DTrack2 User Manual V2.12.0 ART DTrack 2.12

User Manual: ART DTrack User Manual 2.12

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version 2.12
April 2016
c
2016 A.R.T. GmbH
Contents are subject to
change without notice
weisser Text als Fake ...
System user manual
ARTtrack R
, TRACKPACK & DTrack R
dasbetrifft die gesamte seitenbreite der seite des dokumentes etetcetcetcetcetcetcetc etcetcetcetc
Trademarks
The following overview shows the registered trademarks of A.R.T. GmbH (Advanced Re-
altime Tracking GmbH):
trademarks illustrated as in Germany in the EU in the USA
A.R.T. R
ART ×××
ARTtrack R
ARTTRACK ×××
DTrack R
DTrack2 ×
smARTtrack R
SMARTTRACK ×××
×××
Microsoft R
and Windows R
are trademarks registered in the United States and
other countries by the Microsoft Corporation.
The company names and product names written in this manual are trademarks
or registered trademarks of the respective companies.
License agreement
The license provider guarantees the license holder a personal right to use the
DTrack2 software. A single license entitles the license holder to use the
software on all computers and networks of the license holder’s
branch/subsidiary office.
In no event shall ART GmbH be liable for any incidental, indirect, or
consequential damages whatsoever (including, without limitation, damages for
loss of business profits, business interruption, loss of business information, or
any other pecuniary loss) arising out of the use of or inability to use the software
or hardware.
c
1999 - 2016 by ART GmbH
Am Öferl 6
D-82362 Weilheim i. OB
Germany
T+49 (0)881-92530-00
v+49 (0)881-92530-01
http://www.ar-tracking.de
What’s new in version v2.12?
Following, a short overview of the main new features in DTrack2 version v2.12:
Easier addition of cameras: To add a camera, simply re-calibrate the room with-
out losing the origin and orientation of the original coordinate system and continue
tracking. A similar procedure applies when removing cameras from the system.
Integration of ’COOTrans’, our co-ordinate adjustment utility. This means that the
room adjustment can now be used to transform the tracking coordinate system
into the coordinate system of specific 3rd party objects, provided that the reference
points are known and can be measured (license-based)
Support of bodies with up to 30 markers each
Support of bodies with visibility restrictions including display of emission cones
within ’Body Adjustment’
Additional information dialog regarding cylindrical markers within ’Body Calibration
Result Dialog’
New function to remove unused markers from a rigid body within ’Body Adjustment’
Radio channel settings are saved persistently when choosing a specific channel
number
What’s new in version v2.11?
Following, a short overview of the main new features in DTrack2 version v2.11:
Support of new TRACKPACK/E cameras with Controllers including Synccard3 (see
e.g. chapter 4.1.3 on page 31)
Support of new ARTTRACK5/C cameras for cave installations with Controllers in-
cluding Synccard3 (see e.g. chapter 4.1.2 on page 28)
Improvements of usability of Hybrid Motion Capture (see chapter 4.4 on page 63)
What’s new in version v2.10?
Following, a short overview of the main new features in DTrack2 version v2.10:
Support of ARTTRACK5 cameras with Controllers including Synccard3 (see e.g.
chapter 4.1.1 on page 25)
Support of external sync source ’TTL signal, both edges’ (see e.g. chapter 4.5.6.3
on page 101)
New license model. (see e.g. table 4.3 on page 76)
Contents
Termsanddenitions ................................. 9
1 Safety 11
1.1 Symbols and their meaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.2 Safetywarnings ................................. 11
2 Introduction 14
3 Markers and targets (rigid bodies) 16
3.1 Passivemarkers ................................. 16
3.2 Activemarkers .................................. 17
3.3 Standardtargets ................................. 20
4 System setup 25
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART .......................... 25
4.1.1 ARTTRACK5 .............................. 25
4.1.2 ARTTRACK5/C ............................. 28
4.1.3 TRACKPACK/E ............................. 31
4.1.4 ARTTRACK2 (discontinued) ...................... 33
4.1.5 ARTTRACK3 (discontinued) ...................... 35
4.1.6 TRACKPACK (discontinued) ...................... 38
4.1.7 TRACKPACK/C (discontinued)..................... 40
4.2 The Controllers of ART ............................. 43
4.2.1 Installation of the ART Controller (DTrack2 since v2.10) . . . . . . . 44
4.2.2 Installation of the ARTTRACK Controller (discontinued) . . . . . . . 48
4.2.3 Installation of the TRACKPACK Controller (discontinued) . . . . . . 52
4.2.4 Setting a static IP address without the DTrack2 Frontend (available
from controller software version v2.2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.2.5 Thesetuple............................... 55
4.2.6 The information file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.2.7 WakeOnLAN .............................. 56
4.2.8 Remote command strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.3 Setting up cascaded systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.4 Setting up the Hybrid Motion Capture System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
4.5 DTrack2 frontendsoftware ........................... 70
4.5.1 Gettingstarted .............................. 70
4.5.1.1 Installation guide (Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.5.1.2 Installation guide (Linux) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4.5.1.3 Software update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.5.1.4 Start DTrack2 frontend software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
5
4.5.1.5 Connecting to the controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.5.1.6 Adjustment of the cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
4.5.1.7 Localizing and removing of disturbing reflections . . . . . . 76
4.5.2 Roomcalibration............................. 77
4.5.2.1 Room re-calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
4.5.3 Bodycalibration ............................. 84
4.5.3.1 Selecting the coordinate system for 6DOF targets . . . . . 85
4.5.3.2 Calibration with a calibration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
4.5.3.3 Body re-calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
4.5.3.4 Target Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
4.5.4 Bodyadjustment............................. 90
4.5.5 Filtering options in DTrack2 ...................... 91
4.5.6 Menustructure.............................. 93
4.5.6.1 Overview............................ 93
4.5.6.2 MenuDTrack2 ......................... 94
4.5.6.3 Menu Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
4.5.6.4 Menu Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
4.5.6.5 Menu Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
4.5.6.6 MenuTools...........................124
4.5.6.7 MenuAbout ..........................124
5 Interaction devices 126
5.1 Flystick2......................................126
5.2 Flystick3......................................132
5.3 Fingertracking ..................................137
5.4 MeasurementTool ................................144
6 Frequently asked questions (FAQ) 147
6.1 Backup ......................................147
6.2 Cameras .....................................147
6.3 Controller .....................................150
6.4 Synchronization .................................150
6.5 DTrack2 andshutterglasses ..........................157
6.6 DTrack2 andinterfaces .............................157
6.7 Software DTrack2 ................................158
6.8 Calibration ....................................161
6.9 Tracking......................................166
6.10Flystick ......................................167
6.11Fingertracking ..................................169
6.12MeasurementTool ................................171
6.13ActiveTargets...................................171
6.14 ART trackingand3DTVs ............................172
6.15 Radio transceivers used in ART products ...................172
7 General Information 173
7.1 Service ......................................173
7.2 Cleaning of the equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
7.3 Warranty and liability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
7.4 Declaration of conformity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
A Technical specifications 190
A.1 Cameras .....................................190
A.1.1 ARTTRACK5 ..............................190
A.1.2 ARTTRACK5/C .............................191
A.1.3 TRACKPACK/E .............................192
A.1.4 ARTTRACK cameras (discontinued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
A.1.5 TRACKPACK cameras (discontinued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
A.2 Flysticks......................................195
A.3 Fingertracking ..................................196
A.4 ARTController ..................................196
A.5 Overallsystem ..................................197
A.6 Systemlatency..................................199
B Technical Appendix 203
B.1 Definition of Coordinates and Rotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
B.1.1 RoomCalibration.............................203
B.1.1.1 Room Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
B.1.2 BodyCalibration .............................204
B.1.2.1 Definition of the Coordinates by the Body itself . . . . . . . 204
B.1.2.2 Definition of the Coordinates by the Room Coordinate Sys-
tem, with Origin in the Center of the Markers . . . . . . . . 204
B.1.2.3 Definition of the Coordinates by the Room Coordinate Sys-
tem, with Origin in a Marker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
B.1.2.4 Coordinate System Definition for 5DOF Targets (with and
without cylinder markers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
B.1.2.5 Coordinate System Definition for two 5DOF Targets with
cylindermarkers........................205
B.1.3 6DOFResults ..............................205
B.1.4 3DOFData ................................206
B.1.5 Flystickdevices..............................206
B.1.5.1 Flystick1 ............................206
B.1.5.2 Flystick2 ............................207
B.1.5.3 Flystick3 ............................208
B.1.6 Measurement Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
B.1.6.1 Orientation of a Measurement Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
B.1.6.2 Using a reference body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
B.1.7 Fingertracking ..............................209
B.2 Output of Measurement Data via Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
B.2.1 FrameCounter..............................211
B.2.2 Timestamp ................................211
B.2.3 Standard 6DOF Bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
B.2.4 Standard 6DOF Bodies (extended format) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
B.2.5 Flysticks..................................213
B.2.6 Flysticks (Old Format) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
B.2.7 Measurement Tools with sphere tip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
B.2.8 Measurement Tool references . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
B.2.9 Measurement Tools (Old Format) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
B.2.10Fingertracking ..............................217
B.2.11 Additional 3DOF Markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
B.2.12 Additional Informations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
List of Figures 220
List of Tables 222
Index 223
8
Chapter 0
Terms and definitions
term definition
3DOF three degrees of freedom (i.e. only position)
6DOF six degrees of freedom (i.e. position and orientation)
5DOF five degrees of freedom (i.e. one degree less in orientation)
ART Controller calculates tracking data and generates the data output stream
(compatible to ARTTRACK2 ,ARTTRACK3 ,ARTTRACK5 ,
ARTTRACK5/C ,TRACKPACK/E )
ARTTRACK Controller (discontin-
ued)
calculates tracking data and generates the data output stream
(compatible to ARTTRACK1 ,ARTTRACK2 ,ARTTRACK3 )
ARTTRACK 2 & 3 (discontinued) infrared camera
ARTTRACK5 infrared camera
ARTTRACK5/C infrared camera dedicated for multi-sided projections
body calibration teach the system the geometry of a rigid body
body, rigid body rigid arrangement of several single markers (see also "target")
calibration angle (410mm or 710mm) belongs to the room calibration set and defines origin and orien-
tation of the room coordinate system
ceiling suspension equipment to mount an infrared camera to the ceiling
DTrack2
backend software Linux-based software which does all necessary calculations
frontend software graphical user interface to control the controller
Field of View (FoV) is the area of interest captured on the cameraâ ˘
A´
Zs imager
finger thimble a fixture for the finger tip to hold the active marker(s)
Fingertracking tracks the orientation of the hand and the position of the fingers
Flystick wireless interaction device for virtual reality (VR) applications
hand geometry describes the dimensions of your hand and fingers
hybrid tracking fusion of optical and inertial data into one consolidated output
inertial sensor an inertial measurement unit simultaneously measures 9 phys-
ical properties, namely angular rates, linear accelerations, and
magnetic field components (not used) along all 3 axes. This is
achieved using solid state gyroscopes for measurement of roll,
pitch and yaw and accelerometers for drift correction.
infrared optical tracking position measurement of bodies (subjects or objects) based
upon infrared light and optical measurement procedures
license code (license key) software key to unlock certain capabilities of the tracking system
marker object either made of retro reflective material or LED for position
tracking (3DOF)
Measurement Tool a pointing device which allows to measure the position of the
tool’s tip with high accuracy
measurement volume defines the volume where optical tracking is possible
modulated flash infrared signal which is used for wireless synchronization
motion capture track movements of a human body
mutual blinding one camera sees disturbing reflections caused by the infrared
flashes of another one
prediction predicts output for the specified time in the future to compensate
tracking and rendering latency
room calibration teach the system the position of each camera and define origin
and orientation of the room coordinate system
room calibration set consists of angle and wand
syncgroup cameras being in one syncgroup receive the sync signal at the
same time. Syncgroups are distinguished by a short time delay
between their sync signals (i.e. mutual blinding may be avoided).
synccard (Synccard2/3 or Sync-
cardTP)
plug-in card for the controller which serves for synchronizing the
cameras
9
term definition
Tactile Feedback system for finger-based interactions in immersive virtual reality
applications (wires touch the inside of the finger tips and provide
an impression when they are shortened)
target rigid arrangement of several single markers ( = rigid body)
tracking position measurement of bodies that move in a defined space
TRACKPACK (discontinued) infrared camera
TRACKPACK/C (discontinued) infrared camera dedicated for multi-sided projections
TRACKPACK/E infrared camera
TRACKPACK Controller (discontin-
ued)
calculates tracking data and generates the data output stream
(compatible to TRACKPACK and TRACKPACK/C )
USB radio transceiver (RT2, RT3) exchange data with Flystick or Tactile Feedback
virtual point cloud used for calculating the relative positions of the IR cameras
wand precalibrated stick carrying two markers. The wand belongs to
the room calibration set and is used to generate a virtual point
cloud and to scale the system
10
Chapter 1
1 Safety
1.1 Symbols and their meaning
You can find the following symbols and their signification on the equipment or in the man-
ual:
iUseful and important notes.
ZImportant notes, which may lead to system malfunction or to the
loss of warranty by non-observance.
Important safety warning to assure operation safety.
These warnings have to be considered, otherwise user
and equipment could be endangered, the equipment could be
damaged or the function of the equipment is not warranted.
Safety warning for infrared radiation.
These warnings have to be considered, otherwise users eyes
could be endangered.
Table 1.1: Symbols and their meaning
1.2 Safety warnings
ZSafe operation of the equipment is only warranted if the warnings in
this manual and on the equipment are observed.
Never use the equipment if any part looks damaged.
Safe operation is not possible, if
the housing is damaged,
any fluid attains in the housing,
objects attain inside the equipment,
the equipment shows any visible faults (smoke, sparks, fire, smells, etc.) or
the power cord is damaged.
In any of the cases mentioned above (or similar) pull the power cord out of the power
11
1 Safety
socket immediately. Otherwise, users or environment are endangered. Please con-
tact the ART service.
Never change or alter the equipment, neither mechanically nor electrically. Only the
components described by ART shall be used. The conformity and the warranty of
the producer (ART ) expire by non-compliance.
Never open the equipment! Only personnel authorized by ART is allowed to open
the equipment. Inside of the equipment there are various hazards like high voltage,
electric shocks - even if the equipment is disconnected - which can lead to death on
contact. In case of malfunction of the equipment please contact the ART service.
Only peripheral devices which meet the safety requirements of EN/IEC 60950 for
extra low voltage may be attached on Ethernet-, BNC- and the DC-circuit of the
equipment.
The cameras emit infrared light. Keep a distance of min. 20 cm when operating the
cameras. All cameras are assigned to the Exempt Group according to IEC62471-1
and therefore pose no risk or hazard to the human eye or skin at this distance.
Be sure that the cameras are firmly mounted in the correct position.
Do not touch the front pane of the cameras, since the acrylic pane and the lens are
highly sensitive surfaces. Be careful to avoid permanent damages (e.g. scratches).
Only touch the housings of the cameras.
The ventilation holes of the ARTTRACK2 camera must not be covered. Air circu-
lation is necessary to prevent the cameras from overheating. If the air circulation
is restricted overheating will damage the cameras. The minimum distance between
equipment and environmental objects has to be greater than 3 cm.
The equipment has to be attached to a power socket with grounding. If the ground-
ing wire is defective the requirement of the safety and the electromagnetic compat-
ibility (EMC) are not guaranteed. To check the function of the grounding wire ask
your regional located electrician.
Before switching on any device, verify that voltage and frequency of your electric
installation are within the allowed ranges of the equipment. The characteristics of
the equipment can be found on the appliance rating plate or in chapter A on page
190. The appliance rating plates are on the equipment’s housing (ARTTRACK1 on
the lower side of the housing; ARTTRACK2 /ARTTRACK3 on external power sup-
ply, ARTTRACK5 &ARTTRACK5/C /TRACKPACK/E on camera housing, all con-
trollers on the backside of the housing).
The power switch on the backside does not completely separate the devices from
the electricity network. To completely separate the equipment from the electricity
network the power plug must be disconnected from the power socket. The power
plug has to be accessible freely. The power socket must be close to the equipment.
12
Chapter 1
1.2 Safety warnings
Please install the cables such that
no one can stumble over the cords,
the cords cannot be damaged,
the cords cannot damage the cameras due to mechanical strain,
the line of sight of the cameras is not obstructed.
Install a strain relief!
Only use original ART (or ART authorized) components and accessories. Using
non-original components or accessories may damage the equipment, cause mal-
functions or may void operation safety. The provided components and original
accessories can be found in chapters 4 on page 25 and 5 on page 126. Only
use the originally provided external power supply for operating the camera ART-
TRACK2 and ARTTRACK3 and, if applicable, only the provided PoE+ switch for
ARTTRACK5 &ARTTRACK5/C .
The equipment must not be dropped and/or knocked.
Do not use any solvents or water to clean the cameras. For more information about
cleaning the cameras please read chapter 7.2 on page 173.
Never expose the equipment to high levels of humidity or condensating humidity.
Protect the cameras against water and chemicals.
The equipment must not be operated in environments with intensive formation of
dust or hot environments where temperatures rise above 40C (100F).
ZART explicitly denies any liability or warranty if the product is modified
in any way or not used according to this manual and the specification
labels on the equipment.
13
2 Introduction
ART tracking systems are infrared (IR) optical tracking systems. In this user manual we
are going to perceive "tracking" as measurement of the position of objects or subjects that
move in a defined space. These objects or subjects to be tracked have to be equipped
with single markers or rigid arrangements of markers (= rigid body or target).
Position and/or orientation of those rigid bodies can be measured. If only the spatial po-
sition (X, Y, Z) is measured we call this "three degrees of freedom" (3DOF) tracking. The
simultaneous measurement of position and orientation (three independent angular coor-
dinates) is called "six degrees of freedom" (6DOF) tracking.
Single markers are sufficient if only 3DOF coordinates are needed. For 6DOF tracking, a
rigid body is mandatory.
Passive markers are covered with retro reflective material - they act as light reflectors.
Active light emitters (i.e. based on infrared LEDs) are called active markers (see chapter
3 on page 16).
Figure 2.1: Principle of optical tracking (stereo vision)
Figure 2.1 shows the principle of infrared optical tracking with a two-camera system and
a standard target.
14
Chapter 2
The cameras are sending out synchronized IR flashes which are reflected towards the
lens by the retro reflective material which is covering the markers of the target. Intelligent
tracking cameras, that are scanning a certain volume, detect the IR radiation that is re-
flected by the markers and create a greyscale image based on the received IR radiation.
During the preprocessing the camera calculates the 2D marker positions with high accu-
racy using pattern recognition. A mean 2D-accuracy of 0.04 pixels (0.1 pixels maximum
2D-deviation) is standard in ART tracking cameras. Then, the 2D data are being sent to
the Controller via Ethernet.
Now, the controller has to calculate 3DOF or 6DOF data. The base for this calculation
is that the cameras’ field of views are overlapping. DTrack2 calculates the path of the
optical rays from the cameras to the markers and delivers the ray intersections in three-
dimensional coordinates. These intersections are the positions of the markers.
The position and orientation of the cameras are known from the room calibration. During
body calibration, DTrack2 identifies certain marker arrangements as rigid bodies. Based
upon this, DTrack2 is able to calculate 6DOF data and, finally, knows position and orien-
tation of the target and, therefore, of the object or subject to be tracked.
In optical tracking systems you have to be aware that tracking is only possible as long as
the target is positioned in tracking range of the cameras and is not occluded by any other
objects or the object to be tracked. More in detail, at least four markers of a target have
to be visible for a minimum of two cameras to enable tracking.
15
3 Markers and targets (rigid bodies)
3.1 Passive markers
The passive markers used in ART tracking systems are retro reflectors. These markers
reflect the incoming IR radiation into the direction of the incoming light. More precise: the
IR radiation is reflected into a narrow range of angles around the (opposite) direction of
the incoming light. Passive markers can be either
1. spherical markers:
+ excellent visibility from any perspective,
- expensive fabrication,
- sensitive surface,
- target requires larger volume danger of mechanical damage.
2. flat markers:
+ cheap,
+ flat targets possible,
+ robust surface because cover may be applied,
- the angular range of visibility is limited to approx. ±45.
3. ring markers:
+ cheap,
+ cylindrically shaped targets possible,
+ robust surface,
- the angular range of visibility is limited to approx. ±45.
Passive markers are mostly spheres covered with retro reflecting foils. However, they can
also be stickers made from retro reflecting material.
Retro reflecting sheets or foils available on the market can be based on two different op-
tical principles:
16
Chapter 3
3.2 Active markers
1. Triple mirrors, which are arranged such that their planes
form angles of 90by pairs, are reflecting light in the de-
scribed way. Mostly foils with arrangements of many very
small mirrors in a plane are used.
2. Glass spheres (with a proper refraction index) are fo-
cussing incoming light approximately to the opposite sur-
face of the ball. A layer of microscopic glass spheres, car-
ried by a reflecting material, acts as a retro reflector. These
foils can be fabricated on a flexible carrier material, thus
they are widely used for equipping spherical markers with
retro reflecting surfaces.
iART spherical markers are covered with retro reflecting foils, based on
the glass spheres principle.
ZThe quality of the markers decreases when they are in contact with
dust, dirt, fat, liquids, glue or comparable contaminants. Please make
sure that the markers are not touched or damaged.
3.2 Active markers
Basics Active markers are light (i.e. infrared light) emitting elements, mostly LEDs.
In ART tracking systems four types of LED-based active markers may be used, depend-
ing on the application:
1. Single LEDs without diffusor sphere:
+ can be covered with acrylic protection film,
+ results in simple and robust markers providing visibility up
to high distances (up to 10m),
- the angular range of visibility is limited to approx. ±60.
17
3 Markers and targets (rigid bodies)
2. Single LEDs with diffusor sphere:
+ for optimum angular range of visibility,
- distance between marker and tracking camera is limited to
a short distance (up to 4.5m).
