CSC_Hard_Drive_Bible_8th_Edition_1996 CSC Hard Drive Bible 8th Edition 1996

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Eighth Edition
July, 1996

DEDICATION

To my father, Joseph Bodo, who sparked my interest in electronics at an
eadyage.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Martin Bodo is the founder and president of Corporate Systems Center.
An avid computer enthusiast since his eady teens, he holds a degree in
Physics from the University of Santa Clara.
Martin Bodo
Author

THANKS To
The entire CSC staff who have helped write, edit, sell, and distribute the
Hard Drive Bible to over 40,000 satisfied customers.
SPECIAL

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Harold Moorehead
Editor, Photographer

jody Coil
Production Manager

We would like to thank all of the manufacturers who provided us with
data for this publication. Without their cooperation, production of this
book would not have been possible.
Maxtor Technical Support Department
Maxtor Service Center
Quantum Technical Supporlt Department
Western Digital Technical Support Department
Jim Plelps
- Rodime Inc.
Bill Rudock - Seagate Technology
Mike Mori
- Sycard Technologies

90000

janne Masingale
Typographer

9 780964 150317

International Standard Book Number: 0-9641503-1-X

Copyright © 1989-1996 by Corporate Systems Center. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Except as
permitted under the Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by
any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system without the prior written permission of Corporate Systems Center.
Software programs distributed on CD-ROM with this book arc copyrighted by the various authors. All trademarks contained
herein arc the property of their respective owners.

CSC's corporate headquarters is located in Sunnyvale, California. This location puts CSC at the
epicenter of the latest developments in data storage technology.

About

esc

esc was founded in 1986 by our president, Martin Bodo. Since then, we've grown consistently by
providing the best customer service in the industry. Our mission is to offer quality data storage
products available and to back them up with professional service and support.

We're proud to employ the most technically
qualified individuals in the data storage
industry.

Our in-house technical service center
provides free lifetime technical
support for hardware customers.

Corporate Systems Center proudly services
the entire digital data storage market, from
manufacturers to end users.

PCI WIDE SCSI·III CONrROLJtER
UNIVERSAL SCSI CONTROLLER
, DOS, OS/2™, Windows '95 and NfM drivers included
• ASprM

•
•
•
•

An ideal match for fast Pentiums and Windows '95
Supports both Wide and Narrow SCSI drives
FLASH BIOS option permits upgrade to SCSI·III software features
Automatic termination eliminates data errors

You asked for it - we built it. The PCI bus is a perfect performance match for Wide SCSI-III. Take advantage of these
new standards and get twice the data rates of SCSI-II. Connect up to fifteen Wide drives to your fileserver and get
double the performance of standard SCSI-II drives. This card is ideal for disk intensive fileservers and Audio Visual
workstations which operate several drives concurrently.
You want maximum system performance with the fewest headaches. Now,existing, inexpensive SCSI-II drives can
share the bus with Fast & Wide SCSI-III. Get it all - compatibility, ease of installation, and FastCache ™ performance
with Fast & Wide SCSI-III transfer rates.
Drive transfer rate: 20MB/sec; Bus transfer rate: 133MB/sec. Call us today for a free price comparison guide
including Fast & Wide SCSI-III hard disk drives and other storage devices.

csc FAsrCACHCM PCMCIA

CtJ~NrROLLER

esc's fASTCACHr PCItIC'A SCS'-II
•
•
•
•
•
•

Fastest PCMCIA controller available
M
ASpr Compliant. CD·ROM and hard disk drivers included
3.3MB/sec Sustained Data Transfer Rate; 10MB/sec Burst Rate
Full, high performance Windows '95 and OS/2 WarpTM drivers are included
Supports Windows 3.x, Windows for Workgroups, DOS, and OS/2
Includes Cable and Software - Compare and Save

Upgrade your notebook to Fast SCSI-II. The CSC FastCache PC Card slips into your PCMCIA slot and brings your
notebook all the power of CD-ROM, DAT, optical, and Fast SCSI-II hard drives. This controller is ASPI compliant and
includes free CD-ROM and hard disk drivers.
Using PCMCIA is the only way to add CD-ROM with acceptable performance. The PCMCIA Fastcache Card is fully
format compatible with most other SCSI cards, so you can share peripherals with your desktop. Made in the U.S.A.
Call today and connect any SCSI device to your notebook.
M

CSC llJSTCACHr x J0 FLOPPY
ADVANCED 'EArURES

•
•
•
•
•

Accelerates lfloppy performance up to 10 times
Transfers data instantly using 1.5MB cache
Duplicates disks in less ,than 15 seconds
Complete ki11 includes drive and controller
Now includes motorized disk eject

You purchased high end Pentium performance. The video and SCSI accelerators work great. But you could die
frustrated waiting for the floppy drive.
Slip the new lrastCache XIO into your system and hold on. Aseparate microprocessor and 1.5MB RAM cache now
control your floppy. You can boot faster from a floppy than from a hard drive. Your floppy drive is finally useful.
Transfer data instantly. Duplicate disks in seconds, not minutes. Install large applications instantly. The esc
FastCache X10 runs applications up to 10 times faster than normal drives.
The FastCache X10 is designed for people who can't afford to wait. Try it risk free for 15 days. Call us today.

AK47 ISA SCSI..II CONTROLLER
ADVANCED FEATURES

• True FAST SCSI-1110MB/sec burst transfer rate
• Sustained transfer rates reach 3-4MB/sec - depending on processor and ISA :
bus speeds
• On board floppy controller supports 4 drives, including 2.88MB units and
"fast floppy tapes"
• Includes floPI)Y cables, internal SCSI coble, update and ASPI, Windows '95 and
Windows NTM driver software
• Easy plug and play installation in any standard 16 bit slot
• Free softwarEl upgrades from the CSC BBS
Connect any IBM compatible system to the world of CD-ROM and Fast SCSI-II drives. You'll get maximum SCSI disk
system performance without headaches. CSC's proprietary "hyper-FIFO" design and industry standard drivers make
this card compatible where others fail.
Strong termination and power protection eliminate cabling problems and offer maximum reliability, even with up
to 7 drives attached. The optional caching drivers accelerate CD-ROM performance to hard disk speeds.
Flash BIOS lets you add additional SCSI features with free software updates from the CSC BBS.

UNIVERSAL DRIVE DUPLICA1'OR
COPIES TO AND fROM ANY DRIVE:
• SCSI-I, SCSI-II, or SCSI-III disk drives
• CD-ROM players and CD-R recorders
• Erasable Optical Cartridges
• DOS and 32 bit NT compatible files, even on file servers
• IDE, MFM, Rll, or ESDI drives
• Now supports SCSI tape drives
Easily copy an entire hard drive or CD-ROM. Using standard drives, you can instantly copy an entire disk, including
operating systems, directories, files, simply ... everything. Make fast backup copies of CD-ROM software using
CD-R drives. Instantly format drives for PCs, Sun, SGI, and UNIX workstations.
Dealers and system builders can save hours of time by preinstalling software on one drive and then using that
drive as a master for rapid duplication. Users can back up and restore data from CD disk, MlO optical disks, or
even DOS compatible files.
CSC's new menu driven duplication software saves MIS profeSSionals hours every day. Fully install standard
configurations over a network using the DOS file compatibility mode to create master image files on your server.
Any data is fair game for the FastCache duplicator. Data is precisely duplicated on a byte by byte basis.
Exact copies result.

WINDOWS 195 TAPE BACK I'P
MAXIMIZE YOUR SCSI PERfORMANCE
• Universal SCSI device support including 4mm, OAT, 8mm, Exabyte, WI', DLT, autoloaders and
others not supported under Microsoft backup
• Easy to use - Fast menu driven interface shows files on disk and tape
• Automatic selection of files which require backup
• True 32 bit performance and reliability
You made the right choice with Windows '95. Now get powerful multitasking tape backup and
restore protection. FastCacheMbackup is your high performance backup and restore solution. Get
full compatibility with SCSI devices not supported by Microsoft BackupfM. Protect your data from
accidental deletion and system crashes with fast, efficient backups.
Installation is automatic. Backup operation has never been simpler. Aclean graphical user interface shows
files on tape and disk for easy selection.

SCSI ~VlECHANICM FOR WINDOWS 195 AND NT
IIIIAX,.,ZI' YOUIl ICSI I""fOUlAIIC'
• low level format drives, optical cartridges & tapes - reassign defective sectors
manually or automatically

• Verify drive Ilerformance and data integrity
• Clone drives - including Windows '95 and NT operating systems
• Read manufclcturers' information and mode settings
• Easily changE~ drive modes and cache settings
Windows '95 and NT are great operating systems. But it's tough to manage servers and
workstations without good SCSI utilities. Get the new Windows '95 SCSI utility pack from
esc. All the features Microsoft left out are now yours.
Control disk drive "mode pages" to increase efficiency and change cache parameters.
Read the manufacturers' information and mode settings. Verify drive performance and data
integrity with efficient surface scans. Clone entire hard drives - including Windows '95 and NT operating systems
and files. Automatically reassign bad sectors for data security.
This true 32 bit software is designed specifically for Windows '95 and NT. Call CSC today and maximize your
Windows '95 SCSI performance.

CD-ROM DUPLICATOR
QUICKLY COPY CD-'O.S
• Sustained reading speed 4X - 600KB/sec
• Sustained writing speed 4X - 600KB/sec
• Both drives operate concurrently for top performance
• System includes controller, drives, software and blank disk
• PCI controller, cables and terminator me included
Use your PC to copy CD-ROM disks in minutes. Make software backups on rugged, permanent media. Produce
disks quickly and economically for distribution. No mastering software or multimedia experience is required.
Everything you need is included. You get a complete external system with two matched drives: a 4X!6x CD-ROM
reader/writer and an NY certified 700MB SCSI drive. The CSC FastCache duplication software and controller take
advantage of both, operating them Simultaneously to automatically duplicate disks in minutes. You can even transfer
CD images to and from hard disks or optical cartridges.
Plug the controller card in any Pentium PCI slot, connect the external unit, and you'll be up and running out of
the box. Software and hardware are matched for compatibility and top performance.

•

DISK ARRAY ENCLOSURES
SCSI SERVER TOWER
• Holds up to 8 SCSI drives
• Solid steel case with dual cooling fans and microfiltering
• Ideal for LAN servers
• Up to 2 SCSI ports and up to 8 ID switches, optional
• Holds any combination of half or full height 5.25" drives
• Custom cobling to meet your specifications
CSC is now delivering the ultimate SCSI enclosure. Up to eight half height SCSI hard,
CD-ROM, optical, and tape drives can be configured to your specifications.
Whether you need a network storage subsystem, an external SCSI drive case, or a
full-blown disk array, CSC has it. We'll custom build it complete with the drives of your choice for free,
when drives and tower are purchased together.
Aprofessionally designed micro-filtered air cooling system featuring dual forced air fans protects sensitive
optical and tape drives.

CD-ROM rOWERS
NETWORK CD TOWER
• Access data immediately with seven drives on line simultaneously
• Ideal for Novell, OS/2, Banyan, and NT network servers
• Includes dual cooling fans for long term reliability
• Full SCSI-II command set for software compatibility
• Heavy duty enclosure and 300 watt power supply
You demand top network performance. Don't even think of using CD changers on a
network. With a heavy load of multiple users, changer performance is just too low.
Aheavy duty network CD-ROM tower from CSC is your solution. With seven drives
on line simultaneously, your workstations will access data immediately. The custom
manufactured, solid steel disk array enclosure with microfiltered fans ensures long term,
reliable operation. This system is chosen by government, military, and educational institutions.
Call today for your complete seven drive subsystem, ready to plug and play on your file server.
Custom configurations are also available.

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

TABLE OF CONTENTS

The Histor:r of Disk JDrives ••..•...••.••••••.••.•...•..•••••.•....•••••••••...•.••.••.••. 1
:Basic Drive IOperation ............................................................................. 9
Spindle Motors ............ ".............................................. "............................. 9
.Head Carriage ........................ "................................................................ l 0
Media and f[eads .................................................................................... 11
Stepper Motor Servo Systems ................................................................ 12
Voice Coil Servo Systerns ........................................... "........................... 12
Keeping it C:lean ..................................................................................... 14
Data Encoding and Decoding ................................................................ 15
Encoding allLd Decoding Codes .............................................................. 16
NRZ (Non-Return to Zero) ................................... "........................... 16
PE (phase Encoding) ......................................................................... 16
FM (Frequency Modulation) ............................................................. 16
MFM (Modified Frequency Modulation) ........................................... 16
RLL (Run Length Limited Encoding) ................................................ 17
Future C:odes ..................................................................................... 18

Interface Standards.o ....................................................................... 19
ANSI ................................. "................................................................ 19
NAB ...... "............................................................................................ 19
IBM ....................................................................... "........................... 19
IRCC .................................................................................................. 19
IRIG.................................................................................................... 19
Shugart Associates." .............................................. "........................... 20
Seagate Technology.......................................................................... 20
"IDE" or "ATA" Interface .......................................................................... 20
ST-506/ST-412 Interface ......... "................................................................ 21
MI~M and RLL Encoding ................ >
........................................................ 21
©

esc 1996

Hard Drive Bible I

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

TABLE OF CONTENTS
ESDI Interface .......................................................................................... 22
SCSI Interface ......................................................................................... 23
WIDE SCSI .............................................................................................. 23
FAST SCSI .........................................................".................................. ,... 24
Ultra SCSI .............................................................................................'.. 24
SMD Interface ......................................................................................... 24
IPI Interface ............................................................................................ 24
QIC-02 Interface ..................................................................................... 24
QIC-40 Interface ..................................................................................... 2'1
QIC-36 Interface ..................................................................................... 25
SA-400 Interface .................................................................................. ,... 25
Future Standards .................................................................................. ,... 25
PRML Technology-.......................................:.................................

1• • •

27

Enhanced IDE ............................................................................... 29
Original (Non-Enhanced) IDE Limitations ............................................. 29
IBM AT Compatible BIOS Limitations ................................................. " .. 30
1• • •

S.CSI Command Refere:llce .........................•..........•.....•..........•........ 3;3
Format Unit - Op Code 04· H ................................................................... 34
Inquiry - Op Code 12 H .... "..................................................................... 34
Mode Select - Op Code 15H ................................................................... 3'1
Mode Sense - Op Code IA,H ............................................... · ................... 35
Read - Op Code ISH ............................................................................... 35
Read Capacity - Op Code 25 H ............................................................... 35
Read Extended - Op Code 12H .............................................................. 36
Read Long - Op Code 3E1:1: ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 36
Reassign Blocks - Op Code 07H ............................................................. 36
Reassign Blocks Defect List .................................................................... 37
Release - Op Cocle 17H ..................................................................... ...... 3t~
Requests Sense - Op Code 03H .............................................................. 38
Rezero Unit - Op Code OI H............................. ·................................... ,.. 39
Seek - Op Code OB H ............................................................................... 39
Seek Extended - Op Code 2BH .............................................................. 39
Send Diagnostic - Op Code 1DH ............................................................ 40
Start/Stop Unit - Op Code IB H .............................................................. 40
Test Unit Ready - Op Cod(~ OOH ............................................. , ............ ,.. 40
Verify" - Op Code 2FH ....... ,.................................................................. ,... 41
Write - Op Code OAH .......................................................................... ".. 41
Write Extended - Op Code 2AH ............................................................ 41
Write Long - Op Code 3Fn .................................................................... 42
II Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

TABLE OF CONTENTS
What is SC,SI-ill? ................ "............................................................. 43
SCSI Buzzwords .......... ".............................................. "............................ 43
SCSI-III ........,............................................................................................ 43
Fast SCSI - How It All Started .................................................................. 43
Narrow SCSI ........................................................................................... 44
WIDE SCSI., ............ "............................................................................... 44
SCA............ "............................................................................................ 44
Fiber Channel -The Future of SCSI? ......................... "............................ 4 5
Downward CompatibiHty? .................................................................... 45
What SCSI Flavor Should I Buy? ............................................................ 45
SCA Hot Pl.ugs ......

o ••• o • • • • • • • • • Il • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

47

PCI Interface............ ,........................................................................ 49
Choosing a Hard Drive and Controller......................................... 51
Controller Setup and Jumpering.................................................. 55
ISA Bus Basc~ I/O Address ....................................................................... 55
ISA Bus Base BIOS Address ..................................................................... 56
ISA Bus DMA Channel ............................................................................ 56
ISA Bus Controller Interrupt.".............................................................. .56
Floppy Address ...................... "................................................................ 56
A Tip for Motherboards with G'Extended Chipset" Setup ....................... 57
Drive Setu1[> and J umpering........................................................... 59
Typical IDE Drive Installation ................................................................ 59
IDE Drive ]llmpering .............................................................................. 60
DSO or DS 1 Confusion ........................................................................... 60
MFM, RLL and ESDI Drive ]umpering .................................................... 60
SCSI Drive ]llmpering ............................................................................. 61
"Drive CablJlng.......
63
IDE Drive Cabling .................................................................................. 63
What are thtese Twisted Cables? ............................................................ 63
Single Drives (MFM,RLL or ESDI) Cables ............................................... 64
Multi DriveMFM and RLL Cabling ......................................................... 64
l'ermination ............................................................................................ 64
.Multi Drive ESDI Cabling ........................................................................ 65
SCSI Drive <:abling ................................................................................. 65
SCSI Cable Identification ....... "................................................................ 67
e _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . (J • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

©

csc

1996

Hard Drive Bible III

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Low-Level Formatting.................................•................................... 69
What is DEBUG? ............................................... ,...................................... 69
What is CSCFMT? ............................................ ,..................................... 70
Choosing a DriveType ........................................................................... 70
IDE Drive 1)rpes ...................................................................................... 7C)
MFM DriveTypes .................................................................................... 70
RLL and ESDI Drive1)rpes" ..................................................................... 71
SCSI Drive Types .................................................................................... 71
Formatting MFM Drives ......................................................................... 7~~
Table Overrides ................................................ ,..................................... 72
Formatting RLL Drives ........................................................................... 72
Formatting ESDI Drives .......................................................................... 73
Formatting SCSI Drives .................................... ,..................................... 74
Low Level Formatting IDE Drives .......................................................... 74
DOS Partitioning.........................................,................................. 4, •• 75
Old DOS Limitations ........................................ ,..................................... 75
The 32MB Barrier............. "..................................................................... 75
The 1024 Cylinder Barrier..................................................................... 75
Partition Compatibility........................................................................... 76
The 2000MB Partition Limlit ................................................................... 76
DOS Format ............................................................................................ 77
Macintosh Drive InstaU.ation...................................................... ,... 79
Windows Drive Format..............................,.............•................... 83
1• • •

Windows '95 Disk Forolat.........................•.................................... 83
Windows '95 Enhanced IDE Support ..................................................... 83
ROM BIOS Sllpport ......................................................................... 83
Hard Disk BIOS Support ................................................................... 83
Truncation .................. '................................ ,...................................... 84
Real-Mode Geometry Support ......................................................... .8 L!
Windows '95 SCSI Support through Int-13 ............................................ 8.:!
Windows '95 SCSI Support through ASP!. .............................................. 84
Windows '95 and NT SCSI Miniport Drivers .......................................... 84
Disk Manager and Windo~vs '95 ............................................................. 85
Getting 32 bit Disk Access from Win 3.1. .............................................. 86
SMARTDrive 32 bit DiskAccess ...................... ,...................................... 86
SMARTDrive Write Caching ................................................................... 86
IV Hard Drive Bible

©

esc 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Novell Cornpsurf..................................................,........................... 89

Hardware Compatibility Problems ............................................... 91
SCSI Arbitra.tion on Bus Sca.n .................................................................. 91
SCSI Comm.and Set Issues ...................................................................... 91
ISA Bus I/O Channel Ready Timing ........................................................ 92
ISA Bus 16-Bit MemoryTransfers ........................................................... 92
ESDI Defect Tables .................................................................................. 92
VESA VL-Bus Loading Problems .............................................................. 92
IDE Drive J\.laster/Slav(~ Compatibility........................,........................... 93
Common Installation Problems .................................................... 95
Handle Hard Drives Like Eggs! ............................................................... 95
Reversed C.lbles! .................................................................................... 95
lWisted Cal)les ....................................................................................... 95
CMOS Setu1~ ........................................................................................... 96
Hardware C:onflicts ................................................................................ 96
Defect Locli:ing ....................................................................................... 96
ISA Bus Extlended Setup ......................................................................... 96
Keep Optical Drives Clean and Cool! .................................................... 97
SCSI Parity Jumpers ................................................................................ 97
SCSI ID and Termination ........................................................................ 97
Troubleshooting.............................. "~ ............................................. 99
Bus Mastering Compatibility.................................................................. 99
CMOS Drivc~1YpeTables ....... ,................................................................ 99
Matching CMOS Tables for IDE Drives ............................................. 99
ESDI and SCSI Controller Drive Tables ........................................... 100
Compsurf Failure .................................................................................. 100
DOS Partitioning ................................................................................... l 0 1
DOS & Windows '95 2.0GB Limit ......................................................... 101
I)rive Selects ......................................................................................... l 02
Drive Won't Spin .................................................................................. 102
ED Floppy Support .............................................................................. 102
ESDI Sector Sparing ............................................................................. 102
IDE Cabling; ........................... ,.............................................................. 102
IDE Master/Slave .................................................................................. 103
Incorrect Drive Parameters .................................................................. l 03
Interrupts and DMA Channels ............................................................. 103
1.ong Boot l'ime .................................................................................... 103
l . ong Format Time ................. ,.............................................................. 103
©

csc

1996

Hard Drive Bible V

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743-8787

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Multiple Drive Support Uflder DOS ..................................................... I03
No BIOS sign-on banner................................... ,................................... 104
Partition can't be removed ................................................................... l 04
Power Supply........................................................................................ 104
SCSI Cabling ......................................................................................... 104
SCSI ID's ............................................................................................... 105
SCSI Termination ...............................................,................................... 105
Shadow RAM ........................................................................................ 105
System Hangs On Power Up ................................................................ 105
Thermal Problems ................................................................................ 106
1Wisted Data Cables ............................................................................ 106
Won't Boot (DOS) ............................................ "' .................................. 106
Won't Boot (ESDI) ................................................................................ 106
Won't Boot (IDE) ...............,.................................................................. 106
Won't Boot (SCSI) ................................................................................. 107
COMMON ERROR MESSAGES .............................................................. 107
1790/1791 Errors ........................................................................... 107
Attempting to recover allocation Unit XXX..
..107
C:Drive Failure or Drive C:Error................. ~ ................................. ,107
Error Reading Fixed Disk .............................................................. ,,108
HDD Controller Failur(~ .................................................................. 108
Insert Disk For Drive C: ................................................................ ,,108
Invalid Media 'TYpe ...... "................................................................. ,108
Nof Fixed Disk Present .................................................................. , 108
No Partitions Defined .................................•.................................. ,108
No ROM Basic ................................................................................ 109
Non System Disk or Disk Error....................................................... 109
No SCSI Devices Foun(i .................................................................. 109
Track 0 Bad, Disk Unusable ........................................................... , 109
Unable to Access Fixed Disk .......................................................... 109

Universal IDE Paramete:rs ............................................................ 111.
Hard Drive List.........................................................................•..• 113
Landing Zone ....................................................................................... ,.113
Write Precomp ..................................................................................... 114
CDC, Impris or Seagate? ....................................................................... 114
Miniscribe or Maxtor Colorado? ......................................................... 114
0

Fine Tuning................... ,................................................................ 117
CSC Test ............................ "................................................................... 117
VI Hard Drive Bible

©

csc

1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Use 4: 1 Sector Interleave With: ............................................................ 118
Use 3: 1 Sector Interleave With: ............................................................ 118
Use 2: 1 Sector Interleave With: ............................................................ 118
Use 1: 1 Sector Interleave With: ............................................................ 118
Bllffers and FASTOPEN......... "............................................................... 119
Cache Programs .................................................................................... 120

Hard Driv4e Paranleters ................................................................. 123
Alps Ameri<:a ......................................................................................... 123
Ampex ................................................................................................. 123
Areal Techn.ology................................................................................... 123
Atashi 'fech:nology, Inc ........................................................................... 123
Allra Associates ..................................................................................... 124
BASE .................................................................................................... 124
Brand Techll0Iogies ................................................... ".......................... 124
BlIII ............................................................................ ".......................... 124
C. Itoh Electronics ................................................................................ 124
Cardiff.................................................................................................. 125
CDC ...................................................................................................... 125
Century Data ........................................................................................ 128
CMI ....................................... "............................................................... 128
CMS Enhancements, IrIc ....... "............................................................... 129
Cogito ................................... "............................................................... 129
Comport ............................................................................................... 129
Conner Peripherals, Inc ........ "............................................................... 129
Core Intern.ational ................................................................................ 131
Corporate Systems Center........................................................... 132
Data Tech l\1emories ............. "............................................................... 133
Disc Tec ................................................................................................ 133
Disctron ................................................................................................ 133
DMA ..................................................................................................... 134
DTC ...................................................................................................... 134
Ecol. 2 ................................................................................................... 134
Elcoh ...................... "............................................................................. 134
Emulex ................................................................................................. 134
Epson ........ "........................................................................................... 134
Espert .......................... ".......................................................................... 134
Fuji ............ "........................................................................................... 134
Fujitsu Ame:rica, Inc .............................................................................. 135
Hewlett-Pa<:kard .................................................................................... 136
Hitachi Amc~rica ..................................................................................... 137
©

csc 1996

Hard Drive Bible VII

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Hyosung ................................................................................................ 138
IBM Corporation ................................................................................... 138
IMI ........................................................................................................ 139
Intergral Peripherals ............................................................................. 139
Iomega .................................................................................................. 139
JCT........................................................................................................ 139
lVC Companies of America .................................................................. 139
Kalok Corporation ................................................................................ 140
Kyocera Electronics, Inc ........................................................................ 140
Lanstor.................................................................................................. 140
Lapine ................................. ~ ................................................................. 140
Maxtor Corporation ........................................... ,................................... 141
Maxtor Colorado .................................................................................. 142
Mega Drive Systems .............................................................................. 143
Memorex .............................................................................................. 143
Micropolis Corporation ........................................................................ 143
Microscience Internationall Corporation .............................................. 146
Miniscribe Corporation .....................................,................................... 147
Mitsubishi Electronics .......................................;................................... 149
Mitsumi Electronics Corporation ......................................................... 149
MMI .................................................................. "' .................................. 149
NCR Corporation .................................................................................. 149
NEC Technology, Inc ............................................................................. 150
NEI ........................................................................................................ 150
Newberry Data ..................................................'................................... 151
NPL ........................................................................................................ 151
Okidata .............................................................. ,................................... 151
Olivetti .............................................................. ~ ................................... 151
Orca Technology Corporation .............................................................. 152
Otari ..................................................................................................... 152
Pacific Magtron ..................................................................................... 152
Panasonic .............................................................................................. 152
Plus Development ................................................................................ 152
Prairietek Corporation ......................................................................... 153
Priam Corporation ................................................................................ 153
Procom Technology.............................................................................. 154
PTI (peripheral Technology) ................................................................ 155
Quantum Corporation .......................................;.................................. 155
Ricoh ..................................................................................................... 157
RMS ....................................................................................................... 157
Rodime Systems, Inc ............................................................................. 157
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Rodime, In(: ........................................................................................... 157
Samsul1g .... '............................................................................................ 159
Seagate Tec:hnologies ............ "............................................................... 159
Shugart ................................................................................................. 163
Siemens ................................................................................................. 164
Storage Dinlensions .............................................................................. 164
Syquest Technology.............................................................................. 165
Tandon Cornputer Corporation ............................................................ 165
Tandy Corporation ............................................................................... 165
rreac Ameri<:a, Inc ................................................................................. 166
~rexas Instrllments ................................................................................ 166
Tokico ................................................................................................... 166
~roshiba America, Inc ............................................................................ 167
Tulin .......... ".......................................................................................... 168
Vertex ........................................................................ ".......................... 168
Western Dil~ital ..................................................................................... 168
Xebex ................................................................................................... 169
Ye-Data ................................................................................................. 169
Zentec .................................................................................................. 170

Controller Information.... ,............................................................ 171
Adaptec Controllers ............................................................................. 171
CCAT Controllers ................................................................................. 173
Conner Periipherals Controllers ......................................................... 173
Corporate Systems Center Controllers ........................................ 174
DTC Contr()llers ..........,......................................................................... 177
DTK Contr()llers ......... ".............................................. ".......................... 182
Everex Controllers ................ "............................................................... 182
Future DOluain Controllers .................................................................. 182
Lopgshine ·<=ontrollers" .............................................. ".......................... 183
NCL Contrclilers ................................................................................... 183
Seagate Cotltrollers ............... ".............................................................. 184
SMS/OMTI ~Controllers ......................................................................... 185
Storage Ditllensions Controllers ........................................................... 188
Ultrastore C:ontrollers ........................................................................... 188
Wangtec Cc)ntrollers ............................................................................. 190
Western Digital Controllers .................................................................. 190
Connector' Pinouts .. "......... ,............................................................ 199
Apple External HDI-30 ......................................................................... 200
Apple/Future Doma.in Single-Ended SCSI. ............................................ 200
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Single-Ended & Differential B-Cables .................................................... 201
68-Pin Wide SCSI B-,P-, & (~-Cables ....................................................... 201
Single-Ended & Differential P-Cables ................................................... 202
50-Pin, Centronics-Style Connectors .................................................... 203
ESDI Control Signals 01/Pl) ................................................................ 203
ESDI Control Signals 02/P2) ................................................................. 204
IBM I/O Channel Pinouts (Sides A & B) ............................................... 204
IBM I/O Channel Pinouts (Sides C & D) .............................................. 205
IBM High Density PS/2 Connectors ..................................................... 205
IDE Interface Pinout ............................................................................. 206
QIC-36 Connector Pin Assignments ..................................................... 206
SCSI Pinouts (Centronics, ]\1ac, and Differential) ................................. 207
SA-400 Interface Signals ....................................".................................. 208
ST-506 Data Signals 02/P2) ................................................................... 208
Sun Single-Ended SCSI Cables .............................................................. 209

Drive Jumpers ...............
211
Atashi 3085 ....................... "................................................................... 211
CDC Wren III Series ............................................................................. 212
CDC Wren III Series (SCSI ]umpers) .................................................... 212
CDC Wren III Series (ESDE & SCSI) ..................................................... 212
CDC Wren V Series ............................................................................... 212
Conner ................................................................................................. 221
Digitals DSP Series ............................................................................... 230
Fujitsu .................................................................................................. 231
Hitachi .................................................................................................. 234
Hewlett Packard ................................................................................... 236
IBM ....................................................................................................... 239
Maxtor .................................................................................................. 249
Micropolis ............................................................................................ 256
Quantum .............................................................................................. 258
Seagate ................................................................................................... 267
Western Digital ..................................................................................... 277
c• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

CD-ROM .......................................................................................... 279
CD-Media .............................................................................................. 279
CD-ROM Drive Operation .................................................................... 280
CD-ROM Standards ............................................................................... 280
ISO 9660 ......................................................................................... 280
Mode 1 ........................................................................................... ,281
Mode 2 ........................................................................................... ,281
CD-ROM XA ...................................................................................... 281
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CD-I ................................................................................................ 281
Photo CD ............................................................. ,...........·................ 282
Quick Time ..................................................................................... 282
Choosing a CD-ROM Drive ................................................................... 283
The MI:>C Standard ................................................................................ 283
Building a Real Multimedia Pc .................................. ,........................... 284
<:::D-R a:nd CD-WO ................................................................................. 284
Mastering YiDur Own CD-ROM ............................................................. 284
<:::D Handling Hazar(is ................................................ ".......................... 285

Floppy Drlves ..........
287
Industry Standard Floppy Drives .............................. ".......................... 287
I{loptical Drives .................................................................................... 287
Zip Drives .................................................................. ".......................... 287
Accellerated Floppy Drives ....................................... ".......................... 288
I{loppy Driv"e List .................................................................................. 288
4J • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Optical Disk Drive Technology......
289
CD-ROM Drives ......................................................... ".......................... 289
WORM Dri'res ....................................................................................... 289
I~rasable Op,tical Drives ............................................. ".......................... 291
I)~ and H1DCD ......... '............................................... ".......................... 291
D~'s Competitor is High Density Compact Disk (fIDCD) ................ 291
Optical Dis1, Capacity........................................................................... 292
Erasable Drive Capacities ............................................................... 292
WORM lDrive Capacities ................................................................. 292
u •••••••••••••••••••, •••••••••••••••••••••••••

Optical Ju)teboxes ...

o •••••••••

I, ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 293

Optical DrIve Specificatio:tls...........
295
Optical Drive List ....... "......................................................................... 295
$ .............................................

Tape Driv{~s ...........................................................'........................ 303
Tape Drive Interfaces." ......................................................................... 303
Floppyl:ape ......................................................... ".......................... 303
Pertec .............................................................................................. 303
QI(:-02 ................................................................. ".......................... 304
QI(:-36 ................................................................. ".......................... 304
SCSI ................................................................................................. 304
ESCON ................................................................. ,........................... 304
FIREWIlrn ....................................................................................... 304
Data Compression & Honest Capacity................................................. 304
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Choosing a Tape Drive ..................................... :.................................... 305
Tape Drive Performance TI~sts ............................................................. 305
Extended Length Tapes ........................................................................ 307
Standard Tape Capacity ........................................................................ 307
Tape Technology Improvelments ............................................ ,............. 308
1/4 Improvements ................................................................................ 308
Travan ................................................................................................... 309
4mm Improvements ............................................................................. ,309
Bmm Improvements .............................................................................. 309
DLT Future Improvements ................................................................... 310
IDI and ID2Tape Drives ..................................................................... 310

esc Benchmark TestS................................................................... f)311l
Softw'are........................................................................................313

Disclaimer.........................................................·.................................... 313
Copyright Notice .................................................................................. 314

System Notes .................

o •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

329

Industry- phone List.................................... . ~ .................................. 333
BBS Numbers ..............................................•................................. 367

Directory-....................................................................................... 371
I

Glossary-.........................

t •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

377

Index............................................................................................. 42].

