Accton Technology Es3528M Sfp Users Manual Mgmt

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2015-02-05

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Management Guide
ES3528M-SFP
Fast Ethernet Switch
Management Guide
Fast Ethernet Switch
Layer 2 Workgroup Switch
with 24 100BASE-BX (SFP) Ports, 2 1000BASE-T (RJ-45)
and 2 Combination Gigabit (RJ-45/SFP) Ports
ES3528M-SFP
E122007-DG-R01
149100035500A
v
About This Guide
Purpose
This guide gives specific information on how to operate and use the management
functions of the switch.
Audience
The guide is intended for use by network administrators who are responsible for operating
and maintaining network equipment; consequently, it assumes a basic working
knowledge of general switch functions, the Internet Protocol (IP), and Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP).
Conventions
The following conventions are used throughout this guide to show information:
Note: Emphasizes important information or calls your attention to related features or
instructions.
Caution: Alerts you to a potential hazard that could cause loss of data, or damage the
system or equipment.
Warning: Alerts you to a potential hazard that could cause personal injury.
Related Publications
The following publication details the hardware features of the switch, including the
physical and performance-related characteristics, and how to install the switch:
The Installation Guide
Also, as part of the switch’s software, there is an online web-based help that describes all
management related features.
Revision History
This section summarizes the changes in each revision of this guide.
November 2007 Revision
This is the second revision of this guide. This guide is valid for software release v1.1.0.7.
vi
i
Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction 1-1
Key Features 1-1
Description of Software Features 1-2
System Defaults 1-6
Chapter 2: Initial Configuration 2-1
Connecting to the Switch 2-1
Configuration Options 2-1
Required Connections 2-2
Remote Connections 2-3
Basic Configuration 2-3
Console Connection 2-3
Setting Passwords 2-4
Setting an IP Address 2-4
Manual Configuration 2-4
Dynamic Configuration 2-5
Enabling SNMP Management Access 2-6
Community Strings (for SNMP version 1 and 2c clients) 2-6
Trap Receivers 2-7
Configuring Access for SNMP Version 3 Clients 2-8
Saving Configuration Settings 2-8
Managing System Files 2-9
Chapter 3: Configuring the Switch 3-1
Using the Web Interface 3-1
Navigating the Web Browser Interface 3-2
Home Page 3-2
Configuration Options 3-3
Panel Display 3-3
Main Menu 3-4
Basic Configuration 3-12
Displaying System Information 3-12
Displaying Switch Hardware/Software Versions 3-13
Displaying Bridge Extension Capabilities 3-15
Setting the Switch’s IP Address 3-16
Manual Configuration 3-17
Using DHCP/BOOTP 3-18
Enabling Jumbo Frames 3-19
Managing Firmware 3-19
Downloading System Software from a Server 3-20
Contents
ii
Saving or Restoring Configuration Settings 3-21
Downloading Configuration Settings from a Server 3-22
Console Port Settings 3-23
Telnet Settings 3-25
Configuring Event Logging 3-28
Displaying Log Messages 3-28
System Log Configuration 3-28
Remote Log Configuration 3-30
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol 3-31
Resetting the System 3-33
Setting the System Clock 3-34
Setting the Time Manually 3-34
Configuring SNTP 3-34
Configuring NTP 3-35
Setting the Time Zone 3-37
Simple Network Management Protocol 3-38
Setting Community Access Strings 3-39
Specifying Trap Managers and Trap Types 3-40
Enabling SNMP Agent Status 3-41
Configuring SNMPv3 Management Access 3-42
Setting the Local Engine ID 3-42
Specifying a Remote Engine ID 3-43
Configuring SNMPv3 Users 3-43
Configuring Remote SNMPv3 Users 3-45
Configuring SNMPv3 Groups 3-46
Setting SNMPv3 Views 3-49
User Authentication 3-51
Configuring User Accounts 3-51
Configuring Local/Remote Logon Authentication 3-53
Configuring Encryption Keys 3-57
AAA Authorization and Accounting 3-58
Configuring AAA RADIUS Group Settings 3-59
Configuring AAA TACACS+ Group Settings 3-59
Configuring AAA Accounting 3-60
AAA Accounting Update 3-62
AAA Accounting 802.1X Port Settings 3-62
AAA Accounting Exec Command Privileges 3-63
AAA Accounting Exec Settings 3-65
AAA Accounting Summary 3-65
Authorization Settings 3-67
Authorization EXEC Settings 3-68
Authorization Summary 3-68
Configuring HTTPS 3-69
Replacing the Default Secure-site Certificate 3-70
Configuring the Secure Shell 3-71
Contents
iii
Configuring the SSH Server 3-74
Generating the Host Key Pair 3-75
Importing User Public Keys 3-76
Configuring Port Security 3-80
Configuring 802.1X Port Authentication 3-81
Displaying 802.1X Global Settings 3-83
Configuring 802.1X Global Settings 3-83
Configuring Port Settings for 802.1X 3-84
Displaying 802.1X Statistics 3-87
Web Authentication 3-88
Configuring Web Authentication 3-89
Configuring Web Authentication for Ports 3-90
Displaying Web Authentication Port Information 3-91
Re-authenticating Web Authenticated Ports 3-92
Network Access – MAC Address Authentication 3-93
Configuring the MAC Authentication Reauthentication Time 3-94
Configuring MAC Authentication for Ports 3-94
Configuring Port Link Detection 3-96
Displaying Secure MAC Address Information 3-97
MAC Authentication 3-98
Configuring MAC authentication parameters for ports 3-98
Access Control Lists 3-99
Configuring Access Control Lists 3-100
Setting the ACL Name and Type 3-100
Configuring a Standard IP ACL 3-101
Configuring an Extended IP ACL 3-102
Configuring a MAC ACL 3-105
Binding a Port to an Access Control List 3-106
Filtering IP Addresses for Management Access 3-107
Port Configuration 3-110
Displaying Connection Status 3-110
Configuring Interface Connections 3-112
Creating Trunk Groups 3-114
Statically Configuring a Trunk 3-115
Enabling LACP on Selected Ports 3-116
Configuring LACP Parameters 3-118
Displaying LACP Port Counters 3-120
Displaying LACP Settings and Status for the Local Side 3-122
Displaying LACP Settings and Status for the Remote Side 3-124
Setting Broadcast Storm Thresholds 3-125
Configuring Port Mirroring 3-127
Configuring Rate Limits 3-128
Rate Limit Configuration 3-128
Showing Port Statistics 3-129
Address Table Settings 3-133
Contents
iv
Setting Static Addresses 3-133
Displaying the Address Table 3-134
Changing the Aging Time 3-136
Spanning Tree Algorithm Configuration 3-136
Displaying Global Settings 3-138
Configuring Global Settings 3-141
Displaying Interface Settings 3-144
Configuring Interface Settings 3-147
Configuring Multiple Spanning Trees 3-149
Displaying Interface Settings for MSTP 3-151
Configuring Interface Settings for MSTP 3-153
VLAN Configuration 3-155
IEEE 802.1Q VLANs 3-155
Enabling or Disabling GVRP (Global Setting) 3-158
Displaying Basic VLAN Information 3-159
Displaying Current VLANs 3-159
Creating VLANs 3-161
Adding Static Members to VLANs (VLAN Index) 3-162
Adding Static Members to VLANs (Port Index) 3-164
Configuring VLAN Behavior for Interfaces 3-165
Configuring IEEE 802.1Q Tunneling 3-167
Enabling QinQ Tunneling on the Switch 3-170
Adding an Interface to a QinQ Tunnel 3-172
Private VLANs 3-173
Displaying Current Private VLANs 3-174
Configuring Private VLANs 3-175
Associating VLANs 3-176
Displaying Private VLAN Interface Information 3-177
Configuring Private VLAN Interfaces 3-178
Protocol VLANs 3-179
Protocol VLAN Group Configuration 3-179
Protocol VLAN System Configuration 3-180
Link Layer Discovery Protocol 3-181
Setting LLDP Timing Attributes 3-181
Configuring LLDP Interface Attributes 3-183
Displaying LLDP Local Device Information 3-186
Displaying LLDP Remote Port Information 3-187
Displaying LLDP Remote Information Details 3-188
Displaying Device Statistics 3-189
Displaying Detailed Device Statistics 3-190
Class of Service Configuration 3-191
Layer 2 Queue Settings 3-191
Setting the Default Priority for Interfaces 3-191
Mapping CoS Values to Egress Queues 3-192
Enabling CoS 3-194
Contents
v
Selecting the Queue Mode 3-195
Setting the Service Weight for Traffic Classes 3-195
Layer 3/4 Priority Settings 3-196
Mapping Layer 3/4 Priorities to CoS Values 3-196
Enabling IP DSCP Priority 3-197
Mapping DSCP Priority 3-198
Quality of Service 3-199
Configuring Quality of Service Parameters 3-200
Configuring a Class Map 3-200
Creating QoS Policies 3-203
Attaching a Policy Map to Ingress Queues 3-206
VoIP Traffic Configuration 3-207
Configuring VoIP Traffic 3-207
Configuring VoIP Traffic Port 3-208
Configuring Telephony OUI 3-210
Multicast Filtering 3-212
Layer 2 IGMP (Snooping and Query) 3-212
Configuring IGMP Snooping and Query Parameters 3-213
Enabling IGMP Immediate Leave 3-215
Displaying Interfaces Attached to a Multicast Router 3-216
Specifying Static Interfaces for a Multicast Router 3-217
Displaying Port Members of Multicast Services 3-218
Assigning Ports to Multicast Services 3-219
IGMP Filtering and Throttling 3-220
Enabling IGMP Filtering and Throttling 3-221
Configuring IGMP Filter Profiles 3-222
Configuring IGMP Filtering and Throttling for Interfaces 3-223
Multicast VLAN Registration 3-225
Configuring Global MVR Settings 3-226
Displaying MVR Interface Status 3-227
Displaying Port Members of Multicast Groups 3-228
Configuring MVR Interface Status 3-229
Assigning Static Multicast Groups to Interfaces 3-231
DHCP Snooping 3-232
DHCP Snooping Configuration 3-233
DHCP Snooping VLAN Configuration 3-233
DHCP Snooping Information Option Configuration 3-234
DHCP Snooping Port Configuration 3-235
DHCP Snooping Binding Information 3-236
IP Source Guard 3-237
IP Source Guard Port Configuration 3-237
Static IP Source Guard Binding Configuration 3-238
Dynamic IP Source Guard Binding Information 3-239
IP Clustering 3-240
Cluster Configuration 3-241
Contents
vi
Cluster Member Configuration 3-242
Cluster Member Information 3-243
Cluster Candidate Information 3-243
UPnP 3-245
UPnP Configuration 3-245
Chapter 4: Command Line Interface 4-1
Using the Command Line Interface 4-1
Accessing the CLI 4-1
Console Connection 4-1
Telnet Connection 4-2
Entering Commands 4-3
Keywords and Arguments 4-3
Minimum Abbreviation 4-3
Command Completion 4-3
Getting Help on Commands 4-3
Showing Commands 4-4
Partial Keyword Lookup 4-6
Negating the Effect of Commands 4-6
Using Command History 4-6
Understanding Command Modes 4-6
Exec Commands 4-7
Configuration Commands 4-8
Command Line Processing 4-10
Command Groups 4-11
Line Commands 4-12
line 4-13
login 4-13
password 4-14
timeout login response 4-15
exec-timeout 4-15
password-thresh 4-16
silent-time 4-17
databits 4-17
parity 4-18
speed 4-19
stopbits 4-19
disconnect 4-20
show line 4-20
General Commands 4-21
enable 4-21
disable 4-22
configure 4-23
show history 4-23
Contents
vii
reload 4-24
reload cancel 4-24
show reload 4-25
end 4-25
exit 4-26
quit 4-26
System Management Commands 4-27
Device Designation Commands 4-27
prompt 4-27
hostname 4-28
Banner 4-28
banner configure 4-29
banner configure company 4-30
banner configure dc-power-info 4-31
banner configure department 4-31
banner configure equipment-info 4-32
banner configure equipment-location 4-33
banner configure ip-lan 4-33
banner configure lp-number 4-34
banner configure manager-info 4-35
banner configure mux 4-35
banner configure note 4-36
show banner 4-37
User Access Commands 4-38
username 4-38
enable password 4-39
IP Filter Commands 4-40
management 4-40
show management 4-41
Web Server Commands 4-42
ip http port 4-42
ip http server 4-42
ip http secure-server 4-43
ip http secure-port 4-44
Telnet Server Commands 4-45
ip telnet port 4-45
ip telnet server 4-45
Secure Shell Commands 4-46
ip ssh server 4-48
ip ssh timeout 4-49
ip ssh authentication-retries 4-49
ip ssh server-key size 4-50
delete public-key 4-50
ip ssh crypto host-key generate 4-51
ip ssh crypto zeroize 4-51
Contents
viii
ip ssh save host-key 4-52
show ip ssh 4-52
show ssh 4-53
show public-key 4-54
Event Logging Commands 4-55
logging on 4-55
logging history 4-56
logging host 4-57
logging facility 4-57
logging trap 4-58
clear logging 4-58
show logging 4-59
show log 4-60
SMTP Alert Commands 4-61
logging sendmail host 4-61
logging sendmail level 4-62
logging sendmail source-email 4-63
logging sendmail destination-email 4-63
logging sendmail 4-64
show logging sendmail 4-64
Time Commands 4-65
sntp client 4-65
sntp server 4-66
sntp poll 4-67
show sntp 4-67
ntp client 4-68
ntp server 4-69
ntp poll 4-70
ntp authenticate 4-70
ntp authentication-key 4-71
show ntp 4-72
clock timezone-predefined 4-72
clock timezone 4-73
clock summer-time (date) 4-74
clock summer-time (predefined) 4-75
clock summer-time (recurring) 4-76
calendar set 4-77
show calendar 4-77
System Status Commands 4-78
show startup-config 4-78
show running-config 4-79
