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Annual Training
Conference
Setting the
Standard
Washington, DC
July 27-30, 2015
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Welcome Drug Court Family!
Welcome to the world’s largest conference on substance abuse, mental health, and the
justice system. The NADCP Annual Conference is your forum to learn and celebrate;
to acknowledge and give thanks; to reenergize and educate.
As a fi eld and a movement, you work every day saving lives, reuniting families, and
restoring communities. NADCP is your national membership organization and your
resource. We work all year to provide you with the most current publications, training,
and technical assistance, and we will not rest until there is a Drug Court, DWI Court,
Tribal Healing to Wellness Court, and Veterans Treatment Court within reach of every
person in need.
To further that goal, this week we are proud to introduce Volume 2 of the Adult Drug
Court Best Practice Standards. You, your court, and NADCP are setting the standard.
Thank you for your support and encouragement in the development of this ground-
breaking publication. Together we will ensure Drug Courts continue as the foundation
of evidence based justice system reform.
As we gather this week, prepare to make new friends, reconnect with old friends,
educate your Members of Congress, gather resources, learn cutting–edge information,
and reenergize. You make a difference every day. From all of us at NADCP, thank you.
Enjoy the conference!
Sincerely,
Carolyn Hardin
1
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators at HHS-sponsored conferences
do not necessarily refl ect the of cial policy of the Department of Health and Human Services or the Department of Justice; nor does
mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
Acknowledgements
Many thanks to our federal partners for their ongoing efforts and support of
Drug Courts and other Problem-Solving Courts throughout the nation:
Additional thanks to our other partners whose efforts contribute to this conference:
2NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Many thanks to the NADCP Corporate members
The NADCP Corporate Members give generously to support our efforts on behalf of Drug Courts,
DWI Courts, and Veterans Treatment Courts everywhere.
Corporate Members
CHAMPION MEMBERS
PIONEER MEMBERS
SILVER MEMBERS
GOLD MEMBERS
BRONZE MEMBERS
3
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
NADCP welcomes the diversity of methods and opinions shared
through the interactive format of this conference. NADCP does
not necessarily endorse all of the viewpoints expressed.
NADCP Staff .................................................................................... 4
NADCP Board of Directors .............................................................. 5
Discipline Specifi c Breakouts .......................................................... 6
Stanley M. Goldstein Hall of Fame ................................................. 8
State Associations and other Meetings ............................................ 9
Drug Court Expo Schedule ............................................................ 10
Capitol Hill Day ............................................................................. 11
Featured Guests ............................................................................. 14
Conference At-A-Glance ................................................................. 17
Training Track Descriptions ........................................................... 28
Monday Schedule ........................................................................... 33
Tuesday Schedule ........................................................................... 55
Wednesday Schedule .................................................................... 117
Thursday Schedule ...................................................................... 135
Drug Court Expo ......................................................................... 141
Exhibitor Listing .......................................................................... 142
Session Tables .............................................................................. 164
Hotel Floor Plans ......................................................................... 170
Table of Contents
4NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Joyce Barrow
Project Director
Percy Brooks
Registrar
Jennifer Columbel
Senior Director, Public Policy
Imani Cooper
Training Coordinator
Elizabeth Dawson
Project Coordinator, Justice For Vets
Laura Dalemarre
Research Coordinator
Kristen Deutsch
Director of Development
Chris Deutsch
Director of Communications
Melissa Fitzgerald
Senior Director, Justice For Vets
Carson Fox
Chief Operating Offi cer
Bonnie Greenslade
Training Coordinator
Ingrid Gutierrez
Training Coordinator
Carolyn Hardin
Interim CEO, NADCP
Senior Director
National Drug Court Institute
Sonya Harper
Project Director
Nicarssia Herndon
Training Coordinator
Clifford Jacobs
Program Manager
Hon. J. Michael Kavanaugh
Senior Director
National Center for DWI Courts
Greg Loeffl er
Training Coordinator
Jennifer Lubold
Director of Conferences
Janet McCuller
Chief Financial Offi cer
Caitlin Morrison
Director of Membership
Jontelle Niblock
Accounting Technician
David Pelletier
Project Manager, Justice For Vets
Rhonda Pence
Public Relations Manager
Mike Soussi-Tanani
Associate Director of Conferences
Frank Stewart
Special Assistant to the CEO
Scott Swain
Project Director
Tonya Voelker
Associate Director of Legislative Affairs
Terrence Walton
Chief of Standards
Meisha West
Offi ce Manager
RESOURCE
CONSULTANTS
Douglas Marlowe, Ph.D., J.D.
Chief of Science, Law and Policy
Hon. William G. Meyer (ret.)
Senior Judicial Fellow
Clyde J. (Butch) Tate II
Major General, US Army (ret.)
Senior Fellow for Veteran Affairs
NADCP Staff
The NADCP, NCDC, NDCI, and Justice for Vets staff provide technical assistance
and training, host this annual training conference, provide advocacy, sponsor research,
disseminate information and provide a number of other services to the fi eld throughout
the year. We are indebted to our staff for all their hard work.
NADCP PROMISE STATEMENT:
To champion proven strategies within the
judicial system that empower drug-using
offenders to change their lives.
NADCP MISSION STATEMENT:
We will not rest until there are Drug Courts
and other Problem-Solving Courts within
reach of every person in need.
5
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
Hon. Jeff Bagley
Cumming, GA
Hon. Michael Barrasse
Scranton, PA
Hon. Jonathan Blodgett
Salem, MA
Hon. Richard Gebelein
Wilmington, DE
Hon. Pamela Gray
Washington, DC
Hon. Bob Helfrich
Hattiesburg, MS
Domingo Herraiz
Washington, DC
Earl Hightower
Studio City, CA
Mary Kay Hudson
Indianapolis, IN
Mack Jenkins
San Diego, CA
Hon. R. Eagleye Johnny
Nixon, NV
Judi Marie Kosterman, PhD
Reno, NV
Chief Russell B. Laine
Algonquin, IL
Hon. Leonia J. Lloyd
Detroit, MI
Hon. Stephen Manley
San Jose, CA
Connie Payne
Frankfort, KY
Hon. Louis Presenza (Emeritus)
Philadelphia, PA
Hon. Robert Rancourt (Emeritus)
Center City, MN
Hon. Ruben Reyes
Lubbock, TX
Lynn Richardson
Dallas, TX
Charles R. Robinson
Austin, TX
Hon. Robert Russell (Emeritus)
Buffalo, NY
Hon. J. Wesley Saint Clair
Seattle, WA
Hon. John R. Schwartz (Emeritus)
Rochester, NY
Hon. Chuck Simmons
Greenville, SC
Hon. Keith Starrett (Chair)
Hattiesburg, MS
NADCP Board of Directors
The NADCP Board of Directors works tirelessly on behalf of the Drug Court fi eld.
These individuals give generously of their time, energy, and expertise throughout
the year to ensure we move towards our goal of putting a Drug Court within
reach of every American in need. Please take the opportunity to thank your Board
members for their dedication!
6NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Discipline Specifi c Breakouts
Want to know what sessions you should attend? Have questions about the conference agenda? Need to discuss
burning issues impacting your program? This year’s discipline-specifi c sessions are for you!!
This year’s conference includes opportunities for disciplines to meet and resolve burning issues and critical
questions. Starting on Monday morning at 7:30 am, enjoy continental breakfast in the Drug Court Expo
located at Prince George’s Exhibition Hall E and report to the breakout designated for your discipline.
An expert practitioner who shares your role on the team will facilitate the breakout. The facilitator will review
the conference program, identify sessions specifi cally designed for your role on the team, and lead discussion
to address your burning issues.
Then, on Thursday, July 30, from 7:15 - 8:15 am, the discipline-specifi c groups will reconvene to further triage
burning issues, and your facilitator will continue to suggest additional resources, so you can make the most
from your conference experience!
Plus, by attending the discipline breakouts, you will have the opportunity to meet other conference attendees
who share your role in the Drug Court or other Problem-Solving Court!
Monday, July 27
7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Speaker(s) Room
DSB-1 Treatment ProvidersAdults Terrence Walton National Harbor 10
DSB-2 Administrators/Coordinators Joseph Madonia / Michael Princevalli Maryland A
DSB-3 Judges/Adult and Federal Hon. Peggy Davis Maryland D
DSB-4 Treatment Providers - Juvenile Steve Hanson Maryland B
DSB-5 Child Protection Services Russ Bermejo National Harbor 6-7
DSB-6 Judges/Juvenile Courts Hon. Alan Blankenship Chesapeake 4-6
DSB-7 Law Enforcement Vanessa Price Maryland 1-3
DSB-8 Judges – Family Drug Courts Hon. J. Stanley Carmical National Harbor 11
DSB-9 Prosecutors Stephen Ward National Harbor 3
DSB-10 Defense Attorneys Jim Egar Chesapeake ABC
DSB-11 Community Supervision/Probation
Services – Adult Courts
Karen Barnes National Harbor 12
DSB-12 Mental Health Court Emily Harris / Eric Olson Maryland 4-6
DSB-13 Researchers and Evaluators Anne Dannerbeck Janku Chesapeake GHI
DSB-14 Community Supervision/Probation
Services – Juvenile Courts
Marty Yust Maryland C
DSB-15 Non-Judicial Federal Reentry Court Charles R. Robinson National Harbor 13
DSB-16 DWI Court Hon. Michael Kavanaugh National Harbor 2
DSB-17 Tribal Mark Panasiewicz National Harbor 4
DSB-18 Tribal Judges Hon. Joseph Flies-Away National Harbor 5
7
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
Thursday, July 30
7:15 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.
Speaker(s) Room
DSB-1 Treatment ProvidersAdults Terrence Walton National Harbor 10
DSB-2 Administrators/Coordinators Joseph Madonia / Michael Princevalli Maryland A
DSB-3 Judges/Adult and Federal Hon. Peggy Davis Maryland D
DSB-4 Treatment Providers - Juvenile Steve Hanson Maryland B
DSB-5 Child Protection Services Russ Bermejo National Harbor 6-7
DSB-6 Judges/Juvenile Courts Hon. Alan Blankenship Chesapeake 4-6
DSB-7 Law Enforcement Vanessa Price Maryland 1-3
DSB-8 Judges – Family Drug Courts Hon. J. Stanley Carmical National Harbor 11
DSB-9 Prosecutors Stephen Ward National Harbor 3
DSB-10 Defense Attorneys Jim Egar Chesapeake AB
DSB-11 Community Supervision/Probation
Services - Adult Courts
Karen Barnes National Harbor 12
DSB-12 Mental Health Court Emily Harris Maryland 4-6
DSB-13 Researchers and Evaluators Anne Dannerbeck Janku Chesapeake HI
DSB-14 Community Supervision/Probation
Services – Juvenile Courts
Marty Yust Maryland C
DSB-15 Non-Judicial Federal Reentry Court Charles R. Robinson National Harbor 13
DSB-16 DWI Court Hon. Michael Kavanaugh National Harbor 2
DSB-17 Tribal Mark Panasiewicz National Harbor 4
DSB-18 Tribal Judges Hon. Joseph Flies-Away National Harbor 5
NADCP and Justice For Vets Mobile App
Introducing the new NADCP and Justice For Vets mobile app, available to help you
navigate through the NADCP 21st Annual Training Conference, Vet Court Con, and
Capitol Hill Day. Use this excellent app to keep track of schedules, locate meetings,
connect with your fellow attendees, provide session feedback, and much more.
The app contains numerous features to help you navigate the NADCP
21st Annual Training Conference and Vet Court Con with ease including:
Full schedule of events with customizable to do list.
Session descriptions, exhibitor information, and speaker bios.
Attendee networking and social media integration.
Real time updates on conference events.
Search for NADCP or Vet Court Con on the App Store or Google Play or scan
the QR Code to download the app and enhance your conference experience.
N
I
n
8NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
2002 Judge Judy Lambert; Frankfort, KY
Henry Pirowski; Buffalo, NY
Marilyn Roberts; Washington, DC
Judge Jeffrey Tauber; Berkeley, CA
2003 Judge Melanie G. May; West Palm Beach, FL
Judge Stephen Manley; Santa Clara, CA
Judge Robert P. Ziemian; South Boston, MA
2004 Judge Mary Noble; Lexington, KY
Judge Robert T. Russell; Buffalo, NY
2005 Caroline Cooper; Washington, DC
Judge Lou Presenza; Philadelphia, PA
2006 Judge Karen Freeman-Wilson (ret.); Gary, IN
Tim Smith; San Diego, CA
2007 Judge William G. Schma; Kalamazoo, MI
Judge John Schwartz; Rochester, NY
2008 Judge Darrell W. Stevens (posthumous);
Chico, CA
Ann Wilson; Jefferson City, MO
2009 Chief Justice Daniel T. Eismann; Boise, ID
Judge Charles ‘Chuck’ Simmons;
Greenville, SC
2010 Rose Ewing; Tulsa, OK
2011 Judge John E. Girardeau; Hall County, GA
Chief Justice William Ray Price;
Jefferson City, MO
Earl Hightower; Studio City, CA
2012 Judge Joanne Smith; Ramsey County, MN
2013 Helen Harberts; Chico, CA
Judge Robert Rancourt; Center County, MN
2014 Judge Jeffrey Ford; Champaign County, IL
Stanley M. Goldstein Drug Court Hall of Fame
Joe Brann; Washington, DC
Bennett H. Brummer; Miami, FL
Judge John Creuzot; Dallas, TX
Lolita Curtis; Alexandria, VA
Michael Smith, M.D.; Bronx, NY
Katherine Fernandez-Rundle; Miami, FL
Judge Robert Fogan; Fort Lauderdale, FL
Luceille Fleming; Columbus, OH
Edward T. Foote; Miami, FL
Ron George; Sacramento, CA
Judge Michael Getty; Chicago, IL
Judge Stanley Goldstein; Miami, FL
Judge Harl Haas; Portland, OR
Chief Justice Major B. Harding; Tallahassee, FL
Judge Peggy Fulton Hora (ret.); Castro Valley, CA
Judge William Hunter; Franklin, LA
Michael Judge; Los Angeles, CA
Fran Jursco; San Francisco, CA
Judge Herbert M. Klein; Miami, FL
Judge Jack Lehman; Las Vegas, NV
Barry Mahoney, Ph.D.; Denver, CO
General Barry McCaffrey; Washington, DC
Claire McCaskill; Kansas City, MO
Israel Milton; Miami, FL
Judge James Milliken; San Diego, CA
Judge Patrick Morris; San Bernardino, CA
Timothy Murray; Washington, DC
Bill Ritter; Denver, CO
Attorney General Janet Reno; Washington, DC
Assistant Attorney General Laurie Robinson;
Washington, DC
Deputy Associate Attorney General
Reggie Robinson; Washington, DC
Frank Tapia; Oakland, CA
Bill Vickery; San Francisco, CA
Janna Walker; Broken Arrow, OK
Andrew Wells; Vienna, Austria
Judge Gerald Wetherington; Miami, FL
The following list of Drug Court practitioners have distinguished themselves over the years through their
innovation and leadership and have been formally inducted into the Stanley M. Goldstein Drug Court Hall
of Fame. This year’s winner will be inducted at Thursday’s closing ceremony.
Previous recipients of distinguished leadership awards from 1995–2001 were grandfathered into the
Drug Court Hall of Fame in 2002:
9
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
State association meetings have been scheduled throughout this
conference. They will be listed in the day’s ancillary activities.
Please check to see if your state’s association has scheduled a
gathering. Do you want to schedule a state association meeting?
A limited number of “Pop-up” rooms and sessions may be
available! Just approach any NADCP/NDCI staff member and
ask them to get you in touch with Jennifer Lubold who will
assign you to a room.
State Associations and Committee Meetings
12 Step Meetings – Fort Washington Boardroom
6:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 12:15 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.
Monday, July 27 AA (Closed) MA CA NA AA (Open)
Tuesday, July 28 AA (Closed) CA NA MA NA
Wednesday, July 29 AA (Closed) MA NA CA NA (Open)
Thursday, July 30 AA (Closed)
Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, and Cocaine Anonymous Meetings
Sunday, July 26
State Drug Court Coordinators
2:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Annapolis 3
Monday July 27
OJJDP Family Drug Court
Program Grantee Gathering
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Baltimore 3
New England Association of Drug Court
Professionals (NEADCP)Annual Meeting
5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Woodrow Wilson Ballroom D
Michigan Association of Drug Court
Professionals Annual Meeting
5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Woodrow Wilson Ballroom B
Wednesday, July 29
OJJDP Statewide System Reform
Awardee Convening
11:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Chesapeake JKL
Council of State Drug Court Associations Meeting
(State Delegates Only)
Monday, July 27
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Chesapeake D
Council of State Drug Court Associations
10 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Sunday, July 26
2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Drug Court Expo Open
Monday, July 27
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
Expo Open w/ continental breakfast
for all attendees
10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Expo Open with lunch concessions
for purchase at 11:45 a.m.
5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Opening Reception
Tuesday, July 28
7:00 a.m. – 7:45 a.m.
Expo Open w/ continental breakfast
for all attendees
7:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Drug Court Expo Open
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Expo Open w/ lunch concessions
for purchase
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Dessert Reception
Wednesday, July 29
7:00 a.m. – 7:45 a.m.
Expo Open w/ continental breakfast
for all attendees
10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Drug Court Expo Open
Drug Court Expo Schedule – Prince Georges Exhibition Hall DE
Join us in the Drug Court Expo for a night of delicious desserts.
This reception gives you a chance to network with the exhibitors
and your peers. You can see cutting edge technology and services
available to Drug Courts around the world. And while you’re there,
we ask you thank our great exhibitors for their support.
Drug Court Expo Dessert Reception!
Tuesday, July 28 from 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
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Drug Court Expo Opening Reception
Monday, July 27 from 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
It’s So Very Presidential:
George and Abe at Drug Court Expo
Your chance to meet Presidents George Washington and
Abe Lincoln is fi nally here. Join us at the Drug Court
Expo and meet two of the famous “Racing Presidents” from
Washington’s Nationals baseball team. This reception gives you
a chance not only to mingle with the presidents but network with
your peers. And you can see the cutting edge technology and
services available to Drug Courts around the world. There will
be plenty of food and beverages. And while you’re there, we
ask you to visit our great exhibitors and thank them for their support.
Hope to see you there.
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their support.
Special Sessions on Tuesday, July 28th
Star Studded Celebration on Wednesday, July 29th
Join thousands of Drug Court Professionals to take the
message that Drug Courts reduce crime and save money
to Capitol Hill. Your voice counts and must be heard!
Tuesday, July 28th Advocacy Track
Don’t miss the Advocacy Track! (Track 21)
Everything you need to take Capitol Hill by storm
and how to bring it back home will be covered.
Highlights include:
Bring Drug Courts to Your State Legislators
Chesapeake JKL from 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
The A, B, C’s of Meeting with Your Members
of Congress
Chesapeake JKL from 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Raise Your Voice – How to Be an Effective
Advocate for Your Drug Court
Chesapeake JKL from 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Taking Your State Association to the Next Level
Chesapeake JKL from 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.
Taking Capitol Hill
By Storm
Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to educate Congress and
ensure Drug Court is within reach of every American in need.
Capitol Hill Day
Kick-Off Celebration
Wednesday, July 29th
Potomac Ballroom
Join Drug Court Professionals from your
state at the Capitol Hill Day Kick-Off!
With the always hilarious Alonzo Bodden
kicking things off, followed by Members of
Congress and other special guests, it is sure
to have everyone ready to storm the Hill to
let Congress know that Drug Courts $ave!
Capitol Hill Day
Headquarters
Located near Potomac Ballroom,
the Capitol Hill Day Headquarters
is your resource for Congressional
meeting information.
Detailed Maps
Talking Points for
Congressional Meetings
NADCP’s Congressional Brief
and MORE!
Bus Schedule
NADCP will provide shuttle bus service from the Gaylord
Woodrow Wilson Loop to Union Station in Washington, DC.
Visit the Capitol Hill Day Headquarters for detailed maps.
9:15 a.m.
Buses Depart to Union Station
10:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Continuous Shuttle Bus service between Gaylord and
Union Station every hour on the hour. Last bus departs
Union Station at 7:00 p.m.
Ensure Your Member of Congress
Supports Drug Courts
Capitol Hill Day, July 29th
Drug Court participants in your state need you to meet
with your Members of Congress!
You are a constituent and your Members of Congress or
their staff will be glad to meet with you. Even if you do
not have a meeting scheduled, stop by their offi ces to say
hello and leave a NADCP Congressional Brief behind.
Not Sure What to Say in the Meeting?
We have made it easy for you.
Follow this easy 5-step plan and you will hit a home run.
1. Brief Introductions
2. Tell Them about your Drug Court Success
3. Provide National Statistics
Drug Courts Save Money
as much as $27 for every $1 invested
Drug Courts Cut Crime
75% of Drug Court graduates remain arrest free
Today, 11,000 veterans who would otherwise be incarcerated
are receiving life-saving treatment in Veterans Treatment Court
4. Urge your Member of Congress to Reach out to the
Appropriation Committee and Support:
$46 million for Drug Courts, Department of Justice
$15.5 million for Veterans Treatment Court,
Department of Justice
$60 million for Drug Treatment Courts,
Department of Health and Human Services
5. Thank Them for Their Support
14 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Featured Guests
Chris Matthews
Host
Hardball with Chris Matthews, MSNBC
Tommy Rieman
Executive Director
The Independence Fund
Denise O’Donnell
Director
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Michael Botticelli
Director
White House Offi ce of National
Drug Control Policy
Travis Howard
Award Winning Country
Singer-Songwriter
Dr. Mark Rosekind (Invited)
Administrator
National Highway
Traffi c Safety Administration
Cady Huffman
Tony Award Winning Actress
Loretta Lynch (Invited)
Attorney General
United States Department of Justice
Pamela Hyde
Administrator
Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration
15
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
MARYLAND D
Wednesday, July 29
7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
The Anonymous People Documentary
Presentation and Discussion
The NADCP 21st Annual Training Conference and Vet Court Con are pleased to host an exclusive
screening of the powerful fi lm that is revolutionizing how addiction recovery is viewed by the
general public, practitioners, and by recovering individuals themselves. The Anonymous People
is a feature documentary fi lm about the 23.5 million Americans living in long-term recovery from
addiction to alcohol and other drugs. Deeply entrenched social stigma and discrimination have
kept recovery voices silent and faces hidden for decades. The moving story of The Anonymous
People is told through the faces and voices of the leaders, volunteers, corporate executives, and
celebrities who are laying it all on the line to save the lives of others just like them. This passionate
new public recovery movement is fueling a changing conversation that aims to transform public
opinion, and fi nally shift problematic policy toward lasting recovery solutions. The screening
will be followed by audience dialogue with a panel of recovery advocates, including some of those
featured in the documentary. And the popcorn is on us!
Moderator
Terrence D. Walton
Chief of Standards
NADCP
Panelists
Tom Coderre
Senior Advisor to the Administrator
Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services Administration
Darrell Harrington
Counselor/Case Manager
Superior Court Drug Intervention Program
Pat Taylor
Community Outreach Coordinator
UNITE to Face Addiction
4TH DIMENSION PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS “THE ANONYMOUS PEOPLE” A GREG WILLIAMS FILM
FEATURING KRISTEN JOHNSTON CHRIS HERREN PATRICK KENNEDY TARA CONNER WILLIAM COPE MOYERS
WILLIAM WHITE LAURIE DHUE EXECUTIVE PRODUCER PAUL MCCULLEY OF THE MORGAN LE FAY DREAMS FOUNDATION
CO-EXECUTIVE PRODUCER JOHN SILVERMAN EDITOR JEFF REILLY DIRECTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY CRAIG MIKHITARIAN
ORIGINAL SCORE BRENDAN BERRY SOUND BUD MIKHITARIAN
THEANONYMOUSPEOPLE.COM
NADCP is the premier national membership, training, and advocacy organization for the Drug Court
model, representing over 27,000 multi-disciplinary justice professionals and community leaders. NADCP
hosts the largest annual training conference on drugs and crime in the world and provides 130 training
and technical assistance events each year through its professional service branches, the National Drug
Court Institute, the National Center for DWI Courts and Justice for Vets: The National Veterans
Treatment Court Clearinghouse. NADCP publishes numerous scholastic and practitioner publications
critical to the growth and fi delity of the Drug Court model and works tirelessly in the media, on Capitol
Hill, and in state legislatures to improve the response of the American justice system to substance abusing
and mentally ill offenders through policy, legislation, and appropriations. Visit AllRise.org.
Professional Service Divisions
The mission of the GCDTC is to reduce substance abuse, crime, and recidivism throughout the world by
promoting and advocating the establishment of Drug Treatment Courts. The GCDTC aims to achieve
these goals through; consulting with governments and NGOs worldwide about the principles of Drug
Treatment Courts and other therapeutic responses to the drug problem; consulting with jurisdictions world-
wide that want to establish Drug Treatment Courts, including startup information and training; informing
Drug Treatment Courts across the world on developments in international drug policy; consistently survey-
ing and reporting international Drug Treatment Court activity; maintaining an international database and
disseminating the latest developments and research to assist international Drug Treatment Courts with their
operations; and facilitating discussion among international Drug Treatment Courts about using the latest
research and practices. Practitioners around the world use GCDTC website to maintain their countrys Drug
Treatment Court history, research, statistics and progress by submitting this information to the worlds only
Drug Treatment Court wiki pages. Visit globaldrugcourts.org.
Justice for Vets believes that no veteran or military service member should suffer from gaps in service, or the
judicial system when they return to their communities. As the stewards of the Veterans Treatment Court
movement, we keep veterans out of jail and connect them to the benefi ts and treatment they have earned;
saving their lives, families, and futures, and saving tax dollars for the American public. Justice For Vets will
ensure that the criminal justice system effectively identifi es, assesses, and responds to all justice-involved
veterans appropriately, and will lead the national effort to establish Veterans Treatment Courts within reach
of every veteran in need. As the national leader, Justice For Vets will aggressively advocate for Veterans
Treatment Courts and mobilize the public to take action to join us in ensuring that no veteran is left
behind. Visit JusticeForVets.org.
NCDC is the only dedicated advocacy, policy, training and technical support organization for DWI Courts in
the nation. Dedicated to delivering research-driven practices to reduce impaired driving recidivism nationwide,
the NCDC is designed to expand DWI Courts nationwide, improve DWI Court operations through training
and technical assistance, and maintain operational standards for DWI Courts. Visit dwicourts.org.
NDCI has emerged as the preeminent source of research-driven training and technical assistance for
Drug Court and Problem Solving Court professionals. Developed in conjunction with leading researchers
and experienced Drug Court practitioners. NDCI seeks to improve Drug Court operations through a
tiered training series. These trainings include the Drug Court Planning Initiative (DCPI) training designed
for local jurisdictional teams planning to implement an Adult, Family, Veterans and/or DWI Drug Court;
Comprehensive Drug Court Practitioner Training for judges, prosecutors, law enforcement, defense
attorneys, probation & parole, treatment providers and other key Drug Court professionals; Advanced
Subject-Matter Training which target topical aspects of Drug Court operation; onsite and Offi ce-Based
Technical Assistance (TA). NDCI supports investigative projects aimed at the development of more
effective Drug Court and Problem Solving Court policies and procedures. NDCI also disseminates
important Drug Court specifi c publications aimed at improving court operations. Visit NDCI.org.
Annual Training
Conference
Setting the
Standard
Conference
At-A-Glance
Conference
At-A-Glance
Continuing Education Online Only
Deadline to submit evaluations: August 21, 2015
Visit www.AllRise.org or the continuing education desk at the Gaylord National
Resort & Convention Center onsite for further instructions.
This Program is approved by the National Association of Social Workers for
19.5 continuing education contact hours.
To receive continuing education credits you must register with YOUR email address.
You will be able to complete your evaluations and get your certifi cate up until August 21, 2015. Continuing
legal education (CLE) and continuing judicial education (CJE) credits will be offered for attorneys and judges
attending the conference. Continuing education units (CEU) will be offered for mental health, social work,
and drug addiction treatment professionals. A link will be sent to the email address you provided when you
registered. This will give you access to the session evaluations, post conference evaluation, and your certifi cate
(#, State, type of certifi cate) in order to get credit. To receive CLE, CJE, or CEU credits, you must register with
YOUR email address. If you don’t have an email address or did not provide one when you registered – see the
onsite continuing education desk or email Ann Wilson at awilson@allrise.org for assistance. Attendees cannot
use another attendee’s email link to access the survey as the certifi cate will be in another person’s name. You must
record each session you attended online in order to receive credit. Pre-approval of hours will still continue as in
years past, and reports will still be made to states requiring reports from the provider. All reports will be based
on the online evaluation and attendance that you complete. In order to receive credits, all evaluations must be
completed in the online system by August 21, 2015. Make sure to visit the continuing education desk during
the conference to obtain State required certifi cates.
NADCP is a NAADAC-approved education provider.
Onsite:
You will receive emails before, during and after the conference with a link to the session and overall
conference evaluations. Emails after the conference will also include a link for the certifi cate of attendance.
Use your e-mail address you registered with to log-in to the automated evaluation system.
If you don’t have an e-mail address, you registered on-site, or you were a substitute for somebody else – see the
continuing education desk for help.
Make sure to complete your session evaluations on-line.
Back home – enter the overall conference evaluation and print your certifi cate.
Continuing education hours will be reported to the respective states, after completion of the session
evaluations, post conference survey, and certifi cate is printed.
Attorneys from the following States need to come to the continuing education desk:
Arkansas California
Kansas Pennsylvania
Judges from the State of Washington will need to pick up a certifi cate from the the continuing education desk
in order to receive credit from the AOC.
Substance Abuse Counselors from the State of Maryland will need to sign-in each day at the continuing
education desk in order to get hours approved.
CEU hours are only pre-approved for substance abuse counselors, some mental health counselors, and
the NASW. CEU hours are NOT pre-approved for probation offi cers, law enforcement offi cers, professional
licensed agencies. These hours will NOT count toward college credit.
