C2 124 2014 Fact Book Cleansed

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Additional telephone numbers are listed on pages 140 and 141.
Quick Reference Telephone Numbers
NRL NRL- NRL- NRL NRL VXS-1
WASHINGTON SSC MONTEREY CBD Patuxent River
Hotline (202) 767-6543 (202) 767-6543 (202) 767-6543 (202) 767-6543 (202) 767-6543
Personnel Locator (202) 767-3200 (228) 688-3390 (831) 656-4763 (410) 257-4000 (301) 342-3751
DSN 297- or 754- 828 878 342
Direct-in-Dialing 767- or 404- 688 656 257 342
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The NRL Fact Book is a reference source for information about the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). It is
updated and placed on NRL’s Web site (http://www.nrl.navy.mil) annually. It is printed every other year. To provide ad-
ditional information to the reader, a point of contact is listed for each activity.
NRL has a continuing need for physical scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and support personnel. Vacan-
cies are lled without regard to age, race, creed, sex, or national origin. Information concerning current vacancies is
furnished on request. Address all such inquiries to:
Human Resources Ofce
Personnel Operations Branch (Code 1810)
Naval Research Laboratory
Washington, DC 20375-5320
NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY
WASHINGTON, DC 20375-5320
iii
Contents
1 INTRODUCTION TO THE NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY
1 Mission
3 The Naval Research Laboratory in the Department of the Navy
4 NRL Functional Organization
5 Current Research
8 Major Research Capabilities and Facilities
15 NRL Sites and Facilities
17 EXECUTIVE DIRECTORATE
19 Executive Directorate – Code 1000 and Code 1001
20 Commanding Ocer
21 Director of Research
23 Executive Council
24 Research Advisory Committee
25 Oce of Technology Transfer
26 Oce of Program Administration and Policy Development
27 Oce of Counsel
28 Institute for Nanoscience
30 Command Support Division
32 Military Support Division
34 Scientic Development Squadron ONE (VXS-1)
36 Laboratory for Autonomous Systems Research
38 Human Resources Oce
40 Ruth H. Hooker Research Library
41 BUSINESS OPERATIONS DIRECTORATE
43 Business Operations Directorate – Code 3000
44 Associate Director of Research for Business Operations
46 Contracting Division
48 Financial Management Division
50 Supply and Information Services Division
52 Research and Development Services Division
55 SYSTEMS DIRECTORATE
57 Systems Directorate – Code 5000
58 Associate Director of Research for Systems
60 Radar Division
62 Information Technology Division
64 Optical Sciences Division
66 Tactical Electronic Warfare Division
69 MATERIALS SCIENCE AND COMPONENT TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE
71 Materials Science and Component Technology Directorate – Code 6000
72 Associate Director of Research for Materials Science and Component Technology
74 Laboratories for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics
76 Chemistry Division
78 Materials Science and Technology Division
80 Plasma Physics Division
82 Electronics Science and Technology Division
84 Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering
iv
87 OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE
89 Ocean and Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate – Code 7000
90 Associate Director of Research for Ocean and Atmospheric Science and Technology
92 Oce of Research Support Services (NRL-SSC)
94 Acoustics Division
96 Remote Sensing Division
98 Oceanography Division
100 Marine Geosciences Division
102 Marine Meteorology Division
104 Space Science Division
107 NAVAL CENTER FOR SPACE TECHNOLOGY
109 Naval Center for Space Technology – Code 8000
110 Director of Naval Center for Space Technology
112 Space Systems Development Department
114 Spacecraft Engineering Department
117 TECHNICAL OUTPUT, FISCAL, AND PERSONNEL INFORMATION
119 Technical Output
120 FY 2012/2013 Sources of New Funds (Actual)
121 FY 2012/2013 Uses of Funds
122 FY 2012 Total New Funds by Category
123 FY 2013 Total New Funds by Category
124 Personnel Information
125 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
127 Programs for NRL Employees
129 Programs for Non-NRL Employees
131 GENERAL INFORMATION
133 Maps
140 Key Personnel
1
Introduction to the
Naval Research Laboratory
To conduct a broadly based multi-
disciplinary program of scientic research
and advanced technological development
directed toward maritime applications of
new and improved materials, techniques,
equipment, systems, and ocean, atmospheric,
and space sciences and related technologies.
The Naval Research Laboratory
Provides primary in-house research for
the physical, engineering, space, and
environmental sciences;
Provides broadly based exploratory and
advanced development programs in
response to identied and anticipated DON
needs;
Provides broad multidisciplinary support
to the Naval Warfare Centers;
Provides space and space systems
technology development and support; and
Assumes responsibility as the Navy’s
corporate laboratory.
Mission
The Naval Research Laboratory Detachment is located
at Stennis Space Center, Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
(NRL-SSC).
The NRL Marine Meteorology Division is located in
Monterey, California (NRL-MRY).
The Naval Research Laboratory is located in Washington,
DC, on the east bank of the Potomac River.
2
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NAVAL SPACE
AND WARFARE
(SPAWAR)
SYSTEMS
CENTER
3
The Naval Research Laboratory
in the
Department of the Navy
The Naval Research Laboratory is the Department of the Navy‘s corporate laboratory, and it
reports to the Chief of Naval Research. As the corporate laboratory of the Navy, NRL is the principal
in-house component in the Oce of Naval Research’s (ONR) eort to meet its science and technology
responsibilities.
NRL has had a long and fruitful relationship with industry as a collaborator, contractor, and
through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs). NRL values this linkage and
continues to develop it.
NRL is an important link in the Navy Research, Development, and Acquisition (RD&A) chain.
Through NRL, the Navy has direct ties with sources of fundamental ideas in industry and the academic
community throughout the world and provides an eective coupling point to the R&D chain for ONR.
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NRL Functional Organization
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
RESEARCH ADVISORY
COMMITTEE
OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY
TRANSFER
1004
OFFICE OF COUNSEL
1008
HUMAN RESOURCES
OFFICE
1800
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO
THE DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH
1001.1
INSTITUTE FOR
NANOSCIENCE
1100
OFFICE OF PROGRAM
ADMIN & POLICY
DEVELOPMENT
1006
INSPECTOR GENERAL
1000.1
BUSINESS OPERATIONS
DIRECTORATE
ASSOC DIRECTOR OF
RESEARCH
3000
NAVAL CENTER FOR
SPACE TECHNOLOGY
8000
MATERIALS SCIENCE AND
COMPONENT TECHNOLOGY
DIRECTORATE
ASSOC DIRECTOR OF
RESEARCH
6000
SYSTEMS
DIRECTORATE
ASSOC DIRECTOR OF
RESEARCH
5000
MANAGEMENT
INFORMATION
SYSTEMS OFFICE
3030
CONTRACTING
DIVISION
3200
SUPPLY AND
INFORMATION
SERVICES
DIVISION
3400
FINANCIAL
MANAGEMENT
DIVISION
3300
RESEARCH &
DEVELOPMENT
SERVICES
DIVISION
3500
RADAR
DIVISION
5300
OPTICAL
SCIENCES
DIVISION
5600
INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
DIVISION
5500
TACTICAL
ELECTRONIC
WARFARE
DIVISION
5700
SPACE SYSTEMS
DEVELOPMENT
DEPARTMENT
8100
CHEMISTRY
DIVISION
6100
ELECTRONICS
SCIENCE AND
TECHNOLOGY
DIVISION
6800
CENTER FOR
BIO/MOLECULAR
SCIENCE &
ENGINEERING
6900
LABORATORIES FOR
COMPUTATIONAL
PHYSICS & FLUID
DYNAMICS 6040
OFFICE OF RESEARCH
SUPPORT SERVICES
7030
LAB FOR
COMPUTATIONAL
PHYSICS & FLUID
DYNAMICS
6400
MATERIALS
SCIENCE AND
TECHNOLOGY
DIVISION
6300
PLASMA
PHYSICS
DIVSION
6700
*DIRECT ACCESS
1830 DEEOO
3005 DEP FOR SMALL BUS
3540 SAFETY OFFICER
HS-IRB CHAIR
OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
DIRECTORATE
ASSOC DIRECTOR OF
RESEACH
7000
MARINE
METEOROLOGY
DIVISION
7500
SPACE
SCIENCE
DIVISION
7600
SPACECRAFT
ENGINEERING
DEPARTMENT
8200
ACOUSTICS
DIVISION
7100
OCEANOGRAPHY
DIVISION
7300
REMOTE
SENSING
DIVISION
7200
NAVAL RESEARCH
LABORATORY
COMMANDING OFFICER *
1000
DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH
1001
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
FOR
TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT
1001.3
ADMINISTRATIVE
RESOURCES MANAGER
1003
PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE
1030
CHIEF STAFF OFFICER
1002
COMMAND SUPPORT
DIVISION
1200
MILITARY SUPPORT
DIVISION
1400
SCIENTIFIC DEVEL
SQUADRON ONE
1600
MARINE
GEOSCIENCES
DIVISION
7400
LAB FOR AUTONOMOUS
SYSTEMS RESEARCH
1700
5
Current Research
The following areas represent broad elds of NRL research. Under each, more specic topics that are being in-
vestigated for the benet of the Navy and other sponsoring organizations are listed. Some details of this work
are given in the NRL Review, published annually. More specic details are published in reports on individual
projects provided to sponsors and/or presented as papers for professional societies or their journals.
Advanced Radio, Optical, and IR
Sensors
Advanced optical sensors
EM/EO/meteorological/oceanographic sensors
Satellite meteorology
Precise space tracking
Radio/infrared astronomy
Infrared sensors and phenomenology
UV sensors and middle atmosphere research
Image processing
VLBI/astrometry
Optical interferometry
Imaging spectrometry
Liquid crystal technology
Autonomous Systems
Algorithms for control of autonomous systems
Cognitive robotics
Human-robot interaction
Perception hardware and algorithms
High-level reasoning algorithms
Machine learning and adaptive algorithms
Sensors for autonomous systems
Power and energy for autonomous systems
Networking and communications for mobile systems
Swarm behaviors
Test and evaluation of autonomous systems
Computer Science and Articial
Intelligence
Standard computer hardware, development
environments, operating systems, and run-time
support software
Methods of specifying, developing, documenting,
and maintaining software
Human-computer interaction
Intelligent systems for resource allocation, signal
identication, operational planning, target
classication, and robotics
Parallel scientic libraries
Algorithms for massively parallel systems
Digital progressive HDTV for scientic visualization
Adaptive systems: software and devices
Advanced computer networking
Simulation management software for networked
high performance computers
Interactive 3D visualization tools and applications
Real-time parallel processing
Scalable, parallel computing
Petaop computing, globally distributed le systems,
terabit-per-second networking
Directed Energy Technology
High-energy lasers
Laser propagation
Solid-state and ber lasers
High-power microwave sources
RAM accelerators
Pulse detonation engines
Charged-particle devices
Pulse power
DE eects
Electronic Electro-optical Device
Technology
Integrated optics
Radiation-hardened electronics
Nanotechnology
Microelectronics
Microwave and millimeter-wave technology
Hydrogen masers for GPS
Aperture syntheses
Electric eld coupling
Vacuum electronics
Focal plane arrays
Infrared sensors
Radiation eects and satellite survivability
Molecular engineering
Electronic Warfare
EW/C2W/IW systems and technology
COMINT/SIGINT technology
EW decision aids and planning/control systems
Intercept receivers, signal processing, and identication
systems
Passive direction nders
Decoys and oboard countermeasures (RF and IR)
Expendable autonomous vehicles/UAVs
Repeaters/jammers and EO/IR active countermeasures
and techniques
Platform signature measurement and management
Threat and EW systems computer modeling and
simulations
Visualization
Hardware-in-the-loop and yable ASM simulators
Missile warning infrared countermeasures
RF environment simulators
EO/IR multispectral/hyperspectral surveillance
Enhanced Maintainability, Reliability, and
Survivability Technology
Coatings
Friction/wear reduction
Water additives and cleaners
6
Fire safety
Laser hardening
Satellite survivability
Corrosion control
Automation for reduced manning
Radiation eects
Mobility fuels
Chemical and biological sensors
Environmental compliance
Environmental Effects on Naval Systems
Meteorological eects on communications
Meteorological eects on weapons, sensors, and
platform performance
Air quality in conned spaces
Electromagnetic background in space
Solar and geomagnetic activity
Magnetospheric and space plasma eects
Nonlinear science
Ionospheric behavior
Oceanographic eects on weapons, sensors, and
platforms
EM, EO, and acoustic system performance/
optimization
Environmental hazard assessment
Contaminant transport
Biosensors
Microbially induced corrosion
Imaging Research/Systems
Remotely sensed signatures analysis
Real-time signal and image processing algorithms/
systems
Image data compression methodology
Image fusion
Automatic target recognition
Scene/sensor noise characterization
Image enhancement/noise reduction
Scene classication techniques
Radar and laser imaging systems studies
Coherent/incoherent imaging sensor exploitation
Remote sensing simulation
Hyperspectral imaging
Microwave polarimetry
Information Technology
High-performance, all-optical networking
Antijam communication links
Next-generation, signaled optical network
architectures
Integrated voice and data
Information security (INFOSEC)
Voice processing
High performance computing
High performance communications
Requirements specication and analysis
Real-time computing
Wireless mobile networking
Behavior detection
Machine learning
Information ltering and fusion
Integrated internet protocol (IP) and asynchronous
transfer mode (ATM) multicasting
Reliable multicasting
Wireless networking with directional antennas
Sensor networking
Communication network simulation
Bandwidth management (quality of service)
High assurance software
Distributed network-based battle management
High performance computing supporting uniform
and nonuniform memory access with single and
multithreaded architectures
Distributed, secure, and mobile information
infrastructures
Simulation-based virtual reality
High-end, progressive HDTV imagery processing
and distribution
Defensive information warfare
Virtual reality/mobile augmented reality
3D multimodal interaction
Model integration (physical, environmental,
biological, psychological) for simulation
Command decision support
Data fusion
Marine Geosciences
Marine seismology, including propagation and
noise measurement
Geoacoustic modeling in support of acoustic
performance prediction
Geomagnetic modeling in support of nonacoustic
system performance prediction
Static potential eld measurement and analysis
(gravity and magnetic) in support of navigation
and geodesy
Geotechnology/sediment dynamics aecting mine
warfare and mine countermeasures
Foreshore sediment transport
Geospatial information, including advanced
seaoor mapping, imaging systems, and
innovative object-oriented digital mapping
models, techniques, and databases
Materials
Superconductivity
Magnetism
Biological materials
Materials processing
Advanced alloy systems
Solid free-form fabrication
Environmental eects
Energetic materials/explosives
Aerogels and underdense materials
Nanoscale materials
Nondestructive evaluation
Ceramics and composite materials
Thin lm synthesis and processing
Electronic and piezoelectric ceramics
Thermoelectric materials
7
Active materials and smart structures
Computational material science
Paints and coatings
Flammability
Chemical/biological materials
Spintronic materials and half metals
Biomimetic materials
Multifunctional materials
Power and energy
Synthetic biology
Meteorology
Global, theater, tactical-scale, and on-scene
numerical weather prediction
Data assimilation and physical initialization
Atmospheric predictability and adaptive
observations
Adjoint applications
Marine boundary layer characterization
Air/sea interaction; process studies
Coupled air/ocean/land model development
Tropical cyclone forecasting aids
Satellite data interpretation and application
Aerosol transport modeling
Meteorological applications of articial
intelligence and expert systems
On-scene environmental support system
development/nowcasting
Tactical database development and
applications
Meteorological tactical decision aids
Meteorological simulation and visualization
Ocean Acoustics
Underwater acoustics, including propagation,
noise, and reverberation
Fiber-optic acoustic sensor development
Deep ocean and shallow water environmental
acoustic characterization
Undersea warfare system performance
modeling, unifying the environment,
acoustics, and signal processing
Target reection, diraction, and scattering
Acoustic simulations
Tactical decision aids
Sonar transducers
Dynamic ocean acoustic modeling
Underwater acoustic communications
Oceanography
Oceanographic instrumentation
Open ocean, littoral, polar, and nearshore
oceanographic forecasting
Shallow water oceanographic eects on
operations
Modeling, sensors, and data fusion
Bio-optical and ne-scale physical processes
Oceanographic simulation and visualization
Coastal scene generation
Waves, tides, and surf prediction
Coupled model development
Sea-ice modeling
Coastal ocean characterization
Oceanographic decision aids
Global, theater, and tactical-scale modeling
Remote sensing of oceanographic parameters
Satellite image analysis
Space Systems and Technology
Space systems architectures and requirements
Advanced payloads and optical communications
Controllers, processors, signal processing, and VLSI
Precision orbit estimation
Onboard autonomous navigation
Satellite ground station engineering and
implementation
Tactical communication systems
Spacecraft antenna systems
Launch and on-orbit support
Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) technology
Atomic time/frequency standards/instrumentation
Passive and active ranging techniques
Design, fabrication, and testing of spacecraft and
hardware
Structural and thermal analysis
Attitude determination and control systems
Reaction control
Propulsion systems
Navigation, tracking, and orbit dynamics
Spaceborne robotics applications
Surveillance and Sensor Technology
Point defense technology
Imaging radars
Surveillance radars
Multifunction RF systems
High-power millimeter-wave radar
Target classication/identication
Airborne geophysical studies
Fiber-optic sensor technology
Undersea target detection/classication
EO/IR multispectral/hyperspectral detection and
classication
Sonar transducers
Electromagnetic sensors, gamma ray to RF
wavelengths
SQUID for magnetic eld detection
Low observables technology
Ultrawideband technology
Interferometric imagery
Microsensor system
Digital framing reconnaissance canvas
Biologically based sensors
Digital radars and processors
Undersea Technology
Autonomous vehicles
Bathymetric technology
Anechoic coatings
Acoustic holography
Unmanned undersea vehicle dynamics
Weapons launch
8
Major Research Capabilities and Facilities
Institute for Nanoscience (Code 1100)
Clean room (5000 sq ft), quiet (4000 sq ft), and ultra-
quiet (1000 sq ft) laboratories
35 dB and 25 dB acoustically isolated zones
20ºC ± 0.5ºC and 0.1ºC controlled temperature zones
Vibration isolation
Vertical (mm, pp) <0.1 @ 70–500 Hz
Horizontal (mm, pp) <0.1 @ 70–500 Hz
Clean electrical power, free from SCR spikes and
other interferences, and < ±10% voltage change
<0.5 mG at 60 Hz EMI
45 ± 5% relative humidity
Class 100 clean room
Source of water meeting ASTM D5127 spec. Type E1.2
Clean Room Major Equipment
Monitoring system (toxic gas, hazmat, temperature)
Laminar ow wet benches for localized Class 1/10
ambient in clean room
Air purication unit to remove local organic
contamination
DI water system
Wire bonder
Two electron-beam writers
Two scanning electron microscopes
Atomic force microscope
Metallurgical optical microscopes
3D optical proler
Mask aligners (2, 1, and 0.2 µm)
Electron beam evaporation systems
Low pressure chemical vapor deposition
(LPCVD) system
Magnetron sputter deposition system
Reactive ion etching systems
Dual-beam focused ion beam workstation
Optical pattern generating system
Laser micromachining system
Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition
(PECVD) system
Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition system
Chlorine reactive ion etching system
Other Major Equipment
Transmission electron microscope
UHV multi-tip scanning tunneling microscope/
nanomanipulator
Laboratory for Autonomous Systems Research
(Code 1700)
Prototyping High Bay: (150 ft by 75 ft by 30 ft), contains
real-time motion capture system, directional environ-
mental sounds, GPS repeater and simulator
Four human-systems interaction labs contain eye track-
ers and multiuser, multitouch monitors
Littoral High Bay with 45 ft by 25 ft by 5.5 ft deep pool
with 16-channel wave generator and slope that allows
simulation of littoral environments; multiple sediment
tanks (from 5 ft to 16 ft); GPS repeater and simulator;
portable tank 4 ft by 36 ft
Desert High Bay with a 40 ft by 14 ft area of sand 2.5
ft deep, and 18 ft high rock walls; high speed fans
and variable lighting
Tropical High Bay, a 60 ft by 40 ft greenhouse, con-
tains a re-creation of a southeast Asian rain forest
with native plants; nominal 80 degrees temperature
and 80% humidity; can generate rain events up to
6 in. per hour; Rainforest contains waterfall, stream,
and pond
Outdoor test range is a 1/3 acre highland forest with
a waterfall, stream and pond, and terrain of dier-
ing diculty including large bolder structures and
earthen berms
Sensor lab contains environmental chambers (small
and walk-in) with maximum temperature range of
−50°F to 375°F, relative humidity from 10% to 95%
and for smaller chamber, barometric pressure of
−9000 feet to 100,000 feet; lab also contains various
fume hoods, biosafety cabinet, anechoic chamber,
vapor generators, and other specialized equipment
Power and energy lab contains specialized equipment
including a battery dry room, glove box, isolation
room, and fume hoods
Research and Development Services Divi-
sion (Code 3500)
Military construction
Research support engineering
Planning
Full range of facility contracting, including construc-
tion, architect/engineering services, facilities
support, and reserved parking
Transportation
Telephone services
Maintenance and repair of buildings, grounds, and
communication and alarm systems
Shops for machining, sheet metal, carpentry, and
welding
Safety and Occupational Health/Industrial Hygiene
Explosives safety
Health physics
Environmental Program
Radar Division (Code 5300)
Shipboard radar research and development test beds:
FlexDAR demonstration system (every element
digital beamforming)
AN/SPS-49-A(V)1
S-Band radar wavefrom development testbed
Airborne research radar facility, AN/APS-137D(V)5
High Power 94 GHz radar system
Ultra-high resolution radar (Microwave Microscope)
Radar signature calculation facility
Electromagnetic numerical computational facility
Compact range and neareld antenna measurement
laboratory
9
Electronic Protection (EP) and adaptive pulse compres-
sion (APC) testbed
Electronics and mechanical computer aided design
facility
High Frequency (HF) Multiple-Input Multiple-Output
(MIMO) testbed
HF Surface Wave Radar Testbed
Microwave and RF instrumentation laboratories
Information Technology Division
(Code 5500)
Extended Spectrum Experimentation Laboratory
Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory
Immersive Simulation Laboratory
Warghter Human-Systems Integration Laboratory
Audio Laboratory
Mobile and Dynamic Network Laboratory
Integrated Communications Technology Test Lab
General Electronics Environmental Test Facility
Key Management Laboratory
Crypto Technology Laboratory
Navy Cyber Defense Research Laboratory
Communications Security (COMSEC) Laboratory
Navy Shipboard Communications Testbed
Behavior Detection Laboratory
Virtual Reality Laboratory
Service Oriented Architecture Laboratory
Distributed Simulation Laboratory
Motion Imagery Laboratory
Laboratory for Large Data Research
Aliated Resource Center for High Performance Com-
puting
Ruth H. Hooker Research Library
Optical Sciences Division (Code 5600)
Optical probes laboratory to study viscoelastic, struc-
tural, and transport properties of molecular systems
Short-pulse excitation apparatus for kinetic mecha-
nisms investigations
IR laser facility for optical characterization of semicon-
ductors
Facilities for synthesis and characterization of optical
glass compositions and for the fabrication of optical
bers
Silica and IR uoride/chalcogenide ber fabrication
facilities
Environmental testing of ber sensors (acoustic,
magnetic, electric eld, etc.)
