HES A Pages1 392 MCD 289 2006 Handbook

User Manual: MCD 289

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without the prior written permission of the publisher.
© Copyright Victoria University 2006
ISSN 1322-8536
Caution: This Handbook provides a guide to courses available
within the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science at the
University in 2006. The Handbook cannot hope to cover all of the
various options adequately, although it attempts to be as accurate
as possible, and students should always check with the relevant
faculty or school officers in planning their courses. The Handbook
also includes descriptions of courses that may be altered later or
that may not in fact be offered due to insufficient enrolments or
changes in teaching personnel. The fact that details of a course are
included in the Handbook can in no way be taken as creating an
obligation on the part of the University, faculty or school to teach it
in any given year, or to teach it in the manner described. The
University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any
time without notice.
Published by Victoria University
PO Box 14428
MELBOURNE VIC 8001 AUSTRALIA
CONTENTS
How to use this book............................................................ 7
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE....... 9
Research........................................................................... 10
Alternative Entry ................................................................ 10
Further Information............................................................. 10
STAFF ........................................................................ 11
University Officers.............................................................. 11
Principal Officers of the University........................................ 11
Members of the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science.... 11
Centre for Environmental Safety and Risk Engineering ........... 12
Centre for Telecommunication and Micro-Electronics .............. 12
Food Marketing Research Unit............................................. 12
School of Architectural, Civil and Mechanical Engineering...... 13
School of Biomedical Sciences ............................................ 13
School of Computer Science and Mathematics ...................... 13
School of Electrical Engineering........................................... 14
School of Health Sciences................................................... 14
School of Molecular Sciences.............................................. 15
School of Nursing and Midwifery ........................................ 16
Sustainability Group........................................................... 16
Foundation Studies............................................................. 16
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES......................................... 17
Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science ............. 17
Courses Offered ................................................................ 17
Certificate in Foundation Studies (Engineering and Science).... 17
Bachelor of Business Electronic Commerce/
Bachelor of Science ........................................................... 18
Bachelor of Engineering/
Bachelor of Business Electronic Commerce ............................ 18
Bachelor of Engineering/Bachelor of Science........................ 19
Bachelor of Engineering/Bachelor of Laws............................ 19
Bachelor of Engineering/Bachelor of Arts ............................. 19
Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Laws.................................. 19
Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science ................................... 19
School of Architectural, Civil and Mechanical
Engineering ............................................................ 21
Bachelor of Engineering in Architectural Engineering.............. 24
Bachelor of Engineering in Building Engineering.................... 26
Bachelor of Engineering in Civil Engineering......................... 28
Bachelor of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering............... 30
Bachelor of Engineering in Robotic Engineering..................... 31
Bachelor of Technology in Building Surveying........................ 33
School of Biomedical Sciences ................................. 35
Biology and General Science Teaching for
Physical Education Graduates ............................................. 36
Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Sciences .......................... 37
Bachelor of Science in Nutritional Therapy............................ 38
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Health and Safety.......... 38
Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Biomedical Sciences............ 39
Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Psychology......................... 39
School of Computer Science and Mathematics ......... 41
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science ............................. 42
Bachelor of Science in Computer and Mathematical Sciences.. 42
Bachelor of Science in Internet Technologies and Applications. 44
Bachelor of Science in Information Technology ...................... 45
Bachelor of Science in Computational Financial Mathematics.. 46
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Aviation .......... 46
Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Computer Science............... 47
Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Computer
and Mathematical Sciences................................................. 48
International Programs:
Offshore Program Conducted in Hong Kong.......................... 48
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.............................. 48
Bachelor of Science in Information Technology ...................... 48
Bachelor of Science in Internet Technologies & Applications.... 48
Offshore Program Conducted in Malaysia............................. 49
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.............................. 49
Bachelor of Science in Internet Technologies & Applications.... 49
External Program Conducted in Sydney ................................ 49
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.............................. 49
School of Electrical Engineering ...............................51
Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical
and Electronic Engineering.................................................. 52
Bachelor of Engineering Science in Electrical
and Electronic Engineering.................................................. 54
Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Computer Technology.......... 54
Bachelor of Science (Honours) – Physics................................ 54
School of Health Sciences ........................................57
Bachelor of Chinese Medicine (Acupuncture and Herbs) ......... 57
Bachelor of Health Science – Clinical Dermal Therapies.......... 58
Bachelor of Health Science – Natural Medicine (Conversion)... 59
Bachelor of Health Science Naturopathy & Homoeopathy....... 60
Bachelor of Health Science –
Paramedic (Three-year Pre-service) ....................................... 61
Bachelor of Health Science –
Paramedic (One-year Conversion)........................................ 62
Bachelor of Health Science – Chinese Medicine..................... 62
Bachelor of Health Science
(Chinese Medicine & Clinical Sciences) ................................ 63
Bachelor of Health Science –
Chinese Medicine with Honours........................................... 63
Bachelor of Science – Clinical Sciences ................................ 63
School of Molecular Sciences ...................................65
Bachelor of Applied Science in Chemistry ............................. 66
Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology ................................... 67
Bachelor of Science in Medical, Forensic
and Analytical Chemistry .................................................... 68
Bachelor of Science in Nutrition, Food and Health Science......68
Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Chemical Sciences .............. 69
Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Biology (Biotechnology) ....... 69
Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Nutrition & Food Science ..... 69
School of Nursing and Midwifery ............................71
NON-AWARD SHORT COURSES........................................ 71
Bridging Course (Division 2 Entry)........................................ 71
Bridging Course (Graduate Entry) ........................................ 71
AWARD COURSES ............................................................ 72
Bachelor of Nursing (Division 2 Entry).................................. 72
Bachelor of Nursing (Graduate Entry) ................................... 72
Bachelor of Nursing (Graduate Entry) ................................... 73
Bachelor of Nursing (Pre-Registration) .................................. 73
Bachelor of Nursing (Pre-Registration) .................................. 74
Bachelor of Nursing (Post-Registration)................................. 75
Bachelor of Health Science (Honours) – Nursing .................... 75
Bachelor of Midwifery ........................................................ 76
Bachelor of Midwifery ........................................................ 77
Sustainability Group ...............................................79
Bachelor of Science in Ecology and Sustainability.................. 80
Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Ecology and Sustainability ... 83
UNDERGRADUATE SUBJECT DETAILS............................ 85
POSTGRADUATE STUDIES.......................................... 261
Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science ........... 261
Master’s Qualifying Program .............................................261
Master of Engineering and Science, and Doctor
of Engineering Science......................................................261
Centre for Environmental Safety
and Risk Engineering............................................ 263
Graduate Certificate in Performance-Based
Building and Fire Codes....................................................264
Graduate Diploma in Building Fire Safety
and Risk Engineering ........................................................265
Master of Engineering in Building Fire Safety
and Risk Engineering (Coursework).....................................265
Masters (by Research).......................................................266
Doctor of Philosophy.........................................................266
Centre for Telecommunication and
Micro-Electronics................................................... 267
Food Marketing Research Unit .............................. 269
School of Architectural, Civil and
Mechanical Engineering ........................................ 271
Graduate Certificate in Project Management........................273
Graduate Diploma in Project Management..........................274
Master of Engineering (Project Management) (Coursework) ...275
Master of Engineering in Mechanical
Engineering (Coursework) .................................................275
School of Biomedical Sciences ............................... 277
School of Computer Science and Mathematics ....... 279
Doctor of Philosophy.........................................................279
Master of Science (Research) .............................................279
Graduate Diploma in Computer Science .............................280
Graduate Diploma in Computer and Mathematical Sciences..280
Graduate Diploma in Multimedia Information Networking.....280
Graduate Diploma in Software Engineering.........................281
Master of Science in Computer Science...............................282
Master of Science in Computer and Mathematical Sciences...282
Master of Science in Software Engineering..........................283
School of Electrical Engineering ............................. 285
Doctor of Philosophy.........................................................285
Master of Engineering (Research) .......................................285
Master of Science (Research) .............................................285
Graduate Certificate in Microelectronic Engineering .............286
Graduate Diploma in Microelectronic Engineering................286
Master of Engineering in Microelectronic Engineering...........286
Graduate Certificate in Systems and Control Engineering......287
Graduate Diploma in Systems and Control Engineering.........287
Master of Engineering in Systems and Control Engineering....287
Graduate Certificate in Telecommunication Engineering........288
Graduate Diploma in Telecommunication Engineering ..........288
Master of Engineering in Telecommunication Engineering......288
Master of Engineering in Electrical and
Electronic Engineering.......................................................288
Master of Engineering Science in Computer
and Microelectronic Engineering (Coursework) ....................289
Master of Engineering in Microelectronic Engineering/
Master of Engineering Science in Computer
and Microelectronic Engineering........................................290
School of Health Sciences...................................... 293
Graduate Diploma in Clinical Chinese Medicine.................293
Graduate Diploma in Complementary Therapies ..................293
Graduate Diploma in Prepared Chinese Medicines..............294
Master of Health Science – Osteopathy...............................294
Master of Health Science (by Minor Thesis)..........................295
Master of Health Science (by Research)..............................296
Doctor of Philosophy.........................................................296
School of Molecular Sciences ................................. 297
Postgraduate Programs by Research................................... 297
Biotechnology Research Group.......................................... 297
Chemical Synthesis & Analytical Science Research Group .... 297
Food Science Research Group........................................... 298
Graduate Diploma in Environmental Management............... 298
Master of Science in Environmental Management ................ 298
Master of Science (Food Science) ...................................... 299
Master of Science – Biotechnology
(Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Streams) ........................ 299
Packaging and Polymer Research Unit ..................300
International Programs:
Offshore Program Conducted in Netherlands ...................... 301
Master of Engineering Science in Packaging (Coursework) ... 301
School of Nursing and Midwifery.......................... 303
Graduate Diploma in Substance Abuse Studies ................... 303
Master of Nursing............................................................ 304
Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas in
– Cancer Nursing ............................................................ 304
– Emergency Nursing....................................................... 304
– Gerontic Nursing .......................................................... 304
– Neuroscience Nursing................................................... 304
– Orthopaedic Nursing .................................................... 304
– Paediatric Nursing ........................................................ 304
– Nursing Management.................................................... 304
Master of Midwifery......................................................... 305
Graduate Diploma in Midwifery ........................................ 305
Master of Public Health Nursing ........................................ 306
Graduate Certificate in Public Health Nursing .................... 306
Graduate Diploma in Public Health Nursing....................... 306
Master of Nursing (by Research)........................................ 306
Doctor of Philosophy ........................................................ 307
Sustainability Group ............................................. 309
POSTGRADUATE SUBJECT DETAILS .............................311
RECOGNITION – RPL/RCC, CREDIT TRANSFER AND
ADVANCED STANDING ............................................. 393
Pathways........................................................................ 393
Application Process.......................................................... 394
Fees............................................................................... 394
Notification..................................................................... 394
Right of Appeal ............................................................... 394
Selection Criteria for Articulating Students –
Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science......................... 394
ADMISSIONS, ENROLMENTS, EXAMINATIONS,
GRADUATIONS AND ACADEMIC PROCEDURES.......... 395
Student Services Department ............................................. 395
How to Apply for a Victoria University Course..................... 395
Centre for Commencing Students....................................... 396
Portfolio Partnership Program ............................................ 396
Course Entry ................................................................... 396
Special Entry and Access Schemes..................................... 396
Need Help?.................................................................... 397
Flexible Learning ............................................................. 397
Australian Qualifications Framework.................................. 397
Modes of Study ............................................................... 397
Postgraduate Courses....................................................... 398
Undergraduate Courses.................................................... 399
Postgraduate Courses....................................................... 399
Direct Applications........................................................... 399
Selection Procedures ........................................................ 399
Scholarships.................................................................... 400
Enrolment ....................................................................... 400
Student Identity Card........................................................ 401
Continuing Students ......................................................... 401
Enrolment Enquiries.......................................................... 401
5
Enrolment Variations and Course Withdrawal ..................... 402
Leave Of Absence and Deferment...................................... 402
Personal Details ............................................................... 402
Enrolment Related Fees and Charges.................................. 402
Refund Of Fees................................................................ 403
Cross Institutional Enrolment .............................................. 403
Communication from the University To Students ................... 405
Assessment...................................................................... 405
Unit Of Study Assessment and Grading .............................. 408
Academic Progression ...................................................... 409
Graduation Procedures..................................................... 409
Credit Points.................................................................... 410
EFTSL ............................................................................. 410
SERVICES AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS........................... 411
Student Career Development ............................................. 411
Children’s Services........................................................... 411
Graduating Students ........................................................ 412
School of Health Sciences Teaching Clinics......................... 412
Independent Access: Students with a Disability .................... 412
Orientation ..................................................................... 412
Moondani Balluk (Indigenous Services).............................. 412
Student Support ............................................................... 413
VU International Services .................................................. 414
Health Advice ................................................................. 414
First Aid.......................................................................... 414
Student Learning Services [SLS].......................................... 414
Teaching and Learning Support ......................................... 415
Postcompulsory Education Centre (PEC) .............................. 415
Student Career Services.................................................... 415
Staff Learning and Educational Development (SLED) ............. 415
Student Learning Services (SLS).......................................... 415
Sport and Recreation Facilities and Services....................... 416
Student Organisations ...................................................... 416
Travel Concessions........................................................... 416
COURSES AT VICTORIA UNIVERSITY IN 2006............. 417
Undergraduate Courses and Programs ................. 417
Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science......................... 417
Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development............. 419
Faculty of Business and Law .............................................. 421
Postgraduate Courses........................................... 423
Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science......................... 423
Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development............. 425
Faculty of Business and Law .............................................. 426
TAFE Courses at Victoria University in 2006 .......... 429
7
HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
Welcome to the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science
Handbook 2006. The Handbook is designed to provide students
with detailed information on course structure, subject content,
on-campus facilities and University regulations and procedures
required for the successful completion of study.
This Handbook lists all undergraduate and postgraduate courses
offered by the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science. The
Undergraduate Studies section outlines the requirements and
structure of all undergraduate courses offered by individual Schools
within the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science. The credit
point value for each subject is included with the course details. The
course outlines are followed in the Undergraduate Subject Details
section by a detailed description of all undergraduate subjects,
which are listed in alphanumeric order according to their subject
code. The postgraduate area is similar, outlining each course offered
followed by a description of all postgraduate subjects.
The back sections of the Handbook include useful information about
articulation and credit transfer, recognition of prior learning,
admission and enrolment procedures and services available to
students.
HANDBOOK ON THE WEB
This Handbook is also on Victoria University’s web site at
www.vu.edu.au
CREDIT POINTS
Victoria University has a credit points system in which each subject is
given a value according to its academic weighting. To complete
each year of a course, students must complete subjects to the value
of 120 points. For more information on credit points, see the
‘Admission, Enrolments, Examinations, Graduations and Academic
Procedures’ section in the back of this Handbook.
PLEASE NOTE
The attention of all students and prospective students is drawn to the
possibility that due to circumstances that presently cannot be
foreseen, the details of the programs, courses and subjects set out in
this Handbook might change after the date of publication.
Accordingly, before final decisions are made or enrolment occurs
based on information contained in the Handbook, each student or
prospective student should contact the Faculty Student Information on
(03) 9919 4516 to ensure that the pertinent information is still
accurate.
8
9
FACULTY OF
HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
Welcome to the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science at
Victoria University and to one of the most exciting periods in your
life. Your studies over the next few years will, naturally, be very
important and you will have to be fully committed to your studies if
you are to succeed. However, I have no doubt that it will be worth it
in the end. We will be doing all that we can to help you and this
guide contains some information that should be of assistance.
The Faculty has over 295 staff and the equivalent of 3310 full-time
students located at five of the University’s campuses – City Flinders,
City King, Footscray Park, St Albans and Werribee. The Faculty
Office is located at the St.Albans campus. The Faculty has seven
Schools, two Research Centres, three Research Units and two
Clinics.
SCHOOLS
Architectural, Civil and Mechanical Engineering
Biomedical Sciences
Computer Science and Mathematics
Electrical Engineering
Health Sciences
Molecular Sciences
Nursing and Midwifery
RESEARCH CENTRES
Telecommunications and Micro-Electronics
Environmental Safety and Risk Engineering
RESEARCH UNITS
Food Marketing Research Unit
Packaging and Polymer Research Unit
Sustainability Group
CLINICS
Health Practice Unit
Osteopathic Medicine Clinic
The Faculty currently offers courses at Undergraduate and
Postgraduate levels, an external program in Sydney, offshore
courses in China, Hong Kong, Malaysia and the Netherlands,
together with non-award courses, and a range of pathways. The
Faculty also conducts a very successful access program, Foundation
Studies, which is a one-year full-time course for students whose VCE
results or subjects were not satisfactory to gain entry to a science or
engineering course at university or for those who want to return to
study. Successful completion of appropriate subjects will guarantee
students entry to our Engineering and Science courses at Victoria
University.
The Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science provides students
with a sound scientific training with strong emphasis on practical
skills and problem solving that equips them well for a range of
professional careers. There has been a major change to problem-
based learning strategies in the classroom. The Faculty offers a
comprehensive range of courses in health, engineering and science
up to PhD level.
The courses have been developed to meet the vocational needs of
students, and special care has been taken to consult the professional
organisations to ensure that graduating students receive professional
recognition for their qualifications. Students will find the staff of the
Faculty willing to help and advise them during their studies. Staff
members also take a keen interest in the job placement and careers
of graduates.
There is more to university life than just study and I urge you to make
the most of all social opportunities that Victoria University and
student life has to offer. I would especially recommend that you
become involved with any student society our Faculty has to offer.
Make the most of the opportunities that are before you and best
wishes for your time with us now and beyond.
Professor Ian Rouse
Executive Dean
Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
10
RESEARCH
Research in the Faculty is conducted by academic staff, visiting
researchers, postdoctoral fellows and postgraduate students, and
covers a variety of areas. Research by postgraduate students
enrolled in higher degrees under the supervision of academic staff is
an integral part of the Faculty’s research effort. Through the students’
research training the Faculty seeks not only to meet the immediate
needs of the student and industry but also to play a major role in
developing Australia’s future research personnel and prospective
academics. Research activities and topics are listed in the Schools
and Research Centres/Units/Group in the Postgraduate Studies
section of the Handbook.
ALTERNATIVE ENTRY
Engineering (VTAC code 41441)
Science (VTAC code 41451)
Alternative entry program for students who have:
successfully completed year 12 with the required prerequisites,
but may not have achieved the required study score in all
prerequisites; or
have not studied the required mathematics prerequisite.
All admissions are on an individual basis.
PREREQUISITES
Units 3 and 4 – English (any) and Mathematics (any).
EXTRA REQUIREMENTS
All applicants offered a place will be required to attend an
appropriate summer bridging program or enrol in one or more
subjects from the Foundation Year or undertake part or all of an
appropriate TAFE program.