show system 4-82
show users 4-82
show version 4-83
Frame Size Commands 4-84
Contents
ix
jumbo frame 4-84
Flash/File Commands 4-85
copy 4-85
delete 4-88
dir 4-89
whichboot 4-90
boot system 4-90
Authentication Commands 4-91
Authentication Sequence 4-91
authentication login 4-92
authentication enable 4-93
RADIUS Client 4-94
radius-server host 4-95
radius-server acct-port 4-95
radius-server auth-port 4-96
radius-server key 4-96
radius-server retransmit 4-97
radius-server timeout 4-97
show radius-server 4-97
TACACS+ Client 4-98
tacacs-server host 4-98
tacacs-server port 4-99
tacacs-server key 4-99
tacacs-server retransmit 4-100
tacacs-server timeout 4-100
show tacacs-server 4-101
AAA Commands 4-102
aaa group server 4-102
server 4-103
aaa accounting dot1x 4-103
aaa accounting exec 4-104
aaa accounting commands 4-105
aaa accounting update 4-106
accounting dot1x 4-107
accounting exec 4-107
accounting commands 4-108
aaa authorization exec 4-108
authorization exec 4-109
show accounting 4-110
Port Security Commands 4-111
port security 4-111
802.1X Port Authentication 4-112
dot1x system-auth-control 4-113
dot1x default 4-113
dot1x max-req 4-114
Contents
x
dot1x port-control 4-114
dot1x operation-mode 4-115
dot1x re-authenticate 4-115
dot1x re-authentication 4-116
dot1x timeout quiet-period 4-116
dot1x timeout re-authperiod 4-117
dot1x timeout tx-period 4-117
dot1x intrusion-action 4-118
show dot1x 4-118
Network Access – MAC Address Authentication 4-121
network-access mode 4-121
network-access max-mac-count 4-122
mac-authentication intrusion-action 4-123
mac-authentication max-mac-count 4-123
network-access dynamic-qos 4-124
network-access dynamic-vlan 4-124
network-access guest-vlan 4-125
network-access link-detection 4-125
network-access link-detection link-down 4-126
network-access link-detection link-up 4-126
network-access link-detection link-up-down 4-127
mac-authentication reauth-time 4-127
clear network-access 4-128
show network-access 4-128
show network-access mac-address-table 4-129
Web Authentication 4-130
web-auth login-attempts 4-131
web-auth login-fail-page-url 4-131
web-auth login-page-url 4-132
web-auth login-success-page-url 4-132
web-auth quiet-period 4-133
web-auth session-timeout 4-133
web-auth system-auth-control 4-134
web-auth 4-134
show web-auth 4-135
show web-auth interface 4-135
web-auth re-authenticate (Port) 4-136
web-auth re-authenticate (IP) 4-136
show web-auth summary 4-137
Access Control List Commands 4-139
IP ACLs 4-140
access-list ip 4-140
permit, deny (Standard ACL) 4-141
permit, deny (Extended ACL) 4-141
show ip access-list 4-143
Contents
xi
ip access-group 4-143
show ip access-group 4-144
MAC ACLs 4-144
access-list mac 4-145
permit, deny (MAC ACL) 4-146
show mac access-list 4-147
mac access-group 4-148
show mac access-group 4-148
ACL Information 4-149
show access-list 4-149
show access-group 4-149
SNMP Commands 4-150
snmp-server 4-151
show snmp 4-151
snmp-server community 4-152
snmp-server contact 4-153
snmp-server location 4-153
snmp-server host 4-154
snmp-server enable traps 4-156
snmp-server engine-id 4-157
show snmp engine-id 4-158
snmp-server view 4-159
show snmp view 4-160
snmp-server group 4-160
show snmp group 4-161
snmp-server user 4-163
show snmp user 4-165
Interface Commands 4-166
interface 4-166
description 4-167
speed-duplex 4-167
negotiation 4-168
capabilities 4-169
flowcontrol 4-170
shutdown 4-171
switchport packet-rate 4-172
clear counters 4-172
show interfaces status 4-173
show interfaces counters 4-174
show interfaces switchport 4-175
Mirror Port Commands 4-177
port monitor 4-177
show port monitor 4-178
Rate Limit Commands 4-179
rate-limit 4-179
Contents
xii
Link Aggregation Commands 4-180
channel-group 4-181
lacp 4-182
lacp system-priority 4-183
lacp admin-key (Ethernet Interface) 4-184
lacp admin-key (Port Channel) 4-185
lacp port-priority 4-186
show lacp 4-186
Address Table Commands 4-190
mac-address-table static 4-190
clear mac-address-table dynamic 4-191
show mac-address-table 4-191
mac-address-table aging-time 4-192
show mac-address-table aging-time 4-193
LLDP Commands 4-193
lldp 4-195
lldp holdtime-multiplier 4-195
lldp medFastStartCount 4-196
lldp notification-interval 4-196
lldp refresh-interval 4-197
lldp reinit-delay 4-198
lldp tx-delay 4-198
lldp admin-status 4-199
lldp notification 4-199
lldp mednotification 4-200
lldp basic-tlv management-ip-address 4-201
lldp basic-tlv port-description 4-201
lldp basic-tlv system-capabilities 4-202
lldp basic-tlv system-description 4-202
lldp basic-tlv system-name 4-203
lldp dot1-tlv proto-ident 4-203
lldp dot1-tlv proto-vid 4-204
lldp dot1-tlv pvid 4-204
lldp dot1-tlv vlan-name 4-205
lldp dot3-tlv link-agg 4-205
lldp dot3-tlv mac-phy 4-206
lldp dot3-tlv max-frame 4-206
lldp dot3-tlv poe 4-207
lldp medtlv extpoe 4-207
lldp medtlv inventory 4-208
lldp medtlv location 4-208
lldp medtlv med-cap 4-209
lldp medtlv network-policy 4-209
show lldp config 4-210
show lldp info local-device 4-212
Contents
xiii
show lldp info remote-device 4-213
show lldp info statistics 4-213
UPnP Commands 4-215
upnp device 4-215
upnp device ttl 4-216
upnp device advertise duration 4-216
show upnp 4-217
Spanning Tree Commands 4-217
spanning-tree 4-218
spanning-tree mode 4-219
spanning-tree forward-time 4-220
spanning-tree hello-time 4-221
spanning-tree max-age 4-221
spanning-tree priority 4-222
spanning-tree pathcost method 4-222
spanning-tree transmission-limit 4-223
spanning-tree mst-configuration 4-223
mst vlan 4-224
mst priority 4-225
name 4-225
revision 4-226
max-hops 4-226
spanning-tree spanning-disabled 4-227
spanning-tree cost 4-227
spanning-tree port-priority 4-228
spanning-tree edge-port 4-229
spanning-tree portfast 4-230
spanning-tree link-type 4-231
spanning-tree loopback-detection 4-231
spanning-tree loopback-detection release-mode 4-232
spanning-tree loopback-detection trap 4-233
spanning-tree mst cost 4-233
spanning-tree mst port-priority 4-234
spanning-tree protocol-migration 4-235
show spanning-tree 4-235
show spanning-tree mst configuration 4-237
VLAN Commands 4-238
GVRP and Bridge Extension Commands 4-238
bridge-ext gvrp 4-239
show bridge-ext 4-239
switchport gvrp 4-240
show gvrp configuration 4-240
garp timer 4-241
show garp timer 4-241
Editing VLAN Groups 4-242
Contents
xiv
vlan database 4-242
vlan 4-243
Configuring VLAN Interfaces 4-244
interface vlan 4-244
switchport mode 4-245
switchport acceptable-frame-types 4-246
switchport ingress-filtering 4-246
switchport native vlan 4-247
switchport allowed vlan 4-248
switchport forbidden vlan 4-249
Displaying VLAN Information 4-250
show vlan 4-250
Configuring IEEE 802.1Q Tunneling 4-251
dot1q-tunnel system-tunnel-control 4-251
switchport dot1q-tunnel mode 4-252
switchport dot1q-tunnel tpid 4-253
show dot1q-tunnel 4-253
Configuring Private VLANs 4-254
private-vlan 4-256
private vlan association 4-256
switchport mode private-vlan 4-257
switchport private-vlan host-association 4-258
switchport private-vlan isolated 4-258
switchport private-vlan mapping 4-259
show vlan private-vlan 4-259
Configuring Protocol-based VLANs 4-261
protocol-vlan protocol-group (Configuring Groups) 4-261
protocol-vlan protocol-group (Configuring VLANs) 4-262
show protocol-vlan protocol-group 4-263
show protocol-vlan protocol-group-vid 4-263
Priority Commands 4-264
Priority Commands (Layer 2) 4-264
queue mode 4-265
switchport priority default 4-265
queue bandwidth 4-266
queue cos-map 4-267
show queue mode 4-268
show queue bandwidth 4-268
show queue cos-map 4-269
Priority Commands (Layer 3 and 4) 4-269
map ip dscp (Global Configuration) 4-269
map ip dscp (Interface Configuration) 4-270
show map ip dscp 4-271
Quality of Service Commands 4-272
class-map 4-273
Contents
xv
match 4-274
policy-map 4-275
class 4-276
set 4-277
police 4-277
service-policy 4-278
show class-map 4-279
show policy-map 4-279
show policy-map interface 4-280
Voice VLAN Commands 4-280
voice vlan 4-281
voice vlan aging 4-282
voice vlan mac-address 4-282
switchport voice vlan 4-283
switchport voice vlan rule 4-284
switchport voice vlan security 4-284
switchport voice vlan priority 4-285
show voice vlan 4-286
Multicast Filtering Commands 4-287
IGMP Snooping Commands 4-287
ip igmp snooping 4-288
ip igmp snooping vlan static 4-288
ip igmp snooping version 4-289
ip igmp snooping leave-proxy 4-289
ip igmp snooping immediate-leave 4-290
show ip igmp snooping 4-291
show mac-address-table multicast 4-291
IGMP Query Commands (Layer 2) 4-292
ip igmp snooping querier 4-292
ip igmp snooping query-count 4-293
ip igmp snooping query-interval 4-293
ip igmp snooping query-max-response-time 4-294
ip igmp snooping router-port-expire-time 4-295
Static Multicast Routing Commands 4-295
ip igmp snooping vlan mrouter 4-296
show ip igmp snooping mrouter 4-296
IGMP Filtering and Throttling Commands 4-297
ip igmp filter (Global Configuration) 4-298
ip igmp profile 4-298
permit, deny 4-299
range 4-299
ip igmp filter (Interface Configuration) 4-300
ip igmp max-groups 4-300
ip igmp max-groups action 4-301
show ip igmp filter 4-302
Contents
xvi
show ip igmp profile 4-302
show ip igmp throttle interface 4-303
Multicast VLAN Registration Commands 4-304
mvr (Global Configuration) 4-304
mvr (Interface Configuration) 4-305
show mvr 4-307
IP Interface Commands 4-309
ip address 4-309
ip default-gateway 4-310
ip dhcp restart 4-311
show ip interface 4-311
show ip redirects 4-312
ping 4-312
IP Source Guard Commands 4-313
ip source-guard 4-313
ip source-guard binding 4-315
show ip source-guard 4-316
show ip source-guard binding 4-316
DHCP Snooping Commands 4-317
ip dhcp snooping 4-317
ip dhcp snooping vlan 4-319
ip dhcp snooping trust 4-320
ip dhcp snooping verify mac-address 4-321
ip dhcp snooping information option 4-321
ip dhcp snooping information policy 4-322
ip dhcp snooping database flash 4-323
show ip dhcp snooping 4-323
show ip dhcp snooping binding 4-324
IP Cluster Commands 4-324
cluster 4-324
cluster commander 4-325
cluster ip-pool 4-326
cluster member 4-326
rcommand 4-327
show cluster 4-327
show cluster members 4-328
show cluster candidates 4-328
Appendix A: Software Specifications A-1
Software Features A-1
Management Features A-2
Standards A-2
Management Information Bases A-3
Contents
xvii
Appendix B: Troubleshooting B-1
Problems Accessing the Management Interface B-1
Using System Logs B-2
Glossary
Index
Contents
xviii
xix
Tables
Table 1-1 Key Features 1-1
Table 1-2 System Defaults 1-6
Table 3-1 Configuration Options 3-3
Table 3-2 Main Menu 3-4
Table 3-3 Logging Levels 3-29
Table 3-5 Supported Notification Messages 3-47
Table 3-6 HTTPS System Support 3-69
Table 3-7 802.1X Statistics 3-87
Table 3-8 LACP Port Counters 3-120
Table 3-9 LACP Internal Configuration Information 3-122
Table 3-10 LACP Neighbor Configuration Information 3-124
Table 3-11 Port Statistics 3-129
Table 3-12 Mapping CoS Values to Egress Queues 3-193
Table 3-13 CoS Priority Levels 3-193
Table 3-14 Mapping DSCP Priority Values 3-198
Table 4-1 Command Modes 4-7
Table 4-2 Configuration Modes 4-8
Table 4-3 Command Line Processing 4-10
Table 4-4 Command Groups 4-11
Table 4-5 Line Commands 4-12
Table 4-6 General Commands 4-21
Table 4-7 System Management Commands 4-27
Table 4-8 Device Designation Commands 4-27
Table 4-9 Banner Commands 4-28
Table 4-10 User Access Commands 4-38
Table 4-11 Default Login Settings 4-38
Table 4-12 IP Filter Commands 4-40
Table 4-13 Web Server Commands 4-42
Table 4-14 HTTPS System Support 4-43
Table 4-15 Telnet Server Commands 4-45
Table 4-16 SSH Commands 4-46
Table 4-17 show ssh - display description 4-53
Table 4-18 Event Logging Commands 4-55
Table 4-19 Logging Levels 4-56
Table 4-20 show logging flash/ram - display description 4-59
Table 4-21 show logging trap - display description 4-60
Table 4-22 SMTP Alert Commands 4-61
Table 4-23 Time Commands 4-65
Table 4-24 Predefined Summer-Time Parameters 4-75
Table 4-25 System Status Commands 4-78
Table 4-26 Frame Size Commands 4-84
Table 4-27 Flash/File Commands 4-85
Tables
xx
Table 4-28 File Directory Information 4-89
Table 4-29 Authentication Commands 4-91
Table 4-30 Authentication Sequence 4-91
Table 4-31 RADIUS Client Commands 4-94
Table 4-32 TACACS Commands 4-98
Table 4-34 Port Security Commands 4-111
Table 4-35 802.1X Port Authentication 4-112
Table 4-36 Network Access 4-121
Table 4-37 Web Authentication 4-130
Table 4-38 Access Control Lists 4-139
Table 4-39 IP ACLs 4-140
Table 4-40 MAC ACL Commands 4-144
Table 4-41 ACL Information 4-149
Table 4-42 SNMP Commands 4-150
Table 4-43 show snmp engine-id - display description 4-158
Table 4-44 show snmp view - display description 4-160
Table 4-45 show snmp group - display description 4-163
Table 4-46 show snmp user - display description 4-165