Laser diode pumped solid-state lasers
Mid-IR, low-phonon crystal growth facility
Infrared countermeasure techniques laboratory
Mobile, high-precision optical tracker
EO/IR technology/systems modeling and simulation
capabilities
Field-qualied EO/IR measurement devices
Focal plane array evaluation facility
Facilities for fabricating and testing integrated
optical devices
Panchromatic and multi- and hyperspectral digital im-
aging processing facilities
NRL P-3 aircraft sensor pallet
Airborne EO/IR and radar sensors
VNIR through SWIR hyperspectral systems
VNIR, MWIR, and LWIR high-resolution systems
Wideband SAR systems
RF and laser data links
High-speed, high-power photodetector characterization
Communication link characterization to >100 Gbps
RF phase noise, noise gure, and network analysis
Ultrahigh-speed A/O converters
Tactical Electronic Warfare Division
(Code 5700)
Visualization display room
Transportable step frequency radar
Vehicle development laboratory
Oboard test platform
Compact antenna range facility
Millimeter-Wave Antenna Range Facility
TEWD Mechanical Fabrication Shop
RFCM techniques development chamber facility
Low-power anechoic chamber
High-power microwave research facility
Electro-optics mobile laboratory
Infrared-electro-optical calibration and characterization
laboratory
Infrared missile simulator and simulator development
laboratory
Secure supercomputing facility
CBD/Tilghman Island IR eld evaluation facility
Ultrashort pulse laser eects research and analysis
laboratory
Central Target Simulator facility
Flying Electronic Warfare laboratory
High-power RF explosive laboratory
Classied material lay-up facility
Classied computing facilities
RF measurement laboratory
Wet chemistry laboratory
Ultra-near-eld test facility
RF and millimeter-wave laboratory
Optical laboratory
Paint room
Secure laboratories for classied projects
Laboratories for Computational Physics
and Fluid Dynamics (Code 6040)
1120-core x86 cluster
(3) 64-core SGI Altix systems
184-core x86 cluster
256-core SGI ICE
256-processor Opteron cluster
More than sixty SGI, Apple, and Intel workstations
Three-quarter-terabyte RAID disk storage systems
All computers and workstations have network
connections to NICENET and ATDnet allowing access
10
to the NRL CCS facilities (including the DoD HPC
resources) and many other computer resources both
internal and external to NRL
Chemistry Division (Code 6100)
Synthesis/processing facilities
Paint formulation and coating
Functional polymers/elastomers/composites
Nanotubes/Nanobers
Surface modication
Thin lm deposition/etching with in situ control
Marine Corrosion Facility (at Key West, FL)
Fire/Damage Control Test Facility (at Mobile, AL)
Wave pool (at Mobile, AL)
Large and small boat test platforms (at Mobile, AL)
Characterization facilities
General-purpose chemical analysis/trace analysis
Surface diagnostics
Nanometer scale composition/structure/properties
Magnetic resonance NDI
Tribology
Polymer structure/function/dynamics
Special-purpose capability
Environmental monitoring/remediation
Combustion and re research
Alternate and petroleum-derived fuels
Trace explosive detection test beds
Trace vapor generation and detection test beds
Simulation/modeling
Synchrotron radiation beam lines (at NSLS,
Brookhaven, NY)
Pressurized test chambers (small, medium, large)
Materials Science and Technology
Division (Code 6300)
Synthesis and Processing
Hot and cold isostatic presses
Isothermal heat treating facility
Vacuum arc melting facility
Rapid Solidication System
Composites processing autoclave
200 keV ion-implantation facility
Class 1000 clean room
Metallic lm deposition systems
Laser direct write system
Excimer laser lm deposition facility
Dip pen lithography
3D-printing of polymers
Polymer synthesis and characterization
Polymer extruder
Channel reactors for fuels synthesis
Tape caster
Laser cutting facility
Biomechanical surrogate fabrication facility
Physical Property Characterization
Conductive AFM
Magnetometry
Cryogenic facilities
High-eld magnets
High-resolution analytical scanning transmission
electron microscope (STEM)
High-energy dispersive X-ray analytical system
Electron microprobe, SEM, SAM, and STEM systems
Quantitative metallography
Accelerator mass spectrometry facility
Thermal analysis characterization suite (TGA/DSC/
DMA/DEA/rheometer)
Dielectric characterization facility
Microwave device test facility
Bomen infrared spectrometer facility
Diuse light scattering facility
Femtosecond laser facility
Surface characterization facility
Gas chromatography
X-ray computed microtomography
X-ray diractometers
Powder characterization
Contact angle and surface tension analyzer
Mechanical Property Characterization
Robotic multiaxial loading system
Stress corrosion cracking measurement systems
Computer-aided experimental stress analysis
2D and 3D strain imaging and measurement
Material drop tower test facility
Helmet drop tower test facility
Shock tube
Gas gun
Portable, high speed data acquisition system
Imaging, Modeling, and Simulation
High speed video cameras
Infrared camera
Quantum cascade lasers
Live biological cell confocal imaging and manipula-
tion system
Live biological cell mechanical loading system
High performance computer clusters
Plasma Physics Division (Code 6700)
Mercury, 6 MV, 360 kA, magnetically insulated
inductive voltage adder
Gamble II, 1 MV, 1 MA pulsed power generator
HAWK, 1 MA inductive storage facility
Table-Top Terawatt (T3) laser system
Table-Top Ti: Sapphire Femtosecond Laser (TFL) sys-
tems (10 Hz and 1 kHz)
NIKE krypton uoride laser facility
Space Physics Simulation Chamber
Plasma Applications Laboratory
Microwave facility for processing of advanced
materials (2.45, 35, 83, and 60–120 GHz)
ELECTRA, test bed for high-rep 5 Hz KrF laser
Railgun Materials Testing Facility
Directed Energy Physics Facility
SWOrRD laser facility
Electronics Science and Technology Division
(Code 6800)
Solar Cell Characterization Laboratory
11
Optoelectronic Scanning Electron Characterization
Facility
Infrared Sensor Characterization Laboratory
Ultrafast Laser Facility
Millimeter-Wave Vacuum Electronics Fabrication
Facility
Ultraviolet Photolithography Laboratory for Sub-milli-
meter-Wave Devices
Compound Semiconductor Processing Facility
Atomic Layer Deposition System
Epicenter
Laboratory for Advanced Materials Synthesis
Advanced Silicon Carbide Epitaxial Research
Laboratory
High Pressure Laboratory
Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engi-
neering (Code 6900)
Optical equipment
Confocal microscope
Raman microscope
UV-visible absorption spectrophotometers
Transmission electron microscope
Scanning electron microscope
Microscope/atomic force microscope
Nanosight (nanoparticle tracking analysis)
Analytical instruments
Gas chromatography mass spectrometer
HPLC
LC/MS/MS system
FluroMax-3 spectrouorometer
Titration workstation
General facilities
X-ray scattering
Cold room for storage and preparation
High-speed and microanalytical ultracentrifuges
Inert atmosphere dry box
NMR
FTIR
Ellipsometer
Dynamic mechanical analyzer
Dierential scanning calorimeter
Circular dichroism
Minimill injection mold machine
Multi RF centrifuge
Perkin Elmer BioChip Arrayer I
Freeze-dry system
Aymetrix Gene Chip system
Surface plasmon resonance (SPR)
Isothermal calorimeter
High-resolution 3D Printer
Acoustics Division (Code 7100)
Laboratory Measurements
One-million-gallon, vibration-isolated underwater
acoustic holographic/3D laser vibrometer facility
for studying structural acoustic phenomena
Large, sandy-bottom, acoustic holographic pool facil-
ity for investigating echo characteristics of under-
water buried/near-bottom targets and sediment
acoustics
In-air structural acoustics facility with high spatial
density near-eld acoustic holography and 3D
laser vibrometry for diagnosing large structures,
including aircraft interiors and rocket payload
fairings
Salt water acoustic tank (20 ft by 20 ft by 10 ft deep)
with environmental control and substantial opti-
cal access for studying the acoustics of bubbly
media, acoustic metamaterials, and laser induced
sound
Micro-Nanostructure Dynamics Laboratory to study
the structural dynamics and performance of high
Q oscillators and other micromechanical systems
using laser Doppler vibrometers, super resolution
neareld scanning optical microscope, and low
temperature calorimeter
Model Fabrication Laboratory to fabricate rough
topographical surfaces in various materials for
acoustic scattering and propagation studies and
measurements.
Sonomagnetic Laboratory with doubly insulated
Faraday cage for conducting experiments to
measure weak electromagnetic elds generated by
mechanical/acoustic vibrations of a conducting
medium in an arbitrary magnetic eld
Seagoing Assets
Acoustic arrays (towed/moored/suspended)
64-channel broadband source–receiver array with
time-reversal mirror functionality over a frequen-
cy band of 500 to 3500 Hz
High-powered sound sources and source arrays
Autonomous acoustic sources
Acoustic communications array and data
acquisition buoy
Portable, ocean-deployable synthetic aperture
acoustic measurement system (100-meter rail
with precise positioning)
Containerized, seagoing multichannel data acquisi-
tion system
High-speed, maneuverable towed body with
MK-50 and synthetic aperture sonars to measure
high frequency scattering and coherence
Remote Sensing Division (Code 7200)
WindSAT satellite instrument (joint with Code 8000)
WindSat processing facility
Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO)
International Space Station (ISS) instrument
Ground-based water vapor millimeter-wave
spectrometer (WVMS)
SAR processing facility
SCI processing facility
SEALAB
SAP facility
Hyperspectral imaging, sensors, and processing
Optical remote sensing calibration lab/facility
Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI)
12
NRL/NRAO 74 MHz Very Large Array long-wave
radio receiver system
Free surface hydrodynamics laboratory (including
a 10 m wave tank)
In-water lidar facility
Aerosol and eld measurement facility
NRL RP-3A aircraft sensors
Airborne polarimetric microwave imaging
radiometer (APMIR)
Millimeter-wave imager
Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)
Flight-level meteorological sensors
Visible/near infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral
imaging systems
VNIR polarimetric multispectral imager
Short-wave IR (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging
systems
Midwave infrared (MWIR) indium antimonide
(InSb) imaging system
Long-wave infrared (LWIR) quantum well IR
photodetector (QWIP) imaging system
Oceanography Division (Code 7300)
Towed sensor and advanced microstructure proler
systems for studying upper ocean ne and micro-
structure
Integrated absorption cavity and optical proler sys-
tems for studying ocean optical characteristics
Self-contained bottom-mounted upward-looking
acoustic prolers for measuring ocean variability
Acoustic Doppler proler for determining ocean
currents while under way
Remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV)
Bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler prolers
Towed hyperspectral optical array
SCI processing facility
Satellite receiving stations for AVHRR, MODIS,
DMSP, and JPASS ocean color processing facility
Environmental scanning electron microscope, confo-
cal laser scanning microscope, and Inspect S low
vacuum scanning electron microscope for detailed
studies of biocorrosion in naval materials
Real-time Ocean Observations and Forecast Facility
for monitoring and tracking of ocean physical and
bio-optical conditions
Slocum Electric Gliders for performing wide-area
ocean surveys of temperature, salinity, and optical
characteristics
SCANFISH MKII, a towed undulating vehicle sys-
tem, designed for collecting 3D TS prole data of
the water column
Bottom-mounted Shallow water Environmental Pro-
ler in Trawl-safe Real-time conguration (SEPTR)
for measuring temperature, salinity, and optical
parameters in addition to current proles and pres-
sure
Bio-optical Physical Pop-up Environmental Recon-
naisance System to measure bio-optical and physi-
cal properties of the water column
Cytosense Scanning Flow Cytometer to identify indi-
vidual phytoplankton and zooplankton for ecologi-
cal model development and validation
Shipboard Lidar Optical Proler to measure opti-
cal properties of the water
Raleigh Bernard Convective Tank and a Hybrid
Underwater Camera for providing object detec-
tion and identication in extremely turbid under-
water environments
Collaborative system for propagating environment er-
ror distributions through disparate dynamical sys-
tems
Marine Geosciences Division (Code 7400)
Airborne gravimetry, magnetics, and topographic
measurements suite coupled with dierential GPS
yielding position accuracies of <1.0 meter
100 and 500 kHz sidescan sonar with 2–12 kHz chirp
proler and Cs magnetometer for seaoor charac-
terization/imaging and shallow subbottom
proling
Deep-towed acoustic geophysical system operating
at 220–1000 Hz characterizes subseaoor structure
including gas clathrate accumulations and dissocia-
tion of methane hydrates
Acoustic seaoor classication system operating at
8–50 kHz provides underway, real-time prediction
of sediment type and physical properties
Seaoor probes for measuring sediment pore water
pressures, permeability, electrical resistivity, acous-
tic compressional and shear wave velocities and
attenuations, and dynamic penetration resistance
300 kV transmission electron microscope with envi-
ronmental cell for study of sediment fabric, espe-
cially impact of organic matter
Map data formatting facility compresses map infor-
mation onto CD-ROM media for masters for use in
aircraft digital moving map systems
Comprehensive geotechnical and geoacoustics labora-
tory capability
Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) bathymetry system
Ocean bottom magnetometer system
3D, multispectral, subbottom swath imaging system
Ocean bottom seismographs (OBS)
In situ sediment acoustic measurement system (IS-
SAMS)
Instrumented mine shapes to measure hydrodynam-
ics of free-fall in the water column, dynamics of
deceleration in seaoor sediments, and rates and
depths of scour burial
Hydrothermal plume imaging data acquisition and
analysis system
Integrated digital databases analysis and
display system for bathymetric, meteorological,
oceanographic, geoacoustic, and acoustic data
Stereometric video image processing system for use in
foreshore morphology measurement
Sediment gas-content sampler
13
Acoustic tomographic probes for surf zone sands and
gassy muds
Computed tomography (CT) system and real-time radi-
ography unit with a 0–225 keV @ 0–1 mA micro-focus
X-ray tube and a 225 mm image intensier
Patented Geospatial Information Data Base (GIDB™) for
rapidly accessing disparate geospatial content on the
Internet. http://dmap.nrlssc.navy.mil
Human-centered display design through the application
of human factors principles in the design of geospatial
displays (e.g., analysis of clutter in electronic displays)
GPS-based survey vehicles and equipment to measure
foreshore and nearshore bathymetry (camera towers,
jet ski, and push cart)
Geospatial lab for rapid 2D and 3D visualization, analy-
sis, and prototyping
Small oscillatory ow tunnel to observe sediment dy-
namics under forcing from waves and currents
Tomographic particle image velocimetry system for
three-dimensional volumetric velocity measurements
of uid ow
Marine Meteorology Division (Code 7500)
The USGODAE Data Server (Global Ocean Data Assimi-
lation Experiment) for collection and broad distribu-
tion of near-real-time METOC data and higher-level
products from Navy, DoD, and other providers to the
global ocean and atmospheric research community
A Cray Xe-6 Supercomputer for numerical weather
prediction systems development provided by the
DoD High Speed Computing Modernization Program
(HPCMP) through a Dedicated HPC Project Invest-
ment (DHPI) grant
Bergen Data Center with an extensive disk le stor-
age capacity and research data tape backup/archival
capability
Data visualization center for developing shipboard
brieng tools, displaying individual and merged ob-
servations and model output, and integrating meteo-
rological parameters into tactical simulations
Classied and unclassied radar and satellite data pro-
cessing facility
Two Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Char-
acterization Observatories (MAARCO) used to collect
atmospheric data around the world
Technical research library
New Marine Meteorology Center for the Meteorological
Applications Development Branch, Secure IT Facility,
Division Administrative support, and Front Oce
Management Team
Space Science Division (Code 7600)
Development and test facilities for satellite, sounding
rocket, and balloon instruments, to perform solar
terrestrial, astrophysical, astronomical, solar, upper/
middle atmospheric, and space environment sensing
Solar Coronagraph Optical Test Chamber (SCOTCH)
Vacuum Ultraviolet Calibration Facility (VUCF)
Gamma Ray Imaging Laboratory (GRIL)
Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility
Neutron Characterization Laboratory
Semiautomatic Probe Station
Solar Irradiance Calibration Facility
Suborbital Instrument Assembly and Test Facility
SuperMISTI recongurable and adaptable stand
o gamma ray and neutron radiation detection
systems for detection of special nuclear material
and other radiological/nuclear Weapons of Mass
Destruction
Very high angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer
(VERIS) sounding rocket instrument
Helium Resonance Scattering in the Corona and
Heliospheric (HERSCHEL) sounding rocket instru-
ment
Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection
System (RAIDS) International Space Station instru-
ment
Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution
Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) satellite instru-
ment
Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)
satellite instrument
Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO)
satellite instrument
Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric
Investigation (SECCHI) satellite instrument suite
Solar Orbiter Heliospheric Imager (SoloHI) satellite
instrument
Wide-eld Imager (WISPR) satellite instrument
Compact Coronograph (CCOR) satellite instrument
Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) satel-
lite instrument
Winds Ions Neutrals Composition Suite (WINCS)
small satellite instrument suite
Extensive computer-assisted data manipulation,
interpretive, and theoretical capabilities for space
science instrumentation operations, data imaging,
and modeling
SECCHI Payload Operations Center (POC)
Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly
GLAST) Science Analysis Center (SAC)
SoftWare for Optimization of Radiation Detectors
(SWORD)
Mountain Wave Forecast Model (MWFM)
Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter Radar
empirical atmospheric model (NRLMSISE)
Horizontal Wind Model (HWM)
Ground to Space empirical atmospheric model
(G2S)
Navy Gloval Environmental Model (NAVGEM)
Integrating the Sun-Earth System for the Opera-
tional Environment (ISES-OE)
Space Systems Development
Department (Code 8100)
Payload test facility and processor development
laboratory
14
Laser communications and electro-optics
laboratories
Tactical Technology Development Laboratory
(TTDL)
Precision oscillator (clock) test facility
RF payload development laboratory with anechoic
chamber
Precision high-frequency RF compact range anecho-
ic chamber facility
Transportable ground station development, assem-
bly, and test facility
Multiplatform FPGA/ASIC/VLSI development
laboratory
Satellite telemetry, tracking, and satellite control at
Blossom Point, MD
L/C/S/X-band xed antenna resources
Connectivity to the Air Force Satellite Control
Network (AFSCN)
Pomonkey eld site: large antenna, space communi-
cations, and research facility
Midway Research Center space communications
and research facility
Optical telescope facility
Spacecraft Engineering Department
(Code 8200)
Chambers:
Thermal-vacuum
Acoustic reverberation
Large, tapered horn, RF anechoic chamber
EMI/EMC testing chamber
Facilities:
Spacecraft high-reliability electronic and electrical
rework facility
Spacecraft electronic systems integration and test
facility
Radio frequency (RF) system development facility
RF microcircuit fabrication clean room facility
Large tapered horn RF anechoic chamber facility
Frequency sources laboratory
Shock and vibration test
Clean rooms (multiple classes and sizes)
Spacecraft fabrication and assembly
Fuels testing
Autoclave
Space robotics laboratory
Proximity operations testbed
CAD/CAM
Propulsion system welding
Static loads test
Star tracker characterization
Spacecraft spin balance
Modal analysis
Computational astrodynamic simulation and
visualization
15
1Per DON Facilities Asset Data System standard cost factors.
2NRL Accountable Property Acquisition Costs
*See maps in the General Information section (page 131).
NRL Sites and Facilities
SITE
ACREAGE
EASEMENT/
LICENSE-
PERMIT
BUILDINGS/
STRUCTURES
LAND
OWNED/LEASED
District of Columbia
NRL and
Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling*
Virginia
Midway Research Center
Quantico*
Maryland
NRL Scientific Development
Squadron One (VXS-1), NAS
Patuxent River*
Chesapeake Bay Section
and Dock Facility
Chesapeake Beach*
Multiple Research Site
Tilghman Island*
Free Space Antenna Range
Pomonkey*
Blossom Point Satellite Tracking
and Command Station
Blossom Point*
Florida
Marine Corrosion Facility
Key West
California
NRL Monterey
Monterey*
Mississippi
Stennis Space Center
Bay St. Louis*
Alabama
Ex-USS Shadwell (LSD-15)
Mobile Bay
131/0
162/0
Tenant
168/0
3/0
141/0
0/0
Tenant
Tenant
Tenant
Tenant
93/33
7/11
44/73
3/3
11/10
21/23
0/10.13
0/0
.6/.02
0/0
0/0
0/265
Decommissioned 457-ft vessel used for fire research
PROPERTY
Land: 605 acres Buildings: Replacement Costs:
RDT&E 3,138,104 ft2 Buildings Plant Replacement
Administrative 276,246 ft2 Value (PRV)1 $1,184.7 millio
n
Other 280,190 ft
2
Equipment Costs
2
$523.7 million
17
ExEcutivE DirEctoratE
18
*Acting
+Additional Duty
Key Personnel
Name Title Code
CAPT A.J Ferrari, USN Commanding Ocer 1000
Dr. J.A. Montgomery Director of Research 1001
Mr. D.J. DeYoung Executive Assistant to the Director of Research 1001.1
Ms. C.L. Downing Head, Strategic Workforce Planning 1001.2
Dr. G. Sandhoo Executive Assistant for Technology Deployment/STILO 1001.3
Dr. L. Slater NRL Historian 1001.15
CAPT K. Szczublewski, USN Chief Sta Ocer/Inspector General 1002/1000.1
Ms. B.L. Gibson* Command Management Review 1000.12
Dr. R.C. Manak Head, Oce of Technology Transfer 1004
Ms. M.E. Dixon Head, Oce of Program Administration and
Policy Development 1006
Mr. J.N. McCutcheon Head, Oce of Counsel 1008
Mr. R.L. Thompson Head, Public Aairs Oce 1030
Dr. E.S. Snow+ Director, Institute for Nanoscience 1100
Mr. T. Brewer Head, Command Support Division 1200
CDR D.A. Ursini, USN* Head, Military Support Division 1400
CDR J. Plaisance, USN Commanding Ocer, Scientic Development
Squadron One (VXS-1) 1600
Mr. A.C. Schultz+ Director, Laboratory for Autonomous Systems Research 1700
Ms. C.L. Downing* Director, Human Resources Oce 1800
Ms. L.L. Hill Deputy Equal Employment Opportunity Ocer 1830
Vacant Deputy for Small Business 3005
Mr. K.J. Pawlovich Head, Safety Branch 3540
19
EXECUTIVE DIRECTORATE
Code 1000 and Code 1001
The Commanding Ocer (Code 1000) and the Director
of Research (Code 1001) share executive responsibility for
the management of the Naval Research Laboratory. In ac-
cordance with Navy requirements, the Commanding Ocer
is responsible for the overall management of the Laboratory
and exercises the usual functions of command including
compliance with legal and regulatory requirements, liaison
with other military activities, and the general supervision of
the quality, timeliness, and eectiveness of the technical work
and of the support services.
The Commanding Ocer delegates line authority and
assigns responsibility to the Director of Research for the
Laboratory’s technical program, its planning, conduct, and
stang; evaluation of the technical competence of personnel;
liaison with the scientic community; selection of subordi-
nate technical personnel; exchange of technical information;
and the eective execution of the NRL mission.
Within the limits of Navy regulations, the Command-
ing Ocer and the Director of Research share authority and
responsibility for the internal management of the Laboratory.
The Commanding Ocer retains all authority and responsi-
bility specically assigned to him by higher authority.
The mission of the Laboratory is carried out by three
science and technology directorates and the Naval Center
for Space Technology, supported by the Business Opera-
tions Directorate and the Executive Directorate. In addition,
the Laboratory’s operating stas provide assistance in their
special elds to the Commanding Ocer and to the Director
of Research. The operating stas are listed on the following
pages of this publication.
20
Captain Mark Bruington is the 38th Commanding Ocer
of the Naval Research Laboratory, assuming command on
August 1, 2014. As NRL’s Commanding Ocer, he directs the
activities of more than 2,500 scientists, engineers, and support
personnel in their mission to conduct leading-edge research
and provide new technological capabilities to the Navy and
Marine Corps. Prior to his assumption of command of NRL, he
was the Principal Director, Programs at the Defense Security
Cooperation Agency where he led a team charged with DoD
humanitarian assistance, building partnership capacity and
Foreign Military Training and Equipping U.S. partner nations.
Captain Bruington, a native of California, received his
commission through the Aviation Ocer Candidate School
program after graduating from San Francisco State University
with a B.S. in physics. He received his Wings of Gold at NAS
Beeville, Texas, in 1992 and is a graduate of the United States
Naval Test Pilot School, Class 117, in 2000. He also holds an
M.S. in systems engineering from Johns Hopkins University
and an M.S. in national resource strategy from the Industrial
College of the Armed Forces (ICAF).
His sea tours include an assignment in the A-6 Intruders
with VA-165, “The Boomers,” aboard USS Nimitz (CVN 68) in
support of Operation Southern Watch. Following the decom-
missioning of the A-6E, Captain Bruington transitioned to
the F-14 Tomcat. He next reported to VF-11, “The Red Rip-
pers,” aboard the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) for its maiden,
around-the-world cruise, again in support of Operation Southern Watch. Following the events of September 11th,
Captain Bruington joined VF-211, “The Fighting Checkmates,” again aboard USS John C. Stennis, in the initial
phases of Operation Enduring Freedom, where he led numerous strikes in support of coalition troops in Afghani-
stan. Following his Department Head tour in VF-211, Captain Bruington transitioned to the Aerospace Engineering
Duty Ocer community.
His shore tours include attendance at United States Naval Test Pilot School (USNTPS), and upon graduation, he
reported to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 23 (VX-23) as the squadron’s Safety Ocer and F-14 project ocer. At
VX-23 he worked on numerous F-14 and F/A-18 A-F projects including F-14 digital ight controls systems, enve-
lope expansion and LANTIRN pod integration. His next shore assignment was as the senior xed wing instruc-
tor at USNTPS where he led curriculum development and was integral in the introduction of the F/A-18 Hornet
out-of-control ight syllabus implemented at all F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Squadrons. He next spent three years
in the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter program oce as the Vehicle Systems Integrated Product Team (IPT)
lead. He was responsible for developing the F-35 A/B/C ight controls, propulsion integration, aircraft subsystems
and all aircrew systems. He led his IPT through three F-35 Preliminary Design Reviews (PDRs) and Critical Design
Reviews (CDRs), directly leading to the ight clearances and rst ights of the F-35A Conventional Take-O and
Landing (CTOL) and F-35B Short Take-O and Vertical Landing (STOVL) variants. Following this tour, he attended
ICAF where he earned distinguished graduate honors. Following his tour at ICAF, he was assigned as the “Deputy
CAG,” as part of the OPNAV N88 sta, responsible for development of requirements and budget submissions for
all Naval tactical aircraft, E-2/C-2, unmanned combat air systems and weapons programs across the Naval Aviation
Enterprise. Following his tour on the Navy sta, Captain Bruington next served as the Deputy Program Manager
for the F/A-18 E/F and EA-18G air vehicle and Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) F/A-18F programs as part of
Program Manager AIR (PMA) 265 in NAS Patuxent River, Maryland. He led a diverse team of over 1,000 govern-
ment and industry professionals to execute a $2.7B annual budget, delivering 40-plus Super Hornets and Growlers
to the eet each year. He was also instrumental in the nal delivery of all 24 F/A-18F aircraft to the RAAF.
Captain Bruington has own more than 70 combat missions above Iraq and Afghanistan, own 41 dierent
types of aircraft while amassing 3,200 ight hours and over 500 carrier-arrested landings. His decorations include
the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, four Air Medals (Strike/Flight), and numerous
personal, campaign, and unit level awards.
Commanding Ofcer
21
Dr. John A. Montgomery joined the Naval Research
Laboratory in 1968 as a research physicist in the
Advanced Techniques Branch of the Electronic Warfare
Division, where he conducted research on a wide range of
Electronic Warfare (EW) topics. In 1980, he was selected to
head the O-Board Countermeasures Branch. In May 1985,
he was appointed to the Senior Executive Service and was
selected as Superintendent of the Tactical Electronic Warfare
Division. He has been responsible for numerous systems that
have been developed/approved for operational use by the
Navy and other services. He has had great impact through
the application of advanced technologies to solve unusual
or severe operational deciencies noted during world cri-
ses, most recently in Afghanistan, Iraq, and for Homeland
Defense and in the Pacic theater. Dr. Montgomery has
accumulated 45 years of civilian service to-date at the Naval
Research Laboratory.
