings.
 Use at least one character from three of the four following types of characters:
- Upper case letters (A­Z).
- Lower case letters (a­z).
- Numerals (0­9).
- Non-alphanumeric characters (special characters such as &, #, and $).
 Change your password every 90 days.
 See Handbook AS-805 if you are a privileged user or work in Information Technology.

What not to do when you create a password...

 Do not use all the same characters or digits or other commonly used or easily guessed formats.
 Do not use your name, family members' names, birth date, or other personal information.
 Do not use terms such as Post OfficeTM or user or other Postal Service terminology or acronyms.
 Do not use words that appear in the dictionary.
 Do not use your logon ID.
 Do not repeat your passwords.

Using Logon IDs and Password

What to do when using logon IDs and passwords...
 Keep your password confidential. You are accountable for the actions of anyone using your logon ID and password, even if you didn't give the user permission.
 Change your password if you think it has been compromised and notify the Cybersecurity Operations Center (CSOC) using the procedure described in section 7, Information Security Incidents, of this handbook.

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 If you have forgotten your password or your account has been disabled because you made six unsuccessful attempts to enter your account, use ePassword Reset to re-set your password. The ePassword Reset program will automatically re-set the password to a temporary password, which you must change the next time you log on to the network.
 If you write your personal password down, store it under your personal control or in tamper-resistant manner (e.g., an envelope with a registry seal, time stamped, and signed) to ensure that any disclosure or removal of the written password is clearly recognizable.

What not to do when using logon IDs and passwords...
 Do not write your personal password on a sticky and attach it to your monitor.
 Don't share your personal password under any circumstances, including in the following examples:
- Don't share your personal password with IT technical support staff working to resolve a Service Desk or system upgrade ticket related to your system.
- Don't share your personal password with coworkers to enable them to access your system for any reason (e.g., to resolve any issues related to teleworking and to enable them to access a file, application, e-mail message, attachment, or meeting/calendar-related information.)
- Don't share your personal password with a family member or personal acquaintance to enable them to access the Internet or use MS Office or other USPS® applications installed on a USPS® computing device.
 Never let anyone use your logon ID or password and do not use anyone else's.
 Do not store your password in application code, files, or tables.
 Do not transmit a password for access to your system, to an encrypted document, or to an archive in clear text in an e-mail.

Screensaver Protects information when you are away
from the computer but not logged out.

Using Screensaver Time-Out and Password
 Make sure your screensaver time-out feature is working; and if not, contact the IT Service Desk.

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PIN A specialized authenticator for limited applications and usually used with a token.
Token
A small tangible object that
contains a built-in microprocessor used to store and process
information for authentication.

Using PINs
 Protect PINs with the same care as you protect passwords.
Using Tokens
 Protect your token from theft.
 Do not allow anyone else to use it.
 Do not leave tokens out in plain sight when not in use; secure them in locked drawers.
 Tokens are required for remote access to payment cardholder information.
Resetting Passwords
 If you suspect your password has been compromised, change it immediately by using the Change Password function button on the Window Security Web page (available by simultaneously depressing the Ctrl, Alt, and Delete keys) and notify CSOC using the procedures described in section 7, Information Security Incidents, of this handbook.
 If you forget your password, use ePassword Reset (available from the Postal Service Intranet, http://blue.usps.gov, and from the following links) to reset it:
- Application Password (https://epasswordreset).
- Mainframe Password (https://epasswordreset).

3. Use of Information Resources

General Use

Limited Personal Use See
MI EL-660-2009-10, Limited Personal Use
of Government Office Equipment
and Information
Technology.