Table 4-47 Interface Commands 4-166
Table 4-48 Interfaces Switchport Statistics 4-176
Table 4-49 Mirror Port Commands 4-177
Table 4-50 Rate Limit Commands 4-179
Table 4-51 Link Aggregation Commands 4-180
Table 4-52 show lacp counters - display description 4-187
Table 4-53 show lacp internal - display description 4-188
Table 4-54 show lacp neighbors - display description 4-189
Table 4-55 show lacp sysid - display description 4-189
Table 4-56 Address Table Commands 4-190
Table 4-57 LLDP Commands 4-193
Table 4-58 Spanning Tree Commands 4-217
Table 4-59 VLANs 4-238
Table 4-60 GVRP and Bridge Extension Commands 4-238
Table 4-61 Editing VLAN Groups 4-242
Table 4-62 Configuring VLAN Interfaces 4-244
Table 4-63 Show VLAN Commands 4-250
Table 4-64 IEEE 802.1Q Tunneling Commands 4-251
Table 4-65 Private VLAN Commands 4-254
Table 4-66 Protocol-based VLAN Commands 4-261
Table 4-67 Priority Commands 4-264
Table 4-68 Priority Commands (Layer 2) 4-264
Table 4-69 Default CoS Values to Egress Queues 4-267
Table 4-70 Priority Commands (Layer 3 and 4) 4-269
Table 4-71 IP DSCP to CoS Vales 4-270
Table 4-72 Quality of Service Commands 4-272
Table 4-73 Voice VLAN Commands 4-280
Tables
xxi
Table 4-74 Multicast Filtering Commands 4-287
Table 4-75 IGMP Snooping Commands 4-287
Table 4-76 IGMP Query Commands (Layer 2) 4-292
Table 4-77 Static Multicast Routing Commands 4-295
Table 4-78 IGMP Filtering and Throttling Commands 4-297
Table 4-79 Multicast VLAN Registration Commands 4-304
Table 4-80 show mvr - display description 4-307
Table 4-81 show mvr interface - display description 4-308
Table 4-82 show mvr members - display description 4-308
Table 4-83 IP Interface Commands 4-309
Table 4-84 IP Source Guard Commands 4-313
Table 4-85 DHCP Snooping Commands 4-317
Table 4-86 Switch Cluster Commands 4-324
Table B-1 Troubleshooting Chart B-1
Tables
xxii
xxiii
Figures
Figure 3-1 Home Page 3-2
Figure 3-2 Panel Display 3-3
Figure 3-3 System Information 3-12
Figure 3-4 Switch Information 3-14
Figure 3-5 Bridge Extension Configuration 3-15
Figure 3-6 Manual IP Configuration 3-17
Figure 3-7 DHCP IP Configuration 3-18
Figure 3-8 Jumbo Frames Configuration 3-19
Figure 3-9 Copy Firmware 3-20
Figure 3-10 Setting the Startup Code 3-20
Figure 3-11 Deleting Files 3-21
Figure 3-12 Downloading Configuration Settings for Startup 3-22
Figure 3-13 Setting the Startup Configuration Settings 3-23
Figure 3-14 Console Port Settings 3-24
Figure 3-15 Enabling Telnet 3-26
Figure 3-16 Displaying Logs 3-28
Figure 3-17 System Logs 3-29
Figure 3-18 Remote Logs 3-31
Figure 3-19 Enabling and Configuring SMTP 3-32
Figure 3-20 Resetting the System 3-33
Figure 3-21 SNTP Configuration 3-35
Figure 3-22 NTP Client Configuration 3-36
Figure 3-23 Setting the System Clock 3-38
Figure 3-24 Configuring SNMP Community Strings 3-40
Figure 3-25 Configuring IP Trap Managers 3-41
Figure 3-26 Enabling SNMP Agent Status 3-42
Figure 3-27 Setting an Engine ID 3-43
Figure 3-28 Setting a Remote Engine ID 3-43
Figure 3-29 Configuring SNMPv3 Users 3-45
Figure 3-30 Configuring Remote SNMPv3 Users 3-46
Figure 3-31 Configuring SNMPv3 Groups 3-49
Figure 3-32 Configuring SNMPv3 Views 3-50
Figure 3-33 Access Levels 3-52
Figure 3-34 Authentication Settings 3-55
Figure 3-35 Encryption Key Settings 3-57
Figure 3-36 AAA Radius Group Settings 3-59
Figure 3-37 AAA TACACS+ Group Settings 3-60
Figure 3-38 AAA Accounting Settings 3-61
Figure 3-39 AAA Accounting Update 3-62
Figure 3-40 AAA Accounting 802.1X Port Settings 3-63
Figure 3-41 AAA Accounting Exec Command Privileges 3-64
Figure 3-42 AAA Accounting Exec Settings 3-65
Figures
xxiv
Figure 3-43 AAA Accounting Summary 3-66
Figure 3-44 AAA Authorization Settings 3-67
Figure 3-45 AAA Authorization Exec Settings 3-68
Figure 3-46 AAA Authorization Summary 3-69
Figure 3-47 HTTPS Settings 3-70
Figure 3-48 HTTPS Settings 3-71
Figure 3-49 SSH Server Settings 3-74
Figure 3-50 SSH Host-Key Settings 3-76
Figure 3-51 SSH User Public-Key Settings 3-78
Figure 3-52 Configuring Port Security 3-81
Figure 3-53 802.1X Global Information 3-83
Figure 3-54 802.1X Global Configuration 3-84
Figure 3-55 802.1X Port Configuration 3-85
Figure 3-56 Displaying 802.1X Port Statistics 3-88
Figure 3-57 Web Authentication Configuration 3-89
Figure 3-58 Web Authentication Port Configuration 3-90
Figure 3-59 Web Authentication Port Information 3-92
Figure 3-60 Web Authentication Port Re-authentication 3-92
Figure 3-61 Network Access Configuration 3-94
Figure 3-62 Network Access Port Configuration 3-95
Figure 3-63 Network Access Port Link Detection Configuration 3-97
Figure 3-64 Network Access MAC Address Information 3-98
Figure 3-65 MAC Authentication Port Configuration 3-99
Figure 3-66 Selecting ACL Type 3-101
Figure 3-67 Configuring Standard IP ACLs 3-102
Figure 3-68 Configuring Extended IP ACLs 3-104
Figure 3-69 Configuring MAC ACLs 3-106
Figure 3-70 Configuring ACL Port Binding 3-107
Figure 3-71 Creating an IP Filter List 3-109
Figure 3-72 Displaying Port/Trunk Information 3-110
Figure 3-73 Port/Trunk Configuration 3-113
Figure 3-74 Configuring Static Trunks 3-115
Figure 3-75 LACP Trunk Configuration 3-117
Figure 3-76 LACP Port Configuration 3-119
Figure 3-77 LACP - Port Counters Information 3-121
Figure 3-78 LACP - Port Internal Information 3-123
Figure 3-79 LACP - Port Neighbors Information 3-124
Figure 3-80 Port Broadcast Control 3-126
Figure 3-81 Mirror Port Configuration 3-127
Figure 3-82 Input Rate Limit Port Configuration 3-128
Figure 3-83 Port Statistics 3-132
Figure 3-84 Configuring a Static Address Table 3-134
Figure 3-85 Configuring a Dynamic Address Table 3-135
Figure 3-86 Setting the Address Aging Time 3-136
Figure 3-87 Displaying Spanning Tree Information 3-140
Figures
xxv
Figure 3-88 Configuring Spanning Tree 3-143
Figure 3-89 Displaying Spanning Tree Port Information 3-146
Figure 3-90 Configuring Spanning Tree per Port 3-149
Figure 3-91 Configuring Multiple Spanning Trees 3-150
Figure 3-92 Displaying MSTP Interface Settings 3-152
Figure 3-93 Displaying MSTP Interface Settings 3-155
Figure 3-94 Globally Enabling GVRP 3-158
Figure 3-95 Displaying Basic VLAN Information 3-159
Figure 3-96 Displaying Current VLANs 3-160
Figure 3-97 Configuring a VLAN Static List 3-162
Figure 3-98 Configuring a VLAN Static Table 3-164
Figure 3-99 VLAN Static Membership by Port 3-164
Figure 3-100 Configuring VLANs per Port 3-166
Figure 3-101 802.1Q Tunnel Status and Ethernet Type 3-171
Figure 3-102 Tunnel Port Configuration 3-173
Figure 3-103 Private VLAN Information 3-175
Figure 3-104 Private VLAN Configuration 3-176
Figure 3-105 Private VLAN Association 3-176
Figure 3-106 Private VLAN Port Information 3-177
Figure 3-107 Private VLAN Port Configuration 3-179
Figure 3-108 Protocol VLAN Configuration 3-180
Figure 3-109 Protocol VLAN System Configuration 3-181
Figure 3-110 LLDP Configuration 3-183
Figure 3-111 LLDP Port Configuration 3-185
Figure 3-112 LLDP Local Device Information 3-186
Figure 3-113 LLDP Remote Port Information 3-187
Figure 3-114 LLDP Remote Information Details 3-188
Figure 3-115 LLDP Device Statistics 3-189
Figure 3-116 LLDP Device Statistics Details 3-190
Figure 3-117 Port Priority Configuration 3-192
Figure 3-118 Traffic Classes 3-194
Figure 3-119 Enable Traffic Classes 3-195
Figure 3-120 Queue Mode 3-195
Figure 3-121 Configuring Queue Scheduling 3-196
Figure 3-122 IP DSCP Priority Status 3-197
Figure 3-123 Mapping IP DSCP Priority Values 3-198
Figure 3-124 Configuring Class Maps 3-202
Figure 3-125 Configuring Policy Maps 3-205
Figure 3-126 Service Policy Settings 3-206
Figure 3-127 Configuring VoIP Traffic 3-208
Figure 3-128 VoIP Traffic Port Configuration 3-209
Figure 3-129 Telephony OUI List 3-211
Figure 3-130 IGMP Configuration 3-215
Figure 3-131 IGMP Immediate Leave 3-216
Figure 3-132 Displaying Multicast Router Port Information 3-217
Figures
xxvi
Figure 3-133 Static Multicast Router Port Configuration 3-218
Figure 3-134 IP Multicast Registration Table 3-219
Figure 3-135 IGMP Member Port Table 3-220
Figure 3-136 Enabling IGMP Filtering and Throttling 3-221
Figure 3-137 IGMP Profile Configuration 3-223
Figure 3-138 IGMP Filter and Throttling Port Configuration 3-224
Figure 3-139 MVR Global Configuration 3-227
Figure 3-140 MVR Port Information 3-228
Figure 3-141 MVR Group IP Information 3-229
Figure 3-142 MVR Port Configuration 3-230
Figure 3-143 MVR Group Member Configuration 3-231
Figure 3-144 DHCP Snooping Configuration 3-233
Figure 3-145 DHCP Snooping VLAN Configuration 3-234
Figure 3-146 DHCP Snooping Information Option Configuration 3-235
Figure 3-147 DHCP Snooping Port Configuration 3-235
Figure 3-148 DHCP Snooping Binding Information 3-236
Figure 3-149 IP Source Guard Port Configuration 3-237
Figure 3-150 Static IP Source Guard Binding Configuration 3-239
Figure 3-151 Dynamic IP Source Guard Binding Information 3-240
Figure 3-152 Cluster Member Choice 3-241
Figure 3-153 Cluster Configuration 3-242
Figure 3-154 Cluster Member Configuration 3-242
Figure 3-155 Cluster Member Information 3-243
Figure 3-156 Cluster Candidate Information 3-244
Figure 3-157 UPnP Configuration 3-245
1-1
Chapter 1: Introduction
This switch provides a broad range of features for Layer 2 switching. It includes a
management agent that allows you to configure the features listed in this manual.
The default configuration can be used for most of the features provided by this
switch. However, there are many options that you should configure to maximize the
switchs performance for your particular network environment.
Key Features
Table 1-1 Key Features
Feature Description
Configuration Backup and
Restore
Backup to TFTP server
Authentication Console, Telnet, web – User name / password, RADIUS, TACACS+
Web – HTTPS
Telnet SSH
SNMP v1/2c - Community strings
SNMP version 3 – MD5 or SHA password
Port – IEEE 802.1X, MAC address filtering, Web Authentication
Access Control Lists Supports IP and MAC ACLs, 100 rules per system
DHCP Client Supported
DHCP Snooping Supported with Option 82 relay information
Port Configuration Speed, duplex mode and flow control
Rate Limiting Input rate limiting per port
Port Mirroring One port mirrored to a single analysis port
Port Trunking Supports up to 8 trunks using either static or dynamic trunking (LACP)
Broadcast Storm Control Supported
Static Address Up to 8K MAC addresses in the forwarding table
IEEE 802.1D Bridge Supports dynamic data switching and addresses learning
Store-and-Forward Switching Supported to ensure wire-speed switching while eliminating bad frames
Spanning Tree Algorithm Supports standard STP, Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP), and Multiple
Spanning Trees (MSTP)
Virtual LANs Up to 255 using IEEE 802.1Q, port-based, or private VLANs
Traffic Prioritization Default port priority, traffic class map, queue scheduling, or Differentiated
Services Code Point (DSCP), and TCP/UDP Port
Quality of Service Supports Differentiated Services (DiffServ)
Multicast Filtering Supports IGMP snooping and query, as well as Multicast VLAN Registration
Introduction
1-2
1
Description of Software Features
The switch provides a wide range of advanced performance enhancing features.
Flow control eliminates the loss of packets due to bottlenecks caused by port
saturation. Broadcast storm suppression prevents broadcast traffic storms from
engulfing the network. Port-based and private VLANs, plus support for automatic
GVRP VLAN registration provide traffic security and efficient use of network
bandwidth. CoS priority queueing ensures the minimum delay for moving real-time
multimedia data across the network. While multicast filtering provides support for
real-time network applications. Some of the management features are briefly
described below.
Configuration Backup and Restore – You can save the current configuration
settings to a file on a TFTP server, and later download this file to restore the switch
configuration settings.
Authentication – This switch authenticates management access via the console
port, Telnet or web browser. User names and passwords can be configured locally or
can be verified via a remote authentication server (i.e., RADIUS or TACACS+).
Port-based authentication is also supported via the IEEE 802.1X protocol. This
protocol uses the Extensible Authentication Protocol over LANs (EAPOL) to request
user credentials from the 802.1X client, and then verifies the client’s right to access
the network via an authentication server.
Other authentication options include HTTPS for secure management access via the
web, SSH for secure management access over a Telnet-equivalent connection, IP
address filtering for SNMP/web/Telnet management access, and MAC address
filtering for port access.