19
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SUNDAY JULY 26 REGISTRATION AND DRUG COURT EXPO
TIME EVENT ROOM
2:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. State Drug Court Coordinators Meeting (State Coordinators Only) Annapolis 3
2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Drug Court Expo Opens Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
2:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Registration Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
MONDAY JULY 27 DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC BREAKOUTS, SKILLS BUILDING WORKSHOPS
AND DRUG COURT EXPO OPENING RECEPTION
TIME EVENT ROOM
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m. Come to Your Senses (Facilitated Meditation) Chesapeake JKL
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Drug Court Expo Opens with a Continental Breakfast Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Registration Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. Discipline Specifi c Breakouts See Page 6
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Skills Building Workshops
SB-1 Changing Behavior With 24/7 Alcohol Monitoring: NHTSA’s Newest
Study on SCRAM Use, Recidivism Rates, and Characteristics Chesapeake ABC
SB-2 Data, Evaluation, and Fidelity to the Model: Best Practices Chesapeake GHI
SB-3 Drug Courts in Rural Areas—
Our Strengths and Special Challenges Chesapeake 4-6
SB-4 DWI Court Forum National Harbor 2
SB-5 Family Drug Court: Best Practices National Harbor 10
SB-6 Target Population: Best Practices Maryland A
SB-8 Supervision Maryland 1-3
SB-9 Heroin Resurgence and Prescription Opiates:
Critical Issues in Diagnosis and Treatment Maryland B
SB-10 Everything You Always Wanted to Know about PTSD,
Substance Abuse, and Co-Morbid Disorders:
An Expert Answers Your Questions Maryland C
SB-11 Legal Issues in Adult Drug Courts: Best Practices Maryland D
SB-12 A Team Member’s Guide to Effective Drug Court Treatment:
The Results are In! National Harbor 5
SB-13 The Critical Role of the Team: Best Practices National Harbor 3
SB-14 Judicial Role and Ethics: Best Practices National Harbor 11
SB-15 Grant Information From a Panel of Federal Experts National Harbor 6-7
SB-16 Seeking Safety National Harbor 4
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Drug Court Expo Opens
(Concessions for purchase available in Drug Court Expo) Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
Conference At-A-Glance
20 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
MONDAY JULY 27 (continued)
TIME EVENT ROOM
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Council of State Drug Court Associations Meeting (State Delegates only) Chesapeake D
1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Membership Meeting National Harbor 12
2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Skills Building Workshops
SB-17 Building the Right Team to Support Implementation of VIVITROL®
(naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension) Chesapeake ABC
SB-18 Drug Testing: Best Practices Maryland A
SB-19 Effective Strategies in Juvenile Drug Court Chesapeake GHI
SB-20 DWI Court Forum National Harbor 2
SB-21 Incentives & Sanctions: Best Practices
(Joint NADCP and Vet Court Con Session) Potomac Ballroom
SB-22 Other Problem-Solving Courts:
Engaging the Community and Helping Victims Chesapeake 4-6
SB-23 Case Planning and Recovery Support for Mental Health
and Family Drug Courts National Harbor 11
SB-24 Tribal Nations Forum National Harbor 5
SB-25 Reentry Court on Steroids National Harbor 3
SB-26 Dos and Don’ts of Becoming a DC Coordinator:
Avoiding Pitfalls (Drug Court Coordinator Forum) Maryland C
SB-27 Health Care Reform: Understanding and Navigating the Affordable Care Act Maryland B
SB-28 Historically Disadvantaged Groups National Harbor 6-7
SB-29 HEAT National Harbor 10
SB-30 The Dangers of Spice and the Science Behind It National Harbor 4
SB-31 Using Technology in Problem-Solving Courts:
Strategies for Tuning In and Turning On Maryland 4-6
SB-32 Ancillary Services: Best Practices Maryland D
SB-33 Gender Matters: Creating Trauma Services for Women and Men Maryland 1-3
5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Drug Court Expo Opening Reception Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
For Attorneys and Judges!!
The NADCP 21st Annual Training Conference
includes an unprecedented number of legal sessions.
Sessions include topics on Ethics, Immigration, Due
Process, Representing the Mentally Ill, Prosecutor’s
Role in Drug Court, Defense Attorney’s Role in Drug
Court, Federal Confi dentiality Laws, and much
more! With two tracks devoted to legal sessions,
along with several Skills Building Sessions and
Concurrent General Sessions, this year’s conference
is an even greater tool for the lawyer or judge
working in a Problem-Solving Court.
Please check with the Continuing Education booth
in the Gaylord National Resort & Convention
Center to get more information on possible CLE
credit for your attendance.
Thanks for all your hard work in the
Drug Court fi eld!
21
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
TUESDAY JULY 28 OPENING CEREMONY AND CONCURRENT WORKSHOP SESSIONS
A, B, C, D AND E
TIME EVENT ROOM
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m. Come to Your Senses (Facilitated Meditation) Chesapeake JKL
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Drug Court Expo Opens with a Continental Breakfast Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
7:00 a.m. –5:30 p.m. Registration (Closed During Opening Ceremony) Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Opening Ceremony Potomac Ballroom
10:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Concurrent Workshops Session A
A-1 A Team in Action Maryland D
A-2 A Look Inside The Nations Family Drug Courts National Harbor 11
A-3 Seven Habits of Highly Effective Practices When Addressing
Adolescent Drug Abuse in Juvenile Drug Courts National Harbor 13
A-4 Mental Health Courts A-Z National Harbor 12
A-5 From Compliance to Alliance: Using Recovery and Procedural Justice
Principles to Improve Outcomes in Co-Occurring Disorder Cases Chesapeake GHI
A-6 Race, Culture, Bias, Treatment, and the Courts:
Cultural Competency 101 Chesapeake ABC
A-7 Evaluation Challenges and Solutions in Family Drug Courts Maryland 4-6
A-8 Cocaine Maryland A
A-9 Critical Role of Risk/Need in Building Incentives and Sanctions Maryland C
A-10 Search and Seizure and the Role of a Probation Offi cer National Harbor 10
A-11 Trauma Informed Judicial Decision Making Chesapeake 7-9
A-12 HEAT Update National Harbor 3
A-13 Gender Responsive Strategies and Trauma Informed Care
in Community Treatment National Harbor 4
A-14 What Does My Drug Test Result Really Tell Me? National Harbor 6-7
A-15 Technology in YOUR Court: Learn How Web Based Case Management
Can Support Performance Benchmarks and Best Practices Chesapeake 4-6
A-16 The 10 Guiding Principles of DWI Courts Chesapeake 10-12
A-17 Keeping Kids Safely at Home:
A Discussion on Legal Issues in an In-Home FDC Model Maryland 1-3
A-18 The New ASAM Criteria:
Implications for Drug Courts and Treatment Providers National Harbor 2
A-19 Working Effectively with Native Participants National Harbor 5
A-20 Five Ways to Wreck Your Career: Ethics for Treatment Providers Maryland B
A-21 Building Bridges between Drug Treatment
Courts and the Addiction Recovery Community Chesapeake JKL
A-22 Matrix Model for Criminal Justice Settings Chesapeake DE
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Concessions for Purchase in Drug Court Expo Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
22 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
TUESDAY JULY 28 (continued)
TIME EVENT ROOM
12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. Concurrent Workshops Session B
B-1 Ten Key Components and the Research Maryland D
B-2 Collaborative Approaches to Drug Endangered Children National Harbor 11
B-3 Assessing Fidelity to a Logic Model:
The National Cross-Site Evaluation of JDC/RF Experience National Harbor 13
B-4 Solving the “Rubik’s Cube” of Mental Health Courts:
Effective Strategies for Establishing Statewide Standards National Harbor 12
B-5 Co-Occurring Disorders in Mental Health Courts Chesapeake GHI
B-6 What Your Mama Didn’t Teach You (For Men Only) Chesapeake ABC
B-7 The Pathway to Minnesota’s Drug Court Expansion:
Using Statewide Research as Leverage for Expansion Maryland 4-6
B-8 Alcohol Maryland A
B-9 Fundamentals of Incentives and Sanctions in Adult Drug Court Maryland C
B-10 The Smoking Gun: The Role of Law Enforcement and
Ethical Issues in a Drug Court Setting National Harbor 10
B-11 Cultural Profi ciency with Latinos in Drug Court Practice Chesapeake 7-9
B-12 From the Needle to the Pen: Telling it Like it is!
Addicted to Drugs or Addicted to the Lifestyle National Harbor 3
B-13 Implementing Trauma-Informed Care Principles into Your Program National Harbor 4
B-14 Target 25: Pennsylvania’s Nationally Recognized
DUI Reduction Initiative National Harbor 6-7
B-15 Alcohol Monitoring and Testing Technologies:
A Primer for New Programs, a Refresher on Policies Chesapeake 4-6
B-16 The Computerized Assessment and Referral System (CARS) -
Identifying Mental Health Disorders Among DUI Offenders Chesapeake 10-12
B-17 Indian Country Legal Implications Maryland 1-3
B-18 Unique Aspects of Behavioral Healthcare in Drug Treatment Courts National Harbor 2
B-19 Tribal Youth Wellness: Responses to Underage Drinking
Among Native Youth National Harbor 5
B-20 The Zealous Advocate Maryland B
B-21 Bring Drug Court to Your State Legislators Chesapeake JKL
B-22 Is “Fair Treatment” an Evidence-Based Practice?
How to Measure the Presence and Effects of Procedural Justice Chesapeake DE
Drug Courts perform their duties without manifestation, by word or conduct, of bias
or prejudice, including, but not limited to, bias or prejudice based upon race, gender,
national origin, disability, age, sexual orientation, language or socioeconomic status.
23
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. Concurrent Workshops Session C
C-1 Target Population Maryland D
C-2 Comprehensive Services:
Lessons from the Prevention and Family Recovery Project National Harbor 11
C-3 Using a Gated Assessment Process to Connect the Right Kid
to the Right Intervention National Harbor 13
C-4 A Dozen Years, Two Dozen Courts:
Lessons from New York’s Mental Health Courts National Harbor 12
C-5 Enhancing the Continuum of Care and Expanding the Service
Population via Assertive Community Treatment in Rural Drug Courts Chesapeake GHI
C-6 Real Men Wear Pink (for women only) Chesapeake ABC
C-7 Drug Court Peer Review: Implementation Successes and Lessons Learned Maryland 4-6
C-8 Designer Drugs 101 Maryland A
C-9 Incentives and Sanctions in Juvenile Drug Court Maryland C
C-10 Role of Probation in the Drug Court: Best Practices National Harbor 10
C-11 Immigration Consequences of Criminal Conduct:
How Drug Courts Can Help Chesapeake 7-9
C-12 What’s in it for me? Attracting African Americans to Drug Court National Harbor 3
C-13 Vicarious Trauma & Vicarious Posttraumatic Growth
Among Service Providers In Problem-Solving Courts National Harbor 4
C-14 Making Evidence-Based Decisions:
Using Technology to Assess People, Cases, and Outcomes National Harbor 6-7
C-15 Improve Outcomes by Integrating On-site Drug Testing:
A Collaborative Approach Chesapeake 4-6
C-16 Research Says......... Best Practices in Assessment, Management
and Treatment of Impaired Drivers Chesapeake 10-12
C-17 Felony Deferred Prosecution: A Court Monitored Alternative
to Traditional Prosecution for Low Risk/Low Need Offenders Maryland 1-3
C-18 The Urgency of Hepatitis C in Drug Treatment National Harbor 2
C-19 Honoring our Children by Honoring our Traditions National Harbor 5
C-20 Guess What? You’re a Family Court, Too (if your Clients have
Children)—Legal Issues and Practical Considerations When
Working with Families in Drug Courts Maryland B
C-21 The A, B, Cs of Meeting with Your Members of Congress Chesapeake JKL
C-22 Alcoholics Anonymous:
How We Cooperate With Courts and the Legal Community Chesapeake DE
3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. Concurrent Workshops Session D
D-1 The Brain on Drugs Maryland D
D-2 Effective Strategies to Support Families Through Reunifi cation National Harbor 11
D-3 Engaging Family and Community in Juvenile Drug Court
and Implications for Policy National Harbor 13
D-4 How to Successfully Integrate Drug Court Evidence-Based Practices
into Your Mental Health Court National Harbor 12
D-5 What Juvenile Drug Courts Need to Know About Providing
Effective Treatment for Youth with Co-Occurring Disorders Chesapeake GHI
D-6 Are You Connected? Collaborating in Communities
of Color to Meet the Diverse Needs of Clients Chesapeake ABC
24 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
TUESDAY JULY 28 (continued)
TIME EVENT ROOM
D-7 Applying Quality Improvement Principles to Juvenile Drug Courts Maryland 4-6
D-8 Marijuana Maryland A
D-9 Incentives and Sanctions in Family Drug Court Maryland C
D-10 CBT for LEO (Part 1) National Harbor 10
D-11 Homophobia and Transphobia with Hispanic LGBTQ Participants Chesapeake 7-9
D-12 From Boyz to Men: Saving Our Young African
American Males from the Streets and from Themselves National Harbor 3
D-13 Creating a Trauma Informed Juvenile Drug Court National Harbor 4
D-14 Stone County, Missouri: 5 years of Implementing VIVITROL®
(naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension)
in their Specialty Courts National Harbor 6-7
D-15 The Ultimate Chain of Custody Machine Chesapeake 4-6
D-16 DWI Court Research and Best Practices: What’s the Latest Evidence? Chesapeake 10-12
D-17 Immigration Consequences of Criminal Conduct:
How Drug Courts Can Help Maryland 1-3
D-18 Improving Drug Court Outcomes for Young Adult Offenders National Harbor 2
D-19 Enablement Prevention Program National Harbor 5
D-20 The Proactive Prosecutor Maryland B
D-21 Raise Your Voice: How to be an Effective Advocate for your Drug Court Chesapeake JKL
D-22 Innovative Use of Recovery Coaching to Improve Community
Re-Integration for Drug Court Participants Chesapeake DE
5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m. Concurrent Workshops Session E
E-1 Data, Evaluation and Outcomes: What You Should Collect and Why Maryland D
E-2 Is your FDC Built to Last?
The Importance of Real Sustainability Planning National Harbor 11
E-3 Mentoring in Juvenile Treatment Drug Courts:
Strategies and Tips from OnSite TA and Focus Group Report National Harbor 13
E-4 Diffi cult Issues Faced by Mental Health Court National Harbor 12
E-5 Trauma Symptom Inventory for Treatment Planning among Drug
Court Participants with Co-Occurring Mental Health Disorders Chesapeake GHI
E-6 Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Intersex (GLBTI):
Does it Really Matter in Treatment Courts? Chesapeake ABC
E-7 Programmatic Factors Related to Outcomes in Juvenile Outpatient
Treatment: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Juvenile Drug Courts Maryland 4-6
E-8 Methamphetamine Maryland A
E-9 Behavior Modifi cation and The Seriously Mentally Ill
or Functionally Impaired: Special Issues to Consider Maryland C
E-10 CBT For Probation Offi cers (Part 2) National Harbor 10
E-11 Serving the Needs of Latino Population in a FDC Chesapeake 7-9
E-12 African Americans and Mental Health National Harbor 3
E-13 Addiction, Personality Disorders, and Trauma National Harbor 4
E-16 Judicial Leadership and Strong Treatment Voice and Response Chesapeake 10-12
25
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
E-17 Search and Seizure: Overview of the Law Maryland 1-3
E-18 The Importance of Universal Precautions: Effects of Trauma
and Health Literacy on Health Outcomes in Drug Court National Harbor 2
E-19 Juvenile and Family Healing to Wellness Courts National Harbor 5
E-20 Identifying Federal Firearm Prohibitions in Drug Courts Maryland B
E-21 Taking Your State Association to the Next Level Chesapeake JKL
E-22 Building Effective Interventions for Young Adults in Adult Drug Courts Chesapeake DE
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Drug Court Expo with a Dessert Reception Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
WEDNESDAY JULY 29 CAPITOL HILL DAY, CONCURRENT GENERAL SESSIONS,
AND DOCUMENTARY SCREENING
TIME EVENT ROOM
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m. Come to Your Senses (Facilitated Meditation) Chesapeake JKL
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Drug Court Expo Opens with a Continental Breakfast Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Registration Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
(at 2:00 p.m. registration moves to convention center pre-funtion)
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Capitol Hill Day Kick Off Potomac Ballroom
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. SAMHSA Treatment Drug Court Grantee Meeting Maryland B
9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Concurrent General Sessions
CG-1 Matching Service to Need:
Exploring What “High Risk/High Need” Means for FDCs National Harbor 11
CG-2 Revisiting Phases: Risk Matters National Harbor 12-13
CG-3 Impacts on Health Care Reform for Offender Populations:
What Works to Enhance Collaboration National Harbor 2-3
CG-4 Ethics for Judges National Harbor 4-5
CG-5 Confi dentiality National Harbor 10
CG-6 Designer Drugs: What Drug Court Practitioners Need to Know Maryland C
CG-7 Prescription Drug Abuse Screening and Treatment, and Dealing
with Chronic Pain without use of Narcotics: A Judge’s Guide Maryland A
CG-8 Are All Drug Courts Collecting Reliable and Valid Data to
Examine Potential Racial or Ethnic Disparities in Their Programs? Maryland D
10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Drug Court Expo Opens Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
Badges
Badges are mandatory for all NADCP events and sessions; however, while exploring
the Washington, DC area, please exercise caution and remove your badge.
26 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
WEDNESDAY JULY 29 (continued)
TIME EVENT ROOM
11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Concurrent General Sessions
CG-9 Collaborative Justice in All Treatment Courts:
The PD and the Prosecutor: An Unlikely Couple Chesapeake 10-12
CG-10 Crossover Youth: The Power of Treatment Courts
to Impact the School to Prison Pipeline National Harbor 10
CG-11 Criminal Justice Reform and Drug Courts National Harbor 4-5
CG-12 Dilute Urine Samples:
Courts Response to Low Creatinine Specimens Maryland C
CG-13 Role of Law Enforcement in Drug Court National Harbor 2-3
CG-14 The New ASAM Criteria: Implications for Drug Courts Maryland D
CG-15 Medically Assisted Treatment Maryland A
CG-16 Legal Eagle National Harbor 11
12:15 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Lunch on Your Own
2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. Concurrent General Sessions
CG-17 Matching Service to Need:
Exploring What “High Risk/High Need” Means for FDCs National Harbor 11
CG-18 Revisiting Phases: Risk Matters National Harbor 12-13
CG-19 Impacts on Health Care Reform for Offender Populations:
What Works to Enhance Collaboration National Harbor 2-3
CG-20 Ethics for Judges National Harbor 4-5
CG-21 Confi dentiality National Harbor 10
CG-22 Designer Drugs: What Drug Court Practitioners Need to Know Maryland C
CG-23 Prescription Drug Abuse Screening and Treatment, and Dealing
with Chronic Pain without use of Narcotics: A Judge’s Guide Maryland D
CG-24 Are All Drug Courts Collecting Reliable and Valid Data to Examine
Potential Racial or Ethnic Disparities in Their Programs? Maryland A
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m Superior Court Drug Intervention Program---All Rise! Mock Drug Court Session Maryland 1-3
3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. Concurrent General Sessions
CG-25 Collaborative Justice in All Treatment Courts:
The PD and the Prosecutor: An Unlikely Couple Chesapeake 10-12
CG-26 Crossover Youth: The Power of Treatment Courts
to Impact the School to Prison Pipeline National Harbor 10
CG-27 Criminal Justice Reform and Drug Courts National Harbor 4-5
CG-28 Dilute Urine Samples:
Courts Response to Low Creatinine Specimens Maryland C
CG-29 Role of Law Enforcement in Drug Court National Harbor 2-3
CG-30 The New ASAM Criteria: Implications for Drug Courts Maryland A
CG-31 Medically Assisted Treatment Maryland D
CG-32 Legal Eagle National Harbor 11
6:30 p.m.- 11:30 p.m. Washington DC Night Tour Buses depart from Woodrow Wilson Bus Loop
7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. The Anonymous People Documentary Presentation and Discussion Maryland D
27
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
THURSDAY JULY 30 DISCIPLINE SPECIFIC BREAKOUTS, GENERAL SESSION,
AND CLOSING CEREMONY
TIME EVENT ROOM
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m. Come to Your Senses (Facilitated Meditation) Chesapeake JKL
7:00 a.m. – 7:45 a.m. New Member/First Time Attendee Breakfast Potomac Ballroom 1-3
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast Convention Center Pre-Function
7:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Registration Convention Center Pre-Function
7:15 a.m. – 8:15 a.m. Discipline Specifi c Breakouts See Page 6
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. General Session: Adult Drug Court Best Practice Standards
(the room will be cleared in between sessions) Potomac Ballroom
10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. NADCP/Vet Court Con Closing Ceremony Potomac Ballroom
Session Handouts and speaker biographies
Go to allrise.org to access handouts, speaker biographies, and more!
Tour Washington, DC at Night!
Wednesday, July 29
For more information visit the OnBoard tours desk at registration or go to
http://washingtondctours.onboardtours.com/nadcp/
to purchase your ticket
28 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
TRACK 4
Mental Health Courts: From Implementation
to Operation
Almost half of all addicted persons in the justice
system have a co-occurring mental illness, and over 70
percent of incarcerated mentally ill persons wrestle with
addiction. This track highlights the fundamental issues
needed to understand and develop a Mental Health
Court. Whether you work in a Mental Health Court, or
your Drug Court serves participants with mental illness,
this track has information you need. Come learn what
works in treatment, supervision, and case management
for the mentally ill participants in your program.
TRACK 1
Ready, Set, Go! Fundamentals of Implementing
Your Drug Court
Implementing an Adult Drug Court takes the initiative
and cooperation of a diverse group of players. Public
health and public safety partners define goals and
objectives, identify resources, and strategize on sustain-
ability. This track will address the considerations and
partnerships that must be made in the early stages of
planning and implementing an Adult Drug Court . This
track also provides the scientific principles and best
practices to ensure that any Drug Court is built on a
solid foundation to ensure success and sustainability.
TRACK 2
Raising the Bar: Taking Family Dependency
Treatment Courts to the Next Level
Family Drug Courts are built on a foundation of shared
mission and vision, supported by client services
and agency collaboration, and achieved by shared
outcomes. This track will address both scale and scope
issues and the systems changes that are necessary to
optimize the outcomes of existing FDCs and create
effective new FDCs. Topics will be relevant for profes-
sionals who are working both inside and outside of
FDC programs, for anyone who is seeking to better
engage and serve children and families, including those
in the child welfare system.
TRACK 3
Juvenile Drug Courts: Building on Our Success
Juvenile Drug Courts are a critical part of every juvenile
justice system. They provide a unique partnership
focused on the future of our communities. What is the
best way to engage juveniles and their families? What is
considered developmentally appropriate, gender-specific,
culturally relevant, and evidence-based treatment? What
roles do schools and the faith community play? Whether
you are considering developing a Juvenile Drug Court, or
your Juvenile Drug Court is in operation, this track is for
you. Learn from national researchers as well as subject
matter experts about the latest research and effective
approaches to dealing with adolescent populations.
Training Track Descriptions
29
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
learn how to improve your program measurement and
outcomes, while also learning what recent evaluations
say about program success.
TRACK 8
Keeping Ahead of the Curve: Drugs of Choice
Drug Court participants are very sophisticated
consumers of their drug of choice. They select from
a myriad of drugs whose effects are widely varied.
Although it is critical for treatment providers to
understand the effects of these drugs, all Drug Court
professionals need to be trained in their impact on
supervision, case management, drug testing and
treatment planning. Learn the latest in pharmacology
and research findings to enhance programming and
improve partnerships in your community.
TRACK 9
The Good, The Bad, and The Effective:
Incentives and Sanctions
Incentives and sanctions are essential to every Drug
Court. When properly used, they are a powerful tool
for improving client behavior and outcomes. Drug
Courts achieve better outcomes when practitioners
understand the science behind behavior management.
The research is clear: managing participant behavior
includes the development of graduated and individu-
alized motivational strategies, as well as consequences
to hold participants accountable for failing to meet
programmatic goals. Incentives and sanctions imposed
in the courtroom have an impact not only on the
individual appearing before the judge, but also on the
other Drug Court members present. After attending the
sessions on this track, you will understand the “why”
behind behavior modification, along with “how” to
implement the skills and knowledge.
TRACK 10
Supervision: The Challenges Faced by Probation
and Law Enforcement
Law enforcement, probation, and other community
supervision partnerships are critical to any successful
Drug Court. This track focuses on the importance
of strengthening the role of law enforcement and
community supervision, and assisting probation
officers and law enforcement in better understanding
their role in the Drug Court arena.
TRACK 5
Participants with Co-Occurring Disorders:
Advanced Issues
Hundreds of Problem-Solving Courts have participants
dealing with co-occurring mental illness and addiction.
This track tackles some of the advanced issues for
practitioners serving this population. Whether you’re
looking for the research on outcomes, tips on case
management, or what evidence-based treatment is
available, this track is not to be missed.
TRACK 6
Ensuring Cultural Proficiency:
More Than Just Awareness
Culture is everywhere around us. It is how we dress,
what we choose to eat, and what music we enjoy. It
shapes our past, present, and future. It is essential
to recognize and understand the culture of our Drug
Court participants in order to shape their future. It
follows that we will enhance our effectiveness by
becoming culturally proficient. It is so simple to see,
but so challenging to implement. This track will not
only focus on the ‘seeing,’ but also provide the latest in
practice and research on the implementation.
TRACK 7
The Facts and Nothing But the Facts:
Critical Role of Research
There is no doubt—Drug Court works. This track offers
details into national and statewide evaluations, along
with tips for operating courts on how to incorporate
successful strategies. Fostering partnership with practi-
tioners and researchers is critical toward improving
Drug Court outcomes. Don’t miss the opportunity to
30 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
TRACK 13
Trauma
This track offers evidence-based approaches to
assessment and treatment of trauma, which is critical to
the effective operations of every Drug Court and other
Problem-Solving Court. Hear from national experts and
learn practical tips to enhance your court’s treatment,
case management, and supervision strategies.
TRACK 14 AND 15
Science and Technology
Private enterprise offers many necessary tools for Drug
Court operations. From unique methods assisting with
community supervision to a variety of drug testing
options, from research-proven ways to use medically-
assisted treatment to successful treatment techniques,
our partners in the private sector are a critical asset to
Drug Courts’ success. These sessions apprise practi-
tioners of new developments in science and technology
and provide a perspective on the concerns that every
Drug Court should have in selecting the right tools
of the trade. These tracks provide the practitioner
with a wealth of information in order to become a
wise consumer of products and services intended for
the Drug Court field. (NADCP does not endorse any
product or service.)
TRACK 16
DWI Courts
DWI Courts work. According to the research, DWI
Court saves lives and money and restores participants
to a clean and sober life. DWI Court is based on
the proven Drug Court model, however, DWI Court
participants are different than Drug Court participants,
and understanding those differences is critical for any
DWI Court. If your Drug Court is considering starting
a DWI Court, or you are updating an established
DWI program, then this track is for you. Attendees in
this track will gain an increased understanding of the
principles specific to DWI Court, important issues
in dealing with DWI Court participants, and ways to
modify current operations to include this population.
TRACK 11
Working with the Latino Community
Drug Courts reflect the communities in which they are
located. Addressing the needs of the Latino population
goes well beyond dealing with communication barriers.
Culture, residency status, and employability are among
the many factors that present Drug Court practitioners
an extra challenge when working with these clients.
This track is designed to help practitioners working
with the Latino community meet that challenge.
TRACK 12
African American Clients: Improving Services
and Outcomes
This track is a necessity for problem-solving practitioners
looking to improve outcomes with African American
clients. Experts from around the nation address best
practices, cultural competency, treatment approaches
and more.
31
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
TRACK 20
Legal and Ethical Issues in
Problem-Solving Courts
Problem-Solving Courts present interesting legal issues
and ethical dilemmas. This track asks and answers some
of the most difficult legal and ethical questions facing
the Drug Court team. Whether you are a new Problem-
Solving Court professional, or you’ve been with Drug
Courts for many years, this track includes sessions on
the cutting edge of what every Drug Court and other
Problem-Solving Court practitioner should know.
TRACK 21
Advocacy
From meeting with your Members of Congress to
engaging your State Legislature and developing your
state association, this track will cover ways Drug Court
professionals can ensure Drug Courts remain a public
policy priority. Learn new skills to build relationships
with your states’ key policymakers and develop your
state association from Drug Court professionals who
have paved the way. You are guaranteed a return on
investment when you choose to spend your time
attending these sessions!
TRACK 22
Taking Your Drug Court to the Next Level
Drug Court practitioners have a variety of issues to
consider in addition to providing effective treatment,
case management, and supervision. From budgets to
team transition, from steering committees to contract
management, practitioners at the state and local levels
wrestle with a host of administrative duties, which
can be overwhelming. This track offers insight and
guidance into many of the administrative issues facing
the state and local Drug Court practitioner.
TRACK 17
Legal Issues in and Beyond
Problem-Solving Courts
For attorneys practicing in Problem-Solving Courts,
the legal issues are multi-faceted. The sessions in this
track focus on topics of interest within Problem-Solving
Courts, but also stretch far beyond the Problem-Solving
Court arena. From judicial immunity to statutory
revisions; from issues involving criminal defense to
firearms possession, these sessions are designed to
answer some of the most complex questions for the
attorneys and judges in Problem-Solving Courts.
TRACK 18
Advanced Issues in Drug and Alcohol Treatment
One size definitely does not fit all. As in many things,
this is so true in effective drug and alcohol treatment.
This track identifies a variety of treatment methods,
along with insight into some specific and complex
issues with which many Drug Court clients struggle.
TRACK 19
Learning from Native Traditions:
Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts
Tribal healing to wellness courts are profound expres-
sions of sovereign, self-determining nations. Such courts
have become an important part of a long, often perilous,
and amazing Nation rebuilding process that began for
American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian
communities after centuries of war, oppression, and
resistance. Consequently, the impact of a Tribal Drug
Court is complex and multi-faceted affecting multi-
generational attitudes and perceptions about alcohol and
other drugs, addressing historical trauma and unresolved
grief, acting as a tool to restore tribal values, expanding
tribal justice systems, improving state-tribal and federal-
tribal relationships, and restoring individuals to their
rightful place as contributing members to the tribal
community. Sessions in the tribal track will convey the
complexities and nuances of Tribal Healing/Wellness
Courts and contain useful information for both state and
tribal practitioners.