What to do when using information resources...
 Follow Postal Service limited personal use policies.
 Protect our workstations, laptop computers, and handheld devices, both on and off Postal Service premises, against theft and misuse by following all Postal Service information security requirements.
 Connect to the intranet weekly to receive appropriate software updates and virus pattern recognition files.
 Use only software on the official list of approved software, which is on the Infrastructure Tool Kit site (ITK) at

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http://itk. Click on Access ITK on the right-hand side. The link will show a list of approved software.
 Obtain your vice president or designee's written approval to use Bluetooth devices on Postal Service premises because of the potential interference with Postal Service systems such as Surface Visibility and Yard Management.
 Obtain your vice president or designee's written approval to use personal information resources [e.g., laptops, notebooks, hand-held computers, or storage media including universal serial bus (USB) devices] on Postal Service premises.
 Use Postal Service approved encryption software to encrypt sensitive and sensitive-enhanced information in transit and at rest (storage) and give management recovery keys and decryption instructions.
What not to do when using information resources...
 Do not jeopardize Postal Service information security or impair performance of computer resources.
 Do not attempt unauthorized entry to any computer system.
 Do not install unauthorized hardware or software.
 Do not copy or browse someone else's personal files or accounts.
 Do not copy, move, or store electronic files containing nonpublic information, including personally identifiable information (PII), to local hard drives, removable media, or remote access technologies not related to your normal business activities without written management approval.
 Do not send or store credit or debit card numbers or related cardholder information if not a part of your job responsibilities.
 Do not perform unofficial activities that could degrade the performance of Postal Service equipment or systems, such as playing electronic games and non-Postal Service video files.
 Do not use Postal Service resources to promote or maintain a personal or private business or commit fraudulent or illegal activities.
 Do not use personal information resources (e.g., laptops, notebooks, hand-held computers, or storage media including USB devices) at retail counter areas, mail

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processing areas, or workroom floors; this includes headsets or earpieces attached to such devices. This requirement does not apply to personal information resources used by the unions in accordance with the collective bargaining agreement.
 Do not use watch, cell or smart phone cameras or retail lobby web cams in any manner not authorized by Postal Service MI AS-882-2011-6, Postal Service Use of Retail and Cell Phone Cameras.
 Do not connect personal electronic devices to the Postal Service intranet.
 Do not use imaging devices (e.g., cameras, cell or smart phones with cameras, or watches with cameras) at Postal Service facilities, except as authorized by your vice president or someone designated to make business decisions on the vice president's behalf.
 Do not use Bluetooth devices on Postal Service facilities without approval from the user's vice president or designee because of the potential for interference with Postal Systems such as Surface Visibility and Yard Management.
 Do not disable your password or token-protected screen saver.
 Do not disable your virus protection software.

E-mail Use

Restricted Information Label indicating that access to records or information is restricted based on Postal Service
policies.

What to do when you use e-mail...
 You may use Postal Service e-mail for limited personal use only if it doesn't interfere with Postal Service business (e.g., if the activity is of limited duration, messages are of limited size, have a small transmission impact, and require only a small amount of storage and paper, if printed) and does not violate Postal Service policies.
 Send sensitive, sensitive-enhanced, and non-publicly available information only to authorized personnel with a Postal Service business-related "need-to-know."
 Use Postal Service-approved encryption software to encrypt sensitive and sensitive-enhanced information sent by e-mail and give the recipient the recovery keys and decryption instructions.

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What not to do when you use e-mail...

Privacy? Don't expect it. E-mail and Internet
use may be monitored.
Spam Unsolicited e-mail, often of a commercial nature, sent indiscriminately to multiple addresses.

 Never use Postal Service-provided computing devices, including mobile devices, to check your non-Postal Service or personal e-mail accounts or social media pages.
 Do not open an e-mail message from someone you do not know or recognize as a valid business contact.
 Do not open unsolicited or suspicious e-mail attachments.
 Do not click on links in e-mails (manually type hyperlink in your browser).
 Do not send information that violates state or federal laws and Postal Service regulations or that could defame, libel, abuse, embarrass, tarnish, or present a bad image of or falsely portray the Postal Service, recipient, sender, or anyone else.
 Do not use the "Reply" button. Instead use the "Forward" option and either type in the correct email address or select it from your email address book to ensure the real email address is used.
 Do not send or respond to spam. Delete the spam without opening it.
 Do not view, create, or forward pornographic material.
 Do not view, create, or forward chain letters or other unauthorized mass mailings.
 Do not use the "Reply-All" function to respond to e-mails with large recipient lists unless all recipients need to receive your reply.