3. Big active spherical markers:
+ several single LEDs per marker, covered with light scatter-
ing spheres,
+ provide visibility from all sides and up to very high distances
(approx. 20m),
+ suitable for outdoor tracking,
- diameter: 50mm,
- weight: 50g.
4. Big active flat markers:
+ several single LEDs per marker, covered with light scatter-
ing surface,
+ tracking up to very high distances (approx. 20m),
+ suitable for outdoor tracking,
+ magnetic base for easy positioning on metal surfaces,
- the angular range of visibility is limited to less than 180,
- diameter: 30mm.
All active markers provided by ART are controlled by a special PC board and need power
supply.
Synchronization of active markers Active markers could in principle be activated in
CW mode (i.e. continuous light emission). However, this would not be very clever be-
cause tracking cameras have a very narrow time slot of sensitivity, i.e. most of the light
emitted by the markers would be useless for tracking. As a consequence, maximum dis-
tance between cameras and marker would be very short due to an upper limit of power
dissipation allowed for each single LED. Therefore, all active markers provided by ART are
emitting radiation only when the tracking cameras are sensitive, thus having to be syn-
chronized with the cameras.
Synchronization can be done by a wired connection between the tracking system and the
pc-board controlling the active markers, but can also be done in a wireless way.
18
Chapter 3
3.2 Active markers
(a) Single LED (b) Single LED with diffusor sphere
Figure 3.1: Angular range of visibility
For wireless synchronization a coded IR flash is being sent out by a tracking camera. The
active marker’s PC board recognizes the coded flash and activates the LEDs.
19
3 Markers and targets (rigid bodies)
3.3 Standard targets
Type Description Weight approx. Dimension Marker
size
Hand target The hand target is designed for hand track-
ing in usability and assembly studies re-
spectively. It is also frequently used as a
small general-purpose target. Due to the
small size this target is easily occluded by
the hand carrying it. Therefore, proper ar-
rangement of tracking cameras has to be
used in order to avoid occlusions.
25g / 0.9oz (110 ×80 ×28)mm 12mm
Large hand target This hand target is designed for hand track-
ing in a two camera tracking system. Its
large size allows to move the hand in al-
most all directions, without losing tracking.
30g / 1.1oz (170 ×120 ×35)mm 12mm
Claw target The claw target looks just the same as the
hand target. But it comes in a bigger size
and is equipped with bigger markers.
35g / 1.2oz (160 ×110 ×30)mm 16mm
20
Chapter 3
3.3 Standard targets
Type Description Weight approx. Dimension Marker
size
Tree target Originally designed for tracking HMDs, the
tree target is a general-purpose target
for tracking from longer distances. It is
equipped with 20mm markers.
75g / 2.65oz (195 ×170 ×120)mm 20mm
Generic glasses target For head tracking mostly in passive stereo
systems, tracking targets must be fixed to
the stereo glasses. ART offers several
light-weight standard targets for this pur-
pose.
min:
14g / 0.5oz
max:
22g / 0.7oz
(270 ×120 ×35)mm 12mm
INFITEC PREMIUM target Target tailored to the INFITEC PREMIUM
passive stereo glasses.
26g / 0.9oz (225 ×85 ×80)mm 12mm
21
3 Markers and targets (rigid bodies)
Type Description Weight approx. Dimension Marker
size
CrystalEyes R
2/3 target Target tailored to the shutter glasses of the
StereoGraphics active stereo system. It fits
to both CrystalEyes R
2 and 3.
28g / 1oz (215 ×120 ×60)mm 12mm
CrystalEyes R
5 target Target tailored to the shutter glasses of the
StereoGraphics active stereo system. It fits
to the CrystalEyes R
5.
19g / 0.7oz (195 ×105 ×40)mm 12mm
NuVision APG6000
and APG6100 target
Target tailored to the NuVision APG6000
and APG6100 shutter glasses.
17g / 0.6 oz (220 ×125 ×75)mm 12mm
22
Chapter 3
3.3 Standard targets
Type Description Weight approx. Dimension Marker
size
Volfoni EDGE R
target Target tailored to the Volfoni EDGE R
shut-
ter glasses.
23g / 0.7 oz (230 ×95 ×60)mm 12mm
NVIDIA 3D Vision R
Pro
target
Target tailored to the NVidia 3D Vision Pro
shutter glasses.
25g / 0.9 oz (225 ×100 ×60)mm 12mm
NVisor SX 60 target Target tailored to the NVisor SX 60 head
mounted display.
55g / 1.94oz (300 ×215 ×35)mm 12mm
23
3 Markers and targets (rigid bodies)
Type Description Weight approx. Dimension Marker
size
Motion capture targets ART provides a complete set of targets for
motion capture purposes. All targets are
6DOF targets and can be identified by the
tracking system. A full ART MoCap target
set consists of (subsets can be generated):
1 Glasses target (AGT4) 28g / 1.0oz (225 ×180 ×95)mm 12mm
2 Shoulder targets (UT) 44g / 1.55oz (90 ×75 ×35)mm 12mm
1 Dorsal target (DT) 84g / 2.96oz (150 ×65 ×35)mm 12mm
2 Upper arm targets (HBT) 52g / 1.83oz (150 ×70 ×35)mm 12mm
2 Forearm targets (UBT) 50g / 1.76oz (150 ×65 ×35)mm 12mm
2 Hand targets (HT) 25g / 0.9oz (110 ×80 ×28)mm 12mm
1 Waist target (WT, one-piece) 195g / 6.9oz (390 ×140 ×50)mm 14mm
1 Waist target (WT, multi-part), each 30g / 1.1oz (90 ×60 ×50)mm 16mm
2 Upper leg targets (FBT) 99g / 3.49oz (220 ×120 ×40)mm 16mm
2 Lower leg targets (TBT) 58g / 2.05oz (205 ×70 ×35)mm 16mm
2 Foot targets (FT) 65g / 2.29oz (95 ×105 ×70)mm 16mm
Table 3.3: Standard targets overview
24
Chapter 4
4 System setup
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART
4.1.1 ARTTRACK5
Keep a distance of min. 20 cm when operating the camera ! The
camera is assigned to the Exempt Group according to IEC62471-1 and
therefore poses no risk or hazard to the human eye or skin at this dis-
tance.
Description The ARTTRACK5 infrared camera is intended for working environments
with distances between camera and markers of up to 7.5 metres. By default the ART-
TRACK5 is equipped with a 3.5 mm lens. Depending on the application and the setup the
ARTTRACK5 can be equipped with other lenses (i.e. with different focal lengths). Refer
to A.1 on page 190 for a list of available focal lengths and the respective FoV.
Figure 4.1: Camera ARTTRACK5
Mounting The ARTTRACK5 cameras are optimized for a predefined range of measure-
ment volumes. System operation in smaller or bigger measurement volumes can lead
25
4 System setup
to reduced accuracy or other malfunctions. The measurement volume can be adjusted
within certain limits simply by changing the flash intensity of the ART infrared cameras
(see chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 97).
iThe flash intensities should not be too high. In general, a flash inten-
sity of 50-60 might be sufficient.
Major changes of the measurement volume may require different lenses and thus a new
determination of camera parameters. These changes have to be done at the ART labs.
Be aware that a tracking system is very sensitive to camera movements. Therefore, the
cameras have to be mounted in a way that reduces camera movements (especially vibra-
tions) as much as possible.
iMounting on tripods may be sufficient for presentations and prelimi-
nary installations, but is not recommended as a final solution!
If you want to mount the camera on a tripod there’s no carrier needed.
Otherwise the carrier for the ARTTRACK5 can be attached on both bottom and top side
of the camera. Attach the carrier with the T-piece pointing to the back of the camera as
shown in figure 4.2 on page 26. Note, the ceiling suspension is already connected to the
carrier in figure 4.2.
Figure 4.2: Attaching the ceiling mount to the ARTTRACK5 camera
26
Chapter 4
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART
Figure 4.3: Mounting a camera to a wall or a ceiling (e.g. ARTTRACK2 camera)
Only use screws supplied with the ceiling mount for mounting it.
Also, use all the parts supplied with the ceiling mount - especially the
toothed washer is quite important.
You shall never open other screws on the cameras (see chapter 1.2
on page 11). Otherwise, the camera may be damaged and liability and
warranty is void.
Feel free to contact ART in case you want to realise a more complex installation. We will
assist you in your planning.
Make sure to install the system in a way that you can easily access the cameras and
its cables. Be especially careful to mount the cameras firmly so they cannot fall down.
Unsecured cameras may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Avoid hard shocks at all times! A new camera calibration at the ART fa-
cilities might become necessary in that case.
Figure 4.3 on page 27 shows the correct mounting for a camera to a wall with a carrier
using the example of an ARTTRACK2 camera. Make sure to not fall below minimal
distance to the wall so enough room is left for the cables and to allow readjustment of the
camera angles and maintenance.
Use strong dowels and screws for mounting the cameras to walls or ceilings (see figure
4.3 on page 27).
If in doubt, ask a skilled craftsman for assistance. Use massive and long enough angle
irons to provide the required stiffness and stability.
To avoid measurement problems, no light sources or highly reflecting areas should be
visible to the camera. Especially strong point light sources like e.g. halogen lamps and
direct or reflected sunlight may imply problems for the measurement (fluorescent lamps
are ok).
Please install the cables such that
no one can stumble over the cords,
27
4 System setup
the cords cannot be damaged,
the cords cannot damage the cameras due to mechanical strain,
the line of sight of the cameras is not obstructed.
Inappropriate cabling may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Cable ducts or fixings should be used and a strain relief should be
installed!
Please refer to chapter 4.2.2 on page 48 for more information.
4.1.2 ARTTRACK5/C
Keep a distance of min. 20 cm when operating the camera ! The
camera is assigned to the Exempt Group according to IEC62471-1 and
therefore poses no risk or hazard to the human eye or skin at this dis-
tance.
Description The ARTTRACK5 or TRACKPACK/E system may be combined with the
ARTTRACK5/C camera in order to realize tracking in multi-sided projection environments
(e.g. CAVE R
, I-Space). In such an environment it is necessary to drill holes into the pro-
jections’ corners as the camera cannot see through the screen. The ARTTRACK5/C cam-
era has been designed to easily fit into such holes by separating the lens from the elec-
tronics part (see figure 4.4). With its 4.0 mm lens a large field of view (FoV) is covered.
Refer to A.1 on page 190 for more information.
Figure 4.4: Camera ARTTRACK5/C
The 26-pin D-Sub connector between ARTTRACK5/C remote camera
head and camera body employs proprietary design. Do not try to con-
nect the remote head to any other port (e.g. COM port) !!!
28
Chapter 4
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART
The ARTTRACK5/C system either consists of ARTTRACK5/C cameras only or it can be
mixed with standard ARTTRACK5 or TRACKPACK/E cameras - both variants are limited
to a total number of 50 cameras per system.
Mounting The ARTTRACK5/C cameras are optimized for a predefined range of mea-
surement volumes. System operation in smaller or bigger measurement volumes can lead
to reduced accuracy or other malfunctions. The measurement volume can be adjusted
within certain limits simply by changing the flash intensity of the ART infrared cameras
(see chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 97).
iThe flash intensities should not be too high. In general, a flash inten-
sity of 50-60 might be sufficient.
Major changes of the measurement volume may require different lenses and thus a new
determination of camera parameters. These changes have to be done at the ART labs.
Be aware that a tracking system is very sensitive to camera movements. Therefore, the
cameras have to be mounted in a way that reduces camera movements (especially vibra-
tions) as much as possible.
iMounting on tripods may be sufficient for presentations and prelimi-
nary installations, but is not recommended as a final solution!
If you want to mount the camera on a tripod just mount the carrier on any side of the
camera body and then the remote camera head on the opposite side using a ceiling
mount.
Otherwise the carrier for the ARTTRACK5/C can be attached on all 4 sides of the camera
body. Attach the carrier with the T-piece pointing to the back of the camera in a similar
way to figure 4.2 on page 26. Note, the ceiling suspension is already connected to the
carrier in figure 4.2. The ARTTRACK5/C remote camera head should be installed using
the M6 mounting threads on its back as shown in figure 4.5 on page 29.
Figure 4.5: Camera ARTTRACK5/C remote head (back)
29
4 System setup
ZThe ARTTRACK5/C remote head has to be connected to its corre-
sponding camera body. During mounting please ensure matching se-
rial numbers for both parts !
Only use screws supplied with the ceiling mount for mounting it. Do
not use standard screws for connection of the remote camera head
due to limited space between thread and cable. Also, use all the parts
supplied with the ceiling mount - especially the toothed washer is quite
important.
You shall never open other screws on the cameras (see chapter 1.2
on page 11). Otherwise, the camera may be damaged and liability and
warranty is void.
Feel free to contact ART in case you want to realise a more complex installation. We will
assist you in your planning.
Make sure to install the system in a way that you can easily access the cameras and
its cables. Be especially careful to mount the cameras firmly so they cannot fall down.
Unsecured cameras may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Avoid hard shocks at all times! A new camera calibration at the ART fa-
cilities might become necessary in that case.
Figure 4.3 on page 27 shows the correct mounting for a camera to a wall with a carrier
using the example of an ARTTRACK2 camera. Make sure to not fall below minimal
distance to the wall so enough room is left for the cables and to allow readjustment of the
camera angles and maintenance.
Use strong dowels and screws for mounting the cameras to walls or ceilings (see figure
4.3 on page 27).
If in doubt, ask a skilled craftsman for assistance. Use massive and long enough angle
irons to provide the required stiffness and stability.
To avoid measurement problems, no light sources or highly reflecting areas should be
visible to the camera. Especially strong point light sources like e.g. halogen lamps and
direct or reflected sunlight may imply problems for the measurement (fluorescent lamps
are ok).
Please install the cables such that
no one can stumble over the cords,
the cords cannot be damaged,
the cords cannot damage the cameras due to mechanical strain,
the line of sight of the cameras is not obstructed.
Inappropriate cabling may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Cable ducts or fixings should be used and a strain relief should be
installed!
30
Chapter 4
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART
Please refer to chapter 4.2.2 on page 48 for more information.
4.1.3 TRACKPACK/E
Keep a distance of min. 20 cm when operating the camera ! The
camera is assigned to the Exempt Group according to IEC62471-1 and
therefore poses no risk or hazard to the human eye or skin at this dis-
tance.
Description The TRACKPACK/E infrared camera is intended for working environments
with distances between camera and markers of up to 4.5 metres. With its 3.5 mm lens a
large field of view (FoV) is covered. Refer to A.1 on page 190 for the respective FoV.
Figure 4.6: Camera TRACKPACK/E
Mounting The TRACKPACK/E cameras are optimized for a predefined range of mea-
surement volumes. System operation in smaller or bigger measurement volumes can lead
to reduced accuracy or other malfunctions. The measurement volume can be adjusted
within certain limits simply by changing the flash intensity of the ART infrared cameras
(see chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 97).
iThe flash intensities should not be too high. In general, a flash inten-
sity of 50-60 might be sufficient.
Major changes of the measurement volume may require different lenses and thus a new
determination of camera parameters. These changes have to be done at the ART labs.
Be aware that a tracking system is very sensitive to camera movements. Therefore, the
cameras have to be mounted in a way that reduces camera movements (especially vibra-
31
4 System setup
tions) as much as possible.
iMounting on tripods may be sufficient for presentations and prelimi-
nary installations, but is not recommended as a final solution!
If you want to mount the camera on a tripod there’s no carrier needed.
Otherwise the carrier for the TRACKPACK/E can be attached on both bottom and top
side of the camera. Attach the carrier with the T-piece pointing to the back of the camera
in a similar way to figure 4.2 on page 26. Note, the ceiling suspension is already con-
nected to the carrier in figure 4.2.
Only use screws supplied with the ceiling mount for mounting it.
Also, use all the parts supplied with the ceiling mount - especially the
toothed washer is quite important.
You shall never open other screws on the cameras (see chapter 1.2
on page 11). Otherwise, the camera may be damaged and liability and
warranty is void.
Feel free to contact ART in case you want to realise a more complex installation. We will
assist you in your planning.
Make sure to install the system in a way that you can easily access the cameras and
its cables. Be especially careful to mount the cameras firmly so they cannot fall down.
Unsecured cameras may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Avoid hard shocks at all times! A new camera calibration at the ART fa-
cilities might become necessary in that case.
Figure 4.3 on page 27 shows the correct mounting for a camera to a wall with a carrier
using the example of an ARTTRACK2 camera. Make sure to not fall below minimal
distance to the wall so enough room is left for the cables and to allow readjustment of the
camera angles and maintenance.
Use strong dowels and screws for mounting the cameras to walls or ceilings (see figure
4.3 on page 27).
If in doubt, ask a skilled craftsman for assistance. Use massive and long enough angle
irons to provide the required stiffness and stability.
To avoid measurement problems, no light sources or highly reflecting areas should be
visible to the camera. Especially strong point light sources like e.g. halogen lamps and
direct or reflected sunlight may imply problems for the measurement (fluorescent lamps
are ok).
Please install the cables such that
no one can stumble over the cords,
the cords cannot be damaged,
the cords cannot damage the cameras due to mechanical strain,
32
Chapter 4
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART
the line of sight of the cameras is not obstructed.
Inappropriate cabling may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Cable ducts or fixings should be used and a strain relief should be
installed!
Please refer to chapter 4.2.2 on page 48 for more information.
4.1.4 ARTTRACK2 (discontinued)
Keep a distance of min. 20 cm when operating the camera ! The
camera is assigned to the Exempt Group according to IEC62471-1 and
therefore poses no risk or hazard to the human eye or skin at this dis-
tance.
Description The ARTTRACK2 infrared camera is intended for working environments
with distances between camera and markers of up to 4 metres. By default the ART-
TRACK2 is equipped with a 3.5 mm lens. Depending on the application and the setup the
ARTTRACK2 can be equipped with other lenses (i.e. with different focal lengths). Refer
to A.1 on page 190 for a list of available focal lengths and the respective FoV.
Figure 4.7: Camera ARTTRACK2
Mounting The ARTTRACK2 cameras are optimized for a predefined range of measure-
ment volumes. System operation in smaller or bigger measurement volumes can lead
to reduced accuracy or other malfunctions. The measurement volume can be adjusted
within certain limits simply by changing the flash intensity of the ART infrared cameras
33
4 System setup
(see chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 97).
iThe flash intensities should not be too high. In general, a flash inten-
sity of 3-4 might be sufficient.
Major changes of the measurement volume may require different lenses and thus a new
determination of camera parameters. These changes have to be done at the ART labs.
Be aware that a tracking system is very sensitive to camera movements. Therefore, the
cameras have to be mounted in a way that reduces camera movements (especially vibra-
tions) as much as possible.
iMounting on tripods may be sufficient for presentations and prelimi-
nary installations, but is not recommended as a final solution!
If you want to mount the camera on a tripod just mount the carrier on the bottom of the
camera.
Otherwise the carrier for the ARTTRACK2 can be attached on both bottom and top side
of the camera. To attach the carrier remove the screws from the holes 1 and 2 and attach
the carrier with the T-piece pointing to the back of the camera in a similar way to figure 4.2
on page 26. Note, the ceiling suspension is already connected to the carrier in figure 4.2.
Only use screws supplied with the ceiling mount for mounting it. The
screws used for sealing the housings are not sufficiently long for fixing
the carrier. Also, use all the parts supplied with the ceiling mount -
especially the toothed washer is quite important.
You shall never open other screws on the cameras (see chapter 1.2
on page 11). Otherwise, the camera may be damaged and liability and
warranty is void.
Feel free to contact ART in case you want to realise a more complex installation. We will
assist you in your planning.
It is recommended to install the power supply for the cameras in a way that enables the
switching of all cameras by one main switch. If this is done, the system can be easily
turned off and on without changing camera positions.
Make sure to install the system in a way that you can easily access the cameras and
its cables. Be especially careful to mount the cameras firmly so they cannot fall down.
Unsecured cameras may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Avoid hard shocks at all times! A new camera calibration at the ART fa-
cilities might become necessary in that case.
Figure 4.3 on page 27 shows the correct mounting for a camera to a wall with a carrier
using the example of an ARTTRACK2 camera. Make sure to not fall below minimal
distance to the wall so enough room is left for the cables and to allow readjustment of the
camera angles and maintenance.
Use strong dowels and screws for mounting the cameras to walls or ceilings (see figure
34
Chapter 4
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART
4.3 on page 27).
If in doubt, ask a skilled craftsman for assistance. Use massive and long enough angle
irons to provide the required stiffness and stability.
To avoid measurement problems, no light sources or highly reflecting areas should be
visible to the camera. Especially strong point light sources like e.g. halogen lamps and
direct or reflected sunlight may imply problems for the measurement (fluorescent lamps
are ok).
Furthermore, please make sure the ventilator holes are not covered. For thermal rea-
sons the ventilator always has to be on the upper side of the ARTTRACK2 camera. That
means, if the camera is to be mounted hanging the carrier must be mounted on top (ven-
tilator side). If it is to be mounted standing the carrier has to be on the bottom side of the
housing.
Please install the cables such that
no one can stumble over the cords,
the cords cannot be damaged,
the cords cannot damage the cameras due to mechanical strain,
the line of sight of the cameras is not obstructed.
Inappropriate cabling may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Cable ducts or fixings should be used and a strain relief should be
installed!
Please refer to chapter 4.2.2 on page 48 for more information.
4.1.5 ARTTRACK3 (discontinued)
Keep a distance of min. 20 cm when operating the camera ! The
camera is assigned to the Exempt Group according to IEC62471-1 and
therefore poses no risk or hazard to the human eye or skin at this dis-
tance.