Dr. Montgomery received the Department of Defense
Distinguished Civilian Service Award in 2001. He was recog-
nized by the Department of the Navy Distinguished Civilian
Service Award in 1999 and by the Department of the Navy
Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1986. As a member
of the Senior Executive Service, he received the Presidential
Rank Award of Distinguished Executive in 1991 and again in
2002, and the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive in 1988, 1999 and again in 2007. He also received
the 1997 Dr. Arthur E. Bisson Prize for Naval Technology Achievement, awarded by the Chief of Naval Research in
1998. Further, he has received the Association of Old Crows (Electronic Defense Association) Joint Services Award
in 1993. He was an NRL Edison Scholar, and is a member of Sigma Xi. He served as the U.S. National Leader of The
Technical Cooperation Program’s multinational Group on Electronic Warfare from 1987 to 2002, and served as its
Executive Chairman. In 2006, Dr. Montgomery received the Laboratory Director of the Year award from the Federal
Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer, and in 2011, he received the Roger W. Jones Award for Executive
Leadership from American University’s School of Public Aairs. In 2013, he was elected to membership in the Na-
tional Academy of Engineering.
Dr. Montgomery received his bachelor’s of science degree in physics from North Texas State University in 1967
and his master’s degree, also in physics, in 1969. He received his PhD in physics from the Catholic University of
America in 1982. As Director of Research at the Naval Research Laboratory, Dr. Montgomery oversees research and
development programs with expenditures of approximately $1.2 billion per year.
Director of Research
22
The Executive Council consists of executive, management, and administrative
personnel. Executive Council members include the following:
Commanding Ocer, Chairperson
Director of Research
Executive Assistant to the Director of Research
Associate Directors of Research
Chief Sta Ocer
Director, Naval Center for Space Technology
Associate Director, Naval Center for Space Technology
Heads of Divisions
Director, Laboratories for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics
Director, Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering
Director, Human Resources Oce
Public Aairs Ocer
Deputy Equal Employment Opportunity Ocer
Administrative Resources Manager
Head, Oce of Program Administration and Policy Development
Safety Ocer
Head, Oce of Counsel
Head, Oce of Technology Transfer
Head, Management Information Systems Sta
Head, Oce of Research Support Services
Representative, Administrative Advisory Council
Director, Institute for Nanoscience
Director, Laboratory for Autonomous Systems Research
Executive Council
23
The Research Advisory Committee advises the Commanding Ocer and the Director of Research on
scientic programs and the administration of the Laboratory. The committee assists in planning the long-
range scientic program, coordinating the scientic work, reviewing the budget, accepting or modifying
problems, considering personnel actions, and initiating such studies as may be necessary or desirable. The
membership consists of the following:
Director of Research, Chairperson
Commanding Ocer
Associate Directors of Research
Director, Naval Center for Space Technology
Chief Sta Ocer (Observer)
Research Advisory Committee
24
Deputy Equal Employment Opportunity Ofcer
Code 1830
The Deputy Equal Employment Opportunity Ocer (DEEOO) is the
EEO program manager and the advisor to the Commanding Ocer on all EEO
matters. The DEEOO manages the discrimination complaint and reasonable ac-
commodation processes and directs the Laboratory’s armative action plans and
special emphasis programs (Federal Women’s, Hispanic Employment, African
American Employment, Asian-Pacic Islanders, American Indian Employment,
Individuals with Disabilities, including Disabled Veterans). The DEEOO recruits
quality candidates for those areas when underrepresentation exists. Duties also
include reviewing, coordinating, and monitoring implementation of EEO policies
and developing local guidance, directives, and implementation procedures for
the EEO programs.
Ms. L.L. HiLL
Chief Staff Ofcer/Inspector General
Code 1002/1000.1
The Chief Sta Ocer serves as the Deputy to the Commanding Of-
cer and acts for the Commanding Ocer in his absence. The Command Sup-
port Division (Code 1200), the Military Support Division (Code 1400), and the
Scientic Development Squadron One (VXS-1) (NAS Patuxent River, MD, Code
1600) report directly to the Chief Sta Ocer. When directed, the Laboratory’s
Inspector General investigates, inspects, and/or inquires into matters that aect
the operation and eciency of NRL. These matters include but are not limited to:
eectiveness, eciency, and economy; management practices; and fraud, waste,
and abuse. He serves as principal advisor to the Commanding Ocer on all in-
spection matters and audits and is the principal point of contact and liaison with
all agencies outside NRL.
CAPT K. szCzubLewsKi, usN
Mr. r.L. THoMPsoN
Public Affairs Ofcer
Code 1030
The Public Aairs Ocer (PAO) advises the Commanding Ocer and
Director of Research on public aairs matters, including external and internal
relations and community outreach, and serves as the Commanding Ocer’s
principal assistant in the area of public aairs. To do this, the PAO plans and
directs a program of public information dissemination on ocial NRL activities.
The PAO coordinates responses to requests from the news media and the public
for unclassied information or materials dealing with the Laboratory, coordinates
participation in community relations activities, and directs the internal informa-
tion programs. The PAO is also responsible for coordinating all actions within
the Laboratory that respond to requirements of the Freedom of Information Act
(FOIA).
25
Basic Responsibilities
The Technology Transfer Oce (TTO) is responsible for NRL’s implementation of the Federal Technol-
ogy Transfer Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-502). The law requires the transfer of Government innovative tech-
nologies to industry for commercialization as products and services for public benet. TTO negotiates Coop-
erative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) under which NRL investigators collaborate with
investigators from industry, academia, state or local governments, or other Federal agencies to develop NRL
technologies for government and/or commercial use. It markets NRL’s patented inventions, negotiates patent
license agreements under which the Navy grants a licensee the right to make, use, and sell NRL inventions (in
exchange for receiving licensing fees and a percentage of sales), and enforces licenses to assure diligence in
commercialization eorts.
Personnel: 5 full-time civilian; 1 SCEP student
Key Personnel
Title Code
Head, Technology Transfer 1004
Sr. Licensing Associate 1004
Sr. Licensing Associate 1004
Licensing Associate 1004
Management Analyst 1004
Administrative Assistant (SCEP) 1004
Point of contact: Code 1004, (202) 767-7229
Dr. r.C. MANAK
Code 1004
Ofce of Technology Transfer
26
Basic Responsibilities
The Oce of Program Administration and Policy Development provides managerial, technical, and
administrative support to the Director of Research (DOR) in such areas as program and policy development,
intra-Navy and inter-Service Science and Technology (S&T) program coordination; liaison with other Navy,
DoD, and government activities on matters of mutual concern; and support to the Executive Directorate in
planning and directing NRL’s S&T (6.1, 6.2) program. Specic functions include: monitoring and providing
background information on technical and policy matters that come under the purview of the DOR; represent-
ing NRL, ONR, and/or the Navy on tri-Service or DoD-wide coordination matters; performing special studies
or chairing ad hoc study groups regarding program decisions or policy positions; performing special studies
involving major NRL programs and resource issues; providing administrative support in the areas of person-
nel, budget, facilities, equipment, and security; providing executive management information and analyses
for various aspects of the S&T program eort; coordinating VIP visits to NRL; managing the NRL directives
system; administering the NRL response to Congressional requests; maintaining the NRL R&D achievements
le; developing the S&T guidance for monitoring and reporting the NRL S&T program; administering NRL’s
various postdoctoral fellowship programs; and managing the Facility Modernization Program.
Personnel: 16 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Head, Oce of Program Administration and Policy Development 1006
Head, Program Administration Sta 1006.1
VIP Coordinator/Protocol Ocer/Administrative Ocer 1006.2
Head, Executive Management & Policy Development Sta 1006.3
Directives 1006.31
Head, NRL Facilities Sta 1006.4
Special Assistant 1006.6
Point of contact: Code 1006.2, (202) 767-3370
Code 1006
Ms. M.e. DixoN
Ofce of Program Administration
and Policy Development
*Acting
27
Code 1008
Mr. J.N. MCCuTCHeoN
Basic Responsibilities
The Oce of Counsel is responsible for providing legal services to NRL’s management in all areas of
general, administrative, intellectual property, and technology transfer law. The Oce reviews all procurement-
related actions; reviews NRL scientic papers prior to publication; prepares patent applications and prosecutes
the applications through the Patent and Trademark Oce; defends against contract protests, other contract
litigation, and personnel cases; and advises on other legal matters relating to technology transfer, personnel,
scal, and environmental law.
NRL Counsel also serves as legal advisor to the Commanding Ocer and Director of Research.
Personnel: 30 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Head, Oce of Counsel 1008
Associate Counsel/General Law 1008.1
Associate Counsel/Intellectual Property 1008.2
Associate Counsel/SSC Legal Matters 1008.3
Point of contact: Code 1008.1, (202) 767-7605
Ofce of Counsel
28
Code 1100
Staff Activity Areas
•Interdisciplinary nanoscience that enables:
Low-power, high-speed electronics
Lightweight, high-strength materials
Highly sensitive molecular sensors
Ecient energy generation and storage
NRL researchers working in the Class 100 clean room in the
Institute for Nanoscience.
Transmission electron microscope located
in one of the Institute for Nanoscience’s
environmentally controlled laboratories.
Wafer on graphene transistors.
Institute for Nanoscience
29
The Institute for Nanoscience has two primary responsibilities: to administer an interdisciplinary re-
search program in nanoscience and to provide NRL scientists with high-quality laboratory space and state-of-
the-art nanofabrication facilities.
The mission of the research program is to conduct highly innovative, interdisciplinary research at the
intersections of the elds of materials, electronics, and biology in the nanometer size domain. The Institute ex-
ploits the broad multidisciplinary character of NRL to bring together scientists and engineers with disparate
training and backgrounds to attack common goals at the intersection of their respective elds at this length
scale. The Institute’s S&T programs provide the Navy and DoD with scientic leadership in this complex,
emerging area and help to identify opportunities for advances in future defense technology.
The Institute also operates a nanoscience research building containing nanofabrication facilities and
environmentally controlled measurement laboratories. The central core of the building, a 5000 sq ft Class 100
clean room, has been outtted with the newest tools to permit nanofabrication, measurement, and testing of
devices. In addition to the clean room facility, the building also contains 5000 square feet of controlled-envi-
ronment laboratory space, which is available to NRL researchers whose experiments are suciently demand-
ing to require this space. There are 12 of these laboratories within the building. They provide shielding from
electromagnetic interference, and very low oor vibration and acoustic levels. Eight of the laboratories control
the temperature to within ± 0.5 °C and four to within ± 0.1 °C.
Personnel: 3.5 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Director, Institute for Nanoscience 1100
Position Assistant 1100
Facilities Manager 1100
Facilities Manager 1100
Point of Contact: Code 1100, (202) 767-1804
Dr. e.s. sNow+
Basic Responsibilities
Code 1100
+Additional Duty
30
Code 1200
Staff Activity Areas
Security
Security monitoring
Incoming visitor reception area
Command Support Division
31
The Command Support Division is responsible for NRL security policy, management, and enforcement.
The Division Head is the NRL Security Manager. The primary areas of security are: information assurance,
information security, personnel security, industrial security, classication management, public release, foreign
disclosure, physical security, force protection, antiterrorism, operations security, special security programs,
and communications security. Provides security education across all security disciplines. Conducts local
inspections for compliance with current internal and external policies. Provides advice and guidance to senior
NRL management concerning the security posture of the Command. Provides administrative budget support
to the Military Support Division (Code 1400) and Scientic Development Squadron One (VXS-1, Code 1600).
Personnel: 66 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Head, Command Support Division 1200
Administrative Ocer 1202
Head, Stennis Space Center Security Sta 1203
Head, Force Protection and Physical Security Branch 1210
Head, Information Assurance and Communications Security Branch 1220
Head, Information Security and Special Programs Branch 1230
Head, Personnel Security and Visitor Control Branch 1240
Point of contact: Code 1202, (202) 767-6987
Mr. T. brewer
Basic Responsibilities
COMMAND SUPPORT
DIVISION
HEAD
1200
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
1202
INFORMATION ASSURANCE
AND COMMUNICATIONS
SECURITY BRANCH
1220
NRL-SSC
SECURITY STAFF
1203
PERSONNEL SECURITY
AND VISITOR CONTROL
BRANCH
1240
INFORMATION SECURITY
AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS
BRANCH
1230
FORCE PROTECTION AND
PHYSICAL SECURITY
BRANCH
1210
32
Code 1400
Staff Activity Areas
• Operations
Administrative Operations
Administration
Military Support Division
P-3 airborne research platform
33
MILITA RY SUPPORT DIVISION
HEAD
1400
OPERATIONS
BRANCH
1410
ADMINISTRATION/
PERSONNEL BRANCH
1420
Basic Responsibilities
The Military Support Division provides military operational and administrative services to NRL.
The Operations Branch assists NRL research directorates in planning and executing project ight mis-
sions, develops deployment schedules and military operational and training objectives, and coordinates the
Research Reserve Program within NRL.
The Military Administration Branch is responsible for the coordination and ecient functioning of all
military administrative operations for NRL (including site detachments). These duties specically include:
personnel actions, maintenance of personnel records, performance evaluations, awards and training; advising
the Chief Sta Ocer on manpower matters and organization issues; and preparing and administering the
military operational budget.
Personnel: 1 full-time contractor; 7 military
Key Personnel
Title Code
Head, Military Support Division 1400
Project Ocer 1410
Project Ocer 1410
Project Ocer 1410
Administrative Ocer 1420
Administrative Yeoman 1420
Point of contact: Code 1420, (202) 767-2103
CDr D.A. ursiNi, usN*
34
Code 1600
Staff Activity Areas
Scientic Development Squadron One hangar
P-3 airborne research platform
Aircraft maintenance
VXS-1 maintains two RC-12 aircraft dedicated to airborne
research. They are smaller, more cost-ecient alternatives to
the P-3 Orion. Each aircraft is outtted with a research electri-
cal load center and has a roll-on roll-o capability, which
enables it to be equipped with project stations. The RC-12s
can support a broad spectrum of project congurations.
Scientic Development Squadron ONE (VXS-1)
• Projects
– Operations
– Safety/NATOPS/Training
Administration
• Maintenance
– Quality assurance
• Congurations
– Project Liaison Ocer
35
Basic Responsibilities
The Scientic Development Squadron ONE (VXS-1) located at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, operates
and maintains three uniquely congured P-3 Orion aircraft and one C-12 aircraft. The men and women of the
squadron provide the Naval Research Laboratory with airborne research platforms, conducting ights world-
wide in support of a broad spectrum of projects and experiments. These include magnetic variation mapping,
electro-optic infrared research, hydroacoustic research, bathymetry, electronic countermeasures, gravity map-
ping, data link, and radar research. The squadron annually logs approximately 1000 ight hours, and in its 51
years, Scientic Development Squadron ONE (VXS-1) has amassed 72,000 hours of mishap-free ying.
Personnel: 1 full-time civilian; 63 military; 7 full-time contractors
Key Personnel
Title Code
Commanding Ocer, VXS-1 1600
Executive Ocer 1601
Senior Enlisted Leader 1600.2
Executive Secretary 1600.4
Projects Director 1630
Operations Ocer 1630.1
Safety/Quality Insurance Ocer 1630.2/1650.3
NATOPS/Training Ocer 1630.2
Administrative Ocer/Public Aairs Ocer 1640
Maintenance Ocer 1650
Assistant Maintenance Ocer 1650.1
Maintenance/Material Control Ocer 1650.2
Projects Liaison Ocer 1660
Point of contact: Code 1640, (301) 995-4122
CDr J. PLAisANCe, usN
COMMANDING OFFICER
1600
EXECUTIVE OFFICER
1601
SCIENTIFIC DEVELOPMENT SQUADRON
ONE
OPERATIONS
BRANCH
1630
SAFETY/NATOPS
BRANCH
1660
AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE
BRANCH
1650
ADMINISTRATION
BRANCH
1640
36
Code 1700
Staff Activity Areas
Multidisciplinary research, development, and integration in autonomous systems, including:
Software for intelligent autonomy
Novel human-systems interaction technology
Mobility and platforms
Sensor systems
Power and energy systems
Networking and communications
Trust and assurance
The Laboratory for Autonomous Systems Research integrates S&T components into
research prototype systems.
The Prototyping High Bay can be used for small
autonomous air vehicles, autonomous ground
vehicles, and of course the people who interact with
them.
Laboratory for Autonomous Systems Research
The Desert High Bay contains
a 40 ft by 14 ft area of sand
2 feet deep, and contains
18-foot-high rock walls that
allow testing of robots and
sensors in a desert-like envi-
ronment. We can introduce
blowing sand, and can control
the lighting in that environ-
ment.
The Littoral High Bay features a 45 ft by 25 ft
by 5.5 ft deep pool. This pool has a 16-chan-
nel wave generator, allowing us to create
directional waves. The Littoral High Bay has
a variety of sediment tanks for testing sensors
and energy-harvesting devices.
The Tropical High Bay provides a simulated jungle
terrain and rain forest including a owing water
feature in an enclosed greenhouse. Rain up to 6”
per hour can be generated.
37
Basic Responsibilities
The Laboratory for Autonomous Systems Research provides specialized facilities to support highly in-
novative, interdisciplinary research in autonomous systems, including software for intelligent autonomy, sen-
sor systems, power and energy systems, human-systems interaction, networking and communications, and
platforms and mobility. The Laboratory capitalizes on the broad multidisciplinary character of NRL, bringing
together scientists and engineers with disparate training and backgrounds to advance the state of the art in
autonomous systems at the intersection of their respective elds. The Laboratory provides unique facilities
and simulated environments (littoral, desert, tropical) and instrumented recongurable high bay spaces to
support integration of science and technology components into research prototype systems. The objective of
the laboratory is to enable Naval and DoD scientic leadership in this complex, emerging area and to identify
opportunities for advances in future defense technology.
The facility includes a Recongurable Prototyping High Bay that allows real-time, accurate tracking of
many entities (vehicles and humans) for experimental ground truth. Small UAVs and ground vehicles can
simultaneously operate within the large high bay, which is viewable from four adjacent Human-System In-
teraction labs. The Tropical High Bay emulates a rainforest with appropriate terrain and plants, and includes
owing water features. An outdoor Highland Forest provides an additional forest environment, and also
includes interesting water and terrain features. The Desert High Bay provides a simulated desert environment
featuring as sand pit, natural rock walls, and appropriate lighting and wind. The Littoral High Bay provides
a simulated coastal environment featuring sediment tanks, large pool with a sloping oor, and small ow
tanks. In addition to the environmental high bays, the facility also has a Power and Energy Laboratory, a Sen-
sor Laboratory, and a mechanical and electrical shop.
The facility is open to use by all NRL scientists contributing to the science and technology of autono-
mous systems and will host many NRL scientists as needed.
Personnel: 3.5 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Director, Laboratory for Autonomous Systems Research 1700
Facilities Manager 1700
Secretary 1700
Point of contact: Code 1700, (202) 767-0792
Mr. A.C. sCHuLTz+
Code 1700
+Additional Duty
38
Code 1800
Staff Activity Areas
• Personnel Operations (Stang and Classication)
• Employee Relations
• Employee Development
• Equal Employment Opportunity and Manpower
• Compensation, Reports, and Demonstration Project
• Information Technology and Reports
Employee Relations Branch
Diversity and Employee Recognition Branch
Personnel Operations Branch
Employee Development and Management Branch
Human Resources Ofce
39
HUMAN RESOURCES
OFFICE
DIRECTOR
1800
PERSONNEL
OPERATIONS BRANCH
1810
EMPLOYEE RELATIONS
BRANCH
1850
EEO, DIVERSITY, AND
EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION
BRANCH
1830
ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT
OFFICE
1802
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
&
REPORTS OFFICE
1804
EMPLOYEE
DEVELOPMENT AND
MANAGEMENT BRANCH
1840
Basic Responsibilities
The Human Resources Oce (HRO) provides civilian personnel, manpower, and Equal Employment
Opportunity (EEO) services to the Naval Research Laboratory. The Human Resources Program provides the
full range of operating civilian personnel management in the stang and placement, position classication,
employee relations, labor relations, employee development, EEO functional areas, manpower management,
and morale, welfare, and recreation programs.
The HRO at NRL’s main site in Washington, DC, services approximately 2,500 employees and provides
a centralized capability to perform managerial, service, and advisory functions in support of eld oce
operations. These include issuing policy and procedural directives; developing, designing, and maintaining
automated systems; and monitoring and evaluating product eectiveness to develop and maintain ecient,
cost-eective, service-oriented methods.
Personnel: 30 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Director, Human Resources Oce 1800
Administrative Ocer 1802
Head, Information Technology and Reports Oce 1804
Head, Personnel Operations Branch 1810
Head, EEO, Diversity, and Employee Recognition Branch 1830
Head, Employee Development and Management Branch 1840
Head, Employee Relations Branch 1850
Point of contact: Code 1802, (202) 404-2797
Ms. C.L. DowNiNg*
*Acting
40
Ms. s.M. ryDer
Basic Responsibilities
NRL’s Ruth H. Hooker Research Library supports NRL and ONR scientists in conducting their
research by making a comprehensive collection of the most relevant scholarly information available and
useable; by providing direct reference and research support; by capturing and organizing the NRL research
portfolio; and by creating, customizing, and deploying a state-of-the-art digital library. Traditional library
resources include extensive technical report, book, and journal collections dating back to the 1800s housed
within a centrally located research facility that is staed by subject specialists and information profession-
als. The collections include 44,000 books; 80,000 digital books; 80,000 bound historical journal volumes; more
than 3,500 current journal subscriptions; and approximately 2 million technical reports in paper, microche,
or digital format (classied and unclassied). Research Library sta members provide advanced information
consulting; literature searches against all major online databases including classied databases; circulation
of materials from the collection including classied literature up to the Secret level; and retrieval of articles,
reports, proceedings, or documents through our interlibrary loan and document delivery network. The digital
library provides desktop access to thousands of journals, books, proceedings, reports, databases, and refer-
ence sources.
Personnel: 21 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Chief Librarian 5596
Head, Research Reports and Bibliography 5596.3
Library IT Director 5596.2
Point of contact: Code 5596, (202) 767-2357
Code 5596
Ruth H. Hooker Research Library
41
businEss opErations DirEctoratE
43
BUSINESS OPERATIONS
DIRECTORATE
Code 3000
The Business Operations Directorate provides executive
management, policy development, and program administra-
tion for business programs needed to support the activities
of the scientic directorates. This support is in the areas of
nancial management, supply management, technical in-
formation services, contracting, research and development
services, and management information systems support.
44
Mr. D.K. Therning was born in Modesto, California. He
graduated from Washington State University with a bach-
elor's degree in nance in 1983 and earned a master's degree in
business administration from George Mason University in 1993.
Mr. Therning has accumulated extensive experience in the
nancial business management of research, development, test,
and evaluation (RDT&E) activities within the Department of the
Navy (DON) beginning at the Naval Weapons Center, China
Lake, California, where he served as a budget analyst in the
Public Works Department and then in the Weapons Department.
In 1984, he became the Financial Management Advisor to the
Ordnance Systems Department. In 1985, under the auspices of
the Naval Scientist Training and Exchange Program, he was selected for a one-year assignment in the Oce of
the Director of Naval Laboratories (DNL), Washington, DC. He remained on the DNL sta as a budget analyst
until 1987, when he was appointed Budget Ocer of the DNL's seven Navy Industrial Fund R&D laboratories.
As the DON reorganized the R&D laboratories and T&E activities, Mr. Therning oversaw the nancial re-
organization of the DNL labs with other activities into the Naval warfare centers. Upon the disestablishment of
DNL, Mr. Therning remained in the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command as the Director of the Defense
Business Operations Fund (DBOF) Resources Management Division, with collateral duty as the Financial Man-
ager of the Naval Command, Control, and Ocean Surveillance Center (NCCOSC). During this time, he man-
aged the conversion of nine appropriated fund engineering activities to DBOF and the nancial consolidation
of these activities with NCCOSC.
In 1995, Mr. Therning served as Head of the Revolving Funds Branch of the Oce of the Assistant Secre-
tary of the Navy (Financial Management and Controller), where he was responsible for the budget formulation
and execution processes of all DON DBOF activities, which includes the RDT&E activities, shipyards, aviation
depots, ordnance centers, and supply centers.
Mr. Therning was appointed Head, Financial Management Division/Comptroller of NRL in July 1996. In
October 1996, in addition to leading the Financial Management Division, he assumed responsibilities for the
Management Information Systems oce. In January 1999, as an additional duty to his role as Comptroller, Mr.
Therning was appointed to the newly established position of Deputy Associate Director of Research for Busi-
ness Operations to assist in the management and administration of the Business Operations Directorate.
Mr. Therning was Acting Associate Director of Research for Business Operations from April 1999 until
March 2000, when he was appointed the Associate Director of Research for Business Operations.
Associate Director of Research
for Business Operations
45
Key Personnel
Title Code
Associate Director of Research for Business Operations 3000
Special Assistant 3001
Deputy Associate Director of Research for Business Operations 3002
Deputy for Small Business 3005
Head, Management Information Systems Oce 3030
Head, Contracting Division 3200
Head, Financial Management Division 3300
Head, Supply and Information Services Division 3400
Director, Research and Development Services Division 3500
Point of contact: Code 3000A, (202) 404-7461
*Acting
46
Code 3200
Staff Activity Areas
Advance Acquisition Planning
Acquisition Strategies
Acquisition Training
• Contract Negotiations
• Contractual Execution
• Contract Administration
Acquisition Policy Interpretation and Implementation
Customers are greeted at the receptionist station. Contracting personnel attend training session.