Internet Use

What to do when you use the Internet...
 Use the Internet to support your job, activities, and responsibilities.
 You may only use the Internet for limited personal use if it does not interfere with Postal Service business or violate Postal Service policies.

What not to do when you use the Internet...
 Do not follow links to Web sites embedded in suspicious e-mail or Web advertisements.
 Do not browse pornographic, hate-based, or other sites that the Postal Service considers off-limits.

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 Do not post, send, or acquire sexually oriented, hatebased, or other material the Postal Service considers off-limits.
 Do not use non-work-related applications, software, or games on Postal Service workstations or networks.
 Do not post unauthorized commercial announcements or advertising material.
 Do not promote or maintain a personal or private business.
 Do not arrange to receive news feeds and push data updates unless the material is required for Postal Service business.

Remote Access Access to servers from locations such as a remote office, your home, a hotel,
or a non-Postal Service facility.

Remote Access and Telework
What to do when you use remote access...
 If you want to use your Postal Service workstation or mobile device remotely, use eAccess to ask permission from your manager.
 Use only approved computer hardware and software.
 Use only approved remote access services such as the virtual private network (VPN) or point-to-point protocol (PPP).
 Protect (via locked cabinet or closet) your Postal Service assigned devices so that unauthorized individuals cannot gain access to the device or to the Postal Service intranet.
 Establish approved dial-in access through Postal Service centralized dial-in services.
 Disconnect from the Postal Service intranet before establishing alternate or additional connections to any network such as the Internet.
 Use two-factor authentication (e.g., token) for access to payment cardholder data.

What not to do when you use remote access...
 Do not establish a separate connection to the Internet while your computer is connected to the Postal Service intranet.
 Do not configure your workstation to allow unauthorized dial-in services.
 Do not connect any personal electronic devices to the Postal Service intranet or Postal Service computing devices.

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 Do not allow family members or guests to use your Postal Service computing devices.

Domestic Travel

What to do when you travel...
 Secure laptops at all times in a locked cabinet or desk, or with a security cable and lock attached to an immovable object.
 Ensure laptops are not left unattended in public places.
 When traveling by car, stow laptops in the trunk or some other area where it will not be easily seen or attract attention.
 When traveling by air or train, keep laptops as carry-on luggage.
 Implement safeguards to monitor and maintain acceptable levels of temperature and humidity.
 Lost or stolen laptops or Postal Service issued portable mobile devices should be reported to USPS CSOC immediately at 1-866-877-7247, or by email at CyberSafe@usps.gov.

International Travel

What to do when you travel internationally...
 For some high-risk international destinations, users on official Postal Service business will be prohibited from traveling with their standard issued laptop and mobile devices. In these instances, loaner devices will be provided by IT and the devices will be wiped upon return.
 Request International roaming features for cell or smart phones and portable mobile devices (except Tablets) using eAccess within five (5) business days in advance of planned travel.
 Request International roaming features for Tablets using ServiceNow within five (5) business days in advance of planned travel.

What not to do when you travel...
 Leave laptops or portable mobile devices unsecured or unattended in hotel room or public places.
 Place laptops or portable mobile devices in checked baggage.

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 Do not take Postal Service-issued cellular or portable mobile device(s) when on personal international travel.
 Do not use public USB charging station to charge your Postal Service mobile devices. Use your own instead.
Wireless Technologies
What to do when you use wireless technologies...
 Protect sensitive and sensitive-enhanced information.  Report lost or stolen wireless devices (except devices
used by bargaining employees) to the IT Service Desk at 800-877-7435 and CSOC at 866-877-7247 immediately or as soon as practical after you notice the device is missing.  Bargaining unit employees, report lost or stolen devices to your immediate manager.  Connect to hotel Wi-Fi with a password or reference number provided by the hotel upon check-in.  Disconnect device from public Wi-Fi connections when no longer in use.  Use only Postal Service approved virtual private network (VPN) connections when sharing files through Wi-Fi connections.  Make sure your firewall is on and security anti-virus software is current.
What not to do when you use wireless technologies...
 Do not change any of the authorized configuration settings of your assigned Postal Service-owned equipment.
 Do not use personal mobile devices at retail counter areas, mail processing areas, or workroom floors unless approved by area or headquarter vice president or designee for business purposes.
 Do not use mobile devices with cameras in restrooms or locker rooms.
 Do not copy, move, or store cardholder data on mobile devices (except MPOS devices). (Note: MPOS devices encrypt cardholder data.)