Monday
Schedule of Events
July 27, 2015
Annual Training
Conference
Setting the
Standard
Monday
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m.
Come to Your Senses (Facilitated Meditation)
Chesapeake JKL
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
Drug Court Expo Opens
with a Continental Breakfast
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Registration
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Discipline Specifi c Breakouts
See Page 6
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Skills Building Workshops
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Drug Court Expo Opens
(Concessions for purchase available in
Drug Court Expo)
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall E
Council of Drug Court Associations Meeting
(State Delegates only)
Chesapeake D
1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Membership Meeting
National Harbor 12
2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Skills Building Workshops
5:30 p.m- 7:30 p.m.
Drug Court Expo Opening Reception
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
Notes
Come to Your Senses Chesapeake JKL
The practice of meditation stills the mind, relaxes the body, and refreshes the spirit. It is
a simple practice that can have a profound and immediate impact on one’s life. Sessions
are open to all levels of experience. Come experience meditation. Space is limited.
Monday, July 27
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m.
Tuesday, July 28
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m.
Wednesday, July 29
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m.
Thursday, July 30
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m.
C
o
m
e
t
o
Y
o
ur
S
e
n
s
e
s
Ch
esa
p
ea
k
e JK
L
The practice of meditation stills the mind, relaxes the body, and refreshes the spirit. It is
a
simple practice that can have a profound and immediate impact on one’s life. Sessions
a
re
op
en to all levels of ex
pe
rience. Come e
xp
erience meditation. Space is limited.
Monday, Ju
ly
27
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m
.
Tuesday, July
28
7:
00
a.m. – 7:
20
a.m
.
W
ednesday, July 29
7
:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m.
T
hursday, July 3
0
7
:
00
a.m. – 7:
20
a.m.
MONDAY
35
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION SB-2
Data, Evaluation, and Fidelity to the Model:
Best Practices
Chesapeake GHI
The research is clear: Drug Court works. But does
your Drug Court work? Is your program collecting
data on participants? What data? Do you have an
evaluation plan? Does your court do process and
outcome evaluations? This session will outline the
best practices in collecting data and evaluating your
Drug Court program and optimizing caseload size,
ensuring that your court is keeping fi delity to the Ten
Key Components. One of the critical issues discussed
will be the importance of maintaining fi delity to the
Drug Court model as your program grows—as research
demonstrates that programs tend to stray from the
model at around 125 participants. A group of national
experts will review the research and give practical
advice on how to build a system to collect data,
evaluate your Drug Court, and ensure program success.
Objectives
Understand the importance of collecting data and
performing evaluations.
How to monitor and maintain fi delity to the model
in a large program.
Learn strategies for implementing or enhancing data
collection and evaluation in your Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Juliette Mackin
Executive VP & Sr. Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
SKILLS BUILDING WORKSHOPS
MORNING SESSIONS
Monday, July 27
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
SESSION SB-1
Changing Behavior With 24/7 Alcohol
Monitoring: NHTSA’s Newest Study on SCRAM
Use, Recidivism Rates, and Characteristics
Chesapeake ABC
In 2010, the National Highway Traffi c Safety
Administration (NHTSA) began a study to look
more in-depth at the impact of SCRAM Continuous
Alcohol Monitoring on DUI offender recidivism. The
study focused on two jurisdictions in Wisconsin and
Nebraska and looked at recidivism two years post-
monitoring. The study results, published in May
2015, showed a direct correlation between SCRAM
monitoring and behavior change, as well as some other
characteristics of repeat DUI offenders.
Objectives
Hear from the study’s authors about their key fi ndings.
Learn how this study supports previous research.
Hear about the use of technology by two states and
what elements similar jurisdictions may adopt.
Learn more about the relationship of technology
and recidivism.
Speaker(s)
Tara Casanova Powell
Director of Research
Traffi c Injury Research Foundation USA
Hamden, Connecticut
Julie Tison
Senior Research Scientist
Pruesser Research Group
Trumbull, Connecticut
MONDAY
36 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Speaker(s)
Hon. Tim Bibaud-Dudley
Judge
District Court
Dudley, Massachusetts
Hon. Alan Blankenship
Judge
Stone County Circuit Court
Stone County, Missouri
Bobby DeBatt
Treatment Provider
Westcare Arizona
Bullhead City, Arizona
Jeffrey Kushner
Statewide Drug Court Administrator
Montana Supreme Court - Offi ce of Court
Administrator
Victor, Montana
Hon. Robert Walker
Judge
Fifth Judicial District, Minnesota
Fairmont, Minnesota
SESSION SB-3
Drug Courts in Rural Areas—Our Strengths and
Special Challenges
Chesapeake 4-6
Operating a Drug Court in a rural area presents
unique challenges, but it also offers opportunities and
strengths not found in urban-suburban areas. This skill
building session will focus on the American University
document entitled “A Technical Assistance Guide for
Drug Court Judges and Team Members on Drug Court
Treatment Services“ and in particular the chapter on
Drug Courts in Rural Areas: Responses to Special
Challenges. This will be a highly interactive session
with both the panelists and the audience commenting
on particular challenges/strengths/solutions found
in rural/frontier Drug Courts across the country. The
audience will be encouraged to participate through the
oor microphone. The expert panel will include panel
members with rural expertise on MAT efforts.
Objectives
Change the focus from rural challenges to
opportunities unique to rural drug courts.
Provide proven strategies to develop and sustain
rural drug courts and required ancillary supports
and services.
Offer an opportunity for discussion between rural
drug court professionals to learn from each other’s
experiences.
MONDAY
37
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
Panelists
Michael Brown
Director
Impaired Driving Division
National Highway Traffi c Safety Administration
Department of Transportation
Washington, DC
11:00 a.m – 12:00 p.m.
DWI Academy Courts; Who are They and
What They Can Do for You
DWI Academy Courts are selected through a peer-
review process administered by NCDC and funded
by NHTSA. Four courts are selected from 4 regions
of the country to serve for three years. NCDC’s 3.5
day implementation trainings are held at each of the
Academy Courts each year, which include a trip to
see the Academy DWI Court in session. Listen to
each judge describe what their programs have to offer,
including mentorship service to your programs.
Moderator
Hon. J. Michael Kavanaugh (Ret.)
Senior Director
NCDC
Alexandria, Virginia
Panelists
Hon. Matt Anderson
Judge
Orange County DUI Court
Newport Beach, California
Hon. Charles Auslander
Judge
Athens/Clarke County, Georgia
Hon. Robert Anchondo
Criminal Court Judge
DWI Drug Court Intervention and Treatment Program
El Paso, Texas
Hon. Kerry Meyer
Judge
Minneapolis, Minnesota
SESSION SB-4
DWI Court Forum
National Harbor 2
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Survey of Services provided by NCDC
Welcome to the world of the National Center for
DWI Courts. This session will provide a detailed
explanation of NCDC, the services we provide
including the various opportunities for training that
exist, the application process, training locations, and
training content. Presenters will also introduce the
latest Bottom Line Publication, Research Update on
DWI Courts.
Introduction
Hon. J. Michael Kavanaugh (Ret.)
Senior Director
NCDC
Alexandria, Virginia
Panelists
James Eberspacher
Project Director
NCDC
Alexandria, Virginia
Cliff Jacobs
Program Manager
NCDC
Alexandria, Virginia
10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
NHTSA Fuels the DWI Court Field and NCDC
The National Highway Traffi c Safety Administration
provides signifi cant resources in support of DWI
Courts and NADCP/NCDC. Come and listen
to experts experts as they describe the agency’s
relationship with us at NCDC, our fi eld, and possibly
you. Are you accessing all of the resources available to
implement and enhance your programs? Don’t miss
this chance to ask questions about funding opportu-
nities and to clarify any misconceptions about the use
of federal funds to support DWI Courts.
Introduction
Hon. J. Michael Kavanaugh (Ret.)
Senior Director
NCDC
Alexandria, Virginia
MONDAY
38 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION SB-6
Target Population: Best Practices
Maryland A
When implementing and operating a successful Drug
Court, one of the fi rst and most critical questions is
Who will the court serve?” The research is clear. Drug
Courts are best designed and most successful when
serving high risk/high need populations, that is, those
participants with high criminogenic risk and high
prognostic need. In fact, every component of your Drug
Court program, from treatment to incentives/sanctions
to case management will be integrally connected with
targeting the appropriate population. But how do you
identify high risk/high need participants? How do you
ensure your program is targeting these individuals?
This presentation will outline the research on high risk/
high need, and will further discuss and explain how to
ensure your program targets the correct population.
Objectives
Understand the research behind serving high risk/
high need populations in Drug Court.
Identify strategies for incorporating risk/need
assessment into your Drug Court operations.
Speaker(s)
Douglas Marlowe
Chief of Science, Law, and Policy
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
Alexandria, Virginia
SESSION SB-5
Family Drug Court: Best Practices
National Harbor 10
In 1997, the Offi ce of Justice Programs of the U.S.
Department of Justice identifi ed 10 key components of
drug courts, providing jurisdictions with a framework
for developing and refi ning their drug courts programs
for criminal offenders with substance use disorders.
NADCP published in 2013 Adult Drug Court best
practice standards that quantify some of the key
components. Most recently, Children and Family
Futures released Family Drug Court Guidelines to
help states and programs create practice and systems
changes that will have a lasting impact on FDCs and
the families they serve. This workshop session will
examine best practice research and relate it to the 10
Key Components and the 10 FDC Guidelines. Through
activities and small group discussion this interactive
presentation will use the FDC Self Assessment Tool to
explore how FDC Guidelines and research based best
practices can be used to enhance both practice-level
and systems-level change.
Objectives
Explore the FDC Guidelines and how they
converge and diverge with 10 Key Adult Drug Court
Components and Adult Drug Court Best Practice
Standards.
Gain understanding on how to use the FDC
Guidelines and best practices to make both practice-
level and systems-level changes.
Learn how states and local jurisdictions can use FDC
Guidelines and best practice standards and strategies
to improve FDC practice.
Speaker(s)
Phil Breitenbucher
FDC TTA Program Director
Children and Family Futures, Inc.
Irvine, California
Shannon Carey
Co-President & Sr. Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
MONDAY
39
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION SB-9
Heroin Resurgence and Prescription Opiates:
Critical Issues in Diagnosis and Treatment
Maryland B
Abuse of prescription opiates is at epidemic propor-
tions-and not coincidentally, heroin use is increasing
rapidly. Emergency rooms and fi rst responders are
reporting ever increasing cases of opiate overdoses.
Part one of this session will review the recent history
and current state of opiate abuse and dependence in
the United States, including the most current infor-
mation on evidence based treatment when dealing with
those addicted to opiates. Part two of this session will
educate practitioners on Naloxone (e.g., Narcan®).
Naloxone is a medication used to counter the effects of
opioid overdose. Although traditionally administered
by fi rst-responders, take-home naloxone programs have
been established in approximately 200 communities
throughout the U.S. Naloxone has no potential for
abuse, it can be dispensed with minimal training via
injection or nose spray; making it the ideal overdose
countermeasure for anyone who is in contact with an
opioid user.
Objectives
Understand the surge in opiate use in the
United States.
Identify evidence based treatment for opioid
dependence.
Learn about Naloxone a tool to prevent overdose
incidents from becoming fatalities.
Speaker(s)
Caleb J. Banta-Green
Senior Research Scientist - Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute
Affi liate Associate Professor - School of Public Health
Affi liate Faculty - Harborview Injury Prevention
& Research Center
University of Washington
Seattle, Washington
Steve Hanson
Director
Division of Treatment and Practice Innovation,
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
Rochester, New York
SESSION SB-8
Supervision
Maryland 1-3
Probation and law enforcement have an indispensable
role in a successful Drug Court. Community super-
vision is critical to ensure participants adhere to the
rules of Drug Court. This session will discuss the
role of law enforcement and probation in providing
robust supervision for your Drug Court participants.
Issues discussed will include, but not be limited to,
home visits, drug tests in the fi eld, bench warrants,
bar sweeps, and the role of the supervision offi cer in
staffi ng and court.
Objectives
Understand the role of the supervision offi cer in
Drug Court.
Identify strategies for successful community
supervision.
Speaker(s)
Helen Harberts
Deputy District Attorney (ret.)
Chico, California
Vanessa Price
Law Enforcement Inspector, Ret.
Chair – Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Charles R. Robinson
Chief Probation Offi cer - Director
Travis County Community Supervision and
Correction Department
Austin, Texas
MONDAY
40 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Speaker(s)
Hon. William Meyer
Judge/Senior Judicial Fellow
Judicial Arbiter Group
Denver, Colorado
SESSION SB-12
A Team Member’s Guide to Effective Drug
Court Treatment: The Results are In!
National Harbor 5
There is a growing body of research that identifi es
best practice for Drug Court participants. Arguably,
treatment is the ground upon which everything else in
Drug Court is built. Accordingly, every team member
is expected to know what treatment services partici-
pants receive and whether those services adhere to
best practices. This presentation will elaborate on
research summarized in the NADCP Adult Drug
Court Best Practice Standards Volume 1~ Substance
Abuse Treatment and the Complementary Treatment
and Social Services Standard found in the newly
released Volume II. It will provide every team member
with a starting point for assessing and improving
the integration of treatment into the overall Drug
Court process. This presentation will reveal how both
the Drug Court team and participants can get the
maximum benefi t from Drug Court treatment.
Objectives
Identify the evidenced based primary and
complementary treatment interventions found
to be effective in high risk/high need drug court
populations
Identify the program practices most associated with
effective Drug Court treatment
Discuss Drug Court treatment research and those
areas where research is lacking
Speaker(s)
Terrence Walton
Chief of Standards
NADCP
Alexandria, Virginia
SESSION SB-10
Everything You Always Wanted to Know
about PTSD, Substance Abuse, and Co-Morbid
Disorders: An Expert Answers Your Questions
Maryland C
One of the problems with going to a conference is that,
no matter how much you learn, only some of your
questions are likely to be answered, and more are likely
to arise. Because many other audience members want
to ask questions, you are likely to have only one or two
of your own answered during the question and answer
period. This session is different: an expert in the fi elds
of adolescent and adult trauma and substance abuse
will devote the entire time to answering your questions
about trauma, PTSD, alcohol and drug abuse, and their
frequent co-occurring problems, including depression,
traumatic brain injuries, insomnia, pain, and school/
work, child welfare, family, and legal problems. Join us
for an informative and entertaining session in which
you can ask and get not only your questions answered,
but also learn some surprising information and tips
spurred by the questions of others.
Speaker(s)
Brian Meyer
Clinical Psychologist
H.H. McGuire VA Medical Center
Richmond, Virginia
SESSION SB-11
Legal Issues in Adult Drug Courts: Best Practices
Maryland D
Drug Courts present a myriad of legal and constitutional
issues, many of which are unique and of fi rst impression
at the appellate level. Adult Drug Court Best Practices
addresses many of these issues. This session will provide
an overview of the Best Practices and further discuss
other legal issues impacting Drug Courts and as yet
unresolved in the appellate courts.
Objectives
Identify the legal Best Practices in Adult Drug Courts.
Understand the major constitutional and legal issues
impacting Drug Courts.
Identify trends in appellate decisions impacting
Drug Courts.
MONDAY
41
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION SB-14
Judicial Role and Ethics: Best Practices
National Harbor 11
The research is clear. The Judge’s role is critical to the
success of a Drug Court. This session will review the
research, including the minimum optimal time for a
Drug Court judge to remain on the bench, the param-
eters of successful status hearings with Drug Court
participants, and the need for training specifi c to the
judicial role. The presentation will also review the
ethical dilemmas often faced by Drug Court judges,
and strategies for building a successful Drug Court.
If you are a new or experienced Drug Court judge,
this session is for you.
Objectives
Identify the best practices for Adult Drug
Court judges.
Learn common ethical issues faced by Drug
Court judges.
Identify strategies for improving Drug Court
outcomes through research.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Peggy Hora
Judge (Ret.)
NDCI Sr. Judicial Fellow
Walnut Creek, California
SESSION SB-13
The Critical Role of the Team: Best Practices
National Harbor 3
The Drug Court team is integral to the program’s
success. In order to build and maintain a successful
team, training, cross-training, and participation is
critical. This session will highlight the research on team
training and its importance in the Drug Court, along
with providing practical strategies for giving the team
ongoing updates and training opportunities locally,
statewide, and on the national level.
Objectives
Learn what the research says about full team
participation and its relationship to program success.
Understand the importance of training to a
Drug Court team.
Identify cost-effective strategies to educate and
train your Drug Court team.
Speaker(s)
Ken Arnold
Senior Director- Court services
River Region Human Services
Jacksonville, Florida
Karen Barnes
Chief Probation Offi cer
DWI Courts
Maricopa County, Arizona
Hon. Christine Carpenter
Circuit Court Judge
13th Judicial Circuit
Columbia, Missouri
Jim Egar
Chief Defender
Monterey County Public Defender
Salinas, California
Mike Loeffl er
Senior Assistant District Attorney
State of Oklahoma
Bristow, Oklahoma
MONDAY
42 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
multiple life challenges. We will cover background
on trauma and substance abuse (including rates, the
typical client, models and stages of treatment, and
clinical dilemmas) and clinical Interventions for trauma
and substance abuse, as well as resources for further
learning. The Seeking Safety model will be highlighted
as it is the most evidence-based model for trauma and
substance abuse.
Objectives:
To review scientifi c literature on rates and
presentation of trauma/substance abuse.
To increase empathy and understanding of trauma/
substance abuse.
To describe Seeking Safety counseling strategies.
To provide assessment and treatment resources.
Speaker(s)
Summer Krause
Licensed Professional Counselor
Certifi ed Alcohol and Drug Counselor III
Western Psychological and Counseling Services
Gladstone, Oregon
SESSION SB-17
Building the Right Team to Support
Implementation of VIVITROL® (naltrexone for
extended-release injectable suspension)
Chesapeake ABC
The implementation of any new aspect to an estab-
lished or new program can be diffi cult. Attendees will
hear from those who have incorporated VIVITROL®
into their programs. Attendees will learn about how
programs have made VIVITROL® available to appro-
priate participants; and how it has been integrated with
the court processes and other support systems.
This promotional program is created and
sponsored by Alkermes, Inc.
Mr. Tom Fuchs is a paid speaker for Alkermes, Inc.
Speaker(s)
Tom Fuchs
CEO
Halcyon Consulting, LLC
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin
SESSION SB-15
Grant Information From a Panel of
Federal Experts
National Harbor 6-7
Are you wondering where your Drug Court can fi nd
resources in these tough economic times? Well, look
no further-this is the skills building session for you.
Come hear from United States Department of Justice
and United States Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Services Administration offi cials as they join
an experienced national Drug Court consultant to
discuss funding opportunities from their agencies.
Objectives
Learn federal funding resources for Drug Courts.
Identify key elements of a successful grant application.
Speaker(s)
Jon Berg
Public Health Advisor
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
Rockville, Maryland
Tim Jeffries
Policy Advisor
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Washington, DC
Kellie Dressler Blue
Associate Administrator
Juvenile Justice System Improvement Division
Offi ce of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Washington, DC
Gwendolyn Williams
State Program Manager
State and Community Development Division
Offi ce of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Prevention (OJJDP)
Offi ce of Justice Programs U.S. Department of Justice
Washington, DC
SESSION SB-16
Seeking Safety
National Harbor 4
The goal of this presentation is to describe current
state-of-the art knowledge about the treatment
of patients with trauma and substance abuse, a
population that is typically considered complex, with
MONDAY
43
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
tampering and the use of creatinine measurements,
the application of EtG/EtS monitoring, the challenges
of on-site testing, dispelling popular drug testing
myths and much more. This skills building session is
intended to encourage new practitioners to know more
about drug testing than their clients
Objectives
Learn the best practices in drug testing to ensure
the success of abstinence monitoring.
Gain knowledge about different specimen types;
their advantages and disadvantages.
Understand how specimen tampering can defeat
your abstinence monitoring efforts.
Speaker(s)
Paul Cary
Director
Toxicology and Drug Monitoring Lab
University of Missouri
Columbia, Missouri
SKILLS BUILDING WORKSHOPS
AFTERNOON SESSIONS
Monday, July 27
2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
SESSION SB-18
Drug Testing: Best Practices
Maryland A
Effective drug testing in Drug Court is essential to the
overall success of the program. This presentation is
designed for new Drug Court team members who want
a comprehensive review designed to provide infor-
mation and strategies for building and maintaining a
successful abstinence monitoring program. Collection
strategies and result interpretation - two essential
components of a credible testing program will be
discussed. Attendees will learn the reasons for testing,
how to select clients for maximum abstinence surveil-
lance, and what specimens yield the best results.
Additional focus issues will include controlling sample
MONDAY
44 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION SB-20
DWI Court Forum
National Harbor 2
2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
At Scene On Call—Unique Approaches to
DWI Supervision and Field Services
This session provides critical information related to
the monitoring and supervision of the offender in the
DWI Court Program. Specifi cally, the presenters will
discuss the importance of having adequate community
supervision in place in order to keep track of partici-
pants, know what is going on in their lives, and hold
them accountable quickly if necessary. Attendees will
recognize the benefi ts of community-based approaches
to public safety for DWI supervision, identify how
early detection and intervention serve as an adjunct
to participant success, and understand the critical role
that fi eld services play in overall program success.
Moderator
Vanessa Price
Law Enforcement Inspector, Ret.
Chair – Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Panelists
Hon. Robert Anchondo
Criminal Court Judge
DWI Academy Court
El Paso County, Texas
Karen Barnes
Chief Probation Offi cer
DWI Courts
Maricopa County, Arizona
Juan Ferrell
El Paso Police Department
DWI Academy Court
El Paso, Texas
Julio Gonzales
El Paso County Sheriff’s Department
DWI Academy Court
El Paso County, Texas
Chief Russell Laine
Chief of Police/NADCP Board Member
Village of Algonquin
Algonquin, Illinois
SESSION SB-19
Effective Strategies in Juvenile Drug Court
Chesapeake GHI
Juvenile Drug Courts are not equally effective. In fact,
certain Juvenile Drug Courts have achieved far greater
success, while others have shown very little success
in outcome studies. But what differentiates successful
Juvenile Drug Courts from unsuccessful ones? Research
has clearly shown that Juvenile Drug Courts which
incorporate specifi c best practices achieve far greater
outcomes. This session will outline the research on
Juvenile Drug Courts, including best practices, along
with practical tips on how to implement those practices
in your court. This session is a must for every Juvenile
Drug Court practitioner.
Objectives
Identify the best practices in a Juvenile Drug Court
as identifi ed in the research.
Identify concrete implementation strategies to
incorporate best practices into your Juvenile
Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Shannon Carey
Co-President & Sr. Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Jacqueline Van Wormer
Associate Professor
Washington State University
Richland, Washington
MONDAY
45
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION SB-21
Incentives & Sanctions: Best Practices
Potomac Ballroom AB
Joint NADCP and Vet Court Con Session
Incentives and sanctions are essential tools of the Drug
Court team. However, many Drug Court teams do not
base their responses on scientifi c strategies. Over the
past years, the National Drug Court Institute (NDCI)
has offered topic-specifi c training programs for Drug
Court teams after the completion of a thorough liter-
ature review of over 100 articles pertaining to shaping
behavior. This session will offer an in-depth analysis
of the ten science-based principles every Drug Court
should consider before responding to client behavior.
Objectives
Identify practical applications of the ten science
based principles in developing a comprehensive
strategy on incentives and sanctions.
Identify successful strategies for using incentives
and sanctions in an Adult Drug Court .
Learn the ten science-based principles of changing
behavior.
Speaker(s)
Douglas Marlowe
Chief of Science, Law, and Policy
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
Alexandria, Virginia
Hon. William Meyer
Judge/Senior Judicial Fellow
Judicial Arbiter Group
Denver, Colorado
Facilitators
Hon. Christine Carpenter
Circuit Court Judge
13th Judicial Circuit
Columbia, Missouri
Kim Kozlowski
Project Director
Syracuse Community Treatment Court
Syracuse, New York
Kim Parsons
Collaborative Court Coordinator
Orange County Veterans Treatment Court
Santa Ana, California
Meghan Wheeler
Senior Consultant
National Drug Court Institute, NDCI
Lexington, Ohio
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Marijuana and Driving
As more states medicalize cannabis it is crucial that
DWI Courts have a clear policy on its use based on the
latest research. In this session you will discover what
we know, and, more importantly, what we don’t know
about the effects of THC on driving.
Moderator
James Eberspacher
Program Director
NCDC
Alexandria, Virginia
Panelists
Hon. Peggy Hora (Ret.)
Judge
Walnut Creek, California
Hon. Mary Celeste (Ret.)
Judge
Denver, Colorado
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Regional DWI Courts
Many states are geographically challenged when it
come to being able to provide the full menu of services
necessary to establish DWI Courts. Sparsely populated
counties often do not have the resources within their
jurisdiction and therefore, are unable to join the family
of DWI Courts. Under the judicial leadership of our
panelists see how Michigan has been able to consol-
idate the efforts and resources of several adjoining
counties to create Regional DWI Courts, or Sobriety
Courts as they are called in Michigan, thus allowing
smaller jurisdictions to provide the life-saving benefi ts
of DWI Courts to their communities.
Moderator
Cliff Jacobs
Program Manager
NCDC
Alexandria, Virginia
Panelists
Hon. Patrick Bowler (Ret.)
Judge
Grand Rapids, Michigan
Hon. Harvey Hoffman
Judge
Charlotte, Michigan
MONDAY
46 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION SB-23
Case Planning and Recovery Support for
Mental Health and Family Drug Courts
National Harbor 11
2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Effective Case Management in a Mental
Health Court
This skills-building session will discuss how to apply
research and best-practices, including the Risk-Needs-
Responsivity principle to build effective case plans.
This session will address how to build case plans
based on screenings and assessments; how to identify
effective programming for meeting specifi c needs; and
how to respond to participant successes and failures.
Case studies will be used to help provide attendees an
opportunity to practice these skills and think further
about how these principles can be incorporated into
their own programs.
Learning Objectives:
Understand the Risk-Needs-Responsivity Principle
and its application in a Problem-Solving Court.
Identify the eight criminogenic risk factors, as well
as which risk factors are static or dynamic.
Develop case plans using screenings and assessments
that address identifi ed needs, with appropriate
programming.
More effectively respond to participant setbacks
and failures.
Speakers
Emily Harris
Program Associate, Courts
Council of State Governments Justice Center
New York, New York
Eric Olson
District Manager
Idaho Adult & Juvenile Mental Health Courts
7th Judicial District
Idaho Falls, Idaho
3:15 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Break
SESSION SB-22
Other Problem-Solving Courts: Engaging the
Community and Helping Victims
Chesapeake 4-6
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Session 1: Community Courts and Other
Ideas for Community Engagement
3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Session 2: Domestic Violence, Traffi cking,
and Prostitution: Serving Victims in
Problem-Solving Courts
The two sessions of this three-hour skills building
workshop will explore how Problem-Solving Courts
have expanded their horizons to engage local commu-
nities and to serve the victims of crime. In particular,
the session will explore major principles and practices
of community courts, domestic violence courts, and
traffi cking and prostitution courts; offer ideas for court-
community engagement, an essential component of
any problem-solving initiative; and summarize what the
latest research tells us about the effectiveness of these
types of Problem-Solving Courts.
Objectives
Learn how Problem-Solving Courts other than Drug
Courts engage the community and help victims.
Gain knowledge about the goals and key principles of
domestic violence, traffi cking and prostitution courts.
Understand what the latest research tells us about
the effectiveness of these approaches.
Speaker(s)
Katie Crank
Coordinator of Domestic Violence Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Julius Lang
Director, Technical Assistance
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Michael Rempel
Research Director
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
MONDAY
47
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
Speakers
Tara Doaty-Mundell
Clinical Psychologist and Consultant
Founder/Lead Mental Health Consultant
Sage Wellness Group
Baltimore, Maryland
Laurie Drabble
Professor
San Jose State University
School of Social Work
San Jose, California
Hilary Kushins
Drug Court and Training Programs Manager (Attorney)
Dependency Advocacy Center
San Jose, California
Christine Munroe
Peer Mentor Coordinator
Rhode Island Family Treatment Drug Court
Providence, Rhode Island
Jane Pfeifer
Senior Program Associate
Children and Family Futures
Lake Forest, California
Rosemary Soave
Family Treatment Drug Court Coordinator
Rhode Island Family Treatment Drug Court
Providence, Rhode Island
3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Recovery Support in Your Family Drug Court:
Building and Sustaining Hope through
Creative Partnerships
What impact can recovery support and intensive case
management have within an FDC program? According
to research, recovery support provided through mentor
or specialist positions has a positive impact on multiple
outcome domains, including substance use, mental
health, parenting practices, and family functioning. In
addition, the use of recovery support staff signifi cantly
increases parents’ access to substance abuse treatment,
length of stay in treatment, and the likelihood that
parents will be reunifi ed with their children. This mini-
skills building workshop presentation will highlight
innovative models and practice strategies from three
Family Drug Court programs (Rhode Island, Baltimore,
MD, Santa Clara County, CA) and how they are
impacting their community through client engagement
and creative partnering. Special focus will emphasize
lessons learned from implementation of parent mentor
or peer support models and the importance of research
and leveraging local resources to assist in the delivery,
evaluation, and sustainability of innovations.
Learning Objectives:
Understand the importance of providing parents with
comprehensive recovery support services to achieve
goals of safety, reunifi cation, and permanency.
Learn strategies to implement a peer mentor program
and the community context for intervention and role
in sustaining long-term recovery.
Identify strategies to leverage local resources to
design and implement an evaluation of a mentor
parent program for a Family Drug Court.
MONDAY
48 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION SB-25
Reentry Court on Steroids
National Harbor 3
If you wanted to implement a Reentry Court in your
community, who would the court serve? What service
would the participants need? What partnerships would
be crucial for your Reentry Court’s success? How
would you build those partnerships? What do evalua-
tions say about the success of Reentry Courts? In this
presentation a group of national experts discuss the
target population of a typical Reentry Court, along with
examples of challenges facing those participants and
courts assist the participants successfully complete by
overcoming obstacles and reintegrating into society.