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HISTORY OF DISK DRIVES

T

he magnetic recording technology used in today's disk drives can
be traced back to around 500 B. C. when the mineral magnetite
was discovered. Magnetite is the naturally occuring magnetic material
that was first used in compasses. Alchemists in the first century B.C.
discovered the first magnetic compasses when they noticed that loadstones hung from a string always pointed the same way.
Several hundred years later, the connection between electricity
and magnetism was discovered. Early scientists noticed a that a compass needl<:~ was deflected when it was put near a wire carrying electric current. It was in this era that magnetic technology was pioneered by experimental geniuses like Danish physicist Hans Christian
Oersted and English scientist Michael Faraday who discovered the
principles of electromagnetic induction.
The first practical lnagnetic recording device was the
Telegraphone patented in 1898 by Danish telephone engineer and
inventor Vlademar Poulsen. The Telegraphone was a crude audio
recorder using a stretched magnetized wire. The Telegraphone attracted considerable curiosity when it was first exhibited at the Exposition
Universelle in Paris in 1900. The few words that the Austrian emperor
Franz Josef spoke into it at that exhibition are believed to be the earliest survivilng magnetic recording.
As World War I approached, the German war effort assumed leadership in nlagnetic r(~cording technology. The German firm AEG was
the first to use plastic strips (tape) for magnetic recording. The
Germans put magnetic recording to its first military application on
submarines:. Secret communications were recorded on crude reel to
reel tape r(~corders at slow speeds. The tapes were then played back
and retransmitted at high speeds to prevent Allied interception. The
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Magnetophon Recorder

2 Hard Drive Bible

sages. By World War II the Germans had perfected the recording technology and manufactured high quality reel-to-reel tape recorders
called Magnetophons. These tape recorders were nearly identical to
today's high quality audio tape recorders.
In 1945 an American Signal Corps soldier, John T. Mullin, sent two
of these captured machines home to San Francisco. The analysis of
these units by American engineers at Ampex Corporation in Redwood
City lead to the developrnent of the Ampex Model 200 in 1948. The
Model 200 was the first magnetic recorder to be manufactured in volume
and used commercially. The American Broadcasting Corporation had
provided some of the
financing for the Ampex
recorder project, and was
the first to use them in
broadcasting the Bing
Crosby Show in 1948.
This same technology is
;used in today's high resolution audio, video and
digital tape drives.
Reel to reel tape recorders and Hollerith punch cards were the
main storage devices used in early computers. Paper Holerith cards
and paper tapes were used to perform initial program loading when
early computers were first powered up. Paper tapes were popularized
by the Teletype Corporation who added paper tape readers and
punches to many of their Teletype terminals. Paper tape remained
popular for over 20 years, lasting until the' early 1970's. It took the
convenience and erasability of floppy disks to eliminate paper tapes.
In 1952, IBM, realizing the need for a random access method of
data retrieval with faster access than magnetic tapes, sent Reynold B.
Johnson to San Jose, California to head hlp a magnetic recording
research team. Johnson 'was convinced that a disk based system was
the way to go, but other engineers advised: him to abandon the project. Following his intuition, Johnson designed the first commercially
successful digital disk drilve. In 1956, IBM announced the Model 350
RAMAC (Random Access Method of Accounting and Control). It was a
quantum leap in disk technology for its time. The RAMAC stored 5
megabytes of data on fifty 24-inch disks, spinning at 1200 RPM, and
had an access time of 600 milliseconds. The resulting data transf(~r
rate was .10 Mbits per second. Compare that to the 25 to 80Mbits per
second data rates typical today! The popular name for this huge stack
of disks at IBM was the "baloney slicer".
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In 1955, realizing that magnetic recording density was severely limited by the: number of linear stripes (tracks) on the tape, two brilliant
engineers at Ampex Corporation, Charles Ginsburg and Ray Dolby,
developed the helical scan recording system. Their ingenious scanning system uses a tiny spinning magnetic hea,d with tape wrapped
around it in a spiral. This design
packed recording tracks much
m.ore tightly onto the tape than
was previously possible. The
helical scan recording technique provides an extremely
high recording density with a
single small head. Helical scan
recording its now used in every
video recorder (VCR), Digital
Audio Tape drives (DATs), and
all high capacity tape backup
drives.
I have read with
respect several documents
authored by Ginsburg and
Dolby at Ampex. These engineers deserve more credit for their brilliant invention of the mechanisms and recording techniques copied in every modern VCR.
In 1961l, IBM pushed disk data storage ahead by announcing the
1301 Disk Storage unit that used aerodynamically shaped recording
heads that "flew" above the surfaces of the spinning disks. This
enabled roughly 10 times as much information to be packed in each
square inch of disk surface. This head design would eventually
become the "Winchester disk drive".
The next year, IBM announced the 1311 Disk Pack unit which
helped speed the end of th(~ punched card era by providing removable
and interchangeable "disk packs" containing six disks protected by a
transparent plastic "cake cover." Each disk pack could store roughly
as much data as 25,000 punched cards. Magnetic disks were finally
becoming a practical storage medium for computers.
During 1964, flly parents made the mistake of conceiving Martin
Bodo. Little did they know how much trouble I would eventually
cause theDa. My early fascination with computers would ultimately
place Corporate Systems Center (CSC) at the forefront of magnetic
data storage technology.
In 1967, IBM assigned David L. Noble to head a research team to
develop a convenient storage medium to store and ship microcode. In
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IBM 33FD Floppy Drive

1969 several engineers l{~ft the project to join Memorex. Memorex
soon became an industry leader in magnetic media technologies, disk
drive manufacturing, and magnetic media production.
In 1970, IBM announced the 3330 Disk Storage Facility which was
the first disk storage product to use an electrical feedback system
called a "track-following servo" to control a "voice coil" motor that
could quickly position recording heads at desired positions over the
disk. This combination provided better response time, higher track
density, and more reliable operation than was previously attainable.
Twenty years ahead of its time, this closed loop track following servo
technology would eventually be used in every large capacity disk
drive.
In 1971, the first"disk{~tte"was produced 'by IBM as an ICPL (Initial
Control Program Load) d{~vice. It was called the Minnow and was an
8-inch read-only model that stored 81,664 bytes. It caused paper tapes
to become obsolete almost overnight.
While IBM and others were developing disk technology at honle in
America, Japanese companies like Sony and Japan Victor Corporation
aVC) were making rapid advances in consumer VCR technology. By
the early 1980's, the Japanese had a lead in helical scan tape drive
manufacturing technology that the US could never overcome.
In 1973, the first read-write floppy disk, the Igar (IBM 33FD),
which stored an incredible (for it's time) 242,944 bytes - started shipping to customers. The original code name of the read-write disk was
Figaro, but the initial f and final 0 were removed as a symbolic removal
of "fat" and "overhead". IV[emorex was the first company after IBM to
produce floppy disk products and soon became a strong competitor
in this field.
Also in 1973, IBM announced the 3340 Disk Storage Unit, which
featured an ultra light-weight recording head that could "land" on and
"take off' from a lubricated disk while it
was still spinning. This eliminated the
need for a mechanism to raise the heads
off the disk surface before stopping; substantially reducing the cost of manufacturing. The 3340 also contained two spindles, each with a storage capacity of 30
million characters. Referring to this
arrangement as "30-30", engineers were
reminded of th~ famous rifle and called
their creation a; "Winchester" file. This
term became an industry standard to

a

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identify this "floating head" design.
In 1975, IBM announced the 3350 Direct Access Storage Device,
which marked an extension of Winchester technology and a return
from the re:movable disk pack to fixed disks, permitting higher recording densities and lower cost per bit for on-line storage. The 3350
could store data at a density of more than 3 million bits per square
inch, an increase of more than 1500 times the density of the RAMAC.
By this tirne, cOITtpetitors were catching up. Several companies,
including Shugart, Magnetic Peripherals Incorporated, and PerSci were
about to introduce competitive floppy disk drives.
In 1976, the success of the 33FD floppy disk led to the development of the 43FD using a dual-head drive, that could store 568,320
bytes. This was followed a year later by the double-density, doublesided, 53FD using MFM encoding and a capacity of 1,212,416 bytes.
By 1977, niineteen companies were manufacturing floppy disk drives
in the United States and MFM had become the encoding method of
choice.
In 1979 Seagat(~ Technology was founded and was the first company to mass produce an affordable hard disk drive (the 5 Megabyte
ST506). Seagate has become the largest independent manufacturer of
hard drives, having shipped over 50 million units to date.
I was a runny-nosed high school sophomore in 1979. While IBM
was inventing thin-film recording heads, I was content with my first
5.25" 160K floppy drive. I was hooked, but I didn't know it.
The data storage industry exploded in the eady 1980's with the
help of brilliant engineers who had business sense. Alan Shugart made
the floppy disk the standard for data interchange and floppy drive
sales soared. By 1982, hard disk drive sales had exploded and form
factors were shrinking frotn 14" disks to 8" disks. The 5.25" form factor made popular by Seagate's ST506 was now an industry standard.
When I graduated from college in 1986, I made a living by modifying Alan Shugart's Model 712, 5.25" 10 megabyte hard drives so they
would hold 20MB. I was starting to understand the equation for success in the hard drive industry. It was simple: "Provide the Most Megs
in the Smallest Size for the Least Bucks". I saw an opportunity for a
company that would initially provide repair services for disk drives.
CSC was born in 1986.
In 1989, IBM announced the 3390 Direct Access Storage Device,
which could store as much as 21.5 billion characters in each storage
unit -- the same capacity as its predecessor, the 3380 Model K, but at
an increasf~d density that required only one-third the floor space.
Gosh, it w(~ighed only 800 pounds!
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Early Conner IDE
Drive

6 Hard Drive Bible

As sales of Apple Conlputer's Macintosh line of personal conlputers began to grow, the industry was introduced to the idea of using the
Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI) as a standard port for desktop PC peripherals. SCSI at this point wasbasically a glorified 8 bit
parallel port. But SCSI vl0uld eventually grow into one of the most
popular standards for both low performance PC and higher performance workstation disk drives! Like the IBM-PC, SCSI caught on like
crazy because it was hardware with software standards included.
In 1990, Conner Peripherals in partnership with Compaq conlputers created and made popular both the IDE interface and the 3.5" hard
drive form factor. An enormous volume market for IDE drives grew in
the next few years as IB~[ compatible desktop systems grew in popularity.
By 1990, there was not one American company left producing helical
scan tape recording mechanisms. The Japanese conquest in consumer electronics was about to payoff.
Soon, all helical scan digital
tape recording mechanisms
for computer technology
would come from Asia. In
addition, the American loss
of consumer audio manufacturing
technology
would cost US companies
dearly. All digital CD-RO~[ disk drives based on this technology would
now come from Japan and the Orient.
In 1991, we designed our first caching disk controllers at esc.
These cards would eventually sell by the thousands, as the size of CSC
continued to double yearly.
In 1991, IBM created another first in drive technology, the MR
head. IBM's 9340 drive be:came the first IBM disk to use magneto-resistive recording-head technology, and IBM could now boast of bit densities of > 100Mbits per square inch.
In 1992, improvements in mechanical alignment and media boosted the capacity of standard diskettes to 2.88MB and "ZIP" diskettes to
100MB. Maxtor Corporation announced the "Magic" MXT series of
disk 3.5" disk drives with capacities over 1GB and access times under
8ms. 5.25" disk drives wlere available in 1994 with over 8GB of formatted capacity.
As we write the update to the Hard Drive Bible, it is now 1996. It's

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hard to predict the future, but I'll be glad to share a few thoughts on
the data storage industry.
Compaq will soon ship Floptical drives with 120 MB capacity in a
standard 3.5" form factor. I'm not sure what industry standards will
develop, but other than "floptical" drives, I don't see much future for
the floppy disk industry. Read the chapter on CD-ROM for more
insight. CD-ROM and recordable CD-R drives revolutionizing software
distribution.
The hard disk industry, on the other hand, is moving faster than
ever. Volunnes are huge while only a few manufacturing companies are
staying profitable because of the intense competition. Technology is
advancing faster than ever. My friends and I used to talk about "minimono" disk heads. Then it was "micro-sliders" and even "nano-sliders".
Today we had a nerd's lunch and talked about "pico-sliders" that fly at
4 millionths of an inch above the disk. As far as I'm concerned, that
should be called "contact recording"!
Will hard drive sales continue to grow? To be honest, there are
some potential challengers for hard drives. Optical, and Flash technologies are improving. You can bet our friends at Intel hope Flash
will kill ha:rd drives. But our friends in Japan working on DVD optical
disk drives feel that optical drives will win out in the long run. My
opinion is unchanged. For the last ten years, I've had people tell me
that something better will replace hard drives. Every time there's a
technical advance in Flash or optical drive, there's a corresponding
advance in magnetic disk drive technology. Hard drives are here to
stay. As magnetic, optical, and semiconductor technologies advance
together, hard drives continue to offer more storage for less money,
with a better access time. Each technology has it's distinct advantages, but the magnetic recording technology used in hard drives is
simple, mature and easy to manufacture. Hard drives will remain practical for several more years at least.
In 1996, a major disk drive merger took place between Seagate and
Conner Peripherals. I take my hat off to Alan Shugart, CEO of Seagate
TechnologJies for that accomplishment. Seagate has a broad line of
products from 8" drives to PCMCIA FLASH memory. They're quick on
their feet and poised for the future.
But the majority of disk drive manufacturers continue to loose
money! This is the largest potential problem facing the data storage
industry: price competition. Severe price competition is forcing many
companies to abandon research efforts and concentrate on high volU1ne, low-trech products. Only the lean, high tech companies will survive the competition.
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Some feel that magnetic recording technology has begun to give
way to optical technologies. I agree that optical technology has now
become affordable and reliable enough to replace magnetic drives in
some selected applications. In the past few years, optical recording
techniques pioneered by the Japanese in consumer products have
developed to the point where optical drives are manufactured at reasonable costs. Many companies like Hitachi, Sony, Ricoh, and
MaxOptix do a brisk business selling fast, reliable, low cost optical drJlves. I feel that the cOlnpelling advantage behind optical media is
removability. Cartridge hard drives and hard drives with removable
HDA's are not as large or convenient as optical media. The market for
erasable optical drives VlTill continue to grow, but hard drives will
remain the best choice for non-removable applications.

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BASIC DRIVE OPERATION

ll disk drives perform three basic functions. They spin, seek, and
transfer data. The disks inside a hard drive are mounted and rotated by a motor normally located in the center of the disks called the
spindle motor. The read/write heads are held and moved in a head carriage that lLlsually also holds the preamplifier electronics. Disks and
heads are stacked vertically on the spindle motor, and the head stack
assembly is positioned on-track by a servo system.
Raw read data flows from the preamplifier and is encoded and
decoded by the drive electronics. The heads read and write this
"encoded" data to the disks (media). Data encoding and decoding circuitry is designed to pack as much information as possible into the
snlallest area. Read/write circuits move the encoded data to and from
the magnetic recording heads. When writing, the heads convert the
electric currents fro:m read/write circuits into highly concentrated
magnetic fields. These magnetic fields are stort::d in miniature magnetic groups called "domains" on the surface of the disk. When reading, the magnetic domains stored on the media are converted into
electric currents as the h(~ads pass by a second time, operating in
reverse to :read data. The heads convert the changing magnetic fields
from the diisk into el<~ctric currents as the read data is recovered.
The sections below describe the operation and purpose of the
basic components of a disk drive: the spindle motor, head carriage, the
servo system, heads and media, and the data encoding circuitry.

A

Spindle Molo,rs
The motor used to rota.te the disks in a drive is called a spindle
motor. Disk drives use many different types of spindle motors. The
type used determines the spin-up time of the disk and torque as well
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Spindle motor used in
high-capacity Maxtor
drives

as the heat dissipation inside the drive. A motor with a high start-up
torque is necessary since the extremely flat heads and disks used in
modern drives tend to stick together when power is removed and the
heads land on the disk. At the same time, the spindle motor must operate efficiently with a minimum power consumption. Heat dissipated
inside a disk drive causes the mechanical parts in the actuator and
disk assembly to expand. Because modern, drives require extremely
precise mechanical alignment, it is essential that thermal expansion
caused by spindle motor power dissipation be kept to a mininlum.
Some early drive designs 'were plagued with stiction or heat problems
caused by inadequate spindle motors. Newer designs have resolved
these problems by providing
spindle motors with higher startup torques and lower power consumption. All modern drives use
microprocessor controlled spindle motor drive circuitry that
uses pulse width modulation to
minimize power consumption
once the drive reaches operating
speed.
In high capacity disk drives
the quality of the bearings used
in the spindle motor asse:mbly is becoming increasingly important. As
the concentric tracks in a drive are pushed closer and closer together
in an effort to gain higher storage capacities, spindle bearing "runout"
becomes a consideration. The smallest amount of wobble in a modern
disk assembly can throw a head assembly slightly off track, resulting in
reduced data integrity. Drive manufacturers have gone to great
lengths to find affordable spindle motor bearings that offer the lowest
amount of runout while still providing long life.
Early hard drives spun at 60 revolutions per second (3600 RPM)
because synchronous motors were used that locked to the 60 Hz AC
line frequency. Some neV\Ter designs now offer "fast spin" speeds of up
to 8000 RPM. At these higher spin speeds, improved spindle motor
bearing quality and balancing is essential. Faster response servo systems are also required to track data at higher spindle speeds.

Head Carriage
The mechanical engineer asked to design a modern head carriage
is faced with a difficult task: design a perfectly balanced mechanism to
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hold the heads firrnly and rigidly using existing bearing and actuator
technology.
And management
wants it for free! The head carriage
lnust have the lowest moving mass
possible, enabling it to be moved
hundreds of time a second.
The head carriage pictured uses
a linear actuator. The advantage of
this type of actuator is that the
heads always stay parallel to the
recording track. The disadvantages
are more complexity and moving
parts (higher cost) and higher mass
than a rotary actuator.
The head carriage to
the right is typical of a
modern rotary actuator.
This actuator system has
become standard in modern hard disk drives for
two main re~asons. Rotary
actuators are cheap and
reliable. Typically only
two ball bearings are
needed at the top and bottom of the actuator.

Head carriage with
linear actuator

Head carriage with
rotary actuator

Media and Heads
The ultimate linliting factors in the push for higher and higher data
densities in today's drives are the heads and media. Hard disk media
,~as originally manufactured by spin depositing iron oxide (rust) particles on lnachined aluminum disks. Modern disks are made of
annealed aluminunl that is sputtered and plated with magnetic coatings, then polished and coated with rugged lubricated coatings. Disk
media is classified by the amount of magnetic field in Oersteds (Oe)
required tOl produce enough magnetic dipole reversals in the disk
coating to be detected by a magnetic head. Earlier media was easily
magnetized using fields of 600 Oe or less. Newer high density media
requires fields of 1800 Oe or more to achieve sufficient magnetic pene:tration.
Head technologies have also evolved over the years. As head gaps
become snlaller, the size of the magnetic coils used must shrink
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5.25" Plated media

accordingly. New heads must handle higher write currents and be
more sensitive when reading.
Head gap sizes are constantly
shrinking. Due to this, the drive
industry is moving toward the thin
film and magneto-resistive heads
of the future and away from monolithic heads of yesterday. Head flying heights are now just a few millionths of an inch to enable efficient magnetic coupling with
miniscule gap widths.

Stepper Motor Servo Systems
Stepper motors are rotary actuators that: rapidly move in small discrete steps (usually .8 to 4 degrees per step). Stepper motors provide
a simple, reliable positioning system that is easy to use and inexpensive to manufacture. The stepper motor shaft is usually connected to
a small metal band that converts the rotary shaft motion into a linear
or rotary motion of the head carriage. Stepper motors are ideal positioners for floppy drives due to their low cost.
A low cost stepper nlotor servo system has two major disadvantages. The mass of the rotor in a stepper motor is generally high.
Using stepper motors as actuators in disk dtives produces low access
times because the heavy rotor inside the stepper motor must be
moved along with the head carriage.
The number of concentric tracks recorded per inch on a disk drive
is referred to as the "track density". The second disadvantage in a stepper motor servo system is a limitation on track density. High track densities are difficult to achieve with stepper motor servo systems
because most stepper motors move only in large discrete steps. The
electronics required to "fine tune" the position of a stepper fllotor
servo system are expensilve to manufacture. It is easier to adjust the
position of a voice coil and keep the heads on track than it is to fine
tune a stepper motor.
The future of stepper motors remains in low cost open-loop servo
system, like floppy disk drives. They have become yesterday's technology, and there's no reason to use them in hard disk drives today.

Voice Co;1 Servo Systems
It's hard to inlagine a lnechanism that can move to any position over
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an inch in less than 1/100th of a second and come to a complete stop within 0.000 I" of its target. Modern voice coil actuators are capable of doing
this over 1,000,000,000 times.
The voice coil servo system is
the key conlponent in all newer
high perfonnance disk drives. A
voice coil actuator is simply a
coil of copper wire attached
to the head carriage. This coil
is surrounded by high energy
permanent magnets that are
attached to the HDA base casting. To move the head carriage
and "seek" to a track, the control electronics apply a current to the
voice coil. The curf(~nt applied induces a magnetic field in the coil
that attracts or repels the stationary permanent magnets. The amount
of torque induced to move the head carriage is directly proportional
to the amount of current applied to the voice coil.
Many drives use an ASIC control chip in the voice coil servo system
that contains a D/A converter. The output of the D/A converter usually drives a MOSFET power amplifier that provides the current
required by the voice coil. The circuitry that moves the head from
track to track is simple compared to the circuitry that decodes the
servo information recorded on the drive. In order to control the voice
coil, the s{~rvo electronics must know precisely where the head is
positioned on the drive. The positioning information fed back to the
electronics to control the voice coil positioner is called "servo feedback" . Sev,eral different servo schemes are used to provide position
feedback informati.on to the drive electronics and "close" the servo
loop.
Some large capacity drives use a "dedicated" voice coil servo feedback systenll. When you see a drive in the drive table with an odd number of read/write heads, it probably uses a dedicated servo system. In
a dedicated system, the entire surface of one disk is reserved for use
by the servo system. Position information is recorded on the reserved
(dedicated) disk so that the drive electronics can determine the exact
position and velocity of the head carriage.
Assuming that the head carriage holds the entire head stack rigidly together, the position of the read/write heads will track along with
the dedicated servo head. A dedicated servo system offers fast positioning and is simple to design. One of the only disadvantages to this
system is that since only one head is used for servo, a dedicated servo
system has difficulty compensating for thermal warpage of the head
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stack assembly.

Voice Coil Servo

A more popular voice coil
servo feedback system is called an
"embedded" servo. An embedded
servo system works in a manner
similar to the dedicated system
except for the physical location of
the servo position information.
The embedded system interleaves
servo and data information by
placing servo positioning bursts
between the data recorded on the
disk. Embedded servo systems have advantages and disadvantages
over dedicated servo systems. Advantages of an embedded systetn
include the ability to accurately position each individual head by sensing the position information directly under that head. A dedicated
servo system positions all of the heads together. Disadvantages of an
embedded servo system are increased servo electronics complexity
(which translates to higher cost), and the requirement for seek and
settling delays when switching between heads.
Some drives employ a "hybrid" servo system that combines both a
dedicated servo for fast coarse positioning, and an embedded servo to
finely position the head on track. Hybrid servo systems offer the best
access and positioning of any system, but their cost is also the highest.
One disadvantage this system shares with dedicated servo systems is
that an entire surface is used for servo. This dedicated surface could
have been used to store lnore data.

Keeping it Clean
When a drive is running, Winchester heads "fly" or "float" on a cushion of air. There is virtually no wear on the disk surface when the drive
is running and the heads are stationary. Almost all the wear on a drive
occurs when the drive is turned off and the heads "land" and touch the
disk.
All modern voice coil servo drives use an electronic or mechanical
mechanism to move the heads away from th¢ data area of the disk to a
"landing zone" when power is removed. Better drives also use a me chanicallatch mechanism to park and lock the heads in the landing zone.
As the media wears in a drive, microscopic particles flake off frorn
the disk surface. A quality hard drive designed for long life contains a
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circulating air system that catches these particles in a filter.
Most disk drives have filtered vents that permit outside air to enter
and exit the HDA.
These vents help if a
pressure
differential
develops between the
HDA and the ambient
air. Some newer drive
designs
(notably
Conner and Maxtor drives) have eliminated
the outside air vents.

Drive Filter and Latch
Components

Dota Encotlin~g anti Decoding
Data encoding is the technique used to convert a stream of binary
data into a varying current that drives a magnetic head. The varying
current in the head produces magnetic flux reversals in the head.
These flux reversals orient the molecular magnetic dipole moments of
the media. The media is thus "magnetized" in a pattern that stores the
data. The magnetic head has a maximum frequency limitation that
deternlines how close the .magnetic flux reversals can be placed on
the disk while still maintaining acceptable reliability. There is also a
lninimum frequency limitation imposed by the drive electronics.
The difference between the minimum and lnaximum frequency
limitations is called the recording bandwidth. One goal in manufacturing disk drives is to provide the highest data recording rate possible.A hight::r data recording rate translates to higher capacity per track
and higher data transfer speeds. The magnetic recording bandwidth of
a drive is Bmited by several factors including head and media design
and positioning accuracy.
The goal in designing data encoding and decoding circuitry then
becomes one of placing the maximum amount of data bits within a
tlxed recording bandwidth while maintaining acceptable reliability.
Disk drive data encoder circuitry removes the need to place clock
information on the track by combining the data bits to be recorded
with as fevr clock signals as possible. The decoder circuitry regenerates the clock from the recorded signal and synchronizes the clock to
the decode:d data. The encoder and decoder circuitry in a drive are
usually cOfllbined into a chip called an "ENDEC".

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Encoding and Decoding Codes
The following encoding and decoding codes are used in disk drives:

NRI (Non-Return to lero)
This code was originally used in telecommunications and its
encoding and decoding are simple to understand. Inste~d of discrete
pulses for each data bit, the signal rises or falls only when a one (1) bit
in the incoming data stf(~am is followed by a zero (0) bit or when a
zero (0) bit is followed by a one (1) bit.
This coding techniqu(~ has a serious flaw because certain data patterns can be generated "rhich will result in a fixed logic state output
(Le. the output of the encoder will be static, stuck at zero or one). The
"worst-case" condition can violate the minimum recording bandwidth
of the drive electronics. In practice, this would rarely happen, but it"s
a serious strike against NRZ coding.

PE (Phase Encoded)
This coding is used in credit cards and instrument recorders. It is
reliable and also simple to understand. The direction of a flux reversal in the middle of each cell indicates whether the encoded bit is
either a zero or a one. This effectively shifts the phase of the output
signal each time there is an NRZ type transition between zeros and
ones.

FM (Frequency Modulati",,)
This coding technique was used in the earlier floppy drives
(including 8" drives). These older drives were called single density
"SD" drives. The FM method of encoding is basically equivalent to the
PE method. FM coding is no longer used in disk drives.

MFM (Modified Frequene)' Modulation}
MFM is by far the easiest modern coding technique to implenlent.
This encoding is used in all modern floppy drives and many small
capacity hard drives. MFM doubles the data capacity of FM encoding
without increasing the f(~cording bandwidth (MFM floppy drives are
called Double Density). It works by eliminating the clock pulses in FM
encoding and replacing them with data bits. Clock pulses are still used,
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but they an:~ written only when a one (1) data bit is not present in both
the precedilng and the curBIT
9 10
6
rent
data
cell.
POSITION 1 2 3 4
0 0 1
NRZ
To decode MFM data, a
MESSAGE
data separator must generDATA
ate a clock signal based on
CLOCK
several flux transitions. In
MFM
order to rnaintain a low
CODE
error rate, the spe(~d of
data flowing into the
encoder must remain
steady, and the decoder must lock onto this stream. In practice, the
rotational speed of hard and floppy drives is easily controlled within
the tolerances required for reliable MFM recording. An electronic
compensating circuit called a Phase Locked Loop (or PLL) is used to
lessen the teffects of spindle speed variations.

MFM Encodingz

RLL (Run Length Limited Encoding)
This entcoding scheme was first used in 14" drives from IBM, CDC,
and DEC. It is now used in almost all high capacity 3.5" and 5.25" hard
drives. COlnmon RLL coding techniques are RLL 1,7 and RLL 2,7. 1,7
and 2,7 refer to the maximum number of consecutive zeros in the
code. RLL 2,7 offers a 50% improvement in data transfer rate and data
recording density as compared with MFM within the same fixed
recording bandwidth.
The easilest way to understand RLL encoding is to examine the encoding tree below. Bits are encoded by following the tree, starting at the root.
When you reach the end of a branch, the stream of bits at that branch correspond to the encoded
data to be written to the
drive.
RLL encoding has two
main disadvantages. The
first is that RLL requires
significantly more complex encoding and decoding circuitry than :MFM.
This has be:en overco.me in
part by single ENDEC chips from companies like SSI,VTC and National
Semiconductor. The second disadvantage with RLL encoding is that a
sOlall defect can produce a long stream of data errors. To combat this,
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drive manufacturers are ilnproving the design of read/write heads and
media and lowering the flying height of these heads to improve signal
to noise ratios. Longer, improved error correcting codes and retry
algorithms are also used 'with RLL encoded drives.
Spindle motors are now driven by crystal controlled microprocessors to improve rotational speed accuracy. The quality of the heads,
media, and spindle control circuits used to manufacture today's hard
disk drives are more than adequate for reliable RLL encoding.
Future Codes

Many other coding and encoding techniques have been developed
that offer higher data rates and recording densities than RLL within
the same fixed recording bandwidth. All of these codes are more susceptible to timing jitter and large error bursts than RLL coding. At present, nearly all ESDI, SCSI, and IDE drives use RLL coding. We expect
that RLL will continue to be the most commonly used coding in magnetic mass storage devices for the nex~ few years. The recent advent
of PRML techniques to inlprove read channel performance is causing
a gradual shift away from RLL.

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INTERFACE STANDARDS

ith every new developing technology comes the problem of
standlardization. The data storage industry has been influenced
by standards from tnanufacturers and various groups including:

W

ANSI
American National Standards Institute
11 West 42nd Street, 13th Floor
New York, New York 10036-8002
(212)642-4900 (212)398-0023 Fax

NAB
National Association of Broadcasters
1771 North Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20036-2891
(202)429-5300 (202)429-5343 Fax

IBM
First in standards for drives and computers
IBM Personal Computer Division
Route 100
Somers, NY 10589
(800) 772-2227

IRCC
International Radio Consultive Committee

IRIG
Interrange Instrumentation Group

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Shugart Associates
Pioneer in floppy disk drives

Seagate Techjrrology
Pioneer in hard disk drives
Seagate Technology
920 Disc Drive
Scotts Valley, CA 95067

(408}438-6550 (408)4318-6356 Fax

Some of the popular standards that have evolved are listed below:

"IDE" or "ATA" Interlace
With the emergence of IBM compatible PCs as a hardware standard, drive manufacturers have integrated much of the IBM controller
hardware onto their disk drives. These drives are called "Intelligent
Drive Electronics" or "Integrated Drive Electronics" (IDE) drives. This
interface is often referred to as the "ATA" or "IBM Task File" compatible
interface. Drives with an older 8-bit IDE interface were originally
called "XT Interface" drives, while drives with a 16-bit interface are
often called "AT Interface" drives. By imbedding an AT controller card
into the drive, a significant manufacturing cost savings occurs. :Many
parts (including line drivers and even a microprocessor) can be eliminated.
Older "XT Interface" drives used a BIOS ROM on the paddleboard
and could not be interchanged with "AT Interface" drives. An XT
Interface controller and drive may be used in an AT class computer if
the CMOS is set to "no drive installed".
Conner Peripherals and Compaq Computer were among the first
companies to ship AT compatible IDE drives in volume. Since then,
acceptance of the IDE interface based on their original design has
grown.
Since the imbedded controller on an IDE drive is optimized to run
efficiently with the driv(~ it is attached to, IDE interface drives often
operate with improved performance over their comparable MFM or
RLL counterparts. Some sacrifices were made in MFM/RLL controller
and drive design to ensure compatibility with a large range of drives.
Imbedded controllers are usually faster due to optimization.
It is clear that IDE drives have rapidly replaced the original MFM
and RLL drives used in (~arly IBM-AT compatible applications. Since
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most new disk drives use zoned recording techniques to increase
drive capacilty, all of these drives must use imbedded controllers. The
only practical interface alternatives for imbedded controllers on small
disks are IDE or SCSI.
One disadvantage of the original IDE interface was the 528MB limitiation. This limitation has been overcome with the industry standard
"EIDE" or Enhanced IDE interface. See the Enhanced IDE chapter for
more inforrnation on how the EIDE interface will continue to be
improved in the future.
Another minor problem with the IDE interface is hardware incompatibility. Some IDE drives nlay be incompatible with each other. This
is generally due to different buffering or decoding. See the Enhanced
IDE Chapter for more infornlation on IDE drives.

51-506/S1-412 Interlace
Seagate Technology is the world's largest manufacturer of hard
drives. Their first ST506 five megabyte full-height 5.25" disk drive was
one of the first hard drives manufactured in volume. This drive used
a 5 Mbit/s(~cond MF]\1 encoded interface. The standard interface
copied fronl this drive was used in all "ST-506 compatible" MFM and
RLL drives.

MFM and RLL Encoding
Modified Frequency Modulation (MFM) encoding was first patented by Ampex Corporation in 1963. MFM encoding is often called" double density" and is used to code data on floppy and hard drives. MFM
is an attractive coding scheme mainly because it is simple to encode
and decode. MFM is now the standard coding technique for floppy
disk drives and some small capacity hard disk drives.
Run Length Lim.ited (RLL) encoding is a group coding technique
that provides an increase in data density over MFM encoding. In RLL
encoding, streams of data are grouped together and each group of data
produces a recording pattern that depends on the bits that came
before it. R1LL encoding eliminates high frequency flux transitions and
permits an increased data density within a fixed recording bandwidth.
The most common RLL coding (RLL 2,7) provides a 50% improvement in recording density over MFM coding. For example, a drive that
stores 1000MB of data at 5Mbit/sec MFM data rate can be made to
store 15001V1B of data using RLL encoding. The data transfer rate
increases by 50% using RLL 2,7, while the recording bandwidth stays
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the same.
Other RLL codings can provide even higher recording densities.
RLL 3,9 (commonly called ARRL) provides a 100% improvement in
recording density. Longer codes can provide even greater increases.
Because RLL coding does not require an increased read/write channel
bandwidth when compared to MFM encoding, RLL is now a popular
coding technique used to increase capacity in many hard disk drives.
Modern IDE and SCSI drives use RLL encoding. For a more detailed
description of how RLL data is coded and decoded, see the previous
chapter.
Since RLL encoding provides higher data density in the same
recording bandwidth, the data capture window is reduced. To accurately reproduce data in this smaller capture window, RLL encoding
requires an improved data separator, an accurate read channel, and
better PLL circuitry. Th(~ rotational speed of the disk drive must also
remain more constant. Simply put, there is less margin for error using
RLL encoding.

ESDI Interlace
The Enhanced Small Device Interface (ESDI) was basically an
improved, high speed ST-506 interface. This interface was pioneered
by Maxtor. The combination of a 34-pin control cable and a 20-pin
data cable from the ST-506 interface are retained, but the ESDI interface features improved actuator commands, and data transfer rates.
The ESDI interface uses a data separator located on the disk drive
itself. Older ST-506 designs used a data separator on the controller
card instead. Moving the data separator to the drive improved COlllpatibility and made the ESDI interface independent of data rate.
Providing the maximutrl data transfer rate of the controller is not
exceeded, any speed ESDI drive can be connected to any controller.
ESDI drives were manufactured with rates ~lP to 28 Mbits/sec.
ESDI is not particula:rly well suited to zoned recording, and is really only useful for fixed disks. ESDI was once a useful, fast interface for
hard disks, but SCSI has ,;von out in popUlarity. The attraction of being
able to daisy chain peripherals like CD-ROM and SCSI tape drives has
ultimately driven the industry away from ESDI and toward SCSI and
EIDE/ATAPI.
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SCSllnlerlacE'
The Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI) first became popular
as the interface used for Apple Macintosh peripherals. Actually, SCSI
has been used for quite some time in workstation applications and is
rapidly gaining popularity in the PC marketplace. SCSI offers the ability to daisy chain up to fift(~en devices (hard, optical, tape, etc.) to a
single controller with a single cable.
SCSI is basically a high-speed bidirectional 8-bit parallel interface
that has been standardized in terms of both hardware and software by
ANSI. The SCSI bus allows addition of up to 15 devices using a daisychained cable. Unfortunately though, most manufacturers of SCSI
peripherals adhere to the basic ANSI hardware specifications; while
the level of SCSI software compatibility varies from manufacturer to
nlanufacturer. A newer ANSI standard, SCSI-II was announced in an
attempt to standardize the SCSI software interface. The ANSI SCSI-II
specification added features like disconnect/reconnect, and messaging while m.aintaining downward compatibility with SCSI-I devices. A
recent copy of the SCSI specification may be obtained from ANSI or at
www.corpsys.com. The SCSI-III specification is now under developlllent.
Good termination and shielding allow a "single wide" SCSI bus to
operate at speeds in excess of 10MB/sec. Since most existing SCSI
peripherals only sustain data rates of around 4-5MB/sec, the SCSI interface has the data bandwidth to handle higher speed drives in the
future.
The ne",' SCSI-II standards for Wide SCSI and Fast SCSI offer a wider
bus and sustained transfer rates up to 40MB/sec. These new versions
of SCSI offer more than adequate throughput for any storage device
that might appear in the near future.
The SCSI interface offers the flexibility and room for future expansion, but brings with it all the problems of a developing technology.

WIDE SCSI
Currently, the terms "wide SCSI" and "double wide SCSI" are used to
refer to a SCSI interface with a 16 bit wide data path. This interface
uses a 68 pin connector, and the electrical handshaking and data transfer system is identical to the more common 8 bit "single wide" SCSI
bus. The ANSI SCSI specification provides a method for negotiating
·with peripherals to determine if they offer "wide SCSI" capabilities.
Theoreticallly, the wide SCSI bus is downward compatible with standard "single wide" SCSI devices.
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FAST SCSI
"FAST SCSI" refers to a SCSI handshaking system that reduces hardware overhead during data transfers. Peripherals that support this feature will transfer data at higher burst rates if they are connected to a
controller that also supports FAST SCSI. If either the peripheral or the
controller does not support FAST SCSI, the burst data transfer rate is
unaffected.

Ultra SCSI
The "Ultra SCSI" industry standard is an attempt to accelerate SCSI
peripherals by changing SCSI timing and handshake specifications. To
keep up with the more critical and noise sensitive requirements of Ultra
SCSI, cable lengths must be reduced and termination becomes more
critical. In most systems, Wide SCSI provides a more practical performance boost than Ultra :SCSI.

SMD Interface
The Storage Module Device (SMD) interface is the most popular
interface for the 8" drives used in mainframe, minicomputer,and 'workstation applications. Variations include an i.mproved data transfer rate
(HSMD). SMD drives are gradually being replaced by SCSI in most
applications. Bridge controllers are now available to adapt newer
ESDI and SCSI drives to the SMD interface.

IPI Interface
The Intelligent Peripheral Interface (lP!) is a mainframe disk drive
interface standard used mainly on 8" and 14" drives. It is popular in
IBM and Sun workstation and minicomputer applications. Many drives are available with dual IPI ports.

QIC-02 Interface
This QIC-02 interfac(~ is a software standard for tape drives. Most
PC based 1/4" tape controllers use a QIC-02 command set.

QIC-40 Interface
This interface uses an standard floppy controller to store data on
minicartridge data tapes. Although they are relatively slow, these dri24 Hard Drive Bible

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ves are popular in PC applications due to their low cost. Drives are
now available with up to 400MB (800MB compressed) capacities and
data transfer rates up to 2Mbit/sec.

QIC-36 Interf~rce
This novv obsolete 50-pin tape drive interface standard was pioneered by companies like Wangtec and Archive. The pinout is listed in
the Pinout Section. If you run across a QIC-36 drive, you'll need a controller card which is QIC-02 software compatible to make it work.