Access Control Lists – ACLs provide packet filtering for IP frames (based on
address, protocol, or TCP/UDP port number) or any frames (based on MAC address
or Ethernet type). ACLs can be used to improve performance by blocking
unnecessary network traffic or to implement security controls by restricting access to
specific network resources or protocols.
Port Configuration – You can manually configure the speed, duplex mode, and
flow control used on specific ports, or use auto-negotiation to detect the connection
settings used by the attached device. Use the full-duplex mode on ports whenever
possible to double the throughput of switch connections. Flow control should also be
enabled to control network traffic during periods of congestion and prevent the loss
of packets when port buffer thresholds are exceeded. The switch supports flow
control based on the IEEE 802.3x standard.
IP Clustering Supports up to 36 Member switches in a cluster
Table 1-1 Key Features
Feature Description
Description of Software Features
1-3
1
Rate Limiting – This feature controls the maximum rate for traffic received on an
interface. Rate limiting is configured on interfaces at the edge of a network to limit
traffic into the network. Packets that exceed the acceptable amount of traffic are
dropped.
Port Mirroring – The switch can unobtrusively mirror traffic from any port to a
monitor port. You can then attach a protocol analyzer or RMON probe to this port to
perform traffic analysis and verify connection integrity.
Port Trunking – Ports can be combined into an aggregate connection. Trunks can
be manually set up or dynamically configured using IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation
Control Protocol (LACP). The additional ports dramatically increase the throughput
across any connection, and provide redundancy by taking over the load if a port in
the trunk should fail. The switch supports up to 8 trunks.
Broadcast Storm Control – Broadcast suppression prevents broadcast traffic from
overwhelming the network. When enabled on a port, the level of broadcast traffic
passing through the port is restricted. If broadcast traffic rises above a pre-defined
threshold, it will be throttled until the level falls back beneath the threshold.
Static Addresses – A static address can be assigned to a specific interface on this
switch. Static addresses are bound to the assigned interface and will not be moved.
When a static address is seen on another interface, the address will be ignored and
will not be written to the address table. Static addresses can be used to provide
network security by restricting access for a known host to a specific port.
IEEE 802.1D Bridge – The switch supports IEEE 802.1D transparent bridging. The
address table facilitates data switching by learning addresses, and then filtering or
forwarding traffic based on this information. The address table supports up to 8K
addresses.
Store-and-Forward Switching – The switch copies each frame into its memory
before forwarding them to another port. This ensures that all frames are a standard
Ethernet size and have been verified for accuracy with the cyclic redundancy check
(CRC). This prevents bad frames from entering the network and wasting bandwidth.
To avoid dropping frames on congested ports, the switch provides 4 Mbits for frame
buffering. This buffer can queue packets awaiting transmission on congested
networks.
Spanning Tree Algorithm – The switch supports these spanning tree protocols:
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP, IEEE 802.1D) – This protocol provides loop detection
and recovery by allowing two or more redundant connections to be created between
a pair of LAN segments. When there are multiple physical paths between segments,
this protocol will choose a single path and disable all others to ensure that only one
route exists between any two stations on the network. This prevents the creation of
network loops. However, if the chosen path should fail for any reason, an alternate
path will be activated to maintain the connection.
Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP, IEEE 802.1w) – This protocol reduces the
convergence time for network topology changes to 3 to 5 seconds, compared to 30
Introduction
1-4
1
seconds or more for the older IEEE 802.1D STP standard. It is intended as a
complete replacement for STP, but can still interoperate with switches running the
older standard by automatically reconfiguring ports to STP-compliant mode if they
detect STP protocol messages from attached devices.
Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP, IEEE 802.1s) – This protocol is a direct
extension of RSTP. It can provide an independent spanning tree for different VLANs.
It simplifies network management, provides for even faster convergence than RSTP
by limiting the size of each region, and prevents VLAN members from being
segmented from the rest of the group (as sometimes occurs with IEEE 802.1D STP).
Virtual LANs – The switch supports up to 255 VLANs. A Virtual LAN is a collection
of network nodes that share the same collision domain regardless of their physical
location or connection point in the network. The switch supports tagged VLANs
based on the IEEE 802.1Q standard. Members of VLAN groups can be dynamically
learned via GVRP, or ports can be manually assigned to a specific set of VLANs.
This allows the switch to restrict traffic to the VLAN groups to which a user has been
assigned. By segmenting your network into VLANs, you can:
Eliminate broadcast storms which severely degrade performance in a flat network.
Simplify network management for node changes/moves by remotely configuring
VLAN membership for any port, rather than having to manually change the network
connection.
Provide data security by restricting all traffic to the originating VLAN.
Use private VLANs to restrict traffic to pass only between data ports and the uplink
ports, thereby isolating adjacent ports within the same VLAN, and allowing you to
limit the total number of VLANs that need to be configured.
Use protocol VLANs to restrict traffic to specified interfaces based on protocol type.
Note: The switch allows 255 user-manageable VLANs. One other VLAN (VLAN ID 4093)
is reserved for IP clustering.
Traffic Prioritization – This switch prioritizes each packet based on the required
level of service, using four priority queues with strict or Weighted Round Robin
Queuing. It uses IEEE 802.1p and 802.1Q tags to prioritize incoming traffic based on
input from the end-station application. These functions can
be used to provide
independent priorities for delay-sensitive data and best-effort data.
This switch also supports several common methods of prioritizing layer 3/4 traffic to
meet application requirements. Traffic can be prioritized based on the DSCP field in
the IP frame. When these services are enabled, the priorities are mapped to a Class
of Service value by the switch, and the traffic then sent to the corresponding output
queue.
Quality of Service – Differentiated Services (DiffServ) provides policy-based
management mechanisms used for prioritizing network resources to meet the
requirements of specific traffic types on a per-hop basis. Each packet is classified
upon entry into the network based on access lists, IP Precedence or DSCP values,
or VLAN lists. Using access lists allows you select traffic based on Layer 2, Layer 3,
or Layer 4 information contained in each packet. Based on network policies, different
kinds of traffic can be marked for different kinds of forwarding.
Description of Software Features
1-5
1
Multicast Filtering – Specific multicast traffic can be assigned to its own VLAN to
ensure that it does not interfere with normal network traffic and to guarantee
real-time delivery by setting the required priority level for the designated VLAN. The
switch uses IGMP Snooping and Query to manage multicast group registration. It
also supports Multicast VLAN Registration (MVR) which allows common multicast
traffic, such as television channels, to be transmitted across a single network-wide
multicast VLAN shared by hosts residing in other standard or private VLAN groups,
while preserving security and data isolation for normal traffic.
Introduction
1-6
1
System Defaults
The switch’s system defaults are provided in the configuration file
“Factory_Default_Config.cfg.” To reset the switch defaults, this file should be set as
the startup configuration file (page 3-21).
The following table lists some of the basic system defaults.
Table 1-2 System Defaults
Function Parameter Default
Console Port
Connection
Baud Rate 9600
Data bits 8
Stop bits 1
Parity none
Local Console Timeout 0 (disabled)
Authentication Privileged Exec Level Username “admin”
Password “admin”
Normal Exec Level Username “guest”
Password “guest”
Enable Privileged Exec from Normal
Exec Level
Password “super”
RADIUS Authentication Disabled
TACACS Authentication Disabled
802.1X Port Authentication Disabled
Web Authentication Disabled
MAC Authentication Disabled
HTTPS Enabled
SSH Disabled
Port Security Disabled
IP Filtering Disabled
Web Management HTTP Server Enabled
HTTP Port Number 80
HTTP Secure Server Enabled
HTTP Secure Port Number 443
SNMP Community Strings “public” (read only)
“private” (read/write)
Traps Authentication traps: enabled
Link-up-down events: enabled
System Defaults
1-7
1
Port Configuration Admin Status Enabled
Auto-negotiation Enabled
Flow Control Disabled
Rate Limiting Input limits Disabled
Port Trunking Static Trunks None
LACP (all ports) Disabled
Broadcast Storm
Protection
Status Enabled (all ports)
Broadcast Limit Rate 64 kbits per second
Spanning Tree
Algorithm
Status Enabled, RSTP
(Defaults: All values based on IEEE 802.1w)
Fast Forwarding (Edge Port) Disabled
Address Table Aging Time 300 seconds
Virtual LANs Default VLAN 1
PVID 1
Acceptable Frame Type All
Ingress Filtering Enabled
Switchport Mode (Egress Mode) Hybrid: tagged/untagged frames
GVRP (global) Disabled
GVRP (port interface) Disabled
Traffic Prioritization Ingress Port Priority 0
Weighted Round Robin Queue: 0 1 2 3
Weight: 1 2 4 8
IP DSCP Priority Disabled
IP Settings IP Address DHCP assigned, otherwise 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway 0.0.0.0
DHCP Client: Enabled
BOOTP Disabled
Multicast Filtering IGMP Snooping Snooping: Enabled
Querier: Enabled
Multicast VLAN Registration Disabled
Table 1-2 System Defaults (Continued)
Function Parameter Default
Introduction
1-8
1
System Log Status Enabled
Messages Logged Levels 0-6 (all)
Messages Logged to Flash Levels 0-3
SMTP Email Alerts Event Handler Enabled (but no server defined)
SNTP Clock Synchronization Disabled
NTP Clock Synchronization Disabled
DHCP Snooping Status Disabled
IP Source Guard Status Disabled (all ports)
IP Clustering Status Enabled
Commander Disabled
Table 1-2 System Defaults (Continued)
Function Parameter Default
2-1
Chapter 2: Initial Configuration
Connecting to the Switch
Configuration Options
The switch includes a built-in network management agent. The agent offers a variety
of management options, including SNMP, RMON (Groups 1, 2, 3, 9) and a
web-based interface. A PC may also be connected directly to the switch for
configuration and monitoring via a command line interface (CLI).
Note: The IP address for this switch is obtained via DHCP by default. To change this
address, see “Setting an IP Address” on page 2-4.
The switch’s HTTP web agent allows you to configure switch parameters, monitor
port connections, and display statistics using a standard web browser such as
Netscape version 6.2 and higher or Microsoft IE version 5.0 and higher. The switch’s
web management interface can be accessed from any computer attached to the
network.
The CLI program can be accessed by a direct connection to the RS-232 serial
console port on the switch, or remotely by a Telnet connection over the network.
The switch’s management agent also supports SNMP (Simple Network
Management Protocol). This SNMP agent permits the switch to be managed from
any system in the network using network management software such as
HP OpenView.
The switch’s web interface, CLI configuration program, and SNMP agent allow you
to perform the following management functions:
Set user names and passwords
Set an IP interface for a management VLAN
Configure SNMP parameters
Enable/disable any port
Set the speed/duplex mode for any port
Configure the bandwidth of any port by limiting input rates
Control port access through IEEE 802.1X security or static address filtering
Filter packets using Access Control Lists (ACLs)
Configure up to 255 IEEE 802.1Q VLANs
Enable GVRP automatic VLAN registration
Configure IGMP multicast filtering
Upload and download system firmware via TFTP
Upload and download switch configuration files via TFTP
Configure Spanning Tree parameters
Configure Class of Service (CoS) priority queuing
Initial Configuration
2-2
2
Configure up to 8 static or LACP trunks
Enable port mirroring
Set broadcast storm control on any port
Display system information and statistics
Required Connections
The switch provides an RS-232 serial port that enables a connection to a PC or
terminal for monitoring and configuring the switch. A null-modem console cable is
provided with the switch.
Attach a VT100-compatible terminal, or a PC running a terminal emulation program
to the switch. You can use the console cable provided with this package, or use a
null-modem cable that complies with the wiring assignments shown in the
Installation Guide.
To connect a terminal to the console port, complete the following steps:
1. Connect the console cable to the serial port on a terminal, or a PC running
terminal emulation software, and tighten the captive retaining screws on the
DB-9 connector.
2. Connect the other end of the cable to the RS-232 serial port on the switch.
3. Make sure the terminal emulation software is set as follows:
Select the appropriate serial port (COM port 1 or COM port 2).
Set the baud rate to 9600 bps.
Set the data format to 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity.
Set flow control to none.
Set the emulation mode to VT100.
When using HyperTerminal, select Terminal keys, not Windows keys.
Notes: 1. Refer to “Line Commands” on page 4-12 for a complete description of
console configuration options.
2. Once you have set up the terminal correctly, the console login screen will be
displayed.
For a description of how to use the CLI, see “Using the Command Line Interface” on
page 4-1. For a list of all the CLI commands and detailed information on using the
CLI, refer to “Command Groups” on page 4-11.
Basic Configuration
2-3
2
Remote Connections
Prior to accessing the switch’s onboard agent via a network connection, you must
first configure it with a valid IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway using a
console connection, DHCP or BOOTP protocol.
The IP address for this switch is obtained via DHCP by default. To manually
configure this address or enable dynamic address assignment via DHCP or BOOTP,
see “Setting an IP Address” on page 2-4.
Note: This switch supports four concurrent Telnet/SSH sessions.
After configuring the switch’s IP parameters, you can access the onboard
configuration program from anywhere within the attached network. The onboard
configuration program can be accessed using Telnet from any computer attached to
the network. The switch can also be managed by any computer using a web
browser (Internet Explorer 5.0 or above, or Netscape 6.2 or above), or from a
network computer using SNMP network management software.
Note: The onboard program only provides access to basic configuration functions. To
access the full range of SNMP management functions, you must use
SNMP-based network management software.
Basic Configuration
Console Connection
The CLI program provides two different command levels — normal access level
(Normal Exec) and privileged access level (Privileged Exec). The commands
available at the Normal Exec level are a limited subset of those available at the
Privileged Exec level and allow you to only display information and use basic
utilities. To fully configure the switch parameters, you must access the CLI at the
Privileged Exec level.
Access to both CLI levels are controlled by user names and passwords. The switch
has a default user name and password for each level. To log into the CLI at ]the
Privileged Exec level using the default user name and password, perform these
steps:
1. To initiate your console connection, press <Enter>. The “User Access
Verification” procedure starts.
2. At the Username prompt, enter “admin.”
3. At the Password prompt, also enter “admin.” (The password characters are not
displayed on the console screen.)
4. The session is opened and the CLI displays the “Console#” prompt indicating
you have access at the Privileged Exec level.
Initial Configuration
2-4
2
Setting Passwords
Note: If this is your first time to log into the CLI program, you should define new
passwords for both default user names using the “username” command, record
them and put them in a safe place.
Passwords can consist of up to 8 alphanumeric characters and are case sensitive.