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4. Protection of Sensitive and Critical Information
Sensitive Information
Sensitive (hardcopy and electronic) information includes, but is not limited to, the following:
 Private information about individuals (e.g., employees, contractors, suppliers, business partners, and customers) including marital status, age, birth date, race, and buying habits.
 Confidential business information that does not warrant sensitive-enhanced protection including trade secrets, proprietary information, financial information, supplier proposal information, and source selection information.
 Data susceptible to fraud including accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll, and travel reimbursement.
 Information illustrating or disclosing information resource protection vulnerabilities or threats against persons, systems, operations, or facilities. Examples include: information about the physical or technical aspects (including security settings and passwords) of a network, server, workstations, laptops, tablets, cell and smart phones.
Sensitive-Enhanced Information
Sensitive-enhanced (hardcopy and electronic) information includes, but is not limited to, the following:
 Law enforcement information and court-restricted information, including grand jury material, arrest records, and information about ongoing investigations.
 Payment Card Industry (PCI) primary account number (PAN), i.e., full credit/debit card number (13-16 characters).
 Personally identifiable information (PII) including information used to distinguish or trace an individual's identity such as name, social security number, driver's license number, passport number, bank routing with account number, date with place of birth, mother's maiden name, biometric data, and any other information which is linked or linkable to an individual.

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 Information about individuals (e.g., employees, contractors, suppliers, business partners, and customers) protected by law, including protected health information and wire or money transfers.
 Information related to the protection of Postal Service restricted financial information, trade secrets, proprietary information, and emergency preparedness.
 Communications protected by legal privileges (e.g., attorney-client communications encompassing attorney opinions based on client-supplied information) and documents constituting attorney work products (created in reasonable anticipation of litigation).
Additional examples of sensitive and sensitive-enhanced information are included in the Business Impact Assessment (BIA) as part of the electronic certification and accreditation application.
When completing the BIA, an employee from the Privacy Office and the assigned Information Systems Security Officer will provide support to determine the proper information sensitivity and criticality.
How to protect sensitive information to which you have access...
 Limit hardcopy and electronic distribution to persons who have a specific job-related need-to-know for sensitive information.
 Limit the number of copies of sensitive information to minimum necessary.
 Cross-cut-shred hardcopy and zero-bit format or destroy electronic copies that are not distributed or are no longer needed.
 Retain sensitive information in accordance with the retention schedule noted in the Electronic Records and Information Management System (eRIMS) at https://erims.
 Restrict the pickup, receipt, transfer, and delivery of sensitive information to authorized personnel.
 Protect sensitive information on Postal Service workstations, laptop computers, and hand-held devices against theft and disclosure to unauthorized individuals.
 Protect sensitive information against theft and disclosure to unauthorized individuals. This includes information stored on disks, diskettes, CDs, USB, or other storage devices, and hardcopy.

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Restricted Information
The Postal Service caveat for sensitive and sensitive-enhanced
information indicating access is restricted based on Postal Service
regulations and policies. For more
information, see the HBK AS-353, Guide to Privacy and the Freedom of Information Act.