SA-400 Interlace
As with Seagate and the ST-506 Interface, the SA-400 interface is
named after the originator of the first mass produced floppy disk
drive. Shugart Associates manufactured the SA-400 in 1978 and it was
the first disk drive to gain wide acceptance. The interface used a simple 34-pin cable with the 17 odd numbered pins connected to ground
for noise reduction and shielding.
This 34-pin interface was modified to create the ST-506 hard disk
drive interface discussed earlier in this section. The pinout of the
interface used in modern floppy disk drives is shown in the Pinout
Section. Although additional functions have been added since the
original SA··400 drive (mainly DISK_CHANGE, SPEED_SELECT, and
DRIVE_READY), this pinout is still affectionately referred to as the SA400 interface.

future Standards
Currently the most popular disk drive interface for small capacity
hard drives is the EIDE (or ATAPI) standard. In the immediate future,
the PC market will continue to be dominated by IDE drives.
The most popular interface for high performance, large capacity
drives in now SCSI. As SCSI software standards evolve, and the costs
of SCSI drives and controllers drop, much of the EIDE market will be
displaced by SCSI.
In workstations and high-end PC applications, it seems clear that
SCSI is the interface of the future. For example, all of the popular optical and DAT drives us(~ the SCSI interface. We look forward to the time
'when small computer peripheral interfacing is simplified as manufacturers all be:gin to conform to the new SCSI-III and future SCSI-IV standards.
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PRML TECHNOLOGY

PRML Techno/rogy
RML is an acronym for Partial Response Maximum Likelyhood.
PRML is a new solution to an old problem. Since disk drives were
first designed, there has been a push to pack the largest amount of
data possible into the smallest possible disk area. To understand
PRML, first look at the problem PRML is designed to overcome.
As data is packed closer and closer on the magnetic media, the
recorded bits tend to blur together. The blurring is mainly caused by
"bit shift" and by the unavoidable introduction of noise in the read
channel.
PRML re:ad channels differ from conventional analog read channels
in the way they detect and separate recorded data. Analog read channels typically look at the position of the recorded peaks and use only
the peak position information to recover the recorded data. PRML
channels digitize the height of each peak and compare it to an average peak value. Once the PRML read channel has extablished values
for the size and shape of the peak, it adds this information to the values of peaks which are read subsequently. The PRML circuit looks at
the combination of the bit read and the subsequent bits, and then
decides which interpretation of bits will produce the least amount of
errors. If a weak or slightly shifted bit is detected (using an error
checking code), the PRML read channel can determine what the weak
bit should have been by analyzing it in combination with its neighboring bits.
The net effect is that bits can be placed closer together on the
magnetic f(~cording media. This means increased disk capacities without significantly increased costs.
So how soon will PRML technology actually affect the performance

P

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of available hard drives? Sooner than you might expect. Mid range drives will be the first to take advantage of the new technology. Cirrus
Logic and VTC are currently shipping silicon that fully implelnents
PRML. IBM, Quantum and others have PRML drives in production. The
current bottleneck seems to be data rate. Analog read channels are still
much faster than their
WEAl BI T PRML SIMPLIFIEi:J
available PRML counterRECOVEIED DATA 0 1 0 . 0
parts. When this gap
closes, expect PRML to
add 30% to 50% more to
BITSAA:
PFI¥IL CIIIRECTS
ANALYZED
WEAK BI TS AND
existing disk drive
IF ?Bii\i"il ru; ?liiT~S
IN GJIlUPS
"BITSHIFT'
OtE
II
ZERO
"0 ERRORS
5 ERRORS
capaCities!

7

PRML Encoding

OCCIIIi

PFI¥IL
CIIIRECTED
DATA

28 Hard Drive Bible

01~1IIi

REPAIIED 81 T

~~

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ENHANCED IDE

T

he Enhanced IDE standard originally proposed by Western Digital
provides a solution to IDE's three biggest problems: capacity, performance, and expandability. The original IDE drives developed by
Conner and Compaq were designed to be compatible with IBM's early
MFM controller card used in the original IBM AT's. When this "register
level" compatibility was copied, some limitations went along with it.
The original IDE interface had a total drive capacity limitation of
528MB. This constraint came from the original IBM MFM controller
design that supported a maximum of 1024 cylinders, 16 heads, and 63
sectors per track. The original MFM controller used 10 bits to address
the cylinder count, 4 bits to select the head, and 6 bits to select the
sector number (that started with #1). This means that all existing PC
applications which write directly to the IBM compatible disk controller registers have a total of 20 bits available to control the logical
block address of an IDE disk drive. Since a sector number of zero is
disallowed lin the IDE interface, a total of 1,032,192 blocks can be
addressed. With a standard block size of 512 bytes per sector, original IDE was limited to a 528MB maximum capacity.

ORIGINAL (NON-ENHANCED) IDE LIMITATIONS
Heads - 16 MaximUlll (Numbered 0 through 15)
Sectors - 63 Maximum (Numbered 1 through 63)
------------------~

Cylinders .. 1024 Maximum (Numbered 0 through 1023)
Total Blocks - 1,032,192
Maximum Capacity - 528 MB with 512 byte sectors

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To bypass this limitatilon, the new Enhanced IDE standard uses a 28
bit logical block address which can address a total of 26,8435,456
blocks. This provides a nlaximum drive capacity of over 13 Gigabytes,
which is enough for the near future. A standard IBM compatible BIOS
has it's own capacity linllitations. BIOS is limited to 1024 cylinders,
256 heads, and 255 sectors per track. This results in a BIOS maximum
capacity of 8.4GB.

IBM AT COMPATIBLE BIOS HMITATIONS
Heads - 256 Maximum Cl\fumbered 0 though 255)
Sectors - 63 Maximum (N"umbered 1 through 63)
Cylinders - 1024 Maximum (Numbered 0 through 1023)
Total Blocks - 16,515,072
Maximum Capicity - 8.4GB with 512 byte sectors
Without a device driver, the maximum capacity of the proposed
enhanced IDE standard is 8.4GB. This is not currently an issue for hard
disks, but for larger capacity drives, like helical scan tape backup
units, it would be a limitation if other workarounds were not provided. One way to bypass this may be to switch to a larger block size for
these larger devices, such as the 2048 byte per sector block size used
in CD-ROM drives. Another is through the ATAPI system described
below.
The original IDE standard was also limited in terms of performance. This was mainly due to the speed of 16 bit programmed (PIO)
data transfers. SCSI host adapters can transfer data faster than IDE by
using bus mastering processes programmed memory moves, or Direct
Memory Access. IDE drives must wait for the CPU to move data, two
bytes at a time. An instruction execution and an I/O cycle are required
as each pair of bytes to be moved from the IDE registers into main
memory. This PIO process is significantly slower than other methods.
When the original MFM: drives were introduced, these slower data
rates were adequate, but with higher performance drives they are a
serious bottleneck.
The original IDE interface supports a maximum of two drives.
Removable drives, Optical drives, Tape Drives, and CD-ROM drivles
were not provided for in the original IBM AT. Western Digital's proposed solution to this in Enhanced IDE is called ATAPI. ATAPI stands
for ATA Packet Interface, and its design is suspiciously similar to SCSI.
30 Hard Drive Bible

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In fact, ATAPI appears to have been copied from SCSI so that existing
rnanufactun:rs of SCSI drives could easily convert their drives to run
on Enhanced IDE systems. ATAPI provides support for tape, optical,
and CD-ROM drives through a packet messaging system.
Enhanced IDE hard drives are now available from several manufacturers in capacities over 2GB. ATAPI CD-ROM drives have become low
cost, standard units.

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Hard Drive Bible 31

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32 Hard Drive Bible

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Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

SCSI COMMAND REFERENCE

hen 'wre asked esc customers what they wanted added to the
Sixth Edition Hard Drive Bible, the answer was unanimous. You
asked for a complete SCSI command set specification. Although
printing the entire ANSI specification is beyond the scope of this
book, this chapter details the most common SCSI commands and their
command blocks.
The following commands are supported by nearly all SCSI drives:

W

COMMAND
FORMAT UNIT
INQUIRY
MODE SELECT
MODE SENSE
READ
READ CAPACITY
READ EXTENDED
READ LONG
REASSIGN BLOCKS
RELEASE
REQUEST SENSE
REZERO UNIT
SEEK
SEEK EXTENDED
START DIAGNOSTICS
START/STOP UNIT
TEST UNIT READY
VERIFY
WRITE
WRITE EXTENDED
WRITE LONG
© CSC 1996

OP CODE (HEX)
04
12
15
lA
08*
25
28*
3E*
07
17
03
01
OB
2B
ID
IB
00
2F
OA*
2A*
3F*

Note:
99% of the active time
on the SCSI bus is
spent executing these
commands. Most average systems execute 8
or more read commands for each write
command.
Hard Drive Bible 33

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743-8787

Format Unit - Op Coele 04H
The FORMAT UNIT command ensures that the media is form.atted
so that all initiator addressable data blocks can be addressed. The
';
medium is certified BIT
6
4
2
1
0
7
3
BYTE
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
and control struc0
Operation Code 04 H
tures are created for
1
LUN
I FmtDat I CmpLst I Defect List Format
the management of
2
Reserved
the medium and
Interleave (MSB)
3
defects.
Interleave (LSB)
4
Note that sucVU
Reserved
5
I
I Flag I Link
cessful completion
of a FORMAT UNIT comrnand does not necessarily mean that data has
been erased.

Inquiry - Op Coele 12H
The INQUIRY command requests that information regarding para6
4
7
2
1
o
5
meters of the target BIT
3
BYTE
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
to be sent to the ini0
Operation Code 12I-I
tiator.

I

LUN

1

Reserved

2

Reserved

3

Reserved

4

Allocation Length

5

I

VU

l

Reserved

I

Flag

Link

Moele Select - Op Coele 15H
The MODE SELECT command provides a means for the initiator to
change the drive's BIT
6
7
4
2
1
0
5
3
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
operating parame- BYTE
0
Operation Code I5H
ters.
Reserved

2

Reserved

3

Reserved

4

Parameter List Length

';

34 Hard Drive Bible

I

LUN

1

VU

I

Reserved

I

Flag

©

I

SP

I

Link

esc

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1996

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Mode Sense· Op Code lAH
The MCIDE SENSE comlnand provides a means for the drive to
report its medium
BIT---I6
1
0
2
5
BYTE
I
I
I I~3 I
or peripheral to the
0
Operation Code lAH
initiator. This com1
LUN
Reserved
mand is a complePage Code
2
PCF
I
mentary command to
Reserved
the MODE SELECT
Allocation Length
4
command.
--- I---

I

3
5

---'-----

I

VU

I

Reserved

Flag

I

Link

Read· Op Code OBH
The READ command requests that the drive transfer data to the initiator.
Bit/Byte Definition:
Logical Block Address - Specifies the logical block where the read
operation ~rill begin.
Transfer Length
BIT
6
0
7
2
1
5
3
BYTE
I
I
I
I
I
I
- Specifies the num0
Operation Code 08H
ber of contiguous
1
I.UN
Logical Block Address (MSB)
logical blocks of
Logical Block Address
2
data to transfer. A
Logical Block Address (LSB)
3
transfer length of
Transfer Length
zero indicates that
--Reserved
VU
Flag
Link
5
I
I
I
256 logical blocks
will be transferred. Any other value indicates the number of logical
blocks that will be transferred.

I4

I

4 f.--

_ _ _ L--_

---r-~
BIT
7
6

BYTp_l--.
0

I

I~3 I

5

I

1

0

Read Capacity
·Op Code 25H

Operation Code 25H
LUN

1

I

I RelAdr

Reserved

Logical Block Address (MSB)

2

3

Logical Block Address
Logical Block Address

4

Logical Block Address (LSB)

5
6

Reserved

---f.-_-=r=
7

8

VU

9

VU

---'-----© CSC 1996

2

Reserved
Reserved
Reserved

The
READ
CAPACI1Y command
provides a means for
the initiator to request
information regarding
the capacity of the
drive.

PM!

I

Flag

Link

Hard Drive Bible 35

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

for this purpose
The initiator transfers a defect list that contains the logical block
addresses to be reassigned. The drive will reassign the physical media
used for each logical block address in the list. The data contained in
the logical blocks specified in the defect list may be altered, but the
data in all other logical blocks on the medium will be preserved.
Specif:v-ing a logical block to be reassigned that was previously
reassigned
will
BIT
6
4
2
1
0
5
3
!!.YTE
I
I
I
I
I
I
cause that block to
o
Operation Code 07H
be
reassigned
LUN
Reserved
]
again. Thus, over
Reserved
the life of the mediReserved
. um, a logical block
4
Reserved
can be assigned to a
Vl J
Reserved
Flag
Link
I
I
I
multiple physical
addresses until no more spare locations remain.

Reassign Blocks Delect List
The REASSIGN BLOCKS defect list contains a four byte header followed by one or lllore defect descriptors. The length of each defect
descriptor is four bytes.
Defect List Length - Specifies the total length in bytes of the defect
descriptors that follow. The defect list length is equal to four times the
-----------::R:EASSIGN BLOCKS
number of defect
Defect List
descriptors.
BYTE
Defect List Header
Reserved
o
The
defect
Reserved
descriptor specifies
Defect List Length (MSB)
the four byte defect
--_ _ _Defect List Length (LSB)
logical
block
address that contains the defect. The defect descriptors must be in
ascending order.
DEFECT DESCRIPTOR(S)
If the drive has
BYTE
insufficient capaciDefect Logical Block Address (MSB)
ty to reassign all of
Defect Logical Block Address
-----the defective logiDefect Logical Block Address
-----cal blocks, the comDefect Logical Block Address (LSB)
mand will terminate with a CHECK CONDITION status and the sense key set to MEDIUM ERROR. The logical block address of the first logical block not
reassigned will be returned in the information bytes of the sense data.
~)

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Corporate Systems Center (408) 743-8787

Release - Op Code 17H
The RELEASE command is used to release a previously reserved
drive. It is not an error for an initiator to attempt to release a reservation that is not currently active.
BIT

7

BYTE

I

6

I

5

I

4

I

3

I

2

1

I

0

I

Operation Code 17H

0

I

LUN

1

3rd Pty

I

Third Party Device ID

I

Extent

Reservation Identification

2
3

Reserved

4

Reserved

5

I

VU

I

Reserved

Flag

1

Link

Request Sense - Op Code 03H
The REQUEST SENSE command requests that the target transfer
sense data to the initiator.
The sense data is valid for a CHECK CONDITION status returned
on a prior command. The sense data is preserved by the drive for the
initiator receiving the CHECK CONDITION status until a REQUEST
SENSE command or any other is issued to the drive. Sense data is
cleared upon receipt of any subsequent command to the drive from
the initiator receiving the CHECK CONDITION.
The REQUEST SENSE command will return the CHECK CONDITION status only to report fatal errors for this command. For example.
* The target receives a non-zero reserved bit in the command
descriptor block.
* An unrecovered parity error occurs on the data bus.
* A target malfunction prevents the return of sense data.
BIT
BYTE

7

I

6

I

0

I

4

I

3

I

LUN

2

I

1

I

0

Reserved

2

Reserved

3

Reserved

4

Allocation Length

';

I

Operation Code 03H

1

38 Hard Drive Bible

5

VU

1

Reserved

I

Flag

1

Link

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Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

Rezero Unit ,. Op Code 01 H
The REZERO UNIT command requests that the drive position the
actuator to cylinder zero.
BIT

I

6

7

BYTE

4

3

I

I

2

I

1

0

I

Opel'arion Code 01 II

0

I

LUN

Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved

vu

I

Reserved

Flag

I

Link

Seek - Op Code OBH
The SE1EK com:mand requests that the drive position itself to the
specified logical block.
6

BIT
,BYTE

I

I~3

5

o

2

I

1

I

0

I

Operation Code OB H

I

LUN

Logical Block Address (MSB)

Logical Block Address
Logical Block Address (LSB)

4

Reserved

vu

I

Reserved

I

Flag

I

Link

Seek Extended - Op Code 2BH
The SEEK EXTENDED command requests that the drive position
itself to the specified logical block.
BIT
BYTE

O__

~

6

I

5

I~_3

..l..---L_----'----O

~ ----,-LU-N------~·-at-io-n-CO-(-le-2,B-f-I---Re-s-erv-e-d
__

_____________ 1

Logical Block Address (MSB)

--------4

Logical Block Address
Logical Block Address

--~------,--------

Logical Block Address (LSB)

----6

Reserved

7

Reserved

8

Reserved

vu

© CSC 1996

Reserved

Link

Hard Drive Bible 39

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

Send Diagnostic - Op Code I DH
The SEND DIAGNOSTIC command requests that the drive perform
diagnostic tests on itself. There are no additional parameters for this
command.
BIT

6

7

I

BYTE

5

I

I

4

3

I

2

I

I

I

I

0

Operation Code IDH

0

I

I

LUN

I

Reserved

SlfTest

I Dev of I I Unit of I

Reserved

2

3

Parameter List Length (MSB)

4

Parameter List Length (LSB)

5

VU

I

I

Reserved

Flag

I

Link

Start/Stop Unit - Op Code ISH
The START/STOP UNIT command requests that the drive either
start the spin motor and position the read/write heads to cylinder
zero or stop the spin motor and position the read/write heads in the
landing zone.
BIT

BYTE

7

I

6

I

5

I

4

I

I

2

I

I

0

Operation Code IBH

0

T

LUN

1

Reserved

2

Reserved

3

Reserved

4

5

3

Immed

Reserved
VU

I

Start

Reserved

I

Flag

Link

Test Unit Ready - Op Code DOH
The TEST UNIT READY command provides a means to check if
the drive is ready. This is not a request for a self-test. If the drive will
accept a medium- BIT
6
4
7
5
2
I
0
3
I
I
I
I
access
command BYTE
Operation Code OOH
without returning a 0
I
LUN
Reserved
I
CONDICHECK
Reserved
TION status then 2
Reserved
3
this command will
Reserved
return a GOOD sta- 4
VU
Reserved
tus.
I
I Flag I Link

I

1 1

'j

40 Hard Drive Bible

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Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

Verify - Op Code 2FH
BIT

BYTE

~

6

I

]

5

4

1 1
3

1

I

0

I

Ope ration Code 2FH

0

]

LUN

1

LogicaI Block Address (MSB)

3

Log ical Block Address

4

Logical Block Address

5

Lo gic al Block Address (LSB)

6

Reserved

7

VerlfiIcation Length (MSB)

8

Veri fication Length (LSB)

- - t---

I

vu

I BytChk I

Reserved

2

9
--'----

2

I

Reserved

Flag

I

RelAdr

The
VERIFY
command requests
that the drive verify
the data on the
medium.

Link

Write - Op ('ode OAH
,~YrE=--+-71.
~

6

, ..
B:..:,I1.:.,:'

I 5]~3 I

o

2

I

1

I

0

The
WRITE
command requests
that the drive write
the data transferred
by the initiator to
the medium.

Operation Code OAH

]

LUN

Logical Block Address (MSB)

Logical Block Address
Logical Block Address (LSB)
Transfer Length

4

vu

I

Reserved

I

Flag

I

Link

Write Extencled - Op Code 2AH

o

Operation Code 2AH
-LU-N----]

Reserved

RelAdr

Logical Block Address (MSB)

-----

Logical BlockAddress
Logical Block Address
Logical Block Address (LSB)

I~--~-------------

Reserved

The
WRITE
EXTENDED command requests that
the drive write the
data transferred by
the initiator to the
medium.

Transfer Length (MSB)
Transfer Length (LSB)

vu

© CSC 1996

----'---

Reserved

Link

Hard Drive Bible 41

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

Write Long - Op Coele 3FH
The WRITE LONG command will transfer a sector of data and Eee
bytes to the drive. The bytes transferred to the drive are written in the
data field and the Eee bytes for the particular sector specified in the
logical block address. This command is intended for diagnostic purposes.
The nutuber of bytes transferred to the drive will be the sector size
plus the number of bytes contained in the Eee field.
BIT

BYTE

6

7

I

I

LUN

I

I

I

0

I

Reserved

I

2

Logical Block Address (MSB)

3

Logical Block Address

4

Logical Block Address

';

Logical Block Address (LSB)

6

Reserved

7

Reserved

8

Oln

9

I

2

3

I

Operation Code 3Fn

0

42 Hard Drive Bible

4

5

I

VU

I

Reserved

I

Flag

I

RelAdr

I

Link

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

WHAT IS SCSI-III?

SCSI Buzzwonls
he American National Standards Institute (abbreviated ANSI) organizes committees of industry representatives who work together and
form standards for computer interfaces. These standards are designed so
that peripheral products from different manufacturers will operate
together with little or no custom configuration.
The ultilmate goal of ANSI SCSI committees is the creation of true "plug
and play" interface standards. They want SCSI to support ALL of the drives in your system: HARD, CD-ROM, TAPE, OPTICAL and even printers!
They're making progress, but the standards are constantly changing.
Here's a brief explanation of the more popular terms:

T

SCSI-III
SCSI-III ils the popular name for the newest standard document that is
currently being completed by ANSI. The SCSI-III document will include
several new interface standards, including "fiber channel" which uses an
optical fiber to transmit data at increased speeds. You can download more
information and SCSI specifications from the CSC BBS at (408) 541-8455.
We will be adding the SCSI spec documents to our Web site at:
www.CORPSYS.COM soon.
The current SCSI-II standard document is the only SCSI document that
has been completed and accepted by the industry at the time of this writing. The SCSI-II specification includes the following connector standards
that are novv in widespread use throughout the hard disk drive industry.

FAST SCSI - How it all started
The original SCSI-I standard dates back to 1986. ANSI named the
specification "ANSI X3. 31-1986", and a standard was born. The first
SCSI products transferred data at rates from 1.5 to 5MB/sec over a stan©

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Hard Drive Bible 43

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

dard 50 pin connector. As more devices began to share the bus, and as
hard disk performance increased, the 5MB/sec maximum transfer specification became a bottleneck. "Fast SCSI" came to the rescue. Timing specifications were adjusted as synchronous transfers were added so that 10
MB/sec could be transferred over the 8 bit interface.

Narrow SCSI
The term "Narrow SCSI" is now used to refer to SCSI devices that
transfer data over a "narrow" 8 bit 50 pin connector up to 10MB/sec. Most
currently manufactured SCSI-II devices support "fast SCSI" and transfer
data up to 10 MB/sec. Several manufacturers are working on variations of
narrow SCSI that increase transfer rates over 10 MB/sec. One proposed
standard is "Ultra SCSI", which uses the 50 pin narrow SCSI interface but
makes changes to timing and handshaking to increase burst transfer performance up to 20MB/sec. For "Ultra SCSI" to work, both the controller
and drive must fully support the faster timing and handshaking. "Ultra
SCSI" drives are more susceptible to termination and noise problems, and
require shorter cables than standard 10 MB/sec SCSI-II drives.

WIDE SCSI
The term "SCSI-III" is often used to refer to WIDE SCSI. This isn't exactly correct. WIDE SCSI is the correct name of the popular 16-bit wide
interface that doubles data transfer rates to 20MB/sec. Wide SCSI drives
use 68 pin and separate power connectors. Wide SCSI provides a reliable
performance boost for workstations and file servers. The difference
between narrow (50 pin) and wide (68 pin) SCSI performance is particularly noticeable when using multitasking operating systems like Novell or
Windows NT. Proposed standards exist to increase the transfer rates up
to 40MB/sec using a 32-bit cable. Wide SCSI drives are reliable and robust.
The only disadvantage to using WIDE is the added bulk and expense of
the cables.

SCA
Another popular SCSI drive interface is "SCA" , which stands for Single
Connector Assembly. SCA connectors carry both the SCSI data and power
to the drive in a single connector. SCA is used in newer file servers, disk
arrays, and workstations. 80 pin, 16 bit Wide SCSI is the most common
SCA, but narrow connectors are also available. SCA connectors are
rugged and designed for "hot plug" operation.

44 Hard Drive Bible

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Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

Fiber Channel' - The future of SCSI?
Fiber channel is an optical interface proposed but not finalized in the
new SCSI-III standard. Current fiber channel technology operates at 12.525MB/sec data transfer rates. Much higher transfer rates are possible as
the technology develops. Fiber channel cables are unaffected by termination, electrical noise, length, and other limitations that make conventional SCSI cabling difficult.
Both Sun Microsystems and Silicon Graphics use fiber channel interfaces to their disk arrays. In early 1996, list prices for fiber channel disk
arrays started around $16,000. Inside the disk arrays, standard SCA or
Wide SCSI cables are used to interface with the drives. Disk drives with
optical fib(~r interfacc~s have not yet become affordable or available in
quantity. Fiber channel will certainly have an effect on the SCSI industry,
but it will be years before it's in widespread use.
Another potential alternative is Apple Computer's proposed "Fire
Wire" standard. "Fire Wire" offers fiber channel data transfer rates over
lower cost, easy to connect 6 pin cables. Time will tell if Apple's idea will
catch on.

Note:
1MB/sec = 8-10
Mbit/sec

Downward Compatibility?
Can SCSI-II and SCSI-III devices share the same controller? How about
narrow and wide drives? The answer is yes - sometimes. To properly
share narrow and wide drives on a PC, you'll want a controller card that
has both connectors - narrow 50 pin and wide 68 pin.
If you'rc~ using a workstation with a 68 pin wide connector, you'll need
a 50 pin to 68 pin adaptor cable to use both wide and narrow drives
simultaneolLlsly. Adapter cables can cause termination problems for reasons that we won't discuss here. Use them only as a last resort.
The ideal solution is a controller with three connectors (2 wide and
one narro"r) and automatic termination. CSC manufactures a three connector PCI card that's supported by Win '95 and NT.

What SCSIII.Jvor should I buy?
All standards are subject to change until the industry approves and
accepts them. Whatever you choose, make sure it's upgradable for future
expansion. A card with FLASH ROM or removable EPROM like CSC's PCI
cards will let you add software features as SCSI standards advance.
For file servers and workstations, your best performance choice today
is Wide SCSI. In the PC environment, we recommend SCSI over IDE for
performance, fleXibility, and the ability to add high performance peripherals.
©

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Hard Drive Bible 45

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46 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743-8787

seA HOT PLUG

echnically, SCA isn't a separate interface. It's really just another
way to use SCSI. SCA stands for "Single Connector Assembly", and
seA drives use a single 8 pin connector which carries both power and
data. SCA 'was originally desinged for use in disk arrays, but it's finding
its way into workstations and high end PC environments.
SCA drives are often mounted
in a carriel" which permits them to be
easily removed for service, replacement, or to exchange data. Military
and Governnlent institutions with
strong data security requirements like
the removability of SCA. Since hard
drives are relatively fragile devices, we
don't recommend you remove your
drive for transport in your briefcase.
But if you're running a mission critical network system, SCA provides
great serviceability along with Wide SCSI performance.
Since an SCA drive includes everything a SCSI drive contains,
simple adapters are available to connect thes drives to either Narrow
orWide systems. A SeA adaptor from
CSC is pictured to the right.

T

SCA drive in carrier
(as used in SUN
workstations)

SCA Adapter (available
from CSC)

©

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1996

Hard Drive Bible 47

Corporate Systems Center (408) 143·8787

48 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

PCIINTERFACE

he PCI bus has rapidly overtaken older industry standards like
EISA, and VESA. PCI uses a solid hardware and sofware specification to ensure compatability with different cards and different CPU
chips. PCl stands for "Peripheral Computer Interface", and is used
with processors ranging from Intel's Pentium Pro to DEC's fast Alpha
Chip. Apple loves how it accelerates the Motorola Power PC processors.
PCI offers two main advantages. First, it's fast. Real fast. A true
133MB/sec transfer rate is realistic. This transfer feeds data faster than
most tnicroprocessors and memory systems can digest. There's no
disk drive that can sustain transfer rates anywhere near what the PCI
bus can handle.
The second advantage of PCI is "plug and play". PCI boards install
easily without setting jumpers or switches. Automatic configuration
of interrupts, merrlory and I/O address space are performed by the
host processor when the system first starts up. There's almost no
potential for an interrupt or address conflict.
PCI self configuration is made possible by a hardware resource
switching system that operates under software control. On power up,
the host processor first checks to see what hardware requirements
each adaptor card will hav(~. These requirements may include memory address space, l/C) address space, hardware interrupts, and even
DMA transfer capability. The processor then starts assigning resources
to each PCl slot. To be "PCI compatible", the adapter card and its driver software must support any address, interrupt, or I/O location that
is assigned to it. So the processor forces each card to take a "place in
Hne" by assigning hardware resources in sequence.

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Unfortunately, "Plug and Play" sometimes becomes "Plug and Pray" .
When a PCI card won't work in your system, you don't have any
options to reconfigure it. You might end up wishing your card had
switches and jumpers after all. Don't abandon hope. Most newer
motherboards (we like the Intel manufactured boards) have PCI configuration options in CMOS setup to help you. Try changing the "PCI
Bus Mastering" option for network or SCSI controller card problems.
Switch the PCI system interrupt number if your card works but the
software drivers won't load.

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CHOOSING A HARD DRIVE &
CONTROLLER

CHOOSING A HARD DRIVE AND CONTROLLER
ith so many different drives and controllers on the market,
where do you start? Begin with software requirements. Narrow
your choic(~s by eliminating drive interfaces or controllers that are not
compatible with your application. For example, an IDE drive might
not offer sufficient performance for your netw-ork software, or an
older rnachine might not be compatible with Enhanced IDE. In general PC applications, IDE drives are the most conlpatible since nearly
all operating syste:ms will run an IDE drive without additional software drivers.
In terms of performance and fleXibility, SCSI is always the best
choice. Unfortunately, almost all advanced operating systems like Win
95, OS/2 and Windows NT require software drivers for full performance and support of SCSI controllers. Determine the availability of
software drivers for your applications before choosing SCSI.
Conside:r future expandability and upgradability. SCSI controllers
offer the nlost flexibility and expandability in the long run. With a
SCSI controller, you can daisy-chain 7to 15 different devices, including
SCSI hard drives, CD-ROMs, erasable optical drives, DAT and other SCSI
peripherals from the same controller.
Most interfaces other than SCSI and IDE are now obsolete. Use
them only ilf you are upgrading an older system that already has them
installed. 1ESDI, RLL, and MFM drives are still available. They may not
be the fastest or most economical choice, but they may be a good
choice for upgrading an older system.
If you arle building a new IBM compatible system, you also have a choice
of motherboard bus/controller card configurations. The most popular
choices are ISA and PCI. Each bus has it advantages and limitations.

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ISA refers to the original 16-bit bus that IBM designed into the first
80286 based AT computers. The IBM ISA specifications strictly limited bus speed to 8MHZ and set firm rules about bus timing. Newer
clone motherboards violate this specification and permit operation up
to 16MHz. The ISA bus design is capable of accommodating most hard
drives and I/O cards without a bottleneck. Its main limitation is video.
With the advent of programs like Microsoft Windows, large amounts of
data must be transferred quickly to the video card as windows are
opened, closed, and scrolled. The original AT bus lacks the band width
for acceptable video performance.
To solve the AT-Bus performance problem, a committee called the
Video Electronics Standards Association was formed. The VESA local
bus standard was established to improve video performance while
maintaining conlpatibility with ISA bus peripherals. VESA bus motherboards have two or three local bus slots that are connected directly
to the 32 bit bus of the Intel compatible CPU chips. This permits up
to three VESA peripherals to operate at any speed up to the full speed
of the processor. The main problem with the VESA bus design is bus
loading. As VL-bus speed is increased (VESA bus speed is linked directly to processor speed), the number of adapter cards that can be used
decreases. For example, lll0St 50MHz VESA motherboards will support
only one or (maybe) two cards. Due to these limitiations, the VESA VLBUS standard has lost popularity and is now found only in older systems.
A new standard, the Peripheral Connection Interface (or PCI) bus
has now taken front stage. The PCI bus offers high performance (up
to 133MB/sec in burst mode) and easy installation. PCI doesn't suffer
from a limited number of supported slots as VESA does. PCI boards
are also auto configuring (an advantage over VESA and ISA). As more
PCI peripherals become available and prices drop, the price/performance ratio of PCI will make it the only practical bus for SCSI drive
interface cards. Insist on both PCI and ISA if you are building up a new
system.
Once you've selected a motherboard, it's time to make sure the
controller board is really compatible. The EISA bus is so strictly
defined that we have seen very few compatibility issues arise. ISA
compatibility problems usually occur only when the bus speed is
increased over 10MHz or the bus timing is irregular. The VESA bus is
famous for conlpatibility problems between video and controller
cards. PCI cards are generally all compatible, but inserting one low
performance PCI card in your system will lower the performance of
all the other cards.

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With standard IDE controllers, bus speed is normally not an issue.
With fllemory or I/O mapped SCSI controllers, you will need an available interrupt and rsufficient address space in the base 640K memory
to support the footprint of the controller BIOS. ISA bus mastering
controllers of any type can be a nightmare. Bus on/off times and
refresh rele:ase rates often need to be adjusted to get things working.
With a negligible performance difference between bus mastering and
memory mapped controllers, you are best off steering clear of bus
mastering controllers. ISA bus mastering controllers may also have
compatibility problems or performance limitations in machines with
more than 16MB of memory.
Our ove:rall recommendations: A fast PCI SCSI controller for new
systems. Couple this controller with the largest SCSI drive you can
afford. If you are interested in a small capacity drive and controller, an
EIDE drive 'will offer the most for the money. Weigh your storage and
speed requirements. For Network server applications, go with the
fastest wide: SCSI drive you can afford. For workstations or light database applications, a larger capacity drive with a slower access time
and lower cost may be preferable. In notebook and portable applications insist on a drive with good shock tolerance. When selecting a
drive capacity, be sure to think to the future. It's better to start with
a large capacity drive now than to replace the entire drive in the near
future.
In sumtuary, for most low capacity applications we recommend a
small, inexpensive EIDE drive with an imbedded controller. For maxi:mum software compatibility in sizes below 2GB standard EIDE drives
are a good choice. For top performance and upward compatibility
with the ability to daisy-chain additional peripherals, choose a SCSI
drive and controller.

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CONTROLLER SETUP &JUMPERING'

n PC applications, controller jumpering is often the first step in
installing a new drive and controller. You will need the controller
board manual, to correctly jumper the controller, as well as documentation on the other boards installed in the system. Settings for
some comn[}on controllers are provided in the Controller Information
section of this manual.
You may need to jumper the controller board for one or more of
the following settings:

I

ISA Bus Base I/O Address
The baste I/O address of your controller can normally be left at the
factory default setting unless you are installing two controller boards
in the same system. If you are installing two boards, the first board
must be set at the prilmary I/O address, and the second board can use
any available I/O address. Be sure to check for conflicts with network boards, tape drive controllers, and video boards before selecting
your secondary address.
If you are installing an IDE disk drive, the primary port addresses
used are IFO-IF7H and 3F6-3F7H. At the time of this printing, MS-DOS
6.4 did not support the use of more than one IDE controller at an
alternate (slecondary) address. Windows '95 and IBM's OS/2, however, do support a secondary IDE controller.
If you are designing an I/O mapped controller card that must
coexist with an IDE or similar board, I recommend using a base
address of 180H or 320H. These areas are almost never used by other
peripherals.

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ISA Bus Base BIOS Address
NOTE:
Not all motherboard
BIOS ROMs will support controller card
BIOS addresses over
EOOOn If you experience problems, try
choosing a BIOS
address between
AOOO}/ and DFFFH

If your controller card has a ROM BIOS, you will need to select a
starting address. When selecting a starting BIOS address, add the starting address of the card and the length of the required I/O space. Make
sure that the address you select will not cause ROM address conflicts
with any other boards (particularly VGA and network boards). If you
are unsure of the length of the BIOS ROM on the controller, use
DEBUG to dump the third byte of the ROM. This corresponds to the
length of the BIOS in 512 byte blocks. Every system configuration is
different, but most IBM compatibles have room for a 16K or 32K BIOS
starting at C800H or DOOOH.

ISA Bus DMA Channel
Most controller cards do not use third party DMA. Exceptions to
this are some high performance SCSI and ESDI controllers. You can
share a DMA channel with another device only in the rare case that
your software and hardware support it. Make sure to set both DREQ
and DACK jumpers identically.

ISA Bus Controller Interrupt
Most controller boards do not use interrupts in DOS applications,
but a hardware interrupt is required for all Novell and most UNIX
applications. Select any available interrupt, but be sure to define it
correctly when running NETGEN. Interrupts 14 and 15 are generally
available on most PC's. IRQ 14 is normally used by the primary IDE
controller. Lower interrupt numbers have higher CPU priority.

Floppy Address
A secondary floppy address must be selected for two floppy controllers to peacefully coexist in the same system. OS/2 users will find
support for two floppy controllers built into the operating system. If
you are running DOS, you will not be able to use the second floppy
controller without a device driver installed in your CONFIG.SYS file.
If your floppy controller is compatible with the original IBM-XT architecture (copied in all clones from 8088's to PS's), you can use DOS
DRIVER.SYS to control your extended floppies.
DOS DRIVER.SYS parameters are listed below. Enter all necessary
parameters on the DEVICE = DRIVER.SYS line in your CONFIG.SYS
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file. For example, if you have one hard disk installed and wish to use
a 1.44MB floppy as your third (Le. D:) drive, add the following line to
your CONFIG.SYS:
DEVICE=DRIVER.SYS /F:7 /C
The following switches are supported by MS DOS 5.0:
/T:x

x = number of tracks

/C indicates that disk change is supported by the
drive
/F:x
x = drive form factor code
o = 360K
2 = 720K
1 = 1.2MB
7 = 1.44MB
9 = 2.88 MB
/H:x
x = number of heads
/S:xx = number of sectors per track
More detailed information on CONFIG.SYS can be found in your
DOS manual.
ControUer cards with well written BIOS codes (like the CSC
fastCache™ series) will operate extended floppy drives without software drivers. If you have one of these cards, modifications to your
CONFIG.SYS will not be needed in most cases.
2.88MB drives are now supported as primary (boot) drives by most
new motherboard BIOS ROM's, including AMI, and M.R. BIOS.

A Tip lor ISA Motherboards With "Extended Chipset" Setup
If you are using a motherboard based on the Chips & Technology
:3 chip LSI chips, the newer OPTI chips or other programmable
chipset, congratulations! The speed of your RAM and I/O channel can
be altered to increase overall system performance by "fine tuning"
your motherboard. You can select I/O clock speed and wait states by
running th{~ extended setup program that came with your motherboard and using the information in Table A. Be careful when setting
X/O channell wait states on these motherboards. It is easy to outrun
many controller boards by selecting SYSCLOCK/2 without wait states.
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Once your controller is jumpered correctly, proceed to CMOS setup
and then low-level format. See the following section that corresponds
to your drive type for set-up and low-level formatting instructions.
16-Bit Bus
Wait States

N

I/O Channel
Read/Write
Wait States

Over 8 MHz

1 wait state

2 wait states

8 MHz or less

o wait states

1 to 2 wait states

SYSCLOCK
Recommended C & T,
OPT!, Intel, and ETQ
Wait States.