To prevent unauthorized access to the switch, set the passwords as follows:
1. Open the console interface with the default user name and password “admin” to
access the Privileged Exec level.
2. Type “configure” and press <Enter>.
3. Type “username guest password 0 password,” for the Normal Exec level, where
password is your new password. Press <Enter>.
4. Type “username admin password 0 password,” for the Privileged Exec level,
where password is your new password. Press <Enter>.
Note: ‘0’ specifies the password in plain text, ‘7’ specifies the password in encrypted
form.
Setting an IP Address
You must establish IP address information for the stack to obtain management
access through the network. This can be done in either of the following ways:
Manual — You have to input the information, including IP address and subnet mask.
If your management station is not in the same IP subnet as the stack’s master unit,
you will also need to specify the default gateway router.
Dynamic — The switch sends IP configuration requests to BOOTP or DHCP
address allocation servers on the network.
Manual Configuration
You can manually assign an IP address to the switch. You may also need to specify
a default gateway that resides between this device and management stations that
exist on another network segment. Valid IP addresses consist of four decimal
numbers, 0 to 255, separated by periods. Anything outside this format will not be
accepted by the CLI program.
Note: The IP address for this switch is obtained via DHCP by default.
Username: admin
Password:
CLI session with the ES3528M-SFP is opened.
To end the CLI session, enter [Exit].
Console#configure
Console(config)#username guest password 0 [password]
Console(config)#username admin password 0 [password]
Console(config)#
Basic Configuration
2-5
2
Before you can assign an IP address to the switch, you must obtain the following
information from your network administrator:
IP address for the switch
Default gateway for the network
Network mask for this network
To assign an IP address to the switch, complete the following steps:
1. From the Privileged Exec level global configuration mode prompt, type
“interface vlan 1” to access the interface-configuration mode. Press <Enter>.
2. Type “ip address ip-address netmask,” where “ip-address” is the switch IP
address and “netmask” is the network mask for the network. Press <Enter>.
3. Type “exit” to return to the global configuration mode prompt. Press <Enter>.
4. To set the IP address of the default gateway for the network to which the switch
belongs, type “ip default-gateway gateway,” where “gateway” is the IP address
of the default gateway. Press <Enter>.
Dynamic Configuration
If you select the “bootp” or “dhcp” option, IP will be enabled but will not function until
a BOOTP or DHCP reply has been received. You therefore need to use the “ip dhcp
restart” command to start broadcasting service requests. Requests will be sent
periodically in an effort to obtain IP configuration information. (BOOTP and DHCP
values can include the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway.)
If the “bootp” or “dhcp” option is saved to the startup-config file (step 6), then the
switch will start broadcasting service requests as soon as it is powered on.
To automatically configure the switch by communicating with BOOTP or DHCP
address allocation servers on the network, complete the following steps:
1. From the Global Configuration mode prompt, type “interface vlan 1” to access
the interface-configuration mode. Press <Enter>.
2. At the interface-configuration mode prompt, use one of the following commands:
To obtain IP settings via DHCP, type “ip address dhcp” and press <Enter>.
To obtain IP settings via BOOTP, type “ip address bootp” and press <Enter>.
3. Type “end” to return to the Privileged Exec mode. Press <Enter>.
4. Type “ip dhcp restart” to begin broadcasting service requests. Press <Enter>.
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.5 255.255.255.0
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#ip default-gateway 192.168.1.254
Console(config)#
Initial Configuration
2-6
2
5. Wait a few minutes, and then check the IP configuration settings by typing the
“show ip interface” command. Press <Enter>.
6. Then save your configuration changes by typing “copy running-config
startup-config.” Enter the startup file name and press <Enter>.
Enabling SNMP Management Access
The switch can be configured to accept management commands from Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) applications such as HP OpenView. You
can configure the switch to (1) respond to SNMP requests or (2) generate SNMP
traps.
When SNMP management stations send requests to the switch (either to return
information or to set a parameter), the switch provides the requested data or sets the
specified parameter. The switch can also be configured to send information to
SNMP managers (without being requested by the managers) through trap
messages, which inform the manager that certain events have occurred.
The switch includes an SNMP agent that supports SNMP version 1, 2c, and 3
clients. To provide management access for version 1 or 2c clients, you must specify
a community string. The switch provides a default MIB View (i.e., an SNMPv3
construct) for the default “public” community string that provides read access to the
entire MIB tree, and a default view for the “private” community string that provides
read/write access to the entire MIB tree. However, you may assign new views to
version 1 or 2c community strings that suit your specific security requirements (see
page 3-49).
Community Strings (for SNMP version 1 and 2c clients)
Community strings are used to control management access to SNMP version 1 and
2c stations, as well as to authorize SNMP stations to receive trap messages from
the switch. You therefore need to assign community strings to specified users, and
set the access level.
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address dhcp
Console(config-if)#end
Console#ip dhcp restart
Console#show ip interface
IP address and netmask: 192.168.1.54 255.255.255.0 on VLAN 1,
and address mode: User specified.
Console#copy running-config startup-config
Startup configuration file name []: startup
\Write to FLASH Programming.
\Write to FLASH finish.
Success.
Basic Configuration
2-7
2
The default strings are:
public - with read-only access. Authorized management stations are only able to
retrieve MIB objects.
private - with read-write access. Authorized management stations are able to both
retrieve and modify MIB objects.
To prevent unauthorized access to the switch from SNMP version 1 or 2c clients, it is
recommended that you change the default community strings.
To configure a community string, complete the following steps:
1. From the Privileged Exec level global configuration mode prompt, type
“snmp-server community string mode,” where “string” is the community access
string and “mode” is rw (read/write) or ro (read only). Press <Enter>. (Note that
the default mode is read only.)
2. To remove an existing string, simply type “no snmp-server community string,”
where “string” is the community access string to remove. Press <Enter>.
Note: If you do not intend to support access to SNMP version 1 and 2c clients, we
recommend that you delete both of the default community strings. If there are no
community strings, then SNMP management access from SNMP v1 and v2c
clients is disabled.
Trap Receivers
You can also specify SNMP stations that are to receive traps from the switch. To
configure a trap receiver, use the “snmp-server host” command. From the Privileged
Exec level global configuration mode prompt, type:
“snmp-server host host-address community-string
[version {1 | 2c | 3 {auth | noauth | priv}}]”
where “host-address” is the IP address for the trap receiver, “community-string
specifies access rights for a version 1/2c host, or is the user name of a version 3
host, “version” indicates the SNMP client version, and “auth | noauth | priv” means
that authentication, no authentication, or authentication and privacy is used for v3
clients. Then press <Enter>. For a more detailed description of these parameters,
see “snmp-server host” on page 4-154. The following example creates a trap host
for each type of SNMP client.
Console(config)#snmp-server community admin rw 4-152
Console(config)#snmp-server community private
Console(config)#
Console(config)#snmp-server host 10.1.19.23 batman 4-154
Console(config)#snmp-server host 10.1.19.98 robin version 2c
Console(config)#snmp-server host 10.1.19.34 barbie version 3 auth
Console(config)#
Initial Configuration
2-8
2
Configuring Access for SNMP Version 3 Clients
To configure management access for SNMPv3 clients, you need to first create a
view that defines the portions of MIB that the client can read or write, assign the view
to a group, and then assign the user to a group. The following example creates one
view called “mib-2” that includes the entire MIB-2 tree branch, and then another view
that includes the IEEE 802.1d bridge MIB. It assigns these respective read and read/
write views to a group call “r&d” and specifies group authentication via MD5 or SHA.
In the last step, it assigns a v3 user to this group, indicating that MD5 will be used for
authentication, provides the password “greenpeace” for authentication, and the
password “einstien” for encryption.
For a more detailed explanation on how to configure the switch for access from
SNMP v3 clients, refer to “Simple Network Management Protocol” on page 3-38, or
refer to the specific CLI commands for SNMP starting on page 4-150.
Saving Configuration Settings
Configuration commands only modify the running configuration file and are not
saved when the switch is rebooted. To save all your configuration changes in
nonvolatile storage, you must copy the running configuration file to the start-up
configuration file using the “copy” command.
To save the current configuration settings, enter the following command:
1. From the Privileged Exec mode prompt, type “copy running-config
startup-config” and press <Enter>.
2. Enter the name of the start-up file. Press <Enter>.
Console(config)#snmp-server view mib-2 1.3.6.1.2.1 included 4-159
Console(config)#snmp-server view 802.1d 1.3.6.1.2.1.17 included
Console(config)#snmp-server group r&d v3 auth mib-2 802.1d 4-160
Console(config)#snmp-server user steve group r&d v3 auth md5
greenpeace priv des56 einstien 4-163
Console(config)#
Console#copy running-config startup-config
Startup configuration file name []: startup
\Write to FLASH Programming.
\Write to FLASH finish.
Success.
Console#
Managing System Files
2-9
2
Managing System Files
The switch’s flash memory supports three types of system files that can be managed
by the CLI program, web interface, or SNMP. The switch’s file system allows files to
be uploaded and downloaded, copied, deleted, and set as a start-up file.
The three types of files are:
Configuration This file stores system configuration information and is created
when configuration settings are saved. Saved configuration files can be selected
as a system start-up file or can be uploaded via TFTP to a server for backup. A file
named “Factory_Default_Config.cfg” contains all the system default settings and
cannot be deleted from the system. See “Saving or Restoring Configuration
Settings” on page 3-21 for more information.
Operation Code — System software that is executed after boot-up, also known as
run-time code. This code runs the switch operations and provides the CLI and web
management interfaces. See “Managing Firmware” on page 3-19 for more
information.
Diagnostic Code — Software that is run during system boot-up, also known as
POST (Power On Self-Test).
Due to the size limit of the flash memory, the switch supports only two operation
code files. However, you can have as many diagnostic code files and configuration
files as available flash memory space allows.
In the system flash memory, one file of each type must be set as the start-up file.
During a system boot, the diagnostic and operation code files set as the start-up file
are run, and then the start-up configuration file is loaded.
Note that configuration files should be downloaded using a file name that reflects the
contents or usage of the file settings. If you download directly to the running-config,
the system will reboot, and the settings will have to be copied from the
running-config to a permanent file.
Initial Configuration
2-10
2
3-1
Chapter 3: Configuring the Switch
Using the Web Interface
This switch provides an embedded HTTP web agent. Using a web browser you can
configure the switch and view statistics to monitor network activity. The web agent
can be accessed by any computer on the network using a standard web browser
(Internet Explorer 5.0 or above, or Netscape 6.2 or above).
Note: You can also use the Command Line Interface (CLI) to manage the switch over a
serial connection to the console port or via Telnet. For more information on using
the CLI, refer to Chapter 4: “Command Line Interface.”
Prior to accessing the switch from a web browser, be sure you have first performed
the following tasks:
1. Configure the switch with a valid IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
using an out-of-band serial connection, BOOTP or DHCP protocol. (See
“Setting an IP Address” on page 2-4.)
2. Set user names and passwords using an out-of-band serial connection. Access
to the web agent is controlled by the same user names and passwords as the
onboard configuration program. (See “Setting Passwords” on page 2-4)
3. After you enter a user name and password, you will have access to the system
configuration program.
Notes: 1. You are allowed three attempts to enter the correct password; on the third
failed attempt the current connection is terminated.
2. If you log into the web interface as guest (Normal Exec level), you can view
the configuration settings or change the guest password. If you log in as
“admin” (Privileged Exec level), you can change the settings on any page.
3. If the path between your management station and this switch does not pass
through any device that uses the Spanning Tree Algorithm, then you can set
the switch port attached to your management station to fast forwarding (i.e.,
enable Admin Edge Port) to improve the switch’s response time to
management commands issued through the web interface. See “Configuring
Interface Settings” on page 3-147.
Configuring the Switch
3-2
3
Navigating the Web Browser Interface
To access the web-browser interface you must first enter a user name and
password. The administrator has Read/Write access to all configuration parameters
and statistics. The default user name and password for the administrator is “admin.”
Home Page
When your web browser connects with the switch’s web agent, the home page is
displayed as shown below. The home page displays the Main Menu on the left side
of the screen and System Information on the right side. The Main Menu links are
used to navigate to other menus, and display configuration parameters and
statistics.
Figure 3-1 Home Page
Panel Display
3-3
3
Configuration Options
Configurable parameters have a dialog box or a drop-down list. Once a configuration
change has been made on a page, be sure to click on the Apply button to confirm
the new setting. The following table summarizes the web page configuration
buttons.
Notes: 1. To ensure proper screen refresh, be sure that Internet Explorer is configured
so that the setting “Check for newer versions of stored pages” reads “Every
visit to the page”.
Internet Explorer 6.x and earlier: This option is available under the menu
“Tools / Internet Options / General / Temporary Internet Files / Settings”.
Internet Explorer 7.x: This option is available under “Tools / Internet Options
/ General / Browsing History / Settings / Temporary Internet Files”.
2. You may have to manually refresh the screen after making configuration
changes by pressing the browser’s refresh button.
Panel Display
The web agent displays an image of the switch’s ports. The Mode can be set to
display different information for the ports, including Active (i.e., up or down), Duplex
(i.e., half or full duplex, or Flow Control (i.e., with or without flow control). Clicking on
the image of a port opens the Port Configuration page as described on page 3-112.
Figure 3-2 Panel Display
Table 3-1 Configuration Options
Button Action
Revert Cancels specified values and restores current values prior to pressing Apply.
Apply Sets specified values to the system.
Help Links directly to webhelp.
Configuring the Switch
3-4
3
Main Menu
Using the onboard web agent, you can define system parameters, manage and
control the switch, and all its ports, or monitor network conditions. The following
table briefly describes the selections available from this program.