This presentation is a must for anyone considering a
Reentry Court.
Objectives
Identify the characteristics of the Reentry Court
target population.
Understand how to integrate services into your
Reentry Court.
Identify strategies for building community coalitions
for an effective Reentry Court.
Speaker(s)
Lama Hassoun Ayoub
Senior Research Associate
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Leah Claire Bennett
Clinical Director
Pine Grove Recovery Center
Hattiesburg, Mississippi
Francine Byrne
Supervising Research Analyst
Judicial Council of California
San Francisco, California
Hon. Stephen Manley
Judge
Superior Court of California, Santa Clara
San Jose, California
Marla Newby
Reentry Coordinator
Norfolk Circuit Court Reentry Docket
Norfolk, Virginia
SESSION SB-24
Tribal Nations Forum
National Harbor 5
Participants will be welcomed by a member of the
NADCP Board of Directors and get a brief history
of Alaska Native and Tribal experience individually
melding the original 10 Key Components with
tribal custom and dispute resolution before advent
of the Tribal Key Components, meet each other,
members of NADCP’s Tribal Drug Court Committee
(“Committee”), and the agency that provides Training
and Technical Assistance (T&TA) to Alaska Native and
American Indian Tribes.
Tribal Treatment and Healing to Wellness
Courts In Action
The best ideas and strategies come from the Tribal
Drug Court Team members themselves. During the
Workshop there will be two separate presentations
from two operational Courts from entry to graduation.
Near the conclusion of the workshop, team members
from both courts will be available to answer questions.
Objectives
Learn the History of Tribal Courts and the
Drug Court Movement.
Learn the 2016 Goals of the Tribal Drug Court
Committee.
Learn the 10 Tribal Key Components.
Receive practical advise on planning, implementing
and or operating a treatment court.
Learn fi ve strategies for sustaining their court.
Speaker(s)
Hon. R. Eagleye Johnny
Judge (Ret.)
JD, NREMT & Nevada AEMT
Nixon, Nevada
Hon. Lawrence Lujan
Judge
Ysleta del Sur Pueblo
El Paso, Texas
Lauren van Schilfgaarde
Tribal Law Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
West Hollywood, California
MONDAY
49
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
Carolyn Hardin
Interim Chief Executive Offi cer
Senior Executive Director
NDCI - The Professional Services Branch of NADCP
Alexandria, Virginia
Sonya Harper
Project Director of NDCRC
NDCI - The Professional Services Branch of NADCP
Alexandria, Virginia
Tara Kunkel
Principal Court Management Consultant
National Center for State Courts
Williamsburg, Virginia
Dennis Reilly
Deputy Director, Drug Court Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Lauren van Schilfgaarde
Tribal Law Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
West Hollywood, California
Michelle White
Principal Court Consultant
National Center for State Courts
Denver, Colorado
Charles R. Robinson
Chief Probation Offi cer - Director
Travis County Community Supervision
and Correction Department
Austin, Texas
Hon. Keith Starrett
NADCP Board Chair
U.S. District Judge
Southern District of Mississippi
U.S. District Court, Mississippi
SESSION SB-26
Dos and Don’ts of Becoming a DC Coordinator:
Avoiding Pitfalls (Drug Court Coordinator Forum)
Maryland C
Drug Court coordinators are the glue that holds
the Drug Court together. A coordinator wears many
hats—a few include grant writing, budgeting, data
collection and fi le coordination, fi nancial planning,
securing continuing education, and fi nding other
monetary and nonmonetary resources. This special
form for Drug Court coordinators will provide assis-
tance in three critical areas: free online resources; grant
writing tips; and data collection/planning for an evalu-
ation. First, you will hear from the nation’s foremost
providers of Drug Court training and technical assis-
tance and walk through an online demonstration of
distance learning projects. Next, you will receive a
seminar in grant writing; and fi nally, you will learn
the fundamentals of data collection and evaluation
planning. Bring your laptop and prepare to work!
Objectives
Identify online resources for Drug Courts.
Identify grant writing tips.
Understand the fundamentals of evaluation planning.
Speaker(s)
Phil Breitenbucher
FDC TTA Program Director
Children and Family Futures, Inc.
Irvine, California
Steve Collins
Research Specialist/Senior Technical Assistance Coordinator
American University
Washington, DC
MONDAY
50 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION SB-28
Historically Disadvantaged Groups
National Harbor 6-7
The Adult Drug Court Best Practice Standards state that
citizens who have historically experienced sustained
discrimination or reduced social opportunities because
of their race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation,
sexual identity, physical or mental disability, religion, or
socioeconomic status receive the same opportunities as
others. This session will explore how a Drug Court can
ensure equivalent access, retention, treatment, incen-
tives and sanctions, dispositions, and provide team
training on the necessary issues.
Objectives
Understand the best practice standard on Historically
Disadvantaged Groups.
Identify strategies to ensure equivalent treatment of
all persons in Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Anne Dannerbeck Janku
Research Manager
Offi ce of State Courts Administrator
Jefferson City, Missouri
Hon. Robert Russell
Presiding Judge
Buffalo Veterans Treatment Court
Buffalo, New York
Terrence Walton
Chief of Standards
NADCP
Alexandria, Virginia
SESSION SB-27
Health Care Reform: Understanding and
Navigating the Affordable Care Act
Maryland B
We are in a new age of health care in the United States.
In states that expand Medicaid under the ACA, many
individuals who make below 138% of the federal
poverty line will have health care for the fi rst time.
Many Drug Court clients will be Medicaid benefi ciaries,
which will change how Drug Courts operate. This
session will look at how the ACA is changing Drug
Courts and how Medicaid funding sources can create
new revenue streams to reimburse Drug Courts for case
management or connecting individuals with Medicaid.
Speaker(s)
Dan Mistak
Research Associate
COCHS
Oakland, California
Steven Rosenberg
President
Community Oriented Correctional Health Services
Oakland, California
MONDAY
51
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION SB-30
The Dangers of Spice and the Science Behind It
National Harbor 4
This session will provide you with a comprehensive
overview of Spice. Learn about the chemical compo-
sition of synthetic drugs and how it impacts your drug
testing program. Understand the risks to public health
and hear fi rst-hand stories about the signs, symptoms,
and impact these drugs have on our communities and
court systems.
Speaker(s)
Leo Kadehjian
Biomedical Consultant
Palo Alto, California
Hon. Jodi Debbrecht Switalski
Senior Associate
The Stutman Group
Waterford, Michigan
SESSION SB-29
HEAT
National Harbor 10
HEAT—Habilitation, Empowerment & Accountability
Therapy—applies to a holistic, Afro centric, strength
based model that emphasizes a positive and engaging
approach to treatment. It is closely modeled after
Afro centric interventions that have previously been
standardized and published in CSAP, CSAT, and
other publications. A recent CSAT grant has provided
a national pilot for this innovative, manualized
curriculum. The holistic approach of HEAT focuses on
treating the complete person by addressing spiritual,
mental, emotional, physical, environmental, and
experiential factors that infl uence one’s sense of self,
behaviors, and choices. The curriculum seeks to
validate life experiences and help the client address
and resolve emotional, psychological, environmental,
and experiential issues that have shaped his self-image,
behavior, and lifestyle choices.
Objectives
Understand the components of the manualized
treatment model HEAT.
Learn the fundamentals of how to implement
the HEAT holistic approach based on a cultural
foundation.
Gain strategies to retain and engage diffi cult
populations with an emphasis on African American
Males in Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Darryl Turpin
President
Darryl Turpin Consulting
Louisville, Kentucky
Guy Wheeler
President
Guy A. Wheeler Group
Plantation, Florida
MONDAY
52 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Explain methods for using technology to deliver
treatment and other services to Drug Court clients.
Identify specifi c strategies for using technology to
enhance court- and community-based supervision of
Drug Court clients.
Access existing online training resources for Drug
Court professionals.
Speaker(s)
Aaron Arnold
Director, Drug Court Programs and Tribal Justice Exchange
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Annie Schachar
Associate Director
Drug Court Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
3:05 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Break
3:15 p.m. – 3:40 p.m.
Patrick Dulin, PhD, will discuss his stand-alone smart-
phone-based application, and the strong potential to
provide needed intervention to Drug Court participants
due to their in-the-moment intervention capabilities,
their ability to regularly track and provide feedback
on ongoing triggers, progress towards goals and their
context awareness.
Objectives
Describe how smartphone-based intervention
systems can circumvent barriers to treatment.
Discuss empirically-supported interventions that
can be delivered by smartphones
Provide the audience with an overview of the content
of Step Away modules and its on-going interactivity
with a user.
Provide an understanding of how drug court
professionals can utilize Step Away with their
participants.
Speaker(s)
Patrick Dulin
Director of Here and Now Systems, LLC
Associate Professor of Psychology
University of Alaska
Anchorage, Alaska
SESSION SB-31
Using Technology in Problem-Solving Courts:
Strategies for Tuning In and Turning On
Maryland 4-6
2:00 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.
New technological innovations are being developed
and implemented every day. As such, embracing
technology and learning how to use is increasingly
important and recommended. A growing line of
research has highlighted the promising role that inter-
active web-based and mobile technologies may play in
the improving the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and
reach of efforts to assess, prevent, treat, and support
recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs) and
other risk behaviors. Yet, the adoption of technology-
based programs to treat SUDs has been very limited.
This presentation will address emerging opportunities
for using technology for the treatment of SUDs and
the maintenance of recovery. Dr. Michael Chaple will
address the broader issues of utilization of technology:
Objectives:
Demonstrate the widespread use of technology in
everyday life.
Review current state of the evidence on the effi cacy
of technology for SUDs.
Discuss the ability of technology to improve access
to care by circumventing more traditional client and
programmatic barriers to treatment.
Understand the capacity of technology to serve as a
“clinician-extender.”
Improve receptivity to the use of technology for the
treatment of SUDs.
Speaker(s)
Michael Chaple
Executive Director
NDRI-USA
New York, New York
2:35 p.m. – 3:05 p.m.
The Center for Court Innovation will address the
current status of the Drug Court fi eld and the potential
for use of technology in the future.
Objectives
Describe several concrete challenges facing drug
courts that may be addressed through innovative
uses of technology.
MONDAY
53
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
Hilary Curtis
Program Director
Behavioral Treatment Court Collaborative
Advocates Inc.
Ayer, Massachusetts
4:40 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Question and Answer
SESSION SB-32
Ancillary Services: Best Practices
Maryland D
As every Drug Court practitioner knows, program
participants have a host of ancillary issues in addition
to addiction. Therefore, Drug Courts must identify and
target participants’ criminogenic and other rehabili-
tative needs in addition to substance abuse treatment.
In doing so, Drug Courts should develop individu-
alized case management plans identifying appropriate
interventions and services that are updated as the
participants’ needs change. This session will review the
research and offer practical strategies for incorporating
best practices into your Drug Court.
Objectives
Understand the critical need for providing ancillary
service to ensure participant success.
Learn the research supporting the best practices
in providing ancillary services in Drug Court.
Identify strategies for incorporating evidence based
practices into your Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Mary Kay Hudson
Problem-Solving Court Administrator
Indiana Judicial Center
Indianapolis, Indiana
Richard Schwermer
Assistant State Court Administrator
Utah AOC
Salt Lake City, Utah
3:40 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Dr. Carroll will describe development of the web-based
version of CBT (CBT4CBT), now validated in 3
independent trials with treatment seeking substance
users. CBT4CBT is effective in reducing substance
use, its effects (like those of standard CBT) are durable,
and the computer program teaches the targeted coping
and cognitive control skills. She will describe the
program and its potential uses with criminal justice
populations, including an ongoing pilot with the
Montana Drug Courts.
Objectives
Understand the current evidence base for CBT4CBT
for alcohol and drug use disorders
Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a
web-based intervention targeting cognitive and
behavioral skills.
Review the potential applications of web-based
cognitive behavioral interventions with Drug Court
and criminal justice clients.
Kathleen M. Carroll
Albert E Kent Professor of Psychiatry
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven, Connecticut
4:15 p.m. – 4:40 p.m.
Dr. Curtis will review the fi ndings of Advocates Inc.’s
“Technology and Relapse prevention Project” a three
year SAMHSA funded project to provide expanded care
coordination using Health Information Technology,
specifi cally the ACHESS (Addiction - Comprehensive
Health Enhancement Support System) application for
smart phones by Drug Court participants. The project
provided smart phones equipped with ACHESS, a
promising and emerging practice, and distributed those
phones to Drug Court participants.
Objectives
Review project goals of Advocates Inc.’s
“Technology and Relapse prevention Project.”
Learn implementation success and challenges.
Review technology use highlights: Relationship
between technology use and relapse rates.
Learn how the program integrated client and
staff feedback into project operations and
program improvements.
Understand key summary of fi ndings and
sustainability challenges.
MONDAY
54 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Trauma-informed services.
Gender differences in terms of risk and response.
Triggers and retraumatization.
Emotional development.
Secondary traumatic stress.
Specifi c concerns and challenges in criminal
justice settings.
Objectives
Understand the historical background of trauma.
Explore the connection between addiction, trauma,
and mental health.
Discuss gender differences.
Explicate the process of trauma.
Provide specifi c therapeutic interventions.
Develop strategies for work in criminal justice
settings.
Speaker(s)
Twyla Peterson Wilson
Licensed Clinical Social Worker
Psychotherapy and Substance Abuse Services
Durham, North Carolina
SESSION SB-33
Gender Matters: Creating Trauma Services
for Women and Men
Maryland 1-3
While research and clinical experience indicate a high
incidence of co-occurring disorders in women’s lives,
counselors and clinicians often struggle with the realities
of providing treatment. This workshop is based on a
woman-centered trauma treatment curriculum, Beyond
Trauma, designed for use in outpatient, residential,
and criminal justice settings. Cognitive-behavioral
techniques, mindfulness, expressive arts, and the
principles of relational therapy are integrated in this
strength-based approach. The curriculum also has a
psycho-educational component that teaches women
what trauma is, its process, and its impact on both
the inner self (thoughts, feelings, beliefs, values) and
the outer self (behavior and relationships, including
parenting). The training includes interactive exercises
that demonstrate techniques that counselors can use to
help clients develop coping skills, as well as emotional
wellness. In addition, there is a segment on specifi c
issues in criminal justice settings.
Topics
Developing gender-responsive services
Connection between trauma, mental health,
and substance abuse.
7:00 a.m. – 7:20 a.m.
Come to Your Senses (Facilitated Meditation)
Chesapeake JKL
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
Drug Court Expo Opens
with a Continental Breakfast
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Registration (Closed During Opening Ceremony)
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Opening Ceremony
Potomac Ballroom
10:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Concurrent Workshops Session A
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Concessions for Purchase
in Drug Court Expo
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
Concurrent Workshops Session B
2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Concurrent Workshops Session C
3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Concurrent Workshops Session D
5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.
Concurrent Workshops Session E
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Drug Court Expo with a Dessert Reception
Prince George’s Exhibition Hall DE
Tuesday
Schedule of Events
July 28, 2015
Tuesday
Annual Training
Conference
Setting the
Standard
Notes
TUESDAY
57
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
Presentation of the Colors
United States Army Military District
of Washington (MDW) Armed Forces
Color Guard
National Anthem
Cady Huffman
Tony Award Winning Actress
Welcoming Remarks
Carolyn Hardin
Interim CEO
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
Featured Speakers
Loretta Lynch (Invited)
Attorney General
United States Department of Justice
Denise O’Donnell
Director
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Pamela Hyde
Administrator
Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration
Dr. Mark Rosekind (Invited)
Administrator
National Highway Traffi c Safety Administration
Michael Botticelli
Director
White House Offi ce of National Drug Control Policy
The Honorable Pamela Gray
Judge
Washington, DC Family Treatment Court
The Honorable Ruben Reyes
Incoming Board Chair
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
Special Presentations
Parade of Transformation
Cultural Profi ciency Award
DWI Court Award
The Honorable Michael Kavanaugh
Judge (ret)
Senior Director
National Center for DWI Court
POTOMAC BALLROOM
Tuesday, July 28
8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
OPENING CEREMONY
TUESDAY
58 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Corey Roberts
Resource Coordinator
Community Service Council
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Tammy Westcott
Assistant District Attorney/Director of Alternative Courts
Tulsa County District Attorney’s Offi ce
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Debra Young-Allen
Education Coordinator
Tulsa COURTS Program
Tulsa, Oklahoma
SESSION A-2
A Look Inside The Nations Family Drug Courts
National Harbor 11
Children and Family Futures has identifi ed Family
Drug Court (FDC) best practice models by creating
nine mentorship sites across the nation that further the
exchange of learning through peer-to-peer technical
assistance. Peer Learning Courts host visiting FDC
professionals to experience their court in action and
share proven policies, practices and lessons learned.
During this session, attendees will hear a brief overview
of the Peer Learning Court program, including infor-
mation on how to connect with a PLC site through
sharing of resources and/or site visit. In addition,
project leaders from each of the PLCs will provide
an overview of their respective FDC and highlighted
practice, including their implementation experience.
The audience will have the opportunity to interact with
each of the panel members as they discuss barriers
and solutions experienced through the process of
implementing FDC best practices. Presenters will also
provide an overview of the Peer Learning Court (PLC)
program, including information on how to connect
with a PLC site through sharing of resources and/or site
visit.
Objectives
Learn about the Peer Learning Court Program and
how to access this peer-to-peer technical assistance
opportunity.
Hear from several different successful FDCs
describing practice and policy highlights including
how they have impacted their outcomes.
Explore solutions to common barriers experienced
when implementing best practices in FDCs.
TRACK SESSION A
Tuesday, July 28
10:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
SESSION A-1
A Team in Action
Maryland D
Drug Courts often succeed or fail based on their ability
to bring all the various players into a collaborative
team. Tulsa County COURTS Programs encompass the
largest Drug Court program in Oklahoma and one of
the four national mentor courts for Veterans’ Treatment
Courts. Their success is due, in large part, to the effec-
tiveness of their teamwork. The collective contributions
of each team member at staffi ng and in court assure
the highest level of team effectiveness which, in turn,
leads to program excellence and effectiveness. The team
will discuss and demonstrate the processes used in
Tulsa County at staffi ng and at court. They will discuss
the role of each team member and how they process
information from various perspectives in a collaborative
manner. Members of the pane will share personal
experiences including some of the lessons learned
through victories and mistakes. The workshop will
cover principles of building an effective team and how
these principles are implemented in the Tulsa Problem
Solving Courts.
Objectives
Gain ideas and tools to build a collaborative team.
Understand the importance of teamwork in the
success of Problem Solving Courts.
Gain insight from demonstrations of teamwork at a
mock staffi ng.
Speaker(s)
Rosie Andrews
Supervision Offi cer
Human Skills & Resources
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Lawrence Gilbert
Executive Director/Clinical Director
ActionSteps Counseling
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Ericka Jeffords
Program Coordinator
Community Service Council of Greater Tulsa
Tulsa, Oklahoma
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION A-3
Seven Habits of Highly Effective Practices
When Addressing Adolescent Drug Abuse in
Juvenile Drug Courts
National Harbor 13
The phrase evidence-based treatment practice (EBPs)
gets used frequently in both the juvenile justice and
adolescent treatment fi elds. But, what does EBP really
mean and what does it mean to use EBPs. Words like
delity, adolescent development, treatment dosage,
brief intervention, comorbidity are often used in
conjunction with EBPs…again, what does all that really
mean to juvenile justice professionals? In this session,
the presenter will clearly defi ne “7 habits” that will
increase effectiveness in your Juvenile Drug Court.
Objectives
Participants will learn about the current research
around teen-friendly approaches.
Participants will learn about treatment dosage for
youth.
Participants will learn how to integrate these 7 habits
into their programs.
Speaker(s)
Ken Winters
Professor
Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota
Reno, Nevada
Speaker(s)
Alexis Balkey
FDC TTA Program Manager
Children and Family Futures
Irvine, California
Penny Clodfelter
Family & Juvenile Drug Court Program Manager
Jackson County Family Drug Court
Kansas City, Missouri
Jocelyn Gainers
Executive Director
The Family Recovery Program, Inc.
Baltimore, Maryland
Suzanne Muir
Program Director
Treatment Alternatives for Safer Communities
University of Alabama
Birmingham, Alabama
Jill Murphy
Program Supervisor
King County Family Treatment Court
King County, Washington
Hon. William S. Owens
Associate Juvenile Judge
Wapello County Courthouse
Ottumwa, Iowa
Joni Strange
Family Dependency Treatment Court (FDTC) Coordinator
Chatham County Family Dependency Treatment Court
Chatham County, Georgia
POTOMAC 1-3
Thursday, July 30 7:00 a.m. – 7:45 a.m.
NADCP members and fi rst time conference attendees are invited to join the NADCP
Board of Directors and the Executive Committee for a breakfast on Friday. If you are
a fi rst time attendee, but not yet a member, we encourage you to join the NADCP.
Ninth Annual Breakfast For New NADCP Members
and First Time Conference Attendees
TUESDAY
60 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION A-5
From Compliance to Alliance: Using Recovery
and Procedural Justice Principles to Improve
Outcomes in Co-Occurring Disorder Cases
Chesapeake GHI
Mental health treatment services are increasingly incor-
porating principles of recovery, defi ned by SAMHSA
as a process of change through which individuals
improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed
life, and strive to reach their full potential. Recovery
principles, refl ected in federal, state and local mental
health policies, are revolutionizing the way we look at
mental illness and its treatment, offering greater hope
and stronger client engagement. But these principles
may seem foreign and even troubling to criminal
justice practitioners, and treatment court teams may be
reluctant to link individuals under court supervision to
community-based programs that promote autonomy
and empowerment.
This workshop will explore the ways that recovery
principles can not only be reconciled with Drug Court
and Mental Health Court policies and procedures but
also promote better outcomes for participants with
mental illnesses. Topics will include (1) a summary of
Mental Health Court research, which demonstrates
a weak connection between traditional treatment of
symptoms of mental illness and reductions in criminal
behavior; (2) the importance of procedural justice –
which emphasizes dignity, voice, understanding and
neutrality in the court process – in reducing recidivism;
(3) common treatment court practices that incorporate
recovery principles; and (4) adaptations of recovery
principles for individuals under court supervision that
bridge the potential gaps between treatment courts and
recovery-oriented treatment providers. The panelists
will bring perspectives and examples from multiple
disciplines and states.
Objectives
Identify SAMHSA’s recovery principles and
understand the potential tensions with criminal
justice system goals.
Understand the core principles of procedural justice,
its impact on recidivism, and its relationship with
recovery principles.
Learn strategies for incorporating recovery principles
into treatment court policies and procedures to
improve outcomes.
SESSION A-4
Mental Health Courts A-Z
National Harbor 12
This session will teach participants about the history
and research base for Mental Health Courts and discuss
key issues in deciding whether to start a Mental Health
Court, designing a Mental Health Court, and operating
and sustaining a Mental Health Court. The session will
utilize the CSG Justice Center’s experience in providing
training and technical assistance to Mental Health
Court grantees for over a decade, and the Justice
Center’s online, free curriculum, “Developing A Mental
Health Court: An Interdisciplinary Curriculum”, which
includes online presentations and resources and live
group as well as to help jurisdictions interested in
Mental Health Courts. A recently released companion
resource, the Handbook for Facilitators, provides
further information on how to utilize the content
and resources within the Curriculum and will also be
discussed in this session.
Objectives
Describe the essential elements of a Mental
Health Court.
Identify key issues in deciding to start, design, and
sustain a Mental Health Court.
Understand the research base for Mental Health
Courts, particularly compared to Drug Courts.
Utilize online resources to help learn more about
planning and implementing a Mental Health Court.
Speaker(s)
Emily Harris
Program Associate, Courts Program
Council of State Governments Justice Center
New York, New York
TUESDAY
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION A-7
Evaluation Challenges and Solutions in
Family Drug Courts
Maryland 4-6
This session will include a facilitated group discussion
with Family Drug Courts related to evaluation
challenges and solutions. Staff from NPC Research and
Children and Family Futures will share their experi-
ences with data challenges at multiple program sites.
Topics to be covered include 1) the important role
of partners, including staff from child welfare and
the courts, particularly related to accessing data from
different systems, 2) data quality, and 3) common
technical assistance needs with regard to program
evaluation. Family Drug Court staff members are
invited to share their successful strategies and positive
outcomes regarding developing partnerships and
accessing data. Research staff will also present new
ndings from recent evaluation projects, discuss what
research questions they were able to answer (and what
further questions could be answered with additional
data), and share some connections between evaluation
and technical assistance. The panel will discuss how
evaluation implementation and data collection can be
used more directly in systems change work.
Objectives
Understand the importance of data quality for
program improvement and evaluation.
Learn about successes strategies programs have used
to access data for evaluation.
Learn strategies programs have used to build
partnerships between agencies that facilitated data
access.
Speaker(s)
Juliette Mackin
Executive VP & Sr. Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Chad Rodi
Research and Evaluation Director
Children and Family Futures
Lake Forest, California
Speaker(s)
Carol Fisler
Director, Mental Health Court Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Norma D. Jaeger
Statewide Drug Court and Mental Health Court Coordinator
Idaho Supreme Court
Boise, Idaho
SESSION A-6
Race, Culture, Bias, Treatment, and the Courts:
Cultural Competency 101
Chesapeake ABC
Cultural Competency 101 is a strength-based
interactive session, which provides strategies for profes-
sionals to work proactively to address complicated race
and cultural issues potentially impacting their court.
Concerns such as team members not being aware of
bias, racial imbalance of participants, or teams not
understanding behaviors of some participants that may
be natural to their culture all may impede the retention
and engagement of participants. Communication
strategies such as, what to say and what not to stay will
be addressed with basic respectful ways to respond.
A closer look at implicit bias will be reviewed to assist
court professionals to examine their own lens and to
enhance their interaction with all clients.
Objectives
Describe the potential impact of implicit bias.
Identify strategies and techniques to address
challenging situations in Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Susan James-Andrews
President and CEO
James-Andrews and Associates
Mitchellville, Maryland
TUESDAY
62 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION A-10
Search and Seizure and the Role of a
Probation Offi cer
National Harbor 10
Participants in a Problem Solving Court, individuals
placed on probation or those in pre-adjudication court
supervision programs do not lose all protections and
rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution
and the laws of the various jurisdictions. Specifi cally,
the Fourth Amendment of the United States
Constitution protects individuals from unreasonable
searches and seizures and the extent of that protection
has been addressed in a number of Supreme Court and
other appellate court decisions.
This session will provide an overview of the law relating
to search and seizure in the context of supervised
release programs such as probation and Problem
Solving Courts with particular emphasis on the
balancing of effective supervision and the due process
rights of the participant. In addition to analyzing court
decisions from different jurisdictions, there will be
some discussion of best practices, tips and potential
pitfalls to assist the offi cer in the fi eld to properly
consider and comply with the search and seizure rights
of the participants
Objectives
Analyze and comply with statutes and court
decisions regarding search and seizure limitations in
probation and Problem Solving Court supervision.
Evaluate the validity of monitoring procedures that
impact on the due process protections relating to
unreasonable searches and seizures.
Develop effective and constitutional supervision
protocols that properly comply with the due process
rights of participants.
Speaker(s)
Helen Harberts
Deputy District Attorney (ret.)
Chico, California
Hon. Earl Penrod
Judge
Gibson Superior Court
Princeton, Indiana
SESSION A-8
Cocaine
Maryland A
Cocaine, used for centuries to alter consciousness, and
popular since the 1980s in its rock or crack form, has
been a plague on its users, criminal justice systems
and the treatment community for years. However, in
many jurisdictions, crack has been falling in popularity
compared to meth and newer club drugs. Over the
last century, cocaine has seen surges and ebbs in
popularity. Research on cocaine dependence and
cocaine’s impact on the brain has contributed greatly
to the treatment of cocaine addiction. Come learn
about cocaine, it’s impact on the brain, and the current
strategies in treatment.
Speaker(s)
Steve Hanson
Director
Division of Treatment and Practice Innovation,
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
Rochester, New York
SESSION A-9
Critical Role of Risk/Need in Building
Incentives and Sanctions
Maryland C
The research is clear: Drug Courts should focus on
individuals with high prognostic risks and criminogenic
needs. But how does dealing with someone who has
high risk/needs impact how your court delivers incen-
tives and sanctions? What if you mix lower risk and
needs populations with higher risk and needs popula-
tions? Will your incentives and sanctions have the
same impact? This session discusses the importance of
risk/need assessment and its relationship to delivering
effective incentives and sanctions in your Drug Court.
Objectives
Identify the relationship between prognostic risk,
criminogenic need, and incentives/sanctions.
Understand how to effectively deliver incentives and
sanctions to a high risk/high need population.
Speaker(s)
Douglas Marlowe
Chief of Science, Law, and Policy
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
Alexandria, Virginia
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION A-12
HEAT Update
National Harbor 3
This promising practice was introduced at the 2012
conference in Nashville and the preliminary results
are in! Habilitation, Empowerment & Accountability
Therapy (HEAT) applies a holistic, Afro centric,
strength-based model that emphasizes a positive and
engaging approach to treatment. It is closely modeled
after Afro centric interventions that have previously
been standardized and published in CSAP, CSAT and
other publications (e. g., Burnett, 2008; Goddard,
1993; Philleo et al., 1997).
Objectives
This session provides an overview of this manualized
approach to providing services in Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Darryl Turpin
President
Darryl Turpin Consulting
Louisville, Kentucky
Guy Wheeler
President
Guy A. Wheeler Group
Plantation, Florida
SESSION A-11
Trauma Informed Judicial Decision Making
Chesapeake 7-9
A large percentage of Drug Court participants suffer
from one or a series of traumatic experiences. While
there is an increased emphasis on trauma-informed
care from the aspect of the treatment provider, the
judge should also be aware of trauma and its impact
on participants. In this session four judges who are
national experts on trauma informed responses from
the bench will address how they respond and talk with
Latino participants who are suffering from trauma.
Objectives
Understand the impact of trauma in Latino
populations.