FURTHER INFORMATION
Further information about courses and research programs may be
obtained from the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science
Office, Victoria University, PO Box 14428 Melbourne VIC 8001,
telephone (03) 9919 4516, facsimile (03) 9919 4513, or email:
hes@vu.edu.au
11
STAFF
UNIVERSITY OFFICERS
Visitor
His Excellency Mr John Landy AC, MBE
Governor of Victoria
Chancellor
The Hon. Justice Frank Vincent QC
Deputy Chancellor
Dianne Foggo DipTching, DipPhysEd, GradDipMulticultEdMelb
Distinguished Visiting Professor and Chair of the University
Foundation
The Rt Hon. Sir Zelman Cowen AK, GCMG, GCVO, DCLOxf,
QC
Distinguished Professorial Fellow
Professor Jarlath Ronayne AM, MADub, PhDCamb, HonFTCD,
FRSC, FAIM, FTSE
PRINCIPAL OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
Vice-Chancellor and President
Professor Elizabeth Harman BA, MAAuck, PhDMcM, FIPAA,
FAIM
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education Programs) and Director TAFE
Professor John McCallum BEcon(HonsPsych)Qld, MPhil, DPhil
(Oxon)
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Management Services)
Professor Michael Hamerston BA, MEdMelb, MALond, ATEA,
AUSTAFE
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education Services)
Professor Richard Carter BA, DipEdLaT,
GradDipTESL/TEFLSCVToorak, MEdVicMelb
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Industry, Research and Region)
Professor Vaughan Beck DipMechEngFTC, BEng,
MEngScMelb, PhDUNSW, CPEng, FIEAust, FAIB, FTSE
Pro Vice-Chancellor (International)
Professor the Hon. Stephen Martin BAANU, MAAlberta,
MTCPSyd, DipEd UNSW, PhDW’gong
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Institutional Development)
Christine Kotur BA, DipEd, MEdLaT
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Teaching and Learning Support)
Belinda McLennan BAMonash, DipEdRusden,
GradCertEd(Literacy)Deakin, GradCertEd&Trg(Ldrshp&Mgt)WMIT,
MEdLdrshp&MgtRMIT, MACE
Executive Director (Finance and Staffing)
David Nicholson BBus(Acct)WACAE, MBADeakin,
GradDipEdHawthornInst, CPA
Executive Director (Governance, Policy and Planning Services)
Robert Brown BA, DipEdWAust, PGradDipLangStWAustCAE,
MEd, MBAECowan
MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY OF HEALTH,
ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE DEAN
Executive Dean
Professor Ian Rouse BSc(Hons), GradDiplHlthSci, PhD
Professorial Fellow
The Honourable Barry Jones AO, MA, LLBMelb, DLittUTS,
DScMacq, FRSA, ANZAAS, FTS
Deputy Dean
Professor Akhtar Kalam BScCalc, BEngScAlig, MSOklahoma,
PhDBath, CPEng, FIEE, CEng, MIEEE, FIEAust
Associate Dean – Teaching and Learning (Acting)
Robert Taylor BSc, MEdMonash, MAIP, MAAIR
Associate Dean – Research and Research Training
Associate Professor Gregory Baxter BSc(Hons), PhDMelb,
MAIP
Associate Dean – International
Fernando Scarmozzino BSc, MAppScRMIT, DipEdMSC
FACULTY OFFICE
Faculty Manager
Gail Ellis BA, BEd, MEdSt, PhDMonash, DipTToorak
OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE DEAN
Assistant to the Executive Dean
Claudette Butler
Administrative Assistant to the Deputy Dean and Associate Deans
Pauline Ruberto
Administrative Assistant to the Deputy Dean and Associate Deans
Vacant
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Manager – Resources
Irene Brogden AssDipBus(Accounting), ANIA, AIMM
Senior Resources Officer
Lily Ludovico BAPsychPhil, MBAPhil, MATEM
Resources Officers
Linda Tuddenham
Angela Tassone
GOVERNANCE AND COMPLIANCE
Senior Governance and Compliance Officer
Diane Wilkinson
Governance and Compliance Officers
Josephine Georgakopoulos
Daphne D’Souza
MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS
Senior Marketing and Communications Officers
Santa Giordano BSc, DipEdMelb
David Nance TSTCSecondaryTeachColl, BA, BEdLaT, MEdMelb
Marketing and Communications Officer
Mayette Mendoza BSc(Acctg)Phil
Administrative Support (Acting)
Tina Kounadis
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
12
STUDENT ADMINISTRATION
Faculty Student Administration Co-ordinator
George Hawkins BEc, DipEdMonash
Senior Student Administration Officer
Crispin Schneider BBusAcctgVicMelb, GradDipBusComp
Student Administraton Officer
Cheryl Alleyn CertBusCompApplicNewportTAFE
Student Advice Officer – International
Patrick Lambert BEcMonash
Student Advice Officer – Research and Graduate Studies
Elizabeth Smith AssocDipSocSc(ChildCare)FootsTAFE
Timetabling Officer
Ann Proctor
Administrative Officers
Margery Bailey
Meryl Bailey
Anna Calabro
Barbara Drapow CertOffice&SectStudiesFootsTAFE
Hao Liu CertAdmVicMelb, AssocDipArtsRMIT, MBAVicMelb,
AIMM
Pushpa Richards
Student Administration Assistants
Linda Denny
Katherine McGhee
Maureen Wetherall
CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY AND
RISK ENGINEERING (CESARE)
Director
Professor Ian Thomas BEngMonash, PhDMonash
Senior Advisor
Professor Vaughan Beck DipMechEngFTC, BEngMelb,
MEngScMelb, PhDUNSW, CPEng, FIEAust, FAIB
Visiting Professors
Emeritus Professor Michael Hasofer BEngFarukUni,
BSc(Hons)(Mathematics)Tas, BEc, PhDTas
Emeritus Professor John Stearne BSc(Hons)Adel, PhDAdel,
GradDipOccHygDeakin
Academic Associate
Associate Professor Paula Beaver BSc(Hons)UBirmUK,
PhDLeedsUK, CEng, CPhys, MInstP, MIFS, MSFPE, AMIFE,
Principal Fire Engineer, NZ Fire Service
Associate Professor G Caird Ramsay BSc,PhDAdel
Research Staff
Associate Professor Dorothy Bruck BA(Hons)Tas,
PhDLaT,T.CertTas, Department of Psychology
Dr Paul Clancy BEQld, MEngScMelb, PhDVicMelb, MIEAust
Associate Professor Ozden Turan BScMETUTurkey,
MScCaseWesternUni, USA, PhDManit
Dr Jianguo Qu, BEngJilin (China), MEngRMIT, PhDVicMelb
Huang Yao, BEngNanjing, (China), GradDipSoftware
DevelopmentRMIT,MEngMelb
Senior Administrative Officer
David Nance TSTCSecondaryTeachColl, BA, BEdLaT, MEdMelb
Administrative Officer
Helen Demczuk CertSect&BusStudies, Stott’s Bus. College
ONESTEEL FIRE AND CONSTRUCTION RESEARCH UNIT
Head of Unit
Dr Ian Bennetts BEng(Civil)Monash, MEngScMonash,
PhDMonash, FIEAust
Research Staff
Dr Khalid Moinuddin BScChittagong, BEng(Mech)National
UniSciTech (Pakistan), PhDMelb
Technical Staff
Michael Culton
Robert Ralph
CENTRE FOR TELECOMMUNICATION AND
MICRO-ELECTRONICS (CTME)
Acting Director
Professor Michael Faulkner BSc(Elec)UK, MEngSc, MEUNSW,
PhDUTS, MIEEE
Centre Staff
Professor Jugdutt (Jack) Singh BSc(Hons)UK, MScAlta,
PhDVicMelb, TeachCertUSP, MIEEE, MIEICE
University Associates
Dr Prem Dassanayake BScEngSLanka, MSc, PhDWales, MIEE,
MIEEE
Dr Gregory Martin BE(Elec)(Hons)Melb, MECant, PhDVicMelb,
MIEEE
Associate Professor Aladin Zayegh, BE(Elec)Aleppo, MSc,
PhDClaudeBernard, CPEng, AMSE, MIEAust, MIEEE
Associate Professor Fu-Chun Zheng BSc, MSc, PhDEdin,
AMIEE, MIEE
R&D Project Manager
Dr Scott Leyonhjelm BE(Hons)Melb, PhD(Eng)VicMelb
Research Engineer/Research Fellows
Mr Melvyn Pereira BSc(Hons)Melb, MEMelb
Dr Ying Tan BSc, MEng, PhD (China)
Dr Aaron Reid, BE(Hons)AdeAus, PhDAdeAus
Research Officer
Dr Hai Le, BE(Hons)HobAus, PhDVicMelb
Administrative Officer
Shukonya Benka BA(EngLit), MA(EngLit)Bd,
MBus(AdminMngt)VicMelb
FOOD MARKETING RESEARCH UNIT
Director
Associate Professor Suku Bhaskaran BAMal,
GradDipSocScTas, MBus(Research)VicMelb, PhDMonash, MMIGD
Academic Associates
Dr Alex Buchanan BAgScMassey, MAgScIowa, PhDLond, FTS
Mr Darian Warne MScLond, BAMelb, AssDipFoodTechRMIT
University Associates
Professor John Cary BAgScMassey, MAgrSc, PhDMelb
Professor Ross Robinson BANewEngland, DipEdNewEngland,
MAUNSW, PhDBritishColumbia
Professor Graham Thorpe BSc, PhDNott, DEngMelb, CPEng
FIEAust
Professor Negandra Shah BVSc&AH(Hons)Ranchi,
MScSDakota, PhDAlta, AAIFST, MDIAA
Associate Professor Jack Antonas BscWAust,
GradDipEdWAIT, DipDieteticsWAIT, PhDLond, RegDiet, MDAA
Associate Professor Chris Perera BScSLanka, MScCanada,
PhDMonash
Dr Vijay Mishra BScJabalpur, MScMysore, PhDAlta, MAIFST
Dr James Doughney BBus(Econ)GIAE, PhDVicMelb
Mr Brian Fairman BA(Arts)Monash, DipEdLaT, BEdLaT,
GradCertBusMASwinburne
STAFF – FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
13
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURAL, CIVIL AND
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Head of School
Associate Professor Chris Perera BScSLanka, MScCanada,
PhDMonash
Professor
Graham Thorpe BSc, PhDNott, DEngMelb, CPEng FIEAust
Associate Professors
Chandra Bhuta BScKansas, MSKansas, FIEAust, MAIPM, MAIB,
CPEng
Michael Sek MEngSc, PhDPoznan, AIP
Ozden Turan BSc, METUTurkey, MScCaseWesternUni (USA),
PhDManit
Senior Lecturers
Ian Campbell BEngMelb, MScBrunel, MIES
Paul Clancy BEQ’ld, MEngScMelb, PhDVicMelb
Greg Evans BEng, DipEdMelb, MEngScMonash, MIEAust. CPEng
Kevin Hunt BEng, MEngScMelb
Peter Lechte BEng, MEngSc, MEnvStMelb, MIEAust, MAWWA,
MIAA
Jun-de Li BEng(Hons)Tsinghua, PhDMelb
Mariusz Paks MEngScTechUnivWarsaw, AM ASHRAE, MAIRAH
S. Eren Semercigil BSc(Hons), MScMETUTurkey, PhDManit
Danh Tran BE(Hons), BSc, PhDCant, MSEM, MBSSA, MAAEE
Lecturers
Robert Burnell RFD, CertTechBuildSwinburneIT, DipArch,
BArchRMIT, MUrbanPlanMelb, FAIBS, MAIB, RAIA, MPIA, FRMIT,
Reg’d Building Practitioner, Reg’d Architect
Mervyn Minett CertMechEng, BEFIT
David King BEngVicMelb
Josef Rojter BSc, MEngScMonash, MIM, MSPE
Euan Nichol DipCE, BEngRMIT, MIEAust, CEng, CPEng
Vincent Rouillard BE(Dist)FIT, MEngVicMelb, MSEE, MSEM
Vinayaga Sarma BScGlas, MEngScBirm, CPEng, MIEAust,
MASCE, MAIPM, MAIB
Craig Townsend DipCE, BEng, DipEd, MEngScMelb, MIEAust
Computer Systems Engineer
Tien Do BEng(Hons)VicMelb
Technical Staff
Joseph Angelone DipCEFIT, BEng(Civil)VicMelb
Harry Friedrich CertEngAmsterdam, DipBus(Admin)Amsterdam
Laslo Kovacs
Laurence Martin
Norm Welgus
Administrative Officers
Lyn Allis AdvCertRes&CommServ(IntellDis)VicMelb
Glenda Geyer CertCompBusApplicWMCOT
SCHOOL OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
Head of School
Associate Professor Michelle Towstoless BSc(Hons),
PhDMelb, MEPG, MESA, MAPS
Professor
Gabriela Stephenson BSc(Hons)Bucharest, PhDMonash,
GradDipInfoScRMIT
Associate Professors
Jack Antonas BScW Aust, GradDipEdWAIT, DipDieteticsWAIT,
PhDLond
Lily Stojanovska DipMedLabSciRMIT, BSc, MscDePaul,
PhDMelb, MADS, MASMR, MAMS
Senior Lecturers
Kerry Dickson BSc (Hons)WAust, MSc, PhDMonash, MASHB
Alan Hayes BSc (Hons)Melb, PhDMelb, MAuPS, MACSM,
MIRCHAL
Wendy Probert MHScLaT, BSc(Hons)LaT, BAppSc(MedLab)RMIT,
MAIMS, MPHA
Kathy Tangalakis BSc(Hons), PhDMelb
Lecturers
Susan Bevan BSc(Hons), PhDLaT
Beverly Crawford BAppSc(MedLab)RMIT, GradDipEdVicMelb
Neville Critch BScSurrey, MScMonash, GradDipEdHawthorn,
MPHMonash
Catherine Kamphuis BSc(Hons)Melb, PhDMelb, MASMR
Paul Lewandowski BSc(Hons)Deakin, PhDDeakin
Sharleen O’Reilly BSc(Hons), PhDTCDIreland, SRDUK
Siun O’Sullivan BSc(Hons)Melb, PhDMelb
Philip Seymour BEd(PhyEd)BallaratUC, DipAcup, MASEO
Xiao-qun Su BScShaanxi, MScAcademiaSinica, PhDTas,
ASP(Aust)
Research Fellows
Ronny Blazev PhDLaT, BSc(Hons)LaT
Brett O’Connell PhD, BSc(Hon)VicMelb, AUPS
Laboratory Managers
Nikola Popovik MSc
Technical Officers
Lillian Nobile AssocDipBiolSciLabTechWMIT
Danijela Stankovic AssocDipAppSc(LabTech)WMIT
Zheng Tao AssocDipAppSc(LabTech)WMIT
Jillian Vince BScMelb
Administration Officer
Judith Thomas
SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND
MATHEMATICS
Head of School
Associate Professor Pietro Cerone BScUNSW, PhDW’gong,
FAustMS
Professors
Sever Dragomir BScTim, MEdTim, PhDTim
Clement Leung BScMcG, MScOxf, PhDLond, FBCS, FRSA, CEng
Yanchun Zhang BSc(Hons)Hebei, MScBIT, PhDUQ
Associate Professors
Neil Barnett MScLond, PhDMonash, DipEd
Yuan Miao BScShandongU, MEng, PhDTsinghuaU
Nalin Sharda BTech, PhDITDelhi
Anthony Sofo MScLaT, DipEdMelb, PhDVicMelb
Senior Lecturers
John Horwood DipEd, DipComp, MScMelb, PhDMonash
Fuchun Huang BScPeking, MSc CSA, PhD Sokenda (Japan)
Lutfar Khan BScEngDhaka, MEng, DEngAIT
Alasdair McAndrew BSc(Hons)Melb, MScMonash, PhDMonash
Iwona Miliszewska MScDresden,
GradDipComp&InfoScsVicMelb
Gitesh Raikundalia BEcSydney, MCompNCastle, PhDBond,
PACS, MACM, MIEEE-CS
John Roumeliotis BSc(Hons)LaT, PhDUNSW
Fernando Scarmozzino BSc, MAppScRMIT, DipEdMSC
Hao Shi BEJiaoTong, PhDW’gong
Khalil Shihab BSc(Hons), MScBagdad, PhDUK
Jakub Szajman BSc(Hons), PhDLaT
Grace Tan BScOSU, MScVicMelb
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
14
Champa Weerakoon MSc(IrrEng)S’ton
Xun Yi BScWuhanU, MScZhenghen, PhDXidian
Lecturers
Alan Davidson BSc, DipEdMelb, MScLond
Anthony Doggett BAppSCBallaratUC, GradDipEdGippslandAE,
MScMonash
Ian Gomm BSc(Hons), DipEdMonash, MScMelb
Fuchun Huang BScPeking, MSc, CSA, PhDSokenda (Japan)
Tim Hunt BSc, DipEdMelb
Robert Moore BScMelb, BALaT, DipEd, BEdLaT
Daniel Nelson BMath(Dist), MEdMinn, GradDipCompStudsMelb
Anne Venables BScMelb, GradDipEdMelb,
GradDipCompSciVicMelb, MscVicMelb
MacEwan Wright BEc, DipAcctLat, MAccUNE, AIBF CPA CPL.
Bai-Ling Zhang BEngWuhan, MengChina,PhDNCastle
Academic Associate
Don Watson BSc, DipEdUniSyd, MA, PhDMelb
Visiting Professors
Santosh Kumar MScVikram, PhDDelhi
Research Assistant/Executive Editor
Pui Ling Pang BAppScRMIT, GradDipMelb
Computer Systems Manager
Ponnusamy Rajendran BTechIIT, MEngAIT,
DipCompAppPhysics
Computer Systems Administrator
Cameron Giles BScComSciMelb
Computer Systems Officer
Mark Mojic
Technical Assistant
Danh Ho
Administrative Officers
Janet Grady
SCHOOL OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Head of School
Associate Professor Aladin Zayegh, BE(Elec)Aleppo, MSc,
PhDClaudeBernard, CPEng, AMSE, MIEAust, MIEEE
Professors
Michael Faulkner BSc(Elec)UK, MEngSc, MEUNSW, PhDUTS,
MIEEE
Jugdutt (Jack) Singh BSc(Hons)UK, MScAlta, PhDVic,
TeachCertUSP, MIEEE,MIEICE
Associate Professors
Gregory Baxter BSc(Hons), PhDMelb, MAIP
Stephen Collins BSc(Hons), PhDMelb, FAIP
Patrick Leung BEng(Elec), MEng(Sc)Melb, PhDCalif, MIEEE
Alexander Simcock BSc(Electronics)Kent, MEngFIT,
GradCert(Tertiary Educ)VicMelb
Nguyen Truyen BE(Elec)Monash, MEngScUNSW, PhDQ’ld,
SMIREE Aust
Fu-Chun Zheng BSc, MSc, PhDEdin, SMIEEE
Principal Lecturer
Robert Taylor BSc, MEdMonash, MAIP, MAAIR
Senior Lecturers
Gregory Cain BSc(Hons)WAust, PhDMonash
Andrew Cramond BAppSci(Dist), MAppSciChisholm, PhDSalford
Prem Dassanayake BScEngSLanka, MSc, PhDWales, MIEE,
MIEEE
Qin Jiang BScEng(Elec)Shanghai Jiao-Tong, MEngCanterbury,
PhDMonash, MIEEE
Wee Sit Lee BEng(Elec)Sing, MScNUS’pore, PhDANU, MIEEE
Roman Malyniak BE(Elec), PhDWAust
Gregory Martin BE(Elec)(Hons)Melb, ME(Distinction)Cant,
PhDVicMelb, MIEEE, Chartered Electrical Engineer
Juan Shi DipEELiaoningLightIndustryCollege,PRC, BE(Elec)North-
East University,PRC, PhDVicMelb, MIEEE
Michael Wingate BE(Elec), DipEd, MAdminMonash, MScManc,
PhDVicMelb, CPEng, MIEAust
Lige Xia BEDalien, PhDANU, MIEEE
Lecturers
John Chlond BSc(Hons)CNAA UK, GradDipEdHawthornInstEd
Robert Ives BSc(Hons)Nott, MEngVicMelb
Yau Man Ng BSc(Hons)NUS’pore, MScUWIST
Aleksandar Stojcevski BE(ElecEng), MEng(ElecEng),
PhDVicMelb, AMSE, MIEEE, MIEICE, MIEE
Ronny Veljanovski BSc, PhDVicMelb, MIEEE, MIEICE, MAMN
Post Doctoral Fellow
Tan Ying BScHesbin, PhDHesbin
Daniel Kitcher BSc(Hons)ImperialCollege, PhDBath
Research Engineer
Melvin Pereira
Technical and Computer Systems
Hayrettin Arisoy AssocDipScComp&AppPhyVicMelb
Donald Ermel
Foster Hayward COTRMIT
Abdurrahman Kuzucu AssocDipElectEngRMIT
Les Nakonieczny CertBasicElectRMIT, DipComm&CompServICS,
AssocDipElectronicsRMIT
Zoltan Varga AssocDipDigElec&CompFIT
Administrative Officer
Maria Pylnyk
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES
Acting Head of School
Professor Maureen Ryan TPTCToorak, BAMelb, MEdMonash,
PhDMelb, MAPS
Senior Lecturer
Julie Thacker UCLES/RSA CTEFLALond, BSc (Hons)WAust,
GradDipEdCurtin, PhDANU
Co-ordinator
David Dawson MBusAdminDeakin, GradDipAppPsych,
GradDipCompEd, DipTeaching, BScAuckland, MAPS, AITD
Anatomy Laboratory Manager
Jim Johnson CertMelbLabTechSAInstTech
Clinical Co-ordinator
Christopher MacFarlane DO(BSO) UK
Clinical Laboratory Technicians
Jan Carter SEN
Sal Salanitri BAppScHumanMovementPhillip, DipEdHawthorn
CLINICAL TEACHING UNIT
Co-ordinator
Dawn Bannon
RN,BHScNsgVicMelb,CertMass(East&West)VicMelb
OSTEOPATHIC SCIENCES
Associate Professor
Peter Gibbons MB, BSLond, DO,BSO, DM-SMedSoc.Apoth,
FRSH, MHScVicMelb
Senior Lecturer
Melanie Cameron BAppSc(Osteo)RMIT, MHScVicMelb, PhD
Gary Fryer BAppScOst, ND.PhD (in progress)
STAFF – FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
15
Lecturers
Annie Carter BA (Hons)Melb, GradDipOccHealthMonash,
MBBSMelb, GradDipTertEdVicMelb, PhD (in progress)
Cameron Gosling BAppSciRMIT, GradDipExrcsRehab,
MAppScVicMelb
Jenny Hynes BAppSci(Physio)LincolnInst,
MPhysio(Manips)VicMelb
Jim Kiatos MBBS, DipAppSc(Naturopathy) Fellow ANTA
Patrick McLaughlin BAppScFIT, MappScVicMelb,
PhD (in progress)
Brian Nicholls DO.UK, MACant
Denise Cornall BAppSc(Physio)LincolnInst,
DO(Hons) BritSchOsteopathy
Edwina Ryan BScMonash, BAppSc, BOsteoScRMIT,
GradDipEx RehabVicMelb
PARAMEDIC SCIENCES
Senior Lecturer
Helen Webb MHSc(Hons), BEd, TeachCert, PhD (in progress)
Lecturers
Peter Hartley AssocDipHthScVPSEB, GradDipEdMelb, Cert IV
Workplace Training & Assessment CAECA
Gerard McMahon DipT(Prim)SCVC, Cert IV Workplace Training
& Assessment STBV, DipHthSciOPTE, GradCertTertEdVicMelb
Sue Eastcott AdvDipParamedicSc, DipAppSc, (Ambulance
PreHospital Care), Certificate in Ambulance Studies, Cert IV Work
Place Training & Assessment
Clinical Co-ordinator
Sue Ringham
CHINESE MEDICINE
Senior Lecturers
Shelley Beer BAMonash,GradDipWomensHlthMelb,
GradDipChineseHerbalMedACOM, AdvCertClinClinicalStud
NanjingTCM, GradCertChineseMedPracBeijingCollegeTCM, PhD
(in examination)
Hong Xu BMedChina, PhDVicMelb
Damien Ryan BTheol, BPhilosStColSemSyd, DipAcupAcupColl
Syd, DipHerbMedDorothyHallCNM, MedTechSyd, PhDVicMelb
Kerry Watson DipAc(ACA), DNMN (SNMN), DRM(CNS),
OMD(CAC)
Lecturers
Peter Ferrigno BA, DipEdMonash, BSWLaT, DipAcACA,
GradDipChineseHerbalMedACOM, MAVicMelb
Barry Nester BSc, DipEdLaT, DipAcACA, GradAcOICS,
GDipCHMACOM, DipHomACH, PhDVicMelb
Sue Rodger-Withers BScMelb, DipAcACA,
DipChineseHerbalMedNanjingTCM, GradDipHomACH
GradDipChineseHerbalMedACOM, PhDMelb
Deyuan (David) Wang BMed (China), MHScVicMelb
COMPLEMENTARY & INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE UNIT
Shelley Beer BAMonash, GradDipWomensHlthMelb,
GradDipChineseHerbalMedACOM, AdvCertClinClinicalStud
NanjingTCM, GradCertChineseMedPracBeijingCollegeTCM
Vivienne Williams BHScVicMelb, GradDipHealthCounVicMelb
MHScVicMelb DipAc, CertOrientalMassage, CertHerbalMedAAC,
AdvDipTransRBNSW, CertAcuClinicInternBeijing, PhDCand
CLINICAL DERMAL THERAPIES
Lecturer
Frank Perri BScVicMelb, GradDip(Health Psychology)LaT,
PhD (in progress)
Personal Assistant to Head of School
Suzanne Brand
School Adminstrators
Tracey Hamilton-Scott
Makeleta Taunisila
SCHOOL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES
Head of School
Associate Professor Stephen Bigger BAppSc, PhDMelb,
MRACI, C.Chem, MACS
Professors
John Orbell BSc, MSc, PhDAuck, FRACI, C.Chem, MACS, MSBIC
Nagendra Shah BVSc&AH(Hons)Ranchi, MScS.Dakota, PhDAlta,
AAIFST, MDIAA, MADSA, MIFT
Associate Professors
Mary Millikan DipAppChemRMIT, BScMonash, PhDLaT, MRACI,
MSCA, ARSC, AAIFST
Andrew Smallridge BSc(Hons), PhDMonash, MRACI, CChem
Grant Stanley BE(Chem), PhDMelb, MABA
Senior Lecturers
Swati Baindur-Hudson BScANU, BAppScUC, PhDEssex,
MASBMB, MAIMS, MABA
Vijay Mishra BScTNKVV, MScMysore, PhDAlberta, MAIFST
Lawrence Ngeh MScOtago, GradDipEdMonash, PhDVicMelb
Rohani Paimin BSc(Hons), PhDLaT
Lecturers
Domenic Caridi BAppScFIT, BSc(Hons), PhDLaT, MRACI, CChem
Alison Duncan BSAc(Hons)Aberdeen, PhD, CNAARGIT
Sarah Fraser BSc(Hons), PhDDundee
Joshua Johnson BSc(Hons), PhDVicMelb
Sandra McKechnie BSc(Hons), PhDVicMelb
Todor Vasiljevic BScFST, PhDAlberta, MAIFST, MIFT
Laboratory Managers
Dale Tomlinson BSc(Hons)
Technical Officers
Charmaine DiQuattro BSc(Hons)VicMelb
Stacey Lloyd BAppSc(Biotech)RMIT,
GradDipEdVicMelb,GradDip(FoodTech), MScVicMelb
Min Thi Nguyen BAppScFIT, CertBCEWMCOT
Joseph Pelle BScVicMelb, GradDip(FoodTech), MScVicMelb
Irawati Prasatya Ir(ITI)Indonesia, MScVicMelb
Michael Rogerson BSc(Hons), MASM
Administration Officer
Yildiz Djelal AdvCert(OffAdmin), DipBus(Admin)VicMelb
PACKAGING AND POLYMER RESEARCH UNIT
Manager
Associate Professor Kees Sonneveld MAgrScWageningen,
MAIP
Laboratory Manager
Robert Richmond BSMichState
Visting Academics
Professor Joseph Miltz BSc(ChemEng)Technion,
MSc(ChemEng)Technion, DScTechnion
Faculty Associates
See ‘Academic Staff’ under School of Molecular Sciences
Mervyn Minett CertMechEng, BEFIT
Vincent Rouillard BE(Dist)FIT, MengVicMelb, MSEE, MSEM
Associate Professor Michael Sek MEngSc, PhDPoznan, AIP
Administrative Officer
Vacant
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
16
SCHOOL OF NURSING AND MIDWIFERY
Head of School
Terence McCann RNDiv1, PhdNewc, MANewc, BA Open, UK
RMN, RGN, RCNT
Associate Professors
Valerie MacKinnon RN Div1, DipAppScComHealthNsgPreston,
BAppScAdvNsgEdPhillipIT, MEdMelb, FRCNA
Senior Lecturers
Chris Au RNDiv3, DNsg, CertEdLond, BACharlesSturt, EdSyd,
PhDMonash.
Patricia Burton RNDiv1, DipAppSc, BAppScPhillipIT, BSc,
MEdMelb, FRCNA
Jenny Cheung RNDiv1, Midwifery, DipNephro-urologicalNsg,
IntensCareCertUK, DipNsgEd, BAppScAdvNsgEdLincolnInst,
MEdStud, PhDMonash, FRCNA
Daniel Chew RNDiv1, ClinicalTeachCertUK, DipEdUK, BEd,
MEdLaT, PhDLaT
Marilyn Richardson-Tench RNDiv1, PhDMonash,
MEdStudMonash, BAppScAdvNsgLaT, RCNT, CORTM
Lecturers
Cally Berryman RNDiv1, SipCHNsg, BAppSc, MEd, PhDMelb
Gayelene Boardman RN Div3, GradDipPsychiatricNursingRMIT,
MastersMentalHealthNursingVicMelb
Mary Carolan
Lee Chiu RNDiv1, Midwifery, MRCNA, ONG(Hons),
BAppScAdvNsgPhillipIT, MNStudiesLaT, DipEdMelb
Joan Deegan RNDiv1, IDCert, BEd, GradDipEdStud, MEdMelb
Finbar Hopkins RNDiv1, Midwifery, BAppScE.Cowan,
GradDipWomen’sHealthMelb, MWomen's Studies
Mary Huynh RNDiv1, BAppScAdvNsgEdPhillipIT, MEdLaT
Gina Kruger RNDiv1, Certified Midwife (UK), GradDipClin Nurse
Prac&Mgt(AdvMid)RMIT, FPC,MN
Karen Lawrence RN Div1, BNsg, GradDip(Mid), GradDip(VET),
MHthSc(Nursing Ed)
Meng Lim RNDiv1, RSCN, BAFlin, BNsgSACAE, MNRMIT
Leonie Murphy RNDiv1, Midwifery, BALaT,
BAppScAdvNsgEdPhillipIT, MEdStudMonash, MRCNA
Geraldine Rebeiro RNDiv1, Midwifery, BAppScLaT,
BEdStudMelb, MEdStudMelb
Julie Watts RNDiv1, CertNeuroMedSurgNsg,
BAppScAdvNsgEdLincolnInst, GradDipHealthServMgtRMIT,
MBusRMIT
Clinical Co-ordinator
Elvira Brown RNDiv1, Midwifery, BAppScAdvNsgEdPhillipIT,
MRCNA
Assistant Clinical Co-ordinators
Angela Cole
Cora Smith
Laboratory Technicians
Maryanne Craker RN Div2
Glenda Iskov RN Div2
Personal Assistant to Head of School
Leanne Howatson CertBus (OfficeAdmin)VicMelb
Research Assistant to Head of School
Lucy Lu
School Administrator
Anna Matkowsky
Administrative Officer
Niluka Weragoda
SUSTAINABILITY GROUP
Professor
Paul Boon BSc(Hons)Syd, PhDGriffith
Professorial Associate
John Orbell BSc, MSc, PhDAuck, FRACI, CChem, MACS, MSBIC
Senior Lecturers
Trevor Burridge BSc(Hons), PhDMonash
Colin Hocking BSc(Hons)LaT, DipEdMelb, PhDLaT
Russell Swann FRMIT(Physics), BAppScRMIT, DipEdHawthorn,
BEd(Science)WASTC, MEnvScMonash, DipEdMelb, MAIP, MACEA,
PhD
Lecturer
Bronwen Scott BSc(Hons)Bristol, GradCertEdJCU, PhDJCU
Technical Officer
Heather Altimari AssocDipApplSci(LabTech), Cert IV
WorkplaceTraining, DipApplSci(BiolSci)
Administration Officer
Vacant
FOUNDATION STUDIES
Co-ordinator
Nicholas Athanasiou BSc(Chem)(Hons)VicMelb
17
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
COURSES OFFERED
The Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science offers the following
undergraduate courses:
Certificate in Foundation Studies;
Double Degree courses in;
Engineering and Business E-Commerce;
Engineering and Science;
Engineering and Law;
Engineering and Arts;
Science and Business E-Commerce;
Science and Law;
Science and Arts;
Science and Psychology.