Table 3-2 Main Menu
Menu Description Page
System 3-12
System Information Provides basic system description, including contact information 3-12
Switch Information Shows the number of ports, hardware/firmware version
numbers, and power status
3-13
Bridge Extension
Configuration
Shows the bridge extension parameters 3-15
IP Configuration Sets the IP address for management access 3-16
Jumbo Frames Enables jumbo frame packets. 3-19
File Management 3-19
Copy Operation Allows the transfer and copying of files 3-19
Delete Allows deletion of files from the flash memory 3-20
Set Start-Up Sets the startup file 3-20
Line 3-23
Console Sets console port connection parameters 3-23
Telnet Sets Telnet connection parameters 3-25
Log 3-28
Logs Stores and displays error messages 3-28
System Logs Sends error messages to a logging process 3-28
Remote Logs Configures the logging of messages to a remote logging process 3-30
SMTP Sends an SMTP client message to a participating server. 3-31
Reset Restarts the switch 3-33
SNTP 3-34
Configuration Configures SNTP and NTP client settings, including broadcast
mode, authentication parameters or a specified list of servers
3-34
Clock Time Zone Sets the local time zone for the system clock 3-37
SNMP 3-38
Configuration Configures community strings and related trap functions 3-39
Agent Status Enables or disables SNMP Agent Status 3-41
SNMPv3 3-42
Engine ID Sets the SNMP v3 engine ID on this switch 3-42
Main Menu
3-5
3
Remote Engine ID Sets the SNMP v3 engine ID for a remote device 3-43
Users Configures SNMP v3 users on this switch 3-43
Remote Users Configures SNMP v3 users from a remote device 3-45
Groups Configures SNMP v3 groups 3-46
Views Configures SNMP v3 views 3-49
Security 3-51
User Accounts Assigns a new password for the current user 3-51
Authentication Settings Configures authentication sequence, RADIUS and TACACS 3-53
Encryption Key Configures RADIUS and TACACS encryption key settings 3-57
AAA 3-58
RADIUS Group Settings Defines the configured RADIUS servers to use for accounting 3-59
TACACS+ Group Settings Defines the configured TACACS+ servers to use for accounting 3-59
Accounting
Settings Configures accounting of requested services for billing or
security purposes
3-60
Periodic Update Sets the interval at which accounting updates are sent to
RADIUS AAA servers
3-62
802.1X Port Settings Applies the specified accounting method to an interface 3-62
Exec Settings Specifies console or Telnet authentication method 3-65
Summary Displays accounting information and statistics 3-65
Authorization 3-67
Settings Configures authorization of requested services 3-67
EXEC Settings Specifies console or Telnet authorization method 3-68
Summary Displays authorization information 3-68
AAA 3-58
HTTPS Settings Configures secure HTTP settings 3-57
SSH 3-71
Settings Configures Secure Shell server settings 3-80
Host-Key Settings Generates the host key pair (public and private) 3-75
SSH User Public-Key
Settings
Imports and manages user RSA and DSA public keys 3-76
Port Security Configures per port security, including status, response for
security breach, and maximum allowed MAC addresses
3-80
802.1X 3-81
Table 3-2 Main Menu (Continued)
Menu Description Page
Configuring the Switch
3-6
3
Information Displays global configuration settings for 802.1X Port
authentication
3-83
Configuration Configures the global configuration settings 3-83
Port Configuration Sets parameters for individual ports 3-84
Statistics Displays protocol statistics for the selected port 3-87
Web Authentication 3-88
Configuration Configures Web Authentication settings 3-89
Port Configuration Enables Web Authentication for individual ports 3-90
Port Information Displays status information for individual ports 3-91
Re-authentication Forces a host to re-authenticate itself immediately 3-92
Network Access 3-93
Configuration Configures global Network Access parameters 3-94
Port Configuration Configures Network Access parameters for individual ports 3-94
Port Link Detection
Configuration
Configures Port Link Detection parameters 3-96
MAC Address Information Displays Network Access statistics sorted by various attributes 3-97
MAC Authentication 3-98
Port Configuration Configures MAC Authentication parameters for ports 3-98
ACL 3-99
Configuration Configures packet filtering based on IP or MAC addresses 3-100
Port Binding Binds a port to the specified ACL 3-106
IP Filter Sets IP addresses of clients allowed management access via
the web, SNMP, and Telnet
3-107
Port 3-110
Port Information Displays port connection status 3-110
Trunk Information Displays trunk connection status 3-110
Port Configuration Configures port connection settings 3-112
Trunk Configuration Configures trunk connection settings 3-112
Trunk Membership Specifies ports to group into static trunks 3-115
LACP 3-116
Configuration Allows ports to dynamically join trunks 3-116
Aggregation Port Configures parameters for link aggregation group members 3-118
Port Counters Information Displays statistics for LACP protocol messages 3-120
Port Internal Information Displays settings and operational state for the local side 3-122
Table 3-2 Main Menu (Continued)
Menu Description Page
Main Menu
3-7
3
Port Neighbors Information Displays settings and operational state for the remote side 3-124
Port Broadcast Control Sets the broadcast storm threshold for each port 3-125
Trunk Broadcast Control Sets the broadcast storm threshold for each trunk 3-125
Mirror Port Configuration Sets the source and target ports for mirroring 3-127
Rate Limit 3-128
Input Port Configuration Sets the input rate limit for each port 3-128
Input Trunk Configuration Sets the input rate limit for each trunk 3-128
Output Port Configuration Sets the output rate limit for ports 3-128
Output Trunk Configuration Sets the output rate limit for trunks 3-128
Port Statistics Lists Ethernet and RMON port statistics 3-129
Address Table 3-133
Static Addresses Displays entries for interface, address or VLAN 3-133
Dynamic Addresses Displays or edits static entries in the Address Table 3-134
Address Aging Sets timeout for dynamically learned entries 3-136
Spanning Tree 3-136
Port Loopback Detection Configures Port Loopback Detection parameters 3-138
Trunk Loopback Detection Configures Trunk Loopback Detection parameters 3-138
STA 3-136
Information Displays STA values used for the bridge 3-138
Configuration Configures global bridge settings for STA and RSTP 3-141
Port Information Displays individual port settings for STA 3-144
Trunk Information Displays individual trunk settings for STA 3-144
Port Configuration Configures individual port settings for STA 3-147
Trunk Configuration Configures individual trunk settings for STA 3-147
MSTP 3-149
VLAN Configuration Configures priority and VLANs for a spanning tree instance 3-149
Port Information Displays port settings for a specified MST instance 3-151
Trunk Information Displays trunk settings for a specified MST instance 3-151
Port Configuration Configures port settings for a specified MST instance 3-153
Trunk Configuration Configures trunk settings for a specified MST instance 3-153
VLAN 3-155
802.1Q VLAN 3-155
Table 3-2 Main Menu (Continued)
Menu Description Page
Configuring the Switch
3-8
3
GVRP Status Enables GVRP on the switch 3-158
802.1Q Tunnel
Configuration
Enables 802.1Q (QinQ) Tunneling 3-170
Basic Information Displays information on the VLAN type supported by this switch 3-159
Current Table Shows the current port members of each VLAN and whether or
not the port is tagged or untagged
3-159
Static List Used to create or remove VLAN groups 3-161
Static Table Modifies the settings for an existing VLAN 3-162
Static Membership by Port Configures membership type for interfaces, including tagged,
untagged or forbidden
3-164
Port Configuration Specifies default PVID and VLAN attributes 3-165
Trunk Configuration Specifies default trunk VID and VLAN attributes 3-165
Tunnel Port Configuration Adds an interface to a QinQ Tunnel 3-172
Tunnel Trunk Configuration Adds an interface to a QinQ Tunnel 3-172
Private VLAN 3-173
Information Displays Private VLAN feature information 3-174
Configuration This page is used to create/remove primary or community
VLANs
3-175
Association Each community VLAN must be associated with a primary VLAN 3-176
Port Information Shows VLAN port type, and associated primary or secondary
VLANs
3-177
Port Configuration Sets the private VLAN interface type, and associates the
interfaces with a private VLAN
3-178
Trunk Information Shows VLAN port type, and associated primary or secondary
VLANs
3-177
Trunk Configuration Sets the private VLAN interface type, and associates the
interfaces with a private VLAN
3-178
Protocol VLAN 3-179
Configuration Configures protocol VLANs 3-179
System Configuration Configures protocol VLAN system parameters 3-180
LLDP 3-181
Configuration Configures global LLDP timing parameters 3-181
Port Configuration Configures parameters for individual ports 3-183
Trunk Configuration Configures parameters for trunks 3-183
Local Information Displays LLDP information about the local device 3-186
Table 3-2 Main Menu (Continued)
Menu Description Page
Main Menu
3-9
3
Remote Port Information Displays LLDP information about a remote device connected to
a port on this switch
3-187
Remote Trunk Information Displays LLDP information about a remote device connected to
a trunk on this switch
3-187
Remote Information Details Displays detailed LLDP information about a remote device
connected to this switch
3-188
Device Statistics Displays LLDP statistics for all connected remote devices 3-189
Device Statistics Details Displays LLDP statistics for remote devices on a selected port or
trunk
3-190
Priority 3-191
Default Port Priority Sets the default priority for each port 3-191
Default Trunk Priority Sets the default priority for each trunk 3-191
Traffic Classes Maps IEEE 802.1p priority tags to output queues 3-192
Traffic Classes Status Enables/disables traffic class priorities (not implemented) 3-194
Queue Mode Sets queue mode to strict priority or Weighted Round-Robin 3-195
Queue Scheduling Configures Weighted Round Robin queueing 3-195
IP DSCP Priority Status Globally selects DSCP Priority, or disables it. 3-197
IP DSCP Priority Sets IP Differentiated Services Code Point priority, mapping a
DSCP tag to a class-of-service value
3-198
QoS 3-199
DiffServ 3-199
Class Map Sets Class Maps 3-200
Policy Map Sets Policy Maps 3-203
Service Policy Defines service policy settings for ports 3-206
VoIP Traffic Setting 3-207
Configuration VoIP Traffic Setting Configuration 3-207
Port Configuration Configures VoIP Traffic Settings for ports 3-208
OUI Configuration Defines OUI settings 3-210
IGMP Snooping 3-212
IGMP Configuration Enables multicast filtering; configures parameters for multicast
query
3-213
IGMP Filter Configuration Configures IGMP filtering 3-220
IGMP Immediate Leave Enables the immediate leave function 3-215
Multicast Router
Port Information
Displays the ports that are attached to a neighboring multicast
router for each VLAN ID
3-216
Table 3-2 Main Menu (Continued)
Menu Description Page
Configuring the Switch
3-10
3
Static Multicast Router Port
Configuration
Assigns ports that are attached to a neighboring multicast router 3-217
IP Multicast Registration
Table
Displays all multicast groups active on this switch, including
multicast IP addresses and VLAN ID
3-218
IGMP Member Port Table Indicates multicast addresses associated with the selected
VLAN
3-219
IGMP Filter Profile
Configuration
Configures IGMP Filter Profiles 3-220
IGMP Filter/Throttling Port
Configuration
Configures IGMP Filtering and Throttling for ports 3-220
IGMP Filter/Throttling Trunk
Configuration
Configures IGMP Filtering and Throttling for trunks 3-220
MVR 3-225
Configuration Globally enables MVR, sets the MVR VLAN, adds multicast
stream addresses
3-226
Port Information Displays MVR interface type, MVR operational and activity
status, and immediate leave status
3-227
Trunk Information Displays MVR interface type, MVR operational and activity
status, and immediate leave status
3-227
Group IP Information Displays the ports attached to an MVR multicast stream 3-228
Port Configuration Configures MVR interface type and immediate leave status 3-229
Trunk Configuration Configures MVR interface type and immediate leave status 3-229
Group Member Configuration Statically assigns MVR multicast streams to an interface 3-231
DHCP Snooping 3-232
Configuration Enables DHCP Snooping and DHCP Snooping MAC-Address
Verification
3-233
VLAN Configuration Enables DHCP Snooping for a VLAN 3-233
Information Option
Configuration
Enables DHCP Snooping Information Option 3-234
Port Configuration Selects the DHCP Snooping Information Option policy 3-235
Binding Information Displays the DHCP Snooping binding information 3-236
IP Source Guard 3-237
Port Configuration Enables IP source guard and selects filter type per port 3-237
Static Configuration Adds a static addresses to the source-guard binding table 3-238
Dynamic Information Displays the source-guard binding table for a selected interface 3-239
Cluster 3-240
Configuration Globally enables clustering for the switch 3-241
Table 3-2 Main Menu (Continued)
Menu Description Page
Main Menu
3-11
3
Member Configuration Adds switch Members to the cluster 3-242
Member Information Displays cluster Member switch information 3-243
Candidate Information Displays network Candidate switch information 3-243
UPNP 3-245
Configuration Enables UPNP and defines timeout values 3-245
Table 3-2 Main Menu (Continued)
Menu Description Page
Configuring the Switch
3-12
3
Basic Configuration
Displaying System Information
You can easily identify the system by displaying the device name, location and
contact information.
Field Attributes
System Name – Name assigned to the switch system.
Object ID – MIB II object ID for switch’s network management subsystem.
Location – Specifies the system location.
Contact – Administrator responsible for the system.
System Up Time – Length of time the management agent has been up.
These additional parameters are displayed for the CLI.
MAC Address – The physical layer address for this switch.
Web server – Shows if management access via HTTP is enabled.
Web server port – Shows the TCP port number used by the web interface.
Web secure server – Shows if management access via HTTPS is enabled.
Web secure server port – Shows the TCP port used by the HTTPS interface.
Telnet server – Shows if management access via Telnet is enabled.
Telnet port – Shows the TCP port used by the Telnet interface.
Jumbo Frame – Shows if jumbo frames are enabled.
POST result – Shows results of the power-on self-test.
Web – Click System, System Information. Specify the system name, location, and
contact information for the system administrator, then click Apply. (This page also
includes a Telnet button that allows access to the Command Line Interface via Telnet.)
Figure 3-3 System Information
Basic Configuration
3-13
3
CLI – Specify the hostname, location and contact information.
Displaying Switch Hardware/Software Versions
Use the Switch Information page to display hardware/firmware version numbers for
the main board and management software, as well as the power status of the system.
Field Attributes
Main Board
Serial Number – The serial number of the switch.
Number of Ports – Number of built-in RJ-45 ports.
Hardware Version – Hardware version of the main board.
Internal Power Status – Displays the status of the internal power supply.
Management Software
EPLD VersionVersion number of the Electronically Programmable Logic Device
code.
Loader Version – Version number of loader code.
Boot-ROM Version – Version of Power-On Self-Test (POST) and boot code.
Operation Code Version – Version number of runtime code.
Role – Shows that this switch is operating as Master or Slave.
Console(config)#hostname R&D 5 4-28
Console(config)#snmp-server location WC 9 4-153
Console(config)#snmp-server contact Ted 4-153
Console(config)#exit
Console#show system 4-82
System description : ES3528M-SFP
System OID string : 1.3.6.1.4.1.259.8.1.4
System information
System Up time : 0 days, 0 hours, 14 minutes, and 32.93 seconds
System Name : R&D 5
System Location : WC 9
System Contact : Ted
MAC address : 00-00-35-28-10-03
Web server : enabled
Web server port : 80
Web secure server : enabled
Web secure server port : 443
Telnet server : enable
Telnet port : 23
Jumbo Frame : Disabled
POST result
UART Loopback Test ........... PASS
DRAM Test .................... PASS
Timer Test ................... PASS
PCI Device 1 Test ............ PASS
I2C Bus Initialization ....... PASS
Switch Int Loopback Test ..... PASS
Fan Speed Test ............... PASS
Done All Pass.