NOTE:
SYSCLOCK is the CPU
clock frequency of your
motherboard. Use
extended setup to chose
betweembetween
SYSCLOC-E SYSCLOCK or
SYSCLOCK

3

4

5,6 etc.
to adjust your bus
clock frequency.
For example, a system
clock 0/50MHz and an
extended setting of'

Most Floppy Controllers will work at bus speeds up to about
10MHz. Many Hard Drive Controllers do not operate reliably much
over 10 MHz. These estimates include 2 wait states. Note that I/O
operations on the PC bus have one extra wait state when compared to
memory operations. This is why memory mapped cards generally
transfer data faster than I/O mapped cards.
Your C&T or OPTI motherboard extended setup may also permit
disabling the ISA bus REFRESH line. REFRESH is a signal necessary for
proper operation if your system contains any expansion cards that use
dynamic memory. Cards that require this signal include: EMS cards,
laser printer direct video boards, caching controller cards, and several
other peripherals. Disabling this line will improve bus throughput by
between 1% and 3%. Go ahead and disable it if you need this small
performance increase, but be warned of compatibility problems down
the road.

SYSCLOCK
5
will provide a bus
clock speed of
5.Q

5 = 10 MHz.

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DRIVE SETUP & JUMPERING

Typical IDE Dr,rve Installation

e

SC's technical support department is constantly asked: "What drive
parameters should I use to install my IDE drive?" All modern IDE drives use what is called "automatic translation". This translation helps the
drive to match itself to the parameters you choose. For example, a 80megabyte drive might have 6 heads, 17 sectors per track, and 1230 cylinders. This same drive could be installed using a CMOS configuration of 12
heads, 17 s(~ctors per track and 615 cylinders. Doubling the number of
heads and halving the number of cylinders has no effect on the formatted
capacity of the drive. The drive automatically translates the "logical parameter" of cylinder 0 head 6, sector 17 into the "physical" parameter of
cylinder 1, head 3, sector 17. In fact, for DOS to access the full capacity
of a drive, it should be set-up with a configuration of 1024 cylinders or
less.
The syst,em BIOS informs the imbedded drive controller of the CMOS
settings on power up, and the drive then mimics this logical configuration. This mLeans you can choose any parameters for an IDE drive as long
as the CMO~S settings do not: exceed the physical capacity of the drive.
There are also a few other practical limitations to the logical parameters
you choose. For reasons described in the next few chapters, the maximum number of cylinders you should use is 1024. The maximum number
of sectors per track is limited to 63, and the number of heads should not
exceed 64.
To select drive parameters for any IDE drive in the drive list, simply
choose a CMOS type with a formatted capacity less than or equal to the
drive you are using. If you are using a system with a "user definable" drive
type, enter the physical parameters of the drive from the drive list. If the
physical parameters exceed 1024 cylinders, double the number of heads
and halve the number of cylinders.
If you have a copy of CSC's IDSCAN software, ignore the drive tables
and just boot from floppy. Run IDSCAN and we'll take care of setting
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CMOS for you.
Some newer system board BIOS ROM's have ID Scan programs built
in! Selecting the correct CMOS configuration parameters may be as easy
as running the "automatic configuration" utility in your ROM BIOS setup
program!
Once you CMOS is set correctly, proceed to the DOS partitioning and
high-level format instructions in the following chapters. If you are using
the drive for Novell, a Compsurf may be necessary. Low-level formatting
is not required or recommended for any IDE drive.

IDE Drive Jumpering
Most IDE drives have one or more of the following jumpers:
HOST SLY/ACT, C/D, DSp, and ACT.
HSp, when jumpered, grounds the HOST/SLAVE/ACTIVE signal on the
IDE interface. This signals the system that a slave drive is present in a
two drive system. You need to add this jumper only if you have two
ID E drives installed.
C/D is also sometimes labeled DS and is the drive select jumper. This
jumper is set on the master (i.e. C:) drive and removed on the slave
(i.e. D:) drive.
DSP should only be jumpered on the first drive (i.e. C:) if
two IDE drives are installed in the same system. This
jumper tells the master (i.e. C:) drive that there is another
drive present on the IDE cable.
The ACT jumper connects the -ACTIVE signal to the -HOST SLY/ACT
signal on the interface. This signal is used to drive an external LED
that indicates drive activity. If the hard drive activity LED doesn't
work on your system, chances are you need to add an ACT jumper.

DSO or OS, Confusion
Drive select jumpers are often a source of confusion and frustration.
It seems that some manufacturers label their four drive-select jumpers
DSO, DSl, DS2, and DS3. Others label them DSl, DS2, DS3, and DS4. We
will use the more common convention DSO, DSl, DS2, and DS3 throughout this manual.

MFM, RLL, anti ESDI Drive Jumpering
If you are installing a single MFM, RLL, or ESDI drive in your system,
choose DSO if your jumpers start with DSO or choose DS 1 if your jumpers
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start with DS 1. These are actually the same jumpers, just numbered differently by the drive manufacturer. What you need in a single drive
MFM/RLL installation is the first available drive-select jumper.
If you are installing a second MFM or RLL drive in your system with a
twisted cable, choose DS 1 if your jumpers start with DSO or choose DS2
if your jumpers start with DS 1. What you really want in this case is the
second driv1e select jumper.
Always connect drive C: to the last connector (after the twist).
Connect D: to the middle connector (before the twi.st).
And you are installing:

If your drives have select
pins numbered:

} Drive with a
flat cable

2 Drives with a
twisted cable

2 Drives with a
flat cable

MFM, RLL, and ESDI
DSO to DS:,

Set C: to DSO

DSI to Ds4

Set C: to DS}

Set C: to DS}

Set C: to DSO

Set D: to DS}

Set D: to DS}

Set C: to DS2

Set C: to DS}

Set D: to DS2

Set D: to DS2

Drive Jumpering

SCSI Drive Jumpering
SCSI drive jumpering is an altogether different story. SCSI drives usually use thre:e jumpers for addressing. The eight possible on/off configurations of these jumpers represent eight SCSI addresses. Normally these
jumpers follow a straight-forward binary sequence with the lowest numbered jumper being the LSB. Check your drive manual or the Connector
Pinout section to be sure before jumpering your SCSI drive.
SCSI drives usually have a jumper that selects the source of terminator power. This jumper is important if your controller or system does not
supply terminator power. In this case, you will need to jumper the drive
so that terminator power is supplied from the drive.
Many SCSI drives also have a jumper for power up spin. This jumper
is changed to permit the system to control spin-up of the drive. Many
Seagate and Maxtor drives also have jumpers that permit spin up delays
based on th<~ SCSI ID jumper. Since each drive has a different SCSI ID, this
means that each drive will spin up at a different time. This option is provided because the power requirements are much higher during spin-up
than when the drive is running. Many disk arrays and large systems with
multiple drives are set up to take advantage of this option. Longer power
supply life is the result.
If you have an Adaptec™ controller, you will need to set your boot
drive to ID o. Your second drive should be set to ID 1. If you want to use
more than two drives under DOS, you will need to load ASPI4DOS.SYS
and ASPIDISK in your CONFIG.SYS file.ASPIDISK will also be necessary if
you are running any protected mode software. The driver installation
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process with these cards can become quite involved.
If you are using a CSC FastCache™, you will need to run FCSETUP
when you first install your hard drive or when you make any changes to
your SCSI hardware configuration. Once you have run the setup program,
NO DRIVERS will be necessary for running up to 7 SCSI hard drives under
DOS. Erasable optical drives can also be run without drivers. No changes
to your CONFIG.SYS are necessary, and you can set the card to boot from
any ID. Also, no drivers are needed for protected mode programs (like
Windows™ in 386 Enhanced Mode). Just add an exclude statement to
your memory manager so that the memory range of the FastCache is left
unchanged. Nice, huh?
Most other SCSI controllers such as the CSC PCI SCSI-III board will
scan the SCSI bus each time the system is powered up, adding support for
the extended drives at that time.

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DRIVE CABLING

IDE Drive Cab/ring
DE (Imbedded Drive Electronics) interface disk drives use a 40-pin
interface cable. This cable connects the drive logic board (with
imbedded controller) to a bus adapter card or to a motherboard IDE
connector. IDE adapters are usually called "paddle boards". The paddle board buffers (amplifies) the signals from the drive and provides
enough pO~Ter to drive the PC bus.
Cabling an IDE drive is simple. Connect a 40-pin flat cable from
the drive to the controller, being careful to observe pin 1 orientation.
If the drive supports it, a second IDE drive can usually be connected
to the same cable. To do so, jumper the boot drive in "master" mode,
and jumper the second drive as a "slave" as described in the Drive
Setup & ]UITLpering section. Since the IDE interface transfers data and
control signals at full bus speed, IDE cable lengths are critical. As a
rule of thufllb, try to avoid using a cable longer than 18" in any IDE
drive installation.

I

What Are The;se Twisted Cables?
Why do many drive installations use twisted cables? Simply
because IBlV[ used them in the first PC's. In an effort to simplify installation, IBM decided to jumper all of their hard and floppy drives on
the second drive select. This eliminated the need for technicians to
jumper the drives. The first floppy drive (A:) was connected to the
end of the cable (after the twist). The second floppy drive (B:) was
connected before the twist. The twist in the cable simply flipped the
first and second drive select lines so that all drives could be jumpered
identically.
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The floppy and hard drive cables in a standard AT look suspiciously similar. Be careful not to interchange them. A significant number of
installation problems are a result of interchanged hard and floppy
cables. Each cable has a different twist, and they are often not marked.
If you are using twisted cables, make sure the floppy drive cable has
seven conductors twisted. A twisted cable used with older MFM or
RLL hard drives must have only five conductors in the twist. See the
cable chart at the end of this section.

Single Drives (MFM, RLL or ESDI) Cables
Cabling a single drive MFM, RLL, or ESDI system is easy. Use a standard 20-pin flat data cable and a 34-pin control cable with no twist. A
word of caution: watch out for pin one. Pin one is identified by a red
stripe on one side of the cable. This side of the cable must be connected closest to pin one of both the drive and controller. Check the
controller card for a small number 1 or a square dot on the silk screen
near one edge of the connector. Pin 1 on the drive is nearest a notch
in the edge connector. Reversing the data cable can cause damage to
the drive, controller, or both. The differential line drivers on the drive
and controller are easily damaged by reversed cables. If you are not
sure which is pin 1, check the manual, don't try to guess!

Multi Drive MFM anel RLL Cabling
Three cables are required when installing two MFM or RLL drives
using one controller. Two flat 20-pin data cables and one twisted 34pin cable will be necessary. The 34-pin control cable should have only
the drive select and ground pins twisted (5 conductors twisted). Set
both drives to the second drive select position (this position is marked
DSI or DS2 as described in the Drive Setup & ]umpering section).
Terminate the control cable on the last drive only.

Termination
In MFM, RLL, and ESDI installations, terminating resistors for the
control signals should be installed only in the drive located at the
physical end of the control cable. Terminating resistors should be
installed at the end of every data cable in these installations. Since
most drives come from the factory with terminators installed, you will
need to remove terminators in a dual drive installation. See the SCSI
installation section for nlore information on SCSI termination.
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Multi Drive ESDI Cabling
Three cables are required when installing two ESDI drives using
one controller. Two flat 20··pin data cables and one flat 34-pin cable
with two drive connectors are necessary. Set the first ESDI drive
jumpers to drive select O. Set the second drive to drive select 1.
Terminate the control cable on the last drive only.
A flat cable is required for applications with 1llore than two ESDI
drives. If only two drives will be installed, ESDI drives may also be
cabled with a twisted 34-pin cable in a manner identical to MFM
cabling.
Although most ESDI controllers support only two drives, the ESDI
interface provides the ability to daisy-chain up to 8 drives. If you are
installing mlore than two ESDI drives, use a flat 34-pin cable and set
the select jumpers sequentially. A separate 20-pin data cable is
required for each drive.

SCSI Drive CGlbling
Internal SCSI drives are connected to the controller with a 50-pin
ribbon cable. Be extremely careful to observe the pin 1 location when
connecting cables to SCSI drives. Reversing SCSI cables on drives
often causes a loss of termination power which can result in marginal
data transfer or no transfer at all. Some external SCSI drives are connected to the controller with a 2S-pin D-type connector, others use a
50-pin Amphenol connector.
The SCSI bus must have a total of 2 terminators - no more and no
less. If you are using the controller with one internal hard disk, for
example, termination will be installed on the internal hard drive and
on the controller card. If you are installing one internal and one external drive, the terminators must be removed from the controller card
and installed on the internal and external drives. Check the manual
included with your SCSI drives and controller board for terminator
installation and renloval.
PIN 1

RED STRIPE

PIN 1

20-Pin Data Cable. 1
used for each MFM,

RLL or ESDI Hard
Drive.

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PIN 1

RED STRIPE

PIN 1

RED STRIPE

PIN 1

34-Pin Control Cable.
Used for single drive
MFM, RLL or ESDI
systems.

C:DRIVE
PIN 1

PIN 1

Dual Drive straight
34-Pin Control Cable.
Used for MFM, RLL,
and ESDI drives.

Note: W'hen using this cable with 2 drives, one must be set to Drive Select 0
and the other for Drive Select 1 (see Table B in previous chapter).
PIN 1

PIN 1

Dual Hard Drive
twisted (5 wires) 34Pin Control Cable.
Used for MFM, RLL,
and ESDI drives

DRIVE C

RED STRIPE

PIN 1

DRIVE D

Note: When using this cable with 2 drives, both drives must be set to Drive
Select 1.
PIN 1

PIN 1

DRIVE A

DRIVE B

Dual Floppy Drive
twisted (7 wires) 34Pin Cable. Used for
one or two Floppy
Drives

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RED STRIPE

PIN 1

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Note: Both floppy drives should be set to Drive Select 1.
PIN 1

PIN 1

PIN 1

RED STRIPE

40-Pin IDE cable for
one or two hard
drives

DRIVE C

DRIVE D

SCSI CABLE I.DENTIFICA TlON

MAC Style DB-25 to
Centronics Cable

stubs.

Correct Enclosure
Cabling for External
Drives

Wide SCSI Cable and
Mating Connector

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SCSI-II Amp Style to
Centronics Cable

PS/2 to Centronics
SCSI Cable

Centronics to
Centronics SCSI Cable

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LOW-LEVEL FORMATTING

nlike floppy disks that are low-level formatted at the same time as
they are high-level formatted, all hard disks are low-level formatted separately, that is because of the differences in the various types
and styles of controller cards, the encoding format, and the interleave
that can be used with a hard drive.
If you d,ecide to use a different controller card, or to use a different
interleave on the hard disk, it may have to be low-level formatted
again. Once the low-level format is completed properly, it will not
have to be done again unless the controller card is replaced, the interleave is changed, bad sectors appear, or there is a hard disk failure.
Low-level formatting destroys all the data written on the hard disk. Be
sure to back-up all data before a hard disk is low-level or high-level formatted.

U

What ;s DEBUG?
DEBUG is a program provided on the DOS disks (DEBUG. COM)
that is prinlarily used by programmers and service technicians. The
operation of DEBUG is described in detail in the DOS manual. In order
to use DEBUG for low-level formatting, only two commands are generally necessary: the G (GO) command, and the (~ (QUIT) command.
In the following paragraphs, commands such as G=C800: 5 will be
used to start the ROM based low-level formatting program stored on
the hard drive controller.
To start the program, insert a disk containing the DEBUG. COM program into the floppy drive and type DEBUG at the DOS prompt. When
the DEBUG prompt (-) is displayed type G= followed by the starting
address of the ROM based program (G=C800:5) for example. This
tneans go to ROM address C800:5 and run the program contained in
the ROM. After the program is finished, it will usually return you to
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the DOS prompt (». If the program returns you to the DEBUG
prompt (-) type Q to quit DEBUG and return to the DOS prompt.

What is CSCFMT?

WARNING!

As with any low-level
format, CSCFMT will
destroy all existing
data. Don't use
CSCFMT unless you
have a verified backup of all data.

CSCFMT is a low-level format utility supplied on the Hard Drive
Bible companion CD-ROM. CSCFMT works with most MFM,RLL, ESDI,
IDE and EIDE drives. Low-level formatting is the only way of changing
the interleave of a hard drive. CSCFMT is useful if you are installing a
hard drive for the first time, or if you need to change the interleave of
an installed drive to optimize its performance. For most common DOS
installations, CSCFMT is the only program you'll need in addition to
DOS FDISK and FORMAT.
To low-level format, just type CSCFMT at the DOS prompt.
CSCFMT will ask for the interleave you wish to use. Check the interleave information section for the optimum value for your system configuration.

Choosing a Drive Type
Early IBM ATs only provided 14 (MFM) or so drive types to choose
from in the CMOS. The Middle-aged AT's usually have up to 46 (based
on the original MFM) types. If you are installing an IDE drive and you
find a CMOS drive with a matching total drive capacity, go ahead and
use it.
Most new machines have a "User Definable" or "Custom" drive type
that can be created and saved in the CMOS, thus providing a standard
drive type. "User Definable" drive types are used in most IDE drive
installations.

IDE Drive Types
This idea of translation schemes bring us to the AT or IDE
(Imbedded Drive Electronics) interface. These drives are intelligent in
that they will "mimic" other drive geometries that equal or are very
close to the same number of logical blocks. If a "custom" drive type
option is not available for an AT drive, simply pick one from the list of
available choices that has the same number of total megabytes.

MFM Drive Types
Unlike the newer IDE drives, MFM drive configurations must match
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the drive geometry exactly!! If the CMOS drive type table lists the
exact geolnetry, great. If not, then check to see if a "Custom" or "User
Definable" CMOS option is available.
The last resort is to choose a drive type match that is close but
does not exceed either the cylinder or head values. This option will
not usually provide the full formatted capacity of the drive. An exact
match in the head count is definitely preferred when getting a "close"
match. When there is no direct match in the internal drive type tables,
a partitionilng program may be needed to provide a software driven
translation solution in order to achieve full capacity. Keep in mind
that the drilve will format out only to the capacity of the chosen drive
type when not using third-party driver software. Also, some AT 16-bit
MFM controllers provide an onboard BIOS that will allow the unique
geometry of the drive to be dynamically configured.

RLL and ESDI Drive Types
RLL and ESDI drives are usually not represented at all in the internal drive tables, and consequently the controllers for these drives
need onboard a ROM BIOS that either contains its own internal list of
choices for the geometry or else provides the ability to dynamically
configure (define) the controller to the specific geometry of the drive.
In the case of the ESDI interface, the controller gets parameters directly from the drive with the equivalent of a SCSI "Mode Sense" command. Most RLL and ESDI controllers require that CMOS be set to
"Type 1". This setting is then overwritten by the controller BIOS after
power-up.
A special note on ESDI and other drives that have more than 1024
cylinders. Since DOS cannot access cylinders above this limit, a translation scheme may be elected in the controller'S BIOS. As the total
number of Logical Blocks Available (LBA's) is defined as CYLINDERS*HEADS*SECTORS PER TRACK, translations that equal the same
number of logical blocks with the cylinder count below the 1024 limit
will be devised. The controller BIOS will need to be ENABLED in
order to utilize translation schemes.

Note:
Translated LBA's
are always less than
or equal to Native
LBA's.

SCSI Drive Types
Almost all SCSI drives lUse DRIVE TYPE 0 or NONE, as the host
adapter BltDS and the drive communicate together to establish the
drive geoffiletry. The SCSI controller "Scans" the SCSI bus shortly after
power-up and installs BIOS support for any attached SCSI devices.
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Formatting MFM Drives
The first step in a low-level format of an MFM drive is correct
CMOS setup. Check the drive geotnetry list for the heads and cylinders configuration of your drive. Then check your motherboard manual (or ROM based setup program) for a CMOS drive type that matches your drive geometry. If you find an exact match, set the CMOS to
that drive type number and skip the next paragraph.

Table Overrides
If your drive geometry does not match a CMOS drive type, you will
need to perform a CMOS type table override. Use Speedstor or Disk
Manager software to do this. These programs add a software device
driver to the drive that overrides the CMOS drive type settings on
power-up, enabling you to use a drive not listed in your setup program.
Check the Tune-Up section for the correct default interleave for
your system, then low-level format the drive. If you have a late AMI
BIOS, you may have low-level formatting routines built in ROM. If not,
use either the setup disk that came with your computer, CSCFMT, IBM
Diagnostics, Speedstor, or Disk Manager to low-level format.
Once the drive is low-level formatted, proceed to the partitioning
and high level formatting instructions in the following sections.

Formatting RLL Drives
Most of the 16-bit and all of the 8-bit RLL controllers that we have
found have low-level formatting routines in ROM firmware on the
board. The default address segment for XT controller boards is C800
hex. To find the starting address, enter DEBUG and type U C800:3.
The jump instruction is usually found at C800:5 or c8oo:6. The first
two bytes of the ROM are a 55 and AA hex which identify the BIOS
ROM. The third byte represents the length of the BIOS ROM in 512
byte blocks.
To format the drive, first select the correct CMOS setup. Consult
the manual that came with your RLL controller for the correct setup
value.
After setting CMOS, proceed to the low-level format. If you have a
ROM based low-level formatting routine available, use it. Otherwise,
use CSCFMT, Speedstor, or Disk Manager. Be sure to use the /SECS:26
option if you are using Speedstor.
When formatting lower capacity (i.e. 30MB) RLL drives, be sure to
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enter the ~vrite precompensation cylinder correctly. Write precomp is
important to these drives, since RLL encoding leaves less margin for
error. Write precomp is handled automatically on almost all newer
drives.
Once the drive is low-level formatted, proceed to the partitioning
and high-level fonnatting procedures described in the following sections.

Formatting I.:SDI Drives
All of the PC-bus ESDI controllers we have come across have lowlevel formatting routines in ROM firmware. The formatting procedures for these drives vary from controller to controller, so the best
advice we can giv(~ you here is follow the instructions that came with
the card.
In addition to the interleave, you may be asked if you want to use
sector sparing when you format. Sector sparing reduces the number
of available sectors per track from 36 to 35 or from 54 to 53. This will
reduce the: available formatted capacity of your drive. Choose sector
sparing only if your drive has a large defect map. Sector sparing will
allow the controller to remap defective sectors to the spare sector on
each track. This rneans that your application will "see" less defects.
Sparing will reduce the capacity of your drive by 1/36th. If your drive
has a small error nlap, sector sparing won't gain you much. If you are
running an application that requires a "Defect Free" drive, enable sector sparing to "Hide" the drive's defects.
Many ESDI controllers may also ask you for head and track sector
skewing values. These values offset the position of sectors relative to
the index so that as the drive steps from track to track and changes
from head to head, the next sequential sector is ilnmediately available.
To calculate the optimum track skewing value, divide the track-totrack seek time of your drive by 16.6ms. Then multiply this number
by the nutnber of sectors per track (rounding up). This will give you
the optimum track skewing value. Select 0 when asked for head skew.
You may notice that your large capacity ESDI drive contains a large
number of factory defects. Don't sweat it. These~ defects are mapped
by a factory analog tester that is extremely sensitive compared to your
controller. Most of these defects could never be detected using your
controller. They are usually just small analog spikes or dropouts that
are corrected by the ECC on your controller. The factory maps these
defects because they are the most likely areas to cause problems as
the drive "\lvears over time.
Once your ESDI drive is low-level formatted, proceed to the partitioning and high-level formatting procedures in the following sections.
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Note:
Several SCSI drives
including some made
by Quantum will
return almost immediately from a SCSI
low-level FORMAT
command. These
drives report that they
have successfully completed a low-level format but don't actually
format the disk. A
SCSI FORMAT (04h)
command does not
erase data on all drives. In many cases,
data written to the
disk is not erased
until it's overwritten
with a WRITE
command.
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Formatting SCSI Drives

WARNING!

All IDE drives are
already low-level formatted at the factory.
Low-level formatting
an IDE drive could
erase the factory
recorded defect tables.
Defects on these drives
are usually mapped
out using a burn-in
process, not through
the interface.

CAUTION!

Unless you need to
change interleaves, we
don't recommend
reformatting older
IDE drives. Imbedded
factory defect maps
on older drives could
be accidentally erased
by low-level
formatting.

74 Hard Drive Bible

Most SCSI controllers require that the CMOS setup on x86
machines be set for "no drive installed". On power up, the SCSI BIOS
on the adapter card scans the SCSI bus to detect attached devices.
Once detected, these devices are added to the list of available drives.
Most SCSI controllers support up to seven SCSI devices. More than
two drives usually require a third party device driver for use with DOS
versions before 5.0.
Almost every SCSI controller includes a low-level format program
that is specific to that particular board. The low-level format routines
in programs like Speedstor and Disk Manager don't usually work well
with SCSI controllers. This is because the controller card BIOS does
not translate an interrupt-13 format command into a SCSI format command. In this case, you'll most likely need to use the low-level format
program that came with the card.
Once the low-level format is completed, FDISK, Speedstor, or Disk
Manager can be used for partitioning and high-level formatting.

Low Level Formatting IDE Drives
Most IDE drives operate in two modes, "native" and "translation".
To use an IDE drive in native mode, set CMOS to the actual number of
heads and cylinders on the drive, then proceed to partitioning and
high-level format.
If the IDE drive you are using has physical characteristics (i.e.
heads, cylinders, and sectors/track) that are not listed in your ROM
BIOS, and you do not have a BIOS that offers a user defined drive type,
you will need to use translation mode. Translation mode remaps the
drive's physical characteristics into characteristics that match a common drive type. For example, most 40MB IDE drives offer a translation
mode that matches the physical characteristics of the early Seagate
251. Since this type is included in almost all ROM BIOS drive type
tables, compatibility is improved.
Most new IDE drives automatically enable translation mode based
on CMOS settings. Select a drive type that is close to but does not
exceed the megabyte capacity of the drive. The drive will translate to
the megabyte capacity you have selected. Some older type IDE drives
require a jumper. Like SCSI drives, all IDE drives are low-level formatted at the factory.
Once CMOS and translation mode is set correctly, FDISK,
Speedstor, or Disk Manager may be used for partitioning and high-level
formatting.
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DOS PARTITIONING

OS partitioning and high-level formatting can be tricky. This may
be done using DOS FORMAT and FDISK or using a third-party
program such as SpeedStor or Disk Manager. Although these menu driven programs are convenient, DOS and its included utilities are all
that's necessary. It's important to understand the following DOS partition constraints before beginning.

D

Olel DOS Limitations
Versions of MS DOS and PC DOS before 3.30 have a 32MB storage
linlitation. There is no way to access over 32MB per physical drive
without a dlevice driver, if you are using an old version of DOS. If you
are stuck vvith DOS 3.2 or earlier, you will need SpeedStor or Disk
Manager to fully utilize a drive larger than 32MB. The best solution is
to upgrade to 3.30 or later version.

Versions of MS D()S and PC DOS after 3.30 but before 4.0 have a
32MB per partition barrier. Using these DOS versions, you cannot
access more than 32MB per logical partition without using a thirdparty device driver. Both Speedstor and Disk Manager provide a
device driver that can be installed in your CONFIG.SYS to bypass this
linlitation. 'We recomlnend use of DOS 4.01 or later if you desire more
than 32MB per partition.

The 1024 Cylinder Barrier
All versions of DOS have a 1024 cylinder limitation. This is becoming more and more of a problem as larger capacity drives are introduced with more cylinders. To access more than 1024 cylinders, you
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will need a device driver or a controller card that offers a "translate
mode". Some ESDI and most SCSI controllers (like the CSC
FlashCache™64) offer translation nl0de.
Controllers that feature a translation mode will logically remap a
drive's physical parameters so that the system "sees" less cylinders
and more heads or sectors per track. For example, an ESDI drive with
1224 cylinders, 15 heads, and 36 sectors per track might be mapped
into a configuration of 612 cylinders, 30 heads, and 36 sectors per
track. The physical configuration of the drive will remain the same,
but the controller card will remap the drive so that DOS will recognize the entire disk.
Translation mode is usually enabled during the low-level format
procedure. If your controller does not support translation mode, the
only way to bypass the 1024 cylinder limitation is with a device driver.
Once you have decided how you want to partition the drive, use
either Speedstor, Disk Manager, or FDISK to do the work for you.
Divide the disk into as many partitions as you desire. After you have
set the partitions, you will have to reboot the system before any partition changes are recognized. Be sure to mark the partition you want
to boot from as the ACTIVE partition. Then proceed to the high-level
format procedure described in this section.

Partition Compatibility
All versions of DOS 6.x and later have the ability to access partitions created under older versions of DOS. Most, but not all, older versions of DOS will access partitions created under newer DOS versions.
For example, a system booted under DOS 3.3 will recognize a hard
drive partition created under DOS 3.2, but not an extended partition
created under DOS 4.0. If you're partitioning a drive with a later versions of DOS and using partitions larger than 32MB in size, be aware
that you are limiting your compatibility with earlier versions of DOS.
If you plan to reformat a drive originally formatted with a late version
of DOS, you must use the later version of DOS FDISK to erase the
existing partition.

The 2000MB Partition Limit

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76 Hard Drive Bible

DOS 6.x is currently limited to 2000MB per partition. In most
cases, this is an adequate partition size. Although software is available
to bypass this limitation, I don't recommend using it. If you can't partition your data to fit in 2GB partitions, the best solution is another
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operating system with a high performance file system like OS/2™ or
Windows l'~TTM. As partition sizes increase, the efficiency of DOS
decreases. DOS cluster sizes are typically 8K or more in large partitions. Since the minimum allocation size for each file is one cluster,
even small files (Le. lK) will require 8K of disk space per file. If you
have many small files, switching to a smaller partition that decreases
your cluster size will improve efficiency.

DOS Format
DOS format (or high-level format) is simple. Use the DOS format
program with the /S option or use FORMAT and SYS C: to initialize
your bootable partition. If you are using a device driver, install it next
and reboot the system before formatting any remaining partitions. You
tuay also use Speedstor or Disk Manager for high-level formatting. Be
sure to copy COMMAND. COM and invoke SYS C: to copy the DOS system to the active partition after using these programs.
Congratulations! You are now ready to run. Proceed to the tuneup section for tips on optimizing your software setup.

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MACINTOSH DRIVE INSTALLATION

o hard drive technical manual would be complete without
instructions for drive installation on the Apple Macintosh™. The
Mac is the computer which popularized the SCSI standard. Every Mac
since the Plus, introduced in 1984, has a built-in SCSI controller on the
motherboard. This makes installing internal and external SCSI devices
relatively e:asy, providing that you pay proper attention to cabling, termination, SCSI ID, and driver software installation.
As stated in the previous chapters, the SCSI bus utilizes "Daisy
Chain" cabling with dual-ended termination. This means that each
device must be connected in series with either a continuous ribbon
cable or a series of external SCSI cables, with proper termination at
both ends of the chain.
All Macintoshes use a standard DB-25 connector as the external
SCSI port. Most computer stores carry a variety of cables which will
connect your Mac to Centronics 50-pin or other industry standard
SCSI connectors. If you are unable to locate the cable or terminators
you need, esc carries a comprehensive line of SCSI accessories at reasonable prices. W(~ recomnlend that you do not use "T" type cables, as
they can cause line noise and ringing which result in unreliable operation.
Correct termination is critical for any SCSI device installation.
Every SCSI "Daisy Chain" nlust have a total of two terminating resistors, no more and no less. The first terminator is on the internal drive
inside the }\1ac case. Do not remove the internal terminator for any reason. When upgrading the internal drive always make sure that the
replacement device is terrninated. If you are adding extra internal
devices, you will need to remove all terminators from them, except
from the last physical device. If you are adding extra external devices,
only the internal drive and final device should be terminated.

N

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The Macintosh CPU is always at SCSI ID number 7 and the internal
boot drive should always be set to ID number 0 for reliable operation.
Any other external or internal SCSI devices can be set to any other ID
numbers, 1 through 6, as long as the number is not duplicated anywhere else on the SCSI chain. Duplicate SCSI ID numbers will cause
a Mac to hang on startup. External devices should have a SCSI ID
switch somewhere on the outside of the case to set the ID number.
Internal devices will have their SCSI ID number set by removing or
moving the ID jumpers on the device itself. The jumper settings for
most SCSI devices are given in following chapters.
All external SCSI devices attached to the Mac must be powered up
before your Macintosh is switched on. Allow the external hard drives
enough time to spin-up, and then turn on the Mac. External devices
which are attached but not powered up or are started after the Mac
can cause the SCSI bus to hang, preventing drive operation, causing
unreliable data transfers and "Bombs" to occur.
If you intend to boot from a new hard drive, it is imperative that
you install your personal version of the system folder to maintain compatibility and functionality with your existing software. It is vitally
important that ONE and only ONE version of the System File is
installed on the boot drive. It is possible to have different System
Folder on different drives, and then boot from them by choosing
which drive is the Start Up Drive in the Startup Disk Control Panel, if
you so desire. However, DO NOT have more than one System Folder
on any Start Up Drive. It will cause erratic computer behavior, random
crashes, "System Bombs" and other problems, if you can get it to start
up at all.
There are several ways to replace the internal Start Up drive on the
Macintosh. The best way we have found is the following, which
assumes that you have had your Mac apart in the past. If you are not
familiar with or are uncomfortable with putting hardware into your
Mac, there are many comprehensive and more specific books you can
refer to, or you can have an authorized technician install the device.
You will need: the appropriate hand tools to open your specific
Mac case, a Phillips screwdriver, a "Y" power connector, and a three
connector SCSI ribbon cable, in addition to the new drive.
1. Clean up the existing drive. Put all those loose documents in
folders, like you always meant to do, toss those games you
haven't played in 5 years, and take a look at all those files
labeled "stuff" .
2. Optimize the drive. There are several good defragmenting and
optimizing utilities available on the market. You should also get

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third party fonnatting software with the package. Find one and
use ilt. You'll be amazed at how fast your old drive just became.
3. Shut everything off, but do not unplug the Mac.
4. Open the case and touch the power supply case. This grounds
any static electricity.
5. Replace the power connector and the SCSI ribbon on the drive
with the "Y" power connector and the three connector SCSI ribbon
cable.
6. Set the replacement drive to any SCSI ID except 0 or 7, using
the SCSI ID jutnpers. Make sure that the drive is terminated as
well. Then connect it to the power and ribbon cables.
7. Place it somewhere where the PCB cannot ground out. We pre
fer a suitably sized piece of cardboard on top of the existing
drive. In any case, make sure that it will not short anything out
or fall.
8. Restart.
9. Fornaat, initialize, and partition the new drive using the third
party driver software you installed earlier.
10. The new partition(s) will now be on the desktop.
11. Open the old internal drive. Press "Command-A" to select all of
its contents.
12. Drag to the new drive to copy all, then close all when done.
13. Using the Startup Disk Control Panel on the existing drive,
change it to the new drive and restart to check that the instal
lation went as planned.
14. After everything is confirmed, shutdown. Remove the old
drivc~. Set the SCSI ID of the new drive to 0, and install it in the
internal bay using the original power connector and SCSI rib
bon cable.
15. Reassemble your Mac, and you're done.

Note:
If you make
the partitions under
500MB each, the drive
will run faster and
the minimum file
sizes will be smaller.

Installing an external SCSI device is much simpler. You will need
to obtain the correct external SCSI cable, usually a DB-25 to
Centronics 50-pin, a terminator and some version of the aforementioned third party formatting software. The Apple Hard Drive Toolkit
included on the Apple Macintosh System Disks may not work on hard
disk drives without Apple firmware.
1. Once again, shut everything off. NEVER install or remove any
device while power is on!
2. Connect the external device(s) with the appropriate SCSI
cabl,e(s).
3. Check that there are no duplicate SCSI IDs.

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Note #7:
If you make the partitions under 500MB
each, the drive will
run faster and the
minimum file sizes
will be smaller.
Note #8:
All new partitions will
have individual icons
on your desktop. It is
possible to have only
one hard drive
installed and have a
desktop full of partition icons, which for
all intents and purposes look just like
hard drive icons. It is
advisable to change
the names and icons
of the individual partitions, if for no other
reason than that it
makes it far easier to
tell them apart.

82 Hard Drive Bibl.

4. Confirm that the last device and only the last device has been
terminated.
5. Power-up all external SCSI devices and allow them time to spinup.
6. Switch on your Mac, and launch the third party formatting soft
ware.
7. Format, initialize, and partition the new drive using the
third party driver software you installed earlier. See note to
left.
8. The new partition(s) will now be on the desktop. See note.
It is very important that all of the SCSI hard drives in your Mac
SCSI chain have been formatted with the same third party software
and are running the same SCSI driver. We often see a multiple hard
drive Mac system suddenly report "THIS DISK IS UNREADABLE,
WOULD YOU LIKE TO INITIALIZE?". This is most often caused by a
SCSI driver conflict, in which two or more drives were formatted with
different software. While most of the better third party software packages do offer "work arounds" for this situation, it is preferable that all
of the devices be formatted with identical software. Even different
versions of the same formatting software can and will cause conflicts.
Virtually all of the SCSI device installation problems which we
encounter in Mac systems stem from cabling, termination, or SCSI ID
errors. First of all, make absolutely sure of all cables and their orientation. Cables should fit tightly, but never be forced, and all securing
clips should snap in to place. There must be two and only two terminators, one on the internal drive and one on the last physical device
on the SCSI chain. No SCSI ID number can ever be duplicated on the
chain. Please note that the physical placement of a device and its SCSI
ID are NOT the same. It is very likely that a device can be set to the
SCSI ID of 2, for example, and be the final physical device of four
external SCSI devices on the SCSI chain.

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WINDOWS DRIVE FORMATTING

Windows '95 Disk Format
indo-,ws '95 uses a standard DOS compatible File Allocation Table
(FAT) type disk format. Windows '95 also keeps a reserved area
of the disk available for long file name support. The first character of
the DOS filf~ name is changed in the directory to indicate that a long
file name exists for each file.
Window-s '95 should install easily on any preformatted BIOS supported drivf~. DOS FDISK and FORMAT will still work. Some work will
be necessary to save the long file name attributes should you decide
to repartition your drive. It's a good idea to back things up before
upgrading to '95.