CERTIFICATE IN FOUNDATION STUDIES
(ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE)
Course Code: JCFY
PHILOSOPHY AND AIMS OF THE COURSE
Many students are interested in science, health science, computing
and/or engineering but have reservations about some of the
fundamental study areas that define these disciplines. For various
reasons, study areas such as chemistry, physics and mathematics
are regarded as unapproachable.
To remedy this situation, the Faculty of Health, Engineering and
Science provides a year-long Foundation Studies program.
The Foundation Studies has been designed to:
strengthen a student’s understanding of these ‘difficult’ study
areas;
endeavour to develop a student’s confidence in these study
areas; and
foster an intellectual vigour in tackling both further future tertiary
courses and areas of employment that are built upon these
study areas.
Upon successful completion of the Foundation Studies program
prerequisite subjects, students are guaranteed entry into courses
operated by the Engineering and Science areas and access to a
considerable number of courses run by the Health Science area
within the Faculty. Access to Double degree programs run by the
Faculty can also be accessed, however distinction marks across pre
requisite subjects is required to access such programs.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
In general, the Foundation Studies program aims to provide an
opportunity for students:
(i) who have not studied science and mathematics at Year 12
level;
(ii) who have studied basic science and mathematics at Year 12
level but did not achieve appropriate study scores to enable
them to satisfy the entrance requirements for courses in the
Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology;
(iii) whose recent educational results have not been at the level of
which they are capable of performing;
(iv) who are returning to study after some years away from formal
education; or
(v) who wish to change direction in their education.
To make certain that students receive a concerted education that will
fulfill the entry requirements of the tertiary system whilst taking into
consideration the educational background of the students, the
majority of the foundation study areas are streamed. Different
streams can be undertaken for different subjects if required.
These streams; beginners, intermediate and advanced; offered by
the Foundation Studies program reflect and accommodate the broad
cross-section of the educational backgrounds of students.
STUDIES STREAMS
BEGINNERS STREAM
The beginners stream is designed for students that would like to
pursue a tertiary qualification in a science, computing or an
engineering discipline but:
have had no prior contact with these disciplines; or
have previously experienced learning difficulties in the study of
these disciplines.
The beginners stream is specifically designed to introduce students
to the fundamental principles that underpin the disciplines of science
and engineering; to provide students with the ability to recognise,
utilise and interpret these principles; to prepare students for their
further tertiary education and most importantly foster a process of
sustained learning and research.
Recognising the possible lack of confidence and/or trepidation
brought about by the unfamiliarity of these study areas, students
within this stream will be provided with extensive tuition in small
classes over extended semesters. The beginners stream will
commence in March and conclude in early February of the following
year. Upon successful completion of prerequisite subject areas,
students will gain guaranteed entry into one of the undergraduate
courses offered by the Faculty of Science, Engineering and
Technology.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
18
INTERMEDIATE STREAM
The intermediate stream is designed for students that would like to
pursue a tertiary qualification in a science, computing or an
engineering discipline but have not been successful in completing or
meeting the pass requirements of related subject areas previously
undertaken.
The intermediate level will run over two semesters, each of which
will run for 16 weeks and will commence in March and conclude in
December of the same year.
ADVANCED STREAM
Students enrolled into the advanced stream of a particular subject
will undertake an accelerated program. If all the topic areas within
the study area(s) over Semester One are successfully completed a
student may be eligible to enter a first-year undergraduate course or
first-year year undergraduate core subjects within the Faculty in
Semester Two.
CHOICE OF STREAM
Suitability of entry into any of these streams will be assessed upon
completion of an entrance test and an interview. Students that have
not previously attempted study areas that parallel those they wish to
undertake at foundation level may opt not to sit for the test and enter
the beginners stream.
Each stream will be timetabled so as to allow students upon
consultation with Foundation Studies staff to move into an alternate
stream over the duration of the course.
STUDY AREAS CHOICES
The following study areas are offered as part of Foundation Studies:
Biology, Chemistry, English Language and Communication Skills, IT,
Mathematics for Scientists, Mathematics for Engineers and Physics.
Students will generally enrol in four subject areas. Fewer subjects
may be undertaken. This will be determined by considering the
students previous academic record, the results of the grading tests
and via interview with the student. A choice of either a mathematics
for scientists or engineers typically must be undertaken by all
students.
COURSE DURATION
The course is year long course although transfer to other courses is
possible as a subject transfers following semester one. Semester
One is undertaken over 17 weeks and Semester Two over 16
weeks. Beginners students may require to undertake a further session
in early February of the following year for approximately seven
weeks.
COURSE LOCATION
All study areas will be taught at the University’s Footscray Park
campus
COURSE FEE
Students who fit under the Federal Government Guidelines of
disadvantage are HECS exempt with respect to the Foundation
Studies program.
APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Application to Foundation Studies is via direct application. Students
will need to fill out an undergraduate application form available
from Student Admissions, phone on (03) 9919 2286 or download
from the website www.vu.edu.au/admissions. Alternatively the form
can be accessed at www.vu.edu.au/foundationstudies.
Further information regarding the Foundation Studies program can
be obtained from the Faculty Office.
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ELECTRONIC
COMMERCE/BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Course Code: BBES
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The combined course will provide students with a broad ranging
program of study and learning aimed at satisfying the academic
and professional requirements in both the appropriate field of
science and of business. The double degree course will equip
graduates to obtain employment in business and government, in
major scientific organizations and elsewhere. It was improve
learning by providing a fundamental framework for the application
of business and scientific concepts and ideas and their co-
integration which will ensure that students are capable of engaging
successfully in these professional areas in a commercial
environment.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over four years on a full-time basis or part-time
equivalent. All undergraduate degree subjects carry a value of 12
credit points. If undertaking Co-operative Education, additional
credit points is required for graduation.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for admission to the course an applicant must have
successfully completed a course of study at year 12 level or
equivalent.
In addition to satisfying the entry requirements for Australian resident
students or demonstrating equivalence, overseas students must
provide evidence of proficiency in the English language:
International English Language Testing System – overall band
score of 6–7 subject to individual profile; or
Test of English as a Foreign Language – score of 550, plus a
Test of Written English – score of 5.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Subject to approval.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING/BACHELOR OF
BUSINESS ELECTRONIC COMMERCE
Course Code: EBEB
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The combined course will provide students with a broad ranging
program of study and learning aimed at satisfying the academic
and professional requirements in a specialisation in business
together with an appropriate field of engineering. The double
degree course will equip graduates to obtain employment in
business, government, and in major engineering organizations.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over five years on a full-time basis or part-time
equivalent. All undergraduate degree subjects carry a value of 12
credit points.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for admission to the course an applicant must have
successfully completed a course of study at year 12 level or
equivalent.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
19
In addition to satisfying the entry requirements for Australian resident
students or demonstrating equivalence, overseas students must
provide evidence of proficiency in the English language:
International English Language Testing System – overall band
score of 6–7 subject to individual profile; or
Test of English as a Foreign Language – score of 550, plus a
Test of Written English – score of 5.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Subject to approval.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING/
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Course Code: EBSE
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The combined Bachelor of Engineering/Bachelor of Science course
will provide students with a broad ranging program of study and
learning aimed at satisfying the academic and professional
requirements in both science and the appropriate field of
engineering. The double degree course will enable graduates to
obtain employment in business and government, in major
engineering organisations, private industry and elsewhere.
COURSE DURATION
Five years of full-time study.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Subject to approval.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING/
BACHELOR OF LAWS
Course Code: EBBL
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The combined Bachelor of Engineering/Bachelor of Laws course will
provide students with a broad ranging program of study and
learning aimed at satisfying the academic and professional
requirements in both law and the appropriate field of engineering.
The double degree course will equip graduates to obtain
employment in law, business and government, in major engineering
organisations, at the Bar and elsewhere.
COURSE DURATION
Six years of full-time study.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Subject to approval.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING/
BACHELOR OF ARTS
Course Code: EBEA
Campus: Footscray Park
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The double degree structure of the Bachelor of Engineering/
Bachelor of Arts integrates education, training and research. With
the increasing globalisation of industry, Australia’s close proximity
to Asia and the increasing reliance on technology and in particular
multimedia, there is need for professionally qualified engineers to be
offered the opportunity to be exposed to international studies and
develop more skills in the field of multimedia communications. The
course will give students access to a broad curriculum and to a
program, which transcends disciplinary boundaries.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The combined Bachelor of Engineering/Bachelor of Arts course will
prepare professionally trained engineers to have a broader outlook
than just the purely technical skills of the engineering program;
enhance their professional engineering skills with LOTE and cultural
studies; and produce graduates capable of performing their
professional functions in culturally diverse settings.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over 5 years on a full-time basis or part-time
equivalent.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Subject to approval.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE/
BACHELOR OF LAWS
Course Code: BLBS
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The combined Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Laws course will
provide students with a broad ranging program of study and
learning aimed at satisfying the academic and professional
requirements in both law and the appropriate field of science. The
double degree course will equip graduates to obtain employment in
law, business and government, in major scientific organisations, at
the Bar and elsewhere.
COURSE DURATION
Five years of full-time study.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Subject to approval.
BACHELOR OF ARTS/BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Course Code: ABPS
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The combined Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts course will
prepare professionally trained scientists to take their place in
industrial and government employment; enhance the professional
scientific skills with LOTE and cultural studies; and produce
graduates capable of performing their professional functions in a
culturally diverse setting.
COURSE DURATION
Four years of full-time study.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Subject to approval.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
20
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
21
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURAL, CIVIL
AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
COURSES OFFERED
The School of Architectural, Civil and Mechanical Engineering offers
undergraduate courses leading to the award of:
Bachelor of Engineering in;
Architectural Engineering;
Building Engineering;
Civil Engineering;
Mechanical Engineering;
Robotic Engineering;
Bachelor of Technology;
Building Surveying.
A degree with Honours program is offered concurrently with the
fourth year of the engineering degrees. Normally, students entering
the final year of a full-time Bachelor of Engineering program (or its
equivalent in part-time mode) will be offered honours candidacy if
they have achieved at least a credit average over year levels 1–3.
THE SCOPE OF ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING
The degree in Architectural Engineering is an exciting new
development involving studies in Architecture, advanced
environmental services and life safety system design and the
integration of Architecture and all engineered building systems.
The need for a degree in Architectural Engineering has arisen from
the increasing complexity of all building systems in the last two
decades, and an increased level of client demand for buildings and
building systems that better meet their needs.
At Victoria University, Architectural Engineering focuses on the
development of planning and design skills for engineered
environmental services and structural systems. The course blends
selected ‘creative’ Architecture skills into an Engineering degree
framework, so that graduates are better enabled to work closely and
in harmony with Architects in the design of buildings to delight both
clients and end users.
This choice reflects the world-wide trend and emergence of
professional Engineering societies whose role is to ensure that the
highest standards of design and construction of such engineered
systems are achieved. In Australia, both the Society for Building
Services Engineering (Institution of Engineers – Australia) and in
Victoria, defined professional engineering design roles within the
Victorian Building Control Act, are recent examples of this
development.
Architectural Engineering graduates will have strong technical and
communication skills, and a good understanding and appreciation
of Architectural design practice as well as the economic, and social
environment in which they will operate. The ongoing and increasing
need for building infrastructure development will ensure there will be
a significant demand both locally and overseas for graduates with
such highly specialised skills, founded on a broad yet integrated
building technology base.
Employment opportunities exist with private consulting firms,
contractors, and government agencies throughout Australia and
overseas. Exciting and flexible opportunities exist for Architectural
Engineering graduates to play a vital role in:
the private sector including consulting, contracting, construction
and project management firms specialising in the design and
management of building environmental, structural and life
safety systems in the multi-billion dollar national and
international building industry;
the public sector.
THE SCOPE OF BUILDING ENGINEERING
The degree in Building Engineering has been offered for 25 years
and whilst it covers the entire building process, from planning and
financial feasibility studies, to design of structures and services
systems, and site preparation and construction, it focuses on the
skills needed for project managing the planning and construction
process of buildings to achieve completion on time within budget.
Building engineers require multi-disciplinary training that including
building construction technology, construction and project
management, legal and economic processes, basic structures, and
thermo-fluid and electromagnetic systems. Building Engineering
graduates have strong technical and communication skills, and a
good understanding and appreciation of the environmental,
economic, social and legislative environment in which they must
operate.
The ongoing and increasing need for building infrastructure
development will ensure there will be a significant demand for
graduates with a broad yet integrated set of skills in this area, both
locally and overseas.
Employment opportunities exist with private firms and contractors,
government agencies and authorities throughout Australia and
overseas. Exciting and flexible opportunities exist for Building
Engineering graduates to play an important role in:
the public and private sector (consulting, contracting,
construction and project management firms specialising in multi-
billion dollar national and international building industry);
diverse areas such as urban planning; risk assessment and
management; and the operation of buildings.
THE SCOPE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING
Civil engineering is defined as the study, design, construction,
management, and maintenance of lasting community amenities and
infrastructure systems. These include all buildings from houses to
high-rise offices, roads, railways, waterways, reservoirs, sewers,
and all other facilities which are used to improve convenience and
quality of life for the present community and future generations.
There is widespread community concern about conservation issues
and environmental degradation at local, national and global levels.
At the same time, a rapidly increasing world population is imposing
ever-increasing demands on the provision of infrastructure to satisfy
basic and more advanced human needs. Such demands are
particularly illustrated by the rapid urban growth occurring in many
areas, with associated requirements for appropriate types of
building, energy, transportation, water supply and waste
management systems, along with other major community facilities.
These conflicting trends have led to an appreciation by many
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
22
members of the world community that the need for development is
substantial, but at the same time such development must be
sustainable.
Civil Engineering graduates should have strong technical and
communication skills, and a good understanding and appreciation
of the environmental, economic, social and political environment in
which they must operate.
The increasing need for infrastructure provision allied with
substantial forms of development should ensure there will be a
significant demand for graduates with a truly integrated set of skills
in these areas, both on the local scene and overseas.
Employment opportunities exist with private consulting firms and
contractors, government agencies and authorities in Australia and
overseas.
THE SCOPE OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Engineering is the profession in which knowledge of mathematical
and natural sciences is applied to develop technologies to
economically exploit the natural resources for the benefit of
humankind. Mechanical engineering, which began to develop as a
distinctive area of engineering practice in the early part of last
century, has now developed into an extremely diverse and complex
profession.
Mechanical engineers find employment in government and private
enterprise in such wide-spread areas as manufacturing, design of
products and machines such as automotive industry, automatic
control of machines and processes, heating and air conditioning
systems, machine and condition monitoring, hydraulic and
pneumatic systems, computer applications – including finite element
analysis, computer-aided design and computational fluid dynamics
and research and development in a wide range of fields.
This degree course is designed to provide the broad education
required for the mechanical engineer’s professional career. A broad
engineering education leaves engineers better prepared to
communicate with each other, to avoid technological obsolescence
and to learn new skills as technology advances.
The Bachelor of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering program
offered by the School is suitable for men and women and
emphasises achievement across the mechanical engineering
disciplines in concert with problem solving, design, engineering
applications, innovation, management of resources and professional
responsibility.
In addition to these basic studies, the School of Architectural, Civil
and Mechanical Engineering is concerned with bridging the gap
between science and basic knowledge on the one hand, and the
design and development of useful devices and processes on the
other. This is the art of engineering and to teach this art is the
primary object of laboratory practice, industrial projects and
engineering design. Laboratory practice, which takes many forms, is
intended to show how the experimental method is used in the
solution of engineering problems. Design experience includes
devising means to perform specified tasks such as the design of a
device or the synthesis of a system made up of parts having known
characteristics.
THE SCOPE OF ROBOTIC ENGINEERING
Robotic Engineering provides an interface technology that is
concerned with mechanisms, electronics, control systems and
computer design and adaptation. It combines selected studies in
mechanical and electrical engineering.
Robotic engineers are at the forefront of major advances and
improvements in engineering systems in the 21st century and the
opportunities for innovative robotic engineers in industry and
research is rapidly expanding.
The Robotic Engineering course is designed to enable students to
pursue studies orientated towards design and application of
mechanisms, computer adaptation and simulation, electronic
control, instrumentation and automation in industry and research.
The course integrates relevant subjects in engineering and
computing to appeal to incoming good quality students with
mechanical, electronic and computer interests along with the
essential background in mathematics and physics.
This course provides the broad based knowledge required of the
modern engineer to be technically competent in design, problem
solving and analysis while developing important communication and
management skills.
Fundamental studies in engineering mechanics, electrical
engineering, mathematics, design materials and computing are
matched with specialist subject in robotics, mechatronics, control
systems and computer simulation in higher years. Significant
emphasis is placed on project and laboratory activities and industry
exposure throughout the course.
THE SCOPE OF BUILDING SURVEYING
Graduates of the Bachelor of Technology in Building Surveying
course at Victoria University will have gained valuable qualifications
for employment within the building and construction industry where,
as building practitioners or potential building practitioners, they are
likely to be involved in the administration of acts, regulations, codes
and standards relevant to the design, construction, occupation and
maintenance of a wide range of buildings used for residential,
office, retail, storage, industrial, public, etc purposes.
Basic functions that Building Surveyors are authorized (by State
legislation) to perform include the issuing of building permits, the
carrying out of inspections of buildings and building work and the
issuing of occupancy permits and temporary approvals. Building
Surveyors must be sufficiently knowledgeable and experienced to
competently perform the range of professional duties that they are
appointed to carry out.
COMPUTING FACILITIES
The School gives high priority to the provision of quality facilities for
computing-based instruction and research. The University’s centrally
located computing facilities are complemented by special dedicated
facilities within the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science and
the School of Architectural, Civil and Mechanical Engineering.
The School’s facilities include four rooms with some 110 Pentium
PC’s all connected to a central file server and printing facilities. In
addition, most of the School’s laboratories contain high-performance
computing workstations which, when not in use for experiments, are
accessible to students enrolled in the School of Architectural, Civil
and Mechanical Engineering. These computing facilities provide an
extensive range of modern software for engineering applications
such as Computer Aided Design, Finite Element Analysis, Solid and
Surface Modelling, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Digital
Signalling Processing, Statistical Analysis, Control System Design
and Simulation, CivilCAD, EPANET2, MDSolids, Camel, Primavera,
Strand7, Space GASS, Statics and Kinematics Analysis and
Simulation. In addition, major programming languages,
spreadsheets and word processing software are accessible from all
workstations. Access to e-mail, AARNET and the Internet (limited)
are also provided.
The School’s multimedia production studio, containing two high-
performance PCs connected to colour printers, scanners, audio and
video interface devices and CD writers are available to
undergraduate and postgraduate students enrolled at the School.
The School’s computing facilities are managed by a full-time
computer engineer.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
23
ARTICULATION PATHWAYS
Special provision is made for admission into engineering degree
courses on the basis of good results for an Associate Diploma in an
appropriate field of study. Interested persons should refer to the
section on Articulation and Credit Transfer at the back of this book.
Transfer between degree courses with credit for subjects already
passed is a possibility.
ACADEMIC PROGRESSION GUIDELINES AND UNSATISFACTORY
PROGRESS
Each undergraduate course is specified as a unique set of course
subjects. The sequence in which these course subjects are normally
studied is specified, firstly, by grouping them in course years and
secondly, by specifying prerequisites and/or co-requisites for some
subjects.
Normally all of the course subjects in a particular course year must
be completed and all prerequisite/co-requisite requirements satisfied
before enrolment will be permitted in any subject in a subsequent
course year. Enrolment in a group of subjects spanning more than
two course years is not permitted.
In order to satisfy the academic requirements for a course award, all
course subjects must be completed. Such completion may be
obtained by:
being granted exemption in either individual subjects or in
course years; and/or
achieving a grade of P (or higher) in the assessment of each
subject; and/or
being granted compensation in course years.
A stage grading of ‘Year Completed by Compensation’ may be
granted if a student:
has been given final grades in all subjects in the course year;
and
has passed subjects equivalent to more than 80 per cent of total
required semester hours for that course year with no assessment
at less then N1 grade; and
has achieved an hour-weighted average mark of at least 50 per
cent for all subjects in the year.
A grading of ‘Year Completed by Compensation’ recognises an
acceptable overall result but does not constitute a pass in any
individual failed subject.
Students who do not satisfy the requirements for a ‘Year Completed
by Compensation’ must repeat all failed subjects of that year (or
their equivalents) at the earliest opportunity.
Normally, gradings of ‘Year Completed by Compensation’ will not
be granted in consecutive years of a course.
Normal progress through a course requires a student to complete
any defined course year within one year of equivalent full-time
enrolment.
Any of the following may be considered to constitute unsatisfactory
progress by a student:
(i) failure in any subject or unit for the third time.
(ii) failure in any subject or unit at n2 level for the second time.
(iii) failure in 50 per cent or more of their assessed enrolment load
in any semester or calendar year of study;
(iv) failure to complete any two consecutive course years within
three years of equivalent full-time enrolment,
(v) failure to complete the course within any maximum period
defined by University Statute.
(vi) failure to meet a conditional enrolment agreement.
As otherwise defined in the University Statute and subject to being
invited to show cause, a student making unsatisfactory progress will
normally be recommended for exclusion from the course.
EXEMPTIONS
Claims by students for exemptions from subjects of any course on
grounds of special experience or having passed equivalent subjects
at Victoria University, other universities or colleges in Australia or
overseas, should be submitted on the proper form to the Faculty
Office accompanied by proof of the relevant qualifications or
experience. Forms are available from the School or Faculty Office.
Exemption approval is given by notification in writing.
STUDY LOAD
PART-TIME STUDY
Part-time study can be approved at any stage of a course since
progress is by individual subjects rather than by years. Part-time
study involves attending normal day classes. It is unrealistic to
expect to complete a degree course entirely on a part-time basis.
FULL-TIME STUDY
Full-time study of the degree courses is over a four-year period, and
involves from 19 hours of Class Contact per week in first year and
18 lectures per week in subsequent years.
SINGLE SUBJECT ENROLMENT
Suitably qualified persons may be permitted to enrol for single
subjects as a part of their further education but passes in such
subjects may not be counted should the students study later for a
degree or diploma.
SUPPLEMENTARY ASSESSMENT
Supplementary assessment is not normally available in any subject
except at the discretion of the Head of School in exceptional
circumstances.
ENROLMENT AMENDMENT
Enrolment may be changed with agreement by the examiner and
Course Co-ordinator. Application must be made on the appropriate
form. A change for any semester is without penalty up until the
census dates of March 31 and August 31 (refer to published dates).
During the second month a late enrolment amendment fee becomes
payable and HECS liability continues for subjects discontinued.
Thereafter enrolment changes are not normally approved.
ASSIGNMENTS AND LABORATORY REPORTS
During the semester a lecturer may require students to complete
certain assignments and laboratory reports, excursions (and reports
of these), projects, library readings, etc. These are an integral part
of the course and must be satisfactorily completed by the due date.
If, for any legitimate reason a student believes they will be unable to
complete the assignment by the due date, they should obtain prior
approval for an extension of time from the lecturer, who may:
(a) grant an extension of time, with or without mark penalty, or
(b) refuse the request.
In general, 80 per cent of assignment/laboratory work must be
completed satisfactorily before admission to a final examination (if
such is required) or for a pass in the subject (if this is the method of
assessment). Each student must maintain a satisfactory record of
attendance at lectures, tutorials, laboratory sessions, fieldwork
exercises, drawing classes and design sessions.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
24
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS
INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT
Students must buy the drawing instruments specified for engineering
drawing. These will also be required in surveying and other
subjects. A clipboard, heavy boots and waterproof clothing are
required for excursions or surveying field work. Breakages of
University equipment due to misuse must be paid for by students.
COMPUTERS
University and Department computer facilities are provided for use
by students during normal working hours and in extended hours
subject to demand. Extensive relevant software is available.
ELECTRONIC CALCULATORS
Students must have a scientific calculator. Electronic calculators are
used in tutorials, laboratory or fieldwork classes and in
examinations at the discretion of the subject lecturer. Guidelines on
the use of electronic calculators and other electronic storage devices
in examinations are provided in individual subject outlines
distributed to students within the first two weeks of semester and
included on final examination papers.
Electronic calculators and other electronic storage devices will not
be permitted where the above provisions have not been made.
BORROWING OF EQUIPMENT
Students are not permitted to borrow University equipment for use
off-Campus except for survey fieldwork and similar authorised
purposes, in which case students must sign a loan form and assume
full responsibility for the care of the equipment.
FILMS AND EXCURSIONS
Where films or slides are shown as part of a lecture series, these
should be attended by all students of the subject since the material
covered cannot be presented in notes or textbooks and is
examinable. Similarly, excursions outside the University are essential
in bringing students into contact with aspects of professional
practice. These are part of the course and must be attended. Cost of
transport or excursions is normally paid by students as part of the
cost of the course.
MENTORING OF STUDENTS BY STAFF
A staff member to whom each student should refer any problem
likely to affect their progress has been assigned to each course year.
Advisers may be changed only by request of the student or the
adviser to the Head of School. Any problem concerning a service
subject administered by another department should be referred to
the Course Co-ordinator.
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Official notices will be posted on the notice board near the School
Office. Students should view this frequently.
SUGGESTIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT
Student Liaison Committees are a normal forum for students to
express their concerns through student representatives.
Complaints and suggestions for improvement may also be made in
writing at any time to the Head of School or may be placed in the
suggestion box in the library.
PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES
Students are encouraged to join the Institution of Engineers,
Australia and, where appropriate, The Australian Institute of
Building for a nominal fee.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING IN
ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING
Course Code: EBAE
CRICOS No: 040973D
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The course is designed to develop vocational skills for the
engineering planning, design, construction, maintenance and
management of building environmental and life safety systems.
The basic objectives of the course are to produce graduates who:
have a solid foundation of scientific, engineering and project
management knowledge capped by specific theoretical and
practical exposure to the design of building environmental and
life safety systems;
have the ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in
writing, and work well in a team situation;
have an understanding of community need for building
infrastructure in the context of societal aspirations and
expectations;
are motivated to continually improve their knowledge base; and
are immediately productive upon completion of the course and
are thus attractive to prospective employers.
COURSE PHILOSOPHY
The first two years of the degree program involves engineering
fundamentals to provide a solid foundation for the applied
engineering subjects in the following years of the course. Studies in
architecture design practices and architectural history are developed
in second and third year. These fundamentals provide students with
the basis of understanding all developments in the profession of
Architectural Engineering and Engineering in general as technology
continually changes and the profession undergoes continual
adjustment.
The applied engineering subjects building structures, building
environmental and life safety systems, and building project
management are introduced. In the final two years of the program,
students undertake a major in either environmental systems design or
structural systems design. An optional integrated 12 weeks industry
placement period is available in Architectural Engineering at the
end of the third year of the course in a ‘summer semester’ subject.
Architectural Engineering graduates will have enhanced skills for
careers in:
advanced environmental services system design;
building renovation and refurbishment;
building structures design;
computer aided design and drawing;
construction planning, management and project supervision;
cost estimating and project feasibility;
building energy audits and conservation studies;
engineering consultation and investigations;
facilities management and programming;
interior lighting design;
risk assessment for building system performance;
support for preservation Architecture; and
simulation of building environmental system performance.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
25
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
The Bachelor of Engineering in Architectural Engineering will be
submitted for recognition by the Building Practitioners Board and
Building Control Commission in Victoria. This submission is to meet
the minimum academic qualification for registration as a
Mechanical or Electrical Engineer, or as a Civil Engineer (Structures)
as defined by the responsibilities of these categories of ‘Engineer’ in
the Victorian Building Control Act. The degree satisfies the
requirements for accreditation by The Institution of Engineers,
Australia and will be submitted for accreditation by the Australian
Institute of Building.
OVERSEAS EXCHANGE PROGRAM
Each year two students from Victoria University who are enrolled in
either Architectural or Building Engineering, are able to undertake
studies with full credit for one semester in the third year of the
Architectural Engineering degree program at the University of
Nebraska – Omaha (UNO), U.S.A.
University scholarships are available to assist students in undertaking
this exchange. The program at UNO is one of the newest and best
resourced Architectural Engineering degrees in the U.S.A., having
commenced in 1999 within new propose built buildings and
facilities.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PREREQUISITES
The prerequisite subjects for admission into the first year of the
course are based on entry at post Year 12, Victorian Certificate of
Education, or equivalent level, and are as follows:
PREREQUISITES UNITS 3 AND 4
Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics, with a study score
of at least 22 in English
MIDDLE BAND SELECTION
Re-ranking based on study scores in the full range of year 12
student, with particular attention to pre-requisite studies and other
science based studies.
ADMISSION AT OTHER LEVELS
Articulation from Associate Diploma or Diploma courses in Building
Construction and Design or Engineering. Credit will be given to
subjects passed to a sufficient level of competence.
Persons transferring from other courses or having overseas or other
entrance qualifications of at least equivalent standard to those listed
above, should apply for admission in the normal manner.
Full-fee paying international students must have qualifications which
are equivalent to those listed above. In addition, they must provide
evidence of proficiency in the English language:
IELTS – an overall band score of 6+, subject to individual
profile; or
TOEFL – a score of 550+, and a Test of Written English score
of 5+.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over four years on a full-time basis of 22
contact hours per week. Part-time study may be approved. The
course however cannot be completed solely on a part-time basis.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Engineering subject codes commence with ‘V’.
Science subject codes commence with ‘R’.
Credit Semester
Points Hours
Year 1
Semester One
REP1001 Engineering Physics 1A 12 60
RMA1001 Engineering Mathematics 1A 12 60
VAN1011 Experimentation & Computing 12 60
VAN1051 Engineering Profession 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
REP1003 Engineering Physics 1C 12 60
RMA1002 Engineering Mathematics 1B 12 60
VAN1022 Solid Mechanics 1 12 60
VAN1032 Introduction to Design 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 2
Semester One
VAA2031 Architectural History & Design 12 60
VAN2021 Solid Mechanics 2 12 60
VAN2041 Thermofluids 12 60
VAN2061 Engineering Materials 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAA2002 Electrical Power Systems 1 12 60
VAC2022 Building Materials & Construction 12 60
VAC2042 Hydraulics 12 60
VAN2032 Engineering Design 12 60
Total 48 240
SERVICES STREAM
Year 3
Semester One
VAA3001 Electrical Power Systems 2 12 60
VAA3031 Environmentally Sustainable Design 1 12 60
VAA3071 HVAC Systems 1 12 60
VAA3081 Building Construction and Legislation 1 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAN3052 Engineering Management 12 60
VAA3032 Environmentally Sustainable Design 2 12 60
VAA3042 Hydraulic Services Systems 12 60
VAA3072 HVAC Systems 2 12 60
Total 48 240
STRUCTURES STREAM
Year 3
Semester One
VAA3031 Environmentally Sustainable Design 1 12 60
VAA3081 Building Construction and Legislation 1 12 60
VAC3021 Structural Analysis 12 60
VAC3061 Geomechanics 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAA3042 Hydraulic Services Systems 12 60
VAC3062 Geotechnical Engineering 12 60
VAC3092 Structural Design 12 60
VAN3052 Engineering Management 12 60
Total 48 240
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
26
SERVICES STREAM
Year 4
Semester One
VAA4001 Architectural Lighting & Communications
Systems 12 60
VAA4051 Building Quantities and Costs 6 36
VAA4071 HVAC Systems 3 6 36
VAN4011 Engineering Project 1 12 48
VAN4051 Engineering Project Management 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAA4032 Environmentally Sustainable Design 3 12 60
VAA4042 Building Fire Safety Systems 12 60
VAA4082 Building Construction and Legislation 2 6 36
VAA4092 Building Systems Design and Construction 6 36
VAN4012 Engineering Project 2 12 48
Total 48 240
STRUCTURES STREAM
Year 4
Semester One
VAA4051 Building Quantities and Costs 6 36
VAC4021 Structural Engineering Analysis Design 1 12 60
VAN4011 Engineering Project 1 12 48
VAN4051 Engineering Project Management 12 60
VAA4091 Structural Dynamics 6 36
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAA4042 Building Fire Safety Systems 12 60
VAA4082 Building Construction and Legislation 2 6 36
VAA4092 Building Systems Design and Construction 6 36
VAC4022 Structural Engineering Analysis & Design 2 12 60
VAN4012 Engineering Project 2 12 48
Total 48 240
ASSESSMENT
Assessment in subjects is designed to monitor a student’s progress
and achievements as well as contribute to and enhance their
learning. Normally a prescribed range of assessment methods is
employed in any subject.
Assessment is by a combination of written assignments, tests,
laboratory work and examinations.
Supplementary assessment is not normally available in any subject
except at the discretion of the Head of School in exceptional
circumstances.
Special Consideration in assessment may be granted on the grounds
defined by the University Statutes.
Guidelines on the use of electronic calculators and other electronic
storage devices in examinations are provided in individual subject
outlines distributed to students within the first two weeks of semester
and included on final examination papers.
Electronic calculators and other electronic storage devices will not
be permitted where the above provisions have not been made.
DEGREE WITH HONOURS
A Degree with Honours Program is offered concurrently with the
fourth year of the ordinary Bachelor of Engineering program.
Normally, students entering the final year of a full-time Bachelor of
Engineering program (or its equivalent in part-time mode), will be
offered honours candidacy, if they have achieved a minimum hour
weighted average of 60 per cent over year levels 1 to 3, have not
repeated a subject throughout levels 1 to 3 and have not been
granted more than one year completion by compensation
throughout the duration of the course. Fourth year honours degree
gradings will be determined by the relevant Examiners Board on the
basis of the hour weighted average for year level 4.
INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE
Students are required to undertake a 12 week industrial work
experience period during their course. At the end of third year,
students will have to undertake a 12 week (minimum) integrated
industry placement program. It is intended that this program will
meet the 12 week industrial work experience requirements imposed
upon all accredited Engineering degree courses by Engineers
Australia.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING IN BUILDING
ENGINEERING
Course Code: EBCB
CRICOS No: 002858M
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The course is designed to develop vocational skills for the
engineering planning, design, construction, maintenance and
management of buildings and building services systems.
The basic objectives of the course are to produce graduates who:
have a solid foundation of scientific, engineering and project
management knowledge capped by specific theoretical and
practical exposure to either the design of building structures or
building services systems;
have the ability to communicate effectively, both orally in
writing, and work well in a team situation;
have an understanding of community need for building
infrastructure in the context of societal aspirations and
expectations;
are motivated to continually improve their knowledge base; and
are immediately productive upon completion of the course and
are thus attractive to prospective employers.
The course recognises societal needs for professional Engineers who
have sound technical knowledge and good communication skills
and capable of providing appropriate building infrastructure that is
affordable, safe and comfortable to live and work within. The course
is founded on a broad base of science and engineering
fundamentals in the first and second year, with emphasis then given
in the third and fourth years to applied discipline-specific topics,
design and project work. The three study areas commence in the
second and third years of the course and are building structures,
building services and building construction and project
management. In the final year, the focus for the course becomes
planning and project management of the building construction
process.
Strong emphasis is given to professionalism, ethics and community
responsibility. Local examples of building projects provide
experiential learning through site visits together with teaching input
from practicing Engineers and other professionals in industry. These
provide valuable ‘real-world’ case studies and are a motivational
asset to the course.
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
The degree satisfies the requirements for accreditation by Engineers
Australia and will be submitted for accreditation by the Australian
Institute of Building.
OVERSEAS EXCHANGE PROGRAM
Each year two students from Victoria University who are enrolled in
either Architectural or Building Engineering, are able to undertake
studies with full credit for one semester in the third year of the
Architectural Engineering degree program at the University of
Nebraska–Omaha (UNO), U.S.A.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
27
University scholarships are available to assist students in undertaking
this exchange. The program at UNO is one of the newest and best
resourced Architectural Engineering degrees in the U.S.A., having
commenced in 1999 within new purpose-built buildings and
facilities.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PREREQUISITES
The prerequisite subjects for admission into the first year of the
course are based on entry at post Year 12, Victorian Certificate of
Education, or equivalent level, and are as follows:
PREREQUISITES UNITS 3 AND 4
Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics, with a study score
of at least 22 in English.
MIDDLE BAND SELECTION
Re-ranking based on study scores in the full range of year 12
student, with particular attention to pre-requisite studies and other
science based studies.
ADMISSION AT OTHER LEVELS
Persons transferring from other courses or having overseas or at
least equivalent standard to those listed above, should apply for
admission in the normal manner.
Full-fee paying international students must have qualifications which
are equivalent to those listed above. In addition, they must provide
evidence of proficiency in the English language:
IELTS – an overall band score of 6+, subject to individual
profile; or
TOEFL – a score of 550+, and a Test of Written English score
of 5+.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over four years on a full-time basis. Part-time
study may be approved. However, the course cannot be completed
solely on a part-time basis. Students must complete 384 credit
points.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Engineering subject codes commence with ‘V’.
Science subject codes commence with ‘R’.
Credit Semester
Points Hours
Year 1
Semester One
REP1001 Engineering Physics 1A 12 60
RMA1001 Engineering Mathematics 1A 12 60
VAN1011 Experimentation & Computing 12 60
VAN1051 Engineering Profession 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
REP1003 Engineering Physics 1C 12 60
RMA1002 Engineering Mathematics 1B 12 60
VAN1022 Solid Mechanics 1 12 60
VAN1032 Introduction to Design 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 2
Semester One
VAA2031 Architectural History & Design 12 60
VAN2021 Solid Mechanics 2 12 60
VAN2041 Thermofluids 12 60
VAN2061 Engineering Materials 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAA2002 Electrical Power Systems 1 12 60
VAC2042 Hydraulics 12 60
VAC2022 Building Materials & Construction 12 60
VAN2032 Engineering Design 12 60
Total 48 240
SERVICES STREAM
Year 3
Semester One
VAA3001 Electrical Power Systems 2 12 60
VAA3031 Environmentally Sustainable Design 1 12 60
VAA3071 HVAC Systems 1 12 60
VAA3081 Building Construction and Legislation 1 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAN3052 Engineering Management 12 60
VAA3042 Hydraulic Services Systems 12 60
VAA3032 Environmentally Sustainable Design 2 12 60
VAA3072 HVAC Systems 2 12 60
Total 48 240
STRUCTURES STREAM
Year 3
Semester One
VAA3081 Building Construction and Legislation 1 12 60
VAC3021 Structural Analysis 12 60
VAA3031 Environmentally Sustainable Design 1 12 60
VAC3061 Geomechanics 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAA3042 Hydraulic Services Systems 12 60
VAC3062 Geotechnical Engineering 12 60
VAC3092 Structural Design 12 60
VAN3052 Engineering Management 12 60
Total 48 240
SERVICES STREAM
Year 4
Semester One
VAA4051 Building Quantities and Costs 6 36
VAA4071 HVAC Systems 3 6 36
VAN4051 Engineering Project Management # 12 60
Or #
ECP5726 Project Procurement Management # 12 60
ECP5705 Project Management & Information
Technology 12 60
VAN4011 Engineering Project 1 12 48
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAA4082 Building Construction and Legislation 2 6 36
VAA4092 Building Systems Design and Construction 6 36
ECP5716 Project Development Analysis 12 60
ECP5736 Facility Life Cycle Costing 12 60
VAN4012 Engineering Project 2 12 48
Total 48 240
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
28
STRUCTURES STREAM
Year 4
Semester One
VAA4051 Building Quantities and Costs 6 36
ECP5726 Project Procurement Management # 12 60
ECP5705 Project Management &
Information Technology 12 60
VAC4091 Structural Engineering Design 1 6 36
VAN4011 Engineering Project 1 12 48
or
VAN4051 Engineering Project Management 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAA4082 Building Construction and Legislation 2 6 36
VAA4092 Building Systems Design and Construction 6 36
ECP5716 Project Development Analysis 12 60
ECP5736 Facility Life Cycle Costing 12 60
VAN4012 Engineering Project 2 12 48
Total 48 240
ASSESSMENT
Assessment in subjects is designed to monitor a student’s progress
and achievements as well as contribute to and enhance their
learning. Normally a prescribed range of assessment methods is
employed in any subject.
Assessment is by a combination of written assignments, tests,
laboratory work and examinations.
Supplementary assessment is not normally available in any subject
except at the discretion of the Head of School in exceptional
circumstances.
Special Consideration in assessment may be granted on the grounds
defined by the University Statutes.
Guidelines on the use of electronic calculators and other electronic
storage devices in examinations are provided in individual subject
outlines distributed to students within the first two weeks of semester
and included on final examination papers.
Electronic calculators and other electronic storage devices will not
be permitted where the above provisions have not been made.
DEGREE WITH HONOURS
A Degree with Honours Program is offered concurrently with the
fourth year of the ordinary Bachelor of Engineering program.
Normally, students entering the final year of a full-time Bachelor of
Engineering program (or its equivalent in part-time mode), will be
offered honours candidacy, if they have achieved a minimum hour
weighted average of 60 per cent over year levels 1 to 3, have not
repeated a subject through levels 1 to 3 and have not been granted
more than one year completion by compensation throughout the
duration of the course. Fourth year honours degree gradings will be
determined by the relevant Examiners Board on the basis of the hour
weighted average for year level 4.
INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE
Students are required to undertake a 12 week industrial work
experience period during their course. At the end of third year,
students will have an option to undertake a 12 week (minimum)
integrated industry placement program. It is intended that this
program will meet the 12 week industrial work experience
requirements imposed upon all accredited Engineering degree
courses by Engineers Australia.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING IN CIVIL
ENGINEERING
Course Code: EBCC
CRICOS No: 002859K
Civil Engineering is a broad-based discipline involving the planning,
design, construction and management of a wide range of essential
community infrastructure including, commercial and industrial
buildings, water supply and wastewater systems, irrigation,
drainage and flood protection systems, bridges, roads, highways
and transportation systems, and port harbour and airport facilities.
The course philosophy is very much based on a recognition of
society’s need for well-rounded engineers who not only have sound
technical and communication skills but also a good understanding of
the environmental, economic, social and political environment in
which they must operate.
The course is founded on a solid base of science and engineering
fundamentals in the first two years, with emphasis then being given
in years three and four to applied discipline-specific topics, design
and project work. Substantial emphasis is given in a range of
subjects to professionalism, ethics and community responsibility,
team assignments, broad problem solving and communication skills,
and the concepts of sustainability and sustainable engineering
practices. A focus on local engineering examples, experiential
learning and site visits, together with significant input from external
industry-based lecturers, provides students with exposure to real
world problems and is considered a motivational cornerstone of the
course.
There are two major streams in structural and water engineering
running through the course, complemented by minor streams in
geomechanics and transportation engineering. Environmental and
management issues are covered in specific subjects but also more
broadly by integration into a range of other subjects throughout the
course. Subject streams are generally sequential within a well-
defined structure. It is envisaged that this structure may be modified
somewhat in the future with a view to further motivating students by
allowing them a greater degree of flexibility and specialisation,
once a firm foundation has been established in the early years of the
course. The incorporation of more flexibility should also allow
students to remedy any perceived deficiencies in the more basic
communication and technical skills.
A study abroad exchange program is under investigation with the
Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Nebraska at
Omaha, Nebraska, USA.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The course is designed to develop skills for the application of
engineering principles of planning, design, construction and
management of buildings, roads, water supply and all other major
community amenities.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PREREQUISITES
The prerequisite subjects for admission into the first year of the
course are based on entry at post Year 12, Victorian Certificate of
Education, or equivalent level, and are as follows.
PREREQUISITES UNITS 3 AND 4
Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics, with a study score
of at least 22 in English
MIDDLE BAND SELECTION
Re-ranking based on study scores in the full range of year 12
student, with particular attention to pre-requisite studies and other
science based studies.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
29
ADMISSION AT OTHER LEVELS
Persons transferring from other courses or having overseas or other
entrance qualifications of at least equivalent standard to those listed
above, should apply for admission in the normal manner. A
preliminary interview with the Head of School concerned is
advisable for such applicants.
Full-fee paying international students must have qualifications which
are equivalent to those listed above. In addition, they must provide
evidence of proficiency in the English language:
IELTS – an overall band score of 6+, subject to individual
profile, or
TOEFL – a score of 550+, and a Test of Written English (TWE)
score of 5+.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over four years on a full-time basis. Part-time
study may be approved. However the course cannot be completed
solely on a part-time basis. Students must complete 384 credit
points.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Engineering subject codes commence with ‘V’.
Science subject codes commence with ‘R’.
Credit Semester
Points Hours
Year 1
Semester One
REP1001 Engineering Physics 1A 12 60
RMA1001 Engineering Mathematics 1A 12 60
VAN1011 Experimentation & Computing 12 60
VAN1051 Engineering Profession 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
REP1003 Engineering Physics 1C 12 60
RMA1002 Engineering Mathematics 1B 12 60
VAN1022 Solid Mechanics 1 12 60
VAN1032 Introduction to Design 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 2
Semester One
VAC2071 Surveying 12 60
VAN2021 Solid Mechanics 2 12 60
VAN2041 Thermofluids 12 60
VAN2061 Engineering Materials 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 2
Semester Two
VAC2022 Building Materials and Construction 12 60
VAC2042 Hydraulics 12 60
VAC2072 Highway Engineering 12 60
VAN2032 Engineering Design 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 3
Semester One
VAC3021 Structural Analysis 12 60
VAC3031 Civil Engineering Design 1 12 60
VAC3041 Hydrology & Water Resources 12 60
VAC3061 Geomechanics 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 3
Semester Two
VAC3042 Hydraulic Engineering 12 60
VAC3062 Geotechnical Engineering 12 60
VAC3092 Structural Design 12 60
VAN3052 Engineering Management 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 4
Semester One
VAC4071 Transportation Engineering 6 36
VAC4081 Environmental Engineering 1 12 60
VAC4091 Structural Engineering Design 1
(or approved elective 1*) 6 36
VAN4011 Engineering Project 1 12 48
VAN4051 Engineering Project Management 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 4
Semester Two
VAC4032 Civil Engineering Design 2 12 60
VAC4072 Environmental Planning and Design
(or approved elective 2*) 6 36
VAC4082 Environmental Engineering 2 12 60
VAC4092 Structural Engineering Design 2
(or approved elective 3 *) 6 36
VAN4012 Engineering Project 2 12 48
Total 48 240
Electives
May be taken to a value of 6, 12 or 18 CP depending on which of
VAC4072, VAC4091 and/or VAC4092 is done (18 max)
*Approved Electives from within the School of ACME
VAA2031 Architectural History and Design 12 60
VAA3031 Environmentally Sustainable Design 1 12 60
VAA3042 Hydraulic Services Systems 12 60
VAA3081 Building Construction and Legislation 1 12 60
VAA4051 Building Quantities and Costs 6 36
VAA4082 Building Construction and Legislation 2 6 36
VAM2011 Computations & Engineering Analysis 12 60
VEM2012 Electrical Engineering 12 60
Electives from outside School of ACME
(Subject to approval of Course Co-ordinator)
ASSESSMENT
Assessment in subjects is designed to monitor a student’s progress
and achievements as well as contribute to and enhance their
learning. Normally a prescribed range of assessment methods is
employed in any subject.
Assessment is by a combination of written assignments, tests,
laboratory work and examinations.
Supplementary assessment is not normally available in any subject
except at the discretion of the Head of School in exceptional
circumstances.
Special Consideration in assessment may be granted on the grounds
defined by the University Statutes.
Guidelines on the use of electronic calculators and other electronic
storage devices in examinations are provided in individual subject
outlines distributed to students within the first two weeks of semester
and included on final examination papers.
Electronic calculators and other electronic storage devices will not
be permitted where the above provisions have not been made.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
30
DEGREE WITH HONOURS
A Degree with Honours Program is offered concurrently with the
fourth year of the ordinary Bachelor of Engineering program.
Normally, students entering the final year of a full-time Bachelor of
Engineering program (or its equivalent in part-time mode), will be
offered honours candidacy, if they have achieved a minimum hour
weighted average of 60 per cent over year levels 1 to 3, have not
repeated a subject throughout levels 1 to 3 and have not been
granted more than one year completion by compensation
throughout the duration of the course. Fourth year honours degree
gradings will be determined by the relevant Examiners Board on the
basis of the hour weighted average for year level 4.
INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE
Candidates applying for the award of a degree in civil engineering
must ensure that they have submitted for approval evidence of
having undertaken a minimum of 12 weeks industrial experience
relevant to the course to satisfy Engineers Australia requirements.
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
Engineers Australia has granted full recognition for the Bachelor of
Engineering in Civil Engineering. Recognition is a requirement for
Graduate Membership of Engineers Australia and additionally for
equivalent membership of many overseas professional engineering
institutions.
OVERSEAS EXCHANGE PROGRAM
Victoria University has exchange agreements with universities in
many countries, some of which are the U.S.A., Canada, Mexico,
United Kingdom and many European and Asian countries.
For those students who do wish to study abroad, there is the
opportunity to experience living in a different culture and
environment, and to develop self-responsibility and reliance skills.
Many students achieve improved results in their remaining studies
after returning home, having developed a clearer perception of their
future career with a stronger determination to succeed.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING IN
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Course Code: EBME
CRICOS No: 002861E
The degree is designed to provide the broad education required for
a mechanical engineering career. In addition to theoretical and
practical engineering content, the course contains integrated studies
in economics, administration and communication. The degree
emphasises achievement across mechanical engineering disciplines
in concert with problem solving, design, engineering applications,
innovation, resource management and professional responsibility.
Government institutions and private enterprise employ mechanical
engineers in manufacturing, design of products and machines,
automatic control of machines and processes, heating and air
conditioning systems, machine and condition monitoring, hydraulic
and pneumatic systems, computer applications – including finite
element analysis, computer-aided design and Computational Fluid
Dynamics and research and development in a wide range of fields.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The course is designed to provide an educational standard and
vocational skills which will enable graduates to undertake
professional practice in the discipline of Mechanical Engineering.
Graduates are provided with a basis to progress through
postgraduate studies, continuing education courses and participate
in learned society endeavours.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PREREQUISITES
The prerequisite subjects for admission into the first year of the
course are based on entry at post Year 12, Victorian Certificate of
Education, or equivalent level and are as follows.
PREREQUISITES UNITS 3 AND 4
Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics, with a study score
of at least 22 in English
MIDDLE BAND SELECTION
Re-ranking based on study scores in the full range of year 12
students, with particular attention to pre-requisite studies and other
science based studies.
ADMISSION AT OTHER LEVELS
Persons transferring from other courses or having overseas or other
entrance qualifications of at least equivalent standard to those listed
above, should apply for admission in the normal manner.
Full-fee paying international students must have qualifications which
are equivalent to those listed above. In addition, they must provide
evidence of proficiency in the English language:
IELTS – an overall band score of 6+, subject to individual
profile; or
TOEFL – a score of 550+, and a Test of Written English (TWE)
score of 5+.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over four years on a full-time basis. The entire
course cannot be completed on a part-time basis. Students must
complete 384 credit points.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Engineering subject codes commence with ‘V’.
Science subject codes commence with ‘R’.