Console#
Configuring the Switch
3-14
3
Web – Click System, Switch Information.
Figure 3-4 Switch Information
CLI – Use the following command to display version information.
Console#show version 4-83
Unit 1
Serial number:
Hardware version:
EPLD Version: 4.04
Number of ports: 28
Main power status: Up
Redundant power status: Not present
Agent (master)
Unit ID: 1
Loader version: 0.0.0.5
Boot ROM version: 0.0.0.8
Operation code version: 0.0.1.2
Console#
Basic Configuration
3-15
3
Displaying Bridge Extension Capabilities
The Bridge MIB includes extensions for managed devices that support Multicast
Filtering, Traffic Classes, and Virtual LANs. You can access these extensions to
display default settings for the key variables.
Field Attributes
Extended Multicast Filtering Services – This switch does not support the filtering
of individual multicast addresses based on GMRP (GARP Multicast Registration
Protocol).
Traffic Classes – This switch provides mapping of user priorities to multiple traffic
classes. (Refer to “Class of Service Configuration” on page 3-191.)
Static Entry Individual Port – This switch allows static filtering for unicast and
multicast addresses. (Refer to “Setting Static Addresses” on page 3-133.)
VLAN Learning – This switch uses Shared VLAN Learning (SVL), where all
VLANs share the same address table.
Configurable PVID Tagging – This switch allows you to override the default Port
VLAN ID (PVID used in frame tags) and egress status (VLAN-Tagged or
Untagged) on each port. (Refer to “VLAN Configuration” on page 3-155.)
Local VLAN Capable – This switch does not support multiple local bridges outside
of the scope of 802.1Q defined VLANs.
GMRP – GARP Multicast Registration Protocol (GMRP) allows network devices to
register endstations with multicast groups. This switch does not support GMRP; it
uses the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) to provide automatic
multicast filtering.
Web – Click System, Bridge Extension Configuration.
Figure 3-5 Bridge Extension Configuration
Configuring the Switch
3-16
3
CLI – Enter the following command.
Setting the Switch’s IP Address
This section describes how to configure an IP interface for management access
over the network. The IP address for the stack is obtained via DHCP by default. To
manually configure an address, you need to change the switch’s default settings
(IP address 192.168.1.1 and netmask 255.255.255.0) to values that are compatible
with your network. You may also need to a establish a default gateway between the
stack and management stations that exist on another network segment.
You can manually configure a specific IP address, or direct the device to obtain an
address from a BOOTP or DHCP server. Valid IP addresses consist of four decimal
numbers, 0 to 255, separated by periods. Anything outside this format will not be
accepted by the CLI program.
Command Attributes
Management VLAN – ID of the configured VLAN (1-4092, no leading zeroes). By
default, all ports on the switch are members of VLAN 1. However, the management
station can be attached to a port belonging to any VLAN, as long as that VLAN has
been assigned an IP address.
IP Address Mode – Specifies whether IP functionality is enabled via manual
configuration (Static), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), or Boot
Protocol (BOOTP). If DHCP/BOOTP is enabled, IP will not function until a reply has
been received from the server. Requests will be broadcast periodically by the
switch for an IP address. (DHCP/BOOTP values can include the IP address,
subnet mask, and default gateway.)
IP Address – Address of the VLAN interface that is allowed management access.
Valid IP addresses consist of four numbers, 0 to 255, separated by periods.
(Default: 0.0.0.0)
Subnet Mask – This mask identifies the host address bits used for routing to
specific subnets. (Default: 255.0.0.0)
Gateway IP address – IP address of the gateway router between this device and
management stations that exist on other network segments. (Default: 0.0.0.0)
MAC Address – The physical layer address for this switch.
Restart DHCP – Requests a new IP address from the DHCP server.
Console#show bridge-ext 4-239
Max support VLAN numbers: 256
Max support VLAN ID: 4092
Extended multicast filtering services: No
Static entry individual port: Yes
VLAN learning: IVL
Configurable PVID tagging: Yes
Local VLAN capable: No
Traffic classes: Enabled
Global GVRP status: Disabled
GMRP: Disabled
Console#
Basic Configuration
3-17
3
Manual Configuration
Web – Click System, IP Configuration. Select the VLAN through which the
management station is attached, set the IP Address Mode to “Static,” enter the IP
address, subnet mask and gateway, then click Apply.
Figure 3-6 Manual IP Configuration
CLI – Specify the management interface, IP address and default gateway.
Console#config
Console(config)#interface vlan 1 4-166
Console(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 4-309
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#ip default-gateway 0.0.0.0 4-310
Console(config)#
Configuring the Switch
3-18
3
Using DHCP/BOOTP
If your network provides DHCP/BOOTP services, you can configure the switch to be
dynamically configured by these services.
Web – Click System, IP Configuration. Specify the VLAN to which the management
station is attached, set the IP Address Mode to DHCP or BOOTP. Click Apply to
save your changes. Then click Restart DHCP to immediately request a new
address. Note that the switch will also broadcast a request for IP configuration
settings on each power reset.
Figure 3-7 DHCP IP Configuration
Note: If you lose your management connection, use a console connection and enter
“show ip interface” to determine the new switch address.
CLI – Specify the management interface, and set the IP address mode to DHCP or
BOOTP, and then enter the “ip dhcp restart” command.
Renewing DHCP – DHCP may lease addresses to clients indefinitely or for a
specific period of time. If the address expires or the switch is moved to another
network segment, you will lose management access to the switch. In this case, you
can reboot the switch or submit a client request to restart DHCP service via the CLI.
Console#config
Console(config)#interface vlan 1 4-166
Console(config-if)#ip address dhcp 4-309
Console(config-if)#end
Console#ip dhcp restart 4-311
Console#show ip interface 4-311
IP address and netmask: 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 on VLAN 1,
and address mode: User specified.
Console#
Basic Configuration
3-19
3
Web – If the address assigned by DHCP is no longer functioning, you will not be
able to renew the IP settings via the web interface. You can only restart DHCP
service via the web interface if the current address is still available.
CLI – Enter the following command to restart DHCP service.
Enabling Jumbo Frames
You can enable jumbo frames to support data packets up to 9000 bytes in size.
Command Attributes
Jumbo Packet Status – Check the box to enable jumbo frames.
Web – Click System, Jumbo Frames.
Figure 3-8 Jumbo Frames Configuration
CLI – Enter the following command.
Managing Firmware
You can upload/download firmware to or from a TFTP server, or copy files to and
from switch units in a stack. By saving runtime code to a file on a TFTP server, that
file can later be downloaded to the switch to restore operation. You can also set the
switch to use new firmware without overwriting the previous version. You must
specify the method of file transfer, along with the file type and file names as required.
Command Attributes
File Transfer Method – The firmware copy operation includes these options:
- file to file – Copies a file within the switch directory, assigning it a new name.
- file to tftp – Copies a file from the switch to a TFTP server.
- tftp to file – Copies a file from a TFTP server to the switch.
TFTP Server IP Address – The IP address of a TFTP server.
File Type – Specify opcode (operational code) to copy firmware.
Console#ip dhcp restart 4-311
Console#
Console#config
Console(config)#jumbo frame
Console(config)#
Configuring the Switch
3-20
3
File Name
The file name should not contain slashes (\ or /),
the leading letter of
the file name should not be a period (.), and the maximum length for file names on
the TFTP server is 127 characters or 31 characters for files on the switch.
(Valid characters: A-Z, a-z, 0-9, “.”, “-”, “_”)
Note: Up to two copies of the system software (i.e., the runtime firmware) can be stored
in the file directory on the switch. The currently designated startup version of this
file cannot be deleted.
Downloading System Software from a Server
When downloading runtime code, you can specify the destination file name to
replace the current image, or first download the file using a different name from the
current runtime code file, and then set the new file as the startup file.
Web –Click System, File Management, Copy Operation. Select “tftp to file” as the file
transfer method, enter the IP address of the TFTP server, set the file type to
“opcode,” enter the file name of the software to download, select a file on the switch
to overwrite or specify a new file name, then click Apply. If you replaced the current
firmware used for startup and want to start using the new operation code, reboot the
system via the System/Reset menu.
Figure 3-9 Copy Firmware
If you download to a new destination file, go to the System/File/Set Start-Up menu,
mark the operation code file used at startup, and click Apply. To start the new
firmware, reboot the system via the System/Reset menu.
Figure 3-10 Setting the Startup Code
Basic Configuration
3-21
3
To delete a file, select System, File, Delete. Select the file name from the given list
by checking the tick box and click Apply. Note that the file currently designated as the
startup code cannot be deleted.
Figure 3-11 Deleting Files
CLI – To download new firmware form a TFTP server, enter the IP address of the
TFTP server, select “opcode” as the file type, then enter the source and destination
file names. When the file has finished downloading, set the new file to start up the
system, and then restart the switch.
To start the new firmware, enter the “reload” command or reboot the system.
Saving or Restoring Configuration Settings
You can upload/download configuration settings to/from a TFTP server. The
configuration files can be later downloaded to restore the switchs settings.
Command Attributes
File Transfer Method – The configuration copy operation includes these options:
- file to file – Copies a file within the switch directory, assigning it a new name.
- file to running-config – Copies a file in the switch to the running configuration.
- file to startup-config – Copies a file in the switch to the startup configuration.
- file to tftp – Copies a file from the switch to a TFTP server.
- running-config to file – Copies the running configuration to a file.
- running-config to startup-config – Copies the running config to the startup config.
- running-config to tftp – Copies the running configuration to a TFTP server.
- startup-config to file – Copies the startup configuration to a file on the switch.
- startup-config to running-config – Copies the startup config to the running config.
- startup-config to tftp – Copies the startup configuration to a TFTP server.
Console#copy tftp file 4-85
TFTP server ip address: 192.168.1.23
Choose file type:
1. config: 2. opcode: 4. diag: 5. loader: <1,2,4,5>: 2
Source file name: V2.2.7.1.bix
Destination file name: V2271.F
\Write to FLASH Programming.
-Write to FLASH finish.
Success.
Console#config
Console(config)#boot system opcode:V2271.F 4-90
Console(config)#exit
Console#reload 4-24
Configuring the Switch
3-22
3
- tftp to file – Copies a file from a TFTP server to the switch.
- tftp to running-config – Copies a file from a TFTP server to the running config.
- tftp to startup-config – Copies a file from a TFTP server to the startup config.
TFTP Server IP Address – The IP address of a TFTP server.
File Type – Specify config (configuration) to copy configuration settings.
File Name
— The file name should not contain slashes (\ or /),
the leading letter of
the file name should not be a period (.), and the maximum length for file names on
the TFTP server is 127 characters or 31 characters for files on the switch. (Valid
characters: A-Z, a-z, 0-9, “.”, “-”, “_”)
Note: The maximum number of user-defined configuration files is limited only by
available flash memory space.
Downloading Configuration Settings from a Server
You can download the configuration file under a new file name and then set it as the
startup file, or you can specify the current startup configuration file as the destination
file to directly replace it. Note that the file “Factory_Default_Config.cfg” can be
copied to the TFTP server, but cannot be used as the destination on the switch.
Web – Click System, File, Copy Operation. Select “tftp to startup-config” or “tftp to
file” and enter the IP address of the TFTP server. Specify the name of the file to
download and select a file on the switch to overwrite or specify a new file name, then
click Apply.
Figure 3-12 Downloading Configuration Settings for Startup
If you download to a new file name using “tftp to startup-config” or “tftp to file,” the file
is automatically set as the start-up configuration file. To use the new settings, reboot
the system via the System/Reset menu.
Basic Configuration
3-23
3
Note: You can also select any configuration file as the start-up configuration by using the
System/File/Set Start-Up page.
Figure 3-13 Setting the Startup Configuration Settings
CLI – Enter the IP address of the TFTP server, specify the source file on the server,
set the startup file name on the switch, and then restart the switch.
To select another configuration file as the start-up configuration, use the boot
system command and then restart the switch.
Console Port Settings
You can access the onboard configuration program by attaching a VT100
compatible device to the switch’s serial console port. Management access through
the console port is controlled by various parameters, including a password, timeouts,
and basic communication settings. These parameters can be configured via the web
or CLI interface.
Command Attributes
Login Timeout – Sets the interval that the system waits for a user to log into the
CLI. If a login attempt is not detected within the timeout interval, the connection is
terminated for the session. (Range: 0-300 seconds; Default: 0 seconds)
Exec Timeout Sets the interval that the system waits until user input is detected.
If user input is not detected within the timeout interval, the current session is
terminated. (Range: 0-65535 seconds; Default: 600 seconds)
Password Threshold – Sets the password intrusion threshold, which limits the
number of failed logon attempts. When the logon attempt threshold is reached, the
Console#copy tftp startup-config 4-85
TFTP server ip address: 192.168.1.19
Source configuration file name: config-1
Startup configuration file name [] : startup
\Write to FLASH Programming.
-Write to FLASH finish.
Success.
Console#reload
Console#config
Console(config)#boot system config: startup-new 4-90
Console(config)#exit
Console#reload 4-24
Configuring the Switch
3-24
3
system interface becomes silent for a specified amount of time (set by the Silent
Time parameter) before allowing the next logon attempt.
(Range: 0-120; Default: 3 attempts)
Silent Time – Sets the amount of time the management console is inaccessible
after the number of unsuccessful logon attempts has been exceeded.
(Range: 0-65535; Default: 0)
Data Bits – Sets the number of data bits per character that are interpreted and
generated by the console port. If parity is being generated, specify 7 data bits per
character. If no parity is required, specify 8 data bits per character. (Default: 8 bits)
Parity – Defines the generation of a parity bit. Communication protocols provided
by some terminals can require a specific parity bit setting. Specify Even, Odd, or
None. (Default: None)
Speed – Sets the terminal line’s baud rate for transmit (to terminal) and receive
(from terminal). Set the speed to match the baud rate of the device connected to
the serial port. (Range: 9600, 19200, 38400 baud, or Auto; Default: Auto)
Stop Bits – Sets the number of the stop bits transmitted per byte.
(Range: 1-2; Default: 1 stop bit)
Password1 – Specifies a password for the line connection. When a connection is
started on a line with password protection, the system prompts for the password.
If you enter the correct password, the system shows a prompt.