W

Window,s '95 Enhanced IDE Support
Window's '95 supports IDE drives over 540MB (and 1024 cylinders)
using one of four methods:

1. ROM BI05 support using 28 bit LBA addressing
This is the most common means of support. Things will work
"transparently" if your motherboard BIOS supports LBA addressing
and is properly configured. Newer Intel built PCI tnotherboards are an
example.

2. Hard Disk BIOS support
If you have an "Enhanced IDE" controller with a BIOS,Windows '95
will support large drives through Int-13h.
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3. Truncation
This is a last resort. The capacity of your drive will be limited to
540MB, and only the first 1024 cylinders will work. In upgrading some
older machines without EIDE support, truncation may be your only
choice.

4. Real-Mode Geometry Support
This mode adds compatibility but sacrifices speed. You won't get
true 32-bit driver support, and the Windows '95 protected mode disk
driver (called ESDI_503.PDR) won't work. A slower choice,but
if
options #1 and #2 don't work, it's the only way to get the full capacity of a drive over 540MB.

Windows

~9S

SCSI Support through Int-13

Yes, your Windows '95 system can use SCSI hard drives and removable drives without 32 bit drivers. Things will work properly using
Real-Mode Geometry support. Depending on the performance of your
controller, you may still get acceptable performance levels. This is the
trick to making older non-ASPI SCSI cards run under '95.

Windows

~9S

SCSI Support through ASPI

Many earlier SCSI cards include ASPI drivers but not Miniport drivers. For these cards, Microsoft provides a "DOS Compatibility Mode".
Since CD-ROM's aren't normally supported through interrupt-13,
Windows '95 switches into "real" mode and passes commands to these
devices through a DOS ASPI manager. The frequent switches between
"real" and "protected" modes tend to slow the system down.
This is the second level of compatibility and performance. It's
faster than the Int-13 interface described above, but slower than the
Miniport driver explained below. If you own an early model controller
which doesn't have Windows '95 32 bit miniport driver support, consider upgrading to a newer PCI controller which does. An example is
the CSC Universal PCI Wide/Narrow Card.

Windows

~9S

and NT SCSI Miniport Drivers

For top SCSI perfornlance, your controller needs a Windows '95
"Miniport" driver. This driver passes packets of commands and data
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between the Windows '95 operating system and your SCSI controller
hardware. Using a miniport driver provides true 32 bit performance.
Using a miniport driver also helps free the system to "disconnect",
"multitask", and complete other operations during the time that SCSI
devices are accessed.
In some ways, a miniport driver is simpler than an ASPI driver.
When a miniport driver is installed, the operating system becomes
responsible for composing SCSI command packets. These packets are
standardized and easy to create for devices for hard drives. But
devices likt:~ CD-ROM changers, jukeboxes, and SCSI tape drives use
"vendor unique" commands which vary from one device to another.
This shifts the burden of compatibility from the driver to the operating system. So even if your miniport based system won't work with
one SCSI application, it may work with others. Take Microsoft Backup
as an example. Backup has limited compatibility with SCSI devices.
Other tape backup programs such as FastCache backup work fine
with devices like Digital LincarTape (DLT) drives. Both programs pass
commands through the sanle miniport driver "socket". But Backup
has a limited number of supported devices.
Windows '95 and Windows NT miniport sockets are very similar in
nature. Unfortunately, due to operating system differences, most '95
and NT SCSI software isn't compatible. Don't assume that a SCSI program written to work under '95 will operate when you upgrade to NT.

Disk Monogel' ond Windows '95
Using both Disk Manager and Windows '95 can be opening a can
of wonns. l\1ake sure you have the latest version (7.0 or later) of Disk
.Manager before you even attempt it. Disk Manager modifies the MBR
(Master Boot Record) of your hard disk. It uses a small program located in the l"J[BR to trap disk calls made through Interrupt 13h. Virus
detection programs have been known to mistakenly identify the Disk
Manager code stored in the MBR as a virus. If the Disk Manager code
is accidentally removed by a virus checker, you'll need to reinstall it.
Windows '95 is smart enough to recognize Disk Manager, and will
'work with it. Make sure the Disk Manager file "XBIOS.OVL" is located
in the root directory of your boot drive before loading Windows '95.
The file "DMDRVR.BIN" should be loaded before any other files in your
CONFIG.SYS that acc(~ss the disk.
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Getting 32 bit Disk Access from Win 3.1
Windows 3.1 has a 32 bit disk access driver called WDCTRL. It
offers a small performance improvement in systems that have AT compatible disks. As the name implies, it works only with devices that are
compatible with the Wester Digital Controller used in the original IBM
AT. Fortunately, compatible devices include most IDE and EIDE drives,
as well as MFM, RLL, and ESDI devices. IfWDCTRL won't work in your
system, you'll know right away. If the drive and controller you're using
doesn't fully comply to the IBM task file specifications, WDCTRL simply won't load. If the drive and controller are partially compatible,
the system will lock up hard when the driver loads. WDCTRL is not
compatible with SCSI controllers, of course.
To enable the 32 bit driver under Win 3.1, add the following lines
under the [386Enh] section of your Windows SYSTEM.lNI file:
device=*int 13
device=*wdctrl
You can turn 32 bit access of in the system control panel or by
placing a semicolon ";" before each of these lines to "comment them
out".

SMARTDrive 32 bit Disk Access
Windows '95 contains it's own internal software disk cache architecture. The Windows '95 cache is also automatically configured, so
you can skip this section if you're using Windows '95.
SMARTDrive is a 32 bit cache program that runs under Windows
386 enhanced mode. It has the ability to "double buffer" data stores
frequently used data in system memory for faster access. SMARTDrive
integrates well with Windows, and dynamically allocates memory as it
is needed. This feature lets Windows use your EMS memory when the
cache doesn't need it.

SMARTDrive Write Caching
Earlier versions of SMARTDrive (before version 4.0) only cached
read data. Versions 4.0 and later can cache both reads and writes.
Caching write data is commonly called "write-behind caching" or "lazy
writes". Caching write data definitely improves performance and
reduces the overall number of seeks, but it can be dangerous. Since
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data is written first to memory, not to disk, your data could be lost if a
system interruption were to occur.
Enabling write cache will cause loss of data should a system crash
or power interruption occur. SMARTDrive has built-in safety features
that check for CTRL-ALT-DEL resets and "old" data in cache. Another
safety feature flushes the SMARTDrive cache after five seconds. If the
system doesn't crash hard enough to interrupt SMARTDrive's internal
timer interrupt, these safety features will save your data.
To enable SMARTDrive Write caching, put a plus sign after the
drive letter you wish to cache. For example,
SMARTDRV D+ IE:2048
will enable write cache on drive E: with an element size of 2048. The
element sizle specifies the number of bytes to be moved at one time.
For more options, type SMARTDRV I?

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NOVELL COMPSURF

~Tovell's

COMPSURF program is a tricky beast. It is one of the most
.l ~ rigorous and intensive test programs available. It's also a necessary prerequisite to installing some versions of Novell N etware on a
hard drive. Compsurf was first written in 1984 when large capacity
drives were not as reliable as they are today. It uses an intensive random and se:quential read/write test to certify the drive. Compsurf
takes around one hour per 20MB of disk space to run. After testing,
Compsurf partitions the drive for use with Novell, and writes a defect
table to the drive.
Before running COMPSURF, make sure you have all the necessary
software drivers. ELS level I or level II Netware is designed to support
IDE compatible drives only. ELS Compsurf will only work with IDE,
MFM, RLL, or ESDI controllers that bear a close resemblance to the
original IBM-AT MltM controller. If you are running Netware Lite,
Advanced 2:86, SFT 286, or Netware 386, you have more options.
Drivers for SCSI, ESDI, and SMD controllers are available for these versions of N(~tware. To use a Netware driver, you must follow the
l\Tetware installation instructions to the letter, and link the device driver with Compsurf. This will create a custom fOf'matting and testing
program that will operate with your controller.
If you are running a SCSI drive with Compsurf, be sure to answer
NO when Compsurf asks if you wish to format the drive. Use the lowlevel formatting program provided with the controller card instead.
Compsurf can't format SCSI drives because the SCSI interface only
supports a 'FORMAT DRIVE' command, and the 'FORMAT TRACK' comnland is normally ignored by SCSI controllers.
Many newer controllers offer a "watered down" version of
Compsurf in ROM BIOS. We have yet to find a controller card BIOS
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Note:
When running
Compsurf on SCSI drives, be sure to low-level
format the drive first,
then answer NO to the
following prompts:
FORMAT THE DRIVE:
NO (enter)
MAINTAIN DEFECT
LIST:
NO (enter)
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that tests as well as the real Compsurf. Our feelings are that the reliability demands of most network users justify the time it takes to run
the real Compsurf.
To save time and effort, it's a good idea to ask your drive dealer if
he can Compsurf your drive for you. If he's reputable and confident
in his product, this service should be available at no extra charge.
Whatever you do, choose a well built, heavy duty hard drive for
your file server. Novell applications are extremely disk intensive and
demand a reliable disk.

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HARDWARE COMPATABlllTY
PROBLEMS

nfortunately, not all controller cards are compatible with all computers and not all disk drives work with all controller cards.
Some of the major hardware compatibility problems we have come
across are listed below.

U

SCSI Arbitration on Bus Scan
On power-up, a SCSI controller communicates with the attached
devices to determine if th(~ device is operating in synchronous or
asynchronous mode. Many SCSI controllers do not perform this arbitration process correctly. This failure usually causes the system to
hang. The solution is an upgraded controller BIOS or a different controller/driv(~ combination.

SCSI Commanrd Set Issues
SCSI cornmand set problems occur because SCSI commands differ
among device manufacturers. These problems can usually be resolved
with a firm'ware upgrade on the SCSI device or controller. Be. sure to
check for command set compatibility before purchasing any SCSI
devices.
In some cases, aft(~r market products are available to relieve SCSI
compatibility problems. My personal favorites for the Apple
Macintosh ilnclude FWB's SHverlining and Spot On. Corel makes an
excellent S(~t of SCSI disk drivers for ASPI compliant PC controllers.
Storage Dinlension's Speedstor is a great integration program for Sun
platforms.

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ISA Bus I/O Channel Ready Timing
Slow devices connected to the AT bus must assert a signal called
I/O CHANNEL READY to force the motherboard to wait for data. Many
faster motherboards do not conform to the original IBM AT bus timing
specs. Because they don't, a controller card requesting a wait state delay
using this line may not operate correctly. If you have a Chips &
Technology based motherboard, this can be corrected by adding a bus
wait state using extended setup. Otherwise the only solution is a new
controller card.

ISA Bus '6-Bit Memory Tronslers
This problem often occurs in older motherboards that use discrete
chip sets. On the AT bus, a signal called MEM16 must be asserted by the
bus devices in order to initiate a 16-bit data transfer. This signal must be
available almost immediately, or the system may default to 8-bit transfer.
Many of the cheaper clone motherboards do not provide valid address signals in time to decode this signal. If the address signals are not presented in time, it is impossible to perform a 16-bit transfer. This causes problems with many 16-bit cards that use memory mapped I/O, such as the
WD7000 and DTC3280 SCSI controllers. Older DTK motherboards are
notorious in this regard. The solution is to switch to an 8-bit card and suffer a slight loss of performance. If this is not acceptable, the only solution
is upgrading to a higher quality motherboard.

ESOIOelect Tables
Many older style controller cards have problems reading the defect
tables from some ESDI drives. This is due to the way the defect table is
recorded on the drive. The solution is upgrading to a newer style card or
rewriting the defect table using a factory analog type drive tester.

VESA VL-Bus Loading Problems
The VESA VL-Bus specification supports two cards at a 33MHz bus
speed, and only one card at 40MHz or 50MHz bus speeds. Depending on
the quality of their design and construction, some motherboards may
exceed these specifications. There's really no way to correct a VESA bus
loading problem other than lowering the bus speed or removing one
card. A clock doubling CPU (Le. the Intel 486DX2-66) may be the solution
in some cases.
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IDE Drive Mas'~erISlave Compatibility
When mixing different nlanufacturers of IDE drives on the same
cable, compatibility problems may occur. This is caused by timing incompatibilities and because some drives use IDE pins for different purposes
(Le. spindle sync). If you encounter a dual drive IDE situation where only
one drive works, try reversing the Master/Slave jumpers on both drives to
switch their positions in the system.

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COMMON INSTALLATION PROBLEMS

T

he comnrron installation problems below account for 90% of the
technical support calls at csc. Steer clear of trouble by learning
about these issues.

Handle Hard D'rives Like Eggs!
Hard drives are extremely fragile. Dropping, bumping, or jarring
a hard drive: can cause permanent damage. Always use a manufacturer approved shipping carton if you need to transport the drive
outside of the system.. Never transport an optical drive with the
media inserted. Rough handling accounts for more drive failures
than all other factors combined.

Reversed Cablles!
Most drive cables are not keyed - they can easily be installed
backwards. Reversed cables account for a large number of hard
drive electronic failures.
Reversing a SCSI cable will cause the terminator power line to be
grounded. This usually blows a fuse or fusable link on either the
drive or controller. Without terminator power, SCSI data transfer will
be unreliable. Make certain all cables are oriented correctly before
applying po'wer. If you reverse a SCSI cable, you may need to replace
the fuse, or return the drive for service. Line drivers on either the
controller, drive, or both can easily be damaged if cables are
reversed. If you are unsure, don't guess - check the documentation
or call the nlanufacturer!

l'wisted Cables
Refer to the Drive Cabling section to ensure the proper twisted
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cable is used when installing multiple Floppy, MFM, RLL, or ESDI drives.

CMOS Setup
Be sure to read the chapter that describes the differences between
physical and translated IDE parameters. You must to set CMOS to the
translated parameters.
Most ESDI drives use an IBM standard type 1 CMOS setup. This corresponds to a standard 10MB drive. Upon power-up, the BIOS on the
ESDI card overrides this drive type. Most SCSI controllers operate
with CMOS set to 0 (no drive installed). Double check your controller
manual for the correct CMOS setup value. Programs that use drive
table overrides for MFM and RLL drives normally use the closest match
in the ROM type table with an identical number of heads.

Hardware Conflicts
Hardware conflicts can occur if the controller card conflicts with
the interrupt, DMA, I/O address or ROM address of other cards in the
system. These conflicts are often difficult to debug. To be sure, check
the manuals for ALL of the other boards installed in the system before
jumpering the controller card.

Delect Locking
It's important to enter and lock the defect table on all MFM, RLL,
and ESDI drives. If these defects are not entered, long term reliability
will suffer. IDE and SCSI drives automatically lock out drive defects.

ISA Bus Extended Setup
Be sure to set the following extended setup parameters per your
controller card manufacturer's recommendation:
BUS CLOCK SPEED
- Usually 8-12 MHz.
16-BIT BUS WAIT STATES
- Usually 1 or 2 wait states.
AT CLOCK STRETCH
- Usually enabled.
Improper extended setup settings may cause erratic controller
operation.
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Keep Opticall)rives Clean and Cool
Optical drives 01uSt be kept clean, cool and dust free for reliable
long term operation. If an optical drive is installed without a proper
flow of cool, clean air, long term reliability will suffer. When internal
optics become conta.minat(~d by dust, error rates rise significantly.
When temperatures increase, Mia drives will not operate reliably.
Most "clone" cases do not provide a proper environment for optical
drives. Most optical drives work best installed in external enclosures
with proper fans and filters. Clean fan filters regularly. Use cleaning
disks regularly on CD-ROM drives. Purchase a cleaning kit for your
erasable media.

,SCSI Parity Ju'mpers
Most SCSI drives are shipped from the factory with parity enabled.
PC applications sometimes require that parity be disabled by moving
a jumper.

SCSI 10 and Termination
95% or the problelns we have seen with SCSI installations are due
to improper ID settings and. termination errors. Please read the section on SCSJ[ cabling instructions and the termination and ID warnings
before installing your SCSI peripherals. All SCSI installations require a
total of two terminators - no more and no less. This includes the ternlinators that may be installed on the controller card or host adapter.

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TROUBLESHOOTING

T

he following paragraphs list some of the more common problems
encountered in drive installation. They are intended for quick
troubleshooting reference. If you are receiving an unfamiliar error
message, check the Common Error Messages listings later in this chapter.

Bus Masterin,g Compatibility
Bus Mastering cards usually have jumpers for DMA channels, hardware interrupt levels, and bus on/off time. Check these jumpers first
when installing a bus mastering controller. As described in the installation section, each controller must have its own interrupt level and
DMA channel. If you intend to use DOS progratns like Windows '95
that use th.e protected mode of the 386/486/Pentium processor with
a bus mastering card, you will need a software driver.
Even when they are correctly installed, bus olastering controllers
sometimes experience motherboard hardware compatibility problems. If you have trouble getting a bus mastering controller to run
with your rnotherboard, ask the controller manufacturer if your motherboard has been approved for compatibility.

CMOS Drive :rype Tables
Matching CMOS tubles lor IDE Drives
If you are having problems installing a drive that is not listed in
your CMOS drive type table, remember that the CMOS type does not
need to exactly match the physical parameters of the drive. Modern
IDE drives automatically 'translate' to match the physical parameters
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of the drive to match the logical parameters you select in CMOS.
That's why there are two sets of parameters listed in the drive parameters section. Selecting any CMOS drive type that has an identical or
lesser formatted capacity than the capacity of the drive will work. IDE
translation modes are also used to bypass the DOS 1024 cylinder limitation (see the IDE installation section for more information). If you
are installing a high capacity IDE drive in an older system that doesn't
have any high capacity drives listed in the CMOS type table, programs
like SpeedStor or Disk Manager can be used to override the CMOS
table.

ESDI and SCSI Controller Drive Types
All PC SCSI controllers require that CMOS be set to NO DRIVES
installed. The only exception to this rule is if an IDE, MFM, or ESDI
drive is installed and coexists in the same system as the SCSI controller. If this is the case, set CMOS to the drive type used by the IDE,
MFM, or ESDI drive only. Leave additional drive types set to "not
installed". SCSI controllers interrogate the SCSI bus and add drive
types when the system is first powered up.
Nearly all ESDI controllers require that CMOS be set to 'type 1'.
These ESDI cards use an on board BIOS which automatically overrides
the CMOS setting on power-up. The few ESDI controllers that don't
use a BIOS ROM require that the CMOS type exactly match the physical parameters of the drive. These cards can only be used in systems
that have a 'type 47' or user-definable CMOS table or in conjunction
with a program like SpeedStor or DiskManager.

Compsurl Fai/ure
Early versions of Novell N etware build the file server operating system during installation by linking a series of object files together to
form the Netware 'kernel'. Most installation problems with Netware
result from incorrectly installed drivers. The Netware installation
process is detailed and complicated. Follow the installation instructions exactly to avoid link problems.
If you are running IDE drives with early versions of Netware, be
sure to enable translation to keep the logical number of cylinders
below 1024. Early versions of Novell will truncate any additional
cylinders.
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Watch for potential conflicts between interrupts. Most SCSI cards
use IRQ14 or IRQ15, and several network cards use them as well.
UnderNov(~ll, each card must have its own interrupt level. DOS does
not require interrupts, and many SCSI cards do not provide them in
the default configurations. If your SCSI controller works under DOS,
but not Netware, check the interrupts.
In Netw"are 386, the drivers are composed of 'NLM's' or Netware
Loadable Modules. NLM's are loaded after the file server is up and running. If a driver is not properly configured for Netware 386, the file
server will often 'lock up' when the driver is loaded. If this happens,
check the software installation and make sure the driver configuration
matches your hardware.

DOS Partitiollling
The 1024 cylinder barrier is the most common cause of DOS partitioning problems. Most versions of DOS only support 1024 cylinders. To ke:ep the number of cylinders seen by DOS under 1024, do
one of the following:
If you are using an IDE drive, enable translation and increase the
number of heads of sectors per track to reduce the cylinder count.
If you are using an ESDI drive, enable the "63 sector" or "head mapping" mode to enable controller translation.
If you don't have translation available, the only way to access cylinders above 1024 is by making a boot partition within the first 1024
cylinders, and loading an extended partition driver from within the
boot partition.
The 32 Megabyte partition barrier can also be a problem with old
versions of DOS. Versions of MS-DOS earlier than 3.3 and Compaq
DOS earlier than 3.21 lack the ability to access partitions larger than
32 megabytes. Upgrade to a later version of D()S if you encounter
this.

DOS and Windows

~95

2"OGB Limit

Yes, there is a partition size limit under DOS and indow'95W It is
2048MB per partition. If this becomes an issue, consider a different
operating system like Windows NTTM or OS/2's high performance file
system. Although DOS could theoretically be made to work on larger
drives, it's not a great idea. The efficiency of D()S and Windows '95
when storing small files on large drives is poor because the DOS cluster size increases as drive's capacity increases.
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Drive Selects
Many manufacturers label the drive select jumpers on drives like
this: 0,1,2,3. Others label the same select jumpers 1,2,3,4. The correct jumper depends on the position of the drive in the system, the
type of cable you are using, and the way the jumpers are labeled. See
the Installation section for more details.

Drive Won't Spin
This is frequently caused by reversed cables in SCSI and IDE installations. Check pin 1 orientation and don't forget to plug a system
power cable into the drive! "No-spins" are also often caused by a
power problem (see below).

ED Floppy Support
Most existing PC controllers do not yet support the new IBM standard 2.88MB floppy drives. Although many manufacturers advertise
the floppy controller section of their boards as "supports IMHz data
rate", the new 2.88 drives use perpendicular recording that requires
special write gate timing. Many controllers that support IMHz data
transfer rates only operate at the higher rate with "floppy tape" drives.
If you are having problems with an ED drive with a "IMHz" floppy
controller, consult the controller manufacturer to make sure the board
you have is 2.88 compatible.

ESDI Sector Sparing
Many ESDI controllers offer optional "sector sparing". Sector sparing should be enabled if the drive has any significant number of
defects or if the operating system you are using can not tolerate
defects. Sector sparing reduces the formatted capacity of the drive
slightly but increases the overall reliability significantly. When sector
sparing is enabled, the controller can reallocate defects "on the fly".
Use sector sparing when ever possible.

IDE Cabling
Since IDE cables carry data at full motherboard bus bandwidth,
they must be kept as short as possible. Cables over 18" can cause
problems in most installations. The shorter the better.
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IDE MosterISlove
Unfortunately, not all IDE drives are created equally. Many IDE drives will not peacefully coexist in the Master/Slave configuration with
drives from other fllanufacturers. See the hardware compatibility section for advice.

Incorrect Dri'l'e Parameters
If you are having problems with an IDE, EIDE, SCSI or ESDI drive
installation, make sure that the CMOS settings exactly match your
drive's physical or logical parameters. Some ESDI controllers reserve
one cylinde:r of the drive for storing configuration information.

Interrupts onel DMA Channels
Most controllers running under DOS do not require interrupts. All
UNIX and :Novell applications require controller interrupts for acceptable perforlmance. If you suspect an interrupt or DMA channel conflict, check the hardware reference manuals for your installed hardware. The nllost common controller conflicts seem to be with network
cards and scanner interface boards.

Long Boot Time
Most SCSI controllers must scan the bus and "interrogate" each SCSI
device before booting. This process is long and tedious but occurs
only on initial power-up or hardware reset. There is really no way
around this with most controllers.

Long Format Time
Depending on the drive and system, a high level format may take
up to 15 seconds per cylinder. When the drive steps between cylinders, an audible "click" can usually be heard. If the drive is stepping,
be patient and wait for the format to complete. If you are attempting
to format an MFM, RLL, or ESDI drive and the drive isn't stepping,
check for a reversed 20 pin cable.

Multiple Driv~' Support Under DOS
Most controllers support only 2 hard drives under DOS. To support additional drives, a software driver is required. If a driver for
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more drives exists, it is normally only available from the controller
manufacturer. An exception to this are CSC's AK-47 and FC-64 boards
that support 7 SCSI and 4 floppy drives without any drivers.

No BIOS Sign-On Banner
This is one of the most common installation problems. Check to
see that your controller card BIOS does not overlap the memory areas
used by other cards. In particular, watch for VGA and network cards.
If you still don't get a banner, check extended setup and make sure
that the shadow RAM is disabled in the address range occupied by the
controller BIOS.

Partition Can't Be Removed
If a drive is formatted with a 'non-dos' partition, FDISK will not
delete it. The only solution is to erase the partition sector with a sector editor or low-level format. Older versions of DOS (Le. 3.3) will not
delete the larger partitions used by newer versions of DOS (Le. 6.0).
Later versions of DOS (Le. DOS 6.0) will delete partitions created in
earlier (Le. DOS 3.3) versions of DOS. If a low level format is not in
order, a program called "Zapdisk" is available from the CSC BBS at
(408)541-8455 or www.corpsys.com to correct this. Zapdisk will
remove all partition information without reformatting the entire drive.

Power Supply
Power supply problems frequently crop up in new drive installations. Most hard disk drives require 5 volts + 5% and 12 volts + 5% at
the drive connector. The power supplied to the drive must be clean
and well regulated. All modern hard drives include circuitry which
monitors the power supply voltages and shuts down the write circuitry if the input power is too far out of range. Many drives won't
even spin up if the power supply is too far off. If you suspect a power
supply problem, check the voltages at the drive power supply connector while the drive spins up to speed and seeks.

SCSI Cabling
SCSI cables MUST be shielded for reliable operation. Many newer
SCSI cables have individually twisted pairs for each signal line. If you
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can afford it, buy the better quality twisted pair variety. Avoid completely unshielded SCSI cables at any cost.

SCSIID's
Each de:vice installed on the SCSI bus must have a unique and separate ID number. Most SCSI controllers use ID #7, leaving the ID numbers betwe:en 0 and 6 available for disk drives. For reasons unknown,
some PC based tape drive software requires ID#7. If you have multiple DASD drives installed, most PC controllers win scan and boot from
the lowest SCSI ID number. Exceptions to this are the Adaptec 1540
series which only boots from ID#O and the CSC FiashCache™64
which can be programmed to boot from any device.

SCSI TermintJrtion
A SCSI bus must be terminated at each physical end of the SCSI
chain. Only two terminators per bus can be used. The devices at the
physical ends of the cable must have terminators. All other devices on
the SCSI chain (including the controller if it is not at the end of the
chain) must have their terminators removed. If you are using external
and internal SCSI devices on a PC controller, renlove the terminators
from the controller card.

Shadow RAM
System memory should not be used to shadow controllers that are
memory mapped. Controllers twhich are I/O mapped (i.e. ESDI cards)
should be shadowed. System ROM should always be shadowed for
performance.

System Hangs On Power Up
The foillowing are common installation errors which cause the system to hang on power up:
Improper BIOS base address (see above)
Interrupt conflicts (see above)
Bus cotnpatibility jumper (try it both ways)
Reversed SCSI Cable (causes termination power short circuit)
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ThermQI Problems

Thermal problems are common in multiple hard drive installations
and in situations where a hard or optical drive is not adequately
cooled. Drives are mechanical devices and heat is their worst enemy.
As temperatures increase in a drive, the motor and bearings are subject to increased wear.Always make sure a hard drive has a continuous
flow of cooling air and adequate ventilation around it.
Twisted DQtQ CQbles

Twisted floppy and hard drive ribbon cables look suspiciously similar. Floppy cables have seven twisted conductors, and hard drive
cables have five. Check the diagram in the previous chapter for a
quick identification.
Won't Boot (DOS)

If your system has been formatted and won't boot DOS, check to
see that the boot partition has been marked active in FDISK. Also
make sure that the system (hidden) files have been correctly transferred and that COMMAND. COM is present and matches the version
of the hidden files. If your system was booting correctly but suddenly stopped, scan the boot sector for a virus.
Won't Boot (ESDI)

For new ESDI installations, make sure that translation and sparing
modes have been set correctly. Also make sure that the system (hidden) files have been correctly transferred and that COMMAND. COM is
present and matches the version of the hidden files. If your system
was booting correctly but suddenly stopped, scan the boot sector for
a virus. Check FDISK and make sure the boot partition is marked
active.
Won't Boot (IDE)

If you can use your IDE drive when booting from floppy but are
unable to boot directly from the hard drive, check to see if your IDE
drive requires "buffered interrupts". If it does, you may need to
change a jumper on the controller card. Also make sure that the system (hidden) files have been correctly transferred and that COM106 Hard Drive Bible

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MAND.CO~vl

is present and matches the version of the hidden files. If
your systern was booting correctly but suddenly stopped, scan the
boot sector for a virus. Check FDISK and make sure the boot partition
is marked active. Verify that the Master/Slave jumpers are correct. If
your drive 'was booting on an older motherboard, but won't boot on a
new one, check to see that the CMOS settings are identical.

Won't Boot t'SCSI)
Check ~or unshielded cables and termination (described above). If
you are using a hard drive that has a SCSI mode jumper, try it set both
ways. Also make sure that the system (hidden) files have been correctly transferred and that COMMAND.COM is present and matches
the version of the hidden files. If your system was booting correctly
but suddenly stopped, scan the boot sector for a virus. Check FDISK
and make sure the boot partition is marked active.

COMMON ERROR MESSAGES
1790/1191 Errors
1790 is the most common error message encountered in drive
installations. A 1790 error will result when a controller has been
installed, but the attached drive is not formatted. 1791 is the same
message but refers to the second hard drive.

Attempting To Recover Allocation Unit XXX
This m(~ssage appears in high level format when DOS detects a
data verification error. If you are using an IDE or SCSI drive, you
shouldn't see this l11essage since the drive's embedded controller
should mask out m.ost errors before DOS is aware of them. If you see
this message in an IDE or SCSI installation, check for a hardware installation problem. If you see this message in an ESDI installation, make
sure the controller is able to read the drive's defect map, and be sure
you have enabled sector sparing.

C: Drive ,Foi/ure or Drive C: Error
This is at generic error message produced by the motherboard BIOS
on power-up. It is usually caused by a "not-ready" error from the disk
subsystem or an unformatted drive. Check cabling and master/slave
jumpers on new installations.
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Error Reading Fixed Disk
If you have successfully low-level formatted your drive and you
encounter this message from FDISK, the system is unable to verify the
partition sector. This is usually caused by a hardware problem, typically cabling or termination.

HDD Controller Failure
This message is usually caused by incorrect hardware installation.
Check cabling, jumpers and termination. This message will appear if
you install a SCSI controller without setting CMOS to "no drive
installed". You will also get this message if you have an IDE drive set
for slave operation and there is no master drive in the system.

Insert Disk For Drive C:
This message is caused by incorrect software driver installation.
This can happen when DRIVER.SYS is used to add extended floppy
drives and the command line switches are incorrect. It also appears
when extended partition driver software is incorrectly installed.

Invalid Media Type
You have probably seen this message when formatting floppy disks
of the wrong density. It is also generated on hard disks when newer
versions of DOS utilities are used on older DOS partitions. For example, a DOS 6.0 CHKDSK of a DOS 3.2 disk causes it. Avoid mixing DOS
versions.

No Fixed Disk Present
This message is produced by FDISK when it is unable to locate a
drive through BIOS. Check hardware installation, particularly cabling,
termination, and BIOS base address.

No Partitions Defined
This FD ISK message is normal for a disk which has just been formatted. Be sure to set the bootable partition to "active" after creating
it with FDISK.
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No ROM Basic
The motherboard BIOS displays this message when it is unable to
locate a boot device. In IDE or ESDI installations, this message is usually caused by an incorrect CMOS drive type setting. Most SCSI controllers req[uire CMOS be set to "No drive Installed" or type O. If this
error appears in a SCSI isntallation, check cabling, termination, and the
partition sector using FDISK. Most ESDI controllers require that
CMOS be set to type 1 for {~ach drive installed. If this message occurs
in an ESDI installation, CMOS may be accidentally set to zero. Also
make sure that the system (hidden) files have been correctly transferred and that COMMAND. COM is present and matches the version
of the hidden files. If your system was booting correctly but suddenly stopped, scan the boot sector for a virus. Check FDISK and make
sure the boot partition is marked active.

Non Syslrem Disk or Disk Error
Make sure that the system (hidden) files have been correctly transferred and that COMMAND.COM is present and matches the version
of the hidden files. Check termination in SCSI installations.

No SCSI Devices Found
If no SCSI devices appear in the bus scan, check SCSI cabling, termination, and make sure that no two SCSI devices are sharing the
same ID number. Make sure that no devices are using ID #7. ID#7 is
generally reserved for the SCSI controller card.

Track 0 /9ad, Disk U"usable
This fatal data error often indicates a bad drive, although it can also
be caused by improper termination.

Unable to Access Fixed Disk
This FDISK message is caused by an error reported by BIOS during
an attempt to read the drive. Check termination and cabling. When
booting from floppy but are unable to boot directly from the hard
drive, check to see if your IDE drive requires "buffered interrupts". If
it does, you may need to change a jumper on the controller card.
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UNIVERSAL IDE PARAMETERS

ll new"er IDE drives will accept any CMOS parameters that result
in a total number of Logical Blocks (LBA's) that are equal to or less
than the capacity of the drive. You can calculate any IDE drive's maximum LBA's by taking the total capacity of the drive and dividing it by
512. As long as the product of heads, cylinders, and sectors per track
are less than the nunlber LBA's, and within the range of the BIOS, your
parameters will work. If you don't know what the manufacturers recommended parameters are, or if you don't have the time or inclination
to calculate them, feel free to use the table below.
Note that the location of the DOS partition sector on a drive is
determined by the sectors per track used to format the drive. If you
are moving a drive from one system to another, you will need to match
the numb(~r of sectors per track originally used to format the drive in
order for DOS to recogniz(~ all the partitions on the drive.

A

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FORMATTED
CAPACITY

10
15
20
30
40
42
60
80
84
100
105
120
170
200
210
213
240
252
300
320
330
340
380
400
420
450
528
635
810
850
1050
1060
1080
1260
1280
1626
2161

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NUMBER
OF HEADS

4
4
4
4
6
6
8
10
10
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16

NUMBER
OF CYLINDERS

306
430
614
862
766
804
862
919
965
718
754
862
329
388
407
413
465
488
581
620
639
659
736
775
814
872
1024
1234
1572
1652
2045
2064
2097
2448
2484
3158
4095

NUMBER OF
SECTORS/TRACK

17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63
63

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HARD DRIVE LIST

isted in the following chapter are many COmlTIOn hard drives and
their parameters. The capacities listed are in formatted megabytes
(1,000,000 bytes), with 512 bytes per sector. Formatted capacities
may vary slightly depending on how the drive is formatted (Le., using
sector sparing or 35/36 sectors per track). As you would expect, all
older MFM drives have 17 sectors per track, and all RLL drives thatuse
the ST-506 interface have 26 sectors per track. ESDI drives have 35,
36,48, or 63 sectors per track.
Access Hmes listed are those published by the manufacturer. These
advertised access times are often slightly lower than the average tested times. Drive information that was unavailable at the time of printing is entered as dashes (-).

L

Landing 10m,
The landing zone, or "park cylinder" of a hard drive is a location to
which the drive head carriage should be moved before the drive is
transported. Older hard drives that use stepper motor actuators had
to be manually parked before they were transported. This parking procedure moved the heads away from the data area of the disk and
reduced the chance of data loss if the drive was bumped or jarred
with the plOwer off.
All neV\Ter hard disk drives with voice coil actuators incorporate
automatic parking mechanisms. These mechanisms are as simple as a
spring and a small latch that move and lock the heads away from the
data areas of the disk when power is removed. Because the manual
landing zone is no longer used in modern drives, we have omitted it
from the tables. If you have an older stepper motor type drive which
does require manual parking, step the heads to the maximum cylinder
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+ 1 before renloving power from the drive. For example, if you have
a ST-225 which has 615 cylinders, step to the 616th cylinder before
power down if you intend to transport the drive.

Write Precomp
Write precompensation is a technique that alters the timing of data
written to a hard drive on particular cylinders. Since the track length
of cylinders that are close to the center of the disk is shorter than the
outer cylinders, the timing of data read changes.
To compensate for the difference in read data timing between
inner and outer tracks, several drives use "write precompensation"
that alters the timing of data written to inner cylinders on the drive.
All newer drives automatically generate "write precompensation"
using internal logic that senses the position of the head and adjusts
the timing of write data accordingly. Older drives depend on the controller card to generate write precompensation. Since write precompensation is either handled internally or not used at all on newer hard
drives the starting write precompensation cylinder is not as important
as it once was. We have omitted write precomp information in the
hard drive list to keep things simple. A valid write precompensation
start cylinder for most older drives can be calculated by dividing the
maximum cylinder number by two.

CDC, Imprimis or Seagate?
Control Data Corporation (CDC) was one of the first manufacturers of high performance 5.25" hard disk drives. CDC has over the
years developed an excellent reputation for reliability. In 1987,
Control Data Corporation named its disk drive division Imprimis.
Recently, the CDC's Imprimis division was purchased by Seagate.
If you are trying to locate an Imprimis drive, please check both the
Seagate and CDC sections.