Credit Semester
Points Hours
Year 1
Semester One
RMA1001 Engineering Mathematics 1A 12 60
REP1001 Engineering Physics 1A 12 60
VAN1051 Engineering Profession 12 60
VAN1011 Experimentation & Computing 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
RMA1002 Engineering Mathematics 1B 12 60
REP1003 Engineering Physics 1C 12 60
VAN1032 Introduction to Design 12 60
VAN1022 Solid Mechanics 1 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 2
Semester One
VAM2011 Computations & Engineering
Analysis 12 60
VAN2021 Solid Mechanics 2 12 60
VAN2061 Engineering Materials 12 60
VAN2041 Thermofluids 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VEM2012 Electrical Engineering 12 60
VAM2062 Materials and Manufacture 12 60
VAN2032 Engineering Design 12 60
VAM2042 Thermodynamics & Fluid
Mechanics 1 12 60
Total 48 240
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
31
Year 3
Semester One
VAM3021 Stress Analysis 1 12 60
VAM3071 Dynamics 12 60
VAM3031 Mechanical Engineering Design1 12 60
VAM3041 Thermodynamics & Fluid Mechanics 2 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAM3012 Signal Analysis 12 60
VAM3022 Stress Analysis 2 12 60
VAM3072 Mechanical Vibration 12 60
VAN3052 Engineering Management 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 4
Semester One
VAM4021 Computational Mechanics 12 60
VAN4051 Engineering Project Management 12 60
VAN4011 Engineering Project 1 12 48
VAM4041 Heat Transfer & Combustion 12 60
Total 48 228
Year 4
Semester Two
VAM4032 Mechanical Engineering Design2 12 60
VAN4012 Engineering Project 2 12 48
VAM4042 Fluid Dynamics 12 60
Elective Stream 12 60
Total 48 228
ASSESSMENT
Assessment in subjects is designed to monitor a student’s progress
and achievements as well as contribute to and enhance their
learning. Normally a prescribed range of assessment methods is
employed in any subject.
Assessment is by a combination of written assignments, tests,
laboratory work and examinations.
Supplementary assessment is not normally available in any subject
except at the discretion of the Head of School in exceptional
circumstances.
Special Consideration in assessment may be granted on the grounds
defined by the University Statutes.
Guidelines on the use of electronic calculators and other electronic
storage devices in examinations are provided in individual subject
outlines distributed to students within the first two weeks of semester
and included on final examination papers.
Electronic calculators and other electronic storage devices will not
be permitted where the above provisions have not been made.
DEGREE WITH HONOURS
A Degree with Honours Program is offered concurrently with the
fourth year of the ordinary Bachelor of Engineering program.
Normally, students entering the final year of a full-time Bachelor of
Engineering program (or its equivalent in part-time mode), will be
offered honours candidacy, if they have achieved a minimum hour
weighted average of 60 per cent over year levels 1 to 3, have not
repeated a subject through levels 1 to 3 and have not been granted
more than one stage completion throughout the duration of the
course. Fourth year honours degree gradings will be determined by
the relevant Examiners Board on the basis of the hour weighted
average for year level 4.
INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE
Candidates applying for the award of a degree in mechanical
engineering must ensure that they have submitted for approval
evidence of having undertaken a minimum of 12 weeks industrial
experience relevant to the course to satisfy the Institution of
Engineers, Australia, requirements.
OVERSEAS EXCHANGE PROGRAM
Victoria University has exchange agreements with universities in
many countries, some of which are the U.S.A., Canada, Mexico,
United Kingdom and many European and Asian countries.
For those students who do wish to study abroad, there is the
opportunity to experience living in a different culture and
environment, and to develop self-responsibility and reliance skills.
Many students achieve improved results in their remaining studies
after returning home, having developed a clearer perception of their
future career with a stronger determination to succeed.
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
Engineers Australia recognises the degree as meeting all academic
requirements for corporate membership as a chartered engineer.
Completion of the degree plus 12 weeks approved experience will
admit to Graduate Membership. Victoria University students are
eligible for Student Membership.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING IN ROBOTIC
ENGINEERING
Course Code: EBRE
CRICOS No: 047048G
COURSE OBJECTIVES
This course is envisaged to integrate existing relevant subjects and
resources within the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science to
appeal to incoming high ENTER level students with mechanical,
electronic and computer interests along with the essential
background in mathematics and physics. The structure of the course
is to provide a common core progression with the revised
Mechanical Engineering degree course linked with specialist
subjects in robotics. Student completing this course will find
employment as specialist engineers in the mechanical and electronic
engineering interface in industry and research.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PREREQUISITES
To qualify for admission to the course an applicant must have
successfully completed a course of study at year 12 level or
equivalent.
PREREQUISITES UNITS 3 AND 4
Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics, with study score
of at least 22 in English
MIDDLE BAND SELECTION
Re-ranking based on study scores in the full range of year 12
student, with particular attention to pre-requisite studies and other
science based studies.
ADMISSION AT OTHER LEVELS
In addition to satisfying the entry requirements for Australian resident
students or demonstrating equivalence, overseas students must
provide evidence of proficiency in the English language:
IELTS – an overall band score of 6-7, subject to individual
profile; or
TOEFL – a score of 550+, and a Test of Written English (TWE)
score of 5+.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
32
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over four years on a full-time basis or part-time
equivalent
COURSE STRUCTURE
Engineering subject codes commence with ‘V’.
Science subject codes commence with ‘R’.
Credit Semester
Points Hours
Year 1
Semester One
RMA1001 Engineering Mathematics 1A 12 60
REP1001 Engineering Physics 1A 12 60
VAN1051 Engineering Profession 12 60
VAN1011 Experimentation & Computing 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
RMA1002 Engineering Mathematics 1B 12 60
REP1003 Engineering Physics 1C 12 60
VAN1032 Introduction to Design 12 60
VAN1022 Solid Mechanics 1 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 2
Semester One
VEL1001 Circuit Theory and Electronics 1A 12 60
VAN2021 Solid Mechanics 2 12 60
VAN2041 Thermofluids 12 60
VEC1001 Computer Engineering 1A 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VEL1002 Circuit Theory and Electronics 1B 12 60
VAR2001 Mechatronics 1 12 60
VAN2032 Engineering Design 12 60
VEC1002 Computer Engineering 1B 12 66
Total 48 240
Year 3
Semester One
VEC2001 Computer Engineering 2A 12 60
VAM3071 Dynamics 12 60
VAM3031 Mechanical Engineering Design 1 12 60
VEL2001 Linear Systems & Mathematics 2A 12 60
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VED2002 Engineering Design and
Professional Practice 2 12 60
VAM3012 Signal Analysis 12 60
VEL2002 Linear Systems & Mathematics 2B 12 60
VAN3052 Engineering Management 12 60
Total 48 240
Year 4
Semester One
VEA4400 Robotics and Automation 6 36
VAN4051 Engineering Project Management 12 60
VAN4011 Engineering Project 1 12 48
VEA3000 Control Systems A 12 60
Elective 1 6 36
Total 48 240
Semester Two
VAM4032 Mechanical Engineering Design 2 12 60
VAN4012 Engineering Project 2 12 48
VEA4000 Computer Control Systems B 12 60
Elective Stream 12 60
Total 48 240
Electives
Approved electives from within the School of ACME
VAM4062 Manufacturing and Polymer Technologies 12 60
Approved electives from within the School of Electrical Engineering
VEA4100 Computer Vision & Applications 6 36
VEA4200 Fuzzy Control & Applications 6 36
VEG 4100 Digital Signal Processing A 6 36
RMA4001 Advanced Mathematics for
Electrical Engineers 6 36
Other electives from outside of these Schools
(Subject to approval of Course Co-ordinators)
ASSESSMENT
Assessment in subjects is designed to monitor a student’s progress
and achievements as well as contribute to and enhance their
learning. Normally a prescribed range of assessment methods is
employed in any subject.
Assessment is by a combination of written assignments, tests,
laboratory work and examinations.
INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE
Candidates applying for the award of a degree in robotic
engineering must ensure that they have submitted for approval
evidence of having undertaken a minimum of 12 weeks industrial
experience relevant to the course to satisfy the Institution of
Engineers, Australia, requirements.
OVERSEAS EXCHANGE PROGRAM
Victoria University has exchange agreements with universities in
many countries, some of which are the U.S.A., Canada, Mexico,
United Kingdom and many European and Asian countries.
For those students who do wish to study abroad, there is the
opportunity to experience living in a different culture and
environment, and to develop self-responsibility and reliance skills.
Many students achieve improved results in their remaining studies
after returning home, having developed a clearer perception of their
future career with a stronger determination to succeed.
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
The Institution of Engineers, Australia, recognises the degree as
meeting all academic requirements for corporate membership as a
chartered engineer. Completion of the degree plus 12 weeks
approved experience will admit to Graduate Membership. Victoria
University students are eligible for Student Membership.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
33
BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY IN BUILDING
SURVEYING
Course Code: EBSB
This course provides a tertiary degree in Building Surveying with exit
points at Diploma of Building Surveying qualification level and
Advanced Diploma of Building Surveying qualification level.
The first three years of the course (at Sunshine campus) focus on
building technology and statutory control of building. This involves
completion of twenty-four units of competency learning over two
years leading to the Diploma of Building Surveying, followed by
completion of an additional nineteen units of competency learning
leading to the Advanced Diploma of Building Surveying. Concurrent
studies (at Footscray Park campus) provide students with basic
professional literacy and numeracy. Subjects prescribed for this
purpose are VAN1051 Engineering Profession, JCM0110
Mathematics and RMA1001 Engineering Mathematics 1A.
In the final (fourth) year of the course (spread over Footscray Park
and Werribee campuses) the focus is on professional practice
primarily in the areas of building design, building approval and
building construction.
Graduates of this course will have completed studies equivalent to
the Graduate Certificate in Performance-Based Building and Fire
Codes (Course Code: ETQB) at Werribee campus.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
Course objectives are to produce graduates who have acquired a
strong technological base for professional practice in the area of
Building Surveying and exhibit valuable graduate attributes as
follows: A sound knowledge of the structure and practices of
Australian building (design and construction) regulatory systems; an
understanding and appreciation of building design and approval,
and building construction and inspection, as it is influenced by a
variety of political, social, economic, cultural, industrial and
technological factors; a broad range of vocational skills that can be
used to manage and operate a building surveying business, within
either the private sector or public sector, and meet the needs of
developers, practitioners, authorities, manufacturers, tradespeople
and other significant stakeholders; specific skills that will lead to
employment in the fields of design consultancy, certification,
approvals and permits, construction management, detailed
hydraulic, electrical and mechanical services installations, inspection
and maintenance, and facility management; an ability to work
independently, ethically and professionally in the provision of
building surveying services to clients and/or employers, whether as
a sole practitioner or within larger organizations including
engineering and building surveying consultancies, building
contractors, manufacturers, statutory authorities, local government
and state government departments; an ability to adapt to the
changing needs of industry, commerce and community, as well as
the ability to take a leadership role in promoting institutional and
social change with social justice initiatives.
Graduates of this course will have had the opportunity to experience
learning in a dual sector environment that assists them in both
finding employment and becoming lifelong learners in the broader
context. Successful graduates of the Bachelor of Technology in
Building Surveying course should be able to demonstrate valuable
capabilities as follows: Be effective problem solvers in a range of
settings including professional practice; Locate, evaluate, manage
and use information effectively, including critical thinking,
information technology skills, information gathering skills, and
carrying out statistical and other calculations; Communicate
effectively in oral and written form as a professional and as a
citizen; Work as a professional both autonomously and
collaboratively.
ADMISSION AT OTHER LEVELS
Admission at other levels may be approved, e.g., in the case of an
applicant having commenced or completed studies leading to a
Diploma or Advanced Diploma at an Institute of TAFE or in the case
of a mature-age applicant.
COURSE DURATION
Four years full-time. Part-time enrolment may also be approved.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit Semester
Points Hours
Year 1 and Year 2
DIPLOMA OF BUILDING SURVEYING
BCGSV5001A Assess the construction of
domestic scale buildings * 100
BCGSV5002A Evaluate materials for construction
of domestic scale buildings * 72
BCGSV5003A Produce working drawings for
residential buildings * 90
BCGSV5004A Apply legislation to urban
development and building controls * 36
BCGSV5005A Apply footing and geomechanical
design principles for domestic
scale buildings * 36
BCGSV5006A Assess construction faults in
residential buildings * 36
BCGSV5007A Undertake site surveys and set
out procedures to building projects * 72
BCGSV5008A Apply building control legislation
to building surveying * 36
BCGSV5009A Assess the impact of fire on
building materials * 36
BCGSV5010A Interact with clients in a regulated
environment * 36
BCGSV5011A Apply building codes and standards
to residential buildings * 36
BCGSV5012A Assess timber framed designs
for one and two storey buildings * 36
BCGSV5013A Apply principles of energy efficient
design to buildings * 36
BCGSV5014A Apply building surveying procedures
to residential buildings * 36
BCGSV5015A Assess structural requirements for
domestic scale buildings * 72
BSBADM506A Manage business document design
and development * 60
BSBCMN406A Maintain business technology * 40
CHCCOM3A Utilise specialist communication skills * 50
CHCCOM4A Develop, implement and promote
effective communication techniques * 75
ICAITU128A Operate a personal computer * 30
ICAITU129A Operate a word processing
application * 30
ICAITU130A Operate a spreadsheet application * 30
ICAITU131A Operate a database application * 30
ICAITU133A Send and retrieve information over
the internet using browsers and email * 25
Subtotal for Diploma 1136
plus Higher Education/Foundation Studies
VAN1051 Engineering Profession
(to be completed in Year 1) 12 60
JCM0110 Mathematics
(to be completed in Year 2) 24 72
Total for Years 1 and 2 N/A 1268
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
34
Year 3
ADVANCED DIPLOMA OF BUILDING SURVEYING
BCGSV6001A Assess the construction of
buildings up to 3 storey * 72
BCGSV6002A Produce working drawings for
buildings up to 3 storey * 40
BCGSV6003A Assess construction faults in
buildings up to 3 storey * 40
BCGSV6004A Apply footings and geomechanical
design principles to buildings
up to 3 storey * 40
BCGSV6005A Evaluate services layout and connection
methods for residential and
commercial buildings up to 3 storey * 40
BCGSV6006A Evaluate the use of concrete for
residential and commercial
buildings up to 3 storey * 40
BCGSV6007A Assess structural requirements for
buildings up to 3 storey * 40
BCGSV6008A Apply building codes and standards
to buildings up to 3 storey * 72
BCGSV6009A Implement performance based codes
and risk management principles for
buildings up to 3 storey * 72
BCGSV6010A Apply fire technology to buildings
up to 3 storey * 40
BCGSV6011A Apply legal procedures to building
surveying * 40
BCGSV6012A Facilitate community development
consultation * 40
BCGSV6013A Co-ordinate asset refurbishment * 72
BCGSV6014A Manage and plan land use * 40
BCGSV6015A Analyse and present building
surveying research information * 90
BCGSV6016A Apply building surveying procedures
to buildings up to 3 storey * 90
BSX154L606 Manage human resources * 40
LGAPLEM502A Apply ecologically sustainable
development principles to the
built environment * 60
LMFFT4010A Identify and calculate production costs * 36
Subtotal for Advanced Diploma 1004
plus Higher Education
RMA1001 Engineering Mathematics 1A 12 60
Total for Year 3 N/A 1064
Year 4
Includes subjects as prescribed for Graduate Certificate in
Performance-Based Building and Fire Codes
Semester One
EQB5611 Risk Assessment & Human Behaviour 12 39
EQB5621 Fire growth, Detection and
Extinguishment 12 39
VAN4011 Engineering Project 1 12 48
VAN4051 Engineering Project Management 12 60
Subtotal Semester One 48 186
Semester Two
EQB5632 Smoke and Fire Spread,
Fire Safety System design 12 39
EQB5642 Performance Codes
Methodology and Structure 12 39
VAN4012 Engineering Project 2 12 48
VAN3052 Engineering Management 2 60
Subtotal for Semester Two 48 186
Total for Year 4 96 372
ASSESSMENT
For the competency learning components of the course, assessment
is conducted in accordance with the Assessment Guidelines for the
Building and Construction Industry. For the other subjects that make
up the degree, the various assessment stipulations specific to
individual subjects are as set out in Subject Details in the Faculty of
Health, Engineering and Science Handbook.
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
The course satisfies the academic requirements of Building Surveyor
practitioner registration boards such as the Building Practitioners
Board of Victoria where legislation makes reference to a degree in
Building Surveying from a university within the meaning of the
Tertiary Education Act 1993. This ensures that graduates who are
interested in registering and practising as a professional Building
Surveyor have the necessary formal educational qualifications.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
35
SCHOOL OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
The School of Biomedical Sciences is located at St Albans Campus
of the University. In line with Faculty objectives, the School is
committed to the development and promotion of science and
technology.
The School seeks to provide students with vocationally and
educationally oriented experiences and expertise which will best
equip them for entry into a work environment in which there is likely
to be significant career changes during their working life.
Consequently, the School provides courses and programs with a
close relationship between theory and practice, and seeks to include
relevant industrial experience within each award course.
The School also seeks to foster within its students a personal pride
in, and a professional attitude to their work and a full understanding
of their responsibilities to society as trained scientists and
technologists.
It is the belief of the School that active involvement in research and
consultancy is vital in providing quality teaching as well as in
developing a viable and practical course for the students. To this
end, most of the academic staff have a doctoral degree and
substantial research and consultancy experience. The School
endeavours to develop close relationships with industry and with the
community to keep abreast of their respective needs. To this end
student projects are performed in collaboration with industry, the
community, government bodies, and research institutes wherever
possible.
The School is equipped with world class laboratories and equipment
for teaching and research as well as for industrial training
programs. These include a state of the art Aquatic Research
Laboratory, high performance liquid chromatographs, gas
chromatograph-mass spectrometers, atomic absorption
spectrophotometers, FTIR spectrometers, NMR, UV-Vis
spectrophotometers, an Instron texture analyser, Infratech and NIR
Systems food and feed analysers as well as excellent facilities for
microbiological and genetic engineering work. Specialist facilities
also include a fully-equipped, pilot-scale food processing hall.
The School also offers Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy
degrees by research and Masters and Graduate Diploma
coursework programs. Further details are given in the Postgraduate
Studies section of the Handbook.
COURSES OFFERED
The School Biomedical Sciences offers undergraduate courses
leading to the award of:
Bachelor of Science (Honours);
Bachelor of Science;
Biomedical Sciences;
Nutritional Therapy;
Occupational Health and Safety.
SCHOOL REGULATIONS
The following regulations apply to all courses and subjects
administered or taught by the School of Biomedical Sciences and
are in addition to University regulations governing these areas as
laid down in the Statutes and Regulations.
AWARDS
A student shall qualify to receive an award when that student has
successfully completed all the requirements and prescribed subjects
of the course.
ASSESSMENT
Student assessment will embrace both formal assessment through
final examination and continuous assessment incorporating unit
tests, assignments, report writing, problem solving exercises, class
presentations and laboratory, project and fieldwork.
Students would normally be expected to satisfactorily complete each
component of the assessment to gain a pass in the subject.
PRACTICAL WORK
A minimum of 80 per cent attendance is required at all practical
sessions. Failure to attend at least 80 per cent of practical sessions
will automatically constitute unsatisfactory completion of the subject.
Practical reports will only be accepted from those students who have
attended practical sessions for their full duration.
LATE SUBMISSION
Students failing to submit assessable work by the prescribed
deadline will incur a penalty of five percentage marks per day for
the first ten days after the prescribed deadline. Work submitted after
this time will not be assessed and students will be granted a zero
grade.
This requirement may be varied at the discretion of the subject co-
ordinator.
SUPPLEMENTARY ASSESSMENT
Students may be granted supplementary assessment with a
maximum of two supplementary assessments being permitted in any
one full-time academic year. Supplementary assessment will not be
available for subjects that are being repeated.
USE OF ELECTRONIC CALCULATORS AND STORAGE DEVICES
The use of electronic calculators and electronic storage devices is
not permitted in any examination unless specified in the subject
guide for that subject and/or on the examination paper for that
subject.
UNSATISFACTORY PROGRESS
These regulations should be read in conjunction with the Victoria
University’s Statute 6.4.1 – Unsatisfactory Progress. The following
regulations apply to both full-time and part-time students.
Students in any one of the following categories may be asked to
show cause as to why they should not be excluded from the course:
those who fail 50 per cent or more of their assessable
enrolment load (expressed in subjects) in any semester;
those who fail the same subject twice;
those who transgress a conditional enrolment agreement.
DURATION OF EXCLUSION
Excluded students have no automatic right of re-admission to the
course from which they were excluded. Students who have been
excluded may apply for re-admission not less than one calendar
year from the date of exclusion. These students must provide, with
their application, evidence of changed circumstances which
significantly improve the applicant’s chances of academic success.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
36
PROGRESSION
At Examiners’ Meetings at the end of each semester the results and
progress of all students enrolled in the course will be considered.
Progression through the course is based on the following guidelines:
where any compulsory subject must be repeated, enrolment in
that subject must be at the first opportunity following the initial
failure.
students may not enrol in any subject for which the prerequisite
has not been passed.
student enrolment will not normally be approved where the total
proposed subject hours exceeds the normal total subject hours
for a course year.
where enrolment in a co-requisite subject is required, enrolment
in the co-requisite subject must take preference over enrolment
in an elective.
where a subject is being repeated, requests for exemptions for
part of the subject work are at the discretion of the Department
or School offering the subject. Any exemption granted will
normally apply for one year only.
DISCIPLINARY FAILURE
A student who has failed a subject on disciplinary grounds may not
enrol in any further subjects without the permission of the Faculty
Dean.
REPEATING SUBJECTS
A student who has withdrawn twice in any subject without receiving
a penalty grade must seek the permission of the lecturer in charge
before being permitted to re-enrol in that subject.
STAGE COMPLETION
A student may apply for a Stage Completion if:
all subjects in the course except one have been passed;
a result of N1 (40 per cent – 49 per cent) is achieved in the
failed subject;
the failed subject is not a prerequisite for any other subject in
the course.
The granting of a Stage Completion is at the discretion of the Head
of School and is not regarded as a pass in the failed subject.
DEFERMENT FROM AWARD COURSE
The following rules apply to the courses of the School and are in
addition to University regulations governing these areas.
Approval of deferment is not automatic.
Each application to defer will be dealt with on an individual
basis by the School Administrator in consultation with
appropriate academic staff members.
A deferment will not be granted to VTAC applicants requesting
a deferment at their first enrolment session. Students who fall
into this category will be advised to re-apply for a place at the
end of the year.
In normal circumstances students must have successfully
completed at least one semester of study, by passing at least 50
per cent of subjects undertaken, to be eligible for deferment.
Except under exceptional circumstances students may apply to
defer their studies for a total period not exceeding twelve
months.
Deferment will not normally be granted until consultation has
taken place with the Course Co-ordinator (or nominee) and/or
a student counsellor.
Students failing to re-enrol at the end of their deferment period
will automatically be withdrawn from their course of study.
FURTHER INFORMATION
For further information please contact the School of Biomedical
Sciences on (03) 9919 2691 or fax (03) 9919 2465.
BIOLOGY AND GENERAL SCIENCE TEACHING
FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION GRADUATES
The School of Biomedical Sciences and the Sustainability Group
have arranged elective subjects to assist Physical Education and
Recreation students planning a secondary teaching career. The
School offers two elective programs designed to facilitate the entry
of Bachelor of Applied Science – Physical Education graduates into
a second teaching method in a Diploma of Education course and to
subsequently gain registration with the Ministry of Education to
teach either Biology or General Science, in addition to Physical
Education.
To obtain registration in General Science, the Ministry of Education
requires that students take subjects equivalent to one quarter of the
first year of their Bachelor of Applied Science course in each of two
science areas, both of which have the potential to be extended to
sub-majors. A sub-major in a science area is defined by the Ministry
as a commitment of one quarter of the first year load and one
quarter of the second year load to subjects in this science area.
The physical education degree at Victoria University, Footscray Park
Campus, is based upon a unit system such that one semester-hour of
contact is equivalent to one unit. Since the degree requires a
minimum of 144 units (48 units per year), then one quarter of a year
corresponds to 12 units. To obtain General Science registration
based upon chemistry and biology therefore, requires at least 12
units devoted to chemistry and 12 units to biology in the first year of
the degree.
To obtain registration in biology, it is necessary to take sufficient
biology subjects to constitute a sub-major, i.e. at least 12 units of
biology in first year and 23 units of biology in second year.
Details of the two streams of study are set out below; the code
number is given for each subject.
General Science Stream
RCS1006 Chemistry 1
RBM1518 Human Physiology 1 or RBF1310 Biology 1
RBM1528 Human Physiology 2 or RBF1320 Biology 2
RBM2260 Diet and Nutrition
Biology Stream
RBM2360 Medical Microbiology
RBM1518 Human Physiology 1 or RBF1310 Biology 1
RBM1528 Human Physiology 2 or RBF1320 Biology 2
RBM2260 Diet and Nutrition
RBM3264 Advanced Nerve and Muscle Physiology
RBF2610 Fundamentals of Ecology
RBF2620 Australian Plants
RBF2640 Australian Animals
RBF3600 Aquatic Ecology
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
37
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOMEDICAL
SCIENCES
Course Code: SBBS
CRICOS No: 023699C
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Sciences is designed to
provide professional training in the application of science to human
biology in the market place. The course aims to produce highly
flexible but well-trained graduates who will be adequately equipped
to adapt to a changing environment. Four different streams are
available for this degree in Biomedical Sciences including wellness
management, science media and communications, marketing of
biomedical products, and medical research/clinical sciences.
Although, students are encouraged to follow one of these streams,
they are able to choose from the entire range of subjects offered in
the Biomedical Sciences degree. The overall objectives of the
degree in Biomedical Sciences are to provide graduates with an
excellent knowledge of human physiological functions together with
skills in critical analysis and with highly developed communication
skills. Complementary knowledge will be developed in a wide range
of selected disciplines including psychology, human development,
management, marketing, visual and audiovisual communications
and a language.