Description The ARTTRACK3 camera is the successor of ARTTRACK1 which is no
longer produced. Due to its larger IR flash it can be used for measurements in higher
distances (up to 6 metres). And, because of its passive cooling system (i.e. without fan),
the ARTTRACK3 is also suitable for dirty or noise sensitive environments.
By default the ARTTRACK5/C is equipped with a 4.5 mm lens. Depending on the ap-
plication and the setup the ARTTRACK3 can be equipped with other lenses (i.e. with
different focal lengths). Refer to A.1 on page 190 for a list of available focal lengths and
the respective FoV.
35
4 System setup
Figure 4.8: Camera ARTTRACK3
Mounting The ARTTRACK3 cameras are optimized for a predefined range of measure-
ment volumes. System operation in smaller or bigger measurement volumes can lead
to reduced accuracy or other malfunctions. The measurement volume can be adjusted
within certain limits simply by changing the flash intensity of the ART infrared cameras
(see chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 97).
iThe flash intensities should not be too high. In general, a flash inten-
sity of 3-4 might be sufficient.
Major changes of the measurement volume may require different lenses and thus a new
determination of camera parameters. These changes have to be done at the ART labs.
Be aware that a tracking system is very sensitive to camera movements. Therefore, the
cameras have to be mounted in a way that reduces camera movements (especially vibra-
tions) as much as possible.
iMounting on tripods may be sufficient for presentations and prelimi-
nary installations, but is not recommended as a final solution!
If you want to mount the camera on a tripod just mount the carrier on the bottom of the
camera.
Otherwise the carrier for the ARTTRACK3 can be attached on both bottom and top side
of the camera. Attach the carrier with the T-piece pointing to the back of the camera in a
similar way to figure 4.2 on page 26. Note, the ceiling suspension is already connected to
the carrier in figure 4.2.
36
Chapter 4
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART
Only use screws supplied with the ceiling mount for mounting it. The
screws used for sealing the housings are not sufficiently long for fixing
the carrier. Also, use all the parts supplied with the ceiling mount -
especially the toothed washer is quite important.
You shall never open other screws on the cameras (see chapter 1.2
on page 11). Otherwise, the camera may be damaged and liability and
warranty is void.
Feel free to contact ART in case you want to realise a more complex installation. We will
assist you in your planning.
It is recommended to install the power supply for the cameras in a way that enables the
switching of all cameras by one main switch. If this is done, the system can be easily
turned off and on without changing camera positions.
Make sure to install the system in a way that you can easily access the cameras and
its cables. Be especially careful to mount the cameras firmly so they cannot fall down.
Unsecured cameras may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Avoid hard shocks at all times! A new camera calibration at the ART fa-
cilities might become necessary in that case.
Figure 4.3 on page 27 shows the correct mounting for a camera to a wall with a carrier
using the example of an ARTTRACK2 camera. Make sure to not fall below minimal
distance to the wall so enough room is left for the cables and to allow readjustment of the
camera angles and maintenance.
Use strong dowels and screws for mounting the cameras to walls or ceilings (see figure
4.3 on page 27).
If in doubt, ask a skilled craftsman for assistance. Use massive and long enough angle
irons to provide the required stiffness and stability.
To avoid measurement problems, no light sources or highly reflecting areas should be
visible to the camera. Especially strong point light sources like e.g. halogen lamps and
direct or reflected sunlight may imply problems for the measurement (fluorescent lamps
are ok).
Please install the cables such that
no one can stumble over the cords,
the cords cannot be damaged,
the cords cannot damage the cameras due to mechanical strain,
the line of sight of the cameras is not obstructed.
Inappropriate cabling may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Cable ducts or fixings should be used and a strain relief should be
installed!
37
4 System setup
Please refer to chapter 4.2.2 on page 48 for more information.
4.1.6 TRACKPACK (discontinued)
Keep a distance of min. 20 cm when operating the camera ! The
camera is assigned to the Exempt Group according to IEC62471-1 and
therefore poses no risk or hazard to the human eye or skin at this dis-
tance.
Description The TRACKPACK is a two or four camera infrared optical tracking system
for use in medium-sized working volumes. It is the best solution for Head- and Flystick-
tracking in multi-sided projection environments (max. 3 m x 3 m x 2 m), or in front of
medium-sized projection screens (up to 4.5 m wide). The system consists of two or four
TRACKPACK cameras and a TRACKPACK Controller.
By default the TRACKPACK is equipped with a 3.5 mm lens. Depending on the applica-
tion and the setup the TRACKPACK camera can be equipped with other lenses (i.e. with
different focal lengths). Refer to A.1 on page 190 for a list of available focal lengths and
the respective FoV.
The RJ45 connection between TRACKPACK camera and controller is
used for power supply and synchronization signal. It is not a standard
Ethernet connection! That is why connecting the RJ45 connector to
any other than the equivalent port of the controller may damage the
camera or the connected partner.
Figure 4.9: Camera TRACKPACK
38
Chapter 4
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART
Mounting The TRACKPACK cameras are optimized for a predefined range of measure-
ment volumes. System operation in smaller or bigger measurement volumes can lead
to reduced accuracy or other malfunctions. The measurement volume can be adjusted
within certain limits simply by changing the flash intensity of the ART infrared cameras
(see chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 97).
iThe flash intensities should not be too high. In general, a flash inten-
sity of 3-4 might be sufficient.
Major changes of the measurement volume may require different lenses and thus a new
determination of camera parameters. These changes have to be done at the ART labs.
Be aware that a tracking system is very sensitive to camera movements. Therefore, the
cameras have to be mounted in a way that reduces camera movements (especially vibra-
tions) as much as possible.
iMounting on tripods may be sufficient for presentations and prelimi-
nary installations, but is not recommended as a final solution!
If you want to mount the camera on a tripod just mount the carrier on the bottom of the
camera.
Otherwise the carrier for the TRACKPACK can be attached on both bottom and top side
of the camera. Attach the carrier with the T-piece pointing to the back of the camera in a
similar way to figure 4.2 on page 26. Note, the ceiling suspension is already connected to
the carrier in figure 4.2.
Only use screws supplied with the ceiling mount for mounting it. The
screws used for sealing the housings are not sufficiently long for fixing
the carrier. Also, use all the parts supplied with the ceiling mount -
especially the toothed washer is quite important.
You shall never open other screws on the cameras (see chapter 1.2
on page 11). Otherwise, the camera may be damaged and liability and
warranty is void.
Please keep the distance between the cameras in a range of 1 to 2 metres. Depending
on the lens and the focal length it may be possible to achieve other range values. Please
contact ART for more information.
Make sure to install the system in a way that you can easily access the cameras and
its cables. Be especially careful to mount the cameras firmly so they cannot fall down.
Unsecured cameras may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Avoid hard shocks at all times! A new camera calibration at the ART fa-
cilities might become necessary in that case.
Figure 4.3 on page 27 shows the correct mounting for a camera to a wall with a carrier
using the example of an ARTTRACK2 camera. Make sure to not fall below minimal
distance to the wall so enough room is left for the cables and to allow readjustment of the
39
4 System setup
camera angles and maintenance.
Use strong dowels and screws for mounting the cameras to walls or ceilings (see figure
4.3 on page 27).
If in doubt, ask a skilled craftsman for assistance. Use massive and long enough angle
irons to provide the required stiffness and stability.
To avoid measurement problems, no light sources or highly reflecting areas should be
visible to the camera. Especially strong point light sources like e.g. halogen lamps and
direct or reflected sunlight may imply problems for the measurement (fluorescent lamps
are ok).
Please install the cables such that
no one can stumble over the cords,
the cords cannot be damaged,
the cords cannot damage the cameras due to mechanical strain,
the line of sight of the cameras is not obstructed.
Inappropriate cabling may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Cable ducts or fixings should be used and a strain relief should be
installed!
Please refer to chapter 4.2.3 on page 52 for more information.
4.1.7 TRACKPACK/C (discontinued)
Keep a distance of min. 20 cm when operating the camera ! The
camera is assigned to the Exempt Group according to IEC62471-1 and
therefore poses no risk or hazard to the human eye or skin at this dis-
tance.
Description The TRACKPACK system may also be combined with the TRACKPACK/C cam-
era in order to realize tracking in multi-sided projection environments (e.g. CAVE R
, I-
Space). In such an environment it is necessary to drill holes into the projections’ corners
as the camera cannot see through the screen. The TRACKPACK/C camera has been
designed to easily fit into such holes by separating the lens from the electronics part (see
figure 4.10).
With its 3.5 mm lens a large field of view (FoV) is covered. Refer to A.1 on page 190 for
the respective FoV.
The TRACKPACK system either consists of TRACKPACK/C cameras or it can be mixed
with standard TRACKPACK cameras - both variants are limited to a total number of four
cameras per system and come with a TRACKPACK Controller.
40
Chapter 4
4.1 The tracking cameras of ART
Figure 4.10: Camera TRACKPACK/C
The RJ45 connection between TRACKPACK/C camera and controller is
used for power supply and synchronization signal. It is not a standard
Ethernet connection! That is why connecting the RJ45 connector to
any other than the equivalent port of the controller may damage the
camera or the connected partner.
Mounting The TRACKPACK/C cameras are optimized for a predefined range of mea-
surement volumes. System operation in smaller or bigger measurement volumes can lead
to reduced accuracy or other malfunctions. The measurement volume can be adjusted
within certain limits simply by changing the flash intensity of the ART infrared cameras
(see chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 97).
iThe flash intensities should not be too high. In general, a flash inten-
sity of 3-4 might be sufficient.
Major changes of the measurement volume may require different lenses and thus a new
determination of camera parameters. These changes have to be done at the ART labs.
Be aware that a tracking system is very sensitive to camera movements. Therefore, the
cameras have to be mounted in a way that reduces camera movements (especially vibra-
tions) as much as possible.
iMounting on tripods may be sufficient for presentations and prelimi-
nary installations, but is not recommended as a final solution!
Otherwise the carrier for the TRACKPACK/C can be attached to the camera as shown in
41
4 System setup
figure 4.11.
Figure 4.11: Camera TRACKPACK/C with attached carrier
Only use screws supplied with the ceiling mount for mounting it. The
screws used for sealing the housings are not sufficiently long for fixing
the carrier. Also, use all the parts supplied with the ceiling mount -
especially the toothed washer is quite important.
You shall never open other screws on the cameras (see chapter 1.2
on page 11). Otherwise, the camera may be damaged and liability and
warranty is void.
Please keep the distance between the cameras in a range of 2 to 3 metres. Please con-
tact ART for more information.
Make sure to install the system in a way that you can easily access the cameras and
its cables. Be especially careful to mount the cameras firmly so they cannot fall down.
Unsecured cameras may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Avoid hard shocks at all times! A new camera calibration at the ART fa-
cilities might become necessary in that case.
Use strong dowels and screws for mounting the cameras to walls or ceilings (see figure
4.3 on page 27).
If in doubt, ask a skilled craftsman for assistance. Use massive and long enough angle
irons to provide the required stiffness and stability.
To avoid measurement problems, no light sources or highly reflecting areas should be
visible to the camera. Especially strong point light sources like e.g. halogen lamps and
direct or reflected sunlight may imply problems for the measurement (fluorescent lamps
42
Chapter 4
4.2 The Controllers of ART
are ok).
Please install the cables such that
no one can stumble over the cords,
the cords cannot be damaged,
the cords cannot damage the cameras due to mechanical strain,
the line of sight of the cameras is not obstructed.
Inappropriate cabling may pose a serious hazard to health and safety.
Cable ducts or fixings should be used and a strain relief should be
installed!
Please refer to chapter 4.2.3 on page 52 for more information.
4.2 The Controllers of ART
With the introduction of DTrack2 a new principle of controlling the tracking system is im-
plemented. The tracking system itself consists of cameras, interaction devices (optional),
targets and the ART Controller, the ARTTRACK Controller (discontinued) or TRACK-
PACK Controller (discontinued) respectively.
The software DTrack2 consists of frontend and backend software. The frontend software
is installed on a remote PC which is connected to the controller via Ethernet. A GUI for
easy handling enables the user to control the tracking system completely from the remote
PC. The benefit is that the system becomes more flexible, i.e. different users can con-
trol the tracking system at any one time (but not simultaneously!) from different working
places.
Furthermore, DTrack2 provides the possibility to control its functions via Ethernet (i.e.
without the DTrack2 frontend software). This is done by establishing a TCP/IP connec-
tion with the controller and exchanging short command strings (refer to chapter 4.2.8 on
page 58). Please contact ART if you are interested in using this feature.
The backend software runs on the controller - all necessary calculations (3DOF, 6DOF
data, ...) are done by the controller. The data and control commands are interchanged
via a TCP/IP connection between the controller and the DTrack2 frontend software on the
remote PC. Data output to the application or graphics workstation is done via a UDP con-
nection. The cameras (refer to chapter 4.1 on page 25) and the interaction devices (refer
to chapter 5 on page 126) have to be connected to the respective ports of the controller.
43
4 System setup
ART
Controller
ARTTRACK
Controller
TRACKPACK
Controller
DTrack2 1
ARTTRACK1 × × ×
ARTTRACK2 × × ×
ARTTRACK3 × × ×
ARTTRACK5 × × (from v2.10)
ARTTRACK5/C × × (from v2.11)
TRACKPACK × ×
TRACKPACK/C × × (from v2.5)
TRACKPACK/E × × (from v2.11)
Flystick1 × × × ×
Flystick2 × × × ×
Flystick3 × × × × (from v2.2)
Fingertracking 2× × × ×
Measurement Tool × × × × (from v2.2)
1an appropriate license may be necessary (refer to table 4.3)
2for Fingertracking it is recommended to use six cameras for ideal operation
Table 4.1: Compatibility of the ART cameras and interaction devices
4.2.1 Installation of the ART Controller (DTrack2 since v2.10)
The ART Controller (DTrack2 since v2.10) comes in a 19" inch housing compatible for
rack mounting, see fig. 4.12 on page 44.
To turn on the controller flip the power switch to I, for restart from standby mode press
the button "soft power on". The USB ports can be used for plugging in the USB radio
transceiver for the Flystick2/3 (refer to chapter 5.1 on page 128 or chapter 5.2 on page
134).
ZPlease ensure unblocked airflow at all times for optimal operation of
the ART Controller !
Figure 4.12: ART Controller front view
The following list introduces the ports of the ART Controller (see fig. 4.13 on 45):
ART Synccard3 (master & slave) :
44
Chapter 4
4.2 The Controllers of ART
ExtIn:
Please plug in the external source (TTL or video signal) for synchronization
here. Please use the accessible port without protective cap only. In cascaded
systems please connect the external source to the master controller only. The
slave controller is then synchronized by the master.
PoE+ ports:
All ARTTRACK1 ,ARTTRACK2 ,ARTTRACK3 ,ARTTRACK5 ,ARTTRACK5/C
and TRACKPACK/E cameras have to be plugged in here. In larger systems (>
8ARTTRACK5 and ARTTRACK5/C cameras only), please connect the exter-
nal PoE+ switch to any of these ports.
OUT1-3 (optional):
For cascaded systems please connect OUT1 to ExtIn of a slave controller (see
chapter 4.3 on page 58). For backwards compatibility, please connect ART-
TRACK1 ARTTRACK3 cameras here. Please refer to chapter 4.2.2 on page
48 for more detailed information.
OUT1:
Defines syncgroup # 1. The three different syncgroups are characterized
by their time delay related to syncgroup # 1. When using ARTTRACK1
ARTTRACK3 cameras at least one camera has to be connected here if you
are using active targets (e.g. Fingertracking, Flystick3). Refer to chapter
5.3 on page 137 for more information.
OUT2:
Defines syncgroup # 2. The default time delay related to syncgroup # 1 is
480µs.
OUT3:
Defines syncgroup # 3. The default time delay related to syncgroup # 1 is
960µs.
Figure 4.13: ART Controller back view
USB port:
Please plug in the USB radio transceiver for the Flystick2/3 here (refer to chapter
5.1 on page 128 or chapter 5.2 on page 134).
45
4 System setup
LAN network port:
Please connect the ART Controller to your local network using an RJ45 cable.
Cascaded network port:
For cascaded systems please connect a slave controller to the ART Controller (mas-
ter). Please refer to chapter 4.3 on page 58 for more detailed information.
Power inlet:
Please connect to mains (100 - 240V).
iThe power inlet is fuse-protected (2x4A, anti-surge type T) and features
a line filter for EMV protection.
IP addresses are predefined in ARTTRACK and TRACKPACK/E cameras - changes by
the user are not possible!
i
The camera network ports are configured using:
IP address: 172.28.0.X
subnet mask: 255.255.0.0
In larger systems (> 8 ARTTRACK5 and ARTTRACK5/C cameras only), please use the
Netgear Prosafe GSM7212P PoE+ switch authorized by ART . It features 12 PoE+ Ports
for connection to ARTTRACK5 and ARTTRACK5/C cameras. Please use the accessible
ports without protective caps only (see fig. 4.14 on page 46). To turn on the PoE+ switch,
please connect it to mains.
ZPlease allow min. 3 minutes for booting prior to starting the ART Con-
troller !
Figure 4.14: ART PoE+ switch front view
Mount the cameras at the desired position before connecting the cables.
The ARTTRACK5 ,ARTTRACK5/C and TRACKPACK/E cameras have to be connected
via twisted pair cables (min. Cat.5, max. length 100 m) to the internal ART Synccard3
of the ART Controller or to an external PoE+ switch for systems > 8 cameras (only ART-
TRACK5 and ARTTRACK5/C ). The external PoE+ switch itself has to be connected to
the Synccard3.
The ART Synccard3 is designed as a single cable solution and is therefore used both for
power and synchronization of the IR cameras.
Connection of ARTTRACK1 ,ARTTRACK2 or ARTTRACK3 cameras (backwards
compatible systems) When connecting the synchronization cables it is important to
46
Chapter 4
4.2 The Controllers of ART
correctly chain the cameras on the sync cable (see chapter 6.4 on page 150). There
must be one continuous signal line from the BNC connector of the synccard to the 75
terminating resistor, with the cameras inserted to the line by T-junctions. It is neither al-
lowed to extend the connection between the T-piece and the camera, nor to branch the
signal line.
Usually, all cameras are connected with the sync output no. 1 ("OUT1") of the synccard
like a chain that is finished by a 75terminating resistor. If the cameras have to be
grouped into different syncgroups, in order to avoid blinding, two or three BNC chains
are used at the sync outputs no. 1 and 2 or 1, 2 and 3, respectively, of the synccard3.
The settings are defined by software DTrack2 . All sync signals are transferred via BNC
connections.
Z
ARTTRACK2 and ARTTRACK3 cameras have to be connected via any
external Ethernet switch or the ART PoE+ switch and may not be con-
nected directly to the PoE+ ports of the ART Synccard3. Please refer
to chapter 4.2.2 on page 48 for more detailed information.
Furthermore, the controller uses the "LAN" ethernet plug (1000 Base-TX) for data output
to the remote PC or to any PC within the local network. Figure 4.15 on page 50 shows
two possibilities of connecting the controller to a local network. You may either use the
controller as a DHCP client within your network (figure 4.15(a)), i.e. the tracking data is
transmitted directly via your local network. Or, if due to your company security guidelines
it is not allowed to connect the controller directly to your network, you may install two
network cards in your remote PC - one is connected to the controller and the other one is
connected to your local network (figure 4.15(b)). In this case, the DTrack2 Frontend will
act as a router for the tracking data.
The controller is controlled by a remote PC via DTrack2 frontend software. When deliv-
ered, the controller is set up to support DHCP. Therefore, it will acquire an IP address
automatically given that a DHCP server is running.
Double-check if the cameras are connected properly to the controller and verify that the
cameras are running. Connect the Ethernet cable to your local network and connect the
power plug of the ART Controller to a power socket. If you want to set a specific static IP
address before booting the controller please refer to chapter 4.2.4 on page 54 for more
information.
Press the power switch on the front of the controller. If the controller is booting without
connected Ethernet cable it will use its fall-back IP address.
iThe fall-back IP address of the controller is 192.168.0.1 (subnet mask
255.255.255.0)!
You may configure another static IP address as follows:
select Settings Controller
untick the checkbox DHCP client
enter IP address and subnet mask
47
4 System setup
optionally, enter gateway and nameserver
reboot the controller for the changes to take effect
Z
Please note that these settings are not part of your personal configura-
tion. Changes in this menu will affect all users of your controller! Your
controller may become unreachable with wrong IP settings! Refer to
chapter 4.2.4 on page 54).
Finally, start the DTrack2 frontend software on the remote PC. Please refer to chapter 4.5
on page 70 for more details.
External synchronization An ART Controller can be synchronized with an external
source. On the back of the controller there is a BNC plug ("ExtIn") which serves as input
for the external synchronization signal. The sync signal may be of type TTL or video (see
also chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 101).
Typically, external synchronization has to be used when other systems inside the tracking
system are also using infrared signals for controlling their equipment (e.g. if IR-controlled
shutter glasses are used). The goal is to reduce or eliminate interference. The ART track-
ing system follows the external synchronization signal and chooses time slots when it is
safe to emit infrared radiation without causing interference. The effect is, for example, that
active shutter glasses are not flickering but offer a stable picture for the user.
Z
The external sync input is not internally terminated.
When synchronizing with a video input, a T-piece with an external 75
terminating resistor should be used if the signal line ends at the
controller.
When using a TTL-signal you should not use a terminating resistor.
However, you should use a shielded cable for the synchronization with
a TTL-signal.
4.2.2 Installation of the ARTTRACK Controller (discontinued)
The following list introduces the ports of the ARTTRACK Controller with Synccard2:
internal Ethernet switch:
the cameras have to be plugged in here. In larger systems, please connect the
external switch to any of these ports.
external Ethernet switch:
the Allied Telesis AT-FS708 is an eco friendly switch which is designed to minimize
power consumption (typical 3.5W) through the use of a high efficiency power supply
and a low power chipset. It features an overnight mode (i.e. reduction in power
during after-work hours) as well as other power saving features.