Identify strategies for integrating trauma informed
responses from the bench.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Robert Anchondo
Criminal Court Judge
DWI Drug Court Intervention and Treatment Program
El Paso County, Texas
Hon. Jo Ann Ferdinand
Judge
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Hon. Marcia Hirsch
Judge
Queens Treatment Court
Kew Gardens, New York
TUESDAY
64 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION A-14
What Does My Drug Test Result Really Tell Me?
National Harbor 6-7
Understanding what results really indicate. Is the THCA
positive reuse or residual elimination. Did that donor
test positive for cocaine due to use, accidental ingestion,
dermal adsorption or passive inhalation. This program
should assist the end user in better understanding the
results they receive from the laboratory. We will also
touch on new drugs, synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic
stimulants and natural occurring plant materials.
Objectives
Determining new use or residual elimination of THCA.
Cocaine positive from use, passive inhalation, dermal
adsorption or accidental ingestion.
Understand the synthetic opiates.
Understand the truth about synthetic cannabinoids.
Learn about the new drugs on the streets.
Speaker(s)
Pat Pizzo
Director of Toxicology
Alere Toxicology Services
Gretna, Louisiana
SESSION A-13
Gender Responsive Strategies and Trauma
Informed Care in Community Treatment
National Harbor 4
This workshop will provide information on the experi-
ences of women journeying through the transition/
recovery process of the Drug Court program. Using
evidence based principles the program will address the
specifi c and unique needs of women. Trauma informed
treatment play a vital role in the therapeutic process.
Stepping stones of empowerment, self worth and
building self esteem are explored through the process of
treatment, as well. The paths women travel throughout
the therapeutic experience, including obstacles, are
shared. The women begin the journey searching for
strength, courage, acceptance and wisdom in order to
become confi dent and empowered to move forward
in life overcoming adversity in order to live a life of
sustained recovery.
Objectives
To understand the purpose of gender responsiveness
in the therapeutic environment.
To gain an understanding of barriers women face
during reintegration into the community.
To gain an understanding of the journey to fi nding
self in the therapeutic environment and to address
trauma related issues.
Speaker(s)
Carol Berger
Criminal Justice Liaison
Community Education Centers, Inc.
West Caldwell, New Jersey
Angela Mims
Treatment Provider
Education & Health Centers of America, Inc.
Trenton, New Jersey
TUESDAY
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION A-16
The 10 Guiding Principles of DWI Courts
Chesapeake 10-12
This session gives an overview of the principles which
make DWI Courts different enough to merit specialized
practices. The “Key Components of Drug Court” have
not gone away in DWI Courts but rather have been
supplemented by the Guiding Principles. Fidelity to the
DWI Court model includes both documents as funda-
mental to the success of these programs. The presenters
are national experts on DWI Courts and bring a wealth
of knowledge and experience to the topic.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Michael Barrasse
Presiding Judge
Lackawanna County Veterans Treatment Court
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Hon. Michael Kavanaugh
Judge (Ret)
National Center for DWI Courts
Alexandria, Virginia
SESSION A-15
Technology in YOUR Court: Learn How
Web Based Case Management Can Support
Performance Benchmarks and Best Practices
Chesapeake 4-6
Accountability Court case management systems provide
an effi cient way to regain time for judicial decision
making even as money and court staffs decrease. In
addition, case management systems help the courts to
meet nationally recognized best practices, and to gain
24/7 access to real-time participant status updates and
progress. Conference attendees that participate in this
training session will learn how Accountability Court
case management systems address and assist the court
to meet the Ten Key Components and Performance
Benchmarks of Drug Courts. Attendees will also
learn how web based case management can promote
accuracy and accessibility to data, help to move the
courts to a paperless system, and encourage just dispo-
sitions through accountability.
Speaker(s)
Libby Blackwell
Director of Court Product Development
Five Point Solutions
Dacula, Georgia
Taylor Jones
Project Manager
Five Point Solutions
Dacula, Georgia
TUESDAY
66 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION A-18
The New ASAM Criteria: Implications for Drug
Courts and Treatment Providers
National Harbor 2
The ASAM Criteria are the most widely used guidelines
for intake, assessment, service planning and placement,
continued stay and discharge of patients with addictive
disorders. This presentation will highlight what
treatment providers should know about ASAM Criteria
principles, assessment and treatment levels. There
will be discussion of how to use The ASAM Criteria
to shift drug and other Problem-Solving Courts from a
program-driven to outcomes-driven model and achieve
lasting change.
Objectives
Identify the guiding principles of The ASAM Criteria
and how it interfaces with criminal justice settings.
Apply ASAM Criteria multidimensional assessment
to individualize treatment and move from program-
driven treatment to outcomes-driven services.
Discuss how treatment providers can collaborate with
court personnel through the common language of
The ASAM Criteria to achieve lasting change.
Speaker(s)
David Mee-Lee
Senior Vice President
The Change Companies
Carson City, Nevada
SESSION A-17
Keeping Kids Safely at Home: A Discussion on
Legal Issues in an In-Home FDC Model
Maryland 1-3
The Family Drug Court (FDC) model is characterized
by court-based collaboration among child welfare,
substance abuse treatment providers and the legal
system. FDCs have emerged as a model of meaningful
collaboration that address the specifi c needs of children
and families affected by substance use by providing
comprehensive services which allow children to
remain safely at home while contributing to a parent’s
recovery, and family well-being.
This presentation will explore the legal issues associated
with an In-Home FDC model and highlight outcomes
from the Children Affected by Methamphetamine
(CAM) Grant and Regional Partnership Grant Program
outcomes. The presentation will highlight a Pre-Filing
FDC model in Birmingham, Alabama, initiated as a way
to bring child welfare, substance abuse treatment, and
courts together to intervene early by offering preventive
services in order to address the cycle of drug use and
child abuse/neglect within their community.
Objectives
Explore the legal issues associated with an In-Home
FDC Model.
Discuss opportunities and challenges associated
with children remaining in-home while participating
in FDC.
Explores the lessons and experiences of an FDC
site (Birmingham, AL) in addressing legal obstacles
associated with the implementation of an In-Home
FDC Model.
Speaker(s)
Phil Breitenbucher
FDC TTA Program Director
Children and Family Futures, Inc.
Irvine, California
Hon. Alan Summers
Family Drug Court Judge
Jefferson County Family Court
Birmingham, Alabama
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION A-20
Five Ways to Wreck Your Career:
Ethics for Treatment Providers
Maryland B
Treatment professionals are tasked with assisting
individuals whose substance involvement has left
them temporarily vulnerable to exploitation, coercion,
enmeshment, and a variety of other perils. In many
respects those involved in the criminal justice system
are especially at-risk as the power balance between
participant and helper is tilted heavily to the helper.
This reality places a special burden on practitioners to
structure programs and practices to encourage ethical
conduct. However even the well-intentioned may fi nd
themselves in sticky situations that threaten careers,
families, and reputations. This interactive presentation
will provide strategies for recognizing and resolving
vexing ethical dilemmas.
Objectives
Understand the dynamics of ethical conduct and
misconduct when providing Drug Court treatment.
Identify the fi ve most common ethical pitfalls facing
providers and how to navigate around them.
Identify how treatment providers can ethically
collaborate and communicate with Drug Court
team members, while respecting the privacy and
confi dentiality of participants.
Speaker(s)
Terrence Walton
Chief of Standards
NADCP
Alexandria, Virginia
SESSION A-19
Working Effectively with Native Participants
National Harbor 5
State and tribal courts stem from separate sovereigns
and different histories, enforce different laws, and serve
different, yet often overlapping populations. Similarly,
Native participants have different histories and world-
views. Recognition of these differences, however, can
strengthen rather than diminish the services that
we provide. This workshop/plenary will explore the
history that informs Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts,
potential benefi ts to both Tribal Wellness Courts and
State Drug Courts from collaboration, and will explore
strategies for working with Native participants within
a State Drug Court, including cultural competency
and strategies for effectively incorporating culture and
tradition into the Healing to Wellness Court/Drug Court.
Objectives
Learn about the history of tribes and Tribal Healing
to Wellness Courts.
Learn strategies for collaboration between sovereigns.
Learn strategies for working with Native participants
within State Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Joseph Flies-Away
Chief Justice
Hualapai Court of Appeals
Hon. Lawrence Lujan
Judge
Ysleta del Sur Pueblo
El Paso, Texas
Mark Panasiewicz
Treatment Provider
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
West Hollywood, California
TUESDAY
68 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION A-22
Matrix Model for Criminal Justice Settings
Chesapeake DE
The presentation will provide attendees information on
the Matrix Model for Criminal Justice Settings.
Programs and clinicians will fi nd this treatment
model to be a valuable tool for Drug Court programs,
correctional and jail programs, reentry and outpa-
tient programs treating justice involved populations.
The program includes the treatment of substance use
disorders and the thinking errors that lead to criminal
behaviors in a comprehensive integrated approach.
Programming of the model includes two types
of populations:
Individuals who meet criteria for substance use
disorders who commit crimes or become involved in
the criminal justice system as a result of their use.
Individuals who meet criteria for anti-social
personality disorder and use substances.
The program will address strategies for both popula-
tions and inclusive of best practices that will lead
to improved clinical and overall program outcomes.
An adjustment section is also included to address
issues specifi c to justice involved populations, such as
employment/ housing barriers and family reintegration.
Objectives
How to provide a comprehensive integrated clinical
program that works with a Drug Court phase system.
How to adjust treatment addressing 2 different types
of justice involved populations.
Discuss the adjustment phase of treatment specifi c
to issues typical of justice involved clients such as
employment/housing.
Speaker(s)
Donna Johnson
CEO
Addiction Solutions Inc
Cartersville, Georgia
SESSION A-21
Building Bridges between Drug Treatment
Courts and the Addiction Recovery Community
Chesapeake JKL
Local addiction recovery communities are a resource
for drug court participants and drug treatment court
professionals. This workshop will introduce the
Association of Recovery Communities (ARCO), which
represents over 100 local recovery community organi-
zations as well as national organizations representing
recovery schools and recovery residences.
Workshop participants will be provided with a case
study on how the Henrico Drug Treatment Court
and the McShin Foundation, a Richmond, Virginia
based peer recovery community organization, built an
effective working relationship.
Objectives
Learn about ARCO and how its members can be a
local recovery resource.
Learn how to build and sustain working relationships
with your local recovery community.
Understand what the challenges and opportunities
are in developing relationships with the local
recovery community.
Moderator
Carol McDaid
Principal
Capitol Decisions
Washington, D.C.
Speaker(s)
Honesty Liller
CEO
McShin Foundation
Richmond, Virginia
Patricia Shaw
Administrator
Henrico County Drug Treatment Court
Henrico, Virginia
TUESDAY
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION B-2
Collaborative Approaches to Drug Endangered
Children
National Harbor 11
This presentation by the National Alliance for Drug
Endangered Children (National DEC) focuses on how
to implement the DEC Approach which is a compre-
hensive strategy based on collaboration between
various disciplines and agencies that has proven to be
effective in improving the likelihood of better outcomes
for drug endangered children. This presentation will
provide insights about how various practitioners—
including child welfare professionals, law enforcement
offi cers, court/judicial professionals, prosecutors,
probation/parole, medical personnel, educators and
treatment providers—are in a position to identify,
protect, and serve drug endangered children and their
families. As a signifi cant expansion of the collaborative
approach utilized by drug courts, the DEC approach
leads to better communication and more informed
decisions among a wide array of practitioners who are
in a position to help drug endangered children. The
presenters will discuss the identifi cation of risks to drug
endangered children and what all disciplines can look
for when collecting evidence and information on drug
endangered children. Presenters will utilize pictures
and video of real DEC scenarios to assist professionals
in understanding what to look for regarding the “life of
the child”.
TRACK SESSION B
Tuesday, July 28
12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
SESSION B-1
Ten Key Components and the Research
Maryland D
How can you use the Ten Key Components as a
foundation for building a more successful Drug Court?
What research has been done on the effectiveness of
Drug Court and the use of the Ten Key Components?
Come hear how to integrate the Components into the
court structure and how to help your court conform
to best practices, along with examples of forms and
documents utilized by the Drug Court.
Objectives
Gain awareness of the Ten Key Components, how
they provide the structure for a court and what
documents and forms are necessary for Drug Courts
to achieve the performance benchmarks connected to
the Components.
Learn about the research done on the Ten Key
Components and Drug Court effectiveness.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Christine Carpenter
Circuit Court Judge
13th Judicial Circuit
Columbia, Missouri
Juliette Mackin
Executive VP & Sr. Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
TUESDAY
70 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
sites adhered to the JDC/RF logic model and imple-
mented the model with fi delity. This process involved
the evaluation team creating measures for logic model
components and scoring sites in accordance with
these measures. The presentation will also provide a
brief overview of logic models and how to develop
them, lessons learned from this piece of the evaluation,
and explore the linkages between model fi delity for
particular activities and aggregate outcomes.
Objectives
Understand how logic models can be used as an
evaluation tool to assess program implementation.
Learn how to assess program fi delity to a logic model.
Discover if program fi delity to a logic model effects
program activities and outcomes.
Speaker(s)
Alison Greene
Director of Adolescent Research and Services
University of Arizona Southwest Institute of
Research on Women (SIROW)
Tucson, Arizona
Raanan Kagan
Senior Policy Analyst
Carnevale Associates
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Erika Ostlie
Managing Director
Carnevale Associates, LLC
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Objectives
Gain insight about how our own experience,
attitudes, values and emotions impact effective
collaboration under the DEC Approach.
Gain insight about our collaborative partners
to decrease frustrations when utilizing the DEC
Approach.
Understand how utilizing collaboration leads to more
informed decisions and increased likelihood of better
outcomes on behalf of drug endangered children and
their families under the DEC Approach.
Implement change in identifi cation of children,
mandatory reporting, and evidence and information
collection in our respective practices on behalf of
drug endangered children.
Speaker(s)
Eric Nation
Director of Training and Development
National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children
Westminster, Colorado
Stacee Read
Director of DEC Network Development
National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children
Westminster, Colorado
SESSION B-3
Assessing Fidelity to a Logic Model: The National
Cross-Site Evaluation of JDC/RF Experience
National Harbor 13
Logic models are an important component of program
planning and assessment. They are a unifi ed method
to operations that link the problem at hand with
associated goals, objectives, program activities, outputs,
and outcomes. Logic models also serve as a yardstick
against which evaluators measure a program’s progress,
and can be used by programs to measure their own
progress. But how can a logic model be effectively
used to assess program implementation? Further, does
a program’s fi delity to the logic model even matter?
Using experiences from their work on the National
Cross-Site Evaluation of Juvenile Drug Courts (JDC)
and Reclaiming Futures (RF), the presenters will
describe the utility of logic models when conducting
a process evaluation. Specifi cally, the presenters will
discuss their methodology used to develop a scale that
examines the extent to which participating evaluation
TUESDAY
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION B-5
Co-Occurring Disorders in Mental Health Courts
Chesapeake GHI
This session will discuss how to identify the most
appropriate courts for individuals with co-occurring
substance use and mental health disorders in commu-
nities with multiple Problem Solving Courts, as well
as how to work with individuals with co-occurring
disorders who are participating in a Mental Health
Court program. Participants will learn about treatment
modalities for clients with co-occurring disorders,
and receive handouts to help identify resources and
treatment options in their community.
Objectives
Understand the Risk-Needs-Responsivity Principle
and its application in a Problem-Solving Court.
Identify appropriate treatment modalities for
individuals with co-occurring substance use and
mental health disorders.
Understand methods for working more effectively
with individuals with co-occurring substance use and
mental health disorders in a Mental Health Court.
Utilize handouts and resources to help identify
treatment options and community resources for
clients with co-occurring needs in their jurisdiction.
Speaker(s)
Sarah Wurzburg
Policy Analyst
National Initiatives
New York, New York
SESSION B-4
Solving the “Rubik’s Cube” of Mental Health
Courts: Effective Strategies for Establishing
Statewide Standards
National Harbor 12
Research indicates that there is an overrepresentation of
offenders with serious mental illness and/or co-occurring
disorders in our jails and correctional facilities. In the
past few years, this concern has led a number of Arizona
courts (including Limited and General Jurisdiction
Courts) to establish some form of Mental Health Court
to process criminal cases involving people with serious
mental illnesses. These locally developed problem-
solving courts strive to reduce the incarceration and
recidivism of people with mental illnesses by linking
them to appropriate mental health services and
supports. But is it that easy? The Arizona Supreme Court
has been tasked with establishing statewide standards for
Mental Health Courts but, how do you solve the puzzle
of developing consistencies across programs and jurisdic-
tions while ensuring program effectiveness, procedural
fairness, and adherence to evidence based-practices?
Objectives
Understand the challenges of establishing statewide
standards.
Identify key partners to serve on the advisory group.
Develop the framework for establishing statewide
standards.
Speaker(s)
Susan Alameda
State Coordinator
AZ Supreme Court: Adult Probation Services
Phoenix, Arizona
Mark Stodola
NHTSA/APPA Probation Fellow
American Probation and Parole Association
Lexington, Kentucky
Nicole Waters
Principal Court Research Consultant
National Center for State Courts
Williamsburg, Virginia
TUESDAY
72 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
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SESSION B-7
The Pathway to Minnesota’s Drug Court
Expansion: Using Statewide Research as
Leverage for Expansion
Maryland 4-6
This session will describe Minnesota’s strategy for
expanding Drug Courts across the state, focusing on
how it is using recent statewide Drug Court (adult
substance abuse and DWI) research to support the
expansion effort. Beginning with a Statewide Drug
Court Evaluation (adult substance abuse courts)
in 2012 and additional follow up analysis in 2014,
together with a Statewide DWI Court Study released
in September 2014, Minnesota’s Drug Court Initiative
(DCI) crafted, and began implementing, a fi ve year
expansion plan. The DCI is also leveraging the research
to engage Judicial, Executive, and Legislative Branch
leadership in further policy, funding and implemen-
tation discussions and for developing peer mentoring
and performance-based funding, all with eye toward
statewide implementation and improvement.
Objectives
Learn how to use research effectively to develop
and promote Drug Court expansion.
Understand challenges in expansion efforts (it’s not
just the funding).
Learn effective strategies for engaging Judicial, Executive,
and Legislative Leadership in expansion efforts.
Speaker(s)
Michelle Cern
Statewide Drug Court Coordinator
Minnesota Judicial Branch
Saint Paul, Minnesota
Hon. Shaun Floerke
Judge
Minnesota Judicial Branch
Duluth, Minnesota
SESSION B-6
What Your Mama Didn’t Teach You
(For Men Only)
Chesapeake ABC
Women and girls often present with multiple issues
that many men may not always feel comfortable
responding to. Unintentionally men can sometimes
exacerbate problems when working with females by
what they say and often what they don’t say. Male court
professionals with good intentions can often create
an unsafe situation for themselves and sometimes the
client. From the bench to the community being gender
responsive to the unique needs of females can support
positive outcomes for the client as well as ensuring
the safety for males interacting with females who have
experienced trauma.
Objectives
Identify challenges for men working with women
and girls.
Discuss realistic strategies to maintain safety for the
team and the client.
Speaker(s)
Susan James-Andrews
President and CEO
James-Andrews and Associates
Mitchellville, Maryland
TUESDAY
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
Speaker(s)
Hon. William Meyer
Judge/Senior Judicial Fellow
Judicial Arbiter Group
Denver, Colorado
SESSION B-10
The Smoking Gun: The Role of Law Enforcement
and Ethical Issues in a Drug Court Setting
National Harbor 10
Police and Probation Offi cers face unique challenges
in Drug Court. Some of these challenges present as
ethical dilemmas. Offi cers are often aware of treatment
information which they may not be able to reveal.
Sometimes offi cers are aware of criminal justice investi-
gations which they cannot reveal. When are you at risk
for an ethical breach? What will you do?
Objectives
Learn how to identify ethical problems in a
Drug Court context.
Identify methods of dealing with ethical issues in
the Drug Court.
Learn common ethical problems offi cers and police
face in Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Vanessa Price
Law Enforcement Inspector, Ret.
Chair – Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
SESSION B-8
Alcohol
Maryland A
Neuroimaging has yielded new evidence about the
effects on the brain of alcohol use. This presentation
will focus on those new fi ndings as well as describe
the psychopharmacology of alcohol use from both an
acute and chronic use perspective. The session will
also discuss the implications of this research on the
treatment for alcohol dependency.
Objectives
Identify the neurochemical actions of alcohol in
the brain.
Identify the symptoms of the acute use of alcohol,
its chronic use consequences and withdrawal
symptoms.
Understand Evidence-Based Treatment Implication.
Speaker(s)
Kenneth Robinson
President
Correctional Counseling, Inc.
Germantown, Tennessee
SESSION B-9
Fundamentals of Incentives and Sanctions in
Adult Drug Court
Maryland C
Incentives and sanctions are essential tools of the Drug
Court team. However, many Drug Court teams do not
base their responses on scientifi c strategies. Over the
past years, the National Drug Court Institute (NDCI)
has offered topic-specifi c training programs for Drug
Court teams after the completion of a thorough liter-
ature review of over 100 articles pertaining to shaping
behavior. This session will offer an in-depth analysis
of the ten science-based principles every Drug Court
should consider before responding to client behavior.
Objectives
Identify practical applications of the ten science
based principles in developing a comprehensive
strategy on incentives and sanctions.
Identify successful strategies for using incentives
and sanctions in an Adult Drug Court .
Learn the ten science-based principles of
changing behavior.
TUESDAY
74 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION B-12
From the Needle to the Pen: Telling it Like it is!
-Addicted to Drugs or Addicted to the Lifestyle
National Harbor 3
Substance abusing and criminal justice clients are
not just addicted to drugs but are often addicted
to a lifestyle that court teams continue to miss or
even begin to understand. Without discussing these
dynamics, clients continue to fail, especially from a
cultural perspective. The author discusses and shares
through his writings, how he manipulated and conned
various professionals, and how the pen became his
salvation in the midst of his addiction to fi ght for sanity
in the unforgiving insanity of the drug world. This
session further identifi es what Drug Court practitioners
can do to address these dynamics to support success
for racially and culturally diverse participants.
Objectives
Defi ne the lifestyle of addiction and how it
impacts success.
Explain the relationships between addiction to
the drug and addiction to the lifestyle and the
implications for Drug Courts.
Identify strategies for practitioners to use from peer
coaching to recognizing unrealistic expectations.
Speaker(s)
Timothy James
Author “From the Needle to the Pen
Atlanta, Georgia
Guy Wheeler
President
Guy A. Wheeler Group
Co-Chair: Thurgood Marshall Action Coalition
Plantation, Florida
SESSION B-11
Cultural Profi ciency with Latinos in
Drug Court Practice
Chesapeake 7-9
Achieving behavior change can be extremely diffi cult
for Latino client populations when adhered to cultural
values challenge or contrast the strategies used by
the Drug Court professionals and desired program
outcomes. Further, practitioners are not always privy to
the cultural nuances that can impact behavior change
with Latinos/as. This presentation will offer a cultural
competent modality that practitioners can tap into and
elicit the adhered to Latino cultural facets that impact
behavior change, and essentially forge a successful
recovery process for this diverse population.
Objectives
Identify at least two culturally based questions that
can be added to traditional client assessment tools.
State that integrating the Latino client’s culture can
help lead to effective and sustainable behavior change.
List at least two points of Drug Court program
and client contact where the cultural competence
modality can be integrated.
Speaker(s)
Diana Padilla
Program Manager
NDRI USA / NeC ATTC
New York, New York
TUESDAY
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION B-14
Target 25: Pennsylvania’s Nationally Recognized
DUI Reduction Initiative
National Harbor 6-7
Target 25 is the early identifi cation, placement, and
pretrial supervision of second and subsequent offense
DUI offenders. Started in 2010 in York County,
Pennsylvania, Target 25 uses 24/7 concepts and is
designed to be a complement to DUI Treatment
Courts. Target 25 runs as a collaborative program in
partnership with the District Attorney’s offi ce, the
Court of Common Pleas, the minor judiciary, local
law enforcement, the Sheriff’s Department, Adult
Probation, the Clerk of the Courts, and the local
defense bar. In the last year Target 25 and its founder,
the Honorable John S. Kennedy, have been nationally
recognized by NHTSA and the Governor’s Highway
Safety Association for its unprecedented results,
including reductions in the number of repeat drunk
driving offenses; crashes resulting in injury or fatality
due to a drinking driver; and the rates of re-arrest,
failures to appear, and revocation.
Objectives
Learn how the Target 25 program came to be and
what the most recent statistics show in terms of
local impact.
Hear from leaders in the York County criminal justice
community about how to engage, develop, and
coordinate a multi-departmental program like Target
25 in order to improve outcomes.
Learn about the specifi c requirements of the
program, including methods to promote early
intervention and treatment, 24/7 alcohol monitoring,
and more.
Speaker(s)
Tim Barker
Chief Deputy Prosecutor
York County DA’s Offi ce
York, Pennsylvania
Hon. John S. Kennedy
Judge
York County Treatment Courts
York, Pennsylvania
SESSION B-13
Implementing Trauma-Informed Care Principles
into Your Program
National Harbor 4
Justice system involved and substance abusing
individuals historically experience incidents of trauma.
Trauma means experiencing, witnessing, or being
threatened with an event or events that involve actual
serious injury, a threat to the physical integrity of
one’s self or others, or possible death. If individuals
suffering from trauma do not receive specialized
intervention from trained staff, prospects for long-term
recovery are diminished. Substance abusing individuals
with misidentifi ed or misdiagnosed trauma-related
symptoms often have diffi culty seeking help for their
addiction and engaging in treatment, which makes
relapse more likely. A trauma informed approach in
Drug Courts and substance abuse treatment programs
is essential to effectively address the multiple and
unique needs of trauma survivors.
This session assumes prior knowledge of trauma
informed care principles and primarily will focus on
ideas and practical solutions for implementing trauma-
informed care principles into an existing Drug Court
or program.
Objectives
Provide a brief refresher on Trauma Informed
Care Principles.
Identify areas where individuals can be re-traumatized
in criminal justice settings.
Brainstorm ideas and practical solutions for
implementing trauma-informed care principles.
Speaker(s)
Joseph Madonia
Project Director
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Sky Pena-Davis
Project Manager, Offi ce of Policy and Planning
NYS Unifi ed Court System
New York, New York
Christina Ruffi no
Project Manager, Drug Court Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
TUESDAY
76 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION B-16
The Computerized Assessment and Referral
System (CARS) - Identifying Mental Health
Disorders Among DUI Offenders
Chesapeake 10-12
Repeat DUI offenders often suffer from a number of
psychiatric disorders and other psychosocial risks,
suggesting that untreated mental health and behavioral
issues likely contribute to the persisting rate of DUI.
However, treatment for DUI offenders most commonly
consists of alcohol education and alcohol treatment
only. This presentation describes an innovative
assessment in the fi nal stages of development, the
Computerized Assessment and Referral System (CARS),
for use in DUI treatment and court settings. CARS
packages a powerful mental health assessment with a
user-friendly interface, increased fl exibility, treatment
referrals, and immediate personalized output, to
create a tool that can be used easily by DUI programs
to screen DUI offenders and target comorbid mental
health issues. CARS is being evaluated through a
randomized controlled trial at two separate DUI
treatment locations. The study compares a screener,
full, and self-administered version of the CARS tool.
We are collecting both staff and client impressions, as
well as data from CARS and follow-up information from
clients, courts, and aftercare providers post-treatment
to determine the usability of CARS, its effi cacy as a brief
intervention, and the relationship between psychiatric
comorbidity and outcome among fi rst-time and repeat
DUI offenders. This session will present the latest
ndings from this study.
Objectives
Gain a better understanding of the mental health
profi les of fi rst-time and repeat DUI offenders.
Learn why it is important to screen for mental
disorders in DUI populations and learn about a new
screening tool.
Engage in discussion of how and where such
screening could occur within the DUI court process.
Speaker(s)
Sarah Nelson
Associate Director of Research
Division on Addiction, Cambridge Health Alliance;
Harvard Medical School
Medford, Massachusetts
SESSION B-15
Alcohol Monitoring and Testing Technologies: A
Primer for New Programs, a Refresher on Policies
Chesapeake 4-6
Drug Courts are on the front line of providing encour-
agement when offenders succeed, and holding them
accountable when they fail to meet their obligations.
Sobriety is a major obstacle for many offenders. In fact,
a survey of 1.2 million prisoners in state correctional
facilities found that one-third had been using alcohol
at the time of their offense. Ensuring offenders stay
sober while released to community supervision has
many positive effects. Criminal justice offi cials can
effectively use rapidly evolving technology to track
alcohol consumption by Drug Court participants.
This workshop is for agencies considering an alcohol
monitoring program.
Objectives
Attendees will learn the basics of alcohol testing
methods and devices, including continuous alcohol
monitoring, the benefi ts of adding a program, key
considerations, and how to begin with a focus on
policy development.
This workshop is geared to professionals and
administrators who are new to alcohol testing
and electronic monitoring and/or considering
implementing such a program within their agency.
It will also offer program administrators a refresher on
policy and program development.
Speaker(s)
Joseph Johnson
Account Executive Specializing in Offender Monitoring
BI Incorporated
Boulder, Colorado
TUESDAY
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION B-18
Unique Aspects of Behavioral Healthcare in
Drug Treatment Courts
National Harbor 2
Treatment providers working with drug treatment courts
seldom have prior relevant formal education and only
limited experience in working with the criminal justice
system and court-based interventions, such as drug
treatment courts. The differences between traditional
and drug treatment court practice are numerous, unique,
and profound. These include ethics, client choice,
informed consent, confi dentiality, duty to warn/protect,
evidence-based treatments for this population, partici-
pation in a multidisciplinary team, motivational issues,
behavior management, and the central if often neglected
role of criminogenic risks and needs. Additionally, Drug
Court participants typically present with a complex range
of concerns, such as co-occurring disorders, trauma,
and criminal thinking. Relying solely upon on-the-
job learning extends the learning curve of clinicians,
diminishes the potential benefi ts of treatment, and puts
the clinician at risk to run afoul of the court and other
elements of the criminal justice system. This presen-
tation will assist both new and experienced treatment
providers in identifying the similarities and distinctions
from traditional practice and the appropriate adapta-
tions to make in order to work successfully in the drug
treatment court setting. Relevant research, practical
experience, case vignettes, and discussion will be used
as learning tools.