Procurement Technician reviews contract le.
Specialist and Division Head discuss small business programs.
Contracting Division
47
Basic Responsibilities
The Contracting Division is responsible for the acquisition of major research and development materi-
als, services, and facilities where the value is in excess of $150,000. It also maintains liaison with the ONR
Procurement Directorate on procurement matters involving NRL. Specic functions include: providing
consultant and advisory services to NRL division personnel on acquisition strategy, contractual adequacy of
specications, and potential sources; reviewing procurement requests for accuracy and completeness; initiat-
ing and processing solicitations for procurement; awarding contracts; performing contract administration and
post-award monitoring of contract terms and conditions, delivery, contract changes, patents, etc., and taking
corrective actions as required; providing acquisition-related training to division personnel; and interpreting
and implementing acquisition-related Federal, Department of Defense, and Navy regulations.
Personnel: 40 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Head, Contracting Division 3200
Deputy Head 3201
Administrative Ocer 3202
Contracts Support Branch 3210
Head, Contracts Branch 1 3220
Head, Contracts Branch 2 3230
Team Lead, Contracts Section, SSC 3235
Point of contact: Code 3202, (202) 767-3749
Ms. C.A. HArTMAN*
*Acting
48
The Budget Branch prepares various nancial analyses,
reports, and studies in response to external data calls
and/or management requests.
The Financial Systems, Reports, and Accounting Branch en-
sures that NRL's nancial system satises user requirements
and is in compliance with applicable rules and regulations,
maintains ocial accounting records, and coordinates eorts
with DFAS to complete payment transactions related to NRL
business.
Code 3300
Staff Activity Areas
• Budget
Reports and Statistics
Accounting
• Travel Services
Payroll Liaison
Audit Readiness
Financial Management Division
The Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness team
ensures that NRL is ready for a independent nancial audit
in accordance with Secretary of Defense and congressional
mandates. They perform independent audit readiness test-
ing, develop corrective action recommendations, and serve
as NRL’s liaison with the Navy’s Financial Management
Operations oce.
49
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
DIVISION
HEAD
3300
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
3302
BUDGET AND
FUNDS
MANAGEMENT BRANCH
3310
FINANCIAL SYSTEMS,
REPORTS, AND ACCOUNTING
BRANCH
3350
FINANCIAL IMPROVEMENT
PROGRAM COORDINATOR
3305
Basic Responsibilities
The Financial Management Division (FMD) develops, coordinates, and maintains an integrated system of
nancial management that provides the Comptroller, Commanding Ocer, Director of Research, and other o-
cials of NRL the information and support needed to fulll the nancial and resource management aspects of their
responsibilities. FMD translates the NRL program requirements into the nancial plan, formulates the NRL budget,
monitors and evaluates performance with the budget plan, and provides recommendations and advice to NRL
management for corrective actions or strategic program adjustments. FMD maintains the accounting records of
NRL's nancial and related resources transactions and prepares reports, nancial statements, and other documents
in support of NRL management needs and/or to comply with external reporting requirements. FMD provides
nancial management guidance, policies, advice, and documented procedures to ensure that NRL operates in
compliance with Navy and DoD regulations and with economy and eciency. FMD coordinates eorts with the
Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) to complete payment transactions related to NRL business (e.g.,
the payment of NRL personnel for payroll and travel expenses and the payment to NRL's contractors and vendors
for goods and services purchased by NRL). FMD coordinates Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness eorts
to ensure NRL is ready for an independent nancial audit. Additionally, FMD develops, operates, and maintains
automated business and management information systems supporting the lab-wide administrative and business
processes, including nancial management, procurement and contracting, stores and inventory, asset management,
human resources, facilities, and security.
Personnel: 68 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Head, Financial Management Division 3300
Administrative Ocer 3302
Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness Coordinator 3305
Head, Budget and Funds Management Branch 3310
Head, Funding Section 3311
Head, Internal Budget Section 3312
Head, Corporate Budget Section 3313
Head, Financial Systems, Reports, and Accounting Branch 3350
Head, Cost Accounting Section 3351
Cost and Analysis Unit 3351.1
Head, Vendor Pay Unit 3351.2
Head, Financial Services Section 3352
Head, Payroll Services Unit 3352.1
Head, Travel Services Unit 3352.2
Head, Accounting Systems and Reports Section 3353
Head, Asset Management and Accounting Section 3354
Point of contact: Code 3302, (202) 767-2950
Ms. H.L. FiNCH
50
Code 3400
Staff Activity Areas
• Purchasing
Technical Information Services
• Customer Support and Program Management
• Material Control
Administrative Services
Automated Inventory Management System
Disposal and Storage
Disposal and storage in Building 49.
Woodworkers prepare boxes for shipping.
Customers and employee at the Supply store.
Photographer and videographer capture footage for a
technical presentation.
Employees of the
Administrative Services
Branch discuss NRL
electronic forms.
Supply and Information Services Division
51
Basic Responsibilities
The Supply and Information Services Division provides the Laboratory and its eld activities with con-
tracting, supply management, logistics, administrative, and technical information services. Specic functions
include: procuring required equipment, material, and services; receiving, inspecting, storing, and deliver-
ing material and equipment; packing, shipping, and trac management; surveying and disposing of excess
and unusable property; operating various supply issue stores and performing stock inventories; providing
technical and counseling services for the research directorates in the development of specications for a com-
plete procurement package; and obtaining and providing guidance in the performance stages of contractual
services. Services also include publications, visual information, exhibits, photography, editing, and mailroom
services and correspondence management.
Personnel: 81 full-time civilian; 1 part-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Supply Ocer 3400
Deputy Supply Ocer 3401
Administrative Ocer 3402
Head, Customer Support Sta 3403
Head, Purchasing Branch 3410
Head, Technical Information Services Branch 3430
Head, Material Control Branch 3450
Head, Administrative Services Branch 3460
Point of contact: Code 3402, (202) 404-1701
Ms. C.A. HArTMAN
SUPPLY AND INFORMATION
SERVICES DIVISION
SUPPLY OFFICER
3400
PURCHASING
BRANCH
3410
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
BRANCH
3460
MATERIAL CONTROL
BRANCH
3450
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
SERVICES BRANCH
3430
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
3402
CUSTOMER SUPPORT
STAFF
3403
DEPUTY SUPPLY OFFICER
3401
52
Code 3500
Staff Activity Areas
• Engineering
• Production Control and Transportation
• Shop Services
• Chesapeake Bay Facilities Management
• Customer Liaison
• Safety and Occupational Health/Industrial Hygiene
Explosives Safety
• Health Physics
• Environmental
• Utilities
• Telephones
• Facilities Planning and Operations
Safety and Occupational Health — respirator t testing for
research support personnel.
Health physics — analyzing samples for radioactive material.
Research and Development Services Division
53
Basic Responsibilities
The Research and Development Services Division is responsible for the physical plant of the Naval
Research Laboratory and subordinate eld sites. The responsibilities include military construction, engineer-
ing, and coordination of construction; facility support services, planning, maintenance/repair/operation of all
infrastructure systems; transportation; and occupational safety, health and industrial hygiene, and environ-
mental safety.
The Division provides engineering and technical assistance to research divisions in the installation and
operation of critical equipment in support of the research mission.
Personnel: 154 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Director, Research and Development Services Division 3500
Administrative Ocer 3502
Customer Liaison 3505
Head, Technical/Support Services Branch 3520
Head, Engineering Section 3521
Head, Chesapeake Bay Section 3522
Head, Shop Services Section 3523
Head, Production Control Section 3524
Head, Facilities, Planning and Operations Section 3525
Head, Safety Branch 3540
Occupational Safety and Health/Industrial Hygiene Section 3541
Explosives Safety 3542
Health Physics Section 3544
Environmental Section 3546
Environmental Response Unit 3546.1
Point of contact: Code 3502, (202) 404-4312
Mr. T.K. HuLL, Jr.
RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT
SERVICES DIVISION
DIRECTOR
3500
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE
3502
CUSTOMER LIAISON STAFF
3505
TECHNICAL/SUPPORT
SERVICES BRANCH
3520
SAFTEY BRANCH
3540
*Acting
55
systEms DirEctoratE
57
The Systems Directorate applies the
tools of basic research, concept explo-
ration, and engineering development
to expand operational capabilities and
to provide materiel support to Fleet
and Marine Corps missions. Empha-
sis is on technology, devices, systems,
and know-how to acquire and move
warghting information and to deny
these capabilities to the enemy. Current
activities include:
New and improved radar systems
to detect and identify ever smaller
targets in the cluttered littoral environ-
ment;
Optical sensors and related
materials to extract elusive objects in
complex scenes when both processing
time and communications bandwidth
are limited;
Unique optics-based sensors for
detection of biochemical warfare agents
and pollutants, for monitoring struc-
tures, and for alternative sensors;
Advanced electronic support
measures techniques for signal detec-
tion and identication;
Electronic warfare systems,
techniques, and devices including
quick-reaction capabilities;
Innovative concepts and designs
for reduced observables;
Techniques and devices to dis-
able and/or confuse enemy sensors and
information systems;
SYSTEMS DIRECTORATE
Code 5000
Small “intelligent”/autonomous
land, sea, or air vehicles to carry
sensors, communications relays, or
jammers; and
High performance/high
assurance computers with right-the-
rst-time software and known security
characteristics despite commercial o-
the-shelf components and connections
to public communications media.
Many of these eorts extend from
investigations at the frontiers of science
to the support of deployed systems in
the eld, which themselves provide
direct feedback and inspiration for
applied research and product im-
provement and/or for quests for new
knowledge to expand the available
alternatives.
In addition to its wide-ranging
multidisciplinary research program, the
Directorate provides support to
the corporate laboratory in shared
resources for high performance com-
puting and networking, technical
information collection and distribution,
and in coordination of Laboratory-wide
eorts in signature technology, counter-
signature technology, Theater Missile
Defense, and the Naval Science Assis-
tance Program.
58
Dr. G.M. Borsuk is the Associate Director of Research for Sys-
tems at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington,
DC. In this position he provides executive direction and leadership
to four major NRL research divisions that conduct a broad multi-
disciplinary program of scientic research and advanced techno-
logical development in the areas of optics, electromagnetics, infor-
mation technology, and radar. He is responsible for the conduct
and eectiveness of research programs conducted within these
divisions and for the overall administration of activities through-
out the Systems Directorate. He is also the Focus Area Coordina-
tor for all NRL base programs in electronics science and technology. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Borsuk
served for 23 years as the Superintendent of the Electronics Science and Technology Division at NRL where
he was responsible for the in-house execution of a multidisciplinary program of basic and applied research
in electronic materials and structures, solid state devices, vacuum electronics, and circuits. Dr. Borsuk also
serves as the Technical Chair of the DDR&E's Electronic Warfare Technology Task Force (EWTTF). He was the
Navy Deputy Program Manager and Technical Director for the now completed DARPA/Tri-Service MIMIC
and MAFET Programs. He was the Department of Defense (DoD) technical representative for Electronics to
the Wassenaar Arrangement dealing with export control. He has also served as the DoD representative to the
President's National Science and Technology Council's Electronic Materials Working Group.
Dr. Borsuk joined the ITT Electro-Physics Laboratory in Columbia, Maryland, as a sta physicist in 1973,
where he worked on the application of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) for imaging and signal processing. In
1976 he joined the Westinghouse Advanced Technology Laboratory in Baltimore, Maryland, developing ad-
vanced silicon VLSI integrated circuits and performing device physics research. He performed original work
in the design and fabrication of CCDs for signal processing and photodetectors for use with acousto-optic sig-
nal processors. He headed the Westinghouse VHSIC eort in advanced sub-micron VLSI device technology.
Dr. Borsuk was department manager of Solid State Sciences at the Advanced Technology Laboratory when he
left Westinghouse in 1983 to join the Naval Research Laboratory as the Superintendent of the Electronics Sci-
ence and Technology Division.
Dr. Borsuk received a Ph.D. in physics from Georgetown University in Washington, DC, in 1973. He is
a Fellow of the IEEE, a member of the American Physical Society, a member of the AVS, and is a member of
Sigma Xi. He has 37 technical publications, four patents, and eleven invention disclosures. He is the recipient
of four Presidential Rank Senior Executive Awards, the Distinguished, the most recent awarded in 2010. He
is also the recipient of the IEEE Frederik Philips Award, the IEEE Harry Diamond Memorial Award, the IEEE
Millennium Medal, and an IR-100 Award for his work on high-speed CCDs. Dr. Borsuk also served on the
editorial board of the IEEE Proceedings.
Associate Director of Research
for Systems
59
Key Personnel
Title Code
Associate Director of Research for Systems 5000
Special Assistant 5001
Special Consultant 5007
Head, InTop Program Oce 5008
Superintendent, Radar Division 5300
Superintendent, Information Technology Division 5500
Superintendent, Optical Sciences Division 5600
Superintendent, Tactical Electronic Warfare Division 5700
Point of contact: Code 5000A, (202) 767-3324
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH
FOR SYSTEMS
5000
STAFF
5001 SPECIAL ASSISTANT
5008 INTOP PROGRAM OFFICE
RADAR
DIVISION
5300
TACTICAL ELECTRONIC
WARFARE
DIVISION
5700
OPTICAL SCIENCES
DIVISION
5600
INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
DIVISION
5500
*Acting
60
Code 5300
Staff Activity Areas
Shipboard radar systems
Small target detection
Maritime Domain Awareness
Networked Radar Concepts (FlexDAR)
High-power millimeter-wave radar
Surveillance Technology
Shipboard surveillance radar
Ship self-defense
Electronic counter-countermeasures and
electronic protection (EP)
Target signature and information extraction
T/R module technologies
Asymmetric and expeditionary warfare
spectrum management
Ultrawideband technology
Dynamic waveform diversity
Multistatic radar network information
Ballistic missile defense
Mine detection
Radar Analysis
Target signature prediction
Electromagnetics and antennas
Airborne early-warning radar (AEW)
Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR)
Sea clutter modeling
Periscope detection
Wideband array simulation and fabrication
Advanced Radar Systems
High-frequency over-the-horizon radar systems
HF Radar Technology
Signal analysis
Real-time signal processing and equipment
Computer-aided engineering (CAE)
Optimization techniques
FPGA-based digital processing
The Advanced Multifunction RF Concept (AMRFC) test bed is a
proof-of-principle demonstration system capable of simultaneously
transmitting and receiving multiple beams from common transmit
and receive array antennas for radar, electronic warfare, and com-
munications. This testbed will be expanded to support the FlexDAR
program.
Wavelength scaled array: an ultrawideband array concept
providing constant beamwidth across 8:1 bandwidth; designed
using NRL-developed Domain Decomposition Algorithm.
Radar Division
61
Dr. b.g. DANLy
Basic Responsibilities
The Radar Division conducts research on basic physical phenomena of importance to radar and related
sensors, investigates new engineering techniques applicable to radar, demonstrates the feasibility of new
radar concepts and systems, performs related systems analyses and evaluation of radar, and provides special
consultative services. The emphasis is on new and advanced concepts and technology in radar and related
sensors that are applicable to enhancing the Navy's ability to fulll its mission.
Personnel: 80 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Radar Division 5300
Chief Scientist 5300.1
Associate Superintendent 5301
Administrative Ocer 5302
AEGIS Coordinator 5306
Head, Advanced Concepts Group 5307
Head, Radar Analysis Branch 5310
Head, Advanced Radar Systems Branch 5320
Head, Surveillance Technology Branch 5340
Point of contact: Code 5300, (202) 404-2700
62
Code 5500
Research Activity Areas
Freespace Photonics Communications Ofce
Extended spectrum communications
Atmospheric channel eects on photonic transfer
Studies in marine miraging
Analog modulation techniques on freespace optical
carriers
Modulating retroreector based communications
Signature studies for ISR
Adaptive optics for freespace optical communications
Adversarial Modeling and Exploitation Ofce
Behavioral indicators of hostile intent
Suspicious behavior detection research
Behavioral modeling, analysis, and metrics
Deception detection research
Geospatial modeling and simulation
Spatially integrated social science
Automated video analysis and retrieval
Navy Center for Applied Research in Articial Intelligence
Intelligent decision aids
Natural language and multimodal interfaces
Intelligent software agents
Machine learning and adaptive systems
Robotics software and computer vision
Neural networks
Novel devices/techniques for HCI
Spatial audio
Immersive simulation
Autonomous and intelligent systems
Case-based reasoning and problem-solving methods
Machine translation technology evaluation
Cognitive architectures
Human-robot interaction
Transmission Technology
Communication system architecture
Communication antenna/propagation technology
Communications intercept systems
Virtual engineering
Secure voice technology
Satellite and tactical networking
Satellite communications research
Satellite architecture analysis
RF systems analysis
Center for High Assurance Computer Systems
Secure Enterprise Architectures (SEA)
Formal specication/verication of system security
COMSEC application technology
Technology and solutions to secure networks and
databases
Software engineering for secure systems
Key management and distribution solutions
Information systems security (INFOSEC) engineering
Formal methods for requirements specication and
verication
Security product development
Secure wireless network and wireless sensor technology
Network security protocol modeling, simulation, and verication
Cross-domain solution technology development
Computer Network Defense (CND) technology
Hardware/software co-design
Malicious code analysis
Information hiding (watermarking, covert channel analysis, etc.)
Anonymizing systems
Quantum information science
Logical foundations of security
Networks and Communication Systems
Communication system engineering
Mobile, wireless networking technology
Bandwidth management (quality of service)
Joint service tactical networking
Integration of communication and C2 applications
Automated testing of highly mobile tactical networks
Reliable multicast protocols and applications
Communication network simulation
Networking protocols for directional antennas
Policy-based network management
Tactical voice-over IP
Sensor networks
Advanced tactical data links
Cognitive radio technology
Information Management and Decision Architectures
Virtual reality/mobile augmented reality
Visual analytics
Scientic visualization
Computer graphics
Human-computer interaction
Service oriented architecture
Service orchestration
Data and information management
Human-centered design
Parallel and distributed computation
Distributed modeling and simulation
Natural environments for distributed simulation
Intelligent decision support
Information sharing
Semantic web technology
Data mining
Software agents for data fusion
Center for Computational Science
Transparent optical network research and design
Parallel computing
Scalable high performance computing and networking for
Navy and DoD
Large data in distributed computing
Scientic visualization
High-performance le systems
High-denition video technology
NRL labwide computer network and related services
Labwide support for web, email, and other information
services
ATDnet and leading-edge WAN research networks
Ruth H. Hooker Research Library
Desktop/workbench access to relevant scientic resources
NRL scientic digital archive (TORPEDO)
Authoritative database of NRL-produced publications (NRL
Online Bibliography)
Comprehensive literature/citation/classied searches
Extensive collection of print and digital books, journals, and
technical reports
Information Technology Division
63
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
5500
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
5501
NAVY CENTER FOR
APPLIED
RESEARCH IN ARTIFICIAL
INTELLIGENCE
5510
NETWORKS AND
COMMUNICATION
SYSTEMS BRANCH
5520
CENTER FOR
COMPUTATIONAL
SCIENCE
5590
INFORMATION
MANAGEMENT AND
DECISION ARCHITECTURES
BRANCH
5580
TRANSMISSION
TECHNOLOGY
BRANCH
5550
CENTER FOR HIGH
ASSURANCE COMPUTER
SYSTEMS
5540
FREESPACE PHOTONIC
COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE
5505
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
5502
ADVERSARIAL MODELING
AND EXPLOITATION OFFICE
(AMX)
5508
Dr. J.D. MCLeAN
Basic Responsibilities
The Information Technology Division conducts basic research, exploratory development, and advanced
technology demonstrations in the collection, transmission, processing, presentation, and distribution of infor-
mation to provide information superiority and distributed networked force capabilities that improve Naval
operations across all mission areas. The Division provides immediate solutions to current operational needs
as required while developing those technologies necessary to implement the Navy after next.
Personnel: 204 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent/NRL Chief Information Ocer+ 5500
Associate Superintendent 5501
Administrative Ocer 5502
Head, Freespace Photonic Communications Oce 5505
Head, Adversarial Modeling and Exploitation Oce 5508
Director, Navy Center for Applied Research in Articial Intelligence 5510
Head, Networks and Communication Systems Branch 5520
Director, Center for High Assurance Computer Systems 5540
Head, Transmission Technology Branch 5550
Head, Information Management and Decision Architectures Branch 5580
Director, Center for Computational Science 5590
Chief Librarian, Ruth H. Hooker Research Library 5596
Point of contact: Code 5501, (202) 767-2954
+Additional Duty
64
Optical Sciences Division
Code 5600
Staff Activity Areas
Technical contract monitoring
Theoretical studies
Program analysis and development
Special systems analysis
Technical study groups
Research Activity Areas
Optical Materials and Devices
Advanced infrared optical materials
IR ber-optic materials and devices
IR ber chemical and environmental sensors
IR transmitting windows and domes
Transparent ceramic armor materials
Planar waveguide devices
IR nonlinear materials and devices
Ceramic laser gain materials
Advanced solar cell materials
Fiber lasers/sources and ampliers
Radiation eects
Optical Physics
Laser materials diagnostics
Nonlinear frequency conversion
Optical instrumentation and probes
Optical interactions in semiconductor
superlattices and organic solids
Laser-induced reactions
Organic light-emitting devices
Nanoscale electro-optical research
Aerosol optics
Applied Optics
UV, optical, and IR countermeasures
Ultraviolet component development
Missile warning sensor technology
UV, visible, and IR imager development
Multispectral/hyperspectral sensors
Multispectral/hyperspectral/detection
algorithms
Framing reconnaissance sensors
Novel optical components
Sensor control and exploitation system
development
IR low observables
EO/IR systems analysis
Atmospheric IR measurements
Airborne IR search and track technology
Photonics Technology
Fiber and solid-state laser/sources
High-speed (<100 fs) optical probing
High-power ber ampliers
High-speed ber-optic communications
Antenna remoting
Free space communication
Photonic control of phased arrays
Micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems
Optical clocks
Microwave photonics
Optical Techniques
Fiber-optic materials and fabrication
Fiber Bragg grating sensors/systems
Fiber-optic sensors/systems (acoustic, magnetic,
gyroscopes)
Integrated optics
The Advanced Optical
Materials Fabrication
Laboratory, a state-of-the-
art high vacuum cluster
system, consists of a series
of interconnected chambers
allowing vacuum deposi-
tion of complex, multilayer
lms to be deposited and
patterned without breaking
vacuum during processing.
The Optical Fiber
Preform Fabrica-
tion Facility includes
computer control of the
glass composition and
standard ber-optic
dopants as well as rare
earths, aluminum, and
other components for
specialty bers.
65
Dr. C.A. HoFFMAN*
Basic Responsibilities
The Optical Sciences Division carries out a variety of research, development, and application-oriented ac-
tivities in the generation, propagation, detection, and use of radiation in the wavelength region between near-
ultraviolet and far-infrared wavelengths. The research, both theoretical and experimental, is concerned with
discovering and understanding the basic physical principles and mechanisms involved in optical devices, ma-
terials, and phenomena. The development eort is aimed at extending this understanding in the direction of
device engineering and advanced operational techniques. The applications activities include systems analysis,
prototype system development, and exploitation of R&D results for the solution of optically related military
problems. In addition to its internal program activities, the Division serves the Laboratory specically and the
Navy generally as a consulting body of experts in optical sciences. The work in the Division includes studies
in quantum optics, laser physics, optical waveguide technologies, laser-matter interactions, atmospheric prop-
agation, holography, optical data processing, ber-optic sensor systems, optical systems, optical materials,
radiation damage studies, IR surveillance and missile seeker technologies, IR signature measurements, and
optical diagnostic techniques. A portion of the eort is devoted to developing, analyzing, and using special
optical materials.
Personnel: 132 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Optical Sciences Division 5600
Associate Superintendent 5601
Administrative Ocer 5602
Head, Senior Scientic Sta 5604
Head, Optical Physics Branch 5610
Head, Optical Materials and Devices Branch 5620
Head, Photonics Technology Branch 5650
Head, Applied Optics Branch 5660
Head, Optical Techniques Branch 5670
Point of contact: Code 5602, (202) 767-9306
OPTICAL SCIENCES DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
5600
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
5601
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
5602
SENIOR SCIENTIFIC
STAFF
5604
OPTICAL PHYSICS
BRANCH
5610
PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY
BRANCH
5650
APPLIED OPTICS
BRANCH
5660
OPTICAL TECHNIQUES
BRANCH
5670
OPTICAL MATERIALS AND
DEVICES BRANCH
5620
*Acting
66
Offboard Countermeasures
Expendable technology and devices
Unmanned air vehicles
Oboard payloads
Decoys
Airborne Electronic Warfare Systems
Counter ISR
Wireless network analysis
Jamming technology and deception
Communications CM
Ships Electronic Warfare Systems
Ships systems development
Jamming technology and deception
EW antennas
High power microwaves (HPM) research
Electronic Warfare Support Measures
Intercept systems and direction nders
RF signal simulators
Systems integration
Command and control interfaces
Signal processing
Code 5700
Staff Activity Areas
EW Strategic Planning
Signature Technology Oce
Eectiveness of Naval EW Systems (ENEWS)
Research Activity Areas
Using the latest composite, MMIC, and processing
technologies, the Tactical Electronic Warfare Division
has developed a small, lightweight, and inexpensive
ESM receiving system for use on frigates, Coast Guard
vessels, and various patrol aircraft.