Please refer to the Allied Telesis Installation Guide before connecting the power
source.
ART Synccard2 :
48
Chapter 4
4.2 The Controllers of ART
ExtIn:
Please plug in the external source for synchronization here.
Out1:
Defines syncgroup # 1. The three different syncgroups are characterized by
their time delay related to syncgroup # 1. At least one camera has to be con-
nected here if you are using active targets (e.g. Fingertracking, Flystick3).
Refer to chapter 5.3 on page 137 for more information.
Out2:
Defines syncgroup # 2. The time delay related to syncgroup # 1 is 480µs.
Out3:
Defines syncgroup # 3. The time delay related to syncgroup # 1 is 960µs.
USB port:
Please plug in the USB radio transceiver for the Flystick2/3 here (refer to chapter
5.1 on page 128 or chapter 5.2 on page 134).
Ethernet port:
Please connect the controller to your local network using an RJ45 cable.
Mount the cameras at the desired position before connecting the cables. The ART-
TRACK cameras have to be connected via twisted pair cables either to the internal Eth-
ernet switch of the controller or to an external Ethernet switch. The external switch itself
has to be connected to the controller.
iOlder switches sometimes do have uplink ports which are not suitable
for connecting to the camera. Only use the normal ports of the switch.
The controller is equipped with an internal switch (100 Base-TX) which serves for the
connection to the cameras (suitable for small systems, i.e. 4 cameras). Larger systems
(i.e. >4 cameras) have to be equipped with an external switch which must be connected
to any port (except for the uplink port) of the internal switch of the controller.
i
The camera network is configured using:
IP address: 172.28.0.1
subnet mask: 255.255.0.0
IP addresses are predefined in ARTTRACK cameras - changes by the user are not pos-
sible!
The controller is equipped with a PCI card for synchronization of the IR cameras (ART Sync-
card2). When connecting the synchronization cables it is important to correctly chain the
cameras on the sync cable (see chapter 6.4 on page 150). There must be one continuous
signal line from the BNC connector of the synccard to the 75terminating resistor, with
the cameras inserted to the line by T-junctions. It is neither allowed to extend the connec-
tion between the T-piece and the camera, nor to branch the signal line.
49
4 System setup
(a) standard connection
(b) indirect connection
Figure 4.15: Connecting the ARTTRACK Controller to a local network
50
Chapter 4
4.2 The Controllers of ART
Usually, all cameras are connected with the sync output no. 1 ("OUT1") of the synccard
like a chain that is finished by a 75terminating resistor. If the cameras have to be
grouped into different syncgroups, in order to avoid blinding, two or three BNC chains are
used at the sync outputs no. 1 and 2 or 1, 2 and 3, respectively, of the synccard. The set-
tings of the Synccard2 are defined by software DTrack2 . All sync signals are transferred
via BNC connections.
Furthermore, the controller uses the single Ethernet plug (100 Base-TX) for data output
to the remote PC or to any PC within the local network. Figure 4.15 on page 50 shows
two possibilities of connecting the controller to a local network. You may either use the
controller as a DHCP client within your network (figure 4.15(a)), i.e. the tracking data is
transmitted directly via your local network. Or, if due to your company security guidelines
it is not allowed to connect the controller directly to your network, you may install two
network cards in your remote PC - one is connected to the controller and the other one is
connected to your local network (figure 4.15(b)). In this case, the DTrack2 Frontend will
act as a router for the tracking data.
The controller is controlled by a remote PC via DTrack2 frontend software. When deliv-
ered, the controller is set up to support DHCP. Therefore, it will acquire an IP address
automatically given that a DHCP server is running.
Double-check if the cameras are connected properly to the controller. Verify that power
supplies are switched on and the cameras are running. Connect the Ethernet cable to
your local network and connect the power plug of the ARTTRACK Controller to a power
socket. If you want to set a specific static IP address before booting the controller please
refer to chapter 4.2.4 on page 54 for more information.
Press the switch next to the power plug to start the controller. If the controller is booting
without connected Ethernet cable it will use its fall-back IP address.
iThe fall-back IP address of the controller is 192.168.0.1 (subnet mask
255.255.255.0)!
You may configure another static IP address as follows:
select Settings Controller
untick the checkbox DHCP client
enter IP address and subnet mask
optionally, enter gateway and nameserver
reboot the controller for the changes to take effect
Z
Please note that these settings are not part of your personal configura-
tion. Changes in this menu will affect all users of your controller! Your
controller may become unreachable with wrong IP settings! Refer to
chapter 4.2.4 on page 54).
51
4 System setup
Finally, start the DTrack2 frontend software on the remote PC. Please refer to chapter 4.5
on page 70 for more details.
External synchronization Any ARTTRACK system controller can be synchronized with
an external source. On the back of the controller there is a BNC plug ("ExtIn") which
serves as input for the external synchronization signal. The sync signal may be of type
TTL or video (see also chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 101).
Typically, external synchronization has to be used when other systems inside the tracking
system are also using infrared signals for controlling their equipment (e.g. if IR-controlled
shutter glasses are used). The goal is to reduce or eliminate interference. The ART track-
ing system follows the external synchronization signal and chooses time slots when it is
safe to emit infrared radiation without causing interference. The effect is, for example, that
active shutter glasses are not flickering but offer a stable picture for the user.
Z
The external sync input is not internally terminated.
When synchronizing with a video input, a T-piece with an external 75
terminating resistor should be used if the signal line ends at the
controller.
When using a TTL-signal you should not use a terminating resistor.
However, you should use a shielded cable for the synchronization with
a TTL-signal.
4.2.3 Installation of the TRACKPACK Controller (discontinued)
The following list introduces the ports of the TRACKPACK Controller:
ART SynccardTP :
The syncgroups for TRACKPACK systems can be configured in the DTrack2 fron-
tend software. Please refer to chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 97.
ExtIn:
Please plug in the external source for synchronization here.
Output:
The cameras have to be plugged in to the RJ45 connectors. Synchronization
and power is supplied with this connection.
Firewire:
Please connect the TRACKPACK cameras with the controller using the delivered
Firewire cables.
USB port:
Please plug in the USB radio transceiver for the Flystick2/3 here (refer to chapter
5.1 on page 128 or chapter 5.2 on page 134).
Ethernet port:
Please connect the controller to your local network using an RJ45 cable.
52
Chapter 4
4.2 The Controllers of ART
For connecting the TRACKPACK controller to your local network, please refer to figure
4.15 on page 50. You may either use the controller as a DHCP client within your network
(figure 4.15(a)), i.e. the tracking data is transmitted directly via your local network. If, due
to your company security guidelines, it is not allowed to connect the controller directly to
your network, you may install two network cards in your remote PC - one is connected to
the controller and the other one is connected to your local network (figure 4.15(b)). In that
case, the DTrack2 Frontend will act as a router for the tracking data.
The controller is controlled by a remote PC via DTrack2 frontend software. When deliv-
ered, the controller is set up to support DHCP. Connect the Ethernet cable to your local
network and connect the power plug to a power socket. If you want to set a specific static
IP address before booting the controller please refer to chapter 4.2.4 on page 54 for more
information.
Press the switch next to the power plug to start the controller. If the controller is booting
without connected Ethernet cable it will use its standard IP address.
iThe fall-back IP address of the controller is 192.168.0.1 (subnet mask
255.255.255.0)!
You may configure another static IP address as follows:
select Settings Controller
untick the checkbox DHCP client
enter IP address and subnet mask
optionally, enter gateway and nameserver
reboot the controller for the changes to take effect
Z
Please note that these settings are not part of your personal configura-
tion. Changes in this menu will affect all users of your controller! Your
controller may become unreachable with wrong IP settings! Refer to
chapter 4.2.4 on page 54).
Finally, start the DTrack2 frontend software on the remote PC. Please refer to chapter 4.5
on page 70 for more details.
External synchronization The TRACKPACK system and therefore the TRACKPACK con-
troller can be synchronized with an external source. On the back of the controller there is
a BNC plug ("ExtIn") which serves as input for the external synchronization signal. The
sync signal may be of type TTL or video (see also chapter 4.5.6.3 on pag 101).
Typically, external synchronization has to be used when other systems inside the tracking
system are also using infrared signals for controlling their equipment (e.g. if IR-controlled
shutter glasses are used). The goal is to reduce or eliminate interference. The TRACK-
PACK tracking system follows the external synchronization signal and chooses time slots
when it is safe to emit infrared radiation without causing interference. The effect is, for ex-
ample, that active shutter glasses are not flickering but offer a stable picture for the user.
53
4 System setup
Z
The external sync input is not internally terminated.
When synchronizing with a video input, a T-piece with an external 75
terminating resistor should be used if the signal line ends at the con-
troller.
When using a TTL-signal you should not use a terminating resistor.
However, you should use a shielded cable for the synchronization with
a TTL-signal.
Be aware of the following specialty of the TrackPack system:
The TRACKPACK cameras get power supply and sync via the RJ45
cable!
Therefore, the status of the synchronization is indicated with two LEDs (orange and green)
located on the synccard of the controller. Depending on the operating condition of the
ART tracking system the LEDs are triggered respectively. Table 4.2 shows how the LEDs
are triggered according to the type of synchronization.
two LEDs (on each port of the camera network card)
↓ ↓
orange green
↓ ↓
ON OFF ON OFF
↓ ↓
flashing permanently
lit
measurement
inactive
controller
switched ON
controller
switched OFF
↓ ↓
master (sync
source)
slave (sync
drain)
Status
Table 4.2: Description of the LEDs on the back of the TRACKPACK Controller
4.2.4 Setting a static IP address without the DTrack2 Frontend
(available from controller software version v2.2)
It is possible to configure the IP address of the controller without the DTrack2 frontend
software. You only need a standard USB stick (FAT32 formatted) on which you save a
setup file (format see below).
Plug in the USB stick to the controller. It doesn’t matter if the controller is running or
not.
If necessary start up the controller.
Wait some time (approx. 20-30 seconds, until announced by two beeps) for the
controller to write the two files onto the USB stick.
54
Chapter 4
4.2 The Controllers of ART
Unplug the USB stick.
Now, you may view the information file or edit the setup file with any editor (instruc-
tions given in the setup file).
In case you changed the setup file, please plug in the USB stick to the controller
again.
Wait some time (approx. 20-30 seconds, until announced by three beeps) for the
controller to read the setup file.
Reboot the controller for the changes to take effect.
Now, your controller is configured according to your requirements.
4.2.5 The setup file
This file is used to configure the controller without using the DTrack2 frontend software
regarding three parameters, which are:
configuring the controller to be a DHCP client,
setting a static IP address and
carrying out a factory reset.
Carrying out a factory reset will result in the loss of all your settings!
Following, a description of the file (e.g. ARTtrackController00117_setup.txt) format:
1# ARTtrack Controller Setup:
2
3
4# ethernet settings:
5# - uncomment just one of the lines starting with ’SETNET’
6
7# ethernet settings: DHCP
8# - uncomment the following line to activate DHCP
9#SETNET="dhcp"
10
11# ethernet settings: fix IP address and subnet mask
12# - uncomment the following line to set a fix IP address and subnet mask
13#SETNET="ip 192.168.0.1 255.255.255.0"
14
15# name settings: host name
16# - uncomment the following line to set the host name
55
4 System setup
17#SETHOSTNAME="atc"
18
19# name settings: domain name
20# - uncomment the following line to set the domain name
21#SETDOMAINNAME="art.site"
22
23# name settings: domain name server
24# - uncomment one of the following lines to set (or clear) a domain name server
25#SETNAMESERVER="192.168.0.254" # set DNS (IP or hostname)
26#SETNAMESERVER="-" # clear DNS
27
28# factory reset of all other settings:
29# - CAUTION: use with care, all your settings will be lost!
30# - uncomment the following line to reset all other Controller settings
31#RESETSETTINGS="yes"
Example:
If you wanted to setup a static IP you would have to remove the ’#’ sign and enter the
desired IP address, here for example: 123.123.0.1
before:
13#SETNET="ip 192.168.0.1 255.255.255.0"
after:
13 SETNET="ip 123.123.0.1 255.255.255.0"
4.2.6 The information file
This file contains the current settings of the controller. Following, a description of the file
format (e.g. ARTtrackController00150_info.txt):
ARTtrack Controller Information:
Name : atc-150
Serial Number : 00150
Ethernet (LAN) : dhcp
Ethernet IP (LAN) : 10.10.5.22 255.255.0.0 10.10.0.253
Ethernet MAC (LAN): 00:24:1D:00:C3:B3
Domain Name Server:
4.2.7 Wake On LAN
The controller is capable of Wake On LAN (WOL) if it has been forced into standby mode
before by the user (DTrack2 Controller standby).
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Chapter 4
4.2 The Controllers of ART
There are two options for waking up the controller remotely:
1. you may use DTrack2 or
2. use a separate tool (Windows: WOL program; Linux: console-based command).
Option 1 - WOL via DTrack2 Start the DTrack2 frontend software as usual. The ’Con-
nect’ button will change its name into ’Wake On LAN’ (refer to figure 4.16).
Figure 4.16: Welcome screen of DTrack2 with Wake On LAN option
Please make sure that the controller is still connected to the local net-
work! DTrack2 cannot wake up the controller if no physical connection
between remote PC and controller is established!
Press the ’Wake On LAN’ button and DTrack2 is trying to wake up the controller - this
may take up to two minutes as the controller has to boot up (see figure 4.17).
Figure 4.17: Wake On LAN progress bar
If Wake On LAN was successful DTrack2 will automatically establish the connection with
this controller and start the frontend software.
Option 2 - WOL via separate tool You will need the hostname of the controller as well
as its MAC address. To get this information, please press Settings Controller and re-
member the ’hostname’ and its MAC address (’ethernet-MAC LAN’).
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4 System setup
If you are a Windows user you need a separate WOL program to use this feature. Please
refer to the manual of the WOL program you are using to find out how to configure the
WOL function.
When using Linux you only need to switch to the console and type in the following com-
mand and your controller restarts:
for Linux openSUSE:
$ wol <MAC address of your ATC>
e.g.: $ wol 00:1D:92:3A:58:5F
for Ubuntu:
$ wakeonlan <MAC address of your ATC>
e.g.: $ wakeonlan 00:1D:92:3A:58:5F
4.2.8 Remote command strings
The following commands may be used in combination with the DTrack2 SDK to control
the tracking system remotely (e.g. with your media control) and without the DTrack2 fron-
tend. The DTrack2 SDK is available from ART upon request.
Command string (always preceded by "dtrack2") Description
tracking start Start the measurement
tracking stop Stop the measurement
set config active_config <name> Change the configuration to <name>
set output net <channel id> udp <host> <port> Configure where the data has to be sent to
example: dtrack2 set output net ch02 udp 231.231.0.1 5003
set output net <channel id> multicast <host> <port> Configure where the data has to be sent to
example: dtrack2 set output net ch02 multicast 231.231.0.1 5003
set output active <channel id> <output type> <yes/no> Activate or deactivate the data output and specify
the data to be transmitted
example: dtrack2 set output active ch02 all yes
system shutdown Force the controller to go into standby
system reboot Shut down the controller and reboot automati-
cally afterwards
4.3 Setting up cascaded systems
Cascading means that two or more stand-alone tracking systems are combined to one
large system in order to have only one consolidated data output. It is possible to cas-
cade TRACKPACK/E systems with or without ARTTRACK5 and ARTTRACK5/C and to
build cascades out of ARTTRACK (discontinued) with TRACKPACK systems (discon-
tinued). Therefore, the system is subdivided into one master and up to eight slaves.
However, the total number of cameras in the cascaded system cannot exceed 16 for
TRACKPACK/E only systems and 50 for combined ARTTRACK5 &ARTTRACK5/C and
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Chapter 4
4.3 Setting up cascaded systems
TRACKPACK/E systems respectively.
The task of the master is to gather all single data outputs from all slaves and to merge
them into one single data output. The DTrack2 frontend connects to the master only and
allows to configure (e.g. cameras, output, tracking, etc.) the entire tracking system as
usual.
Z
The master has to be an ARTTRACK Controller with "full-featured" li-
cense (< DTrack2 2.10) and a Synccard2.
Starting with DTrack2 version v2.10 a new license model has been es-
tablished. The master controller needs to have a dedicated "cascaded
systems" license as well as a sufficient license for ALL cameras in the
cascade, e.g. 4 ARTTRACK5 + 4 TRACKPACK/E cameras = license for
8 cameras.
Depending on your setup there are different options how to connect the single tracking
systems within a cascade.
Option 1 - master: all ART and ARTTRACK Controllers, slave(s): ART Controllers
with TRACKPACK/E or TRACKPACK controllers (discontinued) Connect the data
output of the slave controller(s) and the one of the master to the same local area network
LAN (e.g. application network, see option 1 in fig. 4.18 on page 60 and fig. 4.19 on page
61).
Option 2 - master: ART Controllers (DTrack2 => v2.11), slave(s): ART Controllers
with TRACKPACK/E or TRACKPACK controllers (discontinued) Connect the data
output of the slave controller(s) to the cascaded network port of the master (see option 2
in fig. 4.18 on page 60). Please use a switch for two or more TRACKPACK slaves.
Option 3 - master: ARTTRACK controllers (discontinued), slave(s): TRACKPACK con-
trollers (discontinued) Connect the data output of the slave controller(s) to the camera
network of the master (see option 3 in fig. 4.19 on page 61).
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4 System setup
Figure 4.18: Principle of cascading using the LAN (option 1) or the cascaded network port
(option 2 - master ART Controller & DTrack2 => v2.11)
Additionally to the aforementioned figures, please proceed according to the following de-
scription:
1. mount the cameras as usual at the defined positions
2. connect all cameras to their corresponding controller as usual
3. establish a BNC connection between the master’s OUT1 connector and the EXT.In
of the slave(s) for synchronisation of cascade
The USB Radio Transceiver2 for Flystick2 and Flystick3 has to be con-
nected to the master controller.
Double-check if the cameras are connected properly to every controller. If applicable ver-
ify that all power supplies are switched on and the cameras are running (indicated by two
LEDs at the front side of the cameras).
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4.3 Setting up cascaded systems
Figure 4.19: Principle of cascading using the LAN (option 1) or the internal camera net-
work (option 3 - master ARTTRACK controller (discontinued))
The master controller is controlled by a remote PC via DTrack2 frontend software. When
delivered, controllers are set up to support DHCP. When building cascades via LAN (op-
tion 1, see 4.18 on page 60) they will acquire an IP address automatically given that a
DHCP server is running. If you want to set a specific static IP address before booting the
controllers please refer to chapter 4.2.4 on page 54 for more information.
i
If the cascade is connected via the cascaded network port of the
ART Controller (option 2, see 4.18 on page 60), all slave controllers
must be set to a specific static IP address in the subnet 172.29.xxx.xxx
with subnet mask 255.255.0.0 !
In case of using the internal camera network (option 3, see 4.19 on page 61), all slave
controllers will acquire their IP addresses automatically.
Press the power switches (next to the power plug or on the front) to start the master and
the slave controller(s). Make sure the controllers are booted up with all necessary ether-
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4 System setup
net connections, otherwise the fall-back IP address is applied.
iThe fall-back IP address of the controller is 192.168.0.1 (subnet mask
255.255.255.0)!
Finally, start the DTrack2 frontend software on the remote PC and establish a connection
to the master.
iWe recommend creating a new configuration for all cascaded systems:
DTrack2 Configurations New
Now, go to Settings Cascaded System and the main setup dialogue for the cascade
will open up. Basically, you have the possibility to select single tracking systems to join in
the cascade. When using Option 1 (Connection via LAN), you can tick the checkbox ’scan
LAN’ and DTrack2 will search automatically whether controllers are available to become
slaves. They will be listed in the table on the right-hand side of the dialogue (refer to figure
4.20).
Figure 4.20: Cascaded System Settings
Click on the desired Controller and press ’Select’ in order to add it to the cascade. Repeat
these steps if you want to add more single controllers to the cascade.
Make sure that the checkbox ’wake on LAN’ is ticked. This option will enable synchronized
starting and shutting down of the master and all slave controllers. Starting of the cascade
will take 3-4 minutes as the master has to boot up first and then wake up the slave(s). If
the option ’wake on LAN’ is not ticked, the slave(s) WILL NOT be started or shut down
automatically.
The changes will be accepted by the system if you press ’OK ’. Settings (e.g. flash in-
tensity, sync groups) of all cameras inside the cascade can now be edited through the
Settings Cameras dialogue. The next time you start the measurement all cameras
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4.4 Setting up the Hybrid Motion Capture System
inside the cascade can be viewed through the Monitor 2DOF display.
Before continuing, please double-check whether a BNC connection
for synchronization has been established between master (OUT1) and
slave(s) (EXT.In).
Now, you can proceed with calibrating the room as usual. Please refer to chapter 4.5.2
on page 77 where room calibration is explained.
4.4 Setting up the Hybrid Motion Capture System
With the introduction of v2.9.0 DTrack2 supports inertial sensors which are distributed
with our Hybrid Motion Capture suit. The main advantage of hybrid targets is that inertial
sensors still deliver information through the rotation of the target, even when the optical
target may not be tracked any longer due to viewing limitations or occlusions. On the
other hand, drift correction of the inertial sensors is achieved by fusing their output with
position measurements calculated from the optical tracking system. Inertial sensors are
communicating with the DTrack2 system via a 2.4 GHz ISM radio connection.
Connecting the wireless transceivers The wireless antenna comes pre-assembled
with two transceivers (’Dongles’) for communication with the inertial sensors. First con-
nect the USB plugs of these dongles to any free USB port of the controller using the
supplied extension cables. The dongles are activated after rebooting the controller or
calling DTrack2 Search hardware.
Be sure just to use active (USB 2.0) extension cables (like the supplied
’ATEN UE250’) to connect transceivers (’Dongles’) to an ART Con-
troller. Otherwise proper function of the transceivers cannot be guar-
anteed.