Objectives
Understand the signifi cant differences in ethical
practice in traditional counseling and that employed
in the Drug Court setting.
Improved ability to function as a member of the
multidisciplinary Drug Court team.
Acquire greater skill in implementing best practices
in addressing those needs most related to criminal
conduct.
Speaker(s)
Hartwell Dowling
Coordinator of Specialty Dockets and Grants
Administrative Offi ce of the Courts
Augusta, Maine
Sonya Harper
Project Director of NDCRC
NDCI - The Professional Services Branch of NADCP
Alexandria, Virginia
SESSION B-17
Indian Country Legal Implications
Maryland 1-3
Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts function under a
different legal framework compared to their State Drug
Court counterparts. This workshop will explore that
legal framework, including the Indian Civil Rights Act,
the newly enacted Tribal Law and Order Act and the
Violence Against Women Act, as well as potentially
applicable tribal law. In addition, this workshop will
examine the common legal structures that adult, family,
and juvenile Healing to Wellness Courts adopt. Finally,
this workshop will explore common legal issues faced
by Healing to Wellness Courts, including state Drug
Court case law, which while not authoritative, never-
theless offers insights into legal issues facing Healing to
Wellness Courts.
Objectives
Learn the applicable federal Indian law, including
the Indian Civil Rights Act, TLOA, and VAWA.
Learn the applicable federal Drug Court law.
Explore state Drug Court case law for strategies
in tribal court.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Joseph Flies-Away
Chief Justice
Hualapai Court of Appeals
Phoenix, Arizona
Carrie Garrow
Consultant
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
West Hollywood, California
Lauren van Schilfgaarde
Tribal Law Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
West Hollywood, California
TUESDAY
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Precious Bennally
Senior Associate
Drug Court Programs and Tribal Justice Exchange
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Adelle Fontanet
Senior Associate, Tribal Justice Exchange
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
SESSION B-20
The Zealous Advocate
Maryland B
As defense attorneys working in a treatment court we
are in the unique situation as counselors for our clients,
advocates within the legal system and members of a
treatment team. At times each of these rolls seems to
be in direct confl ict with another. However, research
has shown that having the defense attorney as a regular
member of the Drug Court team helps to increase
success rates among the participants.
In this session we will explore how to help participants
understand and feel comfortable with your role as
their legal counsel and as a member of the treatment
team. We will identify rules of conduct as they apply to
Attorney ethical obligations. Finally we will discuss how
being a member of a treatment team is different from
traditional legal roles and ways in which to help other
members of the team understand why your role as
an advocate must be maintained even within the non
adversarial approach of Drug Court.
Objectives
Identify the unique role of the defense attorney in the
treatment court setting.
Understand the defense attorney’s role in developing
and applying evidence based standards within the
treatment court process.
Explore ways to help participants and team members
understand the role of the defense attorney as a team
member and an advocate.
Speaker(s)
Melynda Benjamin
Chief - Specialty Court Division
Kane County Public Defender’s Offi ce
St. Charles, Illinois
SESSION B-19
Tribal Youth Wellness: Responses to Underage
Drinking Among Native Youth
National Harbor 5
The serious consequences of alcohol abuse among
Native youth have been repeatedly affi rmed though
research. Studies including Monitoring the Future and
the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse have
consistently shown that that American Indian and
Alaska Native youth are more likely to start drinking
at a younger age, more likely to drink heavily, more
likely to use drugs together with drinking, and more
likely to suffer higher alcohol-related consequences
than their non-Native peers. Considering that excessive
alcohol consumption is a leading cause of death among
American Indians and Alaska Natives, alcohol abuse
among Native youth can be particularly devastating for
many tribal nations.
The Center for Court Innovation is currently working
with the National Council of Juvenile and Family
Court Judges and several tribes around the country
to explore innovative responses to underage drinking.
At this session, the Center for Court Innovation will
share timely information about effective interven-
tions currently being used in tribal courts and lessons
learned from this project. The presenters will also
facilitate a discussion among participants around the
particular challenges faced by tribes as they seek to
empower their youth and divert them from destructive
alcohol-related behaviors. This session seeks to
enable participants to develop effective responses to
underage drinking among Native youth in their own
communities.
Objectives
Understand the nature and scope of underage
drinking and its attendant consequences among
Native youth.
Identify innovative strategies for addressing underage
drinking in tribal Healing to Wellness Courts.
Engage with other tribal justice practitioners to
discuss different approaches to addressing underage
drinking.
Speaker(s)
Aaron Arnold
Director, Drug Court Programs and Tribal Justice Exchange
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
community courts, Mental Health Courts, and even
traditional courts that exhibit these practices.
There is a robust research basis to support these
ndings. The concept – called procedural justice –
holds that when litigants perceive the process to be fair,
they are more likely comply with court orders and the
law generally. Procedural justice includes several key
dimensions, including treating litigants with respect,
ensuring their understanding of court procedures, and
providing an opportunity to be heard.
This presentation will provide an overview of relevant
procedural justice research and its connection to the
broader topic of improving justice system legitimacy.
Faculty will highlight studies and demonstration
projects nationally in various justice system contexts
that have experimented with the approach.
Faculty will also describe a multi-year project funded by
the Department of Justice to help the fi eld understand
procedural justice, assess their capacity to improve
litigant perceptions of fairness, and make concrete
improvements The presentation will explain available
self-assessment resources and how they are being tested
in pilot jurisdictions around the country.
Lastly, faculty will engage the audience in a discussion
of promising practices that might enhance the primary
dimensions of procedural justice - voice, understanding,
respect, and neutrality of decision-making – in an effort
to stimulate discussion.
Objectives
Defi ne the key elements of procedural justice, its
connection to system legitimacy, and research
supporting these concepts.
Identify and explore available tools to assess court
users’ perceptions of fairness.
Consider promising practices for enhancing
perceptions of voice, understanding, respect, and
neutrality of decision-making.
Speaker(s)
Amanda Berman
Project Director
Red Hook Community Justice Center
Center for Court Innovation
Brooklyn, New York
Michael Rempel
Research Director
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
SESSION B-21
Bring Drug Court to Your State Legislators
Chesapeake JKL
What better way to get your message heard than to
bring Drug Court to your legislators? This session
will give you the tools and resources needed to plan
a Capitol Hill Day at your state capitol, and how to
capitalize on the momentum of the event.
Objectives
Learn how to organize and implement a successful
State Capitol Hill Day.
Identify ways to work with state legislatures to
support Drug Courts, DWI Courts and Veterans
Treatment Courts.
Learn effective ways to get your message heard at
your state capitol.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Brent D. Benjamin
Judge
West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals
Charleston, West Virginia
Hartwell Dowling
Coordinator
Specialty Dockets and Grants
Administrative Offi ce of the Courts, Maine
Augusta, Maine
James M. Eberspacher
Project Director
National Center for DWI Courts
Alexandria, Virginia
SESSION B-22
Is “Fair Treatment” an Evidence-Based Practice?
How to Measure the Presence and Effects of
Procedural Justice
Chesapeake DE
A common theme has emerged from a number of recent
studies of Drug Courts and other problem-solving
courts: defendants’ perceptions of the judge and the
court process are key. The NIJ’s Multi-Site Adult Drug
Court Evaluation, published by the Urban Institute,
RTI International, and the Center for Court Innovation,
found that Drug Courts whose judges interacted with
defendants in a fair, respectful, and knowledgeable way
were more effective, i.e. reduced drug use and reduced
future offending. Similar fi ndings have been shown for
TUESDAY
80 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION C-2
Comprehensive Services: Lessons from the
Prevention and Family Recovery Project
National Harbor 11
What does it take for a Family Dependency Treatment
Court (FDTC) to effectively serve the whole family?
Join us to learn about an innovative public-private
partnership designed to promote larger-scale systems
changes to provide effective, comprehensive family-
centered treatment for families in FDTCs. The
Prevention and Family Recovery (PFR) initiative seeks to
advance the capacity of FDTCs to integrate and sustain
evidence-based parenting services and developmental
and therapeutic services for children into their larger
FDTC program. Children and Family Futures, with
the generous support of the Doris Duke Charitable
Foundation and The Duke Endowment, is providing
funding and intensive technical assistance to four
grantees: Pima County Juvenile Court Center (AZ),
Robeson Health Care Corporation (NC), San Francisco
Superior Court (CA) and Tompkins County Department
of Social Services (NY). This session will highlight
important lessons learned from the grantees’ fi rst year
of operations. These lessons will address progress and
challenges with implementing and monitoring evidence-
based programming, building local cross-systems data
collection and evaluation capacity, and undertaking the
practice and larger systems changes needed to provide
and sustain a family-centered approach in FDTCs. The
presenters will discuss the implications of the lessons
for the larger FDTC fi eld. They will also highlight the
unique characteristics of this venture and offer insights
for future public-private partnerships seeking to advance
systems change.
Objectives
Discuss key lessons about the progress and
challenges associated with implementing and
integrating evidence-based parenting and children’s
services into an established FDTC. Examine the
context of each PFR site and the major mechanisms
that appear to be associated with a FDTC’s readiness
and capacity to provide and sustain comprehensive
family-centered care for families.
Describe the relationships between leadership
and cross-systems program development and
improvements.
TRACK SESSION C
Tuesday, July 28
2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
SESSION C-1
Target Population
Maryland D
When implementing and operating a successful Drug
Court, one of the fi rst and most critical questions is
Who will the court serve?” The research is clear. Drug
Courts are best designed and most successful when
serving high risk/high need populations, that is, those
participants with high criminogenic risk and high
prognostic need. In fact, every component of your Drug
Court program, from treatment to incentives/sanctions
to case management will be integrally connected with
targeting the appropriate population. But how do you
identify high risk/high need participants? How do you
ensure your program is targeting these individuals?
This presentation will outline the research on high risk/
high need, and will further discuss and explain how to
ensure your program targets the correct population.
Objectives
Understand the research behind serving high risk/
high need populations in Drug Court.
Identify strategies for incorporating risk/need
assessment into your Drug Court operations.
Speaker(s)
Douglas Marlowe
Chief of Science, Law, and Policy
National Association of Drug Court Professionals
Alexandria, Virginia
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assessing youth for risk, needs, and substance abuse
involvement; structured decision-making; applying
risk/needs outcome data to effective case management,
applying evidence based practices and matching youth
to evidence based programming.
Objectives
Participants will learn key elements of risk / needs
screening and assessment.
Be able apply the gated approach model JDC client
selection, structured decision-making, and JDC case
management and supervision.
Have a better understanding of evidence-based
practices and programs as they relate to interventions
for JDC-involved youth.
Speaker(s)
Jessica Pearce
Training Manager
National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Reno, Nevada
Douglas Thomas
Senior Research Associate
National Center for Juvenile Justice
Reno, Nevada
Explore how comprehensive family-centered services
infl uence FDTC participants’ family well-being as
well as children’s permanency and safety outcomes.
Explore initial opportunities to apply lessons learned
from the PFR initiative to other jurisdictions.
Speaker(s)
Rosemary Chalk
Consultant
Doris Duke Charitable Foundation
Alexandria, Virginia
Phil Redmond
Associate Director
Child Care Division
Duke Endowment
Charlotte, North Carolina
Nancy Young
Executive Director
Children and Family Futures
Lake Forest, California
SESSION C-3
Using a Gated Assessment Process to Connect
the Right Kid to the Right Intervention
National Harbor 13
Matching the right youth to the right program at the
right time and for the right amount of time is a key
to successful Juvenile Drug Court interventions. This
workshop will present a strategy and procedures for
identifying, screening, assessing youth and making
data-driven decisions regarding JDC referral, matching
with appropriate interventions, case management,
as well as case closing. Matching the “right youth”
requires assessing both static and dynamic risk factors
to determine if an individual is a good fi t for Juvenile
Drug Court, if he or she is amenable to treatment, and
which treatment intervention is most appropriate. The
right program” or intervention will be evidence-based
(to the extent possible), matched to the individual
level of risk and needs of youth, and implemented with
integrity. The “right time” refers to both the youth’s
current amenability to treatment and to maximizing
treatment duration (neither too short nor too long).
The strategy presented in this workshop is a “gated
approach” in which each of the critical decision
points are seen as JDC gates through which juveniles
pass if they match the criteria at each gate. Several
processes will be discussed, including screening and
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82 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
in improving case processing and sentencing options
for defendants with mental illnesses without creating
a specialized court part. This workshop will present
ndings from the policy survey and highlight opportu-
nities for strengthening Mental Health Court operations
and other mental health/criminal justice collaborations.
Objectives
Understand standard practices and trends across
Mental Health Courts (e.g., defi nitions of success),
based on study fi ndings.
Understand common challenges across Mental
Health Courts and learn how courts are addressing
those challenges.
Identify policies and practices from Mental Health
Courts that can be adapted for Drug Courts.
Speaker(s)
Carol Fisler
Director, Mental Health Court Programs
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Josy Hahn
Senior Research Associate
Center for Court Innovation
New York, New York
Sky Pena-Davis
Regional Project Manager
Unifi ed Court System
Cohoes, New York
SESSION C-4
A Dozen Years, Two Dozen Courts: Lessons
from New York’s Mental Health Courts
National Harbor 12
Since 2002, close to 8,000 defendants have partici-
pated in New York’s Mental Health Courts, which
operate in large cities, suburban communities, and
small towns in rural areas. The courts vary widely in
their staffi ng and funding for court operations and in
the local resources for treatment and related supports.
In collaboration with the New York State Unifi ed Court
System, the Center for Court Innovation has conducted
a statewide policy survey of New York’s 25 adult
Mental Health Courts, which has reviewed policies
and practices for adult Mental Health Courts including
eligibility criteria, clinical assessment procedures, risk/
needs assessment, range of available treatment and
other social services, local collaborations, and strengths
and challenges, based on staff reporting. The policy
survey is supplemented by a review of administrative
data and qualitative interviews with select sites to
understand specifi c Mental Health Court practices and
policies. The New York State Unifi ed Court System
and the Center for Court Innovation plan to use the
study results and recommendations drawn from the
national literature to identify common challenges,
promising practices, and training needs, to spark
discussion about policy and practice recommenda-
tions for Mental Health Courts in New York State, and
to provide guidance to jurisdictions that are interested
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Understand quantitative and qualitative outcomes
associated with the implementation of the ACT model.
Speaker(s)
Connie Neal
Chief Operating Offi cer
Kentucky Administrative Offi ce of the Courts
Frankfort, Kentucky
Lisa Shannon
Assistant Professor
Morehead State University
Morehead, Kentucky
SESSION C-6
Real Men Wear Pink
(For Women Only)
Chesapeake ABC
Sometimes we just need to get over ourselves! This
session identifi es the potential challenges for women
working in Drug Court and how often their interaction
with participants can take on the role of “mother” vs.
professional; instigator vs. interventionist; display issues
of transference, exhibit fear of failure amongst other
areas gender responsive services and approaches to often
focus on the unique needs of women and girls. While
this is critically important boys and men are in need
of a gender responsive approach as well. This session
explores the issues facing males in recovery from trauma,
to societal expectations and the impact women may
have had in their lives. It also examines the dynamics of
women who work with men and the challenges that may
occur. Women need to reexamine their approach when
working with boys, men as well as with women and girls
(especially those of color)!
Objectives
Identify approaches of women working with males
that can impede success.
List three issues or potential areas that may impact
boys/men in Drug Courts.
Speaker(s)
Susan James-Andrews
President and CEO
James-Andrews and Associates
Mitchellville, Maryland
SESSION C-5
Enhancing the Continuum of Care and
Expanding the Service Population via Assertive
Community Treatment in Rural Drug Courts
Chesapeake GHI
Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is an evidenced-
based practice designed to provide effective treatment
and support services to the chronically mentally ill by
extending services to individuals with the most needs.
The Kentucky Administrative Offi ce of the Courts has
adapted the model to address the needs of an addicted
population and implemented it in multiple Adult Drug
Court jurisdictions. Along with the traditional Drug
Court approach to supervision and case management,
these participants receive intensive support and
assertive outreach in their own living and working
environments via ACT. ACT has an anticipatory
approach and through this adaptation, provides for
intensive, ongoing assessment of immediate and long
term recovery related needs. Ideally, the implemen-
tation of ACT in Drug Court settings goes beyond the
traditional focus to increase access to needed services
and decrease the likelihood of relapse and related
criminal activity.
This presentation focuses on the adaptation of this
evidence-based practice to meet the needs of partici-
pants in rural Drug Courts as well as discussing
necessary collaborations to ensure implementation
and sustainability as well as research examining
effectiveness and lessons learned to help individuals
understand how this model can be implemented in
other jurisdictions. Specifi cally, this session will: 1)
provide a brief overview of the ACT model, 2) show
how the model can be adapted successfully to rural
Drug Courts, 3) overview the roles/responsibilities
of team members and allow key stakeholders to
share perspectives, and 4) provide evaluation data
to overview lessons learned, successes, challenges,
and effectiveness associated with implementing this
model in Adult Drug Courts. The target audience for
this presentation includes individuals interested in an
approach to help address fragmented systems of care
by a more coordinated approach.
Objectives
Understand the fundamentals of ACT as well as
necessary modifi cations for implementing.
Understand the key roles/responsibilities of the ACT
and Drug Court team members.
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Juliette Mackin
Executive VP & Sr. Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Ryan H. Porter
Behavioral Health and Quality Assurance
Idaho Supreme Court
Boise, Idaho
Brenidy Rice
State Drug Court Coordinator/Court Program Analyst
Colorado Judicial Department
Denver, Colorado
Ben Wyatt
Grant Coordinator
Oregon Criminal Justice Commission
Salem, Oregon
SESSION C-8
Designer Drugs 101
Maryland A
Designer drugs are chemically modifi ed versions of
therapeutic medications, which users take to alter
their mental state. The physical and mental effects of
designer drugs often prove unpredictable because the
illegal manufacture of these substances. Different types
of designer drugs have varying effects on users. This
workshop will highlight several types of designer drugs,
their effects, trends in use, legal issues, and treatment
considerations. This workshop is a mixture of lecture
format, video clips, case presentation, and group inter-
action. Target audience is social workers, physicians,
nurses, counselors, psychologists, law enforcement,
rst responders, parents of teens and young adults,
and anyone who works with individuals with substance
abuse and mental health issues.
Objectives
Distinguish designer drugs and how they are made.
Learn who uses these substances and treatment
considerations.
Know the legal issues involved with Designer Drug use.
Speaker(s)
Kristine Nutt
Treatment Provider
Life Center of Galax
Galax, Virginia
SESSION C-7
Drug Court Peer Review: Implementation
Successes and Lessons Learned
Maryland 4-6
The peer review process is intended to create a
statewide learning community among treatment court
teams. The purpose is for peers to help each other
identify ideas for program improvements and share
successes and challenges. This allows treatment court
community across the state access to information and
support at a low administrative cost while building
relationships between programs. It can also provide
important information to the state about areas of
needed technical assistance and training, and how
to focus those resources most effectively. This panel
will discuss the process of developing and imple-
menting Drug Court peer reviews in Idaho, Georgia,
Oregon, and Colorado. Staff from each state will share
stories and information about their state roll-outs and
what they have experienced. These states have now
conducted peer reviews in multiple sites and will share
highlights from their successes and lessons learned,
as well as how they are using the information and
process. Staff from NPC Research who helped these
states develop their protocols will facilitate a discussion
and question and answer period for interested sites
and states to gain more information about having peer
reviews.
Objectives
What are the benefi ts of using peer reviews? What
are the successes states that have implemented peer
reviews have had?
What challenges have arisen and how did states
overcome them?
What lessons have been learned by the states that
have implemented peer reviews that will help states
that are exploring?
Speaker(s)
Joshua Becker
Certifi cation Program Offi cer, Accountability Courts
Administrative Offi ce of the Courts
Atlanta, Georgia
Shannon Carey
Co-President & Sr. Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
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SESSION C-10
Role of Probation in the Drug Court:
Best Practices
National Harbor 10
Probation is a critical piece of a successful Drug Court.
From administering drug tests to doing home visits,
from performing random searches to asking partici-
pants about their successes and offering support, the
probation offi cer provides accountability, supervision,
and encouragement. This session will outline the role
of the probation offi cer in a Drug Court and offer
advice and insight on how to enhance participant
outcomes with a strong probation presence.
Objectives
Understand the critical role of the probation offi cer
in Drug Court.
Identify ways to enhance Drug Court outcomes by
incorporating effective supervision techniques.
Speaker(s)
Helen Harberts
Deputy District Attorney (ret.)
Chico, California
Charles R. Robinson
Chief Probation Offi cer - Director
Travis County Community Supervision and
Correction Department
Austin, Texas
SESSION C-9
Incentives and Sanctions in Juvenile Drug Court
Maryland C
Behavior change is an important aspect of JDCs, and
research tells us that to promote positive behavior
change within a Juvenile Drug Court, incentives and
sanctions should be given in a 4 to 1 ratio (i.e., four
incentives for every one sanction). However, this is a
diffi cult task to accomplish for juvenile and Adult Drug
Courts. Recommended practice is to try to achieve a 1
to 1 ratio. Ultimately, this means JDC team teams may
need to create opportunities to deliver more incen-
tives than sanctions to the youth in the program. In
addition, it is extremely important to provide incen-
tives that are meaningful to the youth, and as much
as possible, involve the youth in choosing their own
incentive and/or sanction, so they have ownership
in the process. This session will cover a three-prong
approach to implementing incentives and promoting
behavior change in youth.
Objectives
Learn about privilege-reduction strategies to gain
compliance over a single behavior. Delivering a
response every single time!
How to create individualized behavior contracts to
reward and motivate for positive behavior change in
other areas.
Learn about program-wide incentives to motivate
families to engage in the program and promote a
strength-based atmosphere.
Speaker(s)
Cassandra Kirk
Associate Judge
Romae T. Powell Juvenile Justice Center
Reno, Nevada
Wendy Schiller
Site Manager
National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Reno, Nevada
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86 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION C-12
What’s in it for me?
Attracting African Americans to Drug Court
National Harbor 3
In many jurisdictions across the U.S. African Americans
are not accessing Drug Courts. Many of them claim
that the lack of access is due to African Americans
choosing not to participate in Drug Courts. Why are
African Americans not choosing to be in Drug Court?
What can Drug Courts due to make their programs
more attractive to African American populations?
Objectives
This session will discuss disparate numbers of African
Americans accessing Drug Courts across the country.
Participants will examine how using culturally
relevant incentives could make programs more
attractive to African Americans.
This session will explore and discuss other barriers that
keep African Americans from accessing Drug Courts.
Speaker(s)
Darryl Turpin
President
Darryl Turpin Consulting
Louisville, Kentucky
SESSION C-13
Vicarious Trauma & Vicarious Posttraumatic
Growth Among Service Providers In Problem-
Solving Courts
National Harbor 4
Clients in substance abuse treatment often report
histories of trauma, refl ecting, in part, the use of
substances to self-medicate. The co-occurrence of
substance abuse and trauma-related symptoms is
evident among Drug Court participants, all the more
so in family treatment Drug Courts, where child abuse
and neglect and parent-child separations increase
the level of trauma experienced by family members,
and in Veterans Treatment Courts, particularly for
those returning from deployments. In order to be
effective with these clients, there is a need to provide
intercession for trauma-related symptoms as well as
substance abuse. While the integration of treatment
for trauma and substance abuse treatment has positive
effects on clients, less is known about its impact on
service providers. This exposure has been shown to
SESSION C-11
Immigration Consequences of Criminal
Conduct: How Drug Courts Can Help
Chesapeake 7-9
This session will focus on the what can happen to
lawful permanent residents, and undocumented
workers (and their families) who are facing immigration
consequences for alleged criminal conduct. Drug
Courts have proven to be an effective tool to help
mitigate negative consequences for many of these
individuals. Additionally, the DACA and President
Obama’s Executive Orders on immigration and how
criminal prosecution for those who might be eligible
will be discussed.
Objectives
Identify the types of crimes involved in Drug Court
cases that might carry immigration consequences.
Explain what a “conviction” is under Federal
immigration law.
Explain how a sentence to Drug Court can fall within
that defi nition and constitute a conviction of the
underlying crime for Federal immigration purposes.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Rogelio R. Flores
Superior Court Judge
Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara
Santa Maria, California
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Amy Lopez
Drug Court Coordinator
County of Santa Barbara ADMHS
Santa Maria, California
SESSION C-14
Making Evidence-Based Decisions: Using Tech-
nology to Assess People, Cases, and Outcomes
National Harbor 6-7
This workshop focuses on best practices in risk and
needs assessment (RNA) for problem-solving courts and
agencies. Since there are many different kinds of RNA,
selecting the right system with the capacity and function-
ality to meet your agency goals can be a major challenge.
To help sort through the literature, we’ll take a look at
recent process evaluation studies on decision-support
procedures like the Risk-Need-Responsivity principle and
we’ll clarify the main correctional purposes, policies, and
standards that an effective RNA system must support.
Once selected, there are several challenges that can
thwart an effective implementation of RNA, so we’ll
review common errors, defi cits, and challenges that may
undermine your efforts. Topics will include:
Achieving effective supervision of RNA staff.
Ensuring staff competence and “buy-in.”
Achieving high data quality.
Managing staff overrides.
Avoiding errors.
Proper use of RNA in guiding decisions.
Coping with ambiguous cases.
and other common challenges…
We will also explore how senior administrators, judges,
prosecutors, and probation supervisors can use
RNA to enhance agency effectiveness and support
the RNR principles.
This workshop aims to be completely open to
audience participation and Q&A participation will
be encouraged.
Speaker(s)
Tim Brennan
Chief Scientist
Northpointe Institute
Simpsonville, South Carolina
have an untoward impact, activating psychological
distress particularly if staff have had traumatic experi-
ences themselves, but can also result in post-traumatic
growth, providing staff with a stronger sense of self.
The fi rst presentation will focus on understanding
factors associated with vicarious trauma and/or
vicarious post-traumatic growth as a function of
working with clients who have experienced trauma.
The second presentation will focus on a survey of
substance abuse treatment providers for a family
treatment Drug Court and the personal impact on
them of utilizing trauma-informed treatment. Staff
experiences of vicarious trauma symptoms and
vicarious posttraumatic growth subsequent to working
with clients will be discussed. Additionally, factors
associated with these outcomes, including personal
history of trauma and substance abuse, education and
training, and clinical supervision, will be reported.
The third presentation will focus on veterans, who are
exposed to a disproportionate amount of traumatic
events compared to civilians and may experience
traumatic ethical and spiritual challenges. Empirical
and anecdotal evidence on vicarious trauma and
vicarious posttraumatic growth among veterans’
treatment providers, and implication, will be discussed.
Objectives
To understand what is meant by vicarious trauma,
and vicarious post-traumatic growth, and factors
associated with both.
To learn about staff perceptions of conducting
trauma-informed treatment and factors specifi c to
a Family Treatment Drug Court.
To understand the trauma-related challenges and
growth opportunities treatment providers may have
in a Veterans Treatment Court.
Speaker(s)
Merith Cosden
Dean
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, California
Justin Gauthier
Researcher
University of California Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, California
Lauren Koch
Graduate Student Researcher
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, California
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88 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
including the Impaired Driver Assessment designed
specifi cally for probation and parole personnel, super-
vision strategies, available technologies and alcohol
treatment. As part of this continuum of resources,
emphasis will also be placed on the use of DWI
Courts. Modeled after Drug Courts, DWI Courts offer
a post sentence alternative for alcohol dependent,
high-risk, high-need offenders, providing treatment,
quality supervision, testing, behavior modifi cation, and
long-term, recovery sustaining strategies.
The focus of this presentation is to present the
best practices in the assessment and supervision of
impaired drivers. This includes discussion of available
research and meta-analysis as it relates to assessments,
technology (interlock, Transdermal Alcohol Devices
etc.), DUI Courts, evidence based alcohol treatment
and supervision strategies. Specifi c sources of research
analysis includes The National Association of Drug
Court Professionals (NADCP), The National Highway
Safety Administration (NHTSA), Traffi c Injury Research
Foundation (TIRF) and the Substance Abuse Mental
Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).
Objectives
Participants will be able to identify evidence based
approaches to the supervision of impaired drivers.
Participants will identify how DUI assessments
impact supervision strategies.
Participants will identify unique advantages of DWI
Courts in the supervision of impaired drivers.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Michael Kavanaugh
Judge (Ret)
National Center for DWI Courts
Alexandria, Virginia
Nathan Lowe
Research Associate
American Probation and Parole Association
Lexington, Kentucky
Mark Stodola
NHTSA/APPA Probation Fellow
American Probation and Parole Association
Lexington, Kentucky
SESSION C-15
Improve Outcomes by Integrating On-site Drug
Testing: A Collaborative Approach
Chesapeake 4-6
This interactive session will focus on how to develop,
fund, market, and sustain on-site drug testing. Learn
how CoRR supports their community to reduce the
social, health and economic impact on families and
children from all types of substance abuse and behavioral
health issues.
Objectives
Improve treatment outcomes by integrating on-site
automated drug testing into your program.
Speaker(s)
Warren Daniels
CEO
Community Recovery Resources
Grass Valley, California
Ariel King Lovett
Deputy Director
Community Recovery Resources
Grass Valley, California
SESSION C-16
Research Says......... Best Practices in Assessment,
Management and Treatment of Impaired Drivers
Chesapeake 10-12
In 2010, there were 1.4 million drivers arrested for
driving under the infl uence and drunk drivers were
responsible for over 10,000 fatalities. Probation and
parole departments face unique challenges in assessing
risk levels for these offenders and determining the most
appropriate level and type of supervision to minimize
the risk of a re-offense.
This workshop will provide an overview and
continuum of evidence based practices for the super-
vision of high risk impaired drivers from intake to
discharge while helping participants understand
how to maximize effectiveness with these offenders
while reducing risk to the community. Class content
will include the latest research on assessment tools,
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The Program tracks successful participants for
re-arrests, in the fi rst year post-case dismissal. Of the
rst 432 such participants, 85% have no subsequent
arrest, 98% have no subsequent felony conviction
(among results). It has proven to be a cost- effective
alternative to traditional prosecution in a quasi-
treatment court setting while also effective in limiting
additional criminal behavior and allowing participants
the opportunity to avoid a felony criminal record.