 Encrypt sensitive information in storage (i.e., at rest), in transit, or stored off Postal Service premises.
 Label "RESTRICTED INFORMATION" any printed or electronic material considered sensitive, such as printouts, architecture drawings, engineering layouts, CDs, diskettes, and tapes.
 Invoke a password-protected screen saver when leaving your workstation, laptop, or mobile device unattended. Remember "Control-Alt-Delete (and select "lock this computer") before you leave your seat."
 Store sensitive information in a controlled area or a locked cabinet or desk.
 After receiving appropriate management approval, use factory-fresh media to release electronic versions of sensitive information.
 When the retention period or legal hold has expired, destroy sensitive information in accordance with guidelines listed in Handbook AS-805.
 Follow Postal Service disposal procedures for storage media and computer hardware containing sensitive information.
 Cross-cut-shred hardcopy printouts and drawings containing sensitive information before disposal.
 See Handbook AS-805 for the requirements when accessing or downloading sensitive Postal Service electronic information off Postal Service premises or taking sensitive Postal Service electronic and non-electronic information off site (i.e., non-Postal Service premises) including Postal Service data processed by business partners.
 See Handbook AS-805 for the protection requirements of Postal Service information during international travel.
 Report suspicious behavior of employees, contractors, suppliers, or visitors to your supervisor. Remember "If you see something, say something."

How to protect sensitive-enhanced information to which you have access...

Implement all of the protection requirements associated with sensitive information and in addition:
 Limit distribution in e-mail and hardcopy to those persons who have a specific job-related need-to-know for sensitive-enhanced information.

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 Create an inventory listing and track sensitive-enhanced hard- copy and electronic information from creation to destruction.
 Appropriate security requirements must be implemented when processing (i.e., transferring, copying, storing, mailing, and destroying) employee medical records or protected health information (PHI).
If you collect credit card information:
 Periodically check point-of-sale devices to ensure they have not been tampered with (i.e., skimmers have not been installed).
 When accepting credit cards, ensure that the credit card information on the card is protected from view by other customers to prevent the taking of a photo of the card with a mobile phone or observation and memorization of the full credit card number.
 Ensure credit cards are signed.
 Credit cards are not accepted for purchase of money orders, trust fund deposits, permit imprint deposits, purchase of pre-canceled stamps, periodical postage, postage meter setting, money-by-wire, employee debt reconciliation, COD funds, or bulk mailings.
 PANs must not be sent via end-user messaging technologies.
 Encrypt all transmissions containing cardholder data.
 Follow the standard operating procedures for processing debit cards.
 Ensure that the customer has privacy when entering his personal identification number (PIN).
If you process credit card information:
 Protect credit card numbers from view by individuals that do not have a need to know.
 Credit card numbers should not be used for development or testing.
 Mask credit card numbers when displayed (the first six and the last four digits are the maximum digits displayed).
 De-identify or remove credit card numbers from removable media and audit logs.
 Keep cardholder information storage to a minimum and limit retention time.

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 Physically secure all hardcopy and electronic media containing cardholder data.
 Maintain strict control over internal and external distribution of cardholder data.
 Log and track all media removed from the facility.
 Encrypt PCI information throughout the life cycle.
What not to do with sensitive and sensitive-enhanced information to which you have access...
 Do not store sensitive or sensitive-enhanced information on devices not owned by the Postal Service.
 Do not co-mingle sensitive or sensitive-enhanced information with non-Postal Service information.
 Do not remove sensitive or sensitive-enhanced information from Postal Services premises without approval in writing from the functional vice president (data steward) and chief information officer or their designees.
 Do not reveal sensitive or sensitive-enhanced information without management approval.
 Do not print sensitive or sensitive-enhanced information on printers where unauthorized people may see the output.
 Do not copy sensitive or sensitive-enhanced information unless you can protect the copies.
 Do not send (via e-mail, IM, chat, etc.) sensitive or sensitive-enhanced information unless you are able to protect (e.g., encrypt) it.
 Do not discuss sensitive or sensitive-enhanced information in an open area where others might overhear the conversation.
 Do not send sensitive or sensitive-enhanced information by facsimile without management approval.
 Do not delete emails that include PCI/PAN information without de-identifying or encrypting the data.
 To deidentify the PCI/PAN data:
- Select "Actions" from the Outlook menu bar.
- Select "Edit Message" from the menu options.
- Delete all PCI/PAN information.
- "Save" the email.
- At this point, it's safe to delete the message.

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Critical (Moderate) Information

Critical Essential for uninterrupted Postal Service operations or to protect health and safety of Postal Service personnel.