Now within DTrack2 go to Settings Inertial Sensors and check that all attached dongles
have been found with correct device ID, model, name, firmware version and channel (see
figure 4.21 on page 64). Please also check the frequency the sensors are operating at
(default: 100 Hz).
At this point only dongles and no wireless sensors should be listed. Otherwise continue
reading in chapter 4.4 on page 66.
Z
The default channels for all dongles and sensors are 35 and 55 (out of
80). In case these frequencies are already occupied by other devices
in range (e.g. WLAN), connection problems may occur. ART recom-
mends to scan for available channels and to select free channels ac-
cordingly. Keep a minimum distance of 10 channels between dongles
or from otherwise unavailable channels for optimum connectivity.
Next scan the available radio channels by pressing Scan available channels. After com-
pletion the drop-down menu in the column Channel will show a list of all available chan-
nels for each dongle. The currently used channels are marked in bold digits, while all not
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4 System setup
Figure 4.21: Inertial Sensor Settings
recommended channels are greyed out. If the current channel of a dongle is not suitable,
DTrack2 recommends another one (marked green).
Please select an appropriate channel for each dongle. The selected dongle will change
its channel accordingly, like for all assigned sensors. Do not set both dongles to the same
channel or on occupied frequencies from other devices in range.
Adding the inertial sensors to the configuration in DTrack2 This needs to be done
initially - in case the sensors are already connected please skip this step.
Please ensure that all sensors have been charged or alternatively attach the sensors to
the supplied charging hub prior to the following steps.
In the menu Settings Inertial Sensors, press Add sensor to identify and connect all
inertial sensors in range.
In the appearing dialogue (see figure 4.22 on 65) you should find the Scan mode being
default’. In this mode DTrack2 will search for the sensors on default channels 35 and
55, even if the dongles / sensors have been set to different channels manually. In this
case, please change the scan mode to ’single’ and select the corresponding channel in
the adjacent selection box. If you don’t know the current radio channel of your sensors,
choose ’all’ (takes some time). With ’USB’ you can identify sensors that are connected to
the ART Controller via a USB charging cable.
Press Scan and the system will identify all sensors in range. Expect 15 inertial sensors
for a complete ART Hybrid Motion Capture suit. Tick the checkboxes of all sensors to be
added to the configuration in the column Accept or add all sensors by ticking ’accept all’.
Then press Apply and exit this dialogue.
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4.4 Setting up the Hybrid Motion Capture System
Figure 4.22: Add Sensors
i
ART delivers a pre-calibrated hybrid motion capture suit, i.e. both the
optical target geometry as well as the HBC result are stored directly
on the sensor. Unless the hybrid target is disassembled or becomes
damaged, it is sufficient to identify and add all sensors using the menu
Settings Inertial Sensors Add Sensors. There is no need to cali-
brate the targets manually.
The dialogue Inertial Sensor Settings (see figure 4.21 on 64) now shows all available
dongles and sensors with the following properties:
Device ID + wireless icon
Model (e.g. Colibri Wireless)
Name (targets from Hybrid Motion Capture suit or user-defined)
Firmware Version
Currently used channel (default: 35 / 55); with this menu you can also change the
radio channel of a single sensor
Wake-up mode (radio, tapping, USB/button)
Battery level
Temperature (only during measurement)
Z
Take care that all inertial sensors use a radio channel of one of the
dongles; otherwise this sensor won’t be used during measurement.
Also take care that (approximately) the same number of sensors are
assigned to each dongle.
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4 System setup
i
The temperature values between single inertial sensors may vary. The
operating temperature is reached as soon as there are no more tem-
perature changes inside the sensors indicated by a green status bar. It
is not dependent on the absolute temperature value.
For warming up the sensors to operating temperature press the button Warmup start.
All inertial sensors are turned to stand-by mode after a pre-defined idle time, which cor-
responds to the selected wake-up mode.
via: radio (idle time: 1 min.), i.e the sensors are switched on as soon as they are ad-
dressed by the controller.
via: tapping (idle time: 3 min., older sensors only), i.e. the sensors are switched on by
tapping on the sensors with your fingertip or tapping the sensors on a hard surface
(e.g. table).
via: USB/button (idle time: 10 min.), i.e. the sensors are switched on by pressing the
button on the sensor for 3-4 seconds or by connecting them to the supplied charging
hub.
ZFor optimal battery life, ART recommends to switch all sensors to
wake-up mode "USB/button" when not in use for a longer period of
time.
Calibration of Hybrid Bodies As requirement for the following steps it is necessary to
warm-up the sensors to operating temperatures and to maintain a constant temperature
during the calibration. Otherwise the measured data and thus the calibration will have
poor quality. Additionally please double-check that all sensors have been charged to at
least 30 % before you continue.
You can simply use the button Warmup start in the dialogue Inertial Sensor Settings (see
figure 4.21 on 64) or in DTrack2 frontend (top right) and leave the process running for
about 5-10 minutes. The progress bar will stop at 100% (progress bar turns green) even
though the warming up of the sensors continues. This shall guarantee that the sensors
work continuously until the calibration and the actual measurement take place. Otherwise
they would cool down again.
Administration of the bodies Within DTrack2 go to Settings Body Administration (see
figure 4.46 on page 105). All ART pre-calibrated targets have their corresponding optical
target geometries stored inside the inertial sensor. Thus when adding the recognized
inertial sensors, all corresponding target geometries are also added to the tab ’standard
bodies’ in the Body Administration (F8). Unknown or custom hybrid targets, however, will
show up as ’not calibrated’ in the column Calibration. At this point the desired optical
target and the corresponding inertial sensor have to be matched according to their body
ID and device ID.
For new hybrid targets, a three-step calibration procedure has to be performed:
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4.4 Setting up the Hybrid Motion Capture System
1. A standard optical body calibration needs to be carried out. Just press Calibration
and move around the target in front of the cameras. Please refer to 4.5.3 on 84.
2. A hand-eye calibration has to be performed to combine an inertial sensor with its
corresponding optical target. During this Hybrid Body Calibration process (HBC)
the relative rotation of the two sensors is determined.
3. Drift correction for the inertial sensors needs to be measured and applied. Optical
tracking data of the corresponding target allows for correction of residual drift of the
inertial sensor.
ZPlease perform all inertial sensor calibrations with warmed-up sensors
in a constant temperature environment for optimum tracking perfor-
mance.
Hybrid Body Calibration Select the sensor to be calibrated and press Hybrid Body Cali-
bration (see figure 4.23 on page 67). During this calibration the target has to be moved
with moderate speed in any spatial direction of the inertial sensor (please refer to the an-
imation in the HBC dialogue). Select the desired target from the drop-down menu ’Body
ID’ and check the ’sensor ID’ of the inertial sensor for correspondence with the selected
optical target. Then press Calibrate. The appearing dialogue will show the status of the
calibration via a progress bar.
Figure 4.23: Hybrid Body Calibration
As a result you will receive a value for the residual of the calibration. This residual is a
representation of how well the rotational data from the inertial sensor matches the optical
tracking data. Thus it is a measure of the accuracy of the HBC. Values ranging from 1to
2are ideal. Anything less than 3is still acceptable. Please refer to figure 4.24 on page
68
In case the values are acceptable you can assign the calibration and return to the Body
Administration. Now, the sensor should show ’full’ in the column Calibration. Repeat this
procedure for each sensor.
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4 System setup
Figure 4.24: Hybrid Body Calibration Result
ZPlease perform all inertial sensor calibrations with warmed-up sensors
in a constant temperature environment for optimum tracking perfor-
mance indicated by a green temperature bar.
Inertial Sensor Calibration After successful calibration of all hybrid bodies, a drift correc-
tion for all inertial sensors should be measured and applied. To this end, please select
Calibration Inertial Sensor Calibration (see figure 4.25 on page 69). Put all sensors in
the tracking volume (pre-condition: a successful Hybrid Body Calibration for each inertial
sensor) or put them anywhere on a level surface. Do not move or touch them during
the following calibration. Tick the checkboxes in the column Calibrate of all sensors to
be calibrated and press Calibrate. Values around 0.1are ideal and still acceptable up to
0.2 , values indicate possible movement during the calibration. When the calibration is
done, you can apply the drift correction either to single sensors by ticking the appropriate
checkboxes in the column Accept or by ticking ’accept all’ for all sensors in range. Press
Apply and exit the dialogue.
iAfter the Inertial Sensor Calibration has been performed and applied
its result is stored directly on the sensor for future use.
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Figure 4.25: Inertial Sensor Calibration
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4 System setup
4.5 DTrack2 frontend software
The software DTrack2 is intended to run on a remote PC (Windows or Linux). The Con-
troller can be controlled remotely via Ethernet. The software DTrack2 itself is delivered
via USB pen-drive or can be downloaded in the latest version from our Download Center
at http://www.ar-tracking.com/support/.
4.5.1 Getting started
Please refer to chapter A.5 on page 197 for more information on supported operating
systems.
4.5.1.1 Installation guide (Windows)
Run the installation executable "DTrack2_v2.x.x_win32_install.exe" and the installation
wizard of DTrack2 starts.
Click Next to continue and to start the installation
process for ART DTrack2 software. Administra-
tor rights are not necessary.
Now, please choose the destination folder in
which you want to install DTrack2 .
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4.5 DTrack2 frontend software
Please read the license terms carefully and
press I Agree if you agree indeed. A new win-
dow shows the installation progress.
The installation of the DTrack2 software is com-
plete now. DTrack2 has been installed on your
computer. Click Next.
Press Finish to complete the DTrack2 setup wiz-
ard. Now, you can use DTrack2 .
4.5.1.2 Installation guide (Linux)
The software (32-bit and 64-bit package available) is packed in an archive.
(DTrack2_v2.x.x_linux32.tar.gz) You do not need to have administrator rights to extract
all files to a user-defined folder. In a shell, change to the user-defined folder and type in
the command tar xvf DTrack2_v2.x.x_linux32.tar.gz in order to extract the files. For
ease of use, you may create a shortcut on the desktop.
DTrack2 can be started with the command ./DTrack2.
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4 System setup
4.5.1.3 Software update
The latest DTrack2 software is always available from our Download Center at http://www.ar-
tracking.com/support/. For the installation of the update, please proceed as mentioned
before in chapters 4.5.1.1 and 4.5.1.2.
After installing DTrack2 on the host PC the Controller can be updated after establishing
a connection to the Controller with the new Frontend.
4.5.1.4 Start DTrack2 frontend software
When you start DTrack2 on the remote PC you will see the following start window (see
figure 4.26).
Figure 4.26: Welcome screen of DTrack2
4.5.1.5 Connecting to the controller
The first time you start DTrack2 , no default controller will be found and another window
will be opened automatically (see figure 4.27). The radio button at position Specific Con-
troller will be ticked.
If you know the name (typically like "atc-00069") or IP address of your controller you may
enter it in line hostname or IP address and press Connect.
Otherwise, you can select Scan, if you don’t know the hostname or the IP address of your
controller. You will see a list of the available controllers in your network.
In column Name every controller in your network will be listed. If no controller or not the
desired controller is listed there please press Update list. Now, the list should contain
your desired controller. If not, please refer to chapter 6 on page 147.
You can identify the correct controller by comparing the serial number on the label on
the back of the controller with the serial number listed in this window (column Serial).
Controllers set in grey are used by other PCs in the network (IP address listed at the
bottom of the welcome screen). It is only possible to connect to controllers set in black.
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4.5 DTrack2 frontend software
(a) specific controller (b) scan the network
Figure 4.27: Controller Selection
Select the entry which fits to your desired controller and press Connect.
The next time you start DTrack2 your controller is still known by the software and DTrack2 au-
tomatically searches for it. The welcome screen shows the name of your controller. If this
is the one you want to connect to, just press Connect.
The graphical user interface The graphical user interface of DTrack2 offers different
views which can be switched on and off by the user:
1. Monitor 2DOF Graphical display of markers seen/tracked by the cameras.
Colour code signifies the circularity or the size of the mark-
ers, respectively.
2. Event Display Displays DTrack2 events (e.g. "no valid room calibration")
3. Data Display Displays measurement results (6DOF and/or 3DOF)
4. Fingertracking Shows the measurement results of the hands
5. Flystick Shows the measurement results (6DOF) and the operation
of the buttons and the joystick
6. Measurement Tool Shows the measurement results of the Measurement
Tool and, if assigned, the reference body
By default the first three are shown (see figure 4.28).
In the status bar, a button for starting and stopping of the measurement is integrated.
Additionally, you may retrieve information regarding the cameras connected, the synchro-
nization frequency, the number of bodies tracked and the number of single markers seen.
The synchronization frequency field is changing its colour to yellow, orange and red in
case the effective frequency is decreasing (see figure 4.29):
grey: max. 5 frames per minute lost (i.e. 3600 frames per minute are transmitted)
yellow: 5 - 10 frames per minute lost
orange: 10 - 15 frames per minute lost
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4 System setup
red: > 15 frames per minute lost
Figure 4.28: Graphical user interface of DTrack2
(a) yellow: 5 - 10 frames per
minute lost
(b) orange: 10 - 15 frames per
minute lost
(c) red: > 15 frames per minute
lost
Figure 4.29: Visualization of the synchronization frequency decrease
4.5.1.6 Adjustment of the cameras
So far, the cameras have been mounted and connected to the controller. The next step
is to adjust the orientation of each camera such that the measurement volume can be
tracked completely. It is especially important that blinding of one camera by another one
is excluded. Therefore, DTrack2 provides the Monitor 2DOF display that essentially is a
graphical display of the field of view of the IR cameras and of the markers that are seen
by the cameras (presented two-dimensional).
Monitor 2DOF display The Monitor 2DOF view shows a black window for each IR cam-
era (equivalent to the field of view) with a schematic display of positions and sizes of all
recognized markers. A simple colour code signifies the size and the circularity of the
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markers (green = very good quality, yellow = good quality, red = bad quality). As a rule
of thumb, for measurement applications with high accuracy requirements the markers
should be displayed in green; for VR applications yellow markers are always ok. The
Monitor 2DOF display is particularly useful for the final adjustment (especially orientation
adjustments) of the IR cameras.
Additionally, the intensity of the brightest pixel in the field of view is shown using a bar dis-
play for ARTTRACK2 ,ARTTRACK3 ,ARTTRACK5 and TRACKPACK cameras (refer
to figure 4.28). When using an ARTTRACK1 you’ll find the bar display integrated in the
camera on the front side.
A click with the right mouse button into one of the windows opens a menu (see figure
4.30) with settings for the respective camera.
Figure 4.30: Monitor 2DOF view menu (e.g. camera 1)
By clicking and holding the left mouse button on one of the camera displays, its position
can be moved within Monitor 2DOF view.
A more detailed description of the features of the Monitor 2DOF view can be found in
chapter 4.5.6.5 on page 120.
Adjustment of the cameras During this adjustment the user should take care to avoid
mutual blinding of the cameras. If the IR flash of one camera is inside the field of view
of another camera, this situation can, but has not necessarily to be visible in the Monitor
2DOF view. Blinding is often indicated by the observation that the LED bar shows high
intensity, but no markers are inside the measurement volume and the camera does also
not recognize any markers (no marker displayed in Monitor 2DOF view). If this is the
case, it will severely affect tracking in the involved image areas. If these situations cannot
be avoided by proper adjustment of the cameras (i.e. position and orientation), they can
be arranged in different flash groups, thus separating the IR flash of one camera from the
image recording of the other camera on a time scale.
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4 System setup
On the one hand, camera mounting has to ensure that tracking is possible over the entire
measurement volume. On the other hand, attention has to be paid to the fact that at least
two cameras have to see the calibration angle (for room calibration) completely. Moreover,
the fields of view of the single cameras have to overlap sufficiently, in order to enable the
photogrammetric orientation of all cameras in a common coordinate system; especially if
not all IR cameras are able to see the calibration angle.
License overview Up to DTrack2 v2.10 different license models were available for ART-
TRACK and TRACKPACK systems:
ARTTRACK systems extended and full-featured licenses
TRACKPACK systems basic, extended and full-featured licenses
Starting with DTrack2 version v2.10 a new license model has been established.
You may use 2, 4, 8, 16 or up to 50 cameras in any combination with 4, 10, 30 or up to 50
targets depending on the license purchased.
Please refer to table 4.3 for a detailed overview.
Feature denotation Values Possible license status
Cascaded supported / not supported
Fingertracking supported / not supported
Measurement Tool supported / not supported
DTrack2 cameras not supported
DTrack2 max. Ccameras 1C= 2, 4, 8, 16 supported
DTrack2 all cameras supported
DTrack2 max. Bbodies B= 4, 10, 30 supported
DTrack2 all bodies supported
1Max. 4 TRACKPACK (discontinued) or 8 TRACKPACK/E cameras without cascaded
system.
Table 4.3: Licenses overview
iThe maximum number of bodies that may be used in the ARTTRACK or
TRACKPACK system includes the calibrated interaction devices (Fin-
gertracking, Flystick, Measurement Tool )!
4.5.1.7 Localizing and removing of disturbing reflections
Reflections may be detected when starting the Monitor 2DOF view in DTrack2 . They are
illustrated the same way as single markers, i.e. with small coloured crosses. But, there
may also be reflections that are not illustrated in the Monitor 2DOF view when mutual
blinding of cameras occurs. Then, you can only tell from the bar display which is indicat-
ing (high) radiation intensities.
This is a known behaviour which, in case of ARTTRACK2 , can be solved easily with
an update of the cameras’s firmware. Please contact ART in case you experience alike
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problems.
Sources of disturbing reflections may be diverse. Typically, however, the reflections are
produced from one (or more) of the following:
strong infrared radiation sources (e.g. sunlight or sunrays, halogen lamps, ...),
mutual blinding of infrared cameras,
active or passive targets, that are still in tracking range of the cameras,
any kind of reflecting material on clothes or shoes,
blank metal surfaces, especially curved surfaces and surfaces with 90angles,
some types of packaging foils.
For removing disturbing reflections there are different approaches:
reduce the flash intensity of all cameras to "0":
remaining reflections are originating from infrared radiation sources (e.g. sunlight,
halogen lamps, ...). Try to localize and remove them.
reduce the flash intensity for one camera after the other to "0":
remaining reflections are caused by mutual blinding of the cameras. Turn the cam-
era until the bar displays’ segments of the Monitor 2d display do not indicate radia-
tion any more. You may also introduce new syncgroups in order to eliminate mutual
blinding.
try to localize the reflection by moving a target towards the origin of the reflection
(use the Monitor 2DOF display) and proceed as mentioned above.
If reflections cannot be eliminated you may use the reflex suppression tools of DTrack2 (please
refer to 4.5.6.3 on page 98):
1. static reflex scan:
reflexes will be suppressed automatically by DTrack2 upon detection
2. suppress static reflexes manually :
areas to be suppressed may be defined manually
4.5.2 Room calibration
Before you can start tracking, a room calibration has to be carried out. During that cali-
bration, the system identifies the position of the cameras inside the measurement volume
and determines the three-dimensional coordinate system. Carrying out a room calibration
always is the first step. Without it, body calibration and tracking will not be possible.
iThe Show details option offers information about the date of the last
room calibration.
Room calibration has to be carried out
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after the first system setup,
after any changes of IR camera positions (Room re-calibration),
after any changes to the number of cameras,
before a body calibration (when system has been setup initially).
In principle, it is recommended to always perform a room calibration after a certain oper-
ating time of the system, especially if the system setup does not exclude camera move-
ments over time (these camera movements may also be thermal drifts!).
Z
If a camera with 4.5mm lenses (standard for ARTTRACK3 ) is rotated
by one tenth of a degree it will cause aberrations of the optical rays
that are as high as 5 millimetres in 3 metres distance from the camera.
That means for the DTrack2 software (standard settings) that the ob-
servations of this camera are excluded from the calculation of target
positions because these observations would generate unacceptable
errors in the results of measurement. I.e., a camera that is rotated by
one tenth of a degree does not contribute to tracking any more!
For that reason, a room calibration should be carried out whenever any uncertainty re-
garding the mechanical stability or the thermal behaviour of the setup occurs.
For room calibration, the calibration angle of the "room calibration set" is inserted into the
field of view of the IR cameras. The position of the calibration angle defines the room
coordinates. At least two IR cameras have to see all markers of the calibration angle.
Therefore, DTrack2 s Monitor 2DOF display is started in the background when selecting
Calibration Room. Here you can verify that all markers of the angle are seen by the
cameras.
iThe longer arm of the angle defines the X axis (refer to figure 4.32); the
shorter one the Y axis. The center of marker #1 defines the origin of
the room coordinate system (at a height of 43mm).
The pre-calibrated stick carrying two markers is called the "wand". Its function is to create
a virtual "point cloud" in the measurement volume that is used for calculating the relative
positions of the IR cameras with high accuracy. Furthermore, the wand is scaling the
system. That’s why damages of the wand (loose markers, bent poles, etc.) lead to mis-
calculations of the measurement volume.
To choose the marker distances of the calibration angle three predefined settings are pos-
sible, representing the common ART Room Calibration Sets.
Marker distances of the calibration angle can also be set manually using the setting ex-
pert. The numbering of the markers is as seen in figure 4.32.
The wand length has to be set manually in this dialogue - it is written on the label of the
wand.
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Figure 4.31: Room calibration settings (e.g. RCS 410)
wand length marker height H TRACKPACK ARTTRACK2 ARTTRACK3 ARTTRACK5
diameter (see Fig. 4.32)
RCS TP 410.0mm 20mm 58mm ×
RCS 410 410.0mm 20mm 43mm ×××
RCS 710 710.0mm 20mm 43mm ×××
RCS 720 720.0mm 30mm 48mm ×××
Table 4.4: Overview of the ART Room Calibration Sets (RCS)
Figure 4.32: Marker distances (including numbering) on the angle and definition of room
coordinate system
Incorrect input data for this dialogue will lead to a poor room calibra-
tion, to wrong system scaling, or to an abortion of the whole room
calibration process.