Advanced Techniques
Analysis and modeling simulation
Experimental systems
EW concepts
Infrared technology
Integrated EW Simulation
Hardware-in-the-loop simulation
Data management technology
Flyable ASM seeker simulators
Foreign materiel exploitation (FME)
EW Modeling and Simulation
High-delity threat models and simulations
Advanced system visualization
EW tactical decision aids
RF environmental and propagation modeling
The Central Target Simulator (CTS) Programmable Array
is part of a large hardware-in-the-loop simulation facility
whose purpose is to test and evaluate electronic warfare
systems and techniques used to counter radar-guided mis-
sile threats to Navy forces.
Tactical Electronic Warfare Division
67
Dr. F.J. KLeMM
Basic Responsibilities
The Tactical Electronic Warfare Division (TEWD) is responsible for research and development in support
of the Navy’s tactical electronic warfare requirements and missions. These include electronic warfare support
measures, electronic countermeasures, and supporting counter-countermeasures, as well as studies, analyses,
and simulations for determining and improving the eectiveness of these systems.
Personnel: 269 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Tactical Electronic Warfare Division 5700
Head, Electronic Warfare Strategic Planning Organization 5700.1
Associate Superintendent 5701
Administrative Ocer 5702
Senior Scientist for Expendable Vehicles 5704
Head, Electronic Warfare Lead Laboratory Sta 5705
Head, Signature Technology Oce 5708
Head, Oboard Countermeasures Branch 5710
Head, Electronic Warfare Support Measures Branch 5720
Head, Aerospace Electronic Warfare Systems Branch 5730
Head, Surface Electronic Warfare Systems Branch 5740
Head, Advanced Techniques Branch 5750
Head, Integrated Electronic Warfare Simulation Branch 5760
Head, Electronic Warfare Modeling and Simulation Branch 5770
Point of contact: Code 5701, (202) 767-5974
*Acting
TA CTICAL ELECTR ONIC
WARFARE DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
5700
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
5701
OFFBOARD
COUNTERMEASURES
BRANCH
5710
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
MODELING AND
SIMULATION BRANCH
5770
INTEGRATED
EW SIMULATION
BRANCH
5760
ADVANCED
TECHNIQUES
BRANCH
5750
SURFACE ELECTRONIC
WARFARE SYSTEMS
BRANCH
5740
AEROSPACE ELECTRONIC
WARFARE SYSTEMS
BRANCH
5730
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
SUPPORT MEASURES
BRANCH
5720
SENIOR SCIENTIST
FOR
EXPENDABLE VEHICLES
5704
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
5702
CONSULTANT
STAFF
5701.1
HEAD, ELECTRONIC
WARFARE STRATEGIC
PLANNING ORGANIZATION
5700.1
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
LEAD LABORATORY
STAFF
5705
SIGNAT URE TECHNOLOGY
OFFICE
5708
69
matErials sciEncE anD componEnt
tEchnology DirEctoratE
71
MATERIALS SCIENCE AND
COMPONENT TECHNOLOGY
DIRECTORATE
Code 6000
The Materials Science and Compo-
nent Technology Directorate carries out
a multidisciplinary research program
whose objectives are the discovery,
invention, and exploitation of new
improved materials, the generation of
new concepts associated with materials
behavior, and the development of ad-
vanced components based on these new
and improved materials and concepts.
Theoretical and experimental research
is carried out to determine the scientic
origins of materials behavior and to
develop procedures for modifying these
materials to meet important naval needs
for advanced platforms, electronics, sen-
sors, and photonics.
The program includes investiga-
tions of a broad spectrum of materials
including insulators, semiconductors,
superconductors, metals and alloys,
optical materials, polymers, plastics,
articially structured bio/molecular
materials and composites, and energetic
materials, which are used in important
naval devices, components, and systems.
New techniques are developed for pro-
ducing, processing, and fabricating these
materials for crucial naval applications.
The synthesis, processing, proper-
ties, and limits of performance of these
new and improved materials in natural
or radiation environments, and under
deleterious conditions such as those
associated with the marine environ-
ment, neutron or directed energy beam
irradiation, or extreme temperatures
and pressures, are established. For new
materials design, emphasis is placed on
protection of the environment.
Additionally, major thrusts are di-
rected in advanced sensing, detection,
reactive ow physics, computational
physics, and plasma sciences. Areas of
particular emphasis include nanosci-
ence and technology, uid mechanics
and hydrodynamics, nuclear weapon
eects simulations, high energy density
materials including fuels, propellants,
explosives, and storage devices, inter-
actions of various types of radiation
with matter, survivability of materials
and components, and directed energy
devices.
72
Dr. B.B. Rath was born in Banki, India. He received a B.S. degree
in physics and mathematics from Utkal University, an M.S. in
metallurgical engineering from Michigan Technological University,
and a Ph.D. from the Illinois Institute of Technology.
Dr. Rath was Assistant Professor of Metallurgy and Materials
Science at Washington State University from 1961 to 1965. From
1965 to 1972, he was with the sta of the Edgar C. Bain Laboratory
for fundamental research of the U.S. Steel Corporation. From 1972
to 1976, he headed the Metal Physics Research Group of the McDon-
nell Douglas Research Laboratories in St. Louis, Missouri, until he
came to NRL as Head of the Physical Metallurgy Branch. During
this period, he was adjunct professor at Carnegie-Mellon University,
the University of Maryland, and the Colorado School of Mines. Dr.
Rath served as Superintendent of the Materials Science and Tech-
nology Division from 1982 to 1986, when he was appointed to his
present position.
Dr. Rath is recognized in the elds of solid-state transformations,
grain boundary migrations, and structure-property relationships in
metallic systems. He has published over 140 papers in these elds
and edited several books and conference proceedings.
Dr. Rath serves on several planning, review, and advisory boards
for both the Navy and the Department of Defense, as well as for the National Materials Advisory Board of the
National Academy of Sciences, National Science Foundation, University of Virginia, Colorado School of Mines, and
the University of Florida. He is currently the Navy representative to the DOE Deputy Assistant Secretary's advisory
and planning committee on methane hydrates, and the Navy representative to the Indo-U.S. Joint Commission on
Science and Technology. He previously served as the Navy representative to the panel of The Technical Cooperation
Program (TTCP) countries.
Dr. Rath is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is a fellow of the Minerals, Metals and
Materials Society (TMS), American Society for Materials-International (ASM), Washington Academy of Sciences,
Materials Research Society of India, the Institute of Materials of the United Kingdom, and the American Association
for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In 2007, Dr. Rath received an honorary doctorate in engineering from the
Michigan Technological University and was elected to deliver the commencement address to the 2007 graduating
class. In 2008, he received the Illinois Institute of Technology Mechanical Materials & Aerospace Engineering De-
partment 2008 Alumni Recognition Award. In 2010, he received an honorary doctorate from Ravenshaw University
and Indian Institute of Technology.
Dr. Rath has received a number of honors and awards, most recently the Michigan Technological University
Distinguished Alumni Award, the Padma Bhushan Award of Honors and Excellence bestowed by the President of
India, and the Acta Materialia J. Herbert Hollomon Award. His other awards include the DoD Distinguished Civil-
ian Service Award which is presented by the Secretary of Defense for distinguished accomplishments and sustained
superior service, the 2005 Fred Saalfeld Award for Outstanding Lifetime Achievement in Science, the Presidential
Rank Award for Distinguished Executive (2005), the NRL Lifetime Achievement Award (2004), National Materials
Advancement Award from the Federation of Materials Societies (2001), the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Execu-
tive Award (1999 and 2004), the S. Chandrasekhar Award and Medal, and the Award of Merit for Group Achieve-
ment from the Chief of Naval Research. He received the 1991 George Kimball Burgess Memorial Award, the Charles
S. Barrett Medal, and the prestigious TMS Leadership Award for his contributions to materials research. The Ameri-
can Society for Materials-International and The Metals, Minerals, and Materials Society have jointly recognized him
with the TMS/ASM Joint Distinguished Lectureship in Materials & Society Award and the 2001 ASM Distinguished
Life Membership Award. He has served as the 2004–2005 President of the American Society for Materials. He also
has served as a member of the Boards of Directors/Trustees of TMS, ASM-International, and the Federation of Ma-
terials Society (FMS), as a member of the editorial boards of several international materials research journals, and as
chairman of many committees of TMS, ASM, FMS, and American Association of Engineering Societies.
Associate Director of Research
for Materials Science and Component Technology
73
Key Personnel
Title Code
Associate Director of Research for Materials Science and
Component Technology 6000
Special Assistant 6001
Chief Scientist for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics 6003
Director, Laboratories for Computational Physics and
Fluid Dynamics 6040
Superintendent, Chemistry Division 6100
Superintendent, Materials Science and Technology Division 6300
Superintendent, Plasma Physics Division 6700
Superintendent, Electronics Science and Technology Division 6800
Director, Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering 6900
Point of contact: Code 6000, (202) 767-2538
74
Code 6040
Research Activity Areas
Computational Physics Developments
Laser-plasma interactions
Inertial connement fusion
Space debris elimination
Solar physics modeling
Dynamical gridding algorithms
Advanced graphical and parallel
processing systems
Solar & Heliospheric Modeling
Microuidics
Fluid structure interaction
Shock and blast containment
Reactive Flows
Fluid dynamics in combustion
Turbulence in compressible ows
Multiphase ows
Turbulent jets and wakes
Jet noise S&T
Detonation engines
Propulsion systems analysis
Contaminant transport modelling
Fuel cells
Fire and explosion mitigation
CT-Analyst plumes displayed in Google Earth, showing the
same colors and density information as in the CT-Analyst
program.
Detailed simulations have led to new understanding of
high-intensity, nonequilibrium, inhomogeneous, anisotropic
reactive turbulent ows.
Unstructured grid
technology has
been used to design
and develop a
ying unmanned
underwater vehicle
(UUV) for long range
deployment.
Laboratories for Computational Physics
and Fluid Dynamics
Rotating Detonation Engine
research for reducing fuel
consumption and improving
performance.
75
Dr. K. KAiLAsANATH
Basic Responsibilities
The Laboratories for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics (LCP&FD) are responsible for the
research leading to and the application of advanced analytical and numerical capabilities that are relevant
to NRL, Navy, DoD, and other Government agencies. This research is pursued in the elds of compressible
and incompressible uid dynamics, reactive ows, uid/structure interactions including submarine and
aerospace applications, atmospheric and solar geophysics, magnetoplasma dynamics, application of parallel
processing to large-scale problems such as unsteady ows of contaminants in and around cities, advanced
propulsion concepts, ame dynamics for shipboard re safety, jet noise reduction, and other disciplines of
continuum computational physics as required to further the overall mission of NRL. The specic objectives
of the LCP&FD are to develop and maintain state-of-the-art analytical and computational capabilities in uid
dynamics and related elds of physics; to establish in-house expertise in parallel processing for large-scale
scientic computing; to perform analyses and computational experiments on specic relevant problems using
these capabilities; and to transfer this technology to new and ongoing projects through cooperative programs
with the research Divisions at NRL and elsewhere.
Personnel: 22 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Director, Laboratories for Computational Physics and
Fluid Dynamics 6040
Administrative Ocer 6040.2
Chief Scientist for Computational Physics and
Fluid Dynamics 6003
Head, Laboratory for Propulsion, Energetic, and
Dynamic Systems 6041
Head, Laboratory for Advanced Computational Physics 6042
Head, Laboratory for Multiscale Reactive Flow Physics 6043
Point of contact: Code 6040, (202) 404-1064
76
Code 6100
Research Activity Areas
Chemical Diagnostics
Alternate energy sources
Atmosphere analysis and control
Environmental chemistry/microbiology
Ion/molecule processes
Kinetics of gas phase reactions
Laboratory on a chip
Methane hydrates
Optical diagnostics of chemical reactions
Trace analysis
Materials Chemistry
Bio-inspired materials
Degradation and stabilization mechanisms
Functional organic coatings
High-temperature resins
Magnetic resonance
Novel nanotubes and nanobers
Polymer characterization
Reactive nanometals
Synthesis and evaluation of
innovative polymers and composites
Center for Corrosion Science
and Engineering
Aquatic invasive organism control
Biofouling control
Cathodic protection
The Key West site of the NRL Center for Corrosion Science
and Engineering specializes in understanding and modeling
the marine environment's impact on naval materials. A
complete laboratory for the study of corrosion control
technologies provides sponsors with prototypical seawater
exposure of their systems.
Corrosion control engineering
Corrosion science
Environmental fracture and fatigue
Marine coatings
Materials failure analysis
Surface/Interface Chemistry
Adhesion
Bio/organic interfaces
Chemical/biological sensors
Diamond lms
Electrochemistry
Plasmonics
Energy storage materials
Nanostructured materials and interfaces
Surface/interface analysis
Surface properties of materials
Surface reaction dynamics
Synchrotron radiation applications
Tribology
Safety and Survivability
Chemometrics/data fusion
Combustion dynamics
Fire protection and suppression
Mobility fuels
Modeling and scaling of combustion systems
Personnel protection
System automation
Trace analysis
Chemistry Division
The ex-USS Shadwell (LSD 15), moored in Mobile Bay, Alabama, is
NRL’s full-scale, advanced research and full-scale demonstration
vessel operated by the Chemistry Division.
77
Basic Responsibilities
The Chemistry Division conducts basic research, applied research, and development studies in the broad elds
of chemical/structural diagnostics, reaction rate control, materials chemistry, surface and interface chemistry, corro-
sion passivation, environmental chemistry, and ship safety/survivability. Specialized programs within these elds
include coatings, functional polymers/elastomers, clusters, controlled release of energy, physical and chemical
characterization of surfaces, electrochemistry, assembly and properties of nanometer structures, tribology, chemical
vapor deposition/etching, atmosphere analysis and control, environmental protection/reclamation, prevention/
control of res, mobility fuels, modeling/simulation, and miniaturized sensors for chemical, biological, trace analy-
sis and data fusion, and explosives.
To enhance protection of Navy personnel and platforms from damage and injury in peace and wartime, the
Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability performs RDT&E on re and personnel protection, fuels,
chemical defense, submarine atmospheres, and damage control aspects of ship and aircraft survivability; supports
Navy and Marine Corps requirements in these areas; and acts as a focus for technology transfer in safety and sur-
vivability.
To address problems in corrosion and marine fouling, a Marine Corrosion Facility is located in Key West,
Florida. This laboratory resides in an unparalleled site for natural seawater exposure testing and marine related ma-
terials evaluation. The tropical climate is ideal for marine exposure testing. Along with the high quality seawater,
the location provides small climatic variation and a stable biomass throughout the year.
Personnel: 113 full-time civilian; 1 military; 5 intermittent; 3 part-time
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Chemistry Division 6100
Associate Superintendent 6101
Administrative Ocer 6102
Senior Scientic Sta 6104
Senior Scientic Sta 6104
Biotechnology Program Manager 6106
Head, Chemical Dynamics and Diagnostics Branch 6110
Head, Materials Chemistry Branch 6120
Head, Center for Corrosion Science and Engineering 6130
Head, Surface Chemistry Branch 6170
Head, Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability 6180
Senior Scientist for Theoretical Chemistry 6189
Point of contact: Code 6102, (202) 767-2460
Dr. b.J. sPArgo*
CHEMICAL DYNAMICS
AND DIAGNOSTICS BRANCH
6110
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
6102
NAVY TECHNOLOGY CENTER
FOR SAFETY AND
SURVIVABILITY
6180
SURFACE CHEMISTRY
BRANCH
6170
CENTER FOR CORROSION
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
6130
MATERIALS CHEMISTRY
BRANCH
6120
BIOTECHNOLOGY
PROGRAM MANAGER
6106
CHEMISTRY DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
6100
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
6101
SENIOR SCIENTIFIC
STAFF
6104
*Acting
78
Code 6300
Research Activity Areas
Materials and Sensors
Laser direct write
THz sources, devices, and sensors
Spintronic materials and devices
Magnetic materials
Superconducting materials
Optoelectronic materials
Electroceramic materials
Multiferroic materials
Radar absorbing materials
Analysis of extrasolar materials
Chemical sensors
Nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory
Nanoplasmonic biosensors
Thin lm deposition for devices
Ion implantation
Glass ber processing and characterization
Polymer synthesis and characterization
Personal protective equipment
Remote explosives detection
Automated learning
Multifunctional Materials
3D Materials Science
Image-based microstructural modeling
Materials by design
Nano-, micro-, mesoscale material characterization
Grain boundary engineering
Atom probe tomography
Physical metallurgy
Ferrous, nonferrous, and intermetallic alloys
Powder metallurgy
Microwave sintering
Rapid solidication
Rail gun materials
Friction stir welding and joining technologies
Heat treating and phase transformations
Biomechanical surrogate development for warghter
protection
Biomechanical simulation
Personal protective equipment
Composite material systems
Multifunctional structures
Armor
Porovascular structures
Corrosion simulation and control
Modeling of electrochemical corrosion systems
Evaluation of cathodic protection performance
Advanced ceramics
High energy density dielectrics
High temperature ceramics
Thermal barrier coatings
Computational Materials Science
Condensed matter theory
Electronic structure of solids and clusters
Molecular dynamics
Quantum many-body theory
Theory of magnetic materials
Theory of alloys
Materials for power and energy
Semiconductor and surface physics
Theoretical studies of phase transitions
Atomic physics theory
Protein modeling
Continuum multiphysics modeling
Reduced order modeling
Multiphysics simulation of materials behavior
Development of high-performance computational
methods
The Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer/Single-Stage Accelerator
Mass Spectrometer performs spatially resolved composition analy-
sis using secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) to sputter atoms,
and single stage accelerator mass spectrometer (SSAMS) to reduce
background interferences from commonly present molecular ions.
Provides high-sensitivity and high-precision measurements.
Materials Science and Technology Division
79
Dr. P. MATiC
Basic Responsibilities
The Materials Science and Technology Division conducts basic and applied research and engages in
exploratory and advanced development of materials having substantive value to the Navy. The Division is
composed of multidisciplinary teams of materials scientists, metallurgists, ceramists, physicists, chemists, and
engineers using the most advanced testing facilities and diagnostic techniques. R&D programs encompass the
intrinsic behavior of metals, semiconductors, insulators, composites, and ceramics, including eorts in ferrous
alloys, intermetallic compounds, superconducting, dielectric, and magnetic materials, lms and coatings, and
multifunctional materials systems. The programs encompass advanced synthesis and processing techniques,
as well as postprocessing techniques to fabricate sensors, devices, structures, and components. A variety of
state-of-the-art characterization tools are used to probe the atomic, grain, and defect structure (composition
and microstructure) of the materials as well as to delineate the fundamental properties of the material or
material system. Response of materials and material systems to a variety of external inuences (mechanical,
chemical, optical, electromagnetic radiation, high-power lasers, temperature, etc.) is integral to the Division’s
programs, as are performance and reliability projections for military service lifetime. The program includes
strong theoretical, experimental, computational, and simulation eorts to predict, guide, and explain the
behavior of materials and materials systems. Studies conducted in the Division provide guidance for the
selection, design, certication, and life-cycle management of material in Naval vehicles and systems.
Personnel: 100 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Materials Science and Technology Division 6300
Associate Superintendent 6301
Administrative Ocer 6302
Senior Scientist 6300.1
Head, Special Projects Group 6300.2
Head, Multifunctional Materials Branch 6350
Head, Materials and Sensors Branch 6360
Head, Center for Computational Materials Science 6390
Point of contact: Code 6302, (202) 767-2458
*Acting
CENTER FOR
COMPUTATIONAL
MATERIALS SCIENCE
6390
MATERIALS AND SENSORS
BRANCH
6360
MULTIFUNCTIONAL
MATERIALS BRANCH
6350
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
6302
SPECIAL PROJECTS
GROUP
6303
MATERIALS SCIENCE AND
TECHNOLOGY DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
6300
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
6301
80
Code 6700
Research Activity Areas
Radiation Hydrodynamics
Radiation hydrodynamics of Z-pinches and
laser-produced plasmas
X-ray source development
Cluster dynamics in intense laser elds
Plasma kinetics for directed energy and fusion
Plasma discharge physics
Dense plasma atomic physics, equation of
state
Numerical simulation of high-density plasma
Laser driven ion/neutron sources
Laser Plasma
Nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship
Laser fusion, inertial connement
Megabar high-pressure physics
Rep-rate KrF laser development
High power electron beam applications
Laser fusion technology
Laser fusion energy
Detection of chemical/biological/nuclear
materials
Charged Particle Physics
Applications of modulated electron beams
Rocket, satellite, and ISS natural and active
experiments
Laboratory simulation of space plasmas
Large-area plasma processing sources
Nike is the world’s
largest krypton
uoride (KrF)
laser and is used
to explore physics
issues for laser
fusion. Shown is
the propagation
bay where 56 short-
duration (4–5 ns)
beams are directed
by mirrors rst to
the electron-beam-
pumped ampliers and then to the target facility. The Nike KrF
system achieves extremely uniform high-intensity illumination of
planar targets by overlapping numerous smoothed laser beams.
Typical experiments include studies of the ablative acceleration
of matter to high velocities (up to 1000 km/s) and studies of the
reaction of materials to very high pressures (10 million atmospheres)
produced by the laser light.
The NRL Ti:Sapphire Femtosecond Laser (TFL)
currently operates at 40 fs, 15 TW and provides a
facility to conduct research in intense laser-plasma
interactions, ultrashort intense laser propagation
in the atmosphere, remote sensing of chem/bio
agents, and laser-induced electrical discharges.
Surface modication of energy sensitive materials
Atmospheric and ionospheric GPS sensing
Ionospheric eects on communications
Electromagnetic launchers
Radiation belt remediation
Pulsed Power Physics
Production, focusing, and propagation of intense
electron and ion beams
High-power, pulsed radiography
Plasma and bremsstrahlung radiation sources
Capacitive, inductive, and battery energy storage
Nuclear weapons eects simulation
Electromagnetic launchers
Detection of Special Nuclear Materials
Advanced energetics via stimulated nuclear decay
Beam Physics
Directed energy and laser propagation in the
atmosphere
Advanced accelerators and radiation sources
Microwave, plasma, and laser processing of materials
Microwave sources: magnicons and gyrotrons
Nonlinear stochastic dynamical systems
Ultrahigh-intensity laser-matter interactions
Free electron lasers and laser synchrotrons
Theory and simulation of space and solar plasmas
Global ionospheric and space weather modeling
Underwater laser interactions
Plasma Physics Division
81
Dr. T.A. MeHLHorN
Basic Responsibilities
The Plasma Physics Division conducts a broad theoretical and experimental program of basic and
applied research in plasma physics, laboratory discharge, and space plasmas, intense electron and ion beams
and photon sources, atomic physics, pulsed power sources, laser physics, advanced spectral diagnostics, and
nonlinear systems. The eort of the Division is concentrated on a few closely coordinated theoretical and ex-
perimental programs. Considerable emphasis is placed on large-scale numerical simulations related to plasma
dynamics; ionospheric, magnetospheric, and atmospheric dynamics; nuclear weapons eects; inertial con-
nement fusion; atomic physics; plasma processing; nonlinear dynamics and chaos; free electron lasers and
other advanced radiation sources; advanced accelerator concepts; and atmospheric laser propagation. Areas
of experimental interest include laser-plasma, laser-electron beam, and laser-matter interactions, high-energy
laser weapons, laser shock hydrodynamics, thermonuclear fusion, electromagnetic wave generation, the gen-
eration of intense electron and ion beams, large-area plasma processing sources, electromagnetic launchers,
high-frequency microwave processing of ceramic and metallic materials, advanced accelerator development,
inductive energy storage, laboratory simulation of space plasma phenomena, high-altitude chemical releases,
and in situ and remote sensing space plasma measurements.
Personnel: 85 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Plasma Physics Division 6700
Associate Superintendent 6701
Administrative Ocer 6702
Senior Scientist, Directed Energy Physics 6703
Senior Scientist, Radiation Physics and High Energy
Density Materials 6705
Senior Scientist, Intense Particle Beams and Plasma Processes 6709
Head, Radiation Hydrodynamics Branch 6720
Head, Laser Plasma Branch 6730
Head, Charged Particle Physics Branch 6750
Head, Pulsed Power Physics Branch 6770
Head, Beam Physics Branch 6790
Point of contact: Code 6700, (202) 767-2723
RADIATION
HYDRODYNAMICS
BRANCH
6720
SENIOR SCIENTIST FOR
DIRECTED ENERGY
PHYSICS
6703
SENIOR SCIENTIST FOR
RADIATION PHYSICS AND
HIGH ENERGY DENSITY
MATERIALS
6705
BEAM PHYSICS
BRANCH
6790
PULSED POWER
PHYSICS BRANCH
6770
CHARGED PARTICLE
PHYSICS BRANCH
6750
LASER PLASMA
BRANCH
6730
SENIOR SCIENTIST FOR
INTENSE PARTICLE BEAMS
AND PLASMA PROCESSES
6709
PLASMA PHYSICS DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
6700
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
6701
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
6702
82
Code 6800
Research Activity Areas
Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Nanoelectronics
Plasmonics
Energy harvesting
Quantum information
Sensing
Surface and Interface Sciences
Epitaxial growth of graphene
Growth of hyper-abrupt junctions
Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics
Electronic Materials
Advanced elemental and compound semiconductors,
high-k dielectrics, and second-order materials
Unique materials characterization
Fabrication of electronic devices with high degree of
complexity and precision
Computational Modeling and Simulation
Fast principles atomistic calculations
Device modeling activities
Modeling coherent interaction of electromagnetic
elds with electron beams
Power Electronics
SiC and GaN epitaxial growth research
Characterization of defects in SiC and GaN
Development of advanced SiC and GaN power
device processes
Reliability of SiC and GaN power devices
Microwave, Millimeter, and
Sub-Millimeter Technology
Millimeter-wave, sub-millimeter-wave and
terahertz technology
Vacuum electronics
Solid-state electronics
Filters and control components
Optoelectronics
Design and synthesis of new materials in the IR
spectrum region
Photovoltaics
High-eciency technologies for portable photo-
voltaic power systems
Radiation Effects
Particle irradiation
Photons irradiation
Displacement damage dose eects in materials
and devices
The EPICENTER specializes in molecular beam
epitaxial growth of nanostructures created by alter-
nating layers of narrow bandgap materials made
available from four ultrahigh-vacuum chambers.