The Wellness Management stream is designed to produce graduates
with an understanding of human function. Graduates will be eligible
for employment as Wellness consultants either in private practice or
within government agencies, large companies or corporations. The
Science, Media and Communications specialisation is more
specifically designed to produce graduates who would be
knowledgeable in human biology and biomedical sciences.
Graduates would have a broad education, being highly literate and
articulate in specialised areas such as an Asian Language,
Professional Writing, and Communications. Graduates in the
Management and Marketing of Biomedical Products stream will
have an in-depth knowledge of basic human biological function
combined with specialised skills in either human resource
management or in marketing. This combination of skills appears to
be unique in Australia as there seems to be no other course in
Australia with this combination of subjects. The Medical
Research/Clinical Sciences stream will provide students with a
range of skills appropriate to leading edge medical research. This
degree offers a range of subjects appropriate for further
postgraduate study in medical and paramedical fields.
DURATION OF THE COURSE
The course will be equivalent to three years of full-time study for
students entering the course at Year 1 or part-time equivalent.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
UNITS 3 AND 4 ENGLISH
MIDDLE BAND SELECTION
Completing Biology and/or Chemistry can lead to an ENTER 3.5
points higher per study.
LOCATION
The course is currently offered at the St Albans Campuses, but
individual subjects may be offered at the Footscray or Werribee
Campuses.
COURSE STRUCTURE
The course will comprise of two 12 week semesters or 24 weeks per
year for three years. The course outline together with the contact
hours per week is contained in the following pages. First year
subjects listed are currently running at the St Albans Campus.
Electives may be taken from the wide range of science and general
subjects listed below. Other suitable electives (not listed below) may
also be chosen subject to the approval of the course co-ordinator. If
general electives are selected, students are encouraged to take a
four–six semester sequence in one of the following areas including
Human Resource Management, Marketing, Communications,
Psychology, Professional Writing or a language other than English.
Electives will be offered subject to adequate demand.
Students enrolled in the Biomedical Science course Degree must take
a minimum of 60 per cent of their total credit points from subjects
offered by the School of Biomedical Sciences. In addition, no more
than 40 credit points from general elective subjects shall be at first
year level, and at least one elective shall be commensurate with the
year of the student’s course.
Credit Semester
Points Hours
Year 1
RBM1501 Foundations in Biomedical Sciences A 1 12
RBM1514 Functional Anatomy 1 1 12
RBM1518 Human Physiology 1 1 12
RBM1502 Foundations in Biomedical Science B 2 12
RBM1524 Functional Anatomy 2 2 12
RBM1528 Human Physiology 2 2 12
Electives
RCS1110 Chemistry for Biological Sciences A 1 12
APP1012 Psychology 1A 1 12
RCS1120 Chemistry for Biological Sciences B 2 12
APP1013 Psychology 1B 2 12
Other electives 1 or 2 12
Year 2
RBM2260 Diet & Nutrition 1 12
RBM2530 Pathophysiology 1 1 12
RBM2540 Pathophysiology 2 2 12
RBM2800 Cardiorespiratory & Renal Physiology 2 12
Electives
RBM1580 Functional Anatomy 31,4 1 12
RBM2360 Medical Microbiology1,4 1 12
RBM2560 Medical Biochemistry4 1 12
RBM2610 Biomedical Sciences & Society1,2 1 12
RBF2330 Cell Biology4 2 12
RBM2580 Advanced Functional Anatomy1 2 12
RBM3610 Bioscience, Ethics & Values1,2,4 2 12
Other electives 1 or 2 12
Year 3
Choose at least three of following core subjects below per semester
RBM3264 Advanced Nerve & Muscle Physiology4 1 12
RBM3550 Growth & Early Development1,4 1 12
RBM3590 Advanced Experimental Techniques3,4 1 12
RBM3720 Immunology4 1 12
RBM3810 Wellness 11,2 1 12
RBM3540 Advanced Neurosciences4 2 12
RBM3560 Growth, Development and Ageing1,4 2 12
RBM3660 Human Developmental & Clinical Genetics4 2 12
RBM3800 Pharmacology3,4 2 12
RBM3820 Wellness 21,2 2 12
RBM3910 Project1,2,3,4 2 12
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
38
Electives
RBM3650 Advanced Reproduction & Development1,4 1 12
RBM3960 Nutritional Frontiers1,4 2 12
Other electives 1 or 2 12
1 Students in the Wellness Management stream are encouraged to
take these electives (Students in the Wellness stream who decide
to focus on individual and social issues in mental health should
choose Psychology 2A and 2B)
2 Students in the Science, Media and Communication stream are
encouraged to take these electives
3 Students in the Management and Marketing of Biomedical
Products stream are encouraged to take these electives
4 Students in the Medical Research and Clinical Sciences stream
are encouraged to take these electives
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NUTRITIONAL
THERAPY
Course Code: SBNT
Nutritional Therapy is founded in medical science and on peer-
reviewed evidence-based research. Nutritional Therapists use
manipulation of food and diet for therapeutic purposes. Often a
patient’s condition can be improved by suitably matching food
intake to their condition, together with nutriceutical prescription and
appropriate lifestyle advice. The graduates from this course will not
be Dieticians, but will be able to treat chronic non-life threatening
conditions.
This course is modelled on the highly successful BSc Nutritional
Therapy courses offered in Europe. At present there is no similar
course in Nutritional Therapy in Australia, and this course will be the
first in Australasia.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The Bachelor of Science in Nutritional Therapy will provide an
alternative education and training program for those wishing to
apply their knowledge of Nutrition to the treatment of a range of
clients by high-quality nutrition care and therapy. The objectives of
the course are to produce Graduates able to function independently
as Nutritional Therapists. At the end of the course, Graduates will be
able to; evaluate and process requests for nutritional therapy; assess
the client and formulate an appropriate course of nutritional therapy;
educate the client in self–care therapy, and evaluate the client’s
response to the course of treatment.
The Graduates of this course will be able to make a valuable
contribution to society as Nutritional Therapists in private practice,
as Nutrition Consultants to the healthcare and fitness industries, and
as practitioners in integrated health centres.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit
Points
Year 1
RBF2410 Food Components 12
RBM1514 Functional Anatomy 12
RBM1518 Human Physiology 1 12
RBM1528 Human Physiology 2 12
RBM1810 Nutritional Biochemistry 12
RBM1820 Nutrition, Society & Communication 12
RBM1830 Diet Therapy 1 12
RBM2575 Phytopharmaceutics 12
Year 2
HHN0021 Counselling Skills for Natural
Medicine Practitioners 12
RBF3240 Functional Foods 12
RBM2260 Diet and Nutrition 12
RBM2530 Pathophysiology 1 12
RBM2540 Pathophysiology 2 12
RBM2560 Medical Biochemistry 12
RBM2850 Nutritional Therapeutics A 12
RBM2855 Nutritional Therapeutics B 12
Year 3
RBM3810 Wellness 1 12
RBM3820 Wellness 2 12
RBM3850 Nutritional Therapeutics C 12
RBM3855 Nutritional Therapeutics D 12
RBM3950 Nutritional Therapy in Practice 1 12
RBM3955 Nutritional Therapy in Practice 2 12
RBM3960 Nutrition Frontiers 12
RBM3970 Operating a Clinical Practice 12
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
Graduates will be eligible for full membership of the following
professional bodies upon completion of the course
(awaiting formal notification):
Australian Nutrition Society;
British Association of Nutritional Therapy;
Australian Complementary Health Association;
Australasian Integrative Medicine Association.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN OCCUPATIONAL
HEALTH AND SAFETY
Course Code: SBOH
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The aims of the courses are to produce graduates with a
combination of knowledge and skills of science and disciplines
related to occupational health and safety while having a focus on
the management of occupational health and safety.
At the end of the course graduates should be able to: utilise methods
of scientific investigation in solving, occupational health and safety
problems; thoroughly understand the scientific and technological
bases of occupational health and safety; engender the professional
confidence and respect of others; identify health hazards and safety
problems and be able to make appropriate recommendations to
management; understand and be able to effectively participate in
decision-making processes in organisations in order to manage the
promotion and implementation of occupational health and safety
matters; act as an agent of change to improve OH&S at a
workplace.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Normal entry requirements for articulation to the Bachelor of Science
is the successful completion of a Diploma in Occupational Health
and Safety that is equivalent with the course undertaken at Swan
TAFE. A significant number of such applicants are expected to be
occupational health and safety professionals seeking to upgrade
their Diploma qualifications to a degree in Occupational Health and
Safety. Admission requirements may be varied by the Head of
School for applicants who possess other appropriate TAFE or
university qualifications related to occupational health and safety.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
39
Students with a Diploma in Health Occupational Health and Safety,
will complete 13 units to upgrade their qualification to a Bachelor of
Science in Occupational Health and Safety. Students who enrol with
a Diploma of Science in Occupational Health and Safety that is not
equivalent with subjects undertaken at Swan TAFE may need to
undertake a mix of additional units if they wish to upgrade to a
degree.
The course aims at maximising student access by providing flexibility
and modulation in the delivery of subjects. Block mode teaching
delivered at Swan TAFE, Western, Australia, is available. Students
complete all units by distance education mode.
COURSE DURATION
Students who enrol into the degree course with a Diploma in
Occupational Health and Safety (equivalent with Swan TAFE
Diploma OHS) may complete the upgrade after two years of part-
time study. Students with other qualifications may need to complete
additional subjects.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Level 3 Subjects required to upgrade from Diploma in Health-
Occupational Health and Safety to Bachelor of Science in
Occupational Health and Safety.
Credit
Points
RBM2061 Occupational Hygiene Science 12
RBM2161 Ergonomic Science 12
RBM2261 Public and Environmental Health 12
RBM2361 Safety Practice 12
RBM3061 Epidemiology 12
RBM3161 Toxicology 12
RBM3261 Risk Management 12
RBM3361 Occupational Health & Safety Project 12
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS) IN
BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
Course Code: SHBM
RBM4000 Science Honours will comprise a research project
including two oral presentations, a literature review and the project
thesis.
HONOURS COURSE WORK
There will be two course work units comprising of Advanced
Experimental Design and Statistics, and Research Conduct, Ethics
and Training. In special cases undergraduate units of studies may
be substituted for course work units when it is felt that a student
would require further studies of a specialised nature. The lecture or
reading programs that make up the course work units will be
determined by student’s preferences and will vary from time to time.
Course work units will be assessed by oral presentations, written
assignments or a written examination.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE/
BACHELOR OF PSYCHOLOGY
Double Degree
Course Code: SBSP
CRICOS No: 047051A
COURSE OBJECTIVE
The overall objective of the combined Bachelor of Science/Bachelor
of Psychology is to provide graduates with an excellent knowledge
of human physiological and psychological function together with
highly developed skills in critical analysis, social research methods
and communication. The psychology units in this degree comprise an
approved sequence for registration with the Australian Psychological
Society for entry into a fourth year program. Students will be
equipped to enter careers in counselling, health promotion,
laboratory science or as crime scene officers. With further study,
students will be equipped for employment as clinical psychologists
or medical research scientists.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over four years on a full-time basis or part-time
equivalent.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Course structure for Psychology/Biomedical Sciences
Credit Semester
Points Hours
RBM1518 Human Physiology 1 1 12
RBM1514 Functional Anatomy 1 (Head and neck) 1 12
APP1012 Psychology 1A 1 12
AXF1001 Knowing and Knowledge, or
Arts elective 1 12
Total 48
RBM1528 Human Physiology 2 2 15
RBM1524 Functional Anatomy 2
(Thorax and Trunk) 2 12
APP1013 Psychology 1B 2 15
AXF1002 Knowing and Knowledge B or
Arts elective 2 12
Total 48
RBM2530 Pathophysiology 1 3 12
RCS1110 Chemistry for Biological Sciences A* 3 12
APP2013 Psychology 2A 3 12
APP2031 Developmental issues in Psychology 3 12
Total 48
RBM2540 Pathophysiology 2 4 12
RCS1120 Chemistry for Biological Sciences * 4 12
APP2014 Psychology 2B 4 12
APS2040 Quantitative Social Research Methods 4 12
Total 48
*Alternative Biomedical Sciences units below may be substituted for
Chemistry for Biological Sciences A and B subject to the approval of
the course co-ordinator
RBM1580 Functional Anatomy 3 1 12
RBM2360 Medical Microbiology 1 12
RBM2610 Biomedical Sciences & Society 1 12
RBF2330 Cell Biology 2 12
RBM2580 Advanced Functional Anatomy 2 12
RBM3610 Bioscience, Ethics and Values 2 12
Other electives as available – can
include first year units 1 or 2 12
RBM2260 Diet and nutrition 5 12
RBM2560 Medical Biochemistry
or
RBM2360 Medical Microbiology 5 12
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
40
APP3035 Research methods in psychology 5 12
APS2030 Qualitative research methods 5 12
RBM2800 Cardiorespiratory & renal physiology 6 12
RBM3610 Biomedical science, ethics and values
or
RBF2330 Cell biology 6 12
APP3037 Clinical issues in Psychology
Psychology elective 12
APP3036 History and theories of Psychology 7 12
APP3023 Psychological issues in the workplace
(Capstone task) 7 12
Third year Biomedical Sciences unit 7 12
Third year Biomedical Sciences unit 7 12
RBM3910 Biomedical Sciences Project 8 12
Third year Biomedical Sciences unit 8 12
Psychology elective 8 12
Psychology elective 8 12
THIRD YEAR BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE UNITS
RBM3264 Advanced Nerve & Muscle Physiology 1 12
RBM3550 Growth and Early Development 1 12
RBM3590 Advanced Experimental Techniques 1 12
RBM3720 Immunology 1 12
RBM3810 Wellness 1 1 12
RBM3540 Advanced Neurosciences 2 12
RBM3560 Growth, Development and Ageing 2 12
RBM3660 Human Developmental and
Clinical Genetics 2 12
RBM3800 Pharmacology 2 12
RBM3820 Wellness 2 2 12
RBM3650 Advanced Reproduction and
Development 1 12
RBM3960 Frontiers in Nutrition 2 12
Other electives 1 or 2 12
PSYCHOLOGY ELECTIVE UNIT OPTIONS
APP3015 Counselling theory and practice 12
APP3016 Group Behaviour 12
APP3018 Organisations and Work 12
APP3019 Psychobiology 12
APP3020 Psychoanalysis 12
APP3021 Psychology of adjustment 12
APP3025 Psychological assessment 12
Course Total 384
Arts elective units that can be substituted for Knowing and
Knowledge in first year (These are all at St Albans Campus)
ACC1047 Culture and Communication
ACC1048 Media, culture and society
ACL1001 Reading contemporary fiction
ACL1002 Studying poetry and poetics
ACP1053 Introduction to creative writing
ACP1054 Introduction to media writing
ACS1071 Spanish A: Basic Spanish 1
ACS1072 Spanish B: Basic Spanish 2
ACW1020 Sex and gender
ACW1021 Fashioning gender
ASS1012 Sociology 1A – Introduction to Australian society
and cultures
ASS1013 Sociology 1B – Issues in Australian Society
and Culture
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
41
SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
The School of Computer Science and Mathematics offers
undergraduate courses leading to the award of:
Bachelor of Science;
Computer Science;
Computer and Mathematical Sciences;
Internet Technologies and Applications;
Information Technology;
Computational Financial Mathematics;
Computer Science and Aviation;
Bachelor of Science (Honours);
Computer Science;
Computer and Mathematical Sciences.
The School of Computer Science and Mathematics offers a number
of postgraduate and undergraduate programs in Computer Science
and Computer & Mathematical Sciences by course work and by
research.
Our courses equip graduates with the analytical ability, factual
knowledge and communication skills to enable them to work
effectively in business and industry. A significant feature of the
courses is the effort made to involve students in the solution of real
world problems.
Recent experience indicates that graduates can expect to find
employment in industry, commerce and government in areas such as
software engineering, programming, information systems, quality
management, statistical analysis, economic planning, systems
development, market research, production planning and secondary
teaching.
Graduates are eligible for membership of the Australian Computer
Society at the professional level (which is the highest possible level
for students). and the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications
(UK).
The School also offers Computer Science degree programs in Hong
Kong, Malaysia, and Sydney. Postgraduate programs in Computer
Science are also conducted in Hong Kong.
We invite you do spend some time on our web site to find out more
about the School and its staff, its courses and research interests.
Details of the School’s research activities and postgraduate degree
programs are described in the Postgraduate Studies section of the
Handbook.
The School has a large enrolment of both local and international
students. Some programs are offered offshore in Hong Kong and
other parts of Asia.
The Bachelor of Science awards have a large degree of
commonality of subjects in first year which facilitates possible
transfer between courses.
COMPUTER FACILITIES
The School has a number of computing laboratories for teaching
and research. These laboratories are equipped with the latest
equipment such as Pentium PCs, Unix workstations, and high speed
line printers and laser printers. Graphical user interfaces and menu-
driven interfaces are provided for easy access to services. Recent
acquisitions include multimedia facilities.
ARTICULATION PATHWAYS
Holders of a TAFE Associate Diploma in Information Technology
may be admitted into Year One of the School’s undergraduate
courses.
Special advanced admission provisions apply to certain overseas
Diploma and Higher Diploma qualifications.
ASSESSMENT
Assessment in subjects is designed to monitor a student’s progress
and achievement as well as contribute to and enhance their
learning. Normally a prescribed range of assessment methods is
employed in any subject.
Assessment is by a combination of written assignments, tests,
laboratory work and examinations.
Supplementary assessment is not normally available in any subject
except at the discretion of the Head of School in exceptional
circumstances.
Special Consideration in assessment may be granted on the grounds
defined by the University Statutes.
Guidelines on the use of electronic calculators and other electronic
storage devices in examinations are provided in individual subject
outlines distributed to students within the first two weeks of semester
and included on final examination papers.
Electronic calculators and other electronic storage devices will not be
permitted where the above provisions have not been made.
COURSE REGULATIONS
PROGRESS REGULATIONS
The Academic Progress Committee (Board of Examiners’ Meeting
will, at the end of each semester consider the results and progress of
all students enrolled in the courses.
Progression through each course is based on the following
guidelines:
(i) Where any compulsory subject must be repeated, enrolment in
that subject must be at the first opportunity following the initial
failure;
(ii) Students will not normally be allowed to enrol in any subject for
which at least a P grade has not been attained in any of the
prerequisite subjects;
(iii) Student enrolment will not normally be approved where the
total proposed subject hours exceeds the normal semester load.
COMPLETION BY COMPENSATION
No stage completions by compensation will be granted.
UNSATISFACTORY PROGRESS
These regulations should be read in conjunction with the Victoria
University Statute 6.4.1 – Unsatisfactory Progress.
(i) The following shall constitute unsatisfactory progress:
(a) failure in at least 50 per cent of the assessed subjects for
which a student has enrolled in a semester of study;
(b) failure in any subject twice;
(c) transgression of a conditional enrolment stipulation and
agreement.
(ii) Where a student’s progress is unsatisfactory, the section
Academic Progress Committee may recommend the following:
(a) a restricted and conditional enrolment only be approved;
(b) exclusion from the course.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
42
(c) A student who wishes to appeal against the section’s
written recommendation is required to do so in accordance
with the University Statutes. The procedures to be followed
in lodging a submission, hearing of submissions and
communicating the results of hearings are set out in the
University Statutes.
(d) Excluded students have no right of re-admission to the
course from which they were excluded. Students who have
been excluded may apply for re-admission not less than
one calendar year from the date of the exclusion. Students
must provide, with their application, evidence of changed
circumstances which significantly improve the applicant’s
likelihood of academic success.
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
Graduates are eligible for membership of the Australian Computer
Society at the professional level.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER
SCIENCE
Course Code: SBCO
CRICOS No: 023700D
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER AND
MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES
Course Code: SBCM
CRICOS No: 002814A
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The two programs both aim to provide graduates with the analytical
ability, factual knowledge and communication skills that will suit
them for employment in business and industry in one or more of the
following areas:
computing: programming, software development, systems
design and analysis, applications development, technical
support.
statistics: data analysis, quality improvement, market research,
forecasting, econometrics.
operations research: production planning and scheduling,
simulation studies, transportation planning, resource allocation.
financial modelling: investment analysis, project evaluation.
secondary teaching: mathematics, computer science.
One of the most significant features of the courses is the attempt to
involve students in the solution of real world problems. Naturally,
problem-solving is a large component of all the subjects taught in the
course but, starting in the first year, special emphasis is placed on
problem formulation and report writing.
All students undertake at least one industry project in the third year
of the course. These projects tend to be related to problems
encountered in specific areas of the manufacturing industry, banking
or finance, government statutory authorities, or services such as
hospitals and local councils.
As evidenced by the high rate of job placement in the areas listed
above, graduates have been well-received in industry, commerce
and government.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for admission to the course an applicant should have
successfully completed Year 12 of the Victorian Certificate of
Education (VCE), with a study score of at least 20 in English and 22
in Mathematical Methods, or have the equivalent of these
qualifications. Completing Specialist Mathematics leads to an
ENTER score 3 points higher.
Alternatively, entry is via TAFE articulation or under mature age
provisions.
COURSE DURATION
The courses are offered on a full-time basis over three years. Summer
evening subjects are also offered to assist these students to complete
their studies.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit
Semester Points
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Year 1
ACE1145 CSM English Language and
Communication (if needed) – this
replaces RCM1613 in Semester One 1 12
RCM1115 Computer Systems & Architecture 1 12
RCM1311 Programming 1 1 12
RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 1 12
RCM1711 Mathematical Foundations 1 1 12
RCM1114 Introduction to Computing
and the Internet
or
RCM1614 Applied Statistics 2 2 12
RCM1211 Database Systems 1 2 12
RCM1312 Programming 2 2 12
RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 2 12
(for those that did ACE1145 in
Semester One and this replaces the
1st year elective)
RCM1713 Discrete Mathematics 2 12
Year 2
RCM2312 Software Engineering 1 1 12
Three electives from lists A, B or C
below (each worth 12 credit points) 1 36
Four electives from lists A, B or C
below (each worth 12 credit points) 2 48
Year 3
ACE3145 CSM Professional Communication 1 12
RCM3001 Project 1 1 12
Two electives from lists A, B or C
below (each worth 12 credit points) 1 24
RCM3002 Project 2 2 12
Three electives from lists A, B or C
below (each worth 12 credit points) 2 36
LIST A
RCM2111 Data Communications and Networks 1
RCM2112 Operating Systems
RCM2113 Multimedia Systems Design
RCM2213 Computer Graphics
RCM2218 Database Systems 2
RCM2311 Object Oriented Programming 1
RCM2313 Software Development
RCM2315 Advanced Programming
RCM2316 Network Operating Systems Administration
RCM2810 Advanced Internet Programming
RCM2930 3D Web Technologies
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
43
LIST B
RCM3111 Data Communications & Networks 2
RCM3112 User Interface Design
RCM3115 Architectures for Enterprise Wide Computing
RCM3211 Database Systems 3
RCM3311 Object Oriented Programming 2
RCM3312 Intelligent Systems
RCM3313 Software Engineering 2
RCM3314 Object Oriented Analysis and Design
RCM3820 Internet Computing using XML
RCM3950 Internet Data Management
RCM3960 Internet Security
RCM3970 Computer Graphics for Game Programming
LIST C
RCM1712 Mathematical Foundations 2
RCM2321 Mathematics of Continuous Processes B
RCM2511 Image Processing 1
RCM2611 Linear Statistical Models
RCM2612 Forecasting
RCM2614 Statistical Data Mining
RCM2712 Mathematics of Continuous Processes A
RCM2713 Modelling for Decision Making
RCM2911 Linear Optimisation Modelling
RCM2912 Project Scheduling
RCM2915 Stochastic and Combinatorial Optimisation
RCM3511 Image Processing 2
RCM3611 Regression Analysis
RCM3613 Time Series Analysis
RCM3615 Multivariate Statistics
RCM3617 Quality Improvement and Experimental Design
RCM3711 Computational Methods
RCM3720 Cryptography, Computer and Network Security
RCM3911 Simulation
To qualify for the award of Bachelor of Science in Computer
Science, a total of 288 credit points are needed. No stage
completions exist for this course.
Additionally, students must complete a minimum of 3 subjects from
List A and 5 subjects from List B.
COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES
Credit
Semester Points
Year 1
ACE1145 CSM English Language and
Communication (if needed) – this
replaces RCM1613 in Semester One 1 12
RCM1115 Computer Systems & Architecture 1 12
RCM1311 Programming 1 1 12
RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 1 12
RCM1711 Mathematical Foundations 1 1 12
RCM1211 Database Systems 1 2 12
RCM1312 Programming 2 2 12
RCM1614 Applied Statistics 2 2 12
RCM1712 Mathematical Foundations 2 2 12
RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 2 12
(for those that did ACE1145 in Semester One and this
replaces the 1st year elective)
Year 2
RCM2312 Software Engineering 1 1 12
RCM2611 Linear Statistical Models 1 12
One elective from list B below 1 12
One elective from lists A, B, C or D below
(each worth 12 credit points) 1 12
RCM2713 Modelling for Decision Making 2 12
One elective from list B below 2 12
Two electives from list A, B, C, or D below
(each worth 12 credit points) 2 24
Year 3
ACE3145 CSM Professional Communication 1 12
RCM3001 Project 1 1 12
One elective from list D below 1 12
One elective from list C or D below 1 12
RCM3002 Project 2 2 12
Two electives from lists C or D below
(each worth 12 credit points) 2 24
One elective from list D below 2 12
LIST A
RCM2111 Data Communications and Networks 1
RCM2112 Operating Systems
RCM2113 Multimedia Systems Design
RCM2213 Computer Graphics
RCM2218 Database Systems 2
RCM2311 Object Oriented Programming 1
RCM2313 Software Development
RCM2315 Advanced Programming
RCM2316 Network Operating Systems Administration
RCM2810 Advanced Internet Programming
RCM2930 3D Web Technologies
LIST B
RCM2321 Mathematics of Continuous Processes B
RCM2511 Image Processing 1
RCM2612 Forecasting
RCM2614 Statistical Data Mining
RCM2712 Mathematics of Continuous Processes A
RCM2911 Linear Optimisation Modelling
RCM2912 Project Scheduling
LIST C
RCM3111 Data Communications & Networks 2
RCM3112 User Interface Design
RCM3115 Architectures for Enterprise Wide Computing
RCM3211 Database Systems 3
RCM3311 Object Oriented Programming 2
RCM3312 Intelligent Systems
RCM3313 Software Engineering 2
RCM3314 Object Oriented Analysis and Design
RCM3820 Internet Computing using XML
RCM3950 Internet Data Management
RCM3960 Internet Security
RCM3970 Computer Graphics for Game Programming
LIST D
RCM3311 Advanced Mathematical Techniques
RCM3413 Financial Modelling
RCM3511 Image Processing 2
RCM3611 Regression Analysis
RCM3613 Time Series Analysis
RCM3615 Multivariate Statistics
RCM3617 Quality Improvement and Experimental Design
RCM3711 Computational Methods
RCM3720 Cryptography, Computer and Network Security
RCM3911 Simulation
RCM3940 Computational Risk Modelling
To qualify for the award of Bachelor of Science in Computer and
Mathematical Science, a total of 288 credit points are needed. No
stage completions exist for this course.
ASSESSMENT
Assessment for each subject is detailed in the subject listings.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
44
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERNET
TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS
Course Code: SBIA
CRICOS No: 052405D
COURSE OBJECTIVES
Internet and web-based computing has in recent years assumed a
huge importance in industry, for theoretical and applied computer
science, and research.
This course has been established to provide students with the
fundamental background for the development and maintenance of
Internet and web-based services. A new Internet Technologies and
Applications Research Lab has been established recently to support
academic and research activities in the areas.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over three years full-time and part-time
equivalent.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for admission to the course an applicant should have
successfully completed Year 12 of the Victorian Certificate of
Education (VCE), with a study score of at least 20 in English and 22
in Mathematical Methods or have the equivalent of these
qualifications.
Alternatively, entry is via TAFE articulation or under mature age
provisions.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit
Semester Points
Year 1
ACE1145 CSM English Language and
Communication (if needed) – this
replaces RCM1613 in Semester One 1 12
RCM1115 Computer Systems & Architecture 1 12
RCM1311 Programming 1 1 12
RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 1 12
RCM1711 Mathematical Foundations 1 1 12
RCM1312 Programming 2 2 12
RCM1114 Introduction to Computing
and the Internet
or
RCM1614 Applied Statistics 2 2 12
RCM1211 Database Systems 1 2 12
RCM1713 Discrete Mathematics 2 12
RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 2 12
(for those that did ACE1145 in
Semester One and this replaces the
1st year elective)
Year 2
RCM2112 Operating Systems 1 12
RCM2311 Object Oriented Programming 1 1 12
RCM2312 Software Engineering 1 1 12
One subject from lists A, B or C below
(each worth 12 credit points) 1 12
RCM2111 Data Communications and
Networks 1 2 12
RCM2810 Advanced Internet Programming 2 12
RCM2313 Software Development 2 12
One subject from lists A, B or C
below (each worth 12 credit points) 2 12
Year 3
ACE3145 CSM Professional Communication 1 12
RCM3001 Project 1 1 12
RCM3820 Internet Computing using XML 1 12
One subject from lists A, B or C below
(each worth 12 credit points) 1 12
RCM3002 Project 2 2 12
RCM3960 Internet Security 2 12
RCM3950 Internet Data Management 2 12
One subject from lists A, B or C below
(each worth 12 credit points) 2 12
LIST A
RCM2111 Data Communications and Networks 1
RCM2112 Operating Systems
RCM2113 Multimedia Systems Design
RCM2213 Computer Graphics
RCM2218 Database Systems 2
RCM2311 Object Oriented Programming 1
RCM2313 Software Development
RCM2315 Advanced Programming
RCM2316 Network Operating Systems Administration
RCM2810 Advanced Internet Programming
RCM2930 3D Web Technologies
LIST B
RCM3111 Data Communications & Networks 2
RCM3112 User Interface Design
RCM3115 Architectures for Enterprise Wide Computing
RCM3211 Database Systems 3
RCM3311 Object Oriented Programming 2
RCM3312 Intelligent Systems
RCM3313 Software Engineering 2
RCM3314 Object Oriented Analysis and Design
RCM3820 Internet Computing using XML
RCM3950 Internet Data Management
RCM3960 Internet Security
RCM3970 Computer Graphics for Game Programming
LIST C
RCM1712 Mathematical Foundations 2
RCM2511 Image Processing 1
RCM2611 Linear Statistical Models
RCM2612 Forecasting
RCM2614 Statistical Data Mining
RCM2712 Mathematics of Continuous Processes A
RCM2713 Modelling for Decision Making
RCM2911 Linear Optimisation Modelling
RCM2912 Project Scheduling
RCM2915 Stochastic and Combinatorial Optimisation
RCM3511 Image Processing 2
RCM3611 Regression Analysis
RCM3613 Time Series Analysis
RCM3615 Multivariate Statistics
RCM3617 Quality Improvement and Experimental Design
RCM3711 Computational Methods
RCM3720 Cryptography, Computer and Network Security
RCM3911 Simulation
To qualify for the award of Bachelor of Science in Internet
Technologies and Applications, a total of 288 credit points are
needed. No stage completions exist for this course.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
45
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
Course Code: SBIT
CRICOS No: 052403F
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The course aims to equip students with the skills required to deal
with advanced data processing. Students will develop skills and
conceptual understanding needed to design, install, configure and
manage various advanced data management technologies, and to
develop data management processes at both the intranet and
Internet level for modern organizations and enterprises.
On completion of the course, students will:
have acquired skills in the development of database
applications such as relational, object-oriented and multimedia
systems;
be familiar with online transaction and application processing;
be able to design, install, configure and maintain various data
storage systems;
have a sound understanding and competence in the use of
technologies that are utilised in data warehousing and data
mining;
have a sound understanding of distributed systems, including
the ability to establish and maintain data storage strategies
within local area networks, wide area networks, and across the
Internet.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over three years full-time and part-time
equivalent.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for admission to the course an applicant should have
successfully completed Year 12 of the Victorian Certificate of
Education (VCE), with a study score of at least 20 in English and
22 in Mathematical Methods or have the equivalent of these
qualifications.
Alternatively, entry is via TAFE articulation or under mature age
provisions.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit
Semester Points
Year 1
ACE1145 CSM English Language and Communication
(if needed) – this replaces RCM1613 in
Semester One 1 12
RCM1115 Computer Systems & Architecture 1 12
RCM1311 Programming 1 1 12
RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 1 12
RCM1711 Mathematical Foundations 1 1 12
RCM1312 Programming 2 2 12
RCM1114 Introduction to Computing and the Internet or
RCM1614 Applied Statistics 2 2 12
RCM1211 Database Systems 1 2 12
RCM1713 Discrete Mathematics 2 12
RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 2 12
(for those that did ACE1145 in Semester One and this
replaces the 1st year elective)
Year 2
RCM2112 Operating Systems 1 12
RCM2311 Object Oriented Programming 1 1 12
RCM2312 Software Engineering 1 1 12
One subject from lists A, B or C below
(each worth 12 credit points) 1 12
RCM2111 Data Communications and Networks 1 2 12
RCM2218 Database Systems 2 2 12
RCM2313 Software Development 2 12
One subject from lists A, B or C below
(each worth 12 credit points) 2 12
Year 3
ACE3145 CSM Professional Communication 1 12
RCM3001 Project 1 1 12
RCM3314 Object Oriented Analysis & Design 1 12
One subject from lists A, B or C below
(each worth 12 credit points) 1 12
RCM3002 Project 2 2 12
RCM3312 Intelligent Systems 2 12
RCM3313 Software Engineering 2 2 12
One subject from lists A, B or C below
(each worth 12 credit points) 2 12
LIST A
RCM2111 Data Communications & Networks 1
RCM2112 Operating Systems
RCM2113 Multimedia Systems Design
RCM2213 Computer Graphics
RCM2218 Database Systems 2
RCM2311 Object Oriented Programming 1
RCM2313 Software Development
RCM2315 Advanced Programming
RCM2316 Network Operating Systems Administration
RCM2810 Advanced Internet Programming
RCM2930 3D Web Technologies
LIST B
RCM3111 Data Communications & Networks 2
RCM3112 User Interface Design
RCM3115 Architectures for Enterprise Wide Computing
RCM3211 Database Systems 3
RCM3311 Object Oriented Programming 2
RCM3312 Intelligent Systems
RCM3313 Software Engineering 2
RCM3314 Object Oriented Analysis and Design
RCM3820 Internet Computing using XML
RCM3950 Internet Data Management
RCM3960 Internet Security
RCM3970 Computer Graphics for Game Programming
LIST C
RCM1712 Mathematical Foundations 2
RCM2511 Image Processing 1
RCM2611 Linear Statistical Models
RCM2612 Forecasting
RCM2614 Statistical Data Mining
RCM2712 Mathematics of Continuous Processes A
RCM2713 Modelling for Decision Making
RCM2911 Linear Optimisation Modelling
RCM2912 Project Scheduling
RCM2915 Stochastic and Combinatorial Optimisation
RCM3511 Image Processing 2
RCM3611 Regression Analysis
RCM3613 Time Series Analysis
RCM3615 Multivariate Statistics
RCM3617 Quality Improvement and Experimental Design
RCM3711 Computational Methods
RCM3720 Cryptography, Computer and Network Security
RCM3911 Simulation
To qualify for the award of Bachelor of Science in Information
Technology, a total of 288 credit points are needed. No stage
completions exist for this course. Additionally, students must
complete a minimum of two electives from List B.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
46
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTATIONAL
FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS
Course Code: SBCF
CRICOS No: 052404E
COURSE OBJECTIVES
A great many businesses in the unpredictable world of commerce
employ sophisticated and computationally intensive mathematical
tools to help corporations determine strategies for market trading
and risk profiling. As a result, virtually all major banking, investment
and energy companies employ graduates with expertise in
mathematics and/or computing.
This course is designed to address this demand by coupling a
program in computing and mathematical sciences with a focus on
finance and risk management. There is no other undergraduate
course in the country, and indeed very few internationally, that seeks
to combine Finance with both the disciplines of Computer Science
and the Mathematical Sciences in this way.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over three years full-time and part-time
equivalent.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for admission to the course an applicant should have
successfully completed Year 12 of the Victorian Certificate of
Education (VCE), with a study score of at least 20 in English and
22 in Mathematical Methods or have the equivalent of these
qualifications.
Alternatively, entry is via TAFE articulation or under mature age
provisions.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit
Semester Points
Year 1
BAO1101 Accounting for Decision Making 1 12
RCM1311 Programming 1 1 12
RCM1711 Mathematical Foundations 1 1 12
RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 1 12
or
ACE1145 CSM English Language and
Communication
Instead of RCM1613 for
those requiring English
RCM1211 Database Systems 1 2 12
RCM1312 Programming 2 2 12
RCM1712 Mathematical Foundations 2 2 12
RCM1614 Applied Statistics 2 2 12
or
*RCM1613 Applied Statistics 1 2 12
*For those doing ACE1145 in
Semester One, RCM1614 to be taken
over summer semester.
Year 2
RCM2312 Software Engineering 1 1 12
RCM2612 Forecasting 1 12
RCM2712 Mathematics of Continuous
Processes A 1 12
One elective from list A 1 12
RCM2611 Linear Statistical Models 2 12
RCM2713 Modelling for Decision Making 2 12
RCM2321 Mathematics of Continuous
Processes B 2 12
One elective from list A 2 12
Year 3
ACE3145 CSM Professional Communication 1 12
RCM3413 Financial Modelling 1 12
RCM3001 Project 1 (Financial Computing) 1 12
One elective from list B or list C 1 12
RCM3002 Project 2 (Financial Computing) 2 12
RCM3711 Computational Methods 2 12
One elective from list B 2 12
One elective from list C 2 12
LIST A
RCM2111 Data Communications and Networks
RCM2218 Database Systems 2
RCM2311 Object Oriented Programming 1
RCM2313 Software Development
RCM2315 Advanced Programming
RCM2614 Statistical Data Mining
RCM2810 Advanced Internet Programming
RCM2911 Linear Optimization Modelling
RCM2912 Project Scheduling
RCM3112 User Interface Design
RCM3311 Object Oriented Programming 2
LIST B
RCM3316 Advanced Mathematical Techniques
RCM3613 Time Series Analysis
RCM3615 Multivariate Statistics
RCM3720 Cryptography, Computer and Network Security
RCM3911 Simulation
LIST C
BAO3307 Corporate Finance
BAO3403 Investment Portfolio Analysis
RCM3940 Computational Risk Modelling
To qualify for the award of Bachelor of Science in Computational
Financial Mathematics, a total of 288 credit points are needed. No
stage completions exist for this course.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER
SCIENCE AND AVIATION
Course Code: SBCA
CRICOS No: 023702B
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Aviation aims to
provide participants with:
a practical and applied approach to the concepts of computer
science and aviation;
a range of skills in computer science, the mathematical sciences
and aeronautical theory subjects at a level sufficient to satisfy
the requirements for the issue of a Commercial Pilot’s Licence
(CPL), and Instrument Rating.
The specific aims of the course are to provide students with the
opportunity to:
obtain level two accreditation from the Australian Computer
Society (ACS) by passing all compulsory computer science
subjects, and thus gaining professional recognition;
develop skills and competence in aviation theory. The course is
structured so that students can integrate practical flying training
along with their academic studies and if choosing to do so and
following the guidelines given, will complete the degree at the
same time as qualifying for the issue of a Commercial Pilot’s
Licence (CPL) and Command Instrument Rating.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
47
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered over three years full-time and part-time
equivalent.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
ORDINARY ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for admission to the course an applicant should have
successfully completed Year 12 of the Victorian Certificate of
Education (VCE), with a study score of at least 20 in English and 22
in Mathematical Methods, or have the equivalent of these
qualifications. Completing Specialist Mathematics leads to an
ENTER score 3 points higher.
Alternatively, entry is via TAFE articulation or under mature age
provisions. In addition, students must pass the prescribed medical
examination conducted by a Civil Aviation Safety Authority-
Approved Aviation Medical Examiner in order to be permitted to
commence flying training.
Applicants may be interviewed. Consideration by a Faculty panel
may be given to relevant work experience, and any other activities
undertaken demonstrating ability to achieve in this course.
ADVANCED STANDING
Applicants entering with a Private Pilot’s License or higher will be
given full credit for completed aviation subjects and can join the
course with advanced standing provided they meet the admission
requirements. The course provides existing pilots the opportunity to
upgrade their non-flying skills as well as providing them with a
degree qualification which is likely to be necessary if they are to
further their career in the aviation industry.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit
Semester Points
Year 1
RCA1010 Introductory Aviation 1 12
RCM1115 Computer Systems & Architecture 1 12
RCM1311 Programming 1 1 12
RCM1711 Mathematical Foundations 1 1 12
RCM1114 Introduction to Computing and
the Internet 2 12
RCM1312 RCM 1312 Programming 2 2 12
RCM1713 Discrete Mathematics 2 12
RCA1020 Basic Aeronautical Knowledge 2 12
Year 2
RCA2020 Meteorology and Human
Factors for the CPL 1 12
RCA2030 Navigation and Flight law
for the CPL 1 12
RCM2312 Software Engineering 1 12
One computing elective from
the list below 1 12
RCA2040 Aerodynamics for the CPL 2 12
RCA2050 Aircraft General Knowledge
for the CPL 2 12
RCA2060 Operations Performance and
Flight Planning for the CPL 2 12
RCM1211 Database Systems 1 2 12
Year 3
ACE3145 CSM Professional Communication 1 12
RCA3010 Instrument Rating (IREX) 1 12
RCA3030 Meteorology and Human Factors
for the ATPL 1 12
RCA3040 Flight Planning for the ATPL 1 12
RCA3050 Navigation & Air law for the ATPL 2 12
RCA3060 Aerodynamics and Aircraft Systems
for the ATPL 2 12
RCA3070 Performance and Loading
for the ATPL3 2 12
RCA3080 One computing elective from
the list below 2 12
Computing Electives
RCM2111 Data Communications & Networks 1
RCM2112 Operating Systems
RCM2113 Multimedia Systems Design
RCM2213 Computer Graphics
RCM2311 Object Oriented Programming 1
RCM2313 Software Development
RCM2810 Advanced Internet Programming
RCM2930 3D Web Technologies
RCM3960 Internet Security
To qualify for the award of Bachelor of Science in Computer
Science and Aviation, a total of 288 credit points are needed. No
stage completions exist for this course.
ASSESSMENT
The assessment for each subject is detailed in the subject listing.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS) IN
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Course Code: SHCS
Students who do exceptionally well in their degree studies may be
given the opportunity to gain an Honours degree by completing a
fourth year of study in a specific field. This year is designed to assist
students who may wish to proceed to higher degrees by research,
but it also enables students to concentrate their studies more
intensely on areas of particular interest.
The Honours year requires students to select coursework units from
one of the fields of Computer Science, Statistics, and Operations
Research. As well, a minor thesis must be completed.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit
Semester Points
RCM6106 Thesis (4 units) 1 24
RCM6827 Research Perspectives in 1 12
Computer Science
1 approved Computer
Science elective 1 12
RCM6107 Thesis (4 units) 2 24
2 approved Computer Science electives 2 24
Total 96
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
48
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS) IN
COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES
Course Code: SHCM
Students who do exceptionally well in their degree studies may be
given the opportunity to gain an Honours degree by completing a
fourth year of study in a specific field. This year is designed to assist
students who may wish to proceed to higher degrees by research,
but it also enables students to concentrate their studies more
intensely on areas of particular interest.
The Honours year requires students to select coursework units from
one of the fields of Computer Science, Statistics, and Operations
Research. As well, a minor thesis must be completed.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit
Semester Points
RCM6106 Thesis(4 units) 1 24
1 approved Maths/Stats elective 1 12
RCM6107 Thesis(4 units) 2 24
RCM6827 Research Perspectives in 2 12
Computer Science
1 approved Maths/Stats elective 2 12
1 approved Maths/Stats elective 2 12
Total 96
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS: OFFSHORE
PROGRAM CONDUCTED IN HONG KONG
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER
SCIENCE
Course Code: SBCO
COURSE OBJECTIVES
This course specifically caters for part-time students in Hong Kong
who wish to obtain a professional qualification in Computer Science.
The course aims to produce graduates who have a sound
conceptual foundation including practical understanding of recent
developments in computer science and how computer science based
techniques may be applied to solve a wide range of problems in
business and industry.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Students are admitted at either level 1 or level 2.
LEVEL 1
Applicants should have a certificate (or equivalent) qualification with
a quantitative background.
LEVEL 2
Applicants should have qualifications in Engineering, Science or
Computing at the Higher Certificate (or equivalent) level.
COURSE REGULATIONS
Students entering the program at level 1 are required to obtain a
pass in at least fifteen subjects. Students entering the program at
level 2 are required to obtain a pass in at least eleven subjects.
Assessment throughout the course consists of tests, assignments,
project work and end of semester examinations.
Regulations also include:
(i) A student cannot enrol in any subject without having passed the
prerequisite;
(ii) A student cannot undertake a project without having completed
what the Academic Committee considers to be a suitable
academic preparation;
(iii) The following shall constitute unsatisfactory progress.
(a) failure in 100 per cent of enrolled subjects.
(b) failure in any subject twice. (Failures in any examination
and subsequent supplementary examination will be
considered as having failed the subject once.)
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
Course Code: SBIT
COURSE OBJECTIVES
This course specifically caters for part-time students in Hong Kong
who wish to obtain a professional qualification in Information
Technology.
The course aims to produce graduates who have a sound conceptual
foundation including practical understanding of recent developments
in Information Technology and how Information Technology based
techniques may be applied to solve a wide range of problems in
business and industry.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Students are admitted at either level 1 or level 2
LEVEL 1
Applicants should have a certificate (or equivalent) qualification with
a quantitative background.
LEVEL 2
Applicants should have qualifications in Engineering, Science or
Computing at the Higher Certificate (or equivalent) level.
COURSE REGULATIONS
Students entering the program at level 1 are required to obtain a
pass in at least fifteen subjects. Students entering the program at
level 2 are required to obtain a pass in at least eleven subjects.
Assessment throughout the course consists of tests, assignments,
project work and end of semester examinations.
Regulations also include:
(i) A student cannot enrol in any subject without having passed the
prerequisite;
(ii) A student cannot undertake a project without having completed
what the Academic Committee considers to be a suitable
academic preparation;
(iii) The following shall constitute unsatisfactory progress.
(a) failure in 100 per cent of enrolled subjects.
(b) failure in any subject twice. (Failures in any examination
and subsequent supplementary examination will be
considered as having failed the subject once.)
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERNET
TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS
Course Code: SBIA
COURSE OBJECTIVES
This course specifically caters for part-time students in Hong Kong
who wish to obtain a professional qualification in Internet
Technology.
The course aims to produce graduates who have a sound
conceptual foundation including practical understanding of recent
developments in Internet Technology and how Internet Technology
based techniques may be applied to solve a wide range of
problems in business and industry.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
49
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Students are admitted at either level 1 or level 2
LEVEL 1
Applicants should have a certificate (or equivalent) qualification with
a quantitative background.
LEVEL 2
Applicants should have qualifications in Engineering, Science or
Computing at the Higher Certificate (or equivalent) level.
COURSE REGULATIONS
Students entering the program at level 1 are required to obtain a
pass in at least fifteen subjects. Students entering the program at
level 2 are required to obtain a pass in at least eleven subjects.
Assessment throughout the course consists of tests, assignments,
project work and end of semester examinations.
Regulations also include:
(i) A student cannot enrol in any subject without having passed the
prerequisite;
(ii) A student cannot undertake a project without having completed
what the Academic Committee considers to be a suitable
academic preparation;
(iii) The following shall constitute unsatisfactory progress.
(a) failure in 100 per cent of enrolled subjects.
(b) failure in any subject twice. (Failures in any examination
and subsequent supplementary examination will be
considered as having failed the subject once.)
OFFSHORE PROGRAM CONDUCTED IN
MALAYSIA
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER
SCIENCE
Course Code: SBCO
The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science course is offered as
an advanced standing program in conjunction with Sunway
University College in Malaysia. Suitably qualified students (as
determined by the School) are able to complete the final year of the
course in Malaysia.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INTERNET
TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS
Course Code: SBIA
The Bachelor of Science in Internet Technologies and Applications
course is offered as an advanced standing program in conjunction
with Sunway College in Malaysia. Suitably qualified students (as
determined by the School) are able to complete the final year of the
course in Malaysia.
EXTERNAL PROGRAM CONDUCTED IN
SYDNEY
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER
SCIENCE
Course Code: SBCO
The program is offered at Alpha Beta Colleges in Sydney. The
normal entry level is an approved Advanced Diploma of IT (or
equivalent) which is normally of eighteen months duration.
Graduates of such approved programs will be granted subject
exemption equivalent to twelve months (two semesters) of study.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
50
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
51
SCHOOL OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
The School of Electrical Engineering offers undergraduate courses
leading to the award of:
Bachelor of Engineering in;
Electrical and Electronic Engineering;
Bachelor of Engineering Science in;
Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
The School of Electrical Engineering offers a comprehensive portfolio
of undergraduate, postgraduate and research study programs in the
fields of applied physics, electrical and electronic engineering and
photonics. From 2006 our undergraduate courses will be taught
using a Problem Based Learning (PBL) methodology. This is a
teaching and learning paradigm which actively engages students in
the solution of ‘real world’ problems. Through the solution of these
problems the students are guided to learn the necessary technical
and non-technical skills which are essential for professional
engineers. Experience has shown that the exciting challenges posed
by the PBL problems motivates students to achieve higher levels of
success than they might have otherwise accomplished. The new PBL
courses will be rolled out progressively with first year starting in
2006, second year in 2007 and so on.
All courses are designed to have a strong practical bias and include
a significant amount of ‘hands-on’ project work component. They
are taught in laboratories with modern equipment and computing
facilities. As a result, our graduates are highly regarded and sought
after by industry.
Details of the School’s research activities and postgraduate degree
programs are described in the Postgraduate Studies section of the
Handbook.
The School has a large enrolment of both local and international
students.
The Engineering awards have a common first semesters.
The Bachelor of Engineering Science course is of three years
duration and the Bachelor of Engineering course is four years.
DEGREE WITH HONOURS
A Degree with Honours Program is offered concurrently with the
fourth year of the ordinary Bachelor of Engineering program.
Normally, students entering the final year of a full-time Bachelor of
Engineering program (or its equivalent in part-time mode), will be
offered honours candidacy, if they have achieved a minimum hour
weighted average of 60 per cent over year levels 1 to 3, have not
repeated a subject through levels 1 to 3 and have not been granted
more than one stage completion by compensation throughout the
duration of the course. Fourth year honours degree gradings will be
determined by the relevant Examiners Board on the basis of the hour
weighted average for year level 4.
COMPUTER FACILITIES
The School has a number of computing laboratories for teaching
and research. These laboratories are equipped with the latest
equipment such as Pentium PCs, Unix workstations, and high speed
line printers and laser printers. Graphical user interfaces and menu-
driven interfaces are provided for easy access to services.
RESEARCH
The School's research activities are quite varied, and attract
significant government and private funding. Current research areas
include:
telecommunication;
microelectronics;
optical technology;
automation and energy systems.