With the select list at the bottom you may define how the coordinate system of the room
is created relative to the calibration angle (refer to table 4.5).
After pressing Calibrate, the room calibration is started with five seconds delay.
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Standard Powerwall
In the Standard setting the
angle defines the X/Y plane (X
at the long, Y at the short
beam) and Z upward.
With the Powerwall setting the
X/Y plane is in the screen and
the Z axis pointing out of the
screen. This is the standard
screen coordinate system of
many VR systems (e.g.
OpenGL, TrackD, etc.).
Table 4.5: Options for coordinate system definition
A window showing the progress of the room calibration appears (see figure 4.33(a)). The
progress is shown for each camera which is especially helpful for big systems. As soon
as the display for a camera changes its colour to green (see 4.33(b)) enough data for
calculation of the camera position has been collected for this camera.
ARTTRACK5 only: This progress is also displayed individually on each cameras corre-
sponding 2-digit LED matrix. After collection of sufficient data the LED matrix changes
back to its defined setting. Please refer to chapter 4.5.6.3 on page 97 for detailed infor-
mation.
(a) (b)
Figure 4.33: Room calibration progress
If necessary, you may adjust the ’duration’ of the room calibration (Show details) in
a range of 10s - 100s. Resetting the value to default is achieved by pressing the Set to
default button (default = 30s).
Z
Changing the duration of the room calibration, especially towards
shorter durations, may lead to bad room calibration results! Please
make sure that you are always able to cover two thirds of the tracking
volume within the set time.
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Move the wand gently within the measurement volume, in order to generate a virtual point
cloud. This point cloud should fill at least about two thirds of the measurement volume. It
is used for calculation of IR cameras positions, so moving the wand in only a very small
volume will result in reduced accuracy of calibration. Here, a compromise has to be found
between (1) too wide movements that often cause the failing of room calibration, and (2)
sparse movements that lead to a valid, but inaccurate room calibration. Avoid rapid and
hectic movement (see figure 4.34).
Figure 4.34: Room calibration process
During calibration, the two markers of the wand should be visible to all IR cameras as
good as possible. If, in a system setup, no sufficient part of the measurement volume is
seen by all IR cameras simultaneously, the point cloud created by the wand movement
has to connect all cameras in a way that ensures the arrangement of all cameras in a
common room coordinate system. More concrete, cameras that see the calibration an-
gle are oriented first. Then, every additional camera has to be connected by a sufficient
volume with at least two already oriented cameras. In this way, the calibration is stepping
forward from camera to camera. (e.g.: cameras 1 and 2 are seeing the angle - camera 3
overviews a certain volume together with cameras 1 and 2 - camera 4, finally overviews
a volume together with cameras 1 and 3).
Calibrating cameras which do not observe the angle directly is called "chain calibration".
Chain calibrated cameras propagate inaccuracies from the previously calibrated cameras.
It is recommended to place the calibration angle in a point where as many cameras as
possible can see the angle.
After a successful room calibration, the DTrack2 info window with the calibration results is
displayed. This window shows the mean residuals for the single cameras (here: Residual
= mean residual of rays during marker detection), as well as the mean deviation (’wand
residual’) and the maximum deviation (’wand range’) of wand length during the calibration
process. These values depend on the system geometry and can give information about
the quality of calibration only to an experienced user. The value ’Used Frames’ represents
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the percentage of valid (i.e., used for room calibration) data for each camera. It should
be as high as possible for all cameras. Values under 50% indicate poor room calibration
quality. The number of valid frames should be greater than 70% for each camera. The
room calibration is confirmed (i.e., the data are stored) by pressing the button OK .
ZPlease note that percentages of more than 70% may not be reached in
large and complicated measurement volumes.
Figure 4.35: Room calibration result
4.5.2.1 Room re-calibration
IR camera setups may change after a certain operation time; if e.g. movement of single
cameras due to mechanical instabilities cannot be excluded or thermal drifts occur. In
this case it is necessary to perform room calibrations periodically. DTrack2 provides a
simplified room calibration to revise an existing room calibration without need of an angle
tool, called room re-calibration.
Check the corresponding field in the room calibration dialogue (see figure 4.36) to activate
re-calibration. Most settings have to be the same as during the previous standard room
calibration, therefore most values of the dialogue cannot be changed - settings regarding
the wand may be modified. If camera positions changed you would have to mark them
in the room calibration dialogue as ’moved’. Re-calibration is possible as long as camera
movements are not too large.
It will fail, e.g. if the mounting of cameras was changed. To perform a re-calibration, no
angle tool has to be present in the measurement volume; only the wand has to be moved
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Figure 4.36: Room re-calibration dialogue
within the measurement volume in the same way as for a standard room calibration.
The main advantage of a room re-calibration is that DTrack2 preserves the origin of your
coordinate system and therefore, the orientation of the coordinate system as well.
Adding a camera to calibrated setup In order to add a camera to already calibrated
setup and preserve the origin of the room calibration, you proceed as follows:
connect new camera to controller;
wait until the camera is booted;
within DTrack2 press ’F2’ in order to perform a search for new hardware;
check if the camera has been recognized successfully (e.g., by opening camera
settings ’F7’);
when starting measurement you must see the red message “(re-)calibration re-
quired!” on the Monitor 2DOF of corresponding uncalibrated camera (see sec-
tion 4.5.6.5 on page on page 120 for details);
perform room re-calibration 4.5.2.1, new camera is automatically marked as “moved”
in the room re-calibration dialogue.
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4.5.3 Body calibration
The process of teaching a target’s geometry to the tracking system is called body calibra-
tion. For a body calibration, the target (= rigid body) to be calibrated has to be in the field
of view of the IR cameras. The number of bodies to be tracked has to be configured in
Settings Body Administration.
After pressing Calibrate, the body calibration is started within five seconds delay. The
body can be moved during body calibration, always considering that the cameras should
see each marker of the body at the best.
If the body is not moved during the body calibration it should be considered that each
marker of the target has to be seen by at least two cameras and should be seen by
as many cameras as possible. If two markers, seen from one camera’s point of view,
are merging to one reflex, body calibration may be affected. These "merging marker
situations" should be avoided during body calibration, i.e. the target should be oriented
in a way that reduces merging markers to a minimum. The target orientation can be
checked before starting the body calibration, using DTrack2 s Monitor 2DOF display,
which is opened automatically in the background after selecting Calibration Body. The
following figure 4.37 shows a rigid body with five markers that are all correctly seen by the
IR camera.
Figure 4.37: Recognized target in DTrack2 Monitor 2DOF display
Furthermore, the absence of any additional markers in the measurement volume has to
be ensured for body calibration. If additional markers that are not part of the target to be
calibrated are in the field of view of the IR cameras during body calibration, these mark-
ers will be assigned to the target. That means, the target is not correctly calibrated and,
therefore, tracking problems may occur.
First, the target that shall be calibrated has to be selected in the select list Body. By de-
fault the ’type’ is set to standard which allows for calibrating a 6DOF target with spherical,
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(a) Target type "standard" (b) Target type "5DOF"
(c) Target type "5DOF (cylinder)" (d) Target type "2x 5DOF (cylinder)"
Figure 4.38: Body calibration dialogue
flat or active markers. When you are using a target made of ring markers you would select
the ’type’ according to the geometry of the target:
5DOF ’ .. a target made of spherical markers which are aligned along one main
axis. The rotation around that axis cannot be detected by the system - you loose
one dimension of freedom. Therefore, we call it 5DOF target.
5DOF (cylinder)’ .. a target made of ring markers which are aligned along one main
axis.
2x 5DOF (cylinder)’ .. an L-shaped target made of ring markers which delivers
6DOF data.
4.5.3.1 Selecting the coordinate system for 6DOF targets
The type of body calibration can be set as ’due to body’, ’due to room’ or ’due to room
(zero in marker)’. The difference between these calibration types is to be found in the
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orientation of the body coordinate system relative to the body. During body calibration,
DTrack2 defines a local coordinate system (body coordinate system) for each target.
Body calibration setting due to body The body coordinate system is fixed by the markers of
the rigid body according to a set of rules:
1. Search the biggest distance between two markers of the rigid body. These two
markers (# 1 and # 2) will define the X axis.
2. Search for a third marker (# 3) that has the smallest distance to one of the two
markers # 1 and # 2. The marker that has smallest distance to marker # 3 becomes
marker # 1. It will define the coordinate origin. The other marker will be # 2. The
positive X axis is directed from marker # 1 to marker # 2.
3. Marker # 3 defines the X/Y plane, together with markers # 1 and # 2. Marker # 3
has a positive Y coordinate.
4. The Z axis is already defined by these rules, resulting in a right-handed coordinate
system.
(a) Body calibration
"due to body"
(b) Body calibration
"due to room"
(c) Body calibration
"due to room (zero in
marker)"
Figure 4.39: Defining the target coordinate system
Body calibration setting due to room The origin of the body coordinate system is set to the
center (center of gravity) of all markers building the rigid body. The axes of the body co-
ordinate system are parallel to the axes of the room coordinate system in the beginning
of the body calibration. I.e., the result of a body calibration will depend on the angular po-
sition of the target during calibration. A 6DOF measurement, following calibration without
having moved the body, will give the angular coordinates 0/ 0/ 0.
If the target was moved during calibration, the angular position of the target at the begin-
ning of the calibration will be taken.
Body calibration setting due to room (zero in marker) A combination of the first two methods.
The direction of the axes of the body coordinate system will be set parallel to the room
coordinate system in the moment of body calibration - like done with setting due to room.
The origin of the body coordinate system is given by one marker of the body, according
to the rules given for setting due to body.
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Selecting the coordinate system for 5DOF targets Analogue to the settings for the
standard targets it is also necessary to define the body’s coordinate system in case of
5DOF targets. The approach is a bit different but also straight forward.
Coordinate system setting for type ’5DOF’ and ’5DOF (cylinder)In the body coordinate system
all markers of the target are on the selected axis. The origin is in the middle between the
two markers with the largest distance to each other. The orientation is defined by the
marker with the smallest distance to the origin. Its position has a negative sign. The other
two directions are undetermined due to the one degree of freedom.
Coordinate system setting for type ’2x 5DOF (cylinder)The body is expected to consist of two
connected 5DOF targets with a roughly perpendicular and constant angle in between.
These are placed on the two axes. The origin is placed at the position where the two
5DOF targets intersect. The first axis is assigned to the 5DOF target which includes the
marker with the largest distance to the origin. The other 5DOF target is placed in the
plane created by the two axes.
A click-type torque wrench is one the most prominent members of this class of bodies.
Due to the engineering backlash and other high mechanical tolerances in these devices
often times the resulting body calibrations are error-prone.
ZPlease double-check whether all markers of the rigid body have been
recognized.
Then, confirm the result with OK . If this is done, the geometry data of the calibrated target
will be stored in the Backend.
iAfter a new room calibration or room re-calibration it is not necessary
to perform a new body calibration. Only if the body itself changes you
have to calibrate the body again.
ZThe previous body calibration will be lost if you carry out a new body
calibration. If you want to save the previous body calibration please
use the ’Save file(s)’ option in the Body calibration dialogue.
4.5.3.2 Calibration with a calibration file
After successfully calibrating a body the information (i.e. geometry) is stored inside the
ART Controller in your personal configuration (see also 4.5.6.2 on 95). To easily create
backups of calibrated bodies, calibration files can be saved at a desired location on the
remote PC. These files contain the dimensions of the target and the distances between
all markers. Each file is specific for just one type of target.
Press ’Save file(s)’ option in the Body calibration dialogue to store the calibration file(s) of
the currently used bodies.
Optionally a restricted visibility can be defined for each marker of a body. This is per-
formed setting up so called “emission cones”; a 2DOF observation from a camera has to
be inside this cone to be used later for pose estimation. Currently the only way to equip
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markers with emission cones is to import an appropriate calibration file; those are avail-
able on request. These files are created at ART on site performing a body calibration in a
defined environment or measurement volume respectively.
Press Load file(s) (see figure 4.40) and choose the calibration file(s) for your targets. The
format of the file name has to be according to "standard b01.txt" - the identifier "b01"
refers to the ID of the target. DTrack2 automatically assigns the calibration file to the
respective target by using the identifier in the file name. Press ’Load’ again to confirm the
import of the body calibration files.
Figure 4.40: Import of calibration files
ZThe previous body calibrations will be lost if you load new calibration
files.
iInvalid or corrupt files are not loaded by DTrack2 . This is indicated by
an error message in the confirmation dialogue.
In the upcoming window (see figure 4.41) the coordinates of all identified markers are
listed together with the body’s label as well as the number of markers.
Figure 4.41: Body Calibration Result
By clicking Show details additional information can be displayed.
Distances’ shows all possible combinations of distances for all markers (min. dis-
tances are important for customer-specific geometries, call ART for further informa-
tion)
Emissions’ shows normalised emission vectors x, y, z and emission aperture for
bodies with restrictions of visibility (calibration files available on request by ART )
Cylinder’ shows coordinates and radii for bodies with (cylindrical) ring markers
4.5.3.3 Body re-calibration
DTrack2 provides a possibility to re-calibrate a rigid body in case its geometry is affected
due to e.g. mechanical impact. Tick the checkbox re-calibation and perform a routine
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body calibration as described in 4.5.3 on page 84.
iOnly during a re-calibration the origin and orientation of the initial co-
ordinate system, as well as specific information (predefined emission
vectors, cylindrical marker) are preserved.
4.5.3.4 Target Library
With the introduction of DTrack2 v2.8.1 it is possible to make use of an integrated library
that contains calibration data for most ART standard targets (e.g. Motion Capture, glasses
targets, etc.). When you go to Calibration Body choose ’Target Library’ (refer to figure
4.42). The filter is set to ’Found Targets’ by default whereas the other options may be
used in case only targets of this type are to be calibrated (e.g. Motion Capture).
Figure 4.42: Calibrate bodies with the target library
With the ’Found Targets’ filter all targets presented, i.e. shown to the system, will be
found. In the unlikely case that a target is not found by the system it needs to be cal-
ibrated using the standard body calibration. The calibrations for all found targets only
need to be accepted either by ticking the checkbox ’accept all’ or one at a time. Finalize
the assignment of the targets by pressing ’Apply’.
Z
DTrack2 compares the geometry of the physical target with the calibra-
tion data of the target library. In some cases a re-calibration might be
necessary, e.g. when a clip-on target is applied to the glasses bending
is possible.
If you haven’t increased the number of targets before the system will ask you if this number
should be adjusted automatically. Press ’OK ’ if you want the system to do so.
Typical usecase: Motion Capture targets without Inertial sensors For this descrip-
tion we’re assuming that a room calibration for eight cameras has already been carried
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out and that the "full-featured" or "max. 8 cameras" license is available.
First, fit the targets to the test person and make sure that the person is in the calibrated
volume. Then, start the calibration (Calibration Body Target LibraryCalibrate’)
and allow the test person to move around. While this movement the targets must be visi-
ble for the tracking system.
Finally, one after the other target should be recognized and appear in the display. Tick the
checkbox ’accept all’ and start the measurement in order for your application to receive
tracking data.
In case you need to adjust the order of the targets please go to Settings Body Admin-
istration (F8).
4.5.4 Body adjustment
The Body adjustment function (see figure 4.43) is a tool to visualise and manipulate cal-
ibration data of rigid bodies, i.e. the body coordinate system may be changed relative to
the markers of the body.
iBody adjustment is not available for 5DOF targets or measurement
tools.
Figure 4.43: Body Adjustment
The main features of Body adjustment are:
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adjust the body coordinate system of each target within the DTrack2 frontend,
online mode (i.e. the 3D-representation of the target in the ’Graphic view’ is depict-
ing movements / rotation of the target in the "real world"),
visualise (optionally) predefined emission cones due to restrictions of visibility (di-
rectional and angular dependence) for all markers
aligning the axes of body and room coordinate system without changing the origin,
use predefined body coordinate systems,
move the origin of the body coordinate system,
set the origin of the body coordinate system in a selected marker,
delete selected markers from the target geometry.
For detailed information please refer to chapter 4.5.6.4 on page 117.
4.5.5 Filtering options in DTrack2
With the DTrack2 release v2.9.0 we introduce highly improved filtering options which
allow for ideal settings according to the requirement for the tracking performance. For
example in applications where reference targets are used to get the position of a seating
buck it is now possible to apply a strong filter for this specific target which results in abso-
lutely static tracking data.
Using three main settings for defining a filter, i.e. strength, prediction and mode, it is
possible to customize the tracking behaviour in general or for single targets according to
the requirements. Following, a description of these settings.
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Setting Description Usage
Strength Sets the strength of the filter. Low values
mean less filtering with faster reaction but
higher jitter. High values mean stronger fil-
tering with smoother output but slower re-
action.
a strong filter may be ideal for
tracking seating bucks
Prediction Predicts output for the specified time in the
future to compensate tracking and render-
ing latency. Note that too high positive
values can increase jitter and reduce pre-
cision. Negative values can be used for
smoothing the output at the cost of higher
latency.
a "negative" prediction may be
ideal for recording data as la-
tency doesn’t matter so much
Mode Specifies the elementary behavior of the fil-
ter. Several options are available.
Adaptive fast Automatically adapts to the observed mo-
tion.
Moving targets that change be-
tween fast and slow motions,
such as Flysticks.
Adaptive slow Automatically adapts to the observed mo-
tion, with stronger filtering of fast motions.
Moving targets with slow and
medium motions
Fast Optimized for fast motions without special
filtering of slower motions.
Targets where quick reaction is
important, such as HMDs.
Slow Optimized for medium motions without spe-
cial filtering of slow motions.
Targets where quick reaction is
important, but motions are slow.
Static Optimized for targets that are known not to
move at all.
Reference targets attached to
non-moving objects
Reference target Optimized for generally static objects, with
automatic detection of occasional motions.
Reference targets attached to
occasionally moving objects.
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4.5.6 Menu structure
4.5.6.1 Overview
DTrack2 Shortcut page 94
Licenses License overview Licenses can be added by entering
a license key (for Fingertracking, for the Measurement
Tool or for Cascaded Systems)
Configurations Create and save different configurations, lock the used
configuration and save its settings
Start/Stop M Start/Stop measurement
Search hardware F2 Search for newly added hardware
Controller standby Force the controller to go into standby mode
Controller reboot Reboot the controller
Quit Q Quit DTrack2
Settings Shortcut page 97
Cameras F7 Camera settings
Synccard Synccard settings
Inertial Sensor Settings for intertial sensors
ART Radio Info Opens a dialogue where you can see available
transceivers and devices within your setup
Tracking General settings
Body Administration F8 General settings for all targets and interaction devices
Output F9 Set output channels and configure the data to be trans-
mitted
Fingertracking Configure your Fingertracking or Tactile Feedback de-
vice
Flystick Configure your Flystick
Measurement Tool Configure your Measurement Tool
Controller Configure the controller for your local network
Cascaded System Configure a Cascaded System with available con-
trollers
Calibration Shortcut page 111
Start static reflex scan for all
enabled cameras
Starts the static reflex scan
Inertial Sensor Calibration Re-calibrate the internal sensors of the inertial sensor
Room F5 Room calibration
Room adjustment Shift + F5 Adjust room coordinate system
Body F6 Body calibration
Body adjustment Shift + F6 Adjust body coordinate system
Hybrid Body Determine the relative rotation between optical and in-
ertial sensor
Fingertracking Start calibration process for Fingertracking (i.e. hand
geometry)
Measurement Tool Start tip calibration process for the Measurement Tool
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Display Shortcut page 120
Monitor 2DOF Graphical display of markers recognized by the cam-
eras (monitor 2DOF view)
Data F10 Display measurement results (6DOF and/or 3DOF)
Fingertracking Display Fingertracking measurement data
Flystick Display Flystick measurement data
Measurement Tool Display Measurement Tool data
Events Display event messages generated by DTrack2
Set to default Reset the shown displays to default
Tools Shortcut page 124
Controller Update Start the assistant for the controller update
Measurement Tool demo Provides a convenient way to perform measurements,
either by pressing a button or by performing a gesture
with the Measurement Tool
About Shortcut page 124
DTrack2 Frontend software version
Controller Backend software version
What’s new? Overview of the new features
What’s this? Shift + F1 Help
Table 4.7: DTrack2 menu structure overview
4.5.6.2 Menu DTrack2
DTrack2 Shortcut
Licenses
Configurations
Start/Stop M
Search hardware F2
Controller standby
Controller reboot
Quit Q
Table 4.8: Menu DTrack2
Licenses The capability of the tracking system is defined by licenses which can be
managed here. You can add functionality for Fingertracking, the Measurement Tool or
Cascaded Systems by simply entering a license code which can be provided by ART (see
figure 4.44).
If you want to add Fingertracking, for example, go ahead as follows:
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Select the feature Fingertracking.
Click on Hardware Info.
Contact ART and communicate the serial number of the synccard or the MAC ad-
dress of the Ethernet port (=Identification) in order to receive a license code.
Enter the license code you received from ART in the field new license code.
Click on Add license.
(a) Licenses overview (b) Hardware information
Figure 4.44: Managing the licenses
The process is the same for other modules.
Configurations It is possible to create different configurations, e.g. with different tar-
gets or flash settings. These are related to the name of the user and, thus, are easily
accessible.
When creating a new configuration you need to describe your configuration in a few words
(description’) and enter your name (owner’). The configuration can be changed
later on with Edit (see also figure 4.45).
Your personal configuration is created using the values of the current configuration (
clone current configuration’) or default values (create with default values’), respec-
tively:
clone current configuration’:
all existing calibrations (room and body calibration) and flash settings are inherited.
create with default values’:
the system will start from scratch - i.e. as manufactured. That means, you will not
have a room calibration or any body calibrations.