Objectives
Engaging Low Risk/Low Need offenders in a
treatment court setting without requiring excessive
supervision or program demands.
The involvement of the victim and the coordination
of community partners in a deferred prosecution
alternative.
The role that this Program has in the CCSAO matrix
of alternatives to traditional prosecution.
Speaker(s)
Amrithrobin Aakre
Assistant State’s Attorney
Cook County (Il) States Attorney Offi ce
Chicago, Illinois
Mark Kammerer
Supv, Alternative Prosecution/Sentencing Unit
Cook County (Il) States Attorney Offi ce
Chicago, Illinois
Sarah Kaufman
Felony Specialty Courts Coordinator
Cook County (Il) States Attorney Offi ce
Chicago, Illinois
SESSION C-17
Felony Deferred Prosecution: A Court Monitored
Alternative to Traditional Prosecution for
Low Risk/Low Need Offenders
Maryland 1-3
The Cook County State’s Attorney’s Offi ce has long
been an active member of the alternative prosecution
and sentencing arena, at least as far back as the early
1970s. The Offi ce has been a major participant in the
expansion of alternative prosecution processes which
has seen the number of alternative sentencing options
(primarily treatment courts) in Cook County from three
in 2003 to the current 21 and deferred prosecution
options from one in 2009 to the current 12. The
number of individuals involved in one of these options
has risen from approximately 300 in any given month
(in 2000) to the current monthly total of over 2,600.
In 2011, State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez directed the
Alternative Prosecution/ Sentencing Unit to develop
a deferred prosecution program for non-violent
offenders with limited criminal backgrounds. This led
to the development and implementation of the Felony
Deferred Prosecution Program. To date, that Program
has admitted over 1,600 individuals charged with
non-violent felony offenses, with over 75% success-
fully completing the requirements of the Program and
having charges dismissed. The goals of the Program are:
to provide meaningful direction to participants in the
areas of educational achievement, vocational activity,
treatment referral (where indicated), and pursuit of a
law-abiding lifestyle and
to allow eligible offenders an opportunity to avoid
a felony prosecution and the possibility of a felony
conviction and all that entails.
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SESSION C-19
Honoring our Children by Honoring
our Traditions
National Harbor 5
Positive Indian Parenting is a model Indian parent
training curriculum that can be utilized as part of the
treatment and required coursework in both Adult
and Family Healing to Wellness Courts. The general
curriculum was developed by the National Indian
Child Welfare Association (NICWA). This parenting
curriculum draws on the strengths of historic Indian
child-rearing patterns and blends old parenting
values with modern skills. Storytelling, cradleboards,
harmony, lessons of nature, behavior management, and
the use of praise are discussed. Judge Lujan will discuss
how they implemented this unique curriculum in their
community and show how easy it is to tailor to one’s
own community.
Objectives
Describe a parenting resource that can be used
in the community.
Learn how to modify the curriculum to fi t your
community.
Learn ways to engage in your parenting sessions.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Lawrence Lujan
Judge
Ysleta del Sur Pueblo
El Paso, Texas
SESSION C-18
The Urgency of Hepatitis C in Drug Treatment
National Harbor 2
Addiction counselors and mental health specialists
are now encouraged by SAMHSA to screen and test
for Hepatitis C infection, (HCV) since early detection
is vital to treatment success and the client’s overall
health. HCV chronic illness can deter and effect the
process of behavior change which is the ultimate
goal of Drug Courts. Many clients in substance abuse
treatment settings have a history of injection drug use
and/or are born between the years of 1945 and 1965,
emphasizing high risk for HCV infection. This presen-
tation will present basic information on hepatitis C and
how the counselor can play a critical part in promoting
screening and testing for HCV.
Objectives
List 2 factors that put drug treatment clients
potentially at risk for hepatitis C infection and
disease complications.
Identify at least 2 HCV disease factors that can
impact on the Drug Court client’s ability to focus
on drug free behavior.
State at least 2 reasons why addressing HCV in drug
treatment can increase Drug Court outcomes.
Speaker(s)
Diana Padilla
Program Manager
NDRI USA / NeC ATTC
New York, New York
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Hon. Jeri Beth Cohen
Circuit Judge
State of Florida, Eleventh Judicial Circuit
Miami, Florida
SESSION C-21
The A, B, Cs of Meeting with Your Members
of Congress
Chesapeake JKL
You’ve scheduled a meeting with your Member of
Congress. Now What? This session will cover what a
typical meeting entails, what you should say, and how
you can continue a relationship with your Members
long after your meeting has ended.
Objectives
Identify ways of connecting with your Members
of Congress.
Learn what to expect at your meeting with your
Members of Congress.
Discuss Do’s and Don’ts of meeting with your
Members of Congress.
Speaker(s)
Judi Kosterman
Senior Vice President
WestCare Foundation
Las Vegas, Nevada
Connie Payne
Executive Offi cer, Statewide Services
Administrative Offi ce of the Courts
Frankfort, Kentucky
Hon. John Schwartz
Supervising Judge
Rochester, New York
SESSION C-20
Guess What? You’re a Family Court, Too
(if your Clients have Children)—Legal Issues
and Practical Considerations When Working
with Families in Drug Courts
Maryland B
All collaborative courts are family courts if their clients
include parents and children. Many clients have
legal matters involving juvenile delinquency, depen-
dency, family, and domestic violence matters. This
workshop will offer judicial leaders and legal profes-
sionals working in Adult Drug Courts an overview of
the dependency court and child welfare system and
offer some practical strategies on how to work with
parents who are involved in family courts. Participants
will gain a greater understanding and awareness of
how decisions in Adult Drug Court impact the child
and family, even if the child is never seen in court.
This presentation will make the case for why Adult
Drug Courts should pay greater attention to children
and families and why cross-system collaboration
and communication are critical for family safety and
recovery. National resources for legal education and
training will also be provided.
Objectives
Gain greater understanding of dependency and child
welfare system and learn practical strategies on how
to work with Adult Drug Court participants who are
also child welfare involved.
Gain a greater understanding of the impact of
substance use on children, and the importance of
addressing the needs of children and the parent-child
relationship as a critical part of family recovery.
Learn how cross-systems collaboration,
communication, and community partnerships are
critical in serving the complex needs of children and
families in your Drug Court.
Speaker(s)
Phil Breitenbucher
FDC TTA Program Director
Children and Family Futures, Inc.
Irvine, California
Hon. Phillip Britt
Drug Court Commissioner
35th Judicial Circuit
Kennett, Missouri
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share their experience, strength and hope with each
other that they may solve their common problem
and help others to recover from alcoholism.The only
requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking.
There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership; we are
self supporting through our own contributions. A.A. is
not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organi-
zation or institution; does not wish to engage in any
controversy, neither endorses nor opposes any causes.
Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other
alcoholics to achieve sobriety. The solution to under-
standing A.A. and its friends is to get to know them.
Objectives
Singleness of Purpose: The Only Requirement is a
Desire to Stop Drinking.
Spiritual but Never Religious.
Cooperation/Not Affi liation With the Professional
Community- Local A.A. Resources.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Ivan Lemelle
Judge
Alcoholics Anonymous
New York, New York
SESSION C-22
Alcoholics Anonymous: How We Cooperate
With Courts and the Legal Community
Chesapeake DE
This presentation will focus on the availability of A.A.
to national court professionals involved in assessing,
referring, treating, and rehabilitating alcoholics.
Strategies will be provided in accessing A.A. assistance &
involvement, transitioning or bridging between profes-
sional treatment and A.A. The judicial system often
requires clients involved in alcohol related offenses to
attend AA meetings. When offenders are required to
attend A.A. meetings as a condition of their sentence,
there may be a requirement that each offender offer proof
that he/she attends the required number of meetings.
How can courts cooperate with Alcoholics Anonymous
in ways that does not violate A.A. principles? What local
A.A. resources are available to help courts and other
justice professionals obtain accurate A.A. information.
This question will be addressed along with demysti-
fying AA myths and misconceptions while providing an
accurate and current view of A.A. today.Rationalization
and denial are part of the alcoholic’s illness. Initial
rejection of A.A. is part of the denial mechanism. A.A.
members, having broken through their denial and faced
the harm in their drinking, are particularly suited to
helping others break through their denial.Alcoholics
Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who
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SESSION D-2
Effective Strategies to Support Families
Through Reunifi cation
National Harbor 11
The accountable, time-limited mandate for achieving
permanency for children set forth in the 1997
Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) drove the
demand for a better and coordinated system response
to meet the needs of families affected by parental
substance use. This workshop presentation will explore
the impact of parental substance use on the on the
parent-child relationship and the essential service
components needed to address these issues, including
ensuring quality visitation and contact, implemen-
tation of evidence-based services inclusive of parent
education, therapeutic services and access to ongoing
family recovery support.
This workshop discussion will explore family readiness
as a collaborative practice issue by raising the need for
coordinated case plans and effective communication
protocols across child welfare, treatment and court
systems. Discussion will explore different program
designs across sites including the timing and phasing
of reunifi cation, family maintenance supervision and
case termination.
Objectives
Understand the impact of parental substance use
on the parent-child relationship and the essential
service components needed to address these issues.
Understand family readiness as a collaborative
practice issue and why “team” is just as important
as any “tool” for assessing readiness.
Learn various case management strategies, including
implementation of quality visitation and contact,
evidence-based services, coordinated case plans
and effective communication protocols across child
welfare, treatment and court systems.
Speaker(s)
Alexis Balkey
FDC TTA Program Manager
Children and Family Futures
Irvine, California
Phil Breitenbucher
FDC TTA Program Director
Children and Family Futures, Inc.
Irvine, California
TRACK SESSION D
Tuesday, July 28
3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
SESSION D-1
The Brain on Drugs
Maryland D
Alcohol and other drugs modify the body’s entire
neurochemistry once they enter the body’s system.
Alcohol and other drugs trigger a massive release of
neurotransmitters within the brain’s pleasure centers,
inhibiting its ability to replenish its chemical reservoirs.
This session will provide practitioners with insight into
why an individual continually uses drugs to replenish
chemical reservoirs to feel good again.
Objectives
Understand the effect of drug use on mind and body.
Identify the impact on the brain of initial and
prolonged drug use.
Learn to distinguish behaviors associated with use
and withdrawal of various drugs.
Speaker(s)
Steve Hanson
Director
Division of Treatment and Practice Innovation,
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
Rochester, New York
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Learn recommendations to guide policy for JDCs
seeking to improve family and community engagement.
Speaker(s)
Alison Greene
Director of Adolescent Research and Services
University of Arizona Southwest Institute of
Research on Women (SIROW)
Tucson, Arizona
Raanan Kagan
Senior Policy Analyst
Carnevale Associates
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Randolph D. Muck
Senior Clinical Consultant Advocates
Youth and Family Behavioral Health Care Treatment
Harpers Ferry, West Virginia
SESSION D-3
Engaging Family and Community in Juvenile
Drug Court and Implications for Policy
National Harbor 13
Families and the community are important aspects of
adolescent substance abuse treatment (NIDA, 2014).
Engaging the family as a valued partner in all program
aspects and building partnerships with community
organizations are two of the sixteen Juvenile Drug
Court (JDC): Strategies in Practice (BJA, 2003). Family
engagement is identifi ed as an essential JDC goal as the
quality of the relationship between JDC professionals
and families is a signifi cant predictor of case success
(BJA, 2003). Yet effectively engaging families, formal-
izing community partnerships, and creating strong
community linkages do not come easily. This session
will examine how JDCs work to attain these goals and
effectively translate family and community engagement
into JDC operations, process, and programming.
The presenters will draw on lessons learned from
a national cross-site evaluation of JDCs that imple-
mented Reclaiming Futures (RF). The integrated JDC/
RF approach emphasizes the importance of engaging
family and community partners in substance abuse
treatment for youth. As a result, data from this evalu-
ation are particularly informative of how to translate
family and community engagement into JDC opera-
tions, process, and programming and the challenges
of doing so. The challenges/barriers and promising
practices/strategies presented in this session will be
relevant for any JDC seeking to improve family and
community engagement. The presenters will illustrate
a lively discussion by utilizing cross-site fi ndings from
diverse data sources (i.e., one-on-one interviews;
group interviews; observational data; and community
resource utilization assessment) and highlight consid-
erations for involving, engaging, and retaining family
and community partners in adolescent substance abuse
treatment and JDC programming overall. Additionally,
the presenters will provide recommendations to guide
policy for JDCs that are seeking to improve family and
community engagement.
Objectives
Identify practices & strategies for JDCs to increase
involvement and engagement of families.
Understand challenges and barriers associated with
engaging families and the community in JDCs.
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Speaker(s)
Jim Mahar
Collaborative Court Coordinator
Superior Court of California, County of Orange
Santa Ana, California
Andrea Mahar
Probation Offi cer
Orange County Probation Department
Santa Ana, California
Lauren Saunders
Treatment Provider
Orange County Health Care Agency
Costa Mesa, California
Kimberly Stevens
Deputy Public Defender
Public Defenders Offi ce
Orange County, California
SESSION D-4
How to Successfully Integrate Drug Court
Evidence-Based Practices into Your Mental
Health Court
National Harbor 12
There are approximately 400 Adult Mental Health
Courts in operation, but to date there are not any
universally adopted standards of best practices -
resulting in many different models being used. If
Mental Health Courts are going to be successful, they
need an evidence-based starting point from which to
develop. Although Mental Health Courts differ signifi -
cantly from Drug Courts, the overwhelming majority
of Mental Health Courts have a high percentage of
offenders with co-occurring substance abuse or depen-
dence. We must utilize the evidence-based practices
from Drug Court when treating addicted mentally
ill offenders in order successfully to manage their
addiction as well as their mental illness. For the past 25
years, Drug Courts have provided the best antidote for
substance abuse, and by utilizing their best practices
and lessons learned we can make Mental Health Courts
equally successful. Since 2002, Orange County has
operated Mental Health Courts utilizing Drug Court
principles as their foundation. With less than 25%
recidivism, this model is one that is working.
Objectives
Understand how Orange County has successfully
blended Drug Court principles of addiction treatment
and accountability into Mental Health Court.
Understand the ingredients of Drug Courts that must
be implemented for successful Mental Health Courts.
Learn how one program has continued to implement
evidence based practices for mental health and
substance abuse treatment.
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Richard Shepler
Senior Research Associate
The Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and
Education, the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School
of Applied Sciences, Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland, Ohio
SESSION D-6
Are You Connected? Collaborating in
Communities of Color to Meet the Diverse
Needs of Clients
Chesapeake ABC
In an effort to address client needs accountability
courts often struggle to meet the challenge of working
with diverse partners in the community and effectively
engaging (or educating them) about Drug Courts. If
clients are not receiving basic needs such as stable
housing, health services, or food in an environment
that they can relate to or If clients are not comfortable
with the services than the likelihood of a client’s
success may diminish. Identifying community partners
who can engage and retain diverse clients can be
even more challenging if you are not clear on cultural
nuances, strengths and challenges. Do clients fail
services or are we failing clients? This session explores
strategies and identifi es practical solutions to identify,
engage, and collaborate with communities of color.
Objectives
Explore factors that make effective engagement of
community partners a challenge.
Learn how to identify and address beliefs, thoughts,
or attitudes that serve to create barriers between
themselves and their clients.
Learn practical tips to establish authentic
relationships and build trust with diverse community
partners and clients.
Speaker(s)
Kimm Campbell
Deputy Director
Broward County Health & Human Services
Department
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Josalyn Conley
Drug Court Program Manager
King County Superior Court
Seattle, Washington
SESSION D-5
What Juvenile Drug Courts Need to Know
About Providing Effective Treatment for Youth
with Co-Occurring Disorders
Chesapeake GHI
Evidence suggests more than half of all youth in
contact with the juvenile justice system have a
diagnosable mental or substance use disorder, with the
majority experiencing both. Youth with co-occurring
disorders have multiple and complex symptom patterns
and behaviors raising unique challenges for juvenile
courts. These youth typically: are more diffi cult to
engage in treatment and have higher treatment dropout
rates; have more severe symptoms; use substances
earlier, more frequently and over a longer period of
time; and have more serious and complex family issues.
This presentation will provide an overview of the
research and describe the national context for
the movement towards integrated treatment. The
presenters will describe a real-world approach – the
Integrated Co-occurring Treatment (ICT) model – to
addressing the needs of court-involved youth with
co-occurring disorders. ICT, an intensive community-
based method of service delivery, provides a
comprehensive and integrated set of mental health and
substance use treatments to youth with co-occurring
disorders and their families. ICT has been imple-
mented within juvenile specialty courts with promising
results. Finally, this session will provide attendees with
guidance on how to develop capacity in their own
communities to provide integrated, effective treatment
for youth in JDCs with co-occurring disorders.
Objectives
Increase understanding and awareness of the
impact co-occurring disorders in youth has on JDC
participation.
Review the most current research on effective,
integrated interventions for youth with co-occurring
disorders.
Learn about an integrated treatment model that
works with court-diverted youth, and identify steps
to develop local capacity.
Speaker(s)
Robert Kinscherff
Senior Project Associate
National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice
Delmar, New York
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Speaker(s)
Douglas Thomas
Senior Research Associate
National Center for Juvenile Justice
Reno, Nevada
SESSION D-8
Marijuana
Maryland A
Neuro-imaging has yielded new evidence about the
effects on the brain of marijuana use. This presentation
will focus on those new fi ndings as well as describe
the psychopharmacology of marijuana use from both
an acute and chronic use perspective. This session will
also highlight the impact of new fi ndings in what works
in treating those dependent on marijuana.
Objectives
Identify the neurochemical actions of marijuana in
the brain.
Identify the symptoms of the acute use of marijuana,
its chronic use consequences and withdrawal
symptoms.
Identify strategies for treating marijuana dependence.
Speaker(s)
Kenneth Robinson
President
Correctional Counseling, Inc.
Germantown, Tennessee
Hon. Rogelio R. Flores
Superior Court Judge
Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara
Santa Maria, California
Joel Johnson
CEO
Human Resource Development Inc.
Chicago, Illinois
SESSION D-7
Applying Quality Improvement Principles
to Juvenile Drug Courts
Maryland 4-6
Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) is a process
that can help juvenile justice organizations, including
Juvenile Drug Courts, use their own data to continually
improve services with the goal of achieving the best
possible outcomes for youth. By incorporating CQI,
Juvenile Drug Court professionals can defi ne their
purpose, processes, and programs; collect, process,
analyze, and report relevant information; and make
data-informed decisions to improve services and
outcomes. Regularly assessing the organization’s perfor-
mance is the only way to know how current conditions
are impacting the quality of services and outcomes
produced. This workshop describes a process for
Juvenile Drug Courts to adopt and implement CQI
principles into their services. The workshop provides
guidance on how JDC’s can prepare staff and
stakeholders for CQI implementation and steps to
implement and sustain CQI. The practices discussed
in this workshop are derived from high quality research
and have been embraced by criminologists, other social
scientists and experienced practitioners. From the early
steps of organizational readiness to the ultimate goal of
using data to make informed decisions, Juvenile Drug
Court administrators, probation offi cers, case workers
and substance abuse providers will fi nd benefi ts to
incorporating CQI both at the intervention level and
system wide.
Objectives
Participants will learn the essential elements of CQI.
Participants will learn how to achieve organizational
readiness to implement CQI.
Participants will learn how to apply six steps for
implementing CQI to Juvenile Drug Courts.
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SESSION D-10
CBT for LEO (Part 1)
National Harbor 10
Law enforcement offi cers (LEO), with the advantage
of direct community contacts, have a unique oppor-
tunity to intervene in the addictions cycle. People
suffering from addiction are in the right stage of change
during contact with law enforcement, which creates a
prime opportunity to effectuate change in unlearning
harmful attitudes and behaviors. This session will
combine humor with reality to support and encourage
law enforcement offi cers as pro-social role models to
address everyday situations by providing insight into
how thought processes cause feelings and behaviors,
not external factors. Understanding Cognitive-
Behavioral Treatment (CBT) methods will allow law
enforcement offi cers in Problem Solving Courts to
empower addicts to identify their own negative patterns
of thinking and move towards responsibility. This
session will focus on the personal and professional
applications of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment with
interactive discussion and activities.
Objectives
Understand and apply CBT principles to promote
lasting positive life changes, not temporary
compliance with rules and laws.
Learn about excuses and patterns of thinking and
provide information on self-refl ection, role-modeling,
and leadership.
Practice CBT based approaches & learn redirection
techniques to address excuses by challenging
thinking, not the individual.
Speaker(s)
Sara Toms
Cognitive-Behavioral Programs Coordinator
Wyandotte County Community Corrections
Kansas City, Kansas
SESSION D-9
Incentives and Sanctions in Family Drug Court
Maryland C
In order for Family Drug Court parents to change
behaviors which put their children at risk, they
must enter and complete treatment, complete their
child protection case plans and follow the rules of
the program. Learn how to respond to behavior
through the use of incentives, sanctions and thera-
peutic responses to hold parents accountable and
keep parents engaged in case plans. Find out what
research says works, what doesn’t work, and how to
effectively respond to participants so compliance and
good choices are reinforced and non-compliance and
negative choices minimized.
Speaker(s)
Penny Clodfelter
Family & Juvenile Drug Court Program Manager
Jackson County Family Drug Court
Kansas City, Missouri
Meghan Wheeler
Senior Consultant
National Drug Court Institute, NDCI
Lexington, Ohio
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NADCP Washington, DC 2015
and alcohol problems, as well as higher incarceration
rates. The leaders of the rap industry have proven that
it is easier to take advantage of young African American
males than it is to educate them. As a result, gangsta
rappers have amassed personal fortunes fl aunting these
values in music and videos at the expense of the black
community as a whole.
This session will focus on the special challenges of
this population; boyz that want to be treated like men
but refused to grow up. The participants will learn
cognitive behavioral evidence based techniques that I
have developed in my 20 plus years of working with this
population in the fi eld of treatment and corrections. After
completing this session, the participants will be better
equipped to help young African American males accept
responsibility, “man up” and maintain a drug free lifestyle.
The format that I use is a state-of-the-art power point
with embedded videos and audio tapes along with
handouts that are formatted and ready to use in groups
or individually.
Objectives
Learn three proven methods of getting the clients
to use their ‘street hustler’ mentality to work their
program of recovery.
Learn three effective ways to motivate the clients to
avoid the negative pitfalls of the Hip Hop culture.
Learn successful strategies for being more effective
when working with African American males in groups
or individually.
Speaker(s)
Wallace Green
Probation Offi cer / Treatment Coordinator
Greater Cleveland Drug Court
Cleveland, Ohio
SESSION D-11
Homophobia and Transphobia with Hispanic
LGBTQ Participants
Chesapeake 7-9
For some, Hispanic culture and gender identity of
Hispanic LGBTQ Drug Court participants can incur
practitioner discord and consequently impede the
participant’s recovery process. Culturally effective
communication and ensuring a safe environment is key
to engaging Hispanic LGBTQ participants and facilitate
program completion. This presentation will defi ne and
explore homophobia & transphobia, Hispanic cultural
infl uences, and provide culturally informed practices
that can help Hispanic LGBTQ participants to embrace
the opportunities that Drug Court programs offer.
Objectives
Defi ne homophobia and transphobia.
Identify impact of phobic attitudes on practice.
Strategies to effectively work with Hispanic LGBTQ
participants.
Speaker(s)
Diana Padilla
Program Manager
NDRI USA / NeC ATTC
New York, New York
SESSION D-12
From Boyz to Men: Saving Our Young
African American Males from the Streets
and from Themselves
National Harbor 3
‘Gangsta rap’ exploded onto the national scene in
1988 at the height of the crack epidemic. With it,
came a tidal wave of hip hop values which glorifi ed the
hustler lifestyle, normalized the use of marijuana, while
promoting materialism and a “pimp” mentality that
degrades women.
That was 27 years ago. The young African American
males that we are dealing with today are the second
generation. These young men are caught between
twisted images of manhood made popular by the hip
hop culture and an outright rejection of education
and political involvement; values fought long and hard
for during the Civil Rights Era. The result of this self-
imposed street mentality has lead to higher rates of drug
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SESSION D-15
The Ultimate Chain of Custody Machine
Chesapeake 4-6
This 75 minute presentation introduces attendees to
a vision for chain of custody extending well past its
traditional use. The fundamental legal requirement for
chain of custody is well understood within the context
of forensics. The advent of modern testing laboratories
using automated equipment and sophisticated software
to capture and report results has extended the bound-
aries for chain of custody. Today’s chain of custody
obligations go beyond the need to track the physical
transfer of fungible items used as evidence. The audit
trail of evidence must now include the representation
of client specimens as data captured by complex
analyzers, transported across multiple networks,
arranged into manageable data container by a set of
controlled system users, transformed by software into
easily understood reports, certifi ed by scientifi c experts,
and delivered to ordering entities that include court
systems, physicians, hospitals, and others. At eLab,
where laboratory scientists and software developers
focus on faster, less expensive, more comprehensive
drug testing within a corporate culture obsessed
with legal compliance, chain of custody presented
a challenge. In this presentation, we’ll review the
problems you might encounter from the need for chain
of custody reporting, understand the modern scientifi c
management principles used by eLab in its QuikLIMS
laboratory management software, and see the future
it provides within Drug Courts, case management
systems, and the criminal justice system. In the course
of this tract, our objective will be to introduce the
following topics, discuss their meaning and relationship
to chain of custody.
Traditional chain of custody in Evidence Law
History of workfl ow from Gantt to Deming
The Iron triangle of Project Management (aka Triple
Constraint)
The Observer Effect on chain of custody systems
Modern Automated Business Process Management
(BPM) Systems
The need for In-transit visibility of data
Chain of custody as a PROACTIVE tool
Extended capabilities using chain of custodtu within
case management
Complex Event Processing, Big Data, and you
SESSION D-13
Creating a Trauma Informed Juvenile Drug Court
National Harbor 4
This session will present how trauma – particularly
complex trauma in childhood – can lead to a host
of challenging behaviors associated with struggles
in relationships, disengagement from school, and
involvement in the justice system. Participants will
learn how physiological responses to chronic stress
can have a profound impact on brain development,
how subsequent adaptive skills can push youth away
from protective infl uences such as school, and how
educational and allied systems can become more
trauma-informed at all points of contact with children,
youth, and families.
Objectives
Participants will learn key elements in creating
trauma-informed juvenile justice systems.
Be able to identify best practice examples associated
with key elements of trauma-informed juvenile
justice systems.
Participants will have a better understanding of
the crucial role of youth engagement in informing
best practices.
Speaker(s)
Kelly Decker
Service Systems Program Coordinator
National Center for Child Traumatic Stress
Los Angeles, California
SESSION D-14
Stone County, Missouri: 5 years of Implementing
VIVITROL® (naltrexone for extended-release
injectable suspension) in their Specialty Courts.
National Harbor 6-7
Attendees will hear from Stone County leaders on their
use of VIVITROL® in their specialty court. Attendees will
learn about programs implementing VIVITROL; and how
it has been made available to appropriate participants.
This promotional program is created and
sponsored by Alkermes, Inc.
Speaker(s)
Mark Boesen
Associate Director of Government Affairs & Public Policy
Alkermes, Inc.
Waltham, Massachusetts
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Paige Harrison
Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Hon. Richard Vlavianos
Judge
San Joaquin Superior Court
San Joaquin, California
SESSION D-17
Immigration Consequences of Criminal
Conduct: How Drug Courts Can Help
Maryland 1-3
This session will focus on the what can happen to
lawful permanent residents, and undocumented
workers (and their families) who are facing immigration
consequences for alleged criminal conduct. Drug
Courts have proven to be an effective tool to help
mitigate negative consequences for many of these
individuals. Additionally, the DACA and President
Obama’s Executive Orders on immigration and how
criminal prosecution for those who might be eligible
will be discussed.
Objectives
Identify the types of crimes involved in Drug Court
cases that might carry immigration consequences.
Explain what a “conviction” is under Federal
immigration law.
Explain how a sentence to Drug Court can fall within
that defi nition and constitute a conviction of the
underlying crime for Federal immigration purposes.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Rogelio R. Flores
Superior Court Judge
Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara
Santa Maria, California
We will also take a look at eLab’s QuikLIMS product,
its current use and benefi ts within an existing state-
wide cloud-based deployment, the advantages
QuikLIMS’ cloud-based system can provide now,
and have a peek of eLab’s future Case Management
software offering.
The presenter will provide ample opportunity for
the audience to participate, encourage Q&A, and
leave you breathless about the future of software in
case management, Drug Courts, and the criminal
justice system.
Speaker(s)
Richard Williams
Director of Product Development
eLab Solutions Corp.
Huntsville, Georgia
SESSION D-16
DWI Court Research and Best Practices:
What’s the Latest Evidence?
Chesapeake 10-12
What evidence do we have that DWI Courts truly
reduce recidivism and protect public safety? Are DWI
court participants really that different from Adult Drug
Court participants? Who does DWI court work for?
What do we know about DWI court best practices?
What happens if you change the system and all repeat
DWI offenders are monitored and held accountable by
the Court? This session will discuss best practices, the
characteristics of DWI Court participants and the latest
results on DWI court outcomes (including studies in
California, Colorado, Michigan and Minnesota).
Objectives
What is the evidence that DWI courts work?
What kind of offenders does DWI court work best for?
What are some DWI court best practices?
Speaker(s)
Shannon Carey
Co-President & Sr. Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Hon. Shaun Floerke
Judge
Minnesota Judicial Branch
Duluth, Minnesota
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Sara-Ann Steber
Evaluator
University of Pennsylvania
Wyomissing, Pennsylvania
SESSION D-19
Enablement Prevention Program
National Harbor 5
Developed by Hope Works Counseling, the treatment
providers for the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
Adult Healing to Wellness Court, the Enablement
Prevention Program is an interactive program that
involves education of family members to help create
a united team between service providers and loved
ones. The Enablement Prevention Program is based on
existing programs such as Rational Emotive Behavioral
Therapy (REBT), Dialectic Cognitive behavioral therapy
and on evidence based research of the damaging
effect that enablement has on recovery. Enablement
Prevention has been in practice and an element of
recovery for at least the last 20 years. It originated out
of Group Guided Interaction and the 12 step program.