These structures are expected to improve the per-
formance of far-infrared detectors, midwave lasers,
and superhigh frequency transistors and resonant
tunneling diodes.
Electronics Science and Technology Division
83
Dr. b. LevusH
Basic Responsibilities
The Electronics Science and Technology Division conducts programs of basic science and applied research
and development in nanoscience and nanotechnology, surface and interface sciences, electronic materials, com-
putational modeling and simulation, power electronics, microwave, millimeter, and sub-millimeter technology,
optoelectronics, photovoltaic and radiation eects. The activities of the Division integrate device research with
basic materials investigations and with systems research and development needs.
Personnel: 107 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Electronics Science and Technology Division 6800
Associate Superintendent 6801
Administrative Ocer 6802
Senior Scientist for Nanoelectronics 6877
Head, Optoelectronics and Radiation Eects Branch 6810
Head, Electromagnetics Technology Branch 6850
Head, Physics of Electronic Materials Branch 6870
Head, High Power Electronics Branch 6880
Point of contact: Code 6802, (202) 767-3416
84
Code 6900
Research Activity Areas
Biologically Derived Microstructures
Self-assembly, molecular machining
Synthetic membranes
Nanocomposites
Tailored electronic materials
Molecular engineering, biomimetic materials
Molecular imprinting
Viral scaolds
Multifunctional decontamination coatings
Biosensors
Binding polypeptides and proteins
Cell-based biosensors
DNA biosensors
Fiber-optic biosensors
Flow immunosensors
Array-based sensors
Optical biosensors
Microuidics and Microarrays
Novel Materials
Soil/groundwater explosives detection
Single chain and single domain antibodies
Nanoparticles and quantum dots
Nano- and mesoporous materials
Quantum dot and protein conjugates
Biomimetic materials
Molecular Biology
Genomics and proteomics of marine bacteria
Tissue engineering
Gene arrays, biomarkers
System and synthetic biology
Energy Harvesting
Biomaterials for charge storage
Ocean oor biofuel cell
Photo-induced electron transfer
5-color quantum dot immunohistochemical labeling
of mouse splenic tissue and an image of live HEK
cells microinjected with quantum dots. Center:
3-color quantum dot immunoassay results along
with a schematic showing quantum dot potential to
function as both a donor or as an acceptor in dierent
types of energy transfer biosensing congurations.
Bottom: Quantum dot solutions highlighting their
size-tunable photoluminescence.
Porphyrin-functionalized organosilicate sorbents provide
capture and neutralization of vapor phase TIC/TIM targets.
These materials oer the potential for new approaches to air
ltration applicable to personal and facility protection.
Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering
85
Basic Responsibilities
The Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering is using the tools of modern biology, physics,
chemistry, and engineering to develop advanced materials and sensors. The long-term research goal is rst to
gain a fundamental understanding of the relationship between molecular architecture and the function of
materials, then apply this knowledge to solve problems for the Navy and DoD community. The key theme is
the study of complex bio/molecular systems with the aim of understanding how “nature” has approached
the solution of dicult structural and sensing problems. Technological areas currently being studied include
molecular and microstructure design, molecular biology, imaging of cells using nanoparticles, sensor design
and prototype development for biosurveillance or underwater chemical detection, and energy harvesting.
Much of the research deals with the engineering of peptides, proteins, and nanoparticles into complex mi-
crostructures for use in advanced material applications, and the harnessing of the recognition functions of
proteins and cells for the development of advanced sensors. A highly multidisciplinary sta is required to
pursue these research and development programs. The Center provides a stimulating environment for cross-
disciplinary programs in the areas of immunology, biochemistry, systems biology, electrochemistry, synthetic
chemistry, microbiology, microlithography, photochemistry, biophysics, spectroscopy, advanced diagnostics,
organic synthesis, and electro-optical engineering.
Personnel: 57 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Director, Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering 6900
Assistant Director 6901
Administrative Ocer 6902
Senior Scientist for Biosurveillance 6905
Head, Laboratory for Biosensors and Biomaterials 6910
Head, Laboratory for Biomolecular Dynamics 6920
Head, Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Interfacial
Interactions 6930
Point of contact: Code 6902, (202) 404-6012
Dr. b.r. rATNA
LABORATORY FOR
MOLECULARLY ENGINEERED
MATERIALS & SURFACES
6950
LABORATORY FOR THE
STUDY OF MOLECULAR
INTERFACIAL INTERACTIONS
6930
LABORATORY FOR
BIOMOLECULAR DYNAMICS
6920
LABORATORY FOR
BIOSENSORS AND
BIOMATERIALS
6910
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
6902
SENIOR SCIENTIST FOR
BIOSURVEILLANCE
6905
CENTER FOR BIO/MOLECULAR
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
DIRECTOR
6900
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
6901
SENIOR SCIENTIFIC
STAFF
6907
*Acting
87
ocEan anD atmosphEric sciEncE anD
tEchnology DirEctoratE
89
OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE
Code 7000
The Ocean and Atmospheric Sci-
ence and Technology Directorate
performs research and development
in the elds of acoustics, remote sens-
ing, oceanography, marine geosciences,
marine meteorology, and space science.
Areas of emphasis in acoustics include
advanced acoustic concepts and com-
putation, acoustic signal processing,
physical acoustics, acoustic systems,
ocean acoustics, and acoustic simulation
and tactics. Areas of emphasis in remote
sensing include radio, infrared, and
optical sensors, remote sensing phys-
ics and hydrodynamics, remote sensing
simulation, and imaging systems. Areas
of emphasis in oceanography include
coastal and open ocean dynamics, ocean
modeling and prediction, coastal and
open ocean processes, remote sens-
ing applications to oceanography, and
marine biocorrosion processes. Areas of
emphasis in marine geosciences include
marine physics, seaoor sciences,
geospatial information science and
technology, and mapping, charting,
and geodesy. Areas of emphasis in ma-
rine meteorology include atmospheric
dynamics for theater-wide, tactical-
scale prediction systems and forecast
support, and meterological applica-
tions development. Areas of emphasis
in space science include middle and
upper atmosphere physics, solar ter-
restrial relationships, solar physics, and
higher energy astronomy. Senior naval
ocers are assigned as military advi-
sors to help maintain the directorate
focus on operational Navy and other
DoD requirements in these areas of em-
phasis. The directorate is responsible
for administrative and technical sup-
port to major activities in Washington,
DC; Stennis Space Center, Mississippi;
and Monterey, California.
90
Dr. E.R. Franchi was born in Huntington, New York. He
graduated from Clarkson University in 1968 with a bach-
elor of science degree in mathematics. He received his master of
science (1970) and Ph.D. (1973) degrees, both in applied math-
ematics, from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. After completing
his graduate studies, Dr. Franchi accepted a research position
with Bolt, Beranek, and Newman where he performed validation
studies of underwater acoustic propagation and noise models.
Dr. Franchi joined the Naval Research Laboratory in 1975 as
a research mathematician in the Acoustics Division. In this posi-
tion, he conducted and directed research in low frequency acous-
tic reverberation and scattering, including design and conduct of
eld experiments, development of signal processing techniques,
data analysis and interpretation, computer prediction models,
and active sonar performance studies. In 1986, he was named
Head of the Acoustic Systems Branch where he was responsible
for programs that emphasized theoretical, experimental, and
computational research to understand the physical mechanisms
of acoustic propagation, scattering, and ambient noise that con-
trol the design and performance of large-aperture passive sonar
systems, low frequency active sonar systems, and shallow water sonar systems.
In July 1988, Dr. Franchi was appointed to the Senior Executive Service and selected as the Associate Tech-
nical Director of the Naval Ocean Research and Development Activity (NORDA) and its Director of Ocean
Acoustics and Technology. The Directorate conducted basic, exploratory, and advanced research and develop-
ment and program management in the areas of acoustic model development and simulation, ocean acous-
tics measurements, and ocean engineering in support of all undersea warfare missions. In October 1992, the
Directorate became the Center for Environmental Acoustics in the Acoustics Division of the Naval Research
Laboratory, with Dr. Franchi as Director. Dr. Franchi was selected to the position of Superintendent of the
Acoustics Division in October 1993. The Acoustics Division conducts basic, exploratory, and applied research
and development in areas of acoustic modeling and simulation, ocean acoustics measurements, acoustic sys-
tems development, acoustic signal processing, and physical acoustics. He was responsible for the technical/
scientic management, direction, and administration of programs with a total budget in excess of $25M, and
for ecient management of division resources including the activities of approximately 110 civilian personnel.
He served as Acting Associate Director of Research for the Ocean and Atmospheric Science and Technology
Directorate from October 2001 to May 2002 and from June 2007 to April 2008. In April 2008, he was selected as
the Associate Director of Research.
Dr. Franchi received the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive in 2003. He has over 35 years
experience in underwater acoustics research and is the author/co-author of over 35 publications. He is rec-
ognized as an authority on underwater acoustic scattering and reverberation and has played major roles in
Navy low frequency active sonar programs as both performer and advisor/consultant. He served as the U.S.
National Leader of The Technical Cooperation Program’s multinational Panel on ASW Systems and Technol-
ogy from 1996 to 2002, and served as its Panel Chairman from 2002 to 2009. In 2011, Dr. Franchi received the
TTCP Personal Achievement Award in recognition of his signicant contributions and strategic vision in lead-
ing the ASW Panel. He represents the United States to the NATO Maritime Science and Technology Experts
Committee and served as its Committee Chairman from 2010 to the present. In 2011, he was appointed to the
NATO Science and Technology Reform Implementation Team. He was elected to Pi Mu Epsilon, the Honor-
ary National Mathematics Society, while an undergraduate at Clarkson University. Dr. Franchi is a member of
the Acoustical Society of America and past member of the Mathematical Association of America. From 2004 to
2013, he volunteered his time to serve on the Board of Directors of the NRL Federal Credit Union.
Associate Director of Research for Ocean and
Atmospheric Science and Technology
91
Key Personnel
Title Code
Associate Director of Research for Ocean and Atmospheric
Science and Technology 7000
Special Assistant 7001
Military Deputy 7005
Head, Oce of Research Support Services 7030
Superintendent, Acoustics Division 7100
Superintendent, Remote Sensing Division 7200
Superintendent, Oceanography Division 7300
Superintendent, Marine Geosciences Division 7400
Superintendent, Marine Meteorology Division 7500
Superintendent, Space Science Division 7600
Point of contact: Code 7000A, (202) 404-8174
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF
RESEARCH FOR
OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
7000
STAFF
SPECIAL ASSISTANT
7001
MILITARY DEPUTY7005
OFFICE OF RESEARCH
SUPPORT SERVICES
7030
MARINE
GEOSCIENCES
DIVISION
7400
SPACE SCIENCE
DIVISION
7600
MARINE
METEOROLOGY
DIVISION
7500
ACOUSTICS
DIVISION
7100
REMOTE SENSING
DIVISION
7200
OCEANOGRAPHY
DIVISION
7300
92
Code 7030
Staff Activity Areas
Public Affairs Ofce
Community relations
News releases
Exhibits
Information
Freedom of Information Act
NRL-SSC Network Management Ofce
Data communications
Data networking
Computer network maintenance
Ofce of Research Support
Conference coordination, video teleconferencing
Directives, reports, forms
Facilities Ofce
Facilities planning and maintenance
Vehicles
HPC Management Ofce
Supercomputing interface management
Safety/Environmental Ofce
Industrial/laboratory safety
Specialized safety training
Hazard abatement
Mishap prevention
Hazardous materials program
Hazardous waste disposal
Ofce of Research Support Services (NRL-SSC)
93
Dr. H.C. ePPerT, Jr.
Basic Responsibilities
The Oce of Research Support Services is responsible for the operational and management support nec-
essary for the day-to-day operations at NRL Stennis Space Center, Mississippi (NRL-SSC). The Head of NRL-
SSC acts for the Commanding Ocer in dealing with local Navy, Federal, and civil activities and personnel
on matters relating to NRL-SSC support activities and facilities, community and multicommand issues, and
safety and disaster control measures.
Support functions include public aairs, network support, safety, high performance computer manage-
ment, and support services to include management, administration, and facilities.
Personnel: 8 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Head, Oce of Research Support Services 7030
Administrative Ocer 7030.2
Head, Facilities Oce 7030.3
Public Aairs Ocer 7030.4
Safety/Environmental Ocer 7030.5
HPC Management Oce 7030.6
NRL-SSC Network Management Oce 7030.8
Point of contact: Code 7030, (228) 688-4010; DSN 828-4010
*Acting
94
Code 7100
Research Activity Areas
Physical Acoustics
Structural acoustics
Quantum eects in phononic crystals
Nanomechanical devices
Fiber-optic acoustic sensors
Acoustic transduction
Inverse scattering
Target strength/radiation modeling
Flow-induced noise and vibration
Active sonar classication
Underwater distributed, networked sensing
AUV-based sensing
Acoustic Signal Processing and Systems
Underwater acoustic communications and
networking
Limits of array performance
Waveguide invariant processing
Acoustic eld uncertainty
Acoustic interactions with transonic/
supersonic ows
Acoustic noise forecasting
Long-range underwater communications
Underwater distributed sensing networks
Ocean boundary scattering
Acoustic propagation
Acoustic inversion
Characterization of reverberation
Acoustic metamaterials
Acoustics of microuidic bubbly emulsions
Active sonar performance modeling
Compressive sensing
Acoustic classication
Nonlinear propagation
Underwater acoustic network warfare
Acoustic Simulation, Measurements, and
Tactics
Ocean acoustic propagation and scattering
models
Fleet application acoustic models
High-frequency seaoor and ocean acoustic
measurements
Riverine acoustics
Distributed sensing networks
Incorporating uncertainty in predictive models
Tactical acoustic simulations and databases
Warfare eectiveness studies and optimization
Environmental assessment and planning tools
Structural acoustic studies are conducted in the one-
million-gallon Acoustic Holographic Pool Facility.
NRL’s “Reliant” unmanned undersea vehicle with towed
acoustic array being deployed during a long range active
acoustics experiment.
Acoustics Division
95
Dr. D.g. ToDoroFF
Basic Responsibilities
The Acoustics Division conducts basic and applied research addressing the physics of acoustic signal
generation, propagation, scatter, and detection with the objective of improving the strategic and tactical capa-
bilities of the Navy and Marine Corps in the ocean and land operational environment. The Division’s scien-
tists and engineers perform collaborative research with scientists aliated with national and international
academic, private, and governmental research organizations. The Division’s research spans classical and
quantum physics, signal processing, the impact of uid dynamics on the oceans sound speed eld, the propa-
gation and scatter of acoustic signals in the ocean and land environments, structural and physical acoustics
including the development of MEMS and nanotechnology based sensors, and the application of networked
unmanned underwater vehicles and associated sensors to the Navy’s ASW, MCM, and ISR missions.
Personnel: 61 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Acoustics Division 7100
Associate Superintendent 7101
Administrative Ocer 7102
Naval Science (Acoustics) Research Coordinator 7105
Senior Scientist for Structural Acoustics 7106
Head, Physical Acoustics Branch 7130
Head, Acoustic Signal Processing and Systems Branch 7160
Head, Acoustic Simulation, Measurements, and Tactics Branch 7180
Point of contact: Code 7100, (202) 767-3482
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
7102
ACOUSTICS DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
7100
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
7101
NAVAL SCIENCE
(ACOUSTICS) RESEARCH
COORDINATOR
7105
SENIOR SCIENTIST
FOR
STRUCTURAL ACOUSTICS
7106
ACOUSTIC SIMULATION,
MEASUREMENTS, &
TACTICS BRANCH
7180
PHYSICAL
ACOUSTICS
BRANCH
7130
ACOUSTIC SIGNAL
PROCESSING AND SYSTEMS
BRANCH
7160
96
Code 7200
Research Activity Areas
Remote Sensing
Sensors
SAR
Imaging radar
Passive microwave imagers
CCDs and focal plane arrays
Thermal IR cameras
Fabry-Perot spectrometers
Imaging spectrometers
Radio interferometers
Optical interferometers
Adaptive optics
Lidar
Spaceborne and airborne systems
Research Areas
Radiative transfer modeling
Coastal oceans
Marine ocean boundary layer
Polar ice
Middle atmosphere
Global ocean phenomenology
Environmental change
Ocean surface wind vector
Soil moisture
Ionosphere
Data assimilation
Astrophysics
Optical interferometry
Radio interferometry
Fundamental astrometry and reference frames
Fundamental astrophysics
Star formation
Stellar atmospheres and envelopes
Interstellar medium, interstellar
scattering pulsars
Low-frequency astronomy
Physics of Atmospheric/Ocean Interaction
Mesoscale, ne-structure, and microstructure
Aerosol and cloud physics
Mixed layer and thermocline applications
Sea-truth towed instrumentation techniques
Turbulent jets and wakes
Nonlinear and breaking ocean waves
Stratied and rotating ows
Turbulence modeling
Boundary layer hydrodynamics
Marine hydrodynamics
Computational hydrodynamics
Imaging Research/Systems
Remotely sensed signatures analysis/simulation
Real-time signal and image processing
algorithm/systems
Image data compression methodology
Image fusion
Automatic target recognition
Scene/sensor noise characterization
Image enhancement/noise reduction
Scene classication techniques
Radar and laser imaging systems studies
Coherent/incoherent imaging sensor exploitation
Numerical modeling simulation
Environmental imagery analysis
The Hyperspectral Imager for
the Coastal Ocean, or HICO,
is optimized to image the
coastal ocean and adjacent
land in 128 contiguous color
bands. This spectral data is
used to develop maps of water
depth, water optical properties,
land vegetation, and soil bearing strength. HICO was deployed to the
International Space Station in September 2009, providing scientic
imagery of varied coastal types worldwide.
Remote Sensing Division
The WindSat polarimetric
radiometer prior to
spacecraft integration.
97
Dr. r.M. beviLACquA
Basic Responsibilities
The Remote Sensing Division is the Navy’s center of excellence for remote sensing research and develop-
ment, conducting a program of basic research, science, and applications aimed at the development of new
concepts for sensors and imaging systems for objects and targets on the Earth, in the near-Earth environment,
and in deep space. The research, both theoretical and experimental, deals with discovering and understand-
ing the basic physical principles and mechanisms that give rise to target and background emission and to
absorption and emission by the intervening medium. The accomplishment of this research requires the de-
velopment of sensor systems technology. This development eort includes active and passive sensor systems
to be used for the study and analysis of the physical characteristics of phenom ena that give rise to naturally
occurring background radiation, such as that caused by the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans, as well as man-
made or induced phenomena, such as ship/submarine hydrodynamic eects. The research also includes
theory, laboratory, and eld experiments leading to ground-based, airborne, and space-based systems for use
in such areas as environmental remote sensing (including improved meteorological support systems for the
operational Navy), astrometry, astrophysics, surveillance, and nonacoustic ASW. Special emphasis is given to
developing space-based platforms and exploiting existing space systems.
Personnel: 97 full-time civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Remote Sensing Division 7200
Associate Superintendent 7201
Administrative Ocer 7202
Military Deputy 7205
Head, Radio/Infrared/Optical Sensors Branch 7210
Head, Remote Sensing Physics Branch 7220
Head, Coastal and Ocean Remote Sensing Branch 7230
Head, Image Science and Applications Branch 7260
Point of contact: Code 7200, (202) 767-3391
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
7202
IMAGE SCIENCE AND
APPLICATIONS BRANCH
7260
RADIO/IR/OPTICAL
SENSORS BRANCH
7210
SPECIAL PROJECTS
OFFICE
7207
MILITARY
DEPUTY
7205
COASTAL AND OCEAN
REMOTE SENSING BRANCH
7230
REMOTE SENSING
PHYSICS BRANCH
7220
REMOTE SENSING DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
7200
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
7201
98
Code 7300
Research Activity Areas
Ocean Dynamics and Prediction
Circulation
Global resolution of circulation and meso-
scale elds
Littoral circulation at the coast, bays, and
estuaries
Satellite observation processing and
assimilation
UUV adaptive sampling
Observation system simulation experiments
Ice volume and ice drift
Tidal currents and heights
Surface eects
Surface wave eects globally and into bays
Wave breaking
Mixed layer dynamics
Swell propagation and dynamics
Phase averaged wave evolution
Phase resolved wave dynamics
Nearshore
Wave breaking at the shore
Rip currents at the shore
Tidal currents and heights into rivers
Nonlinear wave interaction
Sensor deployment optimization
Acoustic eects
Sound speed variation for acoustic
propagation
Internal waves, solitons, and bores for beam
focusing
Wave bubble entrainment and noise
generation
Ocean Sciences
Dynamical processes
Optical turbulence
Biological sensing and modeling
Optical thin layers
Coastal current systems
Waves and bubbles
Coupled systems
Air/ocean/acoustic coupling
Coupled bio/optical/physical processes
Coupled physical/sediment processes
Remote sensing applications
3D optical proling
Color/hyperspectral signatures
Ocean optics
Sea surface salinity
Microbiologically inuenced corrosion
Metal-microbe interaction
Rayleigh Bernard Convective Tank provides a
controlled environment capable of generating turbulent
microstructures at various repeatable intensities. Environmental scanning electron microscope with focused
ion beam (ESEM/FIB) coupled with an energy dispersive
X-ray detector.
Sea surface height from the 1/25° Global Hybrid Coordinate
Ocean Model (HYCOM) for the Northern Pacic Ocean.
Oceanography Division
99
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
7302
OCEAN SCIENCES
BRANCH
7330
OCEAN DYNAMICS &
PREDICTION BRANCH
7320
OFFICE OF THE SENIOR
SCIENTIST FOR
MARINE MOLECULAR
PROCESSES
7303
MILITARY
DEPUTY
7305
OCEANOGRAPHY DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
7300
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
7301
Basic Responsibilities
The Oceanography Division conducts basic and applied research in description and modeling of biologi-
cal, physical, and dynamical processes in open ocean, regional, and littoral areas; in exploitation of satellite,
airborne, and in situ sensors for environmental characterization; and in investigation and application of
microbial processes to Navy problems. The oceanographic research is both theoretical and experimental in
nature and is focused on understanding and modeling ocean, coastal, and littoral area hydro/thermodynam-
ics, circulation, waves, ice dynamics, air-sea exchange, optics, and small and microscale processes. Analytical
methods and algorithms are developed to provide quantitative retrieval of geophysical parameters of Navy
interest from state-of-the-art sensor systems. The Division work includes analysis of biological processes that
mediate and control optical properties of the oceans, coastal, and littoral regions, and microbially induced
corrosion/metal-microbe interaction. The Division programs are designed to be responsive to and to antici-
pate Naval needs. Transition of Division products to the DoD, Navy systems developers, operational Navy,
and civilian (dual use) programs is a primary goal. The Division’s programs are coordinated and interactive
with other NRL programs and activities, ONR’s research programs, and other government agencies involved
in oceanographic activities. The Division also collaborates and cooperates with scientists from the academic
community and other U.S. and foreign laboratories.
Personnel: 78 full-time civilian; 1 military
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Oceanography Division 7300
Associate Superintendent 7301
Administrative Ocer 7302
Oce of the Senior Scientist for Marine Molecular Processes 7303
Military Deputy 7305
Head, Ocean Dynamics and Prediction Branch 7320
Head, Ocean Sciences Branch 7330
Point of contact: Code 7301, (228) 688-4704; DSN 828-4704
Dr. r.H. PreLLer
100
Code 7400
Research Activity Areas
Marine Geology
Sedimentary processes
Sediment microstructure
Pore uid ow
Diapirism, volcanism, faulting, mass movement
Biogenic and thermogenic methane
Hydrate distribution, formation, and dissociation
Small-scale granular/uid dynamics
Marine Geophysics
Seismic wave propagation
Physics of low-frequency acoustic propagation
Acoustic energy interaction with topography and
inhomogeneities
Gravimetry and geodesy
Geomagnetic modeling
Marine Geotechnique
Acoustic seaoor characterization
Geoacoustic modeling
Geotechnical properties and behavior of sedi-
ments
Measurement and modeling of high-frequency
acoustic propagation and scattering
Mine burial processes
Marine biogeochemistry
Animal-microbe-sediment interactions
Early sediment diagenesis
Biomineralization of palladium species
Physics-based and numerical modeling of
sediment strength
In the Marine Geosciences Division, scientists perform laboratory
experiments with a small oscillatory ow tunnel (S-OFT) to study
the formation and migration of sand ripples. Rippled sand beds
are ubiquitous on the seaoor in shallow water. Understanding
the complex response of the seaoor to forcing from surface
waves and currents is important for Naval operations from
amphibious landings to mine warfare. Shown in the image is
the S-OFT including a mounted laser and four high-speed video
cameras to perform tomographic particle image velocimetry
(Tomo-PIV) measurements, which estimate the three-dimensional
uid velocity in a volume up to 10 cm3. The upper inset is a
picture of a sand ripple formed using a bimodal distribution of
sand where the smaller sand particles are darker and the larger
sand particles are lighter in color. The lower inset is a prole
image of a sand ripple from the same experiment where the
sorting processes between large and small grains have formed
visible strata. Ripple migration is from right to left in both inset
images.