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4 System setup
(a) Main window (b) Create a new configuration
Figure 4.45: Managing the configurations
Just press Create and the configuration is saved on the controller.
It is possible to protect the used configuration by pressing the button Lock . Then, you will
be forced to enter a new password and your configuration is locked.
ZPlease do not forget this password!
Existing configurations may be used by selecting the corresponding entry and clicking
Apply. Quit this dialogue by pressing Exit - the configuration is loaded.
Existing configurations can be deleted if not in use any more. Select the entry to be
deleted and click Delete.
Log settings saves the selected configuration in a text file which can be saved on the
remote PC. This function is mainly intended for supplying information to ART in case a
problem arises.
From DTrack2 v2.8.1 it is possible to export and import configurations. Save’ will export
the complete active configuration. Load’ imports previously saved configurations. The
imported configuration will automatically become the active configuration. It’s possible to
import several configurations at a time.
Please refer to chapter 6.1 on page 147 for detailed information.
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When you export a configuration please make sure that you rename it
before exporting, for example by adding the exporting date (e.g. "Stan-
dard 07122012"). Configurations with the same name (e.g. "Standard")
will be overwritten.
Start/Stop Start/Stop measurement.
Search hardware Search for newly added hardware and continue with the system setup
without the need of restarting the controller.
Controller standby Force the controller to go into standby mode with this command.
You can restart the controller by using Wake On LAN. Please refer to chapter 4.2.7 on
page 56 for more details.
Controller reboot Reboot the controller with this command.
Quit Quit DTrack2 frontend software - the active measurement doesn’t have to be
stopped.
4.5.6.3 Menu Settings
Settings Shortcut
Cameras F7
Synccard
Inertial Sensor
ART Radio Info
Tracking
Body Administration F8
Output F9
Fingertracking
Flystick
Measurement Tool
Controller
Cascaded System
Table 4.9: Menu Settings
Cameras This dialogue shows the information about the cameras connected to the sys-
tem and recognized by the software. It allows changes of flash intensity and camera
orientation, as well as settings for modulated flash - either globally for all cameras or
individually. The modulated flash may only be used with active targets. It is used to syn-
chronize an active target.
Changes to the following settings can be made either for all cameras at once, or for each
camera separately. Each camera is represented by a single tab within this window.
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Room calibration In tab “All Cameras” the “Room cal” column shows which cameras were
used during the room calibration. The ‘yes’ value means that in the latest room calibration
the coordinates of this camera are known. If the camera was not present during the latest
room calibration, this value is ‘no’ and this camera must be re-calibrated to contribute to
the tracking (see section 4.5.2.1 on page 83 on how to add a new camera).
It can also happen that the camera was present during the room calibration, but is not
present anymore (e.g., due to disconnected cable). Such cameras are greyed out and
the only data available are camera type and serial number.
Z
DTrack2 is able to operate although cameras are missing or need to
be (re-)calibrated; for best performance it is highly recommended to
resolve any issues that prevent all available cameras contributing to
the tracking.
Reflex suppression DTrack2 is capable of suppressing reflexes (e.g. sunrays on the floor)
in a static way. However, reflex suppression should always be the last option to be con-
sidered. If possible try adjusting the cameras in order to minimize reflexes. Please refer
to chapter 4.5.1.7 on page 76 for more details.
ZYou should always be aware that reflex suppression results in remov-
ing of the area, in which the reflex originated, from the tracking volume.
There are two possibilities to carry out a reflex suppression:
1. Mark the checkboxes for each camera when you want to suppress reflexes. Af-
terwards, select Calibration Start Static Reflex Scan for all enabled cameras to
make sure that static reflexes will be suppressed.
2. While measurement is running you may define the areas to be suppressed manu-
ally. In the Monitor 2DOF display, right-click on the respective camera window and
enable ’Edit reflex suppression areas’. Alternatively, you may use the shortcut (’E’)
to enable this mode (shown in figure 4.46(a) on page 99).
Within the edit mode you may (also refer to figure 4.46(b) on page 99)
create new areas,
delete areas,
clear regions,
resize areas and
move areas.
Reflex suppression areas are enabled when you leave the edit mode (by disabling
Edit reflex suppression areas’) and accept the changes. The single areas defined
are stored in the controller and can be edited each time you enter this mode.
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(a) Reflex suppression edit mode (b) Reflex suppression edit mode help
If you want to disable all reflex suppression areas for a camera at the same time,
just right-click on the respective camera and deactivate the option ’Active’.
Flash settings The flash intensity may be changed within an interval of
0 .. 6 for ARTTRACK1 ,
0 .. 8 for ARTTRACK2 /ARTTRACK3 ,
0 .. 100 for ARTTRACK5 ,ARTTRACK5/C and TRACKPACK/E
0 .. 7 for TRACKPACK .
i
When using ARTTRACK2/C cameras, it is not possible to adjust the
flash intensity of the respective external flashes with the DTrack2 fron-
tend software!
Please contact ART in case you need to adjust the flash intensity of
the external flashes.
These settings strongly depend on the working area and range. If you have a small work-
ing area where you are close to the cameras small flash intensities may be sufficient.
Otherwise, if your working area is far away from the cameras (but still within tracking
range of the cameras) it may be necessary to change to greater flash intensities.
Generally speaking, you should adjust the flash settings in a way that the recognized
markers are coloured in green or yellow.
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Keep a distance of min. 20 cm when operating the cameras ! All cam-
eras are assigned to the Exempt Group according to IEC62471-1 and
therefore pose no risk or hazard to the human eye or skin at this dis-
tance.
To be on the safe side, always double-check if the markers of the target are seen properly
by the cameras. Therefore, please use the Monitor 2DOF view:
markers coloured in red are characterized by bad circularity, small size or low inten-
sity; this may result in poor tracking quality
markers coloured in yellow offer a good tracking quality
markers coloured in green offer a very good tracking quality
Increase the flash intensity until all markers are yellow or green (recommended).
Syncgroup For ARTTRACK5 ,ARTTRACK5/C and TRACKPACK systems it is possible
to configure the syncgroups via software. You may change the syncgroups either on the
All Cameras tab or on the one of the respective camera. Possible values are ’Channel 1’,
Channel 2’ or ’Channel 3’. These settings correspond to the three syncgroups which can
be setup via hardware (daisy-chain cabling) for ARTTRACK systems.
Global camera mode (ARTTRACK5 ,ARTTRACK5/C and TRACKPACK/E only) To switch the cam-
era mode, select the appropriate entry e.g. 1.3 Mpix, max. 150 Hz. Dependent on your
application needs, this function can give you access to:
higher frame-rates
lower latencies, i.e delay times (approx. 5 ms @ 0.5 Mpix) Please refer to chapter
A.6 on page 199 for more details.
by selecting smaller field of views.
Be aware, that higher frame-rates come at the cost of the cameras’ reduced field of view
as well as a limited amount of targets that can be tracked simultaneously (lesser amount
of targets @ 300 Hz). The max. frame-rate is defined by the camera with the largest
field of view respectively the max. frame-rate of that individual camera. In mixed systems
ARTTRACK2 or ARTTRACK3 &ARTTRACK5 the max. possible frame-rate is always
limited to 60 Hz.
Global display intensity (ARTTRACK5 only) If necessary the brightness of the status LEDs
and the 2-digit LED matrix display can be dimmed from 0...100%, e.g. when used in
light-sensitive environments (global setting or individually).
Global display mode (ARTTRACK5 only) By default the status LEDs are activated, while the
2-digit LED matrix display shows the currently assigned camera ID. Alternatively select
number of markers / camera ID to display the number of markers in the camera’s field of
view during measurements. The 2-digit LED matrix display can also be deactivated by
selecting only status LEDs (global setting or individually).
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Modulated flash The ART tracking system can be used with active markers, i.e. mark-
ers consisting of infrared LEDs instead of retro reflective material (e.g. Fingertracking,
see chapter 5.3 on page 137). This allows both, more robust and longer ranging targets.
These LEDs do not light continuously but also emit light flashes like the camera flash and
thus have to be synchronized with the camera’s timing. This can either be achieved by a
synchronization cable or by using a modulation on the flash.
The option modulated flash, which only appears on the All Cameras tab, allows selecting
one of the cameras to emit the coded flash that triggers active targets. Only one camera
can emit the modulated flash. The modulation reduces the flash intensity in lower flash
settings, so it might be necessary to increase the flash intensity. In higher settings the
reduction is insignificant.
Z
The camera which emits the modulated flash has to be in syncgroup
# 1 ! For ARTTRACK systems this means that the camera has to be
connected to the OUT1 output of the Synccard2. TRACKPACK systems
may be configured via software (refer to chapter Syncgroup above).
Display upside down The checkbox display upside down specifies how the ART camera is
mounted (upright or upside down). This setting does not have any influence on the correct
working of the tracking system because the orientations of the cameras are correctly
determined by the photogrammetric algorithms in any case.
Details Here, it is possible to change the settings concerning markers:
Description
global marker mode configure the marker detection
global maximum number of markers maximum number of markers that a camera is allowed
to see
global maximum size of markers maximum display size of a marker on the sensor
global minimum size of markers minimum display size of a marker on the sensor
Synccard This dialogue shows the model and the serial number of the synccard. Fur-
thermore, it offers a dropdown list to select the mode of synchronization.
Basically, you can select between internal and external synchronization. The further dif-
ferentiation is shown in table 4.10.
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supported synccard mode field of application
internal generated signal (50 up to 300Hz ARTTRACK5 )
external video signal active-stereo projection with an
analogue video sync signal (=VGA)
external video signal, for validated shutter glasses 1
external video signal, for validated shutter glasses, divisor 2 2
external TTL signal active-stereo projection with a TTL
sync signal
external TTL signal, for validated shutter glasses 1
external TTL signal both edges 3
external TTL signal both edges, for validated shutter glasses 1 3
direct settings advanced custom settings
1predefined settings that should be used with the shutter glasses mentioned in table 4.11
2if, additionally, the frequency of the external synchronization signal is greater than 60Hz, this mode
should be used
3available only for Synccard3
Table 4.10: Overview of the supported synccard modes
If you select ’direct settings’ you may use advanced options for configuring the synccard:
Option Description
source configure the type of synchronization to be ’internal’, ’video’,
ttl’, ’ttlinv’ or ’ttlboth
frequency [Hz] change the frequency in an interval of 10 Hz up to 300 Hz
(only for internal synchronization and dependent on camera
mode when using ARTTRACK5 or TRACKPACK/E !
divisor for external signal reduce the tracking frequency (only for external synchroniza-
tion!)
Delay [us] configure the delay between the syncgroups
Brand Type
RealD CrystalEyes 1, 2, 3, 5
NuVision APG6000, APG6100
XPand X101, X103 (with NuVision Long-Range Emitter), X104LX
NVidia 3D Vision Pro (RF sync’ed)
Volfoni EDGE (with Volfoni or NuVision LR Emitter)
Virtalis ActiveWorks 500
Table 4.11: Overview of validated shutter glasses
Inertial Sensor In this dialogue all available wireless transceivers (dongles) are shown.
Furthermore, it is possible to set the frequency the sensors are operating at (default: 100
Hz). Additionally all inertial sensors that have been previously added to the DTrack2 con-
figuration are listed with the following properties:
Device ID + wireless icon
Model (e.g. Colibri Wireless)
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Name (targets from Hybrid Motion Capture suit or user-defined)
Firmware Version
Currently used channel (default: 35 / 55)
Wake-up mode (radio, tapping, USB/button)
Battery level
Temperature (only during measurement)
Z
The default channels for all dongles and sensors are 35 and 55. In
case these WLAN frequencies are already occupied by other devices
in range, connection problems may occur. ART recommends to scan
for available channels and to select free channels accordingly. Keep a
minimum distance of 10 channels between dongles or from otherwise
unavailable channels for optimum connectivity.
ZFor optimal battery life, ART recommends to switch all sensors to
wake-up mode "USB/button" when not in use for a longer period of
time.
For more information, please refer to chapter 4.4 on page 63.
ART Radio Info When you are using a Flystick, for example, you will get information
about the used transceiver and the Flystick device itself. The following information is
offered:
Description
Model the model of the transceiver or the device respectively
Serial the serial number
Version the firmware version
Is free (only for Devices) the device is not free (= ’no’) if it is assigned to an interaction
device ID
Is present the device or the transceiver is present in the tracking volume
By clicking the button Show details the current channel of the radio transceiver is shown.
By default the radio transceiver is automatically selecting a radio channel during booting.
You may also select an appropriate channel manually using the drop-down menu ’set
channel number’. The setting is saved persistently.
Tracking In this dialogue you can configure whether 3DOF markers are calculated or
not and you can enable or disable the ’automatic start of measurement after booting’.
Also, you can globally define the ’central axis’ for all 5DOF targets. For these the rotation
around the body axis cannot be measured by the tracking system. This rotation is there-
fore set to a certain value by the system. Thus, the 5DOF central axis is only important if
you intend to use the rotation around the body axis. The most important properties are:
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If the 5DOF body is positioned parallel to the 5DOF central axis the rotation around
the body axis remains undetermined.
The rotation around the body axis is reduced to a minimum.
We recommend that you choose the 5DOF central axis as the direction which is the least
often parallel to the tracked body axis (e.g. floor to celling for glasses targets).
iThe best choice for the 5DOF ’central axis’ may be found when using
the tracking data in your appplication.
Details of the definition:
In addition to the 5DOF central axis the system selects an axis for each body in the body
coordinate system (i.e. "pulled axis"). The rotation around the body axis is set to the value
minimizing the angle between the pulled axis and the 5DOF central axis. The pulled axis
is always perpendicular to the body axis. In addition the following criteria are used:
If the 5DOF central axis is not the body axis the pulled axis is the axis minimizing
the angle to the 5DOF central axis.
If the 5DOF central axis is the body axis the pulled axis has a random direction in
the plain.
The ’automatic restart of measurement after loss of sync signal’ option is set to ’active
by default and therefore, it is not shown anymore (from DTrack2 v2.8.1).
Body Administration The menu allows for administering all targets (e.g. Standard,
Flystick, etc.) in the system (refer to figure 4.46).
The number of 6DOF bodies represents the number of targets that should be tracked. In
this context, the number of targets does not include the interaction devices (e.g. Flystick,
Fingertracking or Measurement Tool ). These are completely configurable in separate
tabs.
iHowever, the maximum total number of bodies that may be used in
ART systems includes the calibrated interaction devices (Fingertrack-
ing, Flystick, Measurement Tool )!
Here, you can activate, delete or reset target calibrations and change the order of the
single targets. Additionally, you get the information by which means the target has been
calibrated:
Custom’ means that the standard body calibration has been used.
Target Library’ means that the predefined calibration file from the system has been
used.
For a detailed description of the single actions please refer to table 4.12.
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Figure 4.46: Flexible Body Administration (from DTrack2 v2.9.0)
Action Description
Active Activate or deactivate a target. Data of deactivated targets will not be
transmitted in the data stream. The target order will not be affected.
Delete Deletes the calibration of a target - effective immediately after confirm-
ing the security query. The target order will not be affected.
Reset In case the target has been calibrated initially with the ’Target Library
and re-calibrated later by the user, it is possible to reset the calibration
to ’Target Library ’.
Change order With the arrows on the right-hand side of the window you may change
the order of the targets. The data output will change accordingly.
Table 4.12: Body Administration - Detailed description of the actions
As mentioned before you can administer interaction devices as well. Therefore, you may
use the tabs Flystick,Measurement Tool and Fingertracking.
In the bottom right of the dialogue you will find four buttons:
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Button Description
Filter Activate or deactivate the filter for each target. You can either use de-
fined presets or customize it to your requirements. A detailed descrip-
tion of the filtering options can be found in chapter 4.5.5 on page 91.
Calibration Directly access the Body Calibration dialogue and perform the calibra-
tion for the selected target. A detailed description for body calibration
can be found in chapter 4.5.3 on page 84.
Hybrid Body
Calibration
Directly access the Hybrid Body Calibration dialogue and perform the
calibration for the selected hybrid target. A detailed description for hy-
brid body calibration can be found in chapter 4.4 on page 66.
Body Adjust-
ment
Directly access the Body Adjustment dialogue and perform the neces-
sary adjustment for the selected target. A detailed description for body
adjustment can be found in chapter 4.5.4 on page 90.
Output The dialogue Output determines the settings of data output via Ethernet. Data
output will be enabled when you tick the checkbox active.
Figure 4.47: Output settings
Identifier Description
fr frame counter
ts timestamp
6dcal number of adjusted bodies
6d 6DOF standard body
3d 3DOF marker
6df2 Flystick
6dmt Measurement Tool
6dmtr Measurement Tool reference
6dmt2 Measurement Tool (also for ball
probes)
gl Fingertracking hand
glcal number of calibrated Fingertracking
hands
6di 6D inertial body
6df Flystick (old)
only available if activated in Flystick
settings (checkbox ’use old output
format’)
Table 4.13: Output identifiers
ZWhen using the ’timestamp’ please note the remarks on accuracy in
chapter B.2.2 on page 211.
In total, up to 5 UDP channels for DTrack2 data output can be configured. Tick the check-
box this computer to send data to the remote PC you are currently working at. If you want
to send data to any computer within your local network just enter the IP address of the re-
ceiver and a port number. In addition, it is possible to define a multicast output. By ticking
this checkbox the UDP data is sent to a group of addresses in the range of 224.0.1.0 to
239.255.255.255.
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In order to reduce the data of the UDP output data stream you may set the ’send data
divisor’ to values from 1 to 10. The numbers have the following meaning:
1 .. every frame is transmitted,
2 .. every second frame is transmitted,
...
10 .. every tenth frame is transmitted.
The UDP output data may be routed by DTrack2 by ticking the checkbox act as router
for tracking output. This functionality is especially important for customers where it is not
allowed to connect the controller to their local network due to security reasons.
(a) act as router enabled (b) act as router disabled
The mandatory requirement to use this function is that the PC, where DTrack2 is installed,
needs to have two separate Ethernet plugs: one for connecting to the controller and one
for the respective local network. The DTrack2 frontend reads the data from the controller
and routes it to the local network where the application PC is connected to.
iUsing this function will cause a short delay during forwarding of the
data.
ZDo not use this function if the application PC and the controller are in
the same network!
Please refer to chapter B on page 203 for the format of the data output.
Fingertracking Here, you can define the number of hands to be used (values: 0 ..
4). Based upon this value, the correct number of selected hands is shown. By default,
the hand geometry is ’none’ and the field Simulate 5 Fingers is empty until you carried
out a calibration of the fingers (hand geometry). Then, the hand geometry will change
into the name you defined during calibration of the fingers. If you are using a three finger
thimble set but want to get output data for five fingers you may tick the checkbox 3 ->5.
The software DTrack2 will move the two missing fingers parallel to the third finger.
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It is possible to save several hand geometries in DTrack2 - these will appear in available
hand geometries. So you can use your Fingertracking set with different people and, most
important, you need to calibrate the Fingertracking set only once for each person.
From DTrack2 v2.8.1 on it is possible to export (’Save’), import (’Load’) and remove
(’Delete’) available hand geometries. Just press ’Save’ and select the hand geometries
you want to export and save them at your desired location.
For importing a stored hand geometrie just press ’Load’ and change to the respective di-
rectory, select the appropriate file and press ’OK ’. The hand geometrie may now be used
as follows.
Now, just assign the desired hand geometry to the respective hand ID and use Finger-
tracking. Therefore,
mark the respective hand ID,
mark the desired hand geometry and
press Select.
Repeat the steps if you want to use another hand.
Please refer to chapter 5.3 on page 137 to learn how to install Fingertracking.
Flystick In the Flystick Settings you can define the number of Flysticks to be used (max.
20).
Checkbox Description
use old output format Use the output format of the old Flystick1 (see chap-
ter B on page 203)
activate MultiUser function Refer to page 130 in chapter 5.1 for more informa-
tion.
use head targets The data pair (Flystick and head target) of one user
is made available as output data (if MultiUser func-
tion is activated).
Table 4.14: Flystick settings - Description of the checkboxes
Below, there are two more properties which can be configured for Flystick3:
sync groups:
Configure your active(!) Flystick3 to send out IR flashes for one or more syncgroups
(syncgroup #1, syncgroups #1 and #2, . . . ; default = syncgroup #1).
flash intensity:
Set the flash intensity of the active target of the Flystick3 (default = 3) by moving the
slider.
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If you change the number of Flysticks you will immediately recognize entries in the se-
lected Flysticks field. The fields Model,Serial and Port are empty by default.
Make sure that your Flystick is in the available Flysticks list - if necessary, compare the
serial number listed here to the one printed on the battery compartment of the Flystick2 or
on the back cover of the Flystick3. Now, you have to assign your Flystick to the respective
Flystick ID.
Therefore,
mark the respective Flystick ID,
mark the desired available Flystick and
press Select.
Repeat these steps if you want to use another Flystick. Please refer to chapter 5.1 on
page 126 to learn how to install the Flystick2 and refer to chapter 5.2 on page 132 for the
Flystick3.
There are one or two Flystick1 entries in the list available Flysticks, even if no Flystick1
is present in the volume. This is due to the fact that the Flystick1 connects via serial
COMport which cannot be polled automatically. If you are using a Flystick1 please refer
to the Flystick1 manual.
Measurement Tool Within the Measurement Tool dialogue you may define the number
of Measurement Tools and the number of references. It is limited to a total number of
four each.
Below, there are several fields where you may change the default values within the allowed
ranges to suit your application.
Control Description
number of Measurement Tools configure the number of devices to be used
number of references configure the number of reference bodies to be used
measurement duration [s] configure the time to perform a measurement with
the Measurement Tool (valid range: 0.2 - 10.0 sec)
tool tip tolerance [mm] specify the range within which the tip is assumed to
be static (valid range: 0.1 - 5.0 mm)
activate measurement start simula-
tion
activate the start button simulation and enable the
respective controls
minimal angular variation [deg] specify the minimum angle that the Measurement
Tool has to be tilted over to start a measurement
(valid range: 10- 120)
maximum lead time for this angular
variation [s]
waiting time before the measurement start by the
start button simulation
Table 4.15: Measurement Tool settings
If you are working with a reference body you may assign it to a specific ’Measurement
Tool ID’:
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4 System setup
mark the respective Measurement Tool ,
mark the reference body and
press Select.