EPP is a form of peer-group treatment similar to group
interventions where individuals experiencing similar
problems can come together in a safe environment
to share and receive experiences and get support.
Furthermore, it is a cost-effective form of mental health
treatment when compared to individual-based therapy.
The goal of the group is to develop interactions with
the client and to prevent the further enablement of
the client and the client’s criminal behavior. EPP also
utilizes value-based and process-oriented treatment
model. The freedom from enablement will encourage
clients into maturity, pro-social behavior and attitudes,
and manages to make the client answerable for their
own negative, delinquent behaviors and attitudes.
Objectives
Learn the basic of addiction and how triggers operate.
Learn the role of family as both enablers and healers.
Learn strategies for better engaging family members
in a participant’s treatment.
Speaker(s)
Mark Panasiewicz
Treatment Provider
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
West Hollywood, California
SESSION D-18
Improving Drug Court Outcomes for Young
Adult Offenders
National Harbor 2
A county in Southeastern Pennsylvania conducted
a study funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Services Administration to determine if Leading
Everyone to Achieve Potential (LEAP), an enhancement
of its existing Treatment Court, would improve partic-
ipant outcomes for high-risk/high need offenders aged
18-25. This age group had proven hardest to engage
in Treatment Court and experienced higher dropout
rates than older participants. LEAP was specifi cally
designed to break the cycle of substance use and
criminal behavior by addressing trauma, criminogenic
risks, and the educational /vocational needs of young
adult offenders from assessment through treatment
and community supervision. The purpose of this
presentation is to describe LEAP and the outcomes of
150 participants from 2011 to 2014. LEAP improved
retention in Treatment Court (80% retention rate) and
achieved positive clinical and community outcomes for
participants compared to participants in similar Drug
Court studies nationally. These six-month outcomes
include higher rate abstinence from alcohol and
other drugs; higher rates of employment; lower rates
of depression and anxiety; and fewer negative social
consequences related to substance use and crime than
the rates of those in the national Adult Drug Court
study cohort. These outcomes are attributed to the
design and implementation of LEAP.
Objectives
Describe effective recovery supports for Drug
Court Participants.
Design an enhanced employment/vocational
program.
Describe the role of trauma in the lives of Drug
Court participants.
Speaker(s)
Michele Anastacio
Treatment Court Coordinator/Probation Supervisor
Chester County Adult Probation and Parole
West Chester, Pennsylvania
Vince Brown
Exec. Director, Dept. of Drug and Alcohol Services
Chester County PA
West Chester, Pennsylvania
TUESDAY
103
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION D-21
Raise Your Voice: How to be an Effective
Advocate for your Drug Court
Chesapeake JKL
What is the best way to deliver your message to
Members of Congress and State Legislators? Learn ways
to engage your Member of Congress in your District,
how to keep your Member informed of Drug Court
issues, and how to work with NADCP to ensure your
message is heard loud and clear. Interested in getting
your state legislature to work for you? This session has
you covered, too!
Objectives
Learn how to develop a lasting relationship with
your Members of Congress.
Discuss ways to make your legislators champions
of Drug Court.
Identify key opportunities to involve legislators.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Sue Bell Cobb
Judge
Montgomery, Alabama
Hon. Stephen Manley
Judge
Santa Clara, California
SESSION D-20
The Proactive Prosecutor
Maryland B
Stepping from the Adversarial System into the Drug
Court Model presents Prosecutors with a number of
challenges. What role will they play in the process?
How involved must they be in the Staffi ng’s and
Court Sessions? Who should the team be targeting
for entry into the program? What are the common
Constitutional issues that arise and how have court
addressed them? Over the past several years a great
deal of research has been done to explore these
questions and from this several “Best Practices” have
been developed. This presentation will offer some
sound approaches to resolving these legal and ethical
dilemmas based on the research. This presentation is
not just for the Prosecutor who has just been assigned
to Drug Court but is intended for even the Experienced
Prosecutor who is looking to gain more in-depth
information on their role in Drug Court.
Objectives
Best Practices regarding Prosecutor participation
in Staffi ng and Court Sessions.
Most effective use of the Prosecutor in Targeting
Offenders.
The Prosecutors role as an integral part of the
Team Process.
Speaker(s)
Stephen Ward
Assistant District Attorney (Retired)
Mecklenburg County, NC District Attorney’s Offi ce
Charlotte, North Carolina
Tammy Westcott
Assistant District Attorney/Director of Alternative Courts
Tulsa County District Attorney’s Offi ce
Tulsa, Oklahoma
TUESDAY
104 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
as well as Recovery Coaches to assist participants with
community re-integration. Although the program only
began operating in the spring of 2014, enrollment is
high (on average, eight participants are referred monthly)
and nearly all participants have successfully completed
the residential program and are on track to graduate
from BTC. The most innovative aspect of the 90-RRP
program is the use of Recovery Coaches. Recovery
Coaching applies the concepts of Life Coaching and
Business Coaching to those seeking recovery from
alcohol and other drugs. Semi-structured interviews
with Recovery Coaches and program participants
highlight the combination of social support, structured
services, and guidance that lead to successful treatment
completion and positive Drug Court outcomes. This
presentation will highlight the innovative features of the
90-RRP program, from the perspectives of participants
and their Recovery Coaches.
Objectives
Recognize the unique needs of alcohol and opiate
using Drug Court participants.
Understand the importance of community linkage for
alcohol and opiate using Drug Court participants.
Understand the roles Recovery Coaches can play in
the treatment of Drug Court participants.
Speaker(s)
Jacqueline Degiso
Resource Coordinator
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Hon. Jo Ann Ferdinand
Judge
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Lloyd Goldsamt
Senior Research Scientist
New York, New York
Joseph Madonia
Project Director
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
SESSION D-22
Innovative Use of Recovery Coaching to
Improve Community Re-Integration for
Drug Court Participants
Chesapeake DE
Problem Solving Courts provide a range of compre-
hensive services for participants, making use of local
resources where available, and often creating or devel-
oping additional resources as needed. In 2012, the
Brooklyn Treatment Court (BTC) recognized a number
of unmet needs for opiate and alcohol using partici-
pants. First, existing inpatient treatment programs
were not achieving a signifi cant level of success with
these participants, who often relapsed upon discharge.
Second, existing programs did not have the resources
to adequately link participants to services in the
community, including medical care and assistance
with benefi ts including housing and family support
services. In partnership with Samaritan Village, and
through funding from SAMHSA and BJA, we created the
90-day Residential Rehabilitation Program (90-RRP), an
innovative residential treatment program that makes use
of evidence-based treatment programs (MRT; Think for a
Change; Seeking Safety) administered over three months
TUESDAY
105
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION E-2
Is your FDC Built to Last? The Importance of
Real Sustainability Planning
National Harbor 11
If grant funding is the primary resource for funding
your FDC, then your FDC may not have the infra-
structure to sustain itself in this economic climate.
Real sustainability planning involves moving beyond
the boundaries of your FDC as a project towards a
focus on systems thinking and change. During this
workshop, we will present a sustainability planning
framework, explore the impact of federal and state level
policy changes on FDC sustainability, and give specifi c
advice on what sustainable funding options exist. Tessa
Richter from the Jefferson County Family Integrated
Treatment Court will tell her story about starting and
sustaining a FDC without grant funding by distilling
key components of the sustainability planning process.
Ms. Richter plans to focus on how she garnered and
continues to build institutional support to secure stable
funding sources. This workshop is only for profes-
sionals who do not accept barriers as status quo but
rather use them as targets for change.
Objectives
Identify common barriers for sustainability planning.
Explore fi nancing options, practical “barrier-busting”
strategies, and opportunities for change.
Understand the difference between “project
thinking” vs. “systems thinking” and the key features
of systems change.
Learn why issues of scale, targeting, local parallel
initiatives, and institutionalization are critical for
sustaining your FDC.
Speaker(s)
Tessa Richter
Problem Solving Court Coordinator &
Juvenile Programs Coordinator
Family Integrated Treatment Court, 1st Judicial District
Golden, Colorado
Nancy Young
Executive Director
Children and Family Futures
Lake Forest, California
TRACK SESSION E
Tuesday, July 28
5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.
SESSION E-1
Data, Evaluation and Outcomes: What You
Should Collect and Why
Maryland D
The research is clear: Drug Court works. But does your
Drug Court work? Is your program collecting data on
participants? What data? And what can you do with it?
This session will outline the best practices in collecting
data and evaluating your Drug Court program, ensuring
that your court is keeping fi delity to the Ten Key
Components and Best Practice Standards, determine
if you are having the impact on your participants that
you want and how you can use data to help you obtain
funding.
Objectives
Understand the importance of collecting data and
how you can use it to improve your program.
Understand what data to collect.
How you can use data and evaluation to obtain funding.
Speaker(s)
Shannon Carey
Co-President & Sr. Research Associate
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
Charlene Zil
Research Coordinator
NPC Research
Portland, Oregon
TUESDAY
106 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION E-4
Diffi cult Issues Faced by Mental Health Court
National Harbor 12
This session will discuss the “diffi cult issues” faced by
Mental Health Courts, including broad issues such as
the nexus between a criminal charge and mental illness,
utilizing incentives and sanctions, and responding to
high profi le events involving participants, as well as
diffi cult “on-the-ground” issues such as identifying
appropriate treatment providers and fi nding housing
resources. This session will be discussion-based and
attendees are encouraged to come with questions they
would like to discuss.
Objectives
Understand the diffi cult issues facing Mental
Health Courts.
Identify potential solutions and strategies for handling
these diffi cult issues and improving their courts.
Hear from peers about innovative solutions to
various Mental Health Court problems that are being
utilized nationwide.
Speaker(s)
Emily Harris
Program Associate, Courts
Council of State Governments Justice Center
New York, New York
Eric Olson
District Manager
Idaho Adult & Juvenile Mental Health Courts
7th Judicial District
Idaho Falls, Idaho
SESSION E-3
Mentoring in Juvenile Treatment Drug Courts:
Strategies and Tips from OnSite TA and Focus
Group Report
National Harbor 13
This workshop presents results from on-site technical
assistance visits to ten jurisdictions in seven states
and a force fi eld analysis conducted during a Focus
Group conducted in Reno, NV. The U.S. Offi ce of
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention recognizes
mentoring as “an effective way to prevent at-risk youth
from becoming involved in delinquency” and as a way
to help already delinquent youth change their lives for
the better. Research has demonstrated that mentoring
relationships can improve youth’s self-esteem, behavior,
and academic performance. The site visits and focus
group identifi ed fi ve critical features of an ideal circum-
stance for implementing Mentoring JDCs, including: a
clear vision/mission, adherence to a strong model, gritty
determination to make it work, effective programming,
and a quality pool of mentors. Using mentors can be a
valuable asset to Juvenile Drug Courts. Presenters will
discuss the variations in mentoring Juvenile Drug Court
models, provide examples of the fi ve critical features,
and discuss driving and restraining forces associated with
those features.
Objectives
Participants will learn how mentors can enhance
Juvenile Drug Court activities.
Participants will learn fi ve factors of a successful
mentoring Juvenile Drug Court.
Participants will learn about “forces” that enhance
success factors as well as forces that “restrain” the
success factors.
Speaker(s)
Jessica Pearce
Training Manager
National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Reno, Nevada
Douglas Thomas
Senior Research Associate
National Center for Juvenile Justice
Reno, Nevada
TUESDAY
107
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
Objectives
Participants will learn about the Trauma Symptom
Inventory (TSI), including its factor and scale
structure.
Participants will learn how to use the TSI as part of
a comprehensive screening for trauma-related issues
in Drug Court participants.
Participants will learn how to use TSI results to
develop individually-tailored treatment plans for
Drug Court participants.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Jo Ann Ferdinand
Judge
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Lloyd Goldsamt
Senior Research Scientist
New York, New York
Joseph Madonia
Project Director
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
Susan Sturges
Mental Health Specialist
Brooklyn Treatment Court
Brooklyn, New York
SESSION E-5
Trauma Symptom Inventory for Treatment
Planning among Drug Court Participants with
Co-Occurring Mental Health Disorders
Chesapeake GHI
Drug Court participants vary in their clinical
presentation. While all court participants have clini-
cally signifi cant substance use, many present with
co-occurring mental health issues as well as other
social and emotional concerns. For many participants,
exposure to traumatic events is an underlying cause
of many of these issues, and trauma-focused therapies
have been implemented in many treatment settings.
In recognition of these issues, the Brooklyn Treatment
Court (BTC) developed a trauma screening protocol for
Drug Court participants presenting with co-occurring
mental health issues. As of September 2014, 63 Drug
Court participants have been screened for entry into
the program. Of these, 23 (36.5%) were found to be
ineligible, primarily due to severe mental health issues
(these participants were referred to Mental Health
Court) and/or no reported trauma history (referred to
regular Drug Court programming). Trauma Symptom
Inventories (TSIs) have been completed by 17 of the
40 remaining participants (42.5%); administration
of the TSI is ongoing. When percentile scores are
averaged across participants, the mean was above
the 70th percentile on three of the four TSI factors:
Self-Disturbance (73.0%), Post-Traumatic Stress
(81.6%) and Externalization (70.2%). The Somatization
factor, however, was relatively low (39.3%). Five of the
12 clinical scales also averaged higher than the 70th
percentile: Depression (71.6%), Intrusive Experiences
(82.1%), Defensive Avoidance (89.6%), Insecure
Attachment (76.5%), and Tension Reduction Behavior
(80.9%). These fi ndings are consistent with participant
reports and are incorporated into individual treatment
planning. The TSI used in conjunction with diagnostic
interviews allows for a more objective assessment of
what each participant is actually experiencing. BTC staff
uses the TSI to better understand the psychological
consequences of the participants’ trauma experience
and develop a unique treatment plan of specialized
therapeutic services.
TUESDAY
108 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION E-7
Programmatic Factors Related to Outcomes in
Juvenile Outpatient Treatment: Evaluating the
Effectiveness of Juvenile Drug Courts
Maryland 4-6
There is a dearth of literature that provides information
about key elements of successful collaboration and
coordination in Juvenile Drug Courts. In addition, it is
unclear whether collaboration between youth-serving
agencies and coordination of services actually translates
into (1) better organization/system performance (e.g.,
quality; effi ciency), and (2) improved client services and
outcomes. This session will present fi ndings from the
National Cross-Site Evaluation of Juvenile Drug Courts
and Reclaiming Futures (JDC/RF) that address these gaps
in the literature. This National Cross-Site Evaluation of
JDC/RF examines the outcomes and impact of imple-
menting an integrated model of the Juvenile Drug
Court: Strategies in Practice model and the Reclaiming
Futures model (JDC/RF) at eight different Juvenile Drug
Courts. To understand the effectiveness of these JDC/
RF programs, the National Cross-Site Evaluation of
JDC/RF compared the outcomes and impact of these
eight JDC/RF programs to the outcomes and impact of
other Juvenile Drug Courts who have not implemented
Reclaiming Futures (JDC-only) and of other adolescent
intensive outpatient substance abuse treatment programs
(IOP). Session presenters will discuss these three
approaches (JDC/RF, JDC-only, and IOP) and will discuss
the ways in which they are similar and different at the
program level (use of reputable screening tools; frequent
reviews of treatment plans, family engagement, etc.).
Session presenters will also discuss the comparable effec-
tiveness of these three approaches on client outcomes
such as substance use and recidivism. Presenters will
compare the effectiveness of Juvenile Drug Courts to IOP
(JDC/RF and JDC-only vs. IOP) and will also compare
each of the three approaches to each other approach
(JDC/RF vs. JDC-only vs. IOP). Finally, presenters will
discuss the impact of programmatic factors (e.g., use of
reputable screening tools) on client outcomes, identifying
key elements of effective Juvenile Drug Courts, as well as
of adolescent substance abuse programs.
SESSION E-6
Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Intersex (GLB-
TI): Does it Really Matter in Treatment Courts?
Chesapeake ABC
Culture focuses on a variety of aspects of a person life.
What goes on in an individual’s “world” can impact
their recovery (or lack of), if we as professionals don’t
understand the various nuances that may impact their
lives. The issues our clients face are not simply alcohol
and drugs, or criminal behavior. Gender does matter,
and it is not just male and females. How your clients
identify themselves, what services they access, interac-
tions in court, engage family members (or not), even
what services clients access can infl uence treatment
court success, This session goes beyond terminology
and provides helpful strategies when working with
the GLBTI client in juvenile, adult, veteran and family
treatment courts.
Objectives
Identify how implicit bias may impact interactions
with GLBTI clients in treatment courts.
Identify practical tips and resources in the
community that are “safe zones” for the GLBTI
client.
Explore services for friends and family members
to aid in success for treatment court clients.
Speaker(s)
Susan James-Andrews
President and CEO
James-Andrews and Associates
Mitchellville, Maryland
TUESDAY
109
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION E-8
Methamphetamine
Maryland A
Methamphetamine and its impact on the basic brain
is a presentation designed for legal and professional
individuals actively seeking a practical understanding
of how methamphetamine and other stimulant drugs
impact the brain and the body.
Objectives
Better understand the pathological and physical
consequences of using methamphetamine and
stimulant drugs common to most abusers.
Review a current understanding of what regions of
the brain and the body are directly impacted by the
use of methamphetamine and stimulant drugs.
Review the current research and data regarding the use
of methamphetamine and stimulant drugs and their
distinctive impact on various multi-cultural populations.
Speaker(s)
Steve Hanson
Director
Division of Treatment and Practice Innovation,
Bureau of Addiction Treatment Centers
Rochester, New York
Objectives
Understand the similarities and differences between
JDC/RF, JDC-only, and other IOP substance abuse
treatment programs.
Learn about the comparable effectiveness of JDC/RF,
JDC-only, and IOP approaches on client outcomes.
Learn about programmatic factors related to
improved client outcomes in JDC and adolescent
substance abuse treatment programs.
Speaker(s)
Pamela Baumer
Research Associate
Chestnut Health Systems
Normal, Illinois
Josephine Korchmaros
Director-Research Methods and Statistics
University of Arizona -
Southwest Institute for Research on Women
Tucson, Arizona
Sally Stevens
Executive Director and Distinguished Outreach Professor
Southwest Institute for Research on Women
Department of Gender and Women’s Studies
University of Arizona
Tucson, Arizona
TUESDAY
110 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Hon. Peggy Hora
Judge (Ret.)
NDCI Sr. Judicial Fellow
Walnut Creek, California
SESSION E-10
CBT For Probation Offi cers (Part 2)
National Harbor 10
As Drug Court professionals, we know that recovery is
frequently compounded by the way addicts think about
and react to their various problems. By developing a
deeper understanding of erroneous thought patterns
and incorporating cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT)
methods into your regular contacts with participants,
responsible skills can be modeled, taught, practiced,
and role-played by probation offi cers to reinforce
pro-social attitudes and behaviors. Implementing
CBT based techniques to enhance your community
supervision efforts will lead your participants towards
developing critical thinking skills, emotional analysis,
and personal accountability and responsibility. As
Wyandotte County Adult Drug Court graduate John
B. said, who has regularly come back to the probation
offi ce to speak at new-probationer orientation, I
didn’t have a drug problem or an alcohol problem, I
had a thinking problem. With CBT approaches, your
Drug Court will be better equipped overall to address
thinking errors. This session will review and provide
CBT based activities that can be used immediately.
Make your contacts count!
Objectives
Develop an understanding of thinking errors and
cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) methodology.
Discuss leading participants to creatively solve
problems on their own & become less dependent on
others & illegal substances.
Gain practical information & a variety of CBT-based
resources/exercises that can be used for your contact
visits.
Speaker(s)
Sara Toms
Cognitive-Behavioral Programs Coordinator
Wyandotte County Community Corrections
Kansas City, Kansas
SESSION E-9
Behavior Modifi cation and The Seriously
Mentally Ill or Functionally Impaired:
Special Issues to Consider
Maryland C
Mental Health Courts have moved away from the
concept of graduated rewards and sanctions -a key
component of Drug Courts -in favor of a broad array
of strategies to motivate participants to engage in
treatment. In Mental Health Courts, each participant’s
treatment plan must be highly individualized to address
his or her specifi c clinical needs, each participant
responds to incentives and sanctions in idiosyncratic
ways, and mental health service providers acknowledge
their clients’ right to make their own treatment
decisions. In this context, Mental Health Courts have
adapted tactics from Drug Courts but have also created
a range of new strategies, both in their court opera-
tions and in their partnerships with providers, to help
motivate treatment engagement. This workshop will
present promising practices drawn from a wide range
of Mental Health Courts in New York and California.
Objectives
Gain information about specifi c strategies and tactics
used by operational Mental Health Courts that help
motivate participants to engage in treatment and
comply with court supervised treatment plans.
Learn about factors that have been shown to improve
or impair engagement in mental health treatment.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Christine Carpenter
Circuit Court Judge
13th Judicial Circuit
Columbia, Missouri
TUESDAY
111
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION E-12
African Americans and Mental Health
National Harbor 3
Historical trauma has a major impact on African
Americans that enhance cultural mistrust issues. Is
it schizophrenia or healthy paranoia that the black
experience can be misconstrued as mental illness? The
impact of discrimination, racial profi ling, and trauma
are just a few of the areas that can impact our clients
success. Mental illness not only enhances resistance
in Drug Courts; but also can contribute to the lack
of retention. For African American women the issues
can be even be more profound. This session discusses
how to identify cultural relevant services for African
Americans in need of mental health services and
support in Drug Court.
Objectives
Discuss the additional challenges of African American
participants who have mental illness.
Identify strategies to identify community support.
Speaker(s)
Guy Wheeler
President
Guy A. Wheeler Group
Plantation, Florida
SESSION E-11
Serving the Needs of Latino Population in a FDC
Chesapeake 7-9
This workshop will focus on Family Dependency
Treatment Courts for Los Angeles County and will
explore the barriers to treatment within the Latino/
Latina community. Emphasis on the effective collabo-
ration of the treatment team to break down the barriers
to drug dependency inherent in the Latino/Latina
community in Los Angeles county and protect the
children. The related problems that are inherent in the
community and the benefi t of Drug Court.
Objectives
Barriers to treatment within the Latino community
and the benefi t of Family Drug Court for cohesion of
treatment.
The Latino cultural challenges in dealing with the
judicial system and agencies providing services,
including gang related issue.
The relationship in the courtroom between the
participants and the Drug Court team as it relates to
the Latino community, and includes barriers.
Speaker(s)
Germeen Duplessis
MSW, Project Director
Latino Family Center Caliornia Hispanic Commission
on Alcohol & Drug Abuse Inc.
Montebello, California
Michel Eisner
Principal Deputy County Counsel
Offi ce of the County Counsel Los Angeles County
Monterey Park, California
Laura Luna
Supervising Social Worker
Los Angeles County Department of Children and
Family Services
Los Angeles, California
Stephen Marpet
Commissioner of the Superior Court
Superior Court Monterey Park, California
TUESDAY
112 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
SESSION E-16
Judicial Leadership and Strong Treatment Voice
and Response
Chesapeake 10-12
Effective DWI/Drug Court intervention is a complex
interplay of team dynamics (and personalities – let’s
be honest), probation monitoring, treatment voice
and response, targeting the right clients, incentives,
sanctions, testing, data review, and implementing
research fi ndings and best practices. We (a judge and a
treatment provider from a thriving and effective Felony
- High Risk/High Need - DWI Court) will consider
two key components to effective team work, process
and outcomes: the role of the judge as the team leader
and the role of the treatment provider. In addition, we
will explore the nature of the connection and commu-
nication between the judge and treatment provider
as critically essential to thoughtful process and good
outcomes for the court.
Judges must lead in a way that doesn’t overpower the
team or abdicate decision-making. Judges must foster
a collaboration wherein every voice on the team is
heard. Judges must ensure that the treatment voice is
heard and respected and that the treatment response -
essential to great outcomes AND public safety - thrives.
Judges must know the research, their own data, and
fearlessly pursue best practices.
The treatment provider plays a critical role in informing
and education the team. The provider must appropri-
ately assess clients for entry, craft effective interventions
and responses and must also provide ongoing
assessment and response as clients move through
the court. Moreover, they must guide the team in
understanding addiction, mental illness and recovery
and how to respond appropriately to violations
given proximal and distal skills/goals for individual
clients. The treatment voice must also be grounded
in best practices, both in terms of interventions with
clients, but also in guiding the team and making
recommendations.
We will work through research, scenarios, methods,
and best-practice ideas that courts can take home and
apply for more effective interventions and outcomes.
SESSION E-13
Addiction, Personality Disorders, and Trauma
National Harbor 4
Professionals and organizations working with justice
involved populations often see not only substance use
disorders but the additional complications of trauma
and personality disorders This training will discuss
ways to reframe personality disorders and recom-
mended treatment modalities. Trauma and assessment
and treatment models will also be discussed and
featured. This training has also been updated to include
the recent changes with the DSM-V and the clinical
implications for these disorders.
Objectives
Understand why addiction, personality disorders and
trauma are often co-occurring.
Changes and implications with DSM-V.
How understanding the link with these disorders and
lead to better treatment outcomes.
Speaker(s)
Donna Johnson
CEO
Addiction Solutions Inc
Cartersville, Georgia
TUESDAY
113
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION E-17
Search and Seizure: Overview of the Law
Maryland 1-3
The Fourth Amendment to the United States
Constitution protects individuals from unrea-
sonable searches and seizures. Although the Fourth
Amendment generally is interpreted to mean that a
reasonable search requires a warrant supported by
probable cause, the United States Supreme Court and
other appellate courts have authorized a number of
exceptions to the warrant/probable cause requirement
in a variety of circumstances.
Individuals subject to supervision through probation,
Problem Solving Courts or other monitoring programs
are entitled to certain due process rights under state
and federal law, including the Fourth Amendment
protections against unreasonable searches and seizures.
This session will provide an overview of signifi cant
U.S. Supreme Court cases and other appellate court
decisions that analyze the Fourth Amendment’s
protection against unreasonable searches and seizures
in the context of court authorized supervision
programs such as probation, Problem Solving Courts
and pre-conviction monitoring.
Objectives
Analyze signifi cant United States Supreme Court
opinions and other appellate court decisions
regarding search and seizure in probation, Problem
Solving Courts and other court monitoring programs.
Properly evaluate the constitutionality of search and
seizure procedures utilized by probation offi cers/
problem solving court personnel in supervising
participants.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Earl Penrod
Judge
Gibson Superior Court
Princeton, Indiana
Objectives
Appreciate the methods whereby the judge can
support and lead the team to continue to grow and
improve outcomes.
Understand the key role of the treatment provider,
both in client interaction and team decision making.
Consider the essential collaboration between the
judge and treatment provider in implementing
research and best practices.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Shaun Floerke
Judge
Minnesota Judicial Branch
Duluth, Minnesota
Julie Seitz
Clinical Director; LADC, LSW
Center for Alcohol and Drug Treatment
Duluth, Minnesota
TUESDAY
114 NADCP 21st ANNUAL TRAINING CONFERENCE
Setting the Standard Annual Training Conference
Objectives
Understand the prevalence and impact of trauma and
health literacy on client outcomes.
Identify successful strategies for implementing
universal precautions to mediate those effects and
improve client outcomes.
Learn to measure the impact of health literacy and
trauma interventions and incorporate them into the
evaluation/quality improvement.
Speaker(s)
Isis Martel
Evaluator/PI
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Fayetteville, Arizona
SESSION E-19
Juvenile and Family Healing to Wellness Courts
National Harbor 5
Because substance abuse effects more than the
individual, because a criminal referral is but only one
avenue of entry for potential participants, and because
healing involves the entire family, tribes are beginning
to expand their target population and means for serving
that population. This workshop will explore both the
Juvenile and Family Healing to Wellness Court models,
including differing legal options for entry points, the
various additional agencies that should be involved,
additional services that should be considered, and
strategies for doing so effectively and cost-effi ciently.
Objectives
Learn the Juvenile and Family Healing to Wellness
Court models.
Learn about the particular populations that benefi t
from these models, including how to effectively
engage the whole family.
Learn about unique challenges and opportunities
involved with these models.
Speaker(s)
Hon. Joseph Flies-Away
Chief Justice
Hualapai Court of Appeals
Phoenix, Arizona
Carrie Garrow
Consultant
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
West Hollywood, California
SESSION E-18
The Importance of Universal Precautions:
Effects of Trauma and Health Literacy on
Health Outcomes in Drug Court
National Harbor 2
Health Literacy has been hailed as the “missing
element” researchers have sought to understand due
to its strong prediction of health outcomes among
those with chronic disease and is often a stronger
predictor of treatment success than race, education,
or socio-economic status. However, very few studies
have assessed health literacy in adults suffering from
addiction within the criminal justice system. While
experts in the fi eld propose that health literacy inter-
ventions may effectively diminish health disparities
by reducing barriers and increasing access to health
services, these studies did not address disparities in
behavioral health outcomes related to health literacy
among clients within criminal justice populations.
There have also been no prior studies researching the
interaction effects of Trauma and Health Literacy on
treatment court outcomes.
This presentation will discuss signifi cant fi ndings in
the importance of not only addressing trauma within
this population but also its interacting effects on
outcomes with health literacy. Attendees will be intro-
duced to evidence-based interventions in reducing the
negative effects of trauma on program success (Gain’s
center’s Trauma-Informed Care) and the Universal
Precautions Toolkit for improving communication and
cultural practices related to health literacy (Agency
for Healthcare Research and Quality; AHRQ). Specifi c
health outcomes measured will be a reduction in
maladaptive behavioral health symptoms (using the
Brief Symptom Inventory), improvements in treatment
plan fulfi llment, and improvements in client percep-
tions of program practices (Consumer Assessment of
Healthcare Providers and Systems; CAHPS).
Results from this study will provide data that are
needed on concurrent health literacy and trauma
interventions and their impact among substance abuse
clients within treatment courts. The full research design
and process will be discussed as well as a practical
guide to measuring impacts of the interventions that
can be incorporated into existing evaluation/quality
improvement activities.
TUESDAY
115
NADCP Washington, DC 2015
SESSION E-21
Taking Your State Association to the Next Level
Chesapeake JKL
Are you ready