Marine Geosciences Division
Geospatial Sciences and Technology
Digital database design
Digital product analysis and standardization
Data compression techniques and exploitation
Hydrographic survey techniques
Bathymetry extraction techniques from remote and
acoustic imagery
Modeling of nearshore morphodynamics
Geospatial portal design with 2D and 3D interfaces
Characterization of the littoral from airborne
platforms
In Situ and Laboratory Sensors
High-resolution subseaoor 2D and 3D seismic
imaging
Laser/hyperspectral bathymetry/topography
Swath acoustic backscatter imaging
Sediment pore water pressure, permeability, and
undrained shear strength
Compressional and shear wave velocity and
attenuation
Airborne geophysics, gravity, and magnetics
Seaoor magnetic uctuation
Sediment microfabric change with pore uid
and/or gas change
Instrumented mine shapes
Bottom currents and pressure uctuations
101
Dr. H.C. ePPerT, Jr.
Basic Responsibilities
The Marine Geosciences Division conducts a broadly based, multidisciplinary program of scientic
research, advanced technology development, and applied research in marine geosciences, geodesy, geospatial
information, and related technologies. This includes investigations of basic processes within ocean basins,
littoral regions and adjacent land areas, and arctic regions; development of models, sensors, and techniques;
and the exploitation of this knowledge and technology to enhance Navy and Marine Corps systems, plans,
and operations, and to meet national needs.
As the Navy’s subject matter expert in the areas of Geospatial Information and Services (GI&S), the
Division provides vital technical support to the Oceanographer/Navigator of the Navy, CNO, N2/N6E, the
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the Tri-Service Community. NRL also contributes to the
development of leading-edge geospatial technology by reviewing emerging GI&S standards and products.
Close coordination and interactions with the Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Com-
mand, Naval Oceanographic Oce, CNO, Oce of Naval Research (ONR), Systems Commands, Warfare
Centers, NGA, and the other DoD and national organizations are essential to the success of Division pro-
grams, with transition of Division technology to systems developers and to the operational Navy a primary
goal. The Division program is coordinated and interactive with other NRL programs and activities, ONR’s
Research Program Department, NOAA, USGS, NSF, and other government agencies involved in seaoor
activities. The Division collaborates and cooperates with scientists from the academic community, other U.S.
and foreign laboratories, and industry.
Personnel: 62 full-time civilian; 2 military
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Marine Geosciences Division 7400
Associate Superintendent 7401
Administrative Ocer 7402
Head, Oce of Geospatial Science and Technology Innovation 7403
Military Deputy 7405
Head, Marine Physics Branch 7420
Head, Seaoor Sciences Branch 7430
Head, Geospatial Sciences and Technology Branch 7440
Point of contact: Code 7402, (228) 688-4660; DSN 828-4660
GEOSPATIAL SCIENCES AND
TECHNOLOGY BRANCH
7440
MARINE
PHYSICS
BRANCH
7420
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
7402
MILITARY
DEPUTY
7405
SEAFLOOR
SCIENCES
BRANCH
7430
SUPERINTENDENT
7400
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
7401
MARINE GEOSCIENCES DIVISION
*Acting
102
Code 7500
Research Activity Areas
Expert systems
Aviation risk assessment
Atmospheric Physics
Air-sea interaction
Cloud and aerosol microphysics
Radiative transfer
Cloud and aerosol radiative properties
Aerosol characterization
Tropical cyclone structure
Gravity wave drag
Measurement Capabilities Atmospheric
Physics
Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Laboratory
Platform Coastal Facility for Atmospheric Research
Aircraft Aerosol and Radiation Instrumentation
Packages
Aerosol and Radiation Instrumentation Calibration
Facilities
Satellite Data/Imagery
Automated cloud properties
Sensor calibration/validation
Nighttime environmental analysis
Multisensor data fusion
Tropical cyclone characterization
Dust/aerosols monitoring
Satellite imagery analysis and enhancement
Rain rate and snow cover
Precipitation and cloud climatology
Future satellite/constellation assessment
Tactical meteorology
Training and public outreach
Decision Aids
Probabilistic Decision aids
Refractivity/ducting
Ceiling/visibility
Fog/turbulence/icing
Atmospheric acoustics
EM/EO propagation
Tropical cyclones/consensus forecasts
Port studies
Typhoon havens
Forecaster handbooks
Quantication of uncertainty
Counter-piracy guidance
Tropical cyclone sortie guidance
Forecast diculty guidance
Ship wind and wave limits
Optimal ship routing – fuel savings
Atmospheric Dynamics and
Prediction
Global to tactical scale
Deterministic and probabilistic forecasting
Large eddy simulation
Boundary layer processes
Land surface processes and modeling
Cloud microphysics and radiative processes
Coastal processes and modeling
Arctic processes and modeling
Urban eects
Coupled ocean/atmosphere phenomena
Madden Julian oscillation
Atmospheric waves and scale interactions
Coupled littoral prediction
Hydrology and hydrological cycle
Tropical cyclones
Aerosol particles
Gravity waves
Predictability
Ensembles design
Advanced numerical methods
GPU-based computing
Data Assimilation
Hybrid ensemble-variational techniques
3D and 4D variational analysis
Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF)
Quality control and bias correction
Tropical cyclone initialization
Remotely sensed data assimilation
Adjoint technique and applications
Radar data assimilation
Targeted observing strategies
Data selection techniques
Aerosol and trace gas assimilation
UAV/UAS data assimilation
Observing system assimilation experiment
Tactical Environmental Support
Rapid environmental assessment
Through-the-sensor measurements
Atmospheric impact on
weapons systems
Data fusion
Nowcasting
Visualization
Verication and Validation
Information Assurance
Marine Meteorology Division
103
Dr. s.w. CHANg
Basic Responsibilities
The Marine Meteorology Division conducts a basic and applied research and development program
designed to improve scientic understanding of atmospheric processes that impact Fleet operations and to
develop automated systems that analyze, simulate, predict, and interpret the structure and behavior of these
processes and their eect on naval weapons systems. Basic and applied research includes work in air-sea
interaction, aerosol and cloud physics, atmospheric turbulence, orographically forced ow, atmospheric
predictability, scale interactions observation impact, advanced data assimilation, ensemble prediction, tropi-
cal dynamics, and numerical methods. Research and development ranges from development of atmospheric
analysis/forecast systems and satellite data products to the development of tactical decision aids for opera-
tions support. Interdisciplinary research supports the development of coupled analysis/forecast systems,
including components for ocean, wave, land surface, aerosol, chemistry, and middle atmosphere prediction.
NRL-Monterey (NRL-MRY) is co-located with the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center
(FNMOC) and has developed and transitioned to FNMOC and other operational centers the data assimila-
tion, global, and mesoscale weather forecast models, aerosol prediction systems, and satellite applications
products that form the backbone of the Navy’s worldwide environmental forecasting capability. Specialties
of the Division include numerical weather prediction, data assimilation, tropical cyclones, marine boundary
layer processes, aerosols, rapid environmental assessment, environmental decision aids, and satellite data
analysis, interpretation, and application.
Personnel: 74 full-time civilian; 1 military
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Marine Meteorology Division 7500
Associate Superintendent 7501
Administrative Ocer 7502
Lead Scientist, Probabilistic Prediction Research Oce 7504
Military Deputy 7505
Head, Atmospheric Dynamics and Prediction Branch 7530
Head, Meteorological Applications Development Branch 7540
Point of contact: Code 7500, (831) 656-4721; DSN 878-4721
MILITARY
DEPUTY
7505
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
7502
INTERAGENCY
COORDINATION
METEOROLOGY OFFICE
7503
METEOROLOGICAL
APPLICATIONS
DEVELOPMENT BRANCH
7540
ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS
AND PREDICTION
BRANCH
7530
MARINE METEOROLOGY DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
7500
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
7501
PROBABILISTIC
PREDICTION RESEARCH
OFFICE
7504
104
Code 7600
Research Activity Areas
Geospace Science and Technology
Conduct research to observe, understand, model,
and forecast the Earth’s geospace environment and
its connections to its lower and upper boundaries, to
facilitate and create functional capabilities.
With SuperMISTI (Mobile Imaging & Spectroscopic Threat
Identication) in two 20-ft ISO shipping containers, SSD
demonstrates detection and identication of radiological/
nuclear materials at relevant operational stando distances.
High-Energy Space Environment
Advance the understanding of the high-energy en-
vironment through development and deployment
of advanced detectors, simulation of the environ-
ments and operations concepts, and interpretation
and theoretical modeling of the observed phenom-
ena, to address priority S&T goals.
Space Science Division
NRL’s MIGHTI will launch
in 2017 aboard NASA’s
Ionospheric Connection
Explorer to measure the
winds in the thermosphere/
ionosphere, needed for
accurate research and reliable
operational forecasts.
Research in solar and heliophysics space-based sensors —
notably in-house coronagraphs, heliospheric imagers, solar
spectrometers — and a stream of insights and discoveries
driven by resulting data, provide timely knowledge about
solar geoeective storms for defense and civilian readiness.
Solar and Heliospheric Physics
Develop improved heliospace environment un-
derstanding, awareness, sensors, forecast capabili-
ties, and monitoring tools that predict operational
impacts and enable real-time threat warning, and
transition these developments as needed.
105
Dr. J.P. DAHLburg
Basic Responsibilities
The Space Science Division conducts a broad-spectrum RDT&E program in solar-terrestrial physics, astro-
physics, upper/middle atmospheric science, and astronomy. Instruments to be own on satellites, sounding
rockets and balloons, and ground-based facilities and mathematical models are conceived and developed.
Researchers apply these and other capabilities to the study of the atmospheres of the Sun and Earth, including
solar activity and its eects on the Earth's ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and middle atmosphere; laboratory
astrophysics; and the unique physics and properties of celestial sources. The science is important to orbital
tracking, radio communications, and navigation that aect the operation of ships and aircraft, utilitization of
the near-space and space environment of the Earth, and the fundamental understanding of natural radiation
and geophysical phenomena.
Personnel: 77 full-time civilian; 1 military
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Space Science Division 7600
Associate Superintendent 7601
Administrative Ocer 7602
Space Test Program Ocer, Kirtland AFB, NM 7603
Senior Scientist for Sun-Earth Systems Research 7605
Head, Geospace Science and Technology Branch 7630
Head, High-Energy Space Environment Branch 7650
Head, Solar and Helioshperic Physics Branch 7680
Point of contact: Code 7602, (202) 767-3248
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
7602
SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC
PHYSICS
BRANCH
7680
HIGH-ENERGY
SPACE ENVIRONMENT
BRANCH
7650
GEOSPACE SCIENCE AND
TECHNOLOGY
BRANCH
7630
SPACE TEST PROGRAM
(STP) OFFICE
7603
SPACE SCIENCE DIVISION
SUPERINTENDENT
7600
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
7601
SENIOR SCIENTIST FOR
SUN-EARTH
SYSTEMS RESEARCH
7605
107
naval cEntEr for spacE tEchnology
109
NAVAL CENTER FOR SPACE TECHNOLOGY
Code 8000
forming system engineering to allocate
design requirements to subsystems, and
performing engineering development
and initial operation to test and evalu-
ate selected spacecraft subsystems and
systems. The Center is a focal point and
integrator for those divisions at NRL
whose technologies are used in space
systems. The Center also provides sys-
tems engineering and technical direction
assistance to system acquisition man-
agers of major space systems. In this
role, technology transfer is a major goal
and motivates a continuous search for
new technologies and capabilities and
the development of prototypes that
demonstrate the integration of such tech-
nologies.
In its role to preserve and enhance
a strong space technology base and
provide expert assistance in the de-
velopment and acquisition of space
systems that support naval missions,
the Naval Center for Space Technology
performs basic and applied research
through advanced development in
all areas of interest to the Navy space
program. The Center develops space-
craft, systems using these spacecraft,
and ground command and control sta-
tions. Principal functions of the Center
include understanding and clarify-
ing requirements, recognizing and
prosecuting promising research and
development, analyzing and testing
systems to quantify their capabilities,
developing operational concepts that
exploit new technical capabilities, per-
110
Mr. P.G. Wilhelm was born in New York City. He attended
Purdue University, where he received a B.S.E.E. degree
in 1957. By 1961, he had completed all the course work for an
M.S.E. degree from George Washington University.
From 1957 to 1959, Mr. Wilhelm served as an electrical engi-
neer with Stewart Warner Electronics where he was assigned
to a project to redesign the UPM-70, a Navy radar test set. In
March 1959, he joined the Naval Research Laboratory as an
electrical scientist in the Electronics Division. In December 1959,
he joined the Satellite Techniques Branch. In 1961, he became
Head of the Satellite Instrument Section; in 1965, he became
Head of the Satellite Techniques Branch; and in 1974, Head of
the Spacecraft Technology Center. In these positions, he performed satellite system design, equipment devel-
opment, environmental testing, launch operations, and orbital data handling. In 1981, he was named Super-
intendent of the Space Systems and Technology Division, the Navy’s principal organization, or lead labora-
tory, for space. He is credited with contributions in the design, development, and operation of more than 100
scientic and Fleet-support satellites. He has been awarded ve patents. In October 1986, he was appointed
Director of the newly established Naval Center for Space Technology. The Center’s mission is to “preserve
and enhance a strong space technology base and provide expert assistance in the development and acquisi-
tion of space systems which support naval missions.”
Mr. Wilhelm has been recognized with numerous awards including the Navy’s Meritorious Civilian
Service Award, the DoD Distinguished Civilian Service Award, the Presidential Meritorious Executive Award,
the Presidential Distinguished Rank Award, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Aerospace
and Electronic Systems Group Man of the Year Award, the NRL E.O. Hulburt Annual Science and Engineer-
ing Award, the Dexter Conrad Award, the Rotary National Stellar Award, the NRL Lifetime Achievement
Award, and in May 1999, Mr. Wilhelm received the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
(AIAA) Goddard Astronautics Award. He also has been elected a Fellow of the Washington Academy of Sci-
ences and a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and was elected to the National
Academy of Engineering. Mr. Wilhelm is also the rst recipient of the R.L. Easton Award for excellence in
engineering.
Director, Naval Center for Space Technology
111
SPACE SYSTEMS
DEVELOPMENT
DEPARTMENT
8100
SPACECRAFT
ENGINEERING
DEPARTMENT
8200
MILITARY DEPUTY
8020
TECHNICAL STAFF
8001.1
ADMINISTRATIVE/
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
OFFICE
8010
DIRECTOR
NAVAL CENTER
FOR
SPACE TECHNOLOGY
8000
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR
8001
Key Personnel
Title Code
Director, Naval Center for Space Technology 8000
Associate Director 8001
Technical Sta 8001.1
Head, Administrative/Financial Management Oce 8010
Military Deputy 8020
Superintendent, Space Systems Development Department 8100
Superintendent, Spacecraft Engineering Department 8200
Point of contact: Code 8010, (202) 767-6551
112
Code 8100
Research Activity Areas
Space and Airborne Payload Development
Space and airborne system payload concept
denition, design, and implementation includ-
ing hardware and software
Detailed electrical/electronic design of electronic
and electromechanical payload and systems and
components
Design and verication of real-time embedded
multiprocessor software
Payload antenna systems
Space and airborne payload fabrication, test, and
integration
Launch and on-orbit payload support
Laser Communications Research
Ship-to-ship laser communications
Space-to-ground laser communications
Satellite laser ranging for precise orbit determina-
tion
Space and Airborne Mission Development
Mission development and requirements denition
Systems engineering and analysis
Concepts of operations and mission simulations
Mission evaluation and performance assessments
Precision Navigation and Time
Advanced navigation satellite technology
Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) technology
Atomic time/frequency standards/instrumenta-
tion
Passive and active ranging techniques
Precision tracking of orbiting objects from space/
ground
National and International standards for time
keeping/Universal Coordinated Time/UTC
(NRL)
Advanced Space/Airborne/Ground
Systems Technologies
Space systems architectures and requirements
Advanced payloads and optical communications
Controllers, processors, signal processing, and VLSI
data management systems and equipment
Embedded algorithms and software
Satellite laser ranging
Astrodynamics
Precision orbit estimation
Onboard autonomous navigation
Onboard orbit propagation
GPS space navigation
Satellite coverage and mission analysis
Geolocation systems
Orbit dynamics
Interplanetary navigation
Command, Control, Communications,
Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance,
and Reconnaissance
Communications theory and systems
Satellite ground station engineering and imple-
mentation
Transportable and xed ground antenna systems
High-speed xed and mobile ground data collec-
tion, processing, and dissemination systems
Tactical communication systems
The Space Systems Development
Department, operates extensive
laser communication test bed
facilities at Quantico, Virginia;
Tilghman Island, Maryland;
and NRL’s Chesapeake Bay
Detachment (CBD). Optical
communications equipment
at CBD and Tilghman Island
are separated by 16 km across
the Chesapeake Bay, creating a
fully instrumented laboratory
in a maritime environment.
Measurements made at
this facility may be applied
directly to ship-to-ship laser
communications applications. The optical test facility at Quantico,
Virginia, hosts a 1-m telescope and satellite laser ranging equipment
that is used for both precise orbit determination and space-to-
ground laser communications research. Together, these facilities
provide researchers the full spectrum of operating environments
relevant to naval communications needs.
Space Systems Development Department
One-meter SLR and Optical Test Facility in Quantico, Virginia.
113
Basic Responsibilities
The Space Systems Development Department (SSDD) is the space and ground support systems research
and development organization of the Naval Center for Space Technology. The primary objective of the SSDD
is to develop command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnais-
sance (C4ISR) hardware and software solutions to space, airborne, and ground applications to respond to
Navy, DoD, and national mission requirements with improved performance, capacity, reliability, eciency,
and/or life cycle cost. The Department must derive system requirements from the mission, develop architec-
tures in response to these requirements, and design and develop systems, subsystems, equipment, and imple-
mentation technologies to achieve the optimized, integrated operational space, airborne, and ground system.
These development responsibilities extend across the entire space/airborne/ground spectrum of hardware,
software, and advanced technologies, including digital processing and control, analog systems, power, com-
munications, payload command and telemetry, radio frequency, optical, payload, and electromechanical
systems, as well as systems engineering.
Personnel: 126 full-time civilian; 1 part-time civilian; 23 student civilian; 1 intermittent civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Space Systems Development Department 8100
Associate Superintendent 8101
Administrative Ocer 8102
Head, Mission Management Oce 8103
Head, National Programs Support Oce 8104
Head, Mission Development Branch 8110
Head, Advanced Systems Technology Branch 8120
Head, Command, Control, Communications, Computers,
and Intelligence Branch 8140
Head, Advanced Space Precision Navigation and Timing
Branch 8150
Point of contact: Code 8102, (202) 767-0432
Mr. C. Dwyer
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
8102
ADVANCED SPACE
PRECISION NAVIGATION &
TIMING BRANCH
8150
COMMAND, CONTROL,
COMMUNICATIONS,
COMPUTERS & INTELL
BRANCH
8140
ADVANCED
SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
BRANCH
8120
MISSION DEVELOPMENT
BRANCH
8110
NATIONAL PROGRAMS
SUPPORT OFFICE
8104
MISSION MANAGEMENT
OFFICE
8103
SPACE SYSTEMS
DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
SUPERINTENDENT
8100
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
8101
114
Code 8200
Research Activity Areas
Design, Test, and Processing
Preliminary and detailed design of spacecraft
mechanical components, structures, and
mechanisms
Fabrication, assembly, integration, and testing of
spacecraft and payloads
Vibration, shock, acoustic, and thermal vacuum
testing of components, systems, payloads, and
spacecraft
Integration of spacecraft onto launch vehicles
Systems engineering for new spacecraft proposals
Space Mechanical Systems Development
Development, integration, and transition of proto-
type spacecraft systems and experimental pay-
loads
Structural design and analysis
Large space structures
Thermal design, analysis, fabrication, integration,
test, and ight operation
Pumped and advanced multiphase heat transfer
devices
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique
for space systems
Integrated structural/thermal/optical or RF design
and analysis
Mission integration and development
Mission assurance, conguration control, and
safety
Systems engineering and management
Control Systems
Attitude determination and control systems
Precision pointing
Optical line-of-sight stabilization
Propulsion systems
Precision cleaning and component testing
Propellent and pressurization systems
Hydraulic and pneumatics control
Test systems and services
Analytical design and mission planning
Navigation, tracking, and orbit dynamics
Expert systems
Flight operations support
Computer simulation and animation
Computer animation
Robotics systems engineering
Proximity operations
Autonomous servicing and inspection
Autonomous inspection
End eector design
Against the backdrop of a glowing morning sky, the TacSat-4 tactical
satellite, carrying an experimental communications payload developed by
NRL, successfully launched September 27, 2011, aboard an Orbital Sciences
Minotaur-IV+ launch vehicle from the Alaska Aerospace Corporation’s
Kodiak Launch Complex, Kodiak Island, Alaska.
Compliance control
Trajectory planning
Machine vision
Fault detection, isolation, and recovery
Electro-dynamic tethers
Robotic control algorithms and software
Robotic actuation and sensing
Space Electronic Systems Development
Space system concept denition, design, and
implementation including hardware and
software
Detailed electrical design of electronic and
electromechanical systems and components
Implementation of real-time ight software and
embedded command, control, and telemetry
software
Implementation of Spacecraft Ground system
software, including integration and test as well
as operations (Neptune/CGA)
Mission Tasking Software (VMOC)
Spacecraft antenna systems, receivers, transmit-
ters, and radiometers
Space hardware design, fabrication, test, and
integration
Launch and on-orbit support
Space test systems and electronic launch support
equipment
Spacecraft power systems– collection, storage,
conversion, and distribution
Spacecraft TT&C and control systems
Space communications
Spacecraft Engineering Department
115
Mr. J.P. sCHAub
Basic Responsibilities
The Spacecraft Engineering Department (SED) is the focal point for the Navy’s capability to design and
build spacecraft. Activities range from concept and feasibility planning to on-orbit IOC for NRL’s space sys-
tems.
The SED provides spacecraft bus expertise for the Navy and maintains an active in-house capability to
develop satellites; manages Navy space programs through engineering support and technical direction; in
concert with the Space Systems Development Department, designs, assembles, and tests spacecraft and space
experiments, including all aspects of space, launch, and ground support; analyzes and designs structures,
mechanisms, and a variety of control systems, including attitude, propulsion, reaction, and thermal; inte-
grates satellite designs, launch vehicles, and satellite-to-boost stages; functions as a prototype laboratory to
ensure that designs can be transferred to industry and incorporated into subsequent satellite hardware builds;
and consults with the Navy Program Oce on technical issues involving spacecraft architecture, acquisition,
and operation.
Personnel: 128 full-time civilian; 2 part-time civilian; 26 student civilian
Key Personnel
Title Code
Superintendent, Spacecraft Engineering Department 8200
Associate Superintendent 8201
Administrative Ocer 8202
Head, Programs Support Oce 8204
Head, Design, Test, and Processing Branch 8210
Head, Space Mechanical Systems Development Branch 8220
Head, Control Systems Branch 8230
Head, Space Electronics Systems Development Branch 8240
Point of contact: Code 8202, (202) 767-6412
*Acting
ADMINISTRATIVE
OFFICE
8202
SPACE ELECTRONICS
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
BRANCH
8240
CONTROL SYSTEMS
BRANCH
8230
SPACE MECHANICAL
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
BRANCH
8220
DESIGN, TEST, AND
PROCESSING BRANCH
8210
PROGRAMS SUPPORT
OFFICE
8204
SPACECRAFT ENGINEERING
DEPARTMENT
SUPERINTENDENT
8200
ASSOCIATE SUPERINTENDENT
8201
117
tEchnical output, fiscal, anD
pErsonnEl information
119
Publications, Presentations, and Patents
The Navy continues to be a pioneer in science and engineering developments and a leader in applying
these advancements to military requirements. The primary means of informing the scientic and engineer-
ing community of the advances made at NRL is through the Laboratory’s technical output — reports, articles
in scientic journals, contributions to books, papers presented to scientic societies and topical conferences,
patents, and inventions.
The gures for calendar years 2012 and 2013 presented below represent the output of NRL facilities in
Washington, DC; Bay St. Louis, Mississippi; and Monterey, California.
In 1986, Congress enacted the Federal Technology Transfer Act in an eort to encourage the commercial
use of technology developed in Federal laboratories. The Act allows Government inventors and the labora-
tories where they work to share the royalties generated by commercial licensing of their inventions. Also,
the Act encourages the establishment of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs)
between laboratories such as NRL and non-Federal entities such as state and local governments, universities,
and business corporations. Such cooperative R&D agreements can include the allocation in advance of patent
rights on any inventions made under the joint research eort.
The 1986 Act has given additional impetus to the Laboratory’s eorts to patent important inventions aris-
ing out of its various research programs.
Calendar Year 2012
Type of Contribution Unclassied Classied Total
Articles in periodicals, chapters in books,
and papers in published proceedings 1473* 0 1473*
Oral Presentations 1159 0 1159
NRL Formal Reports 7 4 11
NRL Memorandum Reports 61 1 62
Books 1 0 1
Patents granted 87 0 87
Trademarks registered 3 0 3
Calendar Year 2013
Type of Contribution Unclassied Classied Total
Articles in periodicals, chapters in books,
and papers in published proceedings 1260* 0 1260*
Oral Presentations 1016 0 1016
NRL Formal Reports 9 7 16
NRL Memorandum Reports 33 5 38
Books 6 0 6
Patents granted 114 2 116
Trademarks registered 1 0 1
*This is a provisional total based on information available to the Ruth H. Hooker Research Library on January 28, 2014. Total includes
refereed and non-refereed publications.