Information is designated as critical (moderate) information if its unavailability would have a serious adverse impact (e.g., systems temporarily unavailable, mail delivery delayed) on the following:  Customer or employee injury, safety, or health.  Payment to suppliers or employees.  Revenue collection.  Movement of mail.  Communications.  Infrastructure services.  Legal or regulatory.

Critical (High) Information
Information is designated as critical (high) information if its unavailability would have a catastrophic adverse impact (e.g., complete systems or infrastructure failure, mail delivery suspended) on the following:  Customer or employee death, safety, or health.  Payment to suppliers or employees.  Revenue collection.  Movement of mail.  Communications.  Legal or regulatory requirements.

What to do with critical (moderate or high) information to which you have access...
 Protect critical information on workstations, laptop computers, and hand-held devices against theft.
 Invoke a password-protected screen saver when leaving your information resource unattended. Remember "Control-Alt-Delete (and select "lock this computer") before you leave your seat."
 Store critical information in a controlled area or a locked cabinet or desk.
 Back up critical information regularly and label copies.
 Store back-up media offsite in a secure location.

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What not to do with critical (moderate or high) information to which you have access...
 Do not leave critical information in an unprotected area.

5. Protection Against Viruses and Malicious Code

Worms, Trojan Horses, and Trap Doors

Be Safe Install the latest virus
detection patterns.

Viruses and other forms of malicious code are harmful software that can contaminate, damage, or destroy information resources. Viruses can attach to e-mails, proliferate themselves, and spread automatically from computer to computer, causing widespread damage. Symptoms of infection include:
 Files or data are suddenly unavailable.
 Unexpected processes, such as e-mail transmissions or programs starting on their own.
 Files have been edited when no changes should have occurred.
 Files appear or disappear, or undergo unexpected changes in size.
 Systems display strange messages or mislabel files and directories.
 Systems become slow, unstable, or inaccessible.

Preventing Infection

What to do to prevent infection...

Watch Out Viruses may be included in e-mail.

 Make sure your workstation and any portable computers you use for Postal Service business are equipped with the latest virus protection software and the latest virus scanning pattern recognition file.
 Scan diskettes and removable disk drives before you use them.
 Scan incoming files before you load or save them to your computer.
 Scan files before sending them to another computer or user.

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 Back up software and files frequently and maintain several generations.
What not to do . . .
 Do not download unapproved programs, shareware, or freeware from the Internet, diskette, or other media onto Postal Service equipment.
 Do not open unsolicited or suspicious e-mail or attachments.
 Do not modify the configuration of the virus protection software after installation, except as instructed by authorized personnel.
 Do not disable automatic virus scanning programs.
Responding to Infections
What to do. . .
 Stop work if you notice any symptom of infection.  Call CSOC at (866-877-7247), or send an email to:
CyberSafe@usps.gov. and call the IT Service Desk at 800-USPS-HEL(P) (800-877-7435).  Report the virus incident to your manager or supervisor.
What not to do . . .
 Do not use the computer until the CSOC or the IT Service Desk says it is okay to do so.
 Do not wait to report a virus incident.
6. Hardware and Software
Using and Adding Hardware and Software
What to do with hardware and software. . .
 Use only hardware and software that are approved and are included in the Infrastructure Toolkit (ITK). For information on how to add a product to the ITK: - Go to http://itk.

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- Under the heading Help is a link, ITK Request. Clicking on it will open an e-mail message. Or, you may call 202-268-4585.
 Acquire hardware and software only from official Postal Service suppliers.
What not to do with hardware and software . . .
 Do not install on Postal Service computers any unapproved software from the Internet, a diskette, CD, or other media.
 Do not use personally owned software on Postal Service computers without management approval.
 Do not violate copyright laws by using unlicensed software or making unauthorized copies of licensed software.
 Do not attach any hardware to Postal Service workstations or networks without written authorization.

7. Information Security Incidents

Recognizing Incidents

Information Security Incidents
Events or situations (suspected, proven,
deliberate, or inadvertent) that could expose Postal Service information resources to loss or
harm.