Miniscribe or Maxtor Colorado?
Due to financial difficulties, Maxtor Corporation aquired
Miniscribe in 1990. Miniscribe is now called Maxtor Colorado.
Maxtor's management and expertise in high capacity drives has
helped improve the Miniscribe product.
If you are trying to locate an older Maxtor Colorado drive, also
check in the Miniscribe section.
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CONVERTING IMPRIMIS TO SEAGATE NUMBERS
IMPRIS

SEAGATE

IMPRIMIS

SEAGATE

IMPRIS

SEAGATE

94155-85

ST4085

94205-51

ST253

94351-00S

ST1201NS

94155-86

ST4086

94205-77

ST279R

94351-230S

ST1239NS

94155-96

ST4097

94211-106

ST2106N

94354-090

STI090A

94155-135

ST4135R

94216-106

ST2106E

94354-111

STIIIIA

94161-182

ST4182N

94221-125

ST2125N

94354-126

ST1126A

94166-182

ST4182E

94241-502

ST2502N

94354-133

ST1133A

94171-350

ST4350N

94244-274

ST2074A

94354-155

ST1156A

94171-376

ST4376N

94244-383

ST2383A

94354-160

ST1162A

94181-385H

ST4385N

94246-182

ST2182E

94354-186

ST1186A

94181-702

ST4702N

94246-383

ST2383E

94354-200

ST1201A

94186-383

ST43836E

94351-090

STI090N

94354-239

ST1239A

94186-383H

ST4384E

94351-111

STIIIIN

94355-100

STII00

94186-442

ST4442E

94351-126

ST1126N

94355-150

ST1150R

94191-766

ST4766N

94351-133S

ST1133NS

94356-155

ST1156E

94196-766

ST4766E

94351-155

ST1156N

94356-200

ST1201E

94204-65

ST274A

94351-155S

ST1156NS

94536-111

STIIIIE

94204-71

ST280A

94351-160

ST1162N

94601-12G/M

ST41200N

94204-74

ST274A

94351-186S

ST1186NS

94601-767H

ST4767N

94204-81

ST280A

94351-200

ST1201N

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FINE TUNING

T

his section contai.ns a few hints on how to get the most out of
, your hard disk subsystem. There are several ways of measuring
disk perforrnance. In the PC world, the most common utility program
for comparing hard disks is CORETEST from Core International.
Running CC)RETEST on your drive yields a crude performance rating
based on the average seek time and data transfer rate of the drive
reported by the systelll BIOS.
If you do not specify any command line options when running
CORETEST, the program defaults to a block size of 64KB. The perfor.mance rating you get based on a 64K block size is only part of the picture. Many common operating systems (including DOS) often transfer
data in blocks smaller than 64KB. To get an idea of how your system
performs 'with these smaller block sizes, use the command
CORETEST/B:xx where xx is the size of the block you would like to
test. Making a graph of the performance ratings you get for different
block sizes gives a more complete picture.

CORETEST is included
on theHDB
companion CD-ROM.

esc Test
CSC off(~rs its own performance test program called CSCTEST that
is supplied on the CD··ROM that is enclosed with the Hard Drive Bible.
Since this program is larger than will fit on the disk in uncompressed
format, it is supplied in a self extracting compressed archive format.
To uncompress it, first change to the directory on your hard drive
where you 'would like to install the test program. Once you are in that
directory, type A:CSCTEST, and the program will automatically unpack
and transfer itself to your hard disk. To view the results, you will need
an EGA, VGA, or Hercules compatible monitor.
CSCTEST gives an evaluation of system performance by accurately
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measuring the number of seeks per second and 512 byte blocks transferred per second. These ratings are combined to give an overall performance rating. This rating can then be compared with the rankings
of other popular systems.
There are several ways of increasing your system performance by
optimizing software setups and not changing hardware.
The two most important steps to a tune up are optimizing interleave and de fragmenting files. The optimum interleave for your hard
disk system is a function of both the hardware and software in your
system. Contrary to popular opinion, 1: 1 is not the optimum interleave for ALL applications. If the controller you are using does not feature a full track read-ahead cache (most older MFM, RLL, and some
imbedded controllers don't), selecting the optimum interleave will
make a significant difference in data transfer rate.
After extensive testing, we have come up with the following rulesof-thumb regarding interleaves for older MFM and RLL controllers:

Use 4:' Sector Interleave With:
Older 4.77MHz XT class machines.

Use 3:' Sector Interleave With:
Older XT class machines with DOS applications.
Older 6MHz and 8MHz AT class machines running DOS.

Use 2:' Sector Interleave With:
Older 10MHz to 16MHz 286/386 machines running DOS.

Use ,:, Sector Interleave With:
All 20MHz or faster 386 machines running Netware.
All 20MHz or faster 386 machines running DOS.
All newer 486 and Pentium machines.
It's interesting to note that a 20MHz 386 machine running DOS can
operate faster with a 2: 1 interleave controller than a 1: 1. This is
because many DOS applications can't operate fast enough to take
advantage of the 1: 1 interleave. By the time the DOS application
requests the next sequential sector of disk data, the 1: 1 formatted disk
has already spun past that sector, and DOS must wait for the disk to
spin another revolution. Fortunately, if you are building up a new system with a clock speed of 20MHz or faster, the choice is clear. Most
modern clone boards with 8MHz I/O channels and fast CPU's work
best with 1: 1 interleave. If you are tuning up an older system with a
clock speed of 20MHz or less, 2: 1 interleave may be the optimum
choice.
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There is really only one way of exactly determining the actual optim.um interleave for your system. Test it. Popular programs like
OPTUNE or SPINRITE let you determine the optimum interleave based
on hardware considerations only. Unfortunately, these programs do
not take into account the software overhead that DOS and other operating systems create. Format the drive with an interleave value one
sector larger than suggested by SPINRITE or OPTUNE. Then load your
applications and make your own performance tests. Record the
results and then reformat with the interleave recommended by the
test program. If performance increases, you have chosen the optimum
interleave. If not, the software overhead of your applications is causing the system to operate better at the higher interleave.
Defragrnenting files is the next step in increasing system performance. As a disk is used over time, files become fragmented. The simplest way to defragment files is with a progra1ll like Central Point
Software's COMPRESS. Alternately, the files can be copied to another
drive and then restored. Defragmenting files will significantly increase
your systern performance.

Bullers and I~ASTOPEN
Appropriate use of the DOS Buffers and FASTOPEN commands will
also inlprove system throughput.
The DC)S Buffers command allocates a fixed amount of memory
that DOS uses to cache data while reading and writing. As many
buffers as possible should be installed in your CONFIG.SYS file. Each
buffer will take a total of 548 bytes of memory (512 bytes for data and
36 for pointers). If you have extended memory available, use the IX
option to store buffers in extended RAM and keep your base 640k free
and clear. If you are using a caching controller, set the DOS Buffers
command as low as possible for best performance.
The DOS FASTC)PEN program tracks the locations of files on a disk
for fast acoess. Access to files in a complex directory structure can be
time consuming. If you run applications that use several files (such as
dBASE, Paradox, or other database programs), FASTOPEN records the
name and physical location on the drive. When the file is reopened,
access time is significantly reduced. If you are using disk intensive
programs vv-ithout FASTOPEN, your disk performance is suffering.
One of the nicest features of FASTOPEN is its ability to use extended memory. For example adding the line FASTOPEN C:100,10/X to
your AUTOEXEC.BAT file would automatically make FASTOPEN load
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using extended memory to track up to 100 files with a 10 entry extent
cache. Unfortunately, once FASTOPEN is loaded, its setup cannot be
changed. To change FASTOPEN settings, reboot the computer.
FASTOPEN is not needed under Windows '95.

Cache Programs

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120 Hard Drive Bible

Caching programs such as DOS SMARTDRY.SYS dramatically
improve disk system performance. Another benefit of using a good
caching program is extended drive life. Drive life is based not only on
the number of power on hours (POH), but also on the number of seek
operations. Adding even a small RAM cache will prolong drive life significantly by reducing the number of seeks necessary. If you are using
DOS 5.0 or later, we recommend you try the SMARTDRV.SYS program
included with DOS. It offers good performance, particularly with
expanded memory. You can improve drive performance dramatically
without buying extra software by adding SMARTDRV to your CONFIG.SYS file.
For a few dollars more, many excellent third-party caching programs are available that offer improved performance over SMARTDRV.
Two of the best cache programs we have found are PC-Cache from
Central Point Software and Speed Cache from Storage Dimensions.
Both of these programs enable disk caching using extended or
expanded systenl memory. If you purchased IBM DOS 6.1 or later, you
received PC-Cache and a defragmenting program free with DOS smart buy. PC-Cache has an adjustable read-ahead feature which
improves sequential access on large files.
If you are running Unix, Database programs, or other extremely
disk intensive programs, the ultimate solution (if you can afford it) is
a caching controller card. A caching controller can provide reduced
data access times, improve throughputs, and improve your hard drive's
life span. A quick Windows perfornlance boost can be had by moving
the swap file. If this swap file is located near frequently used data, performance will be increased. If the swap file is moved to a separate
drive, performance is even better. For DOS and Microsoft Windows
users, a caching controller frees system memory for applications. Due
to the large number of requests for an inexpensive, high performance
caching controllers, CSC has designed the CSC FastCache™64 ISA
SCSI controller. We are now designing both caching and non caching
VESA VL-Bus and PCMCIA versions. A number of other Fast SCSI
caching and non-caching controllers are available, and if disk I/O is a
bottleneck, they are all worth considering.
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To sum up the fine tuning of your DOS hard drive, perform the following fiv<:: steps for better disk performance:
1. Find the optimum interleave (Reformat if necessary).
2. COlIlpreSS and defragment.

HOT TIP

3. Set buffers correctly.
4. Install FASTOPEN.
5. Use SMARTDRY, PC-CACHE, or another cache program if you do
not have a caching controller.

6. Move swap

fil(~s

to a physical area near data files, or to another

drivle.

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HARD DRIVE PARAMETERS

[M-OD-EL--FORMATTED
~UMBER _ _ _ _ _
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

10
20
20
106
106
212
212
20

2
4
2
2
2
4
4
2

615
615
615
2109
2109
2109
2109
615

17
17
26
63
63
63
63
26

60
60
60
13
13
13
13
60

MFM
MFM
MFM
IDE
SCSI
IDE
SCSI
RLL

3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5"
3.5"
3.5"
3.5"
3.5 X 1"

5
10
15
20

2
4
6
8

320
320
320
320

17
17
17
17

90
90
90
90

MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM

5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"

4
4
2
2
2
2

1024
1488
1024
1323
1410
1632

60
60
60
60
59
63

15
15
19
19
19
19

IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE

2.5"
2.5"
2.5"
2.5"
2.5"
2.5"

15
3
5
7

1632
645
645
645

54
17
17
17

16
38
33
33

ESDI
MFM
MFM
MFM

5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"

CMOS
SETTINGS

ALPS AMERICA
DRND-10A
DRND-20A
DRPO-20D
DR311C
DR311 D
DR312C
DR312D
RPO-20A

13x954x63
13x965x33

AMPEX
PYXIS-7
PYXIS-13
PYSIX-20
PYXIS-27

FH
FH
FH
FH

AREAL TECHNOLOGY
A 120
A 180
MlD-2060
ND-2080
2085
2100

136
81
62
80
85
100

8x548x61
10x715x50
2x1024x60
9x1021x17
10x976x17
12x957x17

ATASI TECIINOLOG" INC.
AT-676
AT-3020
AT-3033
AT-3046

765
17
28
39

FH
FH
FH
FH

'---

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 123

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

AT-3051

43

7

704

17

33

MFM

AT-3051+

44

7

733

17

33

MFM

AT-3075

44

7

733

17

33

MFM

AT-3075

67

8

1024

17

33

MFM

AT-3085

71

8

1024

26

28

RLL

AT-3128

109

8

1024

26

28

RLL

AT-6120

1051

15

1925

71

13

ESDI

CMOS
SETTINGS

FORM
FACTOR

11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH
11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH

AURA ASSOCIATES
1.8 11
11
1.8

AU63

63

2

1330

43

17

PCMCIA

AU126

125

4

1330

43

17

PCMCIA

6185

23

6

440

17

99

MFM

6186

15

4

440

17

70

MFM

6187

8

2

440

17

70

MFM

6188-R1

10

2

612

17

70

MFM

6188-R3

21

4

612

17

70

MFM

6

1800

72

12

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X 111

15x1021x51
16x1017x78

BASF
11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH

BRAND TECHNOLOGIES
BT 3400

400

BT 3650

650

10

1800

36

12

BT 8085

71

8

1024

17

25

BT 8128

109

8

1024

26

25

BT 8170

142

8

1024

36

36

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X
11
MFM
5.25
11
5.25
RLL
11
ESDI
5.25

111

BT 9170A

150

7

1165

36

16

IDE

3.5 X 111

BT 9170E

150

7

1166

36

16

ESDI

3.5 X 111

BT 9170S

150

7

1166

36

16

SCSI

3.5 X 111

BT 9220A

200

9

1209

36

16

IDE

3.5 X 111

BT 9220E

200

9

1210

36

16

ESDI

3.5 X 111

BT 9220S

200

9

1210

36

16

SCSI

3.5 X 111

0-530

25

3

987

17

65

MFM

0-550

43

5

987

17

65

0-570

60

7

987

17

65

0-585

71

7

1166

17

65

5.25 11 FH
11
MFM
5.25 FH
MFM
5.25 11 FH
11
MFM/RLL 5.25 FH

FH
FH
FH
9x968x33

12x968x33

BULL

C. ITOH ELECTRONICS (also see Ye-Data)
YD-3042

44

4

788

26

26

RLL

YD-3082

87

8

788

26

26

RLL

124 Hard Drive Bible

5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408)

[MODEL
~MBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY
---

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

YD-3530

32

5

731

17

26

MFM

5.25" FH

YD-3540

45

7

731

17

26

MFM

5.25" FH

F-3053

44

5

1024

17

20

MFM

3.5 X 1"

F-·3080E

68

5

1024

26

20

ESDI

3.5 xi"

F-3080S

68

5

1024

26

20

SCSI

3.5 xi"

F-3127E

109

5

1024

35

20

ESDI

3.5 X 1"

F-3127S

109

5

1024

35

20

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

734·878~

CMOS
SETTINGS

CARDIFF

CDC (see also Seagate)
94155-19

18

3

697

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-21

21

3

697

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-25 Wren I

24

4

697

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-28

24

4

697

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-36 Wren I

36

5

697

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-38

31

5

733

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-48 Wren

40

5

925

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-51 Wren

43

5

989

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-57 Wren

48

6

926

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-67 Wren

56

7

926

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-77 Wren

64

8

926

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-85 Wren

71

8

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-86 Wren

72

9

925

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155-96 Wr,en I

80

9

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

94155- '120 V\fren II

102

8

960

26

28

RLL

5.25" FH

94155- '135 V\fren II

115

9

960

26

28

RLL

5.25" FH

94156-48 Wr,en II

40

5

925

17

28

ESDI

5.25" FH

94156-67 Wnen II

56

7

925

17

28

ESDI

5.25" FH

94161-86 Wnen II

72

9

925

17

28

ESDI

5.25" FH

94161-86 Wnen III

86

9

969

26

17

SCSI

5.25" FH

94161-101 Wren III 86

9

969

26

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

94161-121 Wren III 120

7

969

26

17

SCSI

5.25" FH

94161-141 Wren III 140

7

969

26

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

150

9

969

36

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

94161-182 Wren III 155

9

969

36

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

94166-101 Wren III 84

5

969

34

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

94166-141 VVren III 118

7

969

34

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

94161-155

94166-182 Wren III 152

9

969

34

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

94171-300

288

9

1365

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

94171-344

335

9

1549

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 125

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734-8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

94171-350 Wren IV 300

9

1412

46

17

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94171-375 Wren IV 375

9

1549

35

16

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94171-376 Wren IV 330

9

1546

45

18

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94181-3850

337

15

791

36

11

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94181-385H

330

15

791

55

11

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94181-574 Wren V 574

15

1549

36

16

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94181-702 Wren V 601

15

1546

54

16

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94181-702M Wren V613

15

1549

54

16

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94186-265 Wren V 221

9

1412

34

18

ESDI

5.25 11 FH

94186-324 Wren V 270

11

1412

34

18

ESDI

5.25 11 FH

94186-383 Wren V 319

13

1412

34

18

ESDI

5.25 11 FH

94186-383H

319

15

1224

34

15

ESDI

5.25 11 FH

94186-383S Wren V 338

13

1412

34

19

ESDI

5.25 11 FH

94186-442 Wren V 368

15

1412

34

16

ESDI

5.25 11 FH

94186-442H Wren V 368

15

1412

34

16

ESDI

5.25 11 FH

94191-766 Wren VI 676

15

1632

54

16

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94191-766M

676

15

1632

54

16

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94196-383 Wren VI 338

13

1412

34

16

ESDI

5.25 11 FH

94196-766 Wren VI 664

15

1632

54

16

ESDI

5.25 11 FH

94204-65

65

5

948

26

29

IDE

5.25 11 HH

94204-71

71

5

1032

26

29

IDE

5.25 11 HH

CMOS
SETTINGS

5x989x27

94204-74 Wren II

71

5

948

26

29

IDE

5.25 HH

8x933x17

94204-81 Wren II

71

5

1032

26

28

IDE

5.25" HH

8x1024x27

11

5.25 HH

5.25 11 HH

11

94205-30 Wren II

25

3

989

26

28

94205-41 Wren II

38

3

989

26

28

94205-51 Wren II

43

5

989

26

28

94205-77

65

5

989

26

28

RLL
RLL
RLL
RLL

94205-75 Wren II

60

5

989

26

30

IDE

94211-91 Wren II

91

5

969

36

16

SCSI

5.25 FH

94211-106 Wren III 91

5

1022

26

18

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94211-209 Wren V

5

1547

36

18

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

94216-106 Wren III 89

5

1024

34

18

ESDI

5.25 11 HH

94221-125 Wren V 107

3

1544

36

18

SCSI

5.25 11 HH

94221-190 Wren V 190

5

1547

36

18

SCSI

5.25 11 HH

94221-209 Wren V 183

5

1544

36

18

SCSI

5.25 11 HH

94241-383 Wren VI 338

7

1261

36

14

SCSI

5.25 11 HH

94241-502 Wren VI 435

7

1755

69

16

SCSI

5.25 11 HH

94244-219

191

4

1747

54

16

IDE

5.25 11 HH

16x536x44

94244-274 Wren VI 191

4

1747

IDE

11

14x983x33

94244-383 Wren VI 338

7

1747

11

11x952x63

94246-182 Wren VI 160

4

126 Hard Drive Bible

142

1453

54
54
54

16
16
15

IDE
ESDI

5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5x989x26

11

5.25 HH
5.25 HH
11

5.25 HH
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

94246-383 VI/ren VI 338

7

1747

54

15

ESDI

94295-51

43

5

989

17

28

MFM

94311-136S

120

5

1068

36

15

SCSI-2

5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 FH
3.5 11 3H

94314-136

120

5

1068

36

15

IDE

3.5 11 3H

CAPACITY
---

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

11x917x17

94316-111 Swift

98

5

1072

36

23

ESDI

3.5 X111

94316-136

120

5

1268

36

15

ESDI

3.5 X 111

94316-155

138

7

1072

36

15

ESDI

3.5 X 111

94316-200 Swift

177

9

1072

36

15

ESDI

3.5 X 111

94335-55

46

5

1268

17

25

MFM

3.5 X 111

94335-100

8~3

9

1268

17

25

MFM

3.5 X 111

94351-90

79

5

1068

29

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-111

98

5

1068

36

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-126

111

7

1068

29

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-128

111

7

1068

36

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-133 Swift

116

7

1268

36

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-133S Swift

116

5

1268

36

15

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

94351-134

117

7

1068

36

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-155 Swift

138

7

1068

36

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-155S Swift

138

7

1068

36

15

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

94351-160 Swift

142

9

1068

29

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-172

150

9

1068

36

15

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

94351-186S

163

7

1268

36

15

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

94351-200

177

9

1068

36

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-200S

177

9

1068

36

15

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

94351-230 Swift

210

9

1272

36

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

94351-230S Swift

210

9

1268

36

15

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

94354-90 Swift

79

5

1072

29

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

10x536x29

94354-'\ 11 Swift

98

5

1072

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

10x1024x17

94354-126 Swift

111

7

1072

29

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

13x984x17

117

5

1272

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

14x961x17

94354-155 Swift

138

7

1072

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

16x993x17

94354-160 Swift

143

9

1072

29

15

IDE

3.5 X 1"

9x942x33

94354- "186 Swift

164

7

1272

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 1"

10x971x33

94354-200 Swift

177

9

1072

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

11x956x33

94354-230 Swift

211

9

1272

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

12x989x3

94355-55 Swift

46

5

1072

17

16

MFM

3.5 X 111

94355-1 00 Swift

83

9

1072

17

15

MFM

3.5 X 111

94355-150 Swift

128

9

1072

25

15

RLL

3.5 X 111

94354-133 Swift

94356-111 Swift

98

5

1072

36

15

ESDI

3.5 X 111

94356-155 Swift

138

7

1072

36

15

ESDI

3.5 X 111

94356-200 Swift

171

9

1072

36

15

ESDI

3.5 X 111

©

esc 1996

Hard Drive Bible 127

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

94601 -12G/M

1037

15

1931

VAR

15

SCSI

5.25" FH

94601-76'7H

665

15

1356

64

12

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

94601-767M

676

15

1508

54

12

SCSI

5.25" FH

97155-36

30

5

733

17

28

MFM

8"

9720-1123 SABRE 964

19

1610

VAR

15

SMD

8"

9720-1230 SABRE

1236

15

1635

VAR

15

SMO/SCSI8"

9720-2270 SABRE

1948

19

2551

VAR

12

SMD

8"

9720-2500 SABRE 2145

19

2220

VAR

12

SMD

8"

9720-368 SABRE

368

10

1635

VAR

18

SMO/SCSI8"

9720-500 SABRE

500

10

1217

VAR

18

SMO/SCSI8"

9720-736 SABRE

741

15

1217

VAR

15

SMO/SCSI8"

9720-850 SABRE

851

15

1635

VAR

15

SMO/SCSI8"

97229-1150

990

19

1784

VAR

15

IPI-2

8"

97500-12G

1050

17

1884

VAR

15

IPI-2

5.25" FH

97500;.15G Elite

1285

17

1991

VAR

16

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

BJ7D5A 177731608 29

5

670

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

BJ7D5A177731613

33

5

733

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

BJ7D5A177731614

23

4

670

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

55

3

1050

35

28

ESDI

5.25" FH

CMOS
SETTINGS

CENTURY DATA
CAST 10203E
CAST 10203S

55

3

1050

35

28

SCSI

5.25" FH

CAST 10304E

75

4

1050

35

28

ESDI

5.25" FH

CAST 10304S

75

4

1050

35

28

SCSI

5.25" FH

CAST 10305E

94

5

1050

35

28

ESDI

5.25" FH

CAST 10305S

94

5

1050

35

28

SCSI

5.25" FH

CAST 14404E

114

4

1590

35

25

ESDI

5.25" FH

CAST 14404S

114

4

1590

35

25

SCSI

5.25" FH

CAST 14405E

140

5

1590

35

25

ESDI

5.25" FH

CAST 14405S

140

5

1590

35

25

SCSI

5.25" FH

CAST 14406E

170

6

1590

35

25

ESDI

5.25" FH

CAST 14406S

170

6

1590

35

25

SCSI

5.25" FH

CAST 24509E

258

9

1599

35

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

CAST 24509S

258

9

1599

35

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

CAST 24611E

315

11

1599

35

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

CAST 24611S

315

11

1599

35

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

CAST 24713E

372

13

1599

35

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

CAST 24713S

372

13

1599

35

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

10

4

306

17

99

MFM

5.25" FH

CMI
CM 3206
128 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
[NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

CM 3426

20

4

615

17

85

MFM

CM 5018H

4

2

256

17

105

MFM

CM 5206

5

2

306

17

99

MFM

CM 5410

8

4

256

17

105

MFM

CM 5412

10

4

306

17

99

MFM

CM 5616

13

6

256

17

105

MFM

CM 5619

15

6

306

17

105

MFM

CN 5826

21

8

306

17

99

MFM

CM 6213

11

2

640

17

105

MFM

CM 6426

21

4

615

17

40

MFM

CM 6426S

22

4

640

17

40

MFM

CM 6640

33

6

640

17

40

MFM

CM 7660

50

6

960

17

40

MFM

CM 7880

67

8

960

17

40

MFM

---

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11
11
5.25
11
5.25
5.25 11

FH
FH
FH

FH
11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH

CMS ENHANCEMENTS, INC.

F320AT-CA

320

15

1224

36

15

ESDI

F70ESDI-T

73

2

1224

36

30

ESDI

H330E'1

330

7

1780

54

14

ESDI

H340E'l

340

7

1780

54

14

ESDI

PS Ex~ressl150

150

7

1224

36

17

ESDI

5.25 11 FH
11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH
11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH
11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH

PS Express/:320

320

15

1224

36

15

ESDI

11
5.25 FH

CG-906

5

2

306

17

85

MFM

CG-912

11

4

306

17

65

MFM

CG-925

21

4

612

17

65

MFM

PT-912

11

2

612

17

40

MFM

5.25 11
11
5.25
11
5.25
5.25 11

PT-925

21

4

612

17

40

MFM

2040

44

4

820

26

35

MFM

2041

44

4

820

26

29

IDE

2082

86

6

820

34

29

SCSI

5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH

788

26

29

SCSI

3.5

F115ESDI-T

114

7

915

35

30

ESDI

F150AT-CA

150

9

969

34

17

IDE

F150AT-WCA

150

7

1224

36

17

IDE

F150EQ-WCA

150

7

1224

36

17

ESDI

9x986x33
9x986x33

COGITO
FH
FH
FH

FH
11
5.25 FH

COMPORT

CONNER PERIPHERALS, INCfP
CP-340
© CSC 1996

42

4

X

111
Hard Drive Bible 129

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

CMOS
SETTINGS

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CP-342

40

4

805

26

29

IDE

3.5

X

1"

4x805x26

CP-344

43

4

788

26

29

IDE

3.5

X

1"

4x788x26

CP-2020

21

2

642

32

23

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

CP-2024 KATO

21

2

653

32

40

IDE

2.5 HH

823

38

119

IDE

2.5 HH

2x823x38

IDE

2.5 HH

4x823x38

2x653x32

CP-2034 PANCHO

32

2

CP-2064 PANCHO

64

4

823

38

19

CP-2084 PANCHO

85

8

548

38

19

IDE

2.5 HH

8x548x38

CP-2304

215

8

1348

39

19

IDE

3.5

X

1"

12x989x35

CP-3000

43

5

976

17

27

IDE

3.5

X

1"

5x988x17

CP-3020

21

2

622

33

27

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

CP-3022

21

2

622

33

27

IDE

3.5

X

1"

2x622x33

CP-3024

22

2

636

33

27

IDE

3.5

X

1"

2x636x33

42

2

1026

40

25

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

CP-3044

43

2

1047

40

25

IDE

3.5

X

1"

CP-3100

105

8

776

33

25

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

CP-3102

104

8

776

33

25

IDE

3.5

X

1"

8x776x33

CP-3104

105

8

776

33

25

IDE

3.5

X

1"

8x776x33

CP-3111

112

8

832

33

25

IDE

3.5

X

1"

8x832x33

CP-3114

112

8

832

33

25

IDE

3.5

X

1"

8x832x33

CP-3180

84

6

832

33

25

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

CP-3184

84

6

832

33

25

IDE

3.5

X

1"

CP-3200F

213

8

1366

38

19/16

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

CP-3204F

213

16

683

38

19/16

IDE

3.5

X

1"

6x683x33

CP-3209F

213

4

1366

38

16

MCA

3.5

X

1"

6x683x38

CP-3304

340

8

1806

46

16

IDE

3.5

X

1"

16x659x63

CP-3360

360

8

1806

49

12

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

CP-3364

360

8

1806

6349

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

CP-3500

510

12

1695

49

12

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

CP-3504

509

12

1695

49

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

CP-3540

540

12

1806

49

12

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

CP-3544

540

12

1806

49

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

CP-4024 STUBBY

22

2

627

34

29

IDE

3.5

X

1"

CP-4044 STUBBY

43

2

1104

38

29

IDE

3.5

X

1"

CP-30060

60

2

1524

39

19

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

CP-30064

61

2

1522

39

-

IDE

3.5

X

1"

4x762x39

CP-3544

540

12

1806

49

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

16x987x38

CP-3554

544

16

1054

63

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

CMOS

CP-4024 STUBBY

22

2

627

34

29

IDE

3.5

X

1"

2x627x34

CP-4044 STUBBY

43

2

1104

38

50

IDE

3.5

X

1"

7x699x17

CP-30060

60

2

1524

39

19

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

CP-30064

61

2

1522

39

14

IDE

3.5

X

1"

CP-3040

130 Hard Drive Bible

5x988x17

6x832x33

11x702x63
16x987x63
16x987x38
7x699x17

4x762x39
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·878'

IMODEL
I!!!!MBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

CP-30080E

85

2

1806

47

17

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X 1"

CP-30080

84

4

1053

39

17

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

8x529x39

CP-30084

84

4

1058

39

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

8x529x39

CP-30084E

85

4

903

46

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

8x529x39

120

4

1522

39

19

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

CP-30104H Allegh. 120

4

1522

39

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

8x762x39

CP-30104 HOPI

120

4

1522

39

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

8x762x39

CP-30109 HOPI

120

4

1522

39

19

MCA

3.5 X 1"

CP-30170E

170

4

1806

46

17

IDE

3.5 X 1"

CP-30200

212

4

2119

49

12

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

CP-30204

213

4

21'19

49

12

IDE

3.5 X 1"

16x683x38

CP-30254

251

4

1984

62

12

IDE

3.5 X 1"

4x990x33

CP-30344

343

4

1121

60

13

IDE

3.5 X 1"

11x966x63

CP-30540

545

6

1984

62

10

FSCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

CP-31370

1371.80 14

2694

63

10

FSCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

CP-30100 HOPI

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

11x941x33

CORE INTERNATIONAL
AT 30

31

5

733

17

26

MFM

5.25" FH

AT30R

48

5

733

26

26

RLL

5.25" FH

AT 32

31

5

733

17

21

MFM

5.25" HH

AT32R

48

5

733

26

21

RLL

5.25" HH

AT 40

40

5

924

17

26

MFM

5.25" FH

AT40R

61

5

924

26

26

RLL

5.25" FH

AT 63

42

5

988

17

26

MFM

5.25" FH

AT63R

65

5

988

26

26

RLL

5.25" FH

AT 72

72

9

924

17

26

MFM

5.25" FH

AT72R

107

9

924

26

26

RLL

5.25" FH

AT 150

150

8

1024

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

HC 40

40

4

564

35

10

RLL

5.25" FH

HC 90

91

5

969

35

16

RLL

5.25" HH

HC 150

156

9

969

35

16

RLL

5.25" FH

HC 175

177

9

1072

35

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

HC 260

260

12

1212

35

25

RLL

5.25" FH

HC 310

311

12

1582

35

16

RLL

5.25" FH

HC 315

340

8

1447

57

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

HC 380

383

15

1412

35

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

HC 650

658

15

1661

53

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

HC 650S

663

14

1661

56

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

HC 655

680

16

1447

57

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

HC 1000S

1200

16

1918

64

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

733

17

21

MFM

5.25" HH

OPTIMA 30
© CSC 1996

31

5

Hard Drive Bible 13'

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

OPTIMA 30R

48

5

733

26

21

RLL

5.25" HH

OPTIMA 40

41

5

963

17

26

MFM

5.25" HH

OPTIMA 40R

64

5

963

26

26

RLL

5.25" HH

OPTIMA '70

72

9

918

17

26

MFM

5.25" FH
5.25" FH

OPTIMA '70R

109

9

918

26

26

RLL

CMOS
SETTINGS

CORPORATE SYSTEMS CENTER
GO 2024

21

2

653

32

23

10E

2.5" HH

4x615x17

GO 2044

40

4

552

38

19

IDE

2.5" HH

5x980x17

GO 2061

60

4

823

38

19

10E

2.5" HH

4x823x38

GO 2064

60

4

823

38

19

IDE

2.5" HH

4x823x38

GO 2081

85

4

1097

38

19

10E

2.5" HH

10x976x17

GO 2084

85

4

1097

38

19

10E

2.5" HH

10x976x17

GO 2088

121

4

1097

38

19

10E

2.5" HH

10x976x17

GO 2121

120

4

1123

53

17

10E

2.5" HH

14x992x17

GO 2124

120

4

1123

53

19

IDE

2.5" HH

14x99x17

GO 2254

252

6

1339

47

12

IDE

2.5" HH

16x489x63

GO 30001A

42

2

1045

40

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

5x980x17

GO 30080E

80

4

1053

39

15

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

GO 30084E

85

4

1053

39

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

8x526x39

GO 30085E

80

2

1806

46

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

4x903x46

GO 30087

80

2

1806

46

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

4x903x46

GO 30100

121

4

1522

39

19

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

GO 301000

121

4

1524

39

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

8x762x39

GO 30174E

170

4

1806

46

15

IDE

3.5 X 1"

8x903x46

63

19

IDE

3.5 X 1"

8x904x46

GO 30175E

170

2

2116

GO 30200

212

4

2119

49

12

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

GO 30204

212

4

2119

49

12

IDE

3.5 X 1"

12x989x35

GO 30214

213

4

2119

49

14

IDE

3.5 X 1"

16x685x38

GO 30254

251

4

1895

62

15

IDE

3.5 X 1"

10x895x55

GO 30270

270

16

524

63

10

SGSI-2

3.5 X 1"

GO 30344

330

4

2116

63

12

IDE

3.5 X 1"

GO 3040A

42

2

1026

40

25

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

GO 3044

42

2

1047

40

25

IDE

3.5 X 1"

5x988x17

GO 3045

42

2

1047

40

25

IDE

3.5 X 1"

5x977x17

GO 30540

545

6

2243

60

10

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

GO 30544
GO 30544

540

6

2249

59

12

IDE

3.5 X 1"

540

6

2242

47

10

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

GO 31050

1037

8

2756

47

10

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

GO 3114

112

8

832

33

15

10E

3.5 X 1"

GO 31370

1300

14

2387

37

10

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

132 Hard Drive Bible

16x904x46

16x1023x63

8x832x33

@

CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·878'

/MODEL

~MMR

FORMATTED NO. OF
NO. OF
SECTORS
AVERAGE
INTERFACE FORM
CMOS
________C._~p._~_a_T_Y___
m_~_D_S____
C~_lI_~_m_s__p_m_m_A_a___'_N_Ms___________
M_C~_~_____S_En_m_G_S______~

GO 32000

2"12

8

1366

38

15

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

GO 3200F

2"12

8

1366

38

15

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

GO 3300

340

8

1807

46

12

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

GO 3301

85

8

1806

46

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

GO 3500

510

12

1695

49

12

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

GO 3504

5'10

12

1806

46

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

16x987x63

GO 3544

524

6

1053

63

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

16x1023x63

GO 5500

510

16

1441

62

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

PI - 16E

1340

19

1772

77

15

ESDI

5.25" FH

McHuge

334

20

1020

36

18

SCSI

EXT

McHuge II

641

15

1224

48

16

SCSI

EXT

44

5

1024

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

TM-853

44

8

640

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

DTM-885

71

8

1024

17

36

MFM

5.25" FH

-

-

IDE

2.5" 4H

FSCSI-2

2.5" 4H

-

9.5

FSCSI-2

3.5" 3H

16x659x63

DATA TECH MEMORIES
DTM-553

DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION
DSP2022A

220

5

DSP2022S

220

5

DSP3053L

535

4

-

DSP3085

852

14

-

-

9

FSCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

DSP3105

1050

14

-

9

FSCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

DSP3107L

1070

8

-

9.5

FSCSI-2

3.53H

DSP3133L

1337

10

9.5

FSCSI-2

3.53H

DSP3160

1600

16

-

9.7

FSCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

DSP3210

2148

16

-

9.5

FSCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

DSP5200

2000

21

12

FSCSI-2

5.25" FH

DSP5300

3000

21

FSCSI-2

5.25" FH

3572

25

-

12

DSP5350

-

-

12

FSCSI-2

5.25" FH

DSP5400

4000

26

-

-

12

FSCSI-2

5.25" FH

DSP34300

4300

20

-

-

9

FSCSI-2

3.5

VP3107

1075

5

FSCSI-2

3.5" 3H

2150

10

-

9

VP3215

-

9

FSCSI-2

3.5" 3H

RHD-20

21

2

615

34

23

IDE

3.5

X

1"

RHD-60

63

2

1024

60

22

IDE

3.5

X

1"

153

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

X

1"

DISC TEC

DISCTRON tALSO SEE OTARI)
0-503

3

2

--"
© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible

13~

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

FORM
FAaOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SEaORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

0-504

4

2

215

17

85

MFM

0-506

5

4

153

17

85

MFM

0-507

5

2

306

17

85

MFM

0-509

8

4

215

17

85

MFM

0-512

11

8

153

17

85

MFM

0-513

11

6

215

17

85

MFM

0-514

11

4

306

17

85

MFM

0-518

15

8

215

17

85

MFM

0-519

16

6

306

17

85

MFM

5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH

0-526

21

8

306

17

85

MFM

5.25 11 FH

11

2

612

17

85

MFM

5.25 11 FH

HF12

10

2

301

78

65

SCSI

HF24

20

2

506

78

60

SCSI

5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH

EC-50

50

1

1720

60

40

10E

3.5 X 111

2x860x60

EC-100

100

2

1720

60

40

10E

3.5 X 111

2x1005x17

EC3-100

100

1

2300

85

20

10E

3.5 X 111

2x957x17

EC3-200

200

2

2300

85

20

10E

3.5 X 1"

2x986x33

OISCACHE 10

10

4

320

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

OISCACHE 20

20

8

320

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

EMS1760

663

-

-

18

ESOI

5.25 11

ER2E/760

663

-

17

ESOI

5.25"

ES36/760-1

663

-

-

-

-

17

ESOI

5.25"

HO 850

11

4

306

17

99

MFM

5.25" HH

HO 860

21

4

612

17

99

MFM

5.25" HH

42

4

1040

27

25

10E

3.5 X 1"

5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH

DMA
306

DTe

EeOL.2

ELeOH

EMULEX

EPSON

ESPERT
EP-340A

134 Hard Drive Bible

5x919x17

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

/MODEL
t~MBER

FORMATTED
___
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SEGORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FAGOR

17

65

MFM

3.5

X

1"

65

MFM

3.5

X

1"

CMOS
SETTINGS

FUJI
FK301-13

10

4

306

FK302-13

10

2

612

FK302-26

21

4

612

17

65

MFM

3.5

X

1"

FK302-39

32

6

612

17

65

MFM

3.5

X

1"

FK303-52

40

8

615

17

65

MFM

3.5

X

1"

FK305-26

2'1

4

615

17

65

MFM

3.5

X

1"

FK305-39

32

6

615

17

65

MFM

3.5

X

1"

FK305-39R

32

4

615

26

65

RLL

3.5

X

1"

FK305-58R

49

6

615

26

65

RLL

3.50 HH

FK308S-39Ft

31

4

615

26

65

SCSI

3.50 HH

FK308S-58Ft

45

6

615

26

65

SCSI

3.50 HH

FK309-26

20

4

615

17

65

MFM

3.50 HH

FK309-39

32

6

615

17

65

MFM

3.50 HH

FK309-39R

30

4

615

26

65

RLL

3.50 HH

FK309S-50Ft

4'1

4

615

26

47

SCSI

3.50 HH

17

FUJITSU AJVlERICA, INC.
M 22250/02

2'1

4

615

32

40/35

MFM

3.5

X

1"

M 22250R

32

4

615

26

35

RLL

3.5

X

1"

M 22260/02

30

6

615

32

40/35

MFM

3.5

X

1"

M 22250R

49

6

615

26

35

RLL

3.5

X

1"

M 22270/02

40

8

615

32

40/35

MFM

3.5

X

1"

M 22270/02

65

8

615

26

35

RLL

3.5

X

1"

M 2230AS

5

2

320

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

M 2230AT

5

2

320

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

M 2231

5

2

306

17

80

MFM

5.25" FH

M 2233AS

11

4

320

17

80

MFM

5.25" FH

M 2233AT

1'1

4

320

17

95

MFM

5.25" HH

M 2234AS

16

6

320

17

80

MFM

5.25" FH

M 2235AS

22

8

320

17

80

MFM

5.25" FH

M 2241 ASIAS2

25

4

754

32

33/30

MFM

5.25" FH

M 2242ASIAS2

43

7

754

17

33/30

MFM

5.25" FH

M 2243ASIAS2

68

11

754

17

33/30

MFM

5.25" FH

M 2243R

110

7

1186

26

25

RLL

5.25" FH

M 2243T

68

7

1186

17

25

MFM

5.25" HH

M 2245SA

120

7

823

35

25

SCSI

5.25" HH

M 2246E

172

10

823

35

25

ESOI

5.25" FH

M 2246SA

148

10

823

35

25

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2247E

143

7

1243

64

18

ESOI

5.25" FH

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 13!