(Default: No password)
Login1 – Enables password checking at login. You can select authentication by a
single global password as configured for the Password parameter, or by
passwords set up for specific user-name accounts. (Default: Local)
Web – Click System, Line, Console. Specify the console port connection parameters
as required, then click Apply.
Figure 3-14 Console Port Settings
1. CLI only.
Basic Configuration
3-25
3
CLI – Enter Line Configuration mode for the console, then specify the connection
parameters as required. To display the current console port settings, use the show
line command from the Normal Exec level.
Telnet Settings
You can access the onboard configuration program over the network using Telnet
(i.e., a virtual terminal). Management access via Telnet can be enabled/disabled and
other various parameters set, including the TCP port number, timeouts, and a
password. These parameters can be configured via the web or CLI interface.
Command Attributes
Telnet Status – Enables or disables Telnet access to the switch.
(Default: Enabled)
Telnet Port Number – Sets the TCP port number for Telnet on the switch.
(Default: 23)
Login Timeout – Sets the interval that the system waits for a user to log into the
CLI. If a login attempt is not detected within the timeout interval, the connection is
terminated for the session. (Range: 0-300 seconds; Default: 300 seconds)
Exec Timeout Sets the interval that the system waits until user input is detected.
If user input is not detected within the timeout interval, the current session is
terminated. (Range: 0-65535 seconds; Default: 600 seconds)
Console(config)#line console 4-13
Console(config-line)#login local 4-13
Console(config-line)#password 0 secret 4-14
Console(config-line)#timeout login response 0 4-15
Console(config-line)#exec-timeout 0 4-15
Console(config-line)#password-thresh 3 4-16
Console(config-line)#silent-time 60 4-17
Console(config-line)#databits 8 4-17
Console(config-line)#parity none 4-18
Console(config-line)#speed 19200 4-19
Console(config-line)#stopbits 1 4-19
Console(config-line)#end
Console#show line 4-20
Console configuration:
Password threshold: 3 times
Interactive timeout: Disabled
Login timeout: Disabled
Silent time: 60
Baudrate: 19200
Databits: 8
Parity: none
Stopbits: 1
VTY configuration:
Password threshold: 3 times
Interactive timeout: 600 sec
Login timeout: 300 sec
Console#
Configuring the Switch
3-26
3
Password Threshold – Sets the password intrusion threshold, which limits the
number of failed logon attempts. When the logon attempt threshold is reached, the
system interface becomes silent for a specified amount of time (set by the Silent
Time parameter) before allowing the next logon attempt.
(Range: 0-120; Default: 3 attempts)
Password2 – Specifies a password for the line connection. When a connection is
started on a line with password protection, the system prompts for the password.
If you enter the correct password, the system shows a prompt. (Default: No
password)
Login2 – Enables password checking at login. You can select authentication by a
single global password as configured for the Password parameter, or by
passwords set up for specific user-name accounts. (Default: Local)
Web – Click System, Line, Telnet. Specify the connection parameters for Telnet
access, then click Apply.
Figure 3-15 Enabling Telnet
2. CLI only.
Basic Configuration
3-27
3
CLI – Enter Line Configuration mode for a virtual terminal, then specify the
connection parameters as required. To display the current virtual terminal settings,
use the show line command from the Normal Exec level.
Console(config)#line vty 4-13
Console(config-line)#login local 4-13
Console(config-line)#password 0 secret 4-14
Console(config-line)#timeout login response 300 4-15
Console(config-line)#exec-timeout 600 4-15
Console(config-line)#password-thresh 3 4-16
Console(config-line)#end
Console#show line 4-20
Console configuration:
Password threshold: 3 times
Interactive timeout: Disabled
Login timeout: Disabled
Silent time: Disabled
Baudrate: 9600
Databits: 8
Parity: none
Stopbits: 1
VTY configuration:
Password threshold: 3 times
Interactive timeout: 600 sec
Login timeout: 300 sec
Console#
Configuring the Switch
3-28
3
Configuring Event Logging
The switch allows you to control the logging of error messages, including the type of
events that are recorded in switch memory, logging to a remote System Log (syslog)
server, and displays a list of recent event messages.
Displaying Log Messages
The Logs page allows you to scroll through the logged system and event messages.
The switch can store up to 2048 log entries in temporary random access memory
(RAM; i.e., memory flushed on power reset) and up to 4096 entries in permanent
flash memory.
Web – Click System, Log, Logs.
Figure 3-16 Displaying Logs
CLI – This example shows the event message stored in RAM.
System Log Configuration
The system allows you to enable or disable event logging, and specify which levels
are logged to RAM or flash memory.
Severe error messages that are logged to flash memory are permanently stored in
the switch to assist in troubleshooting network problems. Up to 4096 log entries can
be stored in the flash memory, with the oldest entries being overwritten first when the
available log memory (256 kilobytes) has been exceeded.
Console#show log ram 4-59
[1] 00:00:27 2001-01-01
"VLAN 1 link-up notification."
level: 6, module: 5, function: 1, and event no.: 1
[0] 00:00:25 2001-01-01
"System coldStart notification."
level: 6, module: 5, function: 1, and event no.: 1
Console#
Basic Configuration
3-29
3
The System Logs page allows you to configure and limit system messages that are
logged to flash or RAM memory. The default is for event levels 0 to 3 to be logged to
flash and levels 0 to 6 to be logged to RAM.
Command Attributes
System Log Status – Enables/disables the logging of debug or error messages to
the logging process. (Default: Enabled)
Flash Level – Limits log messages saved to the switch’s permanent flash memory
for all levels up to the specified level. For example, if level 3 is specified, all
messages from level 0 to level 3 will be logged to flash. (Range: 0-7, Default: 3)
RAM Level – Limits log messages saved to the switch’s temporary RAM memory
for all levels up to the specified level. For example, if level 7 is specified, all
messages from level 0 to level 7 will be logged to RAM. (Range: 0-7, Default: 6)
Note: The Flash Level must be equal to or less than the RAM Level.
Web – Click System, Log, System Logs. Specify System Log Status,
set the level of
event messages to be logged to RAM and flash memory, then click Apply.
Figure 3-17 System Logs
Table 3-3 Logging Levels
Level Severity Name Description
7 Debug Debugging messages
6 Informational Informational messages only
5 Notice Normal but significant condition, such as cold start
4 Warning Warning conditions (e.g., return false, unexpected return)
3 Error Error conditions (e.g., invalid input, default used)
2 Critical Critical conditions (e.g., memory allocation, or free memory
error - resource exhausted)
1 Alert Immediate action needed
0 Emergency System unusable
* There are only Level 2, 5 and 6 error messages for the current firmware release.
Configuring the Switch
3-30
3
CLI – Enable system logging and then specify the level of messages to be logged to
RAM and flash memory. Use the show logging command to display the current
settings.
Remote Log Configuration
The Remote Logs page allows you to configure the logging of messages that are
sent to syslog servers or other management stations. You can also limit the error
messages sent to only those messages below a specified level.
Command Attributes
Remote Log Status – Enables/disables the logging of debug or error messages
to the remote logging process. (Default: Enabled)
Logging Facility – Sets the facility type for remote logging of syslog messages.
There are eight facility types specified by values of 16 to 23. The facility type is
used by the syslog server to dispatch log messages to an appropriate service.
The attribute specifies the facility type tag sent in syslog messages. (See RFC
3164.) This type has no effect on the kind of messages reported by the switch.
However, it may be used by the syslog server to process messages, such as
sorting or storing messages in the corresponding database. (Range: 16-23,
Default: 23)
Logging Trap – Limits log messages that are sent to the remote syslog server for
all levels up to the specified level. For example, if level 3 is specified, all messages
from level 0 to level 3 will be sent to the remote server. (Range: 0-7, Default: 6)
Host IP List – Displays the list of remote server IP addresses that receive the
syslog messages. The maximum number of host IP addresses allowed is five.
Host IP Address – Specifies a new server IP address to add to the Host IP List.
Console(config)#logging on 4-55
Console(config)#logging history ram 0 4-56
Console(config)#end
Console#show logging flash 4-59
Syslog logging: Enabled
History logging in FLASH: level emergencies
Console#
Basic Configuration
3-31
3
Web – Click System, Log, Remote Logs. To add an IP address to the Host IP List,
type the new IP address in the Host IP Address box, and then click Add. To delete
an IP address, click the entry in the Host IP List, and then click Remove.
Figure 3-18 Remote Logs
CLI – Enter the syslog server host IP address, choose the facility type and set the
logging trap.
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) is used to send email messages between
servers. The messages can be retrieved using POP or IMAP clients.
Command Attributes
Admin Status Enables/disables the SMTP function. (Default: Enabled)
Email Source Address – This command specifies SMTP servers email addresses
that can send alert messages.
Severity – Specifies the degree of urgency that the message carries.
Console(config)#logging host 192.168.1.15 4-57
Console(config)#logging facility 23 4-57
Console(config)#logging trap 4 4-58
Console(config)#end
Console#show logging trap 4-58
Syslog logging: Enabled
REMOTELOG status: Enabled
REMOTELOG facility type: local use 7
REMOTELOG level type: Warning conditions
REMOTELOG server ip address: 192.168.1.15
REMOTELOG server ip address: 0.0.0.0
REMOTELOG server ip address: 0.0.0.0
REMOTELOG server ip address: 0.0.0.0
REMOTELOG server ip address: 0.0.0.0
Console#
Configuring the Switch
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3
Debugging – Sends a debugging notification. (Level 7)
Information – Sends informatative notification only. (Level 6)
Notice – Sends notification of a normal but significant condition, such as a cold
start. (Level 5)
Warning – Sends notification of a warning condition such as return false, or
unexpected return. (Level 4)
Error – Sends notification that an error conditions has occurred, such as invalid
input, or default used. (Level 3)
Critical – Sends notification that a critical condition has occurred, such as
memory allocation, or free memory error - resource exhausted. (Level 2)
Alert – Sends urgent notification that immediate action must be taken. (Level 1)
Emergency – Sends an emergency notification that the system is now unusable.
(Level 0)
SMTP Server ListSpecifies a list of recipient SMTP servers.
SMTP Server – Specifies a new SMTP server address to add to the SMTP Server
List.
Email Destination Address List – Specifies a list of recipient Email Destination
Address.
Email Destination Address – This command specifies SMTP servers that may
receive alert messages.
Web – Click System, Log, SMTP. To add an IP address to the Server IP List, type
the new IP address in the Server IP Address box, and then click Add. To delete an IP
address, click the entry in the Server IP List, and then click Remove.
Figure 3-19 Enabling and Configuring SMTP
Basic Configuration
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3
CLI – Enter the host ip address, followed by the mail severity level, source and
destination email addresses and enter the sendmail command to complete the
action. Use the show logging command to display SMTP information.
Resetting the System
This feature restarts the system. You can reboot the system immediately, or you can
configure the switch to reset after a specified amount of time.
Command Attributes
Hours – Specifies the amount of hours to wait, combined with the minutes, before
the switch resets. (Range: 0-576; Default: 0)
Minutes – Specifies the amount of minutes to wait, combined with the hours,
before the switch resets. (Range: 1-34560; Default: 0)
Reset – Resets the switch after the specified time. If the hour and minute fields are
blank, then the switch will reset immediately.
Refresh – Refreshes the countdown timer of a pending delayed reset.
Cancel – Cancels a pending delayed reset.
Web – Click System, Reset. Enter the amount of time the switch should wait before
rebooting. Click the Reset button to reboot the switch or click the Cancel button to
cancel a configured reset. If prompted, confirm that you want reset the switch or
cancel a configured reset.
Figure 3-20 Resetting the System
Console(config)#logging sendmail host 192.168.1.19
Console(config)#logging sendmail level 3
Console(config)#logging sendmail source-email
bill@this-company.com
Console(config)#logging sendmail destination-email
ted@this-company.com
Console(config)#logging sendmail
Console#
Configuring the Switch
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3
CLI – Use the reload command to restart the switch. When prompted, confirm that
you want to reset the switch.
Note: When restarting the system, it will always run the Power-On Self-Test. It will also
retain all configuration information stored in non-volatile memory (See “Saving or
Restoring Configuration Settings” on page 3-21 or the copy running-config
startup-config command (See “copy” on page 4-85)).
Setting the System Clock
Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) allows the switch to set its internal clock
based on periodic updates from a time server (SNTP or NTP). Maintaining an
accurate time on the switch enables the system log to record meaningful dates and
times for event entries. You can also manually set the clock. If the clock is not set,
the switch will only record the time from the factory default set at the last bootup.
When the SNTP client is enabled, the switch periodically sends a request for a time
update to a configured time server. You can configure up to three time server IP
addresses. The switch will attempt to poll each server in the configured sequence.
Setting the Time Manually
You can set the system time on the switch manually without using SNTP.
CLI – This example sets the system clock time and then displays the current time
and date.
Configuring SNTP
You can configure the switch to send time synchronization requests to time servers.
Command Attributes
SNTP Client – Configures the switch to operate as an SNTP client. This requires
at least one time server to be specified in the SNTP Server field. (Default: Disabled)
SNTP Poll Interval – Sets the interval between sending requests for a time update
from a time server. (Range: 16-16384 seconds; Default: 16 seconds)
SNTP Server Sets the IP address for up to three time servers. The switch
attempts to update the time from the first server, if this fails it attempts an update
from the next server in the sequence.
Web – Select SNTP, Configuration. Modify any of the required SNTP parameters,
and click Apply.
Console#reload 4-24
System will be restarted, continue <y/n>? y
Console#calendar set 17 46 00 october 18 2007 4-77
Console#show calendar 4-77
17:46:11 October 18 2007
Console#
Basic Configuration
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3
Figure 3-21 SNTP Configuration
CLI – This example configures the switch to operate as an SNTP unicast client and
then displays the current time and settings.
Configuring NTP
The NTP client allows you to configure up to 50 NTP servers to poll for time updates.
You can also enable authentication to ensure that reliable updates are received from
only authorized NTP servers. The authentication keys and their associated key
number must be centrally managed and manually distributed to NTP servers and
clients. The key numbers and key values must match on both the server and client.
Command Attributes
NTP Client – Configures the switch to operate as an NTP client. This requires at
least one time server to be specified in the NTP Server list. (Default: Disabled)
NTP Polling Interval – Sets the interval between sending requests for a time
update from NTP servers. (Range: 16-16384 seconds; Default: 16 seconds)
NTP Authenticate Enables authentication for time requests and updates
between the switch and NTP servers. (Default: Disabled)
NTP Server Sets th