Technical Output
120
$M
FY 2012 Reimbursable Direct Cite Total
Oce of Naval Research (ONR) 347.6 56.8 404.4
Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) 48.1 44.3 92.4
Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) 29.5 28.9 58.4
Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) 11.2 6.6 17.8
Other Navy 73.2 28.1 101.3
All Other 286.9 113.6 400.5
Total Funds 796.5 278.4 1074.8
$M
FY 2013 Reimbursable Direct Cite Total
Oce of Naval Research (ONR) 316.4 38.4 354.8
Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) 46.2 25.0 71.2
Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) 18.4 1.6 20.0
Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) 8.9 10.7 19.5
Other Navy 68.2 22.0 90.2
All Other 275.0 83.3 358.3
Total Funds 733.1 181.0 914.0
Source of Funds
FY 2012
FY 2012 FY 2013
Source of Funds
FY 2013
FY 2012/2013 Sources of New Funds (Actual)
SPAWAR
5.4%
All Other
37.3%
ONR
37.6%
Other Navy
9.4%
NAVAIR
1.7%
NAVSEA
8.6%
NAVSEA
7.8%
NAVAIR
2.1%
Other Navy
9.9%
ONR
38.8%
All Other
39.2%
SPAWAR
2.2%
121
Distribution of Funds
$M
Direct Labor 247.9
General Overhead 95.1
Indirect Overhead 82.8
Direct Material, Travel, and Other 127.0
Direct Contracts 472.4
Total Costs* 1025.2
$M
Direct Labor 240.1
General Overhead 93.7
Indirect Overhead 93.6
Direct Material, Travel, and Other 125.7
Direct Contracts 377.3
Total Costs* 930.4
*Costs based on CFO statements; direct contracts include costs for reimbursable-funded contracts and obligations for direct cite-funded
contracts.
FY 2012
Distribution of Funds
FY 2013
FY 2012 FY 2013
FY 2012/2013 Uses of Funds
Indirect
Overhead
8.1%
General
Overhead
9.3%
Direct
Material,
Travel, and
Other
12.4%
Direct Labor
24.2%
Direct
Contracts
46.0%
Indirect
Overhead
10.1%
General
Overhead
10.1%
Direct
Material,
Travel, and
Other
13.5%
Direct
Labor
25.8%
Direct
Contracts
40.5%
122
$M
Category Navy Non-Navy Total
BA1 Basic Research 128.8 5.3 134.1
BA2 Applied Research 166.3 37.4 203.7
BA3 Advanced Technology Development 92.3 106.1 198.5
BA4 Advanced Component Development Prototypes 77.9 31.1 109.1
BA5 System Development and Demonstration 87.8 22.3 110.1
BA6 RDT&E Management Support 17.2 14.5 31.7
BA7 Operational System Development 27.9 13.3 41.2
Subtotal RDT&E 598.2 230.0 828.4
Operations and Maintenance 47.4 54.2 101.5
Procurement 22.7 31.5 54.2
Other 1.0 89.8 90.8
Total New Funds 669.3 405.5 1074.9
FY 2012
Distribution of RDT&E, Navy (%)
($598.2)
Distribution of Total (%)
($1074.8)
FY 2012 Total New Funds by Category
BA7
4.7%
BA6
2.9%
BA5
14.7%
BA4
13.0%
BA1
21.5%
BA3
15.4%
BA2
27.8%
Other
Non-Navy
16.3%
RDT&E,
Navy
55.7%
RDT&E,
Non-Navy
21.4%
O&M, Navy
4.4%
Other
Navy
0.1%
Proc., Navy
2.1%
123
$M
Category Navy Non-Navy Total
BA1 Basic Research 125.8 3.5 129.2
BA2 Applied Research 148.2 30.6 178.9
BA3 Advanced Technology Development 58.7 128.4 187.1
BA4 Advanced Component Development Prototypes 72.3 17.4 89.7
BA5 System Development and Demonstration 60.1 (1.6) 58.5
BA6 RDT&E Management Support 19.8 7.8 27.6
BA7 Operational System Development 15.0 31.8 46.8
Subtotal RDT&E 499.9 217.9 717.8
Operations and Maintenance 41.2 33.6 74.8
Procurement 10.1 28.0 38.0
Other 1.7 81.9 83.6
Total New Funds 552.9 361.4 914.2
FY 2013
Distribution of RDT&E, Navy (%)
($499.8)
Distribution of Total (%)
($914.2)
FY 2013 Total New Funds by Category
BA7
3.0%
BA6
4.0%
BA5
12.0%
BA4
14.5%
BA1
25.2%
BA3
11.7%BA2
29.6%
Othe r
Non-Navy
15.7%
RDT&E,
Navy
54.7%
RDT&E,
Non-Navy
23.8%
O&M,
Navy
4.5%
Othe r
Navy
0.2%
Proc., Navy
1.1%
124
Civilian On-Board
Full-Time, Permanent (FTP)
Graded 2,298
Ungraded 88
Total 2,386
Temporary, Part-Time, Intermittent (TPTI)
TPTI 168
Total Civilian 2,554
FTP Breakdown
Scientic/Engineering Professional 1,561
Scientic/Engineering Technical 83
Administrative Specialist/Professional 386
Administrative Support 232
Senior Executive Service 22
Scientic or Professional 14
General Schedule 0
Total 2,298
Military On-Board
Ocers 31
Enlisted 52
Total Military On-Board 83
(Military Allowance) 106
Annual Civilian Turnover Rate (%) (permanent employees only)
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Research divisions 6.8 7.2 9.5 8.5 6.9 4.7 5 5.3 6.0
Nonresearch areas 8.2 8.5 11.0 13.7 13.3 7.4 11 13.5 11.1
Entire Laboratory 6.5 7.4 9.7 9.6 8.2 5.3 6.2 6.9 7.0
Highest Academic Degrees Held by Civilian Permanent Employees
Bachelors 557
Masters 389
Doctorates 868
*All data is as of 31 December 2013 unless otherwise noted.
Personnel Information*
125
profEssional DEvElopmEnt
127
Professional Development
Programs for NRL Employees
e Human Resources Oce supports and provides
traditional and alternative methods of training for employ-
ees. NRL employees are encouraged to develop their skills
and enhance their job performance so they can meet
the future needs of NRL and achieve their own goals for
growth.
One common study procedure is for em ploy ees to
work full time at the Laboratory while taking job-related
courses at universities and schools local to their job site.
e training ranges from a single course to undergraduate,
graduate, and postgraduate course work. Tuition for train-
ing is paid by NRL. e formal pro grams oered by NRL
are described here.
Graduate Programs
e Advanced Graduate Re search Program
(formerly the Sabbati cal Study Program, which began in
1964) enables selected profes sion al employees to devote
full time to re search or pursue work in their own or a
related eld for up to one year at an insti tution or research
facility of their choice without the loss of regular sal ary,
leave, or fringe bene ts. NRL pays all travel and moving
expenses for the em ployee. Criteria for eligi bili ty include
professional stature consistent with the applicants oppor-
tunities and experi ence, a satis factory program of study,
and ac ceptance by the facility selected by the appli cant.
e pro gram is open to em ploy ees who have completed six
years of Feder al ser vice, four of which have been at NRL.
e Edison Memorial Graduate Train ing Program
enables employees to pursue graduate studies in their
elds at local universi ties. Par tici pants in this program
work 24 hours each workweek and pursue their stud-
ies during the other 16 hours. e criteria for eligibility
in clude a minimum of one year of service at NRL, a bach-
elors or masters degree in an appropriate eld, and profes-
sional standing in keeping with the candi dates opportuni-
ties and expe ri ence.
To be eligible for the Select Graduate Training Pro
gram, employ ees must have a bachelor’s degree in an
appropri ate eld and must have demon strated ability and
aptitude for ad van ced training. Students accepted into this
pro gram receive one-half of their salary and benets and
NRL pays for tuition and travel expenses.
e Naval Postgrad uate School (NPS), lo cated in
Monterey, Califor nia, pro vides gradu ate pro grams to
en hance the techni cal prepara tion of Naval ocers and
civil ian em ployees who serve the Navy in the elds of
science, engi neer ing, opera tions analy sis, and manage-
ment. NRL employees desiring to pursue grad uate studies
at NPS may apply; thesis work is ac complished at NRL.
Participants con tinue to receive full pay and bene ts
during the period of study. NRL also pays for tuition and
travel expenses.
In addition to NRL and university oer ings, applica-
tion may be made to a number of note worthy programs
and fellowships. Exam ples of such opportu nities are the
Capitol Hill Workshops, the Legislative Fellowship
(LEGIS) program, the Federal Executive Institute (FEI),
and the Executive Leader ship Pro gram for Mid-Level
Employees. ese and other pro grams are announced
from time to time, as schedules are published.
Continuing Education
Under graduate and graduate courses oered
at local colleges and universities may be subsidized by NRL
for em ploy ees interest ed in improving their skills
and keep ing abreast of current devel op ments in their elds.
NRL oers short courses to all employees in a number
of elds of inter est including administrative subjects, and
su pervisory and manage ment tech niques. Labora tory
em ploy ees may also at tend these courses at non gov ern ment
facili ties. HRO advertises training opportunities on the
online Billboard, HRO website, and in the email newsletter,
HRO Highlights.
For fur ther infor ma tion on any of the above Gradu-
ate and Continuing Education programs, contact the
Employee Development and Management Branch (Code
1840) at (202) 767-8306 or via email at Training@hro.nrl.
navy.mil.
e Scientist-to-Sea Program (STSP) pro vides oppor-
tunities for Navy R&D labo ratory/center personnel to go
to sea to gain rst-hand insight into operational factors
aecting system design, performance, and operations on a
variety of ships. NRL is a participant of this Oce of Naval
Research (ONR) program. Contact (202) 404-2701.
Professional Development
NRL has several programs, profes sional soci ety chap-
ters, and informal clubs that en hance the professional
growth of employees. Some of these are listed below.
e Department of the Navy Civilian Employee
Assistance Program (DONCEAP) provides conden-
128
tial assessment, referral, and short-term counseling for
employees (or their eligible family members) regarding
personal concerns to help avoid adversely aecting job per-
formance. Types of personal concerns may include chal-
lenging relationships (at work or at home); dealing with
stress, anxiety, or depression; grief and loss; or substance
abuse. e DONCEAP also provides work/life referral
services such as live or on-demand webinars; discussion
groups; and advice on parenting, wellness, nancial and
legal issues, education, and much more. Contact (844)-
366-2327 or visit http://donceap.foh.hhs.gov/.
e NRL chapter of Women In Science and Engi-
neering (WISE) was established to address current issues
concerning the scientic community of women at the NRL
such as networking, funding, work-life satisfaction, and
eective use of our resources. We address these issues by
empowering members through the establishment of a sup-
portive and constructive network that serves as a sounding
board to develop solutions that address said issues, and
then serve as a platform in which members work together
to implement these solutions. e NRL chapter of WISE
has started several new initiatives for the 2013-2014 year,
including a seminar series entitled “Working Smarter Not
Harder at NRL — Eective Use of Our Resources” and a
Science as Art competition, which is open to all NRL sites.
Membership is open to all employees. For more informa-
tion, contact (202) 404-3355.
Sigma Xi, e Scientic Research Society, encour-
ages and acknowledges original investigation in pure
and applied science. It is an honor society for research
scientists. Individuals who have demonstrated the ability
to perform original research are elected to membership
in local chapters. e NRL Edison Chapter, comprising
approximately 200 members, recognizes original research
by presenting annual awards in pure and applied science to
two outstanding NRL sta members per year. In addition,
an award seeking to reward rising stars at NRL is presented
annually through the Young Investigator Award. e
chapter also sponsors several lectures per year at NRL on a
wide range of topics of general interest to the scientic and
DoD community. ese lectures are delivered by scien-
tists from all over the world. e highlight of the Sigma
Xi Lecture Series is the Edison Memorial Lecture, which
traditionally is given by an internationally distinguished
scientist. Contact (202) 767-5528.
e NRL Mentor Program was estab lished to provide
an innovative approach to profes sional and career training
and an environ ment for per sonal and professional growth.
It is open to per manent NRL employees in all job series
and at all sites. Mentees are matched with successful, expe-
rienced colleagues having more technical and/or manage-
rial experience who can provide them with the knowledge
and skills needed to maximize their contribution to the
success of their immediate organization, to NRL, to the
Navy, and to their chosen career elds. e ulti mate goal of
the program is to increase job pro ductivity, creativity, and
satis faction through bet ter communication, under standing,
and train ing. NRL Instruction 12400.1B pro vides policy
and proce dures for the pro gram. For more information,
please contact mentor@hro.nrl.navy.mil or (202) 767-6736.
Employees interested in develop ing eec tive self-
expression, listening, thinking, and lead er ship potential
are invited to join the NRL Forum Toastmasters Club, a
chapter of Toastmasters Interna tion al. Members of this
club pos sess di verse career backgrounds and talents and
learn to com muni cate not by rules but by practice in an
atmo sphere of understanding and helpful fellow ship. NRLs
Com manding Ocer and Di rec tor of Re search en dorse
Toastmasters. Contact (202) 404-4670.
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)
Programs
Equal employ ment opportunity (EEO) is a funda men-
tal NRL policy for all employees regard less of race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age, sexual orientation, or
disability. e NRL EEO Oce is a service organization
whose major functions include counseling employees
in an eort to resolve employee/management conicts,
processing formal discrimination complaints, and requests
for reasonable accommodation, providing EEO training,
and managing NRLs MD-715 and armative employment
recruitment programs. e NRL EEO Oce is also respon-
sible for sponsoring special-emphasis programs to promote
awareness and increase sensitivity and appreciation of the
issues or the history relating to females, individuals with
disabilities, and minorities. Contact the NRL Deputy EEO
Ocer at (202) 767-2486 for additional information on any
of their programs or services.
Other Activities
e award-winning Community Outreach Program
directed by the NRL Public Aairs Oce fosters programs
that benet students and other community citizens. Vol-
unteer employees assist with and judge science fairs, give
lectures, provide science demonstrations and student tours
of NRL, and serve as tutors, mentors, coaches, and class-
room resource teachers. e program sponsors student
tours of NRL and an annual holiday party for neighbor-
hood children in December. rough the program, NRL
has active partnerships with three District of Columbia
public schools. Con tact (202) 767-2541.
Other programs that enhance the develop ment of NRL
employ ees in clude sports groups and the Amateur Radio
Club. e NRL Fitness Center at NRL-DC, managed by
Naval Support Activity Washington Morale, Welfare and
Recreation (NSAW-MWR), houses a tness room with
treadmills, bikes, ellipticals, step mills, and a full strength
circuit; a gymnasium for basketball, volleyball, and other
activities; and full locker rooms. e Fitness Center is free
to NRL employees and contractors. Various exercise classes
129
are oered for a nominal fee. NRL employees are also
eligible to participate in all NSAW-MWR activities held on
Joint Base Anacostia–Bolling and Washington Navy Yard,
less than ve miles away.
Programs for Non-NRL Employees
Several programs have been estab lished for non-
NRL professionals. ese programs encour age and sup-
port the participation of visiting scientists and engineers
in research of interest to the Labo ratory. Some of the pro-
grams may serve as step ping-stones to Feder al careers
in sci ence and technology. eir objective is to en hance
the quality of the Labor atory’s research activi ties through
working associations and interchanges with high ly capa-
ble scien tists and engineers and to provide opportunities
for out side scientists and engineers to work in the Navy
labora tory environ ment. Along with en hanc ing the Labo-
ratory’s research, these pro grams acquaint participants
with Navy capabili ties and concerns and may provide a
path to full-time employment.
Postdoctoral Research Associateships
Every year, NRL hosts several postdoctoral research
associates through the National Research Council (NRC)
and American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE)
postdoctoral associateship and fellowship programs. ese
competitive positions provide postdoctoral scientists and
engineers the opportunity to pursue research at NRL in
collaboration with NRL scientists and engineers. Research
associates are guest investigators, not employees of NRL.
NRL/NRC Cooperative Research Associateship
Program: e National Research Council conducts a
national competition to recommend and make awards to
outstanding scientists and engineers at recent postdoc-
toral levels for tenure as guest researchers at participat-
ing laboratories. e objectives of the NRC program are
(1) to provide postdoctoral scientists and engineers of
unusual promise and ability opportunities for research on
problems, largely of their own choice, that are compatible
with the interests of the sponsoring laboratories and (2)
to contribute thereby to the overall eorts of the Federal
laboratories. e program provides an opportunity
for concentrated research in association with selected
members of the permanent professional laboratory sta,
oen as a climax to formal career preparation.
NRL/NRC Postdoctoral Associateships are awarded
to persons who have held a doctorate less than ve years
at the time of application and are made initially for one
year, renewable for a second and possible third year.
Information and applications may be found at http://www.
national-academies.org/rap. To contact NRLs program
coordinator, call (202) 404-7450 or email nrc@hro.nrl.
navy.mil.
NRL/ASEE Postdoctoral Fellowship Program: e
ASEE program is designed to signicantly increase the
involvement of creative and highly trained scientists and
engineers from academia and industry in scientic and
technical areas of interest and relevance to the Navy. Fel-
lowship awards are based upon the technical quality and
relevance of the proposed research, recommendations by
the Navy laboratory, academic qualications, reference
reports, and availability of funds.
NRL/ASEE Fellowship awards are made to persons
who have held a doctorate for less than seven years at the
time of application and are made for one year, renewable
for a second and possible third year. Information and
applications may be found at http://www.asee.org/nrl/. To
contact NRLs program coordinator, call (202) 404-7450 or
email asee@hro.nrl.navy.mil.
Faculty Member Programs
e Oce of Naval Research Summer Faculty
Research and Sabbatical Leave Program provides for
university faculty members to work for ten weeks (or
longer, for those eligible for sabbatical leave) with profes-
sional peers in participating Navy laboratories on research
of mutual interest. Applicants must hold a teaching or
research position at a U.S. college or university. Contact
NRLs program coordinator at sfrp@hro.nrl.navy.mil.
e NRL/United States Naval Academy Coopera-
tive Program for Scientic Interchange allows faculty
members of the U.S. Naval Academy to participate in
NRL research. is collaboration benets the Academy
by providing the opportunity for USNA faculty members
to work on research of a more practical or applied nature.
In turn, NRLs research program is strengthened by the
available scientic and engineering expertise of the USNA
faculty. Contact NRLs program coordinator at usna@hro.
nrl.navy.mil.
Professional Appointments
Faculty Member Appoint ments use the special skills
and abilities of faculty members for short periods to ll
positions of a scientic, engi neer ing, professional, or
analyti cal nature at NRL.
Consultants and experts are employed because they
are outstanding in their elds of specialization or because
they possess ability of a rare nature and could not nor-
mally be em ployed as regular civil servants.
Intergovernmental Person nel Act Ap point ments
temporarily assign person nel from state or local gov-
ernments or educa tional institu tions to the Federal Gov-
ernment (or vice versa) to improve public services ren-
dered by all levels of government.
130
Student Programs
e student programs are tailored to high school,
undergraduate, and graduate students to provide employ-
ment opportunities and work experience in naval
research.
e Naval Research Enterprise Intern Program
(NREIP) is a ten-week summer research opportunity for
undergraduate sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and
graduate students. e Oce of Naval Research (ONR)
oers summer appointments at Navy laboratories to cur-
rent college sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate
students from participating schools. Application is online
at www.asee.org/nreip through the American Society for
Engineering Education. Electronic applications are sent
for evaluation to the point of contact at the Navy labora-
tory identied by the applicant. Contact NRLs program
coordinator at nreip@nrl.navy.mil.
e National Defense Science and Engineering
Graduate Fellowship Program helps U.S. citizens obtain
advanced training in disciplines of science and engineer-
ing critical to the U.S. Navy. e three-year program
awards fellowships to recent outstanding graduates to sup-
port their study and research leading to doctoral degrees
in specied disciplines such as electrical engineering,
computer sciences, material sciences, applied physics, and
ocean engineering. Award recipients are encouraged to
continue their study and research in a Navy laboratory
during the summer. Contact NRLs program coordinator
at (202) 404-7450 or ndseg@hro.nrl.navy.mil.
e Pathways Intern Program (formerly STEP and
SCEP) provides students enrolled in a wide variety of edu-
cational institutions, from high school to graduate level,
with opportunities to work at NRL and explore Federal
careers while still in school and while getting paid for the
work performed. Students can work full-time or part-time
on a temporary or non-temporary appointment. Students
must be continuously enrolled on at least a half-time basis
at a qualifying educational institution and be at least 16
years of age. e primary focus of our Non-temporary
intern appointment is to attract students enrolled in
undergraduate and graduate programs in engineering,
computer science, or the physical sciences. Students on
non-temporary appointments are eligible to remain on
their appointment until graduation and may be noncom-
petitively converted to a permanent appointment within
120 days aer completion of degree requirements. Conver-
sion is not guaranteed. Conversion is dependent on work
performance, completion of at least 640 hours of work
under the intern appointment before completion of degree
requirements, and meeting the qualications for the posi-
tion. e Temporary intern appointment is initially a one
year appointment. is program enables students to earn
a salary while continuing their studies and oers them
valuable work experience. NRLs Pathways Intern Program
opportunities are announced on USAJOBS four times per
year. Visit USAJOBS at https://www.usajobs.gov/ to create
an account, search for jobs, set up an e-mail notication
alert of when positions of interest are posted (see “Saved
Searches”) and apply for our intern opportunities when
posted. For additional information on NRLs Intern Pro-
gram, contact (202) 767-8313.
e Department of Defense Science and Engineer-
ing Apprenticeship Program (SEAP) provides an oppor-
tunity for high school students who have completed at
least Grade 9, and are at least 15 years of age, to serve as
junior research associates. Under the direction of a men-
tor, for eight weeks in the summer, students gain a better
understanding of research, its challenges, and its opportu-
nities through participation in scientic, engineering, and
mathematics programs. Criteria for eligibility are based
on science and mathematics courses completed and grades
achieved; scientic motivation, curiosity, the capacity
for sustained hard work; a desire for a technical career;
teacher recommendations; and exceptional test scores. e
NRL program is the largest in the Department of Defense.
For detailed information visit http://seap.asee.org/, or call
(202) 767-8324, or email seap@hro.nrl.navy.mil.
Volunteer Opportunities
e Student Volunteer Program helps students gain
valuable experience by allowing them to voluntarily per-
form educationally related work at NRL. It provides expo-
sure to the work environment and also provides an oppor-
tunity for students to make realistic decisions regarding
their future careers. Applications are accepted year-round.
For additional information, contact (202) 767-8313.
e Voluntary Emeritus Program (VEP) uses the
services of highly skilled and uniquely qualied individu-
als who are retired from the Federal Service. Paticipants
will work under the program without compensation.
131
gEnEral information
133
Naval Research Laboratory
4555 Overlook Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20375-5320
(202) 767-3200 – DSN 297-3200
CRYSTA L
CITY
WASHINGTON
MARINA
1
ALEXANDRIA
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RESEARCH
LABORATORY
RONALD REAGAN
WASHINGTON
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395
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WASHINGTON, DC
66
MARYLAND
Alexandria
Springfield
Suitland
Bethesda
Silver
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Potomac
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arkway
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(Washington, DC)
1 FollowRoute1Southforapproximately
 3milestotheBeltwayI-95/I-495.
2 ExitrighttotheBeltway.Thisexit
 curvestotherightandthendivides.
 TaketheleftforktoI-95(Baltimore).
 Stayinlocallanes.
3 StayintherightlaneontheWoodrow
 WilsonBridge.Aftercrossingthe
 WoodrowWilsonBridge,taketherst
 exit(I-295).Thisexitdivides.Takethe
 leftforktoI-295North.
4 NRListherstexitoffofI-295
 (approximately2miles)aftercrossing
 theWoodrowWilsonBridge.
5 Makearightatthetrafclightinfront
 ofthemaingate(OverlookAvenue).
 Thenmakeanimmediateleftintothe
 parkinglot.TheVisitorControlCenter
 (Building72)islocatedonthecornerin
 thebrickbuildingnexttothemaingate.
Directions
from Ronald Reagan
Washington National Airport
134
Location of Buildings at NRL Washington
135
Location of Field Sites in the NRL Washington Area
Approximate
Mileage from Cognizant
Location NRL Washington Code
A Chesapeake Bay Section, Chesapeake Beach, MD 40 3522
B Tilghman Island, MD 110 3522
C Patuxent River (MD) Naval Air Station 64 1600
D Pomonkey, MD 20 8124
E Midway Research Center, Quantico, VA 38 8140
F Blossom Point, MD 40 8140
270
495
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66
95
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50 50
301
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WASHINGTON, DC
450
301
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136
Chesapeake Bay Section
(Chesapeake Beach, Maryland)
Access Routes to CBS
Naval Research Laboratory
Chesapeake Bay Section
5813 Bayside Road
Chesapeake Beach, MD 20732
(301) 257-4002
CHESAPEAKE
BAY
CHESAPEAKE
BAY
PATUXENT
RIVER
DULLES
INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
495
RONALD REAGAN
WASHINGTON
NATIONAL
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WASHINGTON,
DC
301
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NAVAL SURFACE
WARFARE CENTER
NORTH
260
2
170
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BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
BALTIMORE,
MARYLAND
ANNAPOLIS
301
301
32
495
695
695
261 TILGHMAN
ISLAND
295
301
PATUXENT RIVER
(MD) NAVAL
AIR STATION
4
4
4
CHESAPEAKE
BAY SECTION
Maryland
Virginia
NRL
WASHINGTON
CHESAPEAKE BAY
SECTION to
NRL Washington
~ 40 Miles
Access Routes to
Chesapeake Bay Section
137
Location of Buildings
at the Chesapeake Bay Section
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