Additional research in the School reflects staff expertise that spans
electrical and electronic engineering and applied physics.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Admission to the course will be governed by the University
Regulations for undergraduate courses as set out in the Faculty of
Health, Engineering and Science Handbook in either of the
categories of Normal Entry or Alternative Category Entry.
The prerequisite subjects for admission into the first year of the
course are based on entry at post Year 12, Victorian Certificate of
Education, or equivalent level, and are as follows.
PREREQUISITES UNITS 1 AND 2
Physics
PREREQUISITES UNITS 3 AND 4
Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics, English
MIDDLE BAND SELECTION
Completing Physics and/or Specialist Mathematics gives an ENTER
3 points higher per study.
ADMISSION AT OTHER LEVELS
Full-fee paying international students must have qualifications which
are equivalent to those listed above. In addition, they must provide
evidence of proficiency in the English language:
IELTS – an overall band score of 6+, subject to individual
profile; or
TOEFL – a score of 550+, and a test of written English (TWE)
score of 5+.
ARTICULATION PATHWAYS
Holders of a TAFE Associate Diploma in Electronics (with
appropriate mathematics and results at Distinction level) may be
admitted into Year One of the School’s undergraduate courses. If
the TAFE Associate Diploma has been completed at High Distinction
level, advanced admission to Year Two may be considered.
Special advanced admission provisions apply to certain overseas
Diploma and Higher Diploma qualifications.
ASSESSMENT
Assessment in subjects is designed to monitor a student’s progress
and achievement as well as contribute to and enhance their
learning. Normally a prescribed range of assessment methods is
employed in any subject.
Assessment is by a combination of written assignments, tests,
laboratory work and examinations.
Assessment in PBL components is by means of a portfolio. Students
keep a journal of their learning experiences through the solution of
the problems which they have been set. Students demonstrate the
satisfactory achievement of the various learning outcomes
associated with problems.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
52
Supplementary assessment is not normally available in any subject
except at the discretion of the Head of School in exceptional
circumstances.
Special Consideration in assessment may be granted on the grounds
defined by the University Statutes.
Guidelines on the use of electronic calculators and other electronic
storage devices in examinations are provided in individual subject
outlines distributed to students within the first two weeks of semester
and included on final examination papers.
Electronic calculators and other electronic storage devices will not
be permitted where the above provisions have not been made.
The assessment of each subject is detailed in the subject listings.
COURSE REGULATIONS
PROGRESSION AND EXCLUSION
Each Engineering undergraduate course is specified as a unique set
of course subjects. The sequence in which these course subjects are
normally studied is specified, firstly, by grouping them in course
years and secondly, by specifying prerequisites and/or co-requisites
for some subjects.
Normally, all of the course subjects in a particular course year
should be completed and all prerequisite/co-requisite requirements
satisfied before enrolment will be permitted in any subject in a
subsequent course year. Enrolment in subjects spanning more than
two course years is not permitted.
In order to satisfy the academic requirements for a course award, all
course subjects must be completed. Such completion may be
obtained by:
(a) being granted exemption in either individual subjects or in
course years; and/or
(b) achieving a grade of P (or higher) in the assessment of each
subject; and/or
(c) being granted compensation in course years.
A stage grading of ‘Year Completed by Compensation’ may be
granted if a student:
(i) has been given final grades in all subjects in the course year;
and
(ii) has passed subjects equivalent to more than 80 per cent of total
required semester hours for that course year with no assessment
at less than N1 grade; and
(iii) has achieved an hour-weighted average mark of at least 50 per
cent for all subjects in the year.
A grading of ‘Year Completed by Compensation’ recognises an
acceptable overall result but does not constitute a pass in any
individual failed subject.
Students who do not satisfy the requirements for a ‘Year Completed
by Compensation’ must repeat all failed subjects of that year (or their
equivalents) at the earliest opportunity.
Normally, gradings of ‘Year Completed by Compensation’ will not
be granted in consecutive years of a course.
Normal progress through a course requires a student to complete
any defined course year within one year of equivalent full-time
enrolment.
Any of the following may be considered to constitute unsatisfactory
progress by a student:
(i) failure in any subject or unit for the third time;
(ii) failure in any subject or unit at N2 level for the second time;
(iii) failure in 50 per cent or more of their assessed enrolment load
in any semester or calendar year of study;
(iv) failure to complete any two consecutive course years within
three years of equivalent full-time enrolment;
(v) failure to complete the course within the maximum period
defined by University Statute;
(vi) failure to meet a conditional enrolment agreement.
As otherwise defined by University Statute and subject to being
invited to show cause, a student making unsatisfactory progress will
normally be recommended for exclusion from the course.
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
All current courses are recognised by Engineers Australia and all
new courses are in the process of being submitted for recognition.
The new courses place much more significance on the ‘Professional
Engineering Graduate Attributes’ required by industry and
necessary to ensure accreditation for the courses and professional
recognition and corporate membership for the graduates by
Engineers Australia.
The graduate attributes of Engineers Australia closely align with
those of the University. The PBL model will enhance industry’s
acceptance of the courses and should virtually ensure recognition
and accreditation by Engineers Australia and other professional
bodies such as the Institution of Radio and Electronics Engineers,
Australia, The Australian Computer Society, the British Computer
Society, the Institution of Electrical Engineers (UK) the Institution of
Electrical and Electronic Engineers (USA), the Australian Institute of
Physics, the Institute of Engineers, Malaysia and other bodies which
are parties to the ‘Washington Accreditation’.
INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE
Candidates applying for the award of an engineering degree must
ensure that they have submitted for approval evidence of having
undertaken a minimum of 12 weeks industrial experience relevant to
the course to satisfy Engineers Australia requirements.
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING IN ELECTRICAL
AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING
Course Code: EBEE
CRICOS No: 002860F
The Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical and Electronic Engineering
is a flexible degree that allows students to specialise in a wide range
of disciplinary areas such as Computer Engineering, Software
Engineering, Microelectronic Systems, Telecommunications, Power
Systems Engineering, Control Systems, Photonics, Robotics and
Automation.
The first two years of the course develop the basic concepts in
electrical and electronic engineering, computer systems and
programming, together with related engineering sciences,
mathematics, design projects and laboratory studies. Students have
the opportunity to choose their field of specialisation in later years of
the course.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The main objectives of the course are to: provide an integrated
foundation for electrical disciplinary studies and course
specialisation into the particular areas of communication, computer,
control, electronic and power engineering; develop attitudes of
personal initiative and enquiry in students that may continue to
further education and meet the technological changes in their
profession; develop oral and written communications and an
understanding of society and the engineer’s role in society; provide
for professional recognition by the Engineers Australia and other
professional bodies.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
53
COURSE STRUCTURE
Only the first year of our new PBL based course is shown in the
following course structure. The later years are indicative of the
existing (non PBL) course. These later years will be replaced as the
PBL course is progressively introduced.
Engineering subject codes commence with ‘V’.
Science subject codes commence with ‘R’.
… A subjects = Semester1, ... B subjects = Semester 2
Credit Semester
Points Hours
Year 1
Subjects total 2 x 48 Credit Points
VEF1001 Enabling Sciences 1A 12 60
VEF1002 Enabling Sciences 1B 12 60
VEF1003 Electrical Fundamentals 1A 12 60
VEF1004 Electrical Fundamentals 1B 12 60
VEB1001 PBL & Engineering Practice 1A 24 120
VEB1002 PBL & Engineering Practice 1B 24 120
Year 2
Subjects total 2 x 48 Credit Points
VEL2001 Linear Systems and Mathematics 2A 12 60
VEL2002 Linear Systems and Mathematics 2B 12 60
VEH2001 Electronic Systems 2A 12 60
VEH2002 Electronic Systems 2B 12 60
VEC2001 Computer Engineering 2A 12 60
VAG1001 Engineering Profession 1A 12 60
VED2002 Engineering Design &
Professional Practice 2 12 60
VEG2002 Introduction to Engineering
Systems 2 12 60
Year 3 A
Subjects total 2 x 48 Credit Points
*Stream Specialization Subjects A 12 60
*Stream Specialization Subjects B 12 60
VED3001 Engineering Design & Projects 3A 12 60
VED3002 Engineering Design & Projects 3B 12 60
Elective (2 x 6 or 1 x 12 credit points) 12 60
Elective (2 x 6 or 1 x 12 credit points) 12 60
*Stream Subjects: Stream subject A is a prerequisite for B.
Students to complete 6 stream subjects (in Sem5-8), selecting a
minimum of two stream A and two stream B subjects.
Year 4
Subjects total 2 x 48 Credit Points
VEG4001 Professional Engineering Practice 4A 12 60
VEG4002 Professional Engineering Practice 4B 12 60
*Stream Specialization Subjects A 12 60
*Stream Specialization Subjects B 12 60
VED4001 Engineering Design & Projects 4A 12 60
VED4002 Engineering Design & Projects 4B 12 60
Elective (2 x 6 or 1 x 12 credit points) 12 60
Elective (2 x 6 or 1 x 12 credit points) 12 60
*Stream Subjects: Stream subject A is a prerequisite for B.
Students to complete 6 stream subjects (in Sem5-8), selecting a
minimum of two stream A and two stream B subjects
Minimum number of Subjects for Specialisation award other than
Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Completion of:
Stream A & Stream B Subject of the Specialisation;
18 Credit points of the Specialisation related Elective Subjects;
Final Project in the field of the Specialisation
Stream Specialization or Elective Subjects (12 Credit pts)
REP4100 Data Acquisition 12 60
REP4200 Directed Studies in Physics 2 12 48
REP4300 Einstein’s Theory of Relativity 6 24
VEA3000 Control Systems A 12 60
VEA4000 Computer Controlled Systems B 12 60
VEA4100 Computer Vision and Applications 6 30
VEA4200 Fuzzy Control and Applications 6 30
VEA4300 Optimal Control Systems 6 30
VEA4400 Robotics and Automation 6 30
VEA4500 Robust Control Systems 6 30
VEA4600 System Identification for Control 6 30
VEE3000 Electrical Machines and Energy Systems A 12 60
VEE4000 Power Electronics and Drives B 12 60
VEE4100 Electric Energy Systems Analysis
and Operation 6 30
VEE4200 Electric Energy Systems Protection 6 30
VEE4300 Electric Energy Transmission and Distribution 6 30
VEE4400 High Voltage Engineering 6 30
RMA4001 Advanced Mathematics for
Electrical Engineers 12 60
VEG4100 Digital Signal Processing A 6 30
VEH3000 Computer and Digital Design A 12 60
VEH4000 Computer and Digital Design B 12 60
VEH4300 Systems on a Programmable Device 6 30
VEM3000 EDA Tools and Design Methodology A 12 60
VEM4000 Integrated Circuit Design B 12 60
VEM4100 Analog and Mixed Signal Design 6 30
VEM4200 ASIC Design 6 30
VEM4300 Embedded Systems Design 6 30
VEM4400 High Level Synthesis – Verilog 6 30
VEM4500 VLSI Design 6 30
VEP3000 Photonics A 12 60
VEP4000 Photonics B 12 60
VES3000 Data Structures and Algorithms Analysis A 12 60
VES4000 Programming Tools and Compilers B 12 60
VES4100 Computer Systems 12 60
VES4200 Network Software & Management 12 60
VES4300 Software Engineering 12 60
VET3000 Telecommunication A 12 60
VET4000 Telecommunication B 12 60
VET4100 Computer Communications 1 6 30
VET4200 Computer Communications 2 6 30
VET4300 Digital Communications 6 30
VET4400 Digital Signal Processing in
Telecommunications 2 6 30
VET4500 Satellite Communications 6 30
VET4600 Wireless Communications 6 30
VET4700 Communication System and Network Design 6 30
VET4800 Multimedia and IP-Based Networks 6 30
Electives from outside School of Electrical Engineering
(Subject to approval of Course Director) 12 60
Electives from outside School of Electrical Engineering
(Subject to approval of Course Director) 6 30
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
54
BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE IN
ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING
Course Code: EBES
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The Bachelor of Engineering Science in Electrical and Electronic
Engineering is a flexible degree that allows students to specialise in
a wide range of disciplinary areas such as Computer Engineering,
Software Engineering, Microelectronic Systems, Telecom-
munications, Power Systems Engineering, Control Systems,
Photonics, Robotics and Automation.
Course structure: First common year of electrical, electronic,
computing, mathematics and physics studies designed to provide a
foundation for students to select from a wide range of higher level
subjects in later years of their course. Students will have the
opportunity to complete a generic Electrical and Electronic
Engineering Science course or specialize in any of the above titled
streams. The course has a focus on practical applications and
design and project work forms a significant component of the total
program.
Student completing their studies at an appropriate standard and
with appropriate subjects may be granted up to three years credit
into the Bachelor of Engineering degree.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Only the first year of our new PBL based course is shown in the
following course structure. The later years are indicative of the
existing (non PBL) course. These later years will be replaced as the
PBL course is progressively introduced.
Engineering subject codes commence with ‘V’.
Science subject codes commence with ‘R’.
… A subjects = Semester1, … B subjects = Semester 2
Credit Semester
Points Hours
Year 1
Subjects total 2 x 48 Credit Points
VEF1001 Enabling Sciences 1A 12 60
VEF1002 Enabling Sciences 1B 12 60
VEF1003 Electrical Fundamentals 1A 12 60
VEF1004 Electrical Fundamentals 1B 12 60
VEB1001 PBL & Engineering Practice 1A 24 120
VEB1002 PBL & Engineering Practice 1B 24 120
Year 2
Subjects total 2 x 48 Credit Points
VEH2001 Electronic Systems 2A 12 60
VEH2002 Electronic Systems 2B 12 60
VEC2001 Computer Engineering 2A 12 60
VAG1001 Engineering Profession 1A 12 60
VED2002 Engineering Design & Professional Prac 2 12 60
Elective 12 60
Elective 12 60
Elective 12 60
Year 3
Stream Subject 12 60
Stream Subject 12 60
Stream Subject 12 60
VED3001 Engineering Design and Projects 3A 12 60
VED3002 Engineering Design and Projects 3B 12 60
or
VED3102 Engineering Design and Projects 3C 12 60
VEG4001 Professional Engineering Practice 4A 12 60
Electives (6 or 12 credit points) 24 120
Stream Subjects: Students to complete a minimum of three stream
subjects.
Stream Specialization or Elective Subjects (12 Credit pts)
Students may choose any subject for which they are qualified from
the Bachelor of Engineering.
Minimum number of Subjects for Specialisation award other than
Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Completion of:
Stream A & Stream B Subject of the Specialisation;
24 Credit points of the Specialisation related Elective Subjects.
*Students entering the degree without the equivalent of pass in
Mathematical Methods at VCE level will be advised to undertake
foundation or transition mathematics as a preparation.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS) IN
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
Course Code: EHEC
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The course is designed to enhance the skills acquired in the
Computer Technology Degree course, by developing the research
potential of the students and allowing in-depth study topics in a
range of computer technology subjects.
The Honours Degree provides for a research project and a selection
of advanced elective subjects. This year may lead to further
postgraduate opportunities. The choice of subjects is dependent
upon the student’s background and intended area of further study.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND PREREQUISITES
To qualify for admission the student must have completed an
appropriate undergraduate course of at least three years in
duration, and obtained results of 60 per cent and higher in the
majority of subjects undertaken.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered on a full-time basis over one year, or part-time
equivalent.
COURSE STRUCTURE
Credit
Points
Semester One
VEC4701 Research Project 24
Semester Two
VEC4702 Research Project 24
Elective subjects (24 credit points per semester)
The elective subjects are to be chosen from the range of final year
undergraduate subjects (no more than two at third year level) and
postgraduate subjects, as approved by the Course Co-ordinator.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONOURS) –
PHYSICS
Course Code: SHPC
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The course aims to broaden and deepen the student’s knowledge
and understanding of physics by the completion of advanced
courses and to provide a basic training in the skills necessary to
undertake research in physics. Research training will include the
ability to devise, design and carry out research intended to yield
data relevant to the solution of specific problems, the ability to
develop and refine working hypotheses, to critically analyse data
and to report results in an appropriate manner.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
55
The research project is normally undertaken in one of the following
areas of expertise of the section: optical fibre sensors, laser physics,
optoelectronic imaging, applied optics and vacuum technology.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for entry to the Honours program the applicant should
have completed the requirements for a pass degree with major
studies in an appropriate discipline. Entry is at the discretion of the
Applied Physics section and applicants should normally have
obtained a ‘credit’ average in the final year of the pass degree. For
mature age applicants, an appropriate combination of qualifications
and experience will be considered.
COURSE DURATION
The course will be offered on a full-time basis over one year or part-
time equivalent.
COURSE STRUCTURE
RPH4411 Physics 4 (Honours) 96 credit points
(48 per semester)
ACADEMIC PROGRESSION
A student will not be allowed to repeat the Honours year or any
component of it without the permission of the Course Co-ordinator.
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
56
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
57
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES
The School of Health Sciences aims both to enhance post-secondary
educational opportunities and to expand vocational opportunity,
particularly for those who live and work in the western metropolitan
region. This will be achieved by progressively offering a range of
courses designed to facilitate the access of students across a range
of educational levels to educational programs which are
professionally and educationally oriented. Three major disciplines
are represented in the School of Health Sciences: Osteopathic
Medicine, Paramedic Sciences, and Chinese Medicine.
Curriculum and teaching approaches adopted by the School include
encouraging students to define their learning needs and to take
responsibility for their learning. The School also aims to foster
students’ personal, professional and educational growth and
development.
Courses are developed in consultation with staff within the
University, with members of the professions, accrediting authorities
and members of the community to ensure the relevance and quality
of courses.
COURSE OFFERINGS
In 2006, the School of Health Sciences will offer the following
undergraduate courses:
*Campus Full-time Part-time
Bachelor Chinese Medicine
(Acupucture & Herbs) S Y Y
Bachelor of Health Science
Clinical Dermal Therapies J n/a Y
Natural Medicine S,ZA Y Y
– Paramedic (3yr pre-service) S,I Y n/a
Paramedic (1yr conversion) ZA,H Y Y
– Chinese Medicine S Y n/a
Naturopathy & Homoeopathy S Y Y
Bachelor of Science
– Clinical Sciences (Osteopathy) C Y n/a
*Campus C=City Flinders J=City King S=St Albans
H=Hong Kong ZA=Internet
BACHELOR OF CHINESE MEDICINE
(ACUPUNCTURE AND HERBS)
Double Major
(For students commencing 2005 onwards)
Course Code : HBAH
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The aims of the course are to:
provide students with detailed training in Chinese medical
theory and practice, including acupuncture and Chinese herbal
medicine;
provide students with comprehensive Chinese medical skills in
both acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, incorporating
adjunctive approaches such as meditation, health enhancement
and CM dietary modalities;
ensure that students practise from Chinese medical theory,
whilst integrating western medical information as appropriate,
to ensure that graduates are safe and competent in the practice
of Chinese Medicine;
provide students with quality clinical experiences in hospitals
and complementary health clinics from Year One of the
program;
provide students with the option of undertaking a clinical
internship placement in an appropriate hospital settting in
China or other countries; and
provide students with opportunities for research and higher
degree in Chinese Medicine on the completion of their
undergraduate degree.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for admission to the course applicants must have
satisfactorily completed the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE),
or equivalent with a study score of at least 20 in Units 3 and 4
English. It is also desirable, but not essential, that applicants have
completed VCE level studies in biology, chemistry, psychology, or
Asian studies.
Applicants who do not meet the normal admission requirements but
who possess appropriate educational qualifications, or work
experience which would enable them to successfully undertake the
course, will be considered for admission.
COURSE DURATION
The course is offered on a full-time basis over four years or part-time
equivalent.
COURSE LOCATION
This course if offered at the St Albans campus.
CLINICAL PLACEMENT
Students will be required to undergo a Victorian Police Check before
commencing placement subjects. Police checks need to be
conducted annually throughout the program. Prospective and
continuing students should be aware that not passing relevant police
checks may restrict access to clinical placements necessary for
graduation. Students will be required to show evidence of a current
first aid in the workplace level 2 qualification whilst enrolled in the
clinical practice unit.
Teaching clinics operate 50 weeks per year, and students will be
required to attend clinical sessions on a rotation basis including
outside of semester hours to maintain a public service and provide
continuity of patient care.
COURSE STRUCTURE
All students will study both Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal
Medicine throughout the four years of this integrated program.
Credit Hours
Points per week
Year One
Semester One
HHT1000 Introduction to Major Classics – Nei Jing 6 3
HHT1001 Introduction to Chinese Medical Literacy 8 3
HHT1002 Fundamentals of Chinese Medicine 12 11
HHT1100 Introduction to Health
Enhancement (Yang Sheng) 6 2
HHT1101 Acupuncture Point Location 1 8 5
RBM1515 Anatomy & Physiology 8 6
Semester Two
HHT1005 Chinese Medical Diagnosis &
Pathogenesis 1 8 6
HHT1007 Chinese Pharmacopoeia 6 7
FACULTY OF HEALTH, ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE
58
HHT1009 Introduction to Chinese Medicine
Clinical Practice 12 48*
HHT1201 Acupuncture Point Location 2 8 5
RBM1525 Anatomy and Physiology 8 6
RBM1910 Microbiology for Chinese
Medicine Practitioners 6 3
Year Two
Semester One
HHT2003 Chinese Medical Diagnosis and
Pathogenesis 2 8 6
HHT2009 Pharmacopoeia and Dispensing 8 6
HHT2011 Chinese Medicine Clinical Practice1 12 72*
HHT2100 Formulae and Strategies 1 6 6
HHT2104 Acupuncture Needling:
Theory and Practice 1 6 4
RBM2911 Pathophysiology 1 8 6
Semester Two
HHT2000 Health Enhancement (Yang Sheng) 6 3
HHT2200 Formulae and Strategies 2 6 6
HHT2202 Acupuncture Theory: Systems and Methods 6 3
HHT2203 Chinese Medicine Clinical Practice 2 16 72*
HHT2205 Acupuncture Needling: Theory
and Practice 2 6 4
RBM2912 Pathophysiology 2 8 6
Year Three
Semester One
HHT3100 Chinese Medical Micro-Systems 6 3
HHT3103 Chinese Medicine Clinical Practice 3 6 72
HHT3104 Major Classics – Shang Han Lun &
Wen Bing 1 8 5
HHT3106 Internal Medicine 1 6 6
HHT3108 Chinese Medicine Therapeutic
Applications 1 6 5
RBM3921 Western Medical Diagnoses
and Interventions 1 6 6
Semester Two
HHT3003 Counselling Skills 8 4
HHT3105 Major Classics – Shang Han Lun
& Wen Bing 2 6 5
HHT3203 Chinese Medicine Clinical Practice 4 16 108*
HHT3207 Internal Medicine 2 6 6
HHT3111 Chinese Medicine Therapeutic
Applications 2 6 5
RBM3922 Western Medical Diagnoses and
Interventions 2 6 6
Year Four
Semester One
HHT4002 Research Methods for Chinese Medicine 6 3
HHT4108 Chinese Medicine Traumatology 6 4
HHT4100 Case Conferencing & Clinical Issues 1 6 4
HHT4101 Chinese Medicine Obstetrics & Gynaecology 6 6
HHT4103 Chinese Medicine Clinical Internship 1 16 156*
RBM4923 Western Medical Diagnoses and
Interventions 3 8 6
Semester Two
HHT4004 Professional Issues for Chinese
Medical Practice 6 4
HHT4200 Case Conferencing and Clinical Issues 2 6 6
HHT4201 Chinese Medicine Paediatrics 6 5
HHT4203 Chinese Medicine Dermatology 6 5
HHT4204 Chinese Medicine Clinical Internship 2 16 264*
RBM4924 Western Medical Diagnosis and
Interventions 4 8 6
Totals 384 3276
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
In order to be awarded a Bachelor of Chinese Medicine
(Acupuncture and Herbs) degree, students must pass all components
of assessment and satisfactorily complete all theoretical and clinical
hurdle requirements to proficiency standards as specified in
Ferrigno, P. (Compiler). (2005). School of Health Sciences Chinese
Medicine Clinical Logbook [CD and manual]. Melbourne: Victoria
University of Technology, School of Health Sciences, CM Unit; and
Mathieson, L. (Producer). (2005). School of Health Sciences Chinese
Medicine Clinical Practice demo CD [CD]. Melbourne: Victoria
University of Technology, School of Health Sciences, CM Unit.
Students should presume that the content in those references
constitutes Required Reading throughout the entire Chinese Medicine
degree.
PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
It is expected that graduates will meet the requirements of the
Chinese Medicine Registration Board of Victoria and be eligible for
membership of the major professional associations.
BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE – CLINICAL
DERMAL THERAPIES
Course Code: HBCD
(This course is currently under review.)
COURSE OBJECTIVES
The aims of the course are to:
provide an opportunity for qualified Beauty Therapists to
establish and develop knowledge and skills in advanced
dermal therapy treatments;
instruct appropriately qualified practitioners in safe and
effective therapies to supplement their existing dermal therapies
practice and enhance the health of the client;
extend and expand interpersonal skills in relation to the
demands of practice;
examine current developments in dermal therapy, advanced
dermal therapy techniques and the application of these in
practice;
develop research perspectives within the context of Clinical
Dermal Therapy and Clinical Dermal Therapy practice;
provide a pathway to Degree level for Diploma of Beauty
Therapy students;
enhance career options for those Beauty Therapists working in
the field;
establish an educational benchmark for the practice of Clinical
Dermal Therapies.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To qualify for admission to the course applicants must have
completed the Diploma of Beauty Therapy, or equivalent, and have
a minimum of one years' work experience in the field. Applicants
may be required to attend an interview. International students are
eligible to apply for entry to the course.
Students will be required to undergo a Victoria Police check before
commencing placement subjects. Police checks need to be
conducted annually throughout the program. Prospective and
continuing students should be aware that not passing relevant police
checks may restrict access to clinical place