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734-8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

M 2247S

138

7

1243

65

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2247SA

149

7

1243

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2247SB

160

7

1243

19

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2248E

224

11

1243

64

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

M 2248S

221

11

1243

65

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2248SA

238

11

1243

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 22488B

252

11

1243

19

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2249E

305

15

1243

64

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

M 22498

303

15

1243

65

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2249SA

324

15

1243

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2249SB

343

15

1243

19

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2261E

326

8

1658

53

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

M 2262E

448

11

1658

48

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

M 2614T

180

8

1334

33

20

IDE

3.5 X 1"

M 26/22SA

330

8

1435

56

12

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

M 2622T

330

8

1435

56

12

IDE

3.5 X 1"

M 2623SA

425

10

1435

56

12

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

M 2623T

425

10

1435

56

12

IDE

3.5 X 1"

M 2624SA

520

12

1435

56

12

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

M 2624T

520

12

1435

56

12

IDE

3.5 X 1"

M 2635FA

425

9

1435

64

12

SCSI-1 &2 3.5 X 1"

M 2651S

1313

16

1944

64

11

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

M 2652S

1752

20

1944

84

11

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

M 2652P

1586

20

1893

84

11

IPI-2

5.25" FH

M 2653

1400

15

2078

88

12

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2654

2100

21

2179

88

12

SCSI

5.25" FH

M 2671P

2640

15

2671

88

12

IPI-2

5 x8.5 x15"

CMOS
SETTINGS

HEWLETT·PACKARD
HP-97500

20

-

-

-

-

SCSI

3.5x 1"

HP-97530E

136

4

-

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

HP-97530S

204

6

-

-

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

HP-97532E

103

-

-

-

17

ESDI

5.25" FH

HP-97500

20

4

615

17

28

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

HP-97530E

136

4

1229

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

HP-97530S

204

6

1643

64

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

HP-97532E

103

4

1643

64

17

ESDI

5.25" FH

HP-97533E

155

6

1643

64

17

ESDI

5.25" FH

HP-97536E

311

12

1643

64

17

ESDI

5.25" FH

HP-97544E

340

8

1457

57

17

ESDI

5.25" FH

HP-97544S/O

331

8

1447

56

17

SCSI

5.25" FH

136 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporale Systems Center (408) 734-878'

MODEL

INUMBER

FORMATTED
___
CAPACITY

HP-97544T/P

331

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

8

1447

56

17

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

ESDI

5.25" FH

CMOS
SETTINGS

HP-97548E

680

16

1457

57

17

HP-97548S/F

663

16

1447

56

17

SCSI

5.25" FH

HP-97548T/P

663

16

1447

56

17

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-97549T/P

1000

16

1911

64

18

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-97556E

681

11

1680

72

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

HO-97556

677

11

1670

72

13.5

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-97556T/P

673

11

1670

72

14

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-97558E

1084

1962

72

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

HP-97558

1069

15
1,,)c·

1935

72

13.5

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-97558T/P

1075

15

1952

72

14

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-97560

1355

19

1935

72

13.5

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-97560E

1374

19

1962

72

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

HP-97560T/P

1363

19

1952

72

14

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-C2233

234

5

1546

72

12.6

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X 1"

HP-C2233S

238

5

1511

49

13

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

HP-C2234

328

7

1546

61

12.6

IDE

3.5

X

1"

HP-C2234S

334

7

1511

61

13

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

HP-C2235

422

9

1546

61

12.6

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X 1"

HP-C2235S

429

9

1511

73

13

SCSI-2

3.5

HP-C3007

1370

13

2255

73

11.5

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-C3009

1792

17

2255

73

11.5

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

HP-C3010

2003

19

2255

73

11.5

SCSI-2

5.25" FH
5.25" FH

HP-C3010
HP-D1660A
HP-D1661A

X

13x1006x63

1"

19

1100

73

9

SCSI-2

333

8

1457

57

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

667

16

1457

57

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

1027

10x1016x63

HITACHI AJVlERICA
OK 301-1

10

4

306

17

85

MFM

3.5

X

1"

OK 301-2

15

6

306

17

85

MFM

3.5

X

1"

OK 312C-25

209

10

1076

38

16

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

OK 312C-25

251

12

1076

38

16

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

OK 314C-41

419

14

1076

38

17

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

DK315C-11

1100

15

1457

63

11.8

FSCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

OK 315C-14

1400

15

1457

63

11.8

FSCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

OK 502-2

2'1

4

615

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

DK511-5

30

5

699

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

DK511-5

42

7

699

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

17

23

MFM

5.25" FH

DK511-8

67

10

823

OK 512-8

67

5

823

34

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

OK 512C-8

6-'

5

823

34

23

SCSI

5.25" FH

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 13J

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

CMOS
SETTINGS

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SEaORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FAaOR

DK 512-12

94

7

823

34

23

ESDI

5.2511 FH

DK 512C-12

94

7

823

34

23

SCSI

5.2511 FH

DK 512-17

134

10

823

34

23

ESDI

5.2511 FH

DK 512C-17

134

10

819

34

23

SCSI

5.2511 FH

DK 514-38

330

14

903

51

16

ESDI

5.2511 FH

DK 514C-38

321

14

903

51

16

SCSI

5.2511 FH

DK 514S-38

330

14

903

51

14

SMD

5.2511 FH

DK515-12

1229

15

1224

69

14

ESDI

5.2511 FH

DK 515-78

673

14

1361

69

16

ESDI

5.2511 FH

DK 515C-78

370.5

14

1261

69

16

ESDI

5.2511 FH

DK 515C-78

670.5

14

1261

69

16

ESDI

5.2511 FH

DK516-12

1230

15

1778

77

16

ESDI

5.2511 FH

DK516-15

1320

15

2235

77

14

ESDI

5.2511 FH

DK 516C-16

1500

15

2172

81

14

SCSI-2

5.2511 FH

DK 517C

2900

21

2381

81

12.8

FSCSI-2

5.2511 FH

DK 517C-26

2000

14

2381

81

12

SCSI-2

5.2511 FH

DK 517C-37

2000

21

2381

81

12

SCSI-2

5.2511 FH

DK 521-5

42

6

823

17

25

MFM

5.2511 HH

DK 522-10

103

6

823

36

25

ESDI

5.2511 HH

DK 522C-·10

88

6

819

35

25

SCSI

5.2511 HH

HC 8085

71

8

1024

17

25

MFM

5.2511 FH

HC 8128

109

8

1024

26

25

MFM

5.2511 FH

HC 8170E

150

8

1024

36

25

ESDI

5.2511 FH

HYOSUNG

IBM CORPORATION
20MB{2}

21

4

615

17

40

MFM

5.2511 FH

20MB{13)

21

8

306

17

40

MFM

5.2511 FH

30MB(22)

31

5

733

17

40

MFM

5.2511 FH

0660-371

320

14

949

48

12

SCSI-2

3.5

X

111

0661-467

400

14

1199

48

11

SCSI-2

3.5

X

111

0663-H11/L 11

868

13

2051

66

10

SCSI

3.5

X

111

0663-H12/L 12

1004

15

2051

66

10

SCSI

3.5

X

111

0671E

319

15

1224

34

20

ESDI

5.2511 HH

0671S

319

15

1224

34

20

SCSI

5.2511 HH

0681

476

11

1458

58

13

SCSI-2

5.2511 HH

WDS-L40

41

2

1038

39

17

SCSI-2

3.5

X

111

WDA-L42

42

2

1067

39

17

IDE

3.5

X

111

WDS-L42

42

2

1066

39

17

SCSI

3.5

X

111

WS-240

43

2

1120

38

19

PS/2

2.511

138 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

WbA-240

43

2

1122

38

19

WDS-240

43

2

1120

38

19

WD-380

80

4

1021

39

16

PS/2

3.5

X

1"

WDA-380

80

4

1021

39

16

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WDS-380

80

4

1021

39

16

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

WD-387

61

4

928

32

23

PS/2

3.5

X

1"

WD-3100

105

2

1990

44

12

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

WD-3158

120

8

920

32

23

PS/2

3.5

X

1"

WD-3160

160

8

1021

39

16

PS/2

3.5

X

1"

WDA-3160

160

8

1021

39

16

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WDS-3160

160

8

1021

39

16

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

WDS-2200

210

4

1990

44

12

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

5006

5

2

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

5007

5

2

312

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

5012

10

4

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

5018

15

6

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

5021H

15

4

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

7720

21

4

310

17

85

MFM

8"

7740

43

8

315

17

85

MFM

8"

64

3

-

17

18

IDE

-

150

2

1380

36

18

SCSI-2

Remov 5.25"

100

5

2

226

17

110

MFM

5.25" HH

105

7

4

306

17

110

MFM

5.25" HH

110

14

8

306

17

130

MFM

5.25" HH

120

20

4

615

17

100

MFM

5.25" HH

1000

5

2

226

17

110

Comm.

5.25" HH

1005

7

4

306

17

110

Comm.

5.25" HH

1010

14

8

306

-

130

Comm.

5.25" HH

---

SEGORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FAGOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

IDE

2.5"

14x10214x33

SCSI

2.5"
9x1021x17

8x1021x39

IMI

-

INTERGRAL PERIPHERALS
1862

IOMEGA
MultiDisk 1501

JeT

lVC COMPANIES OF AMERICA
JD-E2042M

42

2

973

43

16

IDE

2.5" 4H

JD-E2085M

85

4

973

43

16

IDE

2.5" 4H

JD-E2825P(A.)

21

2

581

36

25

IDE

3.5" 4H

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 139

Corporate Systems; Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

JD-E2825P(S}

21

2

581

36

25

SCSI

3.5"4H

JD-E282SP(X}

21

2

581

36

25

IDE

3.5" 4H

JD-E2850P(A}

42

3

791

35

25

IDE

3.5" 4H

JD-E2850P(S}

42

3

791

35

25

SCSI

3.5" 4H

JD-E2850P(X}

42

3

791

35

25

XT-IDE

3.5" 4H

JD-E3824TA

21

2

436

48

28

-

3.5" 3H

JD-E3848HA

42

4

436

48

29

-

3.5" 3H

JD-E3848P{A}

42

2

862

48

25

IDE

3.5" 4H

JD-E3848P(S}

42

2

862

48

25

SCSI

3.5" 4H

JD-E3848P(X}

42

2

862

48

25

XT-IDE

3.5" 4H

JD-E3896P(A}

84

4

862

48

25

IDE

3.5"4H

JD-E3896P(S}

84

4

862

48

25

SCSI

3.5"4H

JD-E3896P(X}

84

4

862

48

25

XT-IDE

3.5" 4H
3.5" 3H

JD-E3896V(A}

84

4

862

48

25

IDE

JD-E3896V(S}

84

4

862

48

25

SCSI

3.5" 3H

JD-E3896V(X}

84

4

862

48

25

XT-IDE

3.5" 3H

JD-F2042M

42

2

973

43

16

IDE

2.5" 4H

JD3842HA

21

2

436

48

28

3.5" 3H

JD3848HA

43

4

436

48

29

-

KALOK

CMOS
SETTINGS

3.5" 3H

CORPORA nON

KL 320 Octagon I

21

4

615

17

48

MFM

3.5 x 1"

KL 330 Octagon I

32

4

615

26

40

RLL

3.5 x 1"

KL 341 Octagon I

40

4

644

26

25

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

KL 343 Octagon I

42

4

676

31

25

IDE

3.5 x 1"

KL 3100 Octagon II 105

6

820

35

19

IDE

3.5 x 1"

KL 3120 Octagon 11120

6

820

40

19

IDE

3.5 x 1"

P5-125

125

2

2048

80

17

IDE

3.50 x .5"

P5-250

251

4

2048

80

17

IDE

3.50 x .5"

KYOCERA ELECTRONICS, INC.
21

4

615

17

65/62

MFM

3.5 x 1"

KC 30AlS

32

4

615

26

65/62

RLL

3.5 x 1"

KC 40GA

41

2

1075

26

28

IDE

3.5 x 1"

KC 80C

87

8

787

28

28

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

LAN-64

71

8

1024

17

MFM

5.25" FH

LAN-115

119

15

918

17

MFM

5.25" FH

LAN-140

142

8

1024

34

-

ESDI

5.25" FH

LAN-180

180

8

1024

26

-

RLL

5.25" FH

KC 20AlS

LANSTOR

140 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

3522

10

4

LT 10

10

2

LT 20

20

LT 200

IMODEL
L~MBER

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

306

17

65

MFM

3.5 X 1"

615

17

65

MFM

3.5 X 1"

4

615

17

65

MFM

3.5 X 111

20

4

614

17

65

MFM

3.5 X 1"

LT 300

32

4

614

26

65

RLL

3.5 X 1"

LT 2000

20

4

614

17

65

MFM

3.5 X 1"

TITAN 20

21

4

615

17

65

MFM

3.5 X 1"

TITAN 30

33

4

615

26

65

RLL

3.5 X 111

TITAN 3532

32

4

615

26

65

RLL

3.5 X 1"

---

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

LAPINE

MAXTOR (ORPORATION
2585

85

4

1092

36

15

IDE

2.5" HH

10x976x17

25128A

128.2

4

1092

48

15

IDE

2.5" HH

15x980x17

25252A, S

251

6

1320

63

12

IDE/SCSI 17 mm high 15x990x33

7080A,S

80

4

1170

36

17

IDE/SCSI 1" high

9x1021x17

7120A,S

120

4

1516

42

15

IDE/SCSI 1" high

14x984x17

7213A,S

213

4

1690

48

15

IDE/SCSI 1" high

13x969x33
15x962x33

7245A,S

244

4

1881

48

15

IDE/SCSI 111 high

LXT-50S

48

4

733

32

27

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

LXT-100S

96

8

733

32

27

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

LXT-200A

207

7

1320

45

15

IDE

3.5 X 1"

lXT-200S

191

7

1320

33

15

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

LXT-213A

213

7

1320

55

15

IDE

3.5 X 1"

LXT-213S

200

7

1320

55

15

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

LXT-340A

320

7

1560

47

13

IDE

3.5 X 1"

LXT-340S

320

7

1560

47

15

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

LXT-4/37A

437

9

1560

63

13

IDE

3.5 X 1"

LXT-437S

437

9

1560

63

13

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

LXT-535A

535

11

1560

63

12

IDE

3.5 X 1"

LXT-535S

535

11

1560

63

12

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

PO-12S Panther

1224

15

1224

63

13

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

P1-08E Panther

696

9

1778

72

12

ESDI

5.25" FH

P1-08S Pantller

696

9

1778

72

12

SCSI

5.25" FH

P1-12E Panther

1051

15

1778

72

13

ESDI

5.25" FH

P1-12S Panther

1005

19

1216

72

10

SCSI

5.25" FH

P1-13E Pantller

1160

15

1778

72

13

ESDI

P1-16E Panther

1331

19

1778

72

13

ESDI

5.25" FH
5.25 11 FH

72

13

ESDI

5.25" FH

13

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

P1-17E Panther

1470

19

1778

P1-17S Pantller

1759

19

1778

©

esc 1996

85

12x1020x33
13x969x33
10x992x63
14x967x63

Hard Drive Bible 141

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

MXT 540SUAL

540

7

2367

41

7.5/8.5

IDE

3.5 X 1"

16x1024x63

MXT 1240S

1.24GB

15

2367

41

8.5/9

SCSI-2

3.5"

RXT-800HS

786

1

2410

88

108

SCSI

5.25" FH

TAHITI {M/O}

650

1

2870

104

35

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 1050

38

5

902

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

XT 1065

52

7

918

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

XT 1085

69

8

1024

17

27

MFM

5.25" FH

XT 1105

82

11

918

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

XT 1120R

104

8

1024

26

27

RLL

5.25" FH

XT 1140

116

15

918

17

26

MFM

5.25" FH

XT 1140E

140

15

1141

17

28

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 1240R

196

15

1024

26

27

RLL

5.25" FH

XT 2085

72

7

1224

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

XT 2140

113

11

1224

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

XT 2190

159

15

1224

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

XT 3170

129

9

1224

26

30

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 3280

216

15

1224

26

30

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 3380

277

15

1224

26

27

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 4170E

157

7

1224

35

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 4170S

157

7

1224

36

14

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 4175E

149

7

1224

34

27

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT4179E

158

7

1224

36

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 4230E

203

9

1224

35

15

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 4280E

1224

34

27

ESDI

5.25" FH

234

11

XT 4280S

241

11

1224

36

27

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 4380E

338

15

1224

35

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 4380S

337

15

1224

36

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 8380E

360

8

1632

54

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 8380EH

361

8

1632

54

13.5

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 8380S

360

8

1632

54

14

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 8380SH

361

8

1632

54

13.5

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 8610E

541

12

1632

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 8702S

616

15

1490

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 8760E

676

15

1632

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 8760EH

677

15

1632

54

13.5

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 8760SH

670

15

1632

54

14.5

SCSI

5.25" FH

XT 8800E

694

15

1274

71

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

XT 81000E

889

15

1632

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

36

17

IDE

3.5 x 1"

MAXTOR COLORADO (also see MiniscribeJ
7040A Cheyene

142 Hard Drive Bible

42

2

1170

5x977x17

©

csc 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
[NUMBER

7040S Che~ene
7060A Che~ene
7060S Che~ene
7080A Che~,ene
7080S Che~,ene
7120A Che~,ene
7120S Che~ene
8051A

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

40
65
65
8"1
65
65
130
43

2
2
2
4
4
4
4
4

1155
1516
1516
1170
1155
1516
1516
745

36
42
42
36
36
42
42
28

17
15
15
17
15
15
15
28

SCSI
IDE
SCSI
IDE
IDE
IDE
SCSI
IDE

3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X

1"
1"
1"
1"
1"
1"
1"
1"

42
84
105
120
170
2'10
425

3
6
6
5
7
7
9

834
834
1019
1123
1123
1156
1512

33
33
33
33
33
33
63

19
19
19
14
14
14
12

SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI

3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X
3.5 X

1"
1"
1"
1"
1"
1"
1"

2
5
10
15
20
10
25
41
58

2
2
4
6
8
2
3
5
7

118
320
320
320
320
612
961
961
961

17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17

80
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90

MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM

5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"

FH
FH
FH
FH
FH
FH
FH
FH
FH

977
977
830
830
830
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024

17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17

-

MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM

8"
8"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"
5.25"

FH
FH
FH
FH
FH
FH
FH
FH
FH

7x984x17
9x1021x17
14x984x17
5x977x17

MEGA DR/IVE SYSTEMS
P-42
P-84
P-105
P-120
P-170
P-210
P-425

MEMOREX
310
321
322
323
324
450
512
513
514

MICROPOLIS CORPORATION
1202
1223
1302
1303
1304
1323
1323A
1324
1324A
1325
1333
© CSC 1996

45
45
20
34
41
35
44
53
62
71
35

7
7
3
5
6
4
5
6
7
8
4

30
30
30
28
28
28
28
28
28

Hard Drive Bible 143

Corporate Systems. Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SEGORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

1333A

44

5

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

1334

53

6

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

1334A

62

7

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

1335

71

8

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

1352

30

2

1024

36

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

1352A

41

3

1024

36

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

1353

75

4

1024

36

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

1353A

94

5

1024

36

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

1354

113

6

1024

36

23

ESDI

5.24" FH

1354A

132

7

1024

36

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

1355

151

8

1024

36

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

1373

73

4

1024

36

23

SCSI

5.25" FH

1373A

91

5

1024

36

23

SCSI

5.25" FH

1374

109

6

1024

36

23

SCSI

5.25" FH

1374A

127

7

1024

36

23

SCSI

5.25" FH

1375

146

8

1024

36

23

SCSI

5.25" FH

1488-15

675

15

1628

54

16

SCSI

5.25"FH

1516-108

678

10

1840

72

13

ESDI

5.25" FH

1517-13

922

13

1925

72

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

1518

1419

15

2100

72

14.5

ESDI

5.25" FH

1518-14

993

14

1925

72

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

1518-15

1064

15

1925

72

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

1528

1341

15

2094

72

14.5

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

1528-15

1354

15

2106

84

14

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

1538-15

872

15

1925

71

15

ESDI

5.25" FH

1548

1748

15

2096

72

14

FSCSI-2

5.25" FH

1551

149

7

1224

34

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1554-7

158

7

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1554-11

234

11

1224

34

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1555-8

180

8

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1555-9

203

9

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1555-12

255

12

1224

34

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1556-10

226

10

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1556-11

248

11

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1556-13

276

13

1224

34

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1557-12

270

12

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1557-13

293

13

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1557-14

315

14

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1557-15

338

15

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

1558-14

315

14

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25 1 FH

1558-15

338

15

1224

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

144 Hard Drive Bible

CMOS
SETTINGS

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

fMODEL
LNUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY
---

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

1566-11

496

11

1632

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

1567-12

541

12

1632

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

1567-13

586

13

1632

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

1568-14

631

14

1632

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

1568-15

676

15

1632

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

1576-11

243

11

1224

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

1577-12

266

12

1224

36

18

SCSI

5.25 11 FH

1577-13

287

13

1224

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

1578-14

310

14

1224

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

1578-15

332

15

1224

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

1586-11

490

11

1632

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

1578-12

535

12

1632

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

1587-13

279

13

1632

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

1588

667

15

1626

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

1588-14

624

14

1632

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

1588-15

668

15

1632

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

1596-10S

668

10

1834

72

35

SCSI

5.25" FH

1597-13

909

13

1919

72

14

SCSI

5.25" FH

1598

1034

15

1922

72

14.5

SCSI-2

5.25" FH

1598-14

979

14

1919

72

14

SCSI

5.25" FH

1598-15

1098

15

1928

71

14.5

SCSI-2

5.25 11 FH

1624

667

7

2099

72

15

FSCSI-2

5.25" HH

1653-4

92

4

1249

36

16

ESDI

5.25" HH

1653-5

115

5

1249

36

16

ESDI

5.25" HH

1654-6

138

6

1249

36

16

ESDI

5.25" HH

1654-7

161

7

1249

36

16

ESDI

5.25" HH

1663-4

197

4

1780

36

14

ESDI

5.25" HH

ESDI

5.25" HH

16,63-5

246

5

1780

36

14

1664-7

345

7

1780

54

14

ESDI

5.25" HH

1673-4

90

4

1249

36

16

SCSI

5.25 11 HH

1673-5

112

5

1249

36

16

SCSI

5.25" HH

1674-6

135

6

1249

36

16

SCSI

5.25" HH

1674-7

158

7

1249

36

16

SCSI

5.25" HH

1683-4

193

4

1776

54

14

SCSI

5.25" HH

1683-5

242

5

1776

54

14

SCSI

5.25" HH

1684-6

291

6

1776

54

14

SCSI

5.25" HH

1684-7

340

7

1776

54

14

SCSI

5.25" HH

1743-5

112

5

1140

28

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

1744-6

135

6

1140

28

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

1744-7

157

7

1140

28

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

10X929X33

1745-8

180

8

1140

28

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

11X968X33

© C:SC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 145

Corporate Systemil Center (408) 734-8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

1745-9
1773-5
1774-6
1774-7
1775-8
1775-9

202
115
135
157
180
202

9
5
6
7
8
9

1140
1140
1140
1140
1140
1140

28
28
28
28
28
28

15
15
15
15
15
15

IDE
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI

3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111

12X986X33

18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
15
25
25
17
16
14
14
14
14
13
14
13
14
65
65
80

MFM
RLL
MFM
RLL
ESDI
ESDI
ESDI
ESDI
ESDI
ESDI
SCSI
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
IDE
ESDI
ESDI
SCSI
SCSI
ESDI
ESDI
SCSI
SCSI
MFM
MFM
MFM

3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
3.5 X 111
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH

MICROSCIENCE INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
4050
4060
4070
4090
5040
5070
5070-20
5100
5100-20
5160
6100
7040
7070-20
7100
7100-20
7100-21
7200
7400
8040
8040/MLC
8080
8200
FH 2414
FH 2777
FH 3414
FH 3777
FH 21200
FH 21600
FH 31200
FH 31600
HH 312
HH 315
HH 325
146 Hard Drive Bible

45
68
62
95
46
77
86
107
120
159
110
47
86
107
120
121
201
420
43
42
85
210
367
688
367
688
1062
1418
1062
1418
10
10
21

5
5
7
7
3
5
5
7
7
7
7
3
5
7
7
5
7
8
2
2
2
4
8
15
8
15
15
15
15
15
4
4
4

1024
1024
1024
1024
855
855
960
855
960
1271
855
855
960
855
960
1077
1277
1904
1047
1024
1768
1904
1658
1658
1658
1658
1921
2147
1921
2147
306
306
612

17
26
17
26
35
35
35
35
35
35
36
36
35
35
35
44
44
39
40
40
47
39
54
54
54
54
72
86
72
86
17
17
17

6x890x17
9x919x17
12x1024x17
14x984x17
14x984x17
12x964x33
13x1001x63
5x977x17
5x977x17
10x976x17
12x986x33

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

HH 330

33

4

612

26

105

RLL

5.25" HH

HH 612

11

4

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 625

21

4

612

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 712

11

2

612

17

105

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 712A

11

2

612

17

75

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 725

21

4

612

17

105

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 738

33

4

612

26

105

RLL

5.25" HH

HH 825

'---------

21

4

615

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 830

33

4

615

26

65

RLL

5.25" HH

HH 1050

45

5

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 1060

66

5

1024

25

28

RLL

5.25" HH

HH 1075

62

7

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 1080

68

7

1024

26

28

RLL

5.25" HH

HH 1090

80

7

1314

17

28

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 1095

95

7

1024

26

28

5.25" HH

HH 1120

122

7

1314

26

28

RLL
RLL

HH 2012

10

4

306

17

80

MFM

5.25" HH

HH 2120

128

7

1024

35

28

ESDI

5.25" HH

HH 2160

160

7

1276

35

28

ESDI

5.25" HH

CMOS
SETTINGS

5.25" HH

HH 3120

121

5

1314

36

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

HH 3160

169

7

1314

36

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

MINISCRIBE CORPOR~ITION
1006

5

2

306

17

179

MFM

5.25" FH

1012

10

4

306

17

179

MFM

5.25" FH

2006

5

2

306

17

93

MFM

5.25" FH

2012

11

4

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

3006

5

2

306

17

-

MFM

5.25" HH

3012

10

2

612

17

155

MFM

5.25" HH

3053

44

5

1024

17

25

MFM

5.25" HH

3085

71

7

1170

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

3085E

72

3

1270

36

17

ESDI

5.25 11 HH

3085S

72

3

1255

36

17

SCSI

5.25" HH

3130E

112

5

1250

36

17

ESDI

5.25" HH

3130S

115

5

1255

36

17

SCSI

5.25" HH

3180E

157

7

1250

36

17

ESDI

5.25 11 HH

3180S

153

7

1255

36

17

SCSI

5.25" HH

3180SM

160

7

1250

36

17

SCSI

5.25" HH

3212/3212 PLUS

11

2

612

17

85/53

MFM

5.25 11 HH

3412

21

4

615

17

60

MFM

5.25" HH

3425/3425 PLUS

21

4

615

17

85/53

MFM

5.25 11 HH

-©

csc

1996

Hard Drive Bible 147

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

3438/3438 PLUS

32
42
63
8
17
25
32
32
43
26
44
62
71
110
130
10
40
40
80
81
21
40
43
42
45
11
20
21
21
21
21
10
21
21
21
32
32
31
40
42
42
42
338

4
6
6
2
4
6
6
8
8
3
5
7
8
8
8
2
4
2
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
15

615
809
809
480
480
480
612
480
612
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
1024
612
980
1156
980
1155
612
1024
745
745
793
612
771
745
798
804
805
306
615
612
615
615
615
615
771
745
748
805
1224

26
17
26
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
26
36
17
36
36
36
36
17
36
28
28
28
17
26
28
26
26
26
17
17
17
17
26
26
26
26
28
26
26
36

85/53

RLL

61/46

MFM

61
133
133
80
65
65
65
28
28
28
28
28
28
90
19
19
19
19
65
65
28
28
28
68
68
28
68
68
68
50

RLL

5.25" HH
5.25" HH
5.25" HH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
5.25" FH
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
3.5 X 1"
5.25" FH

3650/3650F

3675
4010
4020
5330
5338
5440
5451
6032
6053/6053 II

6074
6085
6128
6170E
6212
7040A
7040S
7080A
7080S
7426
8048
8051A
8051 AT
8051
8212
8225
8225AT
8225C
8225S
8225XT
8412
8425/8425F

8425S
8425XT
8434F
8438/8438F

8438XT
8450
8450AT
8450C
8450XT
9000E
148 Hard Drive Bible

68/40

68
68
40
68/40

68
45
40
45
45
16

MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM

RLL
ESDI
MFM
IDE
SCSI
IDE
SCSI
MFM
SCSI
IDE
IDE
SCSI
MFM

RLL
IDE

RLL
SCSI
XT-IDE
MFM
MFM
SCSI
XT-IDE

RLL
RLL
XT-IDE

RLL
IDE

RLL
XT-IDE
ESDI

CMOS
SETTINGS

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

IMODEL
l~UMBER

FORMATtED
_---:..CA_PAClTy

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

9000S

347

15

1220

36

16

SCSI

9230E

203

9

1224

36

36

ESDI

9230S

203

9

1224

36

36

SCSI

9380E

338

15

1224

36

16

ESDI

9380S

347

15

1224

36

16

SCSI

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH

9380SM

319

15

1218

36

16

SCSI

9424E

360

8

1661

54

17

ESDI

9424S

355

8

1661

54

17

SCSI

9780E

676

15

1661

54

17

ESDI

5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH

97808

668

15

1661

54

17

SCSI

5.25" FH

MITSUBISHI' ELECTRONICS
M2860-1

21

4

620

17

120

MFM

8"

M2860-2

50

6

681

17

120

MFM

8"

M2860-3

85

8

681

17

120

MFM

8"

MR 521

10

2

612

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

MR 522

20

4

612

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

MR 533

25

3

971

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

MR 535

42

5

977

17

28

MFM

5.25" HH

MR 535R

65

5

977

26

28

RLL

5.25" HH

MR 535S

50

5

977

26

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

MR 537S

76

5

977

26

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

MR 5310E

10·1

5

977

26

28

ESDI

5.25" HH

MITSUMI ELECTRONICS CORPORATION
HD2509AA

92

4

-

52

16

IDE

2.5" X 4H

HD 2513AA

130

4

-

52

16

ide

2.5" X 4H

M 106

5

2

306

17

75

MFM

3.5 x 1"

M 112

10

4

306

17

75

MFM

3.5 x 1"

M 125

20

8

306

17

75

MFM

3.5 x 1"

M 212

10

4

306

17

75

MFM

5.25" HH

M 225

20

8

306

17

75

MFM

5.25" HH

M 306

5

2

306

17

75

MFM

3.5 x 1"

M 312

10

4

306

17

75

MFM

5.25" HH

M 325

20

8

306

17

75

MFM

5.25" HH

M 5012

10

4

306

17

75

MFM

3.5 x 111

MMI

NCR CORPORATION
6091-5101

323

9

1350

26

27

SCSI

5.25"

6091-5301

675

15

1350

26

25

SCSI

5.25"

-© (s'C 1996

Hard Drive Bible 149

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

NEC TECHNOLOGIES INC.
2247

87

6

841

VAR

80

SMO

8"

03126

20

4

615

17

85

MFM

3.5 X 1"

03142

42

8

642

17

28

MFM

3.5 X 1"

o 3146H

40

8

615

17

35

MFM

3.5 X 1"

03661

118

7

915

36

40

ESDI

3.5 X 1"

03735

56

2

1084

41

20

AT-IDE

3.5 X 1"

03755

105

4

1250

41

20

AT-IDE

3.5 X 1"

03756

105

4

1251

41

19

PC/AT

3.5"

03761

114

7

915

35

20

AT-IDE

3.5 X 1"

03765

176

4

1486

58

16.5

PC/AT

3.5"

03772

331

7

1468

63

14

PC/AT

3.5"

03781

425

9

1464

63

15

PC/AT

3.5"

03835

45

2

1084

41

20

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

03855

105

4

1250

41

20

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

03856

105

4

1251

41

19

SCSI

3.5"

03861

114

7

915

35

20

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

03865

176

4

1486

58

16.5

SCSI

3.5"

03872

331

7

1468

63

14

SCSI

03881

425

9

1464

63

15

SCSI-2

3.5"
3.5

05114

5

2

305

17

-

MFM

5.25"

05124

II

10

4

309

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

o 5126/0 5216H
o 5127H

20

4

612

17

85/40

MFM

5.25" HH

32

4

615

26

85

RLL

5.25" HH

05146/0 5146H

40

8

615

17

85/40

MFM

5.25" HH

o 5147H

65

8

615

26

85

RLL

5.25" HH

05392

22

8

615

26

14

IPI-2

5.25" FH

05452

71

10

823

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

05652

143

10

823

17

23

ESDI

5.25" HH

05655

153

7

1224

35

18

ESDI

5.25" HH

05662

319

15

1224

34

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

05682

664

15

1633

53

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

05862

385

8

1633

65

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

05882

665

15

1633

53

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

05892

1404

19

1678

86

14

SCSI

5.25" FH

S00408

40

-

-

<.35

SCSI

5.25

II

-

<.35

SCSI

5.25

II

120

-

-

RO 312"'

10

2

612

17

150

MFM

5.25"

RD 3255

21

4

612

17

150

MFM

5.25"

S01205

NEI

150 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY
---

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

RO 4127

10

4

3066

17

150

MFM

5.25 11

RD 4255

21

8

306

17

150

MFM

5.25 11

NOR 320

21

4

615

17

150

MFM

5.25 11

NOR 340

42

8

615

17

40

MFM

3.5 X 111

NOR 360

65

8

615

26

150

RLL

-

NOR 1065

55

7

918

17

25

MFM

NOR 1085

71

8

1025

17

26

MFM

NOR 1105

87

11

918

17

25

MFM

5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH

NOR 1140

11 9

15

918

17

25

MFM

NOR 2085

74

7

1224

17

28

MFM

NOR 2140

11 7

11

1224

17

28

MFM

NOR 2190

191

15

918

17

28

MFM

NOR 3170S

146

9

1224

26

28

SCSI

NOR 3280S

24-4

15

1224

26

28

SCSI

NOR 4170

149

7

1224

34

28

ESOI

NOR 4175

179

7

1224

36

28

ESOI

NOR 4380

38 4

15

1224

36

28

ESOI

NOR 4380S

31 9

15

1224

34

28

SCSI

PENNY 340

42

8

615

17

28

MFM

4064

5

2

306

17

MFM

4127

10

4

306

17

-

MFM

4191S

15

6

306

17

-

MFM

4255

20

4

615

17

MFM

NP 02-26S

22

4

640

17

NP 03-13

10

4

306

17

-

MFM

NP 03-6

5

2

306

17

-

MFM

5.25 11
5.25 11

00526

31

4

612

26

65

RLL

3.5 X 111

00540

47

6

612

26

65

RLL

3.5 X 111

H0662/11

10

2

612

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

H0662/12

20

4

612

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

XM 5210

10

4

612

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

XM 522012

20

4

612

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

CMOS
SETTINGS

NEWBERRY DATA

5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11

NPL

MFM

5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11

OKIDATA

OLIVETTI

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 151

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734-8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