Repeat these steps if you want to assign references to other Measurement Tools .
Please refer to chapter 5.4 on page 144 to learn how to install the Measurement Tool .
Controller The menu for the Advanced Controller Settings is divided into two tabs - Net-
work and Time.
On the Network tab you may change the hostname (not recommended!) and the domain
according to your network guidelines. When the network cable has been plugged into the
controller while booting, the controller is a DHCP client and the checkbox is ticked. If the
network cable is unplugged while booting the controller uses its default IP address (i.e.
192.168.0.1).
You may also specify IP address,subnet mask,gateway and nameserver as desired.
The MAC address of the controller is printed in the last line for your information (ethernet-
MAC LAN).
On the Time tab you can set the UTC time of the controller. Furthermore, you can syn-
chronize the UTC (=Universal Time Coordinated) time using NTP (=Network Time Proto-
col). NTP is a protocol designed to synchronize the clocks of computers over a network.
Tick the checkbox activate NTP and enter hostname or IP address of your server.
If NTP is activated the controller is trying to connect to the NTP server repeatedly in or-
der to update its clock. The values for ’reachability’ range between 0% - 100% (typically).
They are a measure for the quality of the reachability of the NTP server. Only NTP servers
which are contacted over the internet may provoke some problems. The quality of the syn-
chronization of the clocks is indicated with ’estimitated precision’ in the unit milliseconds
(=ms).
iSynchronizing with NTP takes quite a long time. Active measurements
won’t be disturbed.
Cascaded System Cascading means that two or more stand-alone tracking systems
are combined to one large system in order to have only one consolidated data out-
put. It is possible to cascade TRACKPACK/E systems with or without ARTTRACK5 and
ARTTRACK5/C and to build cascades out of ARTTRACK (discontinued) with TRACK-
PACK systems (discontinued). Therefore, the system is subdivided into one master and
up to eight slaves. However, the total number of cameras in the cascaded system cannot
exceed 16 for TRACKPACK/E only systems and 50 for combined ARTTRACK5 &ART-
TRACK5/C and TRACKPACK/E systems respectively.
The task of the master is to gather all single data outputs from all slaves and to merge
them into one single data output. The DTrack2 frontend connects to the master only and
allows to configure (e.g. cameras, output, tracking, etc.) the entire tracking system as
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usual.
Z
The master has to be an ARTTRACK Controller with "full-featured" li-
cense (< DTrack2 2.10) and a Synccard2.
Starting with DTrack2 version v2.10 a new license model has been es-
tablished. The master controller needs to have a dedicated "cascaded
systems" license as well as a sufficient license for ALL cameras in the
cascade, e.g. 4 ARTTRACK5 + 4 TRACKPACK/E cameras = license for
8 cameras.
In order to configure the cascaded system you have to start the DTrack2 frontend soft-
ware and establish a connection to the master.
Go to Settings Cascaded System to enter the configuration dialogue for the cascaded
system. Basically, you have the choice between ’scan LAN’ or entering a ’slave host-
name or IP address’ directly. For the latter one, you need to know the hostname or the
IP address of your slave(s) when using DHCP or in case you have set a specific static IP
address. The button ’Update’ refreshes the list.
On the right-hand side of the dialogue you will be presented a list of ’Available’ controllers
(i.e. which can become a slave in the cascaded system). Mark the desired controller
and press the button ’Select’ to assign this controller to the cascaded system. It will then
appear on the left-hand side of the dialogue in the list of the ’Selected’ controllers.
Mark controllers in the list of the ’Selected’ controllers to remove them from the cascaded
system by clicking the button ’Deselect’.
If the checkbox ’wake on LAN’ is ticked, all connected slaves will go to standby mode or
reboot if the master goes to standby mode or reboots.
Refer to chapter 4.3 on page 58 for more information on the cascaded system.
4.5.6.4 Menu Calibration
Calibration Shortcut
Start static reflex scan for all en-
abled cameras
Inertial Sensor Calibration
Room F5
Room adjustment Shift + F5
Body F6
Body adjustment Shift + F6
Fingertracking
Measurement Tool
Table 4.16: Menu Calibration
Start static reflex scan for all enabled cameras All ART cameras are able to sup-
press all reflexes in certain areas of the image sensor. This is especially important for
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4 System setup
setups in multisided projections: these cameras are mounted in the corners of the multi-
sided projection and usually get a lot of unwanted reflexes from the nearby walls. To gain
good tracking results, these reflexes should be suppressed. The feature can be enabled
or disabled either globally for all cameras or individually for each camera in the camera
settings. Scanning for static reflexes allows searching the measurement volume for un-
wanted reflexes. Areas are defined around the visible reflexes, where all reflexes should
be suppressed later during measurements.
ZBe sure to remove all targets from the measurement volume before
starting the scan.
Inertial Sensor Calibration This function carries out a drift correction for all inertial
sensors. Please refer to chapter 4.4 on page 63 for more information.
Room Use the room calibration menu to configure your room calibration set concerning
wand length and marker distances. The wand length is printed on a label on the wand -
please enter the value here.
Figure 4.48: A room calibration set consisting of angle and wand
Marker distances defines the type of room calibration set - it can either be Room Cali-
bration Set TP,Room Calibration Set 410 or Room Calibration Set 710. When choosing
expert the angle of the room calibration set may be defined by the user. Then, the dis-
tances between the markers on the angle have to be configured.
Define the coordinate system as ’normal’ or ’powerwall’. The layout of the coordinate
system is shown in the 4.49 on page 113. You may adjust the ’duration’ of the room
calibration (Show details) in a range of 10s - 100s. Resetting the value to default is
achieved by pressing the Set to default button (default = 30s).
Z
Changing the duration of the room calibration, especially towards
shorter durations, may lead to bad room calibration results! Please
make sure that you are always able to cover two thirds of the tracking
volume within the set time.
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(a) ’normal (b) ’powerwall
Figure 4.49: Defining the coordinate system for the room calibration
If you are re-calibrating your room use the checkbox re-calibration in the bottom left cor-
ner to indicate it to the tracking system. For more information about room re-calibration
please refer to page 82.
Please refer to chapter 4.5.2 on page 77 for the details on how to perform a room calibra-
tion.
Room adjustment During a room calibration origin and orientation of the room coordi-
nate system are located by the position of the calibration angle; e.g. the reflective marker
in the angle’s vertex (marker #1) defines the origin of the coordinate system. Oftentimes
it might be more suitable to set the coordinate system in respect to well-known points in
space.
Possible scenarios for the application of the Room adjustment functionality are:
adjust the origin to the center of a screen
align the coordinate system colinear / parallel to a screen (even very small angular
deviations might lead to substantial misalignment over the full width of the projection
0.1on 5m length equals 8.7 mm deviation)
shift and / or rotate the camera coordinate system to match a reference coordinate
system, e.g. from CAD models
maintaining a specific coordinate system / orientation when using mobile installa-
tions of cameras, i.e. frequently changing the camera setup locations (suitable ref-
erence points provided)
In all these cases the coordinate system must be altered after calibration.
Z
If you press Enter or click OK , all changes which have been done so far
will be confirmed (changes are sent to the controller) and the dialogue
closes. Pressing Apply accepts the current changes, but the dialogue
is left open. Discard all changes by pressing Cancel.
Coarse The Coarse tab offers a simple way to manipulate the orientation of the room
coordinate system with just one click (see figure 4.50 on page 114. You can define the
orientation of two axes using the drop-down menus - the third one will be oriented auto-
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matically according to the right-hand rule. Press Reset to switch back to the unmodified
state.
Figure 4.50: Room adjustment dialogue (coarse)
Fine More detailed options to adjust the room coordinate system are given in the Fine
tab (see figure 4.51 on page 115). By default a cartesian coordinate system is displayed
on the left side of the window. The room coordinate system is shown as a triplet of arrows
with a defined color-coding (x-axis: red, y-axis: green, z-axis: blue), while the xy-plane is
shown as a yellow grid. The current and the transformed room coordinate systems are
marked with (’O’) and (’T’) respectively.
The View position and View orientation may be moved along and / or rotated around all
axes in two different ways:
1. hold down the "Ctrl" key and the left / right mouse button to change the position /
orientation
2. hold down the "Ctrl" key and use the mouse wheel to zoom
3. use the six control dials (below the graphical view) to adjust position and orientation
To center the current room coordinate system, press ’Adjust view’. To restore the default
view (shift and orientation), press ’Reset view’. The visualisation itself can be changed
by clicking the right mouse button to open a menu with the following options. (De-)select
the appropriate ones by (un-)ticking.
Option Description
Long axes extends the coordinate axes of the body coordinate system by
infinite dashed lines
Show XY plane shows the XY plane (yellow grid)
Show YZ plane shows the YZ plane (cyan grid)
Show XZ plane shows the XZ plane (magenta grid)
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Figure 4.51: Room adjustment dialogue (fine)
On the right side of the window the room coordinate system may be customized freely,
i.e. user-specific.
Action Description
Zero point offset [mm] translate the room coordinate system along its axes in steps of 1mm
Reset vector reset the zero point offset to the unmodified state (0.00 mm)
Rotation angles [deg] rotate the room coordinate system around its axes (from -180 to +180
)
Reset angles reset the rotation angles to the unmodified state (0.00 )
Scaling factor enlarge / shrink the room coordinate system uniformly up to a factor of
+/-5 percent
Reset scaling reset the scaling factor to the unmodified state (1.0000)
Matching start up a module for transforming and matching to a reference coordi-
nate system (Measurement Tool & license provided)
All entered transformation values are given in the original room coordinate system.
Example: let’s assume a standard room coordinate system (xy plane on the ground, z
axis facing upwards) that was calibrated using a “Room Calibration Set” RCS 410. So the
current origin is located 43 mm above the ground (refer to chapter 4.5.2 on page 77 about
details). If the new desired origin should be placed 1 m above the ground, then the Zero
point offset for z must be 957 mm (1000 mm - 43 mm).
Transform Press Matching in the Fine tab to open the room matching dialogue (see
figure 4.52 on page 117). This functionality depends on the Measurement Tool license.
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iIf the Measurement Tool is not tracked (calibration provided) matching
cannot be performed. Use an authorised Measurement Tool by ART for
best results.
ZDeselect any previously assigned Measurement Tool References prior
to matching of the coordinate systems. Otherwise matching results
will be erroneous.
The purpose of the coordinate transformation is to convert the origin and orientation of the
initial camera coordinate system (indicated with ’O’) into a reference coordinate system
(indicated with ’T’), e.g. given by a certain object or CAD model. All measurement data
will be transformed with respect to the reference coordinate system (’T’). To this end a
three-step calibration procedure has to be performed:
1. Add measurement data from the reference coordinate system (’T’) by manually en-
tering the coordinates into the table reference points using the button Add. A mini-
mum of three (3) data points is necessary for calculations. Delete single data points
by selecting the corresponding row and press Remove. Alternatively load the coor-
dinates from a text file (ASCII) using the button Load. The text file must comply to
the following format:
1 1.00 20.00 300.00 <CRLF>
2 4.00 50.00 600.00 <CRLF>
3 7.00 80.00 900.00 <CRLF>
# x y z <CRLF>
The import strictly follows the sequence from the ASCII text file. The current set of
reference points can be saved by pressing Save.
2. Select a calibrated and tracked Measurement Tool from the drop-down menu and
measure all points (e.g. on the corresponding object) which directly relate to the
reference points (e.g. from a CAD model) defined in step 1.
Each measurement can be started by:
clicking the button Measure
clicking the start button on the Measurement Tool (if applicable)
using the “measurement start simulation” of the Measurement Tool (refer to 5.4
on page 144)
clicking a button of an assigned Flystick
The following calculations try to correct the order of the measured points, if they
don’t correspond to the order of the reference points. Sometimes this does not
produce the correct result, especially if the points are located too symmetrically
toward each other. In this case toggle the tickbox preserve order of points to lock
the order between reference points and measured points.
ZFor proper matching it is essential to ensure the correct correspon-
dence between reference points and measured points.
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3. After having measured all corresponding points the calculation is started automati-
cally and the result of the transformation is displayed in the textbox transformation.
Double-check that all measured data points correspond to the correct reference data
points. Delete single data points by selecting the corresponding row and press Re-
move or delete all data points to start all over by pressing Clear . The residual error
(standard deviation) is a measure of the transformation quality, i.e. how well the
measured data fit the corresponding reference points. It can be influenced mostly
by the quality of data acquisition and by differences in scale of the camera and refer-
ence coordinate systems. Pressing OK accepts this transformation and closes the
dialogue box.
Figure 4.52: Room matching dialogue
The calculated transformation is applied on both zero point offset as well as rotation
angles in Fine tab. Do not further manipulate the values manually. Press Enter or click OK
to confirm the resulting transformation and to close the dialogue. Pressing Apply accepts
the current changes and leaves the dialogue open. Discard all changes by pressing
Cancel.
Body Select the body you want to calibrate and tick the checkbox if you want to perform
a re-calibration. Define the type and the coordinate system which should be used for the
calibration.
If you want to use body calibration files for calibrating your target, just click Load file(s)
and select the appropriate calibration file(s). By clicking on Save file(s) you can save your
body calibrations in separate text files.
Please refer to chapter 4.5.3 on page 84 for the details on how to perform a body calibra-
tion.
Body adjustment Use this menu (see figure 4.43 on 90) to visualise and manipulate
calibration data of rigid bodies. Just select the desired body from the drop-down list at the
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top of the window. By default a cartesian coordinate system is displayed on the left side
of the window depicting the selected rigid body’s geometry (’Graphic view’).
The body coordinate system is shown as a triplet of arrows with a defined color-coding
(x-axis: red, y-axis: green, z-axis: blue), while the xy-plane is shown as a yellow grid. All
markers, however, are visualised by sequentially colored spheres (RGB) for better iden-
tification. In case the selected rigid body features visibility restrictions, emission cones
may have been predefined. Direction of visibility (emission vector) is depicted as an ar-
row (white) for each marker, while the angular restriction (emission aperture) is shown as
a cone (grey).
The View position and View orientation may be moved along and/or rotated around all
axes in two different ways:
1. hold down the "Ctrl" key and the left / right mouse button to change the position /
orientation
2. hold down the "Ctrl" key and use the mouse wheel to zoom
3. use the six control dials (below ’Graphic view’) to adjust position and orientation
To restore the default view, just press ’Reset view’. Tick the ’use tracked orientation
checkbox to switch to online mode (i.e. the 3D-representation of the target in the ’Graphic
view’ is depicting movements / rotation of the target in the "real world").
The visualisation can be changed by clicking the right mouse button to open a menu with
the following options. (De-)select the appropriate ones by (un-)ticking.
Option Description
Small markers reduces the size of the markers
Colored markers shows the markers in different colors (untick: greyish)
Emissions shows predefined direction (arrows) and angular restriction
(cones) of visibility (if applicable)
Long axes extends the coordinate axes of the body coordinate system by
infinite dashed lines
Show COG shows the body’s center of gravity (white square)
Show XY plane shows the XY plane (yellow grid)
Show YZ plane shows the YZ plane (cyan grid)
Show XZ plane shows the XZ plane (magenta grid)
Show room orientation shows the room coordinate system (only available when check-
box ’use tracked orientation’ is ticked)
Add line between markers adds a line between two selected markers (option greyed out until
two markers are selected)
Delete line between markers removes a line between two selected markers (option greyed out
until line is selected)
Data view switches to the data view
For manipulating the body geometry you have the choice between general or special
options:
General The body coordinate system may be customized freely, i.e. user-specific.
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Action Description
Body position [mm] translate the body coordinate system along its axes in steps of 1mm
Body orientation [deg] rotate the body coordinate system around its axes
Set origin activate a marker in the ’Graphic view’ by left-clicking with the mouse.
The marker is highlighted and the button Set origin is activated. Press-
ing this button translates the origin of the body coordinate system into
the center of the selected marker.
Set origin to COG translate the origin of the body coordinate system into the target’s center
of gravity
Set axis activate two markers sequentially in the ’Graphic view’ by left-clicking
with the mouse. The first one is highlighted in white, the second one in
grey. Additionally, the button Set axis is activated. Pressing this button
opens a dialogue to configure the transformation.
Adjust axes to room pressing this button aligns the body coordinate system collinear to the
room coordinate system
Delete marker activate a marker in the ’Graphic view’ by left-clicking with the mouse.
The marker is highlighted and the button Delete marker is activated.
Pressing this button removes the selected marker from the target ge-
ometry.
Special Choose from the following predefined transformations:
due to body
The body coordinate system is completely defined by the target geometry (see page
86).
due to room (origin in COG)
The coordinate system is rotated and aligned collinear to the room coordinate sys-
tem with the origin set in the center of gravity (COG) (see page 86). In order to use
this function, the checkbox ’use tracked orientation’ has to be ticked.
due to room (origin in marker)
The coordinate system is rotated and aligned collinear to the room coordinate sys-
tem with the origin set in one specific marker (see page 86). In order to use this
function, the checkbox ’use tracked orientation’ has to be ticked.
iPredefined visibility restrictions (emission vectors and angles of aper-
ture) are retained along all body transformations.
Z
If you press Enter or click OK , all changes which have been done for
all bodies will be confirmed (changes are sent to the controller) and
the dialogue closes.
Pressing Apply only results in changes of the currently selected body
- the body will be redrawn afterwards.
Z
If the MultiUser function for Flysticks is enabled the Body Adjustment
module will only load standard bodies. If you want to adjust the body
calibration data of your Flystick, please make sure that the MultiUser
function is disabled (Settings Flystick) - a label ’MultiUser function
should be disabled!’ will appear at the bottom of the dialogue.
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Hybrid Body This function performs a hand-eye calibration to combine an inertial sen-
sor with its corresponding optical target. Please refer to chapter 4.4 on page 66 for more
information.
Fingertracking Define a new or select an existing ’hand geometry name’. Configure
handedness as being ’left’ or ’right’. Select the type of fingerset.
When clicking on the button Help a pop-up window appears where the calibration process
is explained and visualized.
Please refer to chapter 5.3 on page 142 for more information.
Measurement Tool Perform a tip calibration for the Measurement Tool that is currently
inside the tracking volume. DTrack2 automatically detects the ID of the Measurement
Tool and assigns the tip calibration. Just press Calibrate to start the calibration process.
During calibration please move the Measurement Tool while keeping the tip still at exactly
one position.
ZNote that the progress bar is not continuing if the pointing device is
not moved sufficiently.
Please refer to chapter 5.4 on page 145 for more information.
4.5.6.5 Menu Display
Display Shortcut
Monitor 2DOF
Data F10
Fingertracking
Flystick
Measurement Tool
Events
Set to default
Table 4.17: Menu Display
Monitor 2DOF The Monitor 2DOF display essentially is a graphical display of the field
of view of the IR cameras and of the markers that are seen by the cameras. The Monitor
2DOF display shows a black window for each IR camera (equivalent to the field of view),
with a schematic display of positions and sizes of all recognized markers.
In case, several ARTTRACK cameras are being used in one system, it will be helpful
that the number of cameras shown in the Monitor 2DOF display can be adjusted. From
DTrack2 v2.8.1 you may use the slider ’cameras per tab’ in order to achieve clear ar-
rangement. Tabs containing the remaining cameras will be added to the Monitor 2DOF
display.
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The special tab ’most active cameras’ contains these cameras which see the markers of
the targets most of the time.
Example: consider a four camera system with camera01 thru camera04 and you have
set the number of ’cameras per tab’ to two. Now, if you move a target in front of camera02
and camera03 most of the time, these two cameras will then be shown in the ’most active
cameras’ tab.
A simple color code signifies the size and the circularity of the markers (green = very
good quality, yellow = good quality, red = poor quality). Each marker is either displayed
as a circle or as a cross. This indicates the projected size of the marker on the CCD chip
inside the camera (i.e. circle = big marker and cross = small marker).
As a rule of thumb: for measurement applications with high accuracy requirements the
markers should be displayed in green; for VR applications yellow markers are sufficient.
The Monitor 2DOF display is particularly useful for the final adjustment (especially for ori-
entation adjustments) of the IR cameras.
If current room calibration information does not contain some of the currently connected
cameras, on their corresponding monitors a red text “(re-)calibration required!” appears.
On the other hand, if the room calibration does not have some cameras which were
present when calibrating the room, corresponding camera monitors are disabled (crossed
out).
In the Monitor 2DOF display it is possible to interact with your mouse as certain functions
are assigned to the mouse buttons.
left mouse button:
Click and hold down to move a camera display within the Monitor 2DOF view.
middle mouse button:
Click to hide all camera displays except for the one you pointed at. Click once again
and all camera displays are shown.
right mouse button:
A menu is opened; see table 4.18 for more details.
Data On the left hand side, the Data display shows the 6DOF measurement results of
the position and orientation of the body relative to the room coordinate system. The rota-
tion angles are rotations around the X, Y and Z axis. The mathematical definition can be
found in chapter B on page 203. A simple colour code indicates if the body is tracked or
not:
green ... body is being tracked; tracking data is displayed
yellow ... body is being tracked only by the means of the intertial sensor
(only rotational data!)
red ... body is not being tracked; instead of tracking data dashes are
displayed
white ... body is not calibrated; columns are left blank
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4 System setup
Function Shortcut
Grid G Shows a grid in the camera display.
Cross C Shows a cross in the camera display.
Fullscreen F Resizes Monitor 2DOF view to full
screen and back.
One Camera Only show the view of the selected
camera.
Display upside down Changes display orientation. UD’ is
displayed in the camera displa