Examples of incidents that must be reported include:
 System becomes slow, unstable, or inaccessible (e.g., will not boot properly).
 Unexpected processes start without your input.
 Files disappear or undergo significant and unexpected changes in size.
 System displays strange messages or mislabels files or directories.
 Suspected theft of your identity.
 Stolen, missing, or damaged hardware, software, or electronic media.
 Exposed or missing hard copy files containing sensitive, sensitive-enhanced, or critical information.
 Unauthorized disclosure, modification, misuse, or inappropriate disposal of Postal Service information.
 Internal or external unauthorized attempts to access information resources or the facility where they reside.

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 Internal or external intrusions or interference with our networks, including denial-of-service attacks, unauthorized activity on restricted systems, or unauthorized changes to files.
 Unavailability of files or data normally accessible.  Security violations, suspicious actions, suspicion or
occurrence of fraudulent activities, and potentially dangerous activities or conditions.  Unauthorized individual in a controlled area.
Preventing Incidents
What to do to prevent information security breaches . . .
 If you do not understand any of the requirements in this handbook, ask your supervisor for clarification.
 Take the annual information security training course.  Display proper identification when in any Postal Service
facility.  Be aware of your physical surroundings, including
weaknesses in physical security and the presence of any unauthorized visitors.  Protect Postal Service hardware, software, and sensitive, sensitive-enhanced, or critical information.
Responding to Incidents
What to do in response to a security incident. . .
 Immediately report incidents to the CSOC at (866-877-7247) or send an e-mail to CyberSafe@usps.gov. Employees traveling outside the United States should call 001-919-501-9299.
 Notify the following, where appropriate: - Service Desk at 800-USPS-HEL(P) (800-877-7435). - Immediate supervisor or manager. - Local system administrator or local technical support. - Security Control Officer. - Inspection Service local office where incident took place. If you do not know the number, you can look the number up at https://ribbs.usps.gov/locators/find-is.cfm or call 877-876-2455. - Office of Inspector General at 888-877-7644.

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 Take action as directed by the CSOC.  Document all communications and actions taken regarding
the incident.  Complete PS Form 1360, Information Security Incident
Report, and sent to CyberSafe@usps.gov.
What not to do . . .
 Do not dismiss a suspected incident or discount its seriousness.
 Do not postpone reporting a suspected incident, especially a possible incident of a missing computing device in the hope that a lost device may soon be found and reporting it may be avoided; should the device subsequently be located, follow up the initial report with an immediate report indicating the device was found.
8. Monitoring of Information Resources
Why the Postal Service Monitors
The Postal Service has the legal right to monitor use of its information resources. The Postal Service monitors use to ensure these resources are protected and to verify compliance with information security policies and federal regulations. By using Postal Service information resources, you consent to the monitoring of your use of these resources. You have no expectation of privacy when using Postal Service information resources.
How You Are Notified
You are notified of monitoring through various means:  Warning banners on electronic devices.  Information security awareness publications, videos, and
training.  Postal Service official directives such as Handbook
AS805, Information Security, and this publication.

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We Are Interested in Hearing From You
For more information, e-mail questions or comments to information_security@usps.gov.
Acknowledgement of Information
Security Awareness Training
All new hire and designated personnel handling sensitive, sensitive-enhanced (e.g., payment cardholder information) or critical information must acknowledge, initially and at least annually, in writing or electronically, that they have read and understand Postal Service information security policies and procedures contained in this Handbook.
If after reading this handbook, you do not understand how to protect sensitive, sensitive-enhanced, critical (moderate), or critical (high) information, contact your manager for additional information.
Once you understand your personal responsibilities and requirements for protecting the above classifications of information:  Send an e-mail to your manager with "Information
Security Awareness Training" in the subject line or  Make a copy of this page. Sign and date the copy and
provide it to your manager.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: I understand how I am personally required to protect sensitive, sensitive-enhanced, critical (moderate) or critical (high) Postal Service information to which I have access.

Print Name Signature 22

Date
Handbook AS 805-C, May 2020

PSN 7610-05-000-5604
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