CMOS
SETTINGS

FORM
FACTOR

ORCA TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION
OT5H 53M

45

5

1024

17

28

MFM

OT5H 80R

65

5

1024

26

28

RLL

OT5H 138E

115

4

1600

35

25

ESDI

OT5H 138S

115

4

1600

35

25

SCSI

OT5H 172E

140

5

1600

35

25

ESDI

OT5H 172S

140

5

1600

35

25

SCSI

OT5H 207E

170

6

1600

35

25

ESDI

OT5H 207S

170

6

1600

35

25

SCSI

OT5H 760S

702

15

1024

28

14

SCSI

5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
11
5.25 FH

OTARI (also see Disctron)
C 214

10

4

306

17

79

MFM

C 507

5

2

306

17

79

MFM

C 514

10

4

306

17

79

MFM

C 519

15

6

306

17

79

MFM

C 526

21

8

306

17

65

MFM

11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH
5.25 11 FH
11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH

PACIFIC MAGTRON
11
5.25 HH
5.25 11 HH

MT-4115E

115

4

1600

35

16

ESDI

MT-4115S

115

4

1600

35

16

SCSI

MT-4140E

140

5

1600

35

16

ESDI

MT-4140S

140

5

1600

35

16

SCSI

MT-4170E

170

6

1600

35

16

ESDI

MT-4170S

170

6

1600

35

16

SCSI

MT-5400E

360

8

1632

54

14

ESDI

MT-5400S

359

8

1623

54

14

SCSI

MT-5760E

677

15

1632

54

14

ESDI

MT-5760S

673

15

1623

54

14

SCSI

5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH

JU-116

20

4

615

17

85

MFM

3.5 x 111

JU-128

42

7

733

17

35

MFM

3.5 x 111

5.25 11
11
5.25
11
5.25
5.25 11

HH
HH
HH
HH

11
5.25 HH
5.25 11 HH

PANASONIC

PLUS DEVELOPMENT
HARDCARD 20

2'1

47

615

17

40

IDE

HARDCARD 40

42

8

612

17

40

IDE

3.5 11 3H
3.5 11 3H

HARDCARD 11-40

40

5

925

17

25

IDE

-

HARDCARD 11-80

80

10

925

17

25

IDE

3.5 11 3H

HARDCARD II-XL

105

105

15

806

17

17

IDE

50

52

10

601

17

17

IDE

HARDCARD II-XL
152 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

CAPACITY
~NUMBER
----.--MODEL

FORMATTED

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

IMPULSE 10!5AT/LP 105

16

755

17

17

IDE

3.5" 3H

16x755x17

IMPULSE 105S

105

6

1019

19

SCSI-2

3.5

IMPULSE 1005S/LP 105

4

1056

-

17

SCSI-2

3.5" 3H

IMPULSE 120AT

120

5

1123

42

15

IDE

3.5

IMPULSE 120S

120

5

1123

42

15

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

IMPULSE 170AT

169

7

1123

42

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

IMPULSE 170S

169

7

1123

42

15

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

IMPULSE 21 OAT

174

7

1156

42

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

IMPULSE 210S

174

7

1156

42

15

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

IMPULSE 330AT

331

-

-

14

IDE

3.5

X

1"

IMPULSE 330S

331

-

-

-

14

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

IMPULSE 40AT

41

5

965

17

19

IDE

3.5

X

1"

-IMPULSE 408

42

3

834

19

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

IMPULSE 42!5AT

425

-

-

-

14

IDE

3.5

X

1"

IMPULSE 52AT/LP 52

8

751

17

17

IDE

3.5" 3H

IMPULSE 52S/LP

52

2

-

-

17

SCSI-2

3.5" 3H

IMPULSE 80AT

83

10

965

17

19

IDE

3.5

1"

6x611x17

IMPULSE 80AT/LP 85

16

616

17

17

IDE

3.5" 3H

6x611x17

IMPULSE 80S

84

6

918

-

19

SCSI-2

3.5

IMPULSE 80:S/LP

85

4

-

-

17

SCSI-2

3.5" 3H

X

X

X

X

1"
1"

9x814x32
10x966x34
13x873x36

5x968x17

8x751x17

1"

PRAIRIETEl(r CORPORATION
Prairie 120

21

2

615

34

23

IDE

2.5"

Prairie 140

40

2

615

34

23

IDE

2.5"

8x615x17

Prairie 220A

20

2

612

34

28

IDE

2.5"

4x615x17

Prairie 220B

20

4

612

34

28

SCSI

2.5"

Prairie 240

43

4

615

34

28

IDE

2.5"

8x615x17

Prairie 242A

41

4

6615

34

28

IDE

2.5"

8x615x17

Prairie 242S

41

4

1820

34

28

IDE

2.5"

5x942x17

Prairie 282A

82

4

1031

34

28

IDE

2.5"

99x1021x17

Prairie 282S

82

4

1031

34

28

SCSI

2.5"

PRIAM CORPORATION (a/so see Vertex)
502

46

7

755

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

504

46

7

755

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

514

11 "7

11

1224

17

22

MFM

5.25" FH

519

160

15

1224

17

22

MFM

5.25" FH

617

153

7

1225

36

20

ESDI

5.25" FH

623

196

15

752

34

65

ESDI

5.25" FH

628

24'1

11

1225

36

20

ESDI

5.25" FH

630

319

15

1224

34

15

ESDI

5.25" FH

@ CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 153

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

CMOS
SETTINGS

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

638

329

15

1225

36

20

ESDI

5.25" FH

717

153

7

1225

36

20

SCSI

5.25" FH

728

241

11

1225

36

20

SCSI

5.25" FH

738

329

15

1225

36

20

SCSI

5.25" FH

3504

44

5

771

17

65

MFM

3.5

ID20

26

3

987

17

23

MFM

5.25" FH

ID45H

44

5

1024

17

23

MFM

5.25" FH

ID330

338

15

1225

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

ID/ED40

43

5

987

17

23

MFM

5.25" FH

ID/ED45

44

5

1166

17

23

MFM

5.25" FH

ID/ED60

59

7

1018

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

ID/ED62

62

7

1166

17

23

MFM

5.25" FH

ID/ED75

73

5

1166

25

23

RLL

5.25" FH

ID/ED100

103

7

1166

25

15

RLL

5.25" FH

ID/ED120

121

7

1024

33

28

ESDI

5.25" FH

ID/ED130

132

15

1224

17

13

MFM

5.25" FH

ID/ED150

159

7

1276

35

28

ESDI

5.25" HH

ID/ED160

158

7

1225

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

ID160E-PS2

152

7

1195

36

18

PS2

5.25" FH

ID200L-1

200

15

1195

25

15

IDE

5.25" FH

ID/ED230

233

15

1224

25

11

RLL

5.25" FH

ID/ED250

248

11

1225

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

ID330E

336

15

128

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

ID330-PS2

330

15

1195

36

18

PS2

5.25" FH

ID330S

338

15

1218

36

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

ID340H·,U

340

7

1776

54

14

ESDI

525" FH

ID660-U

660

15

1628

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

ID700E

701

15

1774

54

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

ID700S

68

15

1774

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

V 130R

39

3

987

26

28

RLL

5.25" FH

V 150

42

5

987

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

V 160

50

5

1166

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

V 170

60

7

987

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

V 170R

91

7

987

26

28

RLL

5.25" FH

V 185

71

7

1166

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

V 519

159

15

1224

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

V 519-x

62

7

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

189

5

1224

36

15

IDE

3.5

388

8

1224

63

17

ESDI

5.25"

X

1"

15x1024x28

PROCOM TECHNOLOGY
Pro~ag

185-15

HiPer 380
154 Hard Drive Bible

X

1"

11x1016x33

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
[NUMBER

FORMATTED
- - -CAPACITY
,

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

Si 200/PS3

209

4

1224

63

18

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

Si 585/S5

601

8

1224

54

17

SCSI

5.25"

Si 1000/S5

1037

8

1731

77

15

SCSI

5.25"

3.5 X 1"

CMOS
SETTINGS

PTI (PERIPflERAL TECflNOLOGYJ
PT-225

21

4

615

17

35

PT-234

28

4

820

17

35

MFM
MFM

PT-238A

32

4

615

26

35

IDE

3.5 X 1"

PT-238R

32

4

615

26

35

RLL

3.5 X 1"

PT-238S

32

4

615

26

35

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

PT:'251A

43

4

820

26

33

IDE

3.5 X 1"

PT-251 R

43

4

820

26

35

RLL

3.5 X 1"

PT-251S

43

4

820

26

35

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

PT-325R

21

4

615

26

65

RLL

3.5 X 1"

PT-338

32

6

615

17

35

MFM

3.5 X 1"

PT:'338R

32

4

615

26

65

RLL

3.5 X 1"

PT:'351

42

6

820

17

35

MFM

3.5 X 1"

PT-351 R

60

6

820

26

35

RLL

3.5 X 1"

PT-357A

49

6

615

26

35

IDE

3.5 X 1"

PT-357R

49

6

615

26

35

RLL

3.5 X 1"

PT-357S

49

6

615

26

35

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

PT-376A

65

6

820

26

35

IDE

3.5 X 1"

PT-376R

65

6

820

26

35

RLL

3.5 X 1"

PT-376S

65

6

820

26

35

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

PT-468

57

8

820

17

35

MFM

3.5 X 1"

PT-4102A

54

5

820

26

35

IDE

3.5 X 1"

PT-4102R

87

8

820

26

28

RLL

3.5 X 1"

MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM

8"

3.5 X 1"

4x615x26

4x820x26

6x820x26

8x820x26

QUANTUM (ORPORATION
2010

10

-

-

17

-

2020

20

-

-

17

2030

30

-

-

17

-

2040

40

-

-

17

2080

80

-

-

17

-

GoDrive 40

8"
8"
8"
8"

43

2

957

48

16

IDE/SCSI2 2.5"

5x977x17

GoDrive 80

86

4

957

48

16

IDE/SCSI2 2.5"

10x977x17

GoDrive120

127

4

1097

19

<17

IDE/SCSI2 2.5"

GRS 160

169

4

966

38

<17

IDE/SCSI2 2.5"

15x965x17
4x839x19

Hardcard EZ42

42

5

977

17

19

PC ISA-Slot

Hardcard EZ85

85

10

977

17

19

PC ISA-Slot

Hardcard EZ127

127

16

919

17

19

PC ISA-Slot

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 155

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

Hardcard EZ240

245

15

966

33

16

PC ISA-Slot

Pass~ort

XL42

42

5

965

17

19

SCSI-2

Remov

Pass~ort

XL42

85

10

976

17

17

SCSI-2

Remov

Pass~ort

XL 127

127

15

973

17

17

SCSI-2

Remov

Pass~ort

XL 170

170

10

1005

33

17

SCSI-2

Remov

Pass~ort

XL240

245

14

1014

33

16

SCSI-2

Remov

Pass~ort

XL525

525

16

1015

63

10

SCSI-2

Remov

Plus Hardcard XL

50

52

6

957

17

ISA-slot

Slot

Plus Hardcard XL

105

105

12

1005

17

ISA-Slot Slot

XL 231 Plus HC

231

14

976

33

9

ISA-Slot Slot

XL 311 Plus He

311

10

955

63

9

ISA-Slot Slot

XL 360 Plus HC

360

11

958

63

9

ISA-Slot Slot

ProD rive 40AT

42

3

834

52

19

IDE

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 40S

42

3

834

52

19

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 80AT

84

6

834

63

19

IDE

3.5 x 1"

ProD rive 80S

84

6

834

63

19

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProD rive 105S

105

6

1019

63

19

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProD rive 120AT

120

5

1123

63

19

IDE

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 120S

120

5

1123

63

15

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 170AT

168

4

1536

65

19

IDE

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 170S

168

4

1536

65

15

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProD rive 21 OAT

210

7

1156

63

15

IDE

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 210S

210

7

1156

63

15

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProD rive 330AT

330

7

1536

63

14

IDE

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 330S

330

7

1536

63

14

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 425AT

425

7

1800

63

14

IDE

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 425S

425

7

1800

63

14

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProD rive 700S

700

8

1921

63

12

SCSI-2

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 1050

1050

12

2224

63

12

SCSI-2

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive 1225

1225

14

2224

63

12

SCSI-2

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive ELS 42

42

1

977

63

19

SCSI-2

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive ELS 127

85

2

977

63

17

SCSI-2

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive ELS 170

170

4

1011

63

17

SCSI-2

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive LPS 80

85

4

611

63

15

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive LPS 105

105

4

1219

63

17

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProDrive LPS 105AT 105

4

1219

63

17

IDE

3.5 x 1"

ProD rive LPS 105S 105

4

1219

63

17

SCSI

3.5 x 1"

ProD rive LPS 120

122

2

-

44

16

IDE/SCSI 3.5 x 1"

14x980x17

ProD rive LPS 240

245

4

1530

44

16

IDE

3.5 x 1"

14x1014x33

ProDrive LPS 525

525

6

1800

81

10

SCSI2/IDE 3.5 x 1"

16x1017x63

Q-160

200

12

971

36

16

SCSI

156 Hard Drive Bible

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

5x900x17
10x960x17

14x984x17

13x950x33
10x1023x63
13x1013x63

12x1000x17

5.25" HH
©

csc

1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

[MODEL
~UMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

Q -250

53

4

823

36

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

Q -280

80

6

823

36

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

Q -510

8

2

512

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

Q -520

18

4

512

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

Q -530

27

6

512

17

47

MFM

5.25" FH

Q -540

36

8

512

17

40

MFM

5.25" FH

RH-5130

10

2

612

17

85

MFM

RH-5260
RH-5261

10

2

615

17

85

MFM

10

2

612

-

85

SCSI

-

50

2

1285

76

25

SCSI

5.25" HH

49

2

1285

76

25

SCSI

5.25" HH

MS 506

5

4

153

17

130

MFM

5.25"

MS 509

7.5

6

153

17

130

MFM

5.25"

MS 512

10

8

153

17

130

MFM

5.25"

1-

CMOS
SETTINGS

RleDH

RH-5500
RH-9150AR
1-

MS

RDDIME SYSTEMS, INC.
40AT

44

8

640

17

20

IDE

3.5 X 1"

8x640x17

Cobra 80AT

80

4

1030

28

20

IDE

3.5 X 1"

4x1024x17

C obra 110AT

105

7

1053

28

20

ESDI

3.5 X 1"

13x972x17

Cobra 11 OE

1105

7

1053

28

18

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

Cobra 21 OAT

210

7

1156

62

20

IDE

3.5 X 1"

Cobra 210E

210

7

1156

62

18

SCSI-2

3.5 X 1"

Cobra 650E

650

15

1224

63

17

SCSI-2

5.25"

Ro 101

3

2

192

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

R0102

6

4

192

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

I.:.R0103

9

6

192

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

I_R0104

12

8

192

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

R0201

5

2

321

17

90

MFM

5.25" FH

Ro 201E

11

2

640

17

55

MFM

5.25" FH

R0202
R0202E
R0203
I':'
R0203E
R0204
R0204E

11

4

321

17

90

MFM

5.25" FH

22

4

640

17

55

MFM

5.25" FH

16

6

321

17

90

MFM

5.25" FH

33

6

640

17

55

MFM

5.25" FH

22

8

320

17

90

MFM

5.,25" FH

44

8

640

17

55

MFM

5.25" FH

I_Cobra

1-

13x956x33

RDDIME, INC.
1-

11-

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 157

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

RO 251

5

2

306

17

85

5.25" HH

R0252

11

4

306

17

85

RO 351

5

2

306

17

85

R0352

11

4

306

17

85

MFM
MFM
MFM
MFM

RO 652A

20

4

306

33

85

RO 6528

20

4

306

33

RO 752A

20

4

306

RO 3045

37

5

RO 3055

45

RO 3055T

5.25" HH
3.5

X

1"

3.5

X

1"

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

85

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

33

85

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

872

17

28

3.5

X

1"

6

872

17

28

MFM
MFM

3.5

X

1"

45

3

1053

28

24

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3057S

45

5

680

26

28

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3058A

45

3

868

34

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

RO 3058T

45

3

868

34

18

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3060R

49

5

750

26

28

RLL

3.5

X

1"

RO 3065

53

7

872

17

28

MFM

3.5

X

1"

RO 3075R

59

6

750

26

28

RLL

3.5

X

1"

RO 3085R

69

7

750

26

28

RLL

3.5

X

1"

RO 3085S

70

7

750

26

28

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3088A

75

5

868

34

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

RO 3088T

76

5

868

34

18

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3090T

75

5

1053

28

24

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3095A

80

5

923

34

19

IDE

3.5

X

1"

5x923x34

RO 3099AP

80

4

1030

28

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

4x1024X29

RO 3121A

122

4

1207

53

14

IDE

3.5

X

1"

14x1001x17

RO 3128A

105

7

868

34

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

14x868x17

RO 3128T

105

7

868

34

18

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3129TS

105

5

1091

41

18

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3130T

105

7

1053

28

24

SCSI

5.25" HH

RO 3135A

112

7

923

34

19

IDE

3.5

X

1"

14x923x17

RO 3139A

112

7

923

28

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

14x923x17

RO 3139TP

112

5

1148

42

18

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3199AP

112

5

1168

28

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

RI3199TS

163

7

1216

41

18

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3209A

163

15

759

28

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

10x964x33

RO 3259A

213

15

990

28

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

13x990x33

RO 3259AP

213

9

1235

28

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

13x969x33

RO 3259T

210

9

1216

41

18

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

18

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

18

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

RO 3259TP

210

9

1189

42

RO 3259TS

210

9

1216

41

RO 5065

53

5

1224

17

28

MFM

5.25 HH

RO 5075E

65

3

1224

35

22

ESDI

5.25" HH

158 Hard Drive Bible

3x868x34

5x868x34

13x989X17

11

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL

INUMBER

FORMATTED
___
CA_PACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

RO 5075S

61

3

1219

33

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

RO 5078S

61

5

1219

33

18

SCSI

5.25" HH

RO 5090

74

7

1224

17

28

MFM

5.25" HH

RO 5125E

109

5

1224

35

22

ESDI

5.25" HH

RO 5125S

103

5

1219

33

24

SCSI

5.25" HH

RO 5128S

103

7

1219

33

19

SCSI

5.25" HH

RO 54130R

114

7

1224

26

28

RLL

5.25" HH

RP 5178S

144

7

1219

33

19

SCSI

5.25" HH

RO 5180E

153

7

1224

35

22

ESDI

5.25" HH

RO 5180S

144

7

1219

33

24

SCSI

5.25" HH

SHD-3101A

105

4

1282

40

19

IDE

3.5

X

1"

SHlD-3201 S

211

7

1376

43

16

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

SAM SUNG

SEAGATE TE'CHNOLOGIES
This table shows' how to identify Seagate drive model numbers
r-

bS"~W
I

PR = Paired Solution, Drive
shipped with menu driven
installation software. Seagate
controller or host adapter
included with disk drive.

Technology

S

T

r-'

I1 I4
I

r

o

I8 IA
I

1

PR

-I J
I
X

Access Time
0= Standard
1 = Faster
N·1 =Fast SCSI·II

I:orm Factor

r-'
1xxx

2xxx
3xxx
4xxx
6xxx
8xxx
9xxx

3.5' half-heinht
5.25' half·height
3,5' 1-inch height
5,25' full-height
9-inch
a-inch
2.5' .75·inch high

I

I
Interface

Megabytes
Unformatted
(approx.) e.g.
ST225 is
25 unformatted
megabytes

-.-.

=

Unspecified ST4121MFM
N = SCSI/SCSI-II
R = ST4121RLL
A· AT Bus (IDE)
X • XT Bus (IDE)
E= ESDI
J = SMD/SME-E
ND .. Differential SCSI
NM = Mac compatible SCSI
S • Synchronized Spindle
V NetWsre Ready
P = Write Pre-Comp

=

3.5

X

1"

40128

MFM
MFM

3.5

X

1"

26

40/28

IDE

3.5

X

1"

26

40/28

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

MFM

3.5

X

1"

ST 124

21

4

615

17

40

ST 125/-1

21

4

615

17

ST 125A/A-1

21

4

404

ST 125N/N-1

21

4

407

ST 138/-1

32

6

615

17

40128

ST 138A/A-1

32

4

604

26

40/28

IDE

3.5

X

1"

ST 138N/N-1

32

4

615

26

40/28

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

© CSC 1996

4x404x26

4x604x26

Hard Drive Bible 159

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734-8787

CMOS
SETTINGS

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

ST 138R/R-1

33

4

615

26

40/28

RLL

3.5

X

1"

ST 151

43

5

977

17

24

MFM

3.5

X

1"

ST 157A1A-1

45

6

560

26

40/28

IDE

3.5

X

1"

ST 157N/N-1

49

6

615

26

40/28

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

ST 157R/R-1

49

6

615

26

40/28

RLL

3.5

X

1"

ST 177N

61

5

921

26

24

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

ST 206

5

2

306

17

-

MFM

5.25" HH

ST 212

10

4

306

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

ST 213

10

2

615

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

ST 225

21

4

615

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

ST 225N

21

4

615

17

65

SCSI

5.25" HH

ST 225R

21

2

667

31

70

RLL

5.25" HH

ST 238R

32

4

615

26

65

RLL

5.25" HH

ST 250R

42

4

667

31

70

RLL

5.25" HH

ST 251/-1

43

6

820

17

40128

MFM

5.25" HH

ST 251N

43

4

820

26

40

SCSI

5.25" HH

ST 251 N-1

43

4

630

34

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

ST 252

43

6

820

17

40

MFM

5.25" HH

ST 253

43

5

989

17

28

MFM

5.25" HH

ST 274A

65

5

948

26

29

IDE

5.25" HH

820

26

40

SCSI

5.25" HH

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

ST 277N

65

6

6x560x26

5x948x26

ST 277N-1

65

6

628

34

ST 277R/R-1

66

6

820

26

40/28

RLL

5.25" HH

ST 278R/R-1

66

6

820

26

40/28

RLL

5.25" HH

ST 279R

65

5

989

26

28

RLL

5.25" HH

ST 280A

71

5

1032

27

29

IDE

5.25" HH

ST 296N

80

6

820

34

28

SCSI

5.25" HH

ST 325A1X

21

4

615

17

28

IDE

3.5

X

1"

4x615x17

ST 351 AlX

42.8

6

820

17

28

IDE

3.5

X

1"

6x820x17

ST 406

5

2

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 412

10

4

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 419

15

6

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 506

5

4

153

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 1057A

53

6

1024

17

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

6x1024x17

ST 1090A

79

5

1072

29

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

5x1024x33

ST 1090N

79

5

1068

29

15

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

ST 1096N

80

7

906

26

20

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

ST 1100

83

9

1072

17

15

MFM

3.5

X

1"

ST 1102A

89

10

1024

17

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

ST 1106R

91

7

977

26

24

RLL

3.5

X

1"

ST 1111A

98

5

1072

36

15

IDE

3.5

X

111

160 Hard Drive Bible

5x1024x27

10x1024x17
5x1024x37
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
[NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY
---

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

S=r1111E

98

5

1072

36

15

ESDI

3.5 X 111

ST 1111 N

98

5

1068

36

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

ST 1126A

111

7

1072

29

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

ST 1126N

111

7

1068

29

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

ST 1133A

117

5

1272

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

ST 1133NS

116

5

1268

36

15

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

ST 1144A

130

15

1385

36

18

IDE

3.5 X 111

ST 1150R

128

9

1072

26

15

RLL

3.5 X 111

ST 1156A

138

7

1072

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

ST 1156E

138

7

1072

36

15

ESDI

3.5 X 111

ST 1156N/NS

138

7

1068

36

15

SCSI 1&2 3.5 X 111

ST 1162A

143

9

1072

29

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

ST 1162N

142

9

1068

29

15

SCSI

3.5 X 111

8T 1186A

164

7

1272

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

8T 1186NS

163

7

1268

36

15

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

ST 1201A

177

9

1072

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

ST 1201 E

177

9

1072

36

15

ESDI

3.5 X 111

9

1068

36

15

SCSI 1&2 3.5 X 111

ST 1201 N/NS

177

ST 1239A

211

9

1272

36

15

IDE

3.5 X 111

ST 1239NS

210

9

1268

36

15

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

ST 1400A

331

7

1475

62

14

IDE

3.5 X 111

ST 1400N

331

7

1476

62

14

8CSI-2

3.5 X 111

ST 1401A

340

9

1121

62

12

IDE

3.5 X 111

ST 1401 N

338

9

1121

62

12

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

ST 1480A

426

9

1474

-

14

IDE

3.5 X 111

9

1476

62

14

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

ST 1480N/ND

426

ST 1480N/NV

426

9

1476

62

14

SCSI-2

3.5 X 111

ST 1481 N

426

9

1476

62

14

F SCSI

3.5 X 111

ST 1581 N

525

9

1476

77

14

F SCSI

3.5 X 111

13

1730

77

9.9/11.4 F SCSI

ST 1980N/ND

860

ST 2106E

92

5

1024

36

18

ESDI

ST 2106N/NM

91

5

1022

36

18

SCSI

8T 2125 N/NM/NV

107

3

1544

45

18

SCSI

ST 2182E

160

4

1453

54

16

ESDI

ST 2209 N/NM/NV

179

5

1544

45

18

SCSI

ST 2274A

24'1

5

1747

54

16

IDE

13x980x17
14x960x17
15x1001x17
16x990x17

9x1024x30
10x970x33
9x804x48

12x954x36
15x736x62
15x736x62
15x895x62

3.5 X 111
11
5.25 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH

ST 2383A

338

7

1747

54

16

IDE

ST 2383A

338

7

1747

54

16

ESDI

8T 2383 ALL

332

7

1261

74

14

SCSI 1&2 5.25 HH

ST 2502 ALL

435

7

1755

69

16

SCSI 1&2 5.25 HH

8T 3051A

43.1

7

706

17

16

IDE

© CSC 1996

CMOS
SETTINGS

16x465x63
16x737x56

11
11

3.5 X 111

6x820x17
Hard Drive Bible 161

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FAaOR

ST 3096A

89.1

16

590

17

14

IDE

3.5

X

1"

10x1024x17

ST 3120A

106.9

16

754

17

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

12x1024x17

ST 3144A

130.7

16

953

17

16

IDE

3.5

X

1"

15x1001x17

ST 3243S

214

16

413

63

16

IDE

3.5

X

1"

12x1024x36

ST 3283A

245.3

16

470

63

12

IDE

3.5

ST 3283N

248.6

N/A

N/A

-

12

FSCSI

3.5

X

1"

ST 3385A

340

14

767

63

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

ST 3500A

426

8

1820

36

10

IDE

3.5

X

1"

ST 3500N/ND

426

16

825

63

10

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

ST 3550A

452.4

7

1810

63

12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

ST 3550N

456.5

7

1810

63

12

FSCSI

3.5

X

1"

ST 3600A

540

7

1874

10.5/12

IDE

3.5

X

1"

ST 3600N/ND

525

7

1872

10.2112

FSCSI-2

3.5

ST 3601N/ND

535

7

1872

-

10.2112

FSCSI

3.5

ST 4026

21

4

615

17

40

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 4038

31

5

733

17

40

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 4051

42

5

977

17

40

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 4053

45

5

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 4085

71

8

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 4086

72

9

925

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 4096

80.2

9

1024

17

28

RLL

5.25" FH

ST 4097

80

9

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 4135R

115

9

960

26

28

RLL

5.25" FH

ST 4144R

122.7

9

1024

26

28

MFM

5.25" FH

ST 4182E

160

9

969

36

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

ST 4182N/NM

155

9

969

35

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

ST 4350N/NM

300

9

1412

46

17

SCSI

5.25" FH

ST 4376N/NM/NV

330

9

1546

45

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

ST 4383E

338

13

1412

36

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

ST 4384E

338

15

1224

36

14.5

ESDI

5.25" FH

ST 4385N/NM/NV

330

15

1412

55

10.7

SCSI

5.25" FH

ST 4442E

380

15

1412

36

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

ST 4702N/NM

601

15

1546

50

16.5

SCSI

5.25" FH

ST 4766E

676

15

1632

54

15.5

SCSI

5.25" FH

ST 9095A

85.3

16

1024

63

16

IDE

2.5"

ST 9096A

85.3

16

1024

63

16

IDE

2.5"

ST 9096N

85

-

-

-

16

SCSI-2

2.5

ST 9100AG

85.3

16

1024

-

16

IDE

2.5"

ST 9144

42.6

16

1024

63

16

IDE

2.5"

ST 9144A

127.9

16

1024

63

16

IDE

2.5 x.75"

ST 9144N

128

-

-

-

16

SCSI-2

2.5 x.75"

162 Hard Drive I·ible

X

X
X

X

CMOS
SETTINGS

1"

16x470x63
16x659x63
16x825x63
16x876x63
16x1024x63

1"
1"

.75"

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

IMODEL
LNUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPAClYY
---

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SEGORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FAGOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

11

ST 9235N

209

N/A

N/A

-

16

SCSI

2.5

ST 9295AG

261

16

1024

-

16

IDE

2.5

ST 11200N/ND

1050

15

1877

10.51

FSCSI2

3.5 X 111

ST 11200N/ND

1050

15

1877

-

10.5121

FWSCSI2 3.5 X 111

ST 11700N/ND

1430

13

2626

-

9/10.5

FSCSI2

ST 11701 N/ND

1430

13

2626

63

9/10.5

FWSCSI2 3.5 X 111

ST 11750N/ND

1437

12

2756

63

8/9

FSCSI2

ST 11751 N/ND

1437

12

2756

63

8/9

FWSCSI2 3.5 X 111

ST 12400N/ND

2100

19

2626

63

9/10.5

FSCSI2

ST 12401 N/ND

2100

19

2626

63

9/10.5

FWSCSI2 3.5 X 111

ST 12550N/ND

2100

19

2756

63

8/9

FSCSI2

3.5 X 111

ST 12551 N/ND

2100

19

2756

63

8/9

FSCSI2

3.5 X 111

ST 31200N/ND

1050

9

2626

63

9/10.5

FSCSI2

ST 41097J

1097

17

2101

71

12

SMD

ST 41200N/NM/NV 1037

15

1931

71

15

SCSI

ST 41201J/K

1200

15

2101

71

11.5

SMD

ST 41291K

1200

15

2101

71

11.5

DP-IPI

3.5 X
11
5.25
11
5.25
11
5.25
5.25 11

ST 41520K

1370

18

2101

71

11.5

ST 41600N/N D

1370

18

2101

75

11.5

FH
11
DP-SCSI2 5.25 FH
SCSI2
5.25 11 FH

ST 41601 N/ND

1370

18

2101

75

11.5

FSCSI2

ST 41650N/N D

1415

15

2107

87

15

SCSI-2

ST 41651 N/ND

1415

15

2107

77

15

ST 41800K

1624

15

2627

81

11

ST 42000N/N D

1792

15

2627

84

11

ST 42100N

1900

15

2574

84

12.9

ST 42100NM/ND/NV 1037

15

1931

84

15

ST 42101 N/ND

1900

15

2574

84

13

ST 42400N

2100

19

2653

84

11

ST 43200K

33851<

19

2738

91

10/11

11
FWSCSI2 5.25 FH
11
SCSI-2 5.25 FH
FWSCSI2 5.25 11 FH

ST 43400N/N D

2912

19

2738

88

11

FSCSI2

ST 43401 N/N D

2912

19

2738

88

10/11

ST 43402ND

2912

19

2738

88

10/11

11
5.25 FH
FWSCSI2 5.25 11 FH
FWSCSI2 5.25 11 FH

ST 81236J/KIN

1056

17

1635

64

15

IPI-2/SCSI8

ST 81123J

11231<

17

1635

64

15

SMD

8

ST 81154K

1154'1<

17

1635

64

15

IPI-2

8

ST 82030J/K

2030'1<

21

2120

64

11

IPI-2

8

SA 604

5

4

160

17

140

MFM

SA 606

7

6

160

17

140

MFM

11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH

SA 607

5

2

306

17

80

MFM

5.25 11 FH

11

3.5 X 111

3.5 X 111

3.5 X 111

111
FH
FH
FH

11
5.25 FH
5.25 11 FH

11
5.25 FH
DP IPI-2 5.25 11 FH
11
FSCSI2
5.25 FH
FSCSI2
5.25 11 FH
SCSI-2 5.25 11 FH
FSCSI2

11

-

-

11
11
11

SHUGART

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 163

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SEGORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FAGOR

SA 612

11

4

306

17

100

MFM

5.25" FH

SA 706

6

2

320

17

120

MFM

5.25" FH

SA 712

11

4

320

17

80

MFM

5.25" FH

SA 724

20

8

320

17

80

MFM

5.25" FH

SA 1002

5

8

320

17

120

MFM

8"

SA 1004

10

-

-

17

-

MFM

8"

SA 1106

30

-

-

17

8"

SA 4004

14

14"

29

17

MFM

14"

SA 4100

56

-

MFM

SA 4008

-

17

-

MFM

17

-

MFM

14"

1200

174

8

1216

35

25

ESDI

5.25" FH

1300

261

12

1216

35

25

ESDI

5.25" FH

2200

174

8

1216

35

25

SCSI

5.25" FH

2300

261

12

1216

35

25

SCSI

5.25" FH

4410

322

11

1100

52

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

4420

334

11

1100

54

17

SCSI

5.25" FH

5710

655

15

1224

48

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

5720

655

15

1224

48

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

5810

688

15

1658

54

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

5820

688

15

1658

54

14

SCSI

5.25" FH

6200

1062

15

1921

72

14

SCSI

5.25" FH

CMOS
SETTINGS

SIEMENS

STORAGE DIMENSIONS
AT-40

44

5

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" HH

AT-70

71

8

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" HH

AT-100R

109

8

1024

26

28

RLL

5.25" FH

AT-100S

105

3

1224

54

19

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

AT-120

119

15

918

17

27

MFM

5.25" FH

AT-133

133

15

1024

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

AT-140

142

8

1024

34

28

ESDI

5.25" FH

AT-155E

157

7

1224

52

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

AT-155S

156

9

1224

36

36

SCSI

5.25" FH

AT-160

159

15

1224

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

AT-200

204

15

1024

26

28

RLL

5.25" FH

AT-200S

204

7

1021

26

15

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

AT-320E

329

15

1224

35

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

AT-320S

320

15

1224

36

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

AT-335E

338

15

1224

36

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

AT-650E

651

15

1632

52

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

164 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·878J

[MODEL
FORMATTED
~.:..:.:.:M=BE~R _ _ _ _ _--=-CAPACITy

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

AT-650S

651

15

1632

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

AT-1000S

1000

15

1632

63

15

SCSI

5.25" FH

MAC-195

195

7

-

-

15

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

PS-155E

156

9

1224

36

14

ESDI

5.25" FH

PS-155S

156

9

1224

36

14

SCSI

5.25" FH

PS-320S

320

15

1224

36

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

PS-335E

338

1224

36

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

PS-650S

651

15
1,),-

1632

54

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

CMOS
SETTINGS

SYQUEST TECHNOLOGY

so 225F

20

4

615

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

SO 306F

5

4

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

SO 306R

5

2

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

SO 306RD

5

2

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

SO 312

10

2

615

17

85

MFM

4" HH

SO 312RD

10

2

615

17

85

MFM

411 HH

SO 315F

21

4

612

17

65

MFM

411HH

SO 319

10

2

612

17

85

MFM

4"HH

so 325

21

4

612

17

85

MFM

4" HH

SO 325F

20

4

615

17

65

MFM

4"HH

SO 338F

30

6

615

17

65

MFM

411 HH

sa 340AF
sa 555
sa 2542A
sa 5110

38

6

640

17

65

MFM

4"HH

44

2

1021

42

20

SCSI

43

2

1481

41

15

IDE

5.25" HH
2.5 11

5x988x17
13x972x17

89

2

1720

82

20

SCSI

5.25 11 HH

5x1011x17

TANDON COMPUTER CORPORATION
TM 244

41

4

782

26

37

RLL

5.25" HH

TM 246

62

6

782

26

37

RLL

TM 251

5

2

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH
5.25 11 HH

TM 252

10

4

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

TM 261

10

2

615

17

85

MFM

3.5 x 111

TM 262

2'1

4

615

17

65

MFM

3.5 x 111

TM 262R

20

2

782

26

85

RLL

3.5 x 1"

TM 264

4'1

4

782

26

85

RLL

3.5 x 1"

TM 344

4'1

4

782

26

37

RLL

3.5 x 1"

TM 346

62

6

782

26

37

RLL

3.5 x 1"

TM 361

10

2

615

17

65

MFM

3.5 x 1"

TM 362

2'1

4

615

17

65

MFM

3.5 x 1"

TM 362R

20

2

782

26

85

RLL

3.5 x 1"

TM 364

4'1

4

782

26

85

RLL

3.5 x 1"

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 16J

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734-8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

TM 501

5

2

306

17

85

MFM

5.25 11 FH

TM 502

10

4

306

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

85

MFM

5.25 11 FH

TM 503

15

6

306

17

TM 602S

5

4

153

17

85

MFM

5.25 11 FH

TM 603S

10

6

153

17

85

MFM

5.25" FH

TM 603SE

21

6

230

17

85

MFM

5.25 11 FH

TM 702

20

4

615

26

40

RLL

5.25 11 FH

TM 702AT

8

4

615

17

35

MFM

5.25" FH

TM 703

10

5

733

17

40

MFM

5.25" FH

TM 703C

25

5

733

17

40

MFM

TM 703AT

31

5

733

17

35

MFM

5.25" FH
5.25 11 FH

TM 705

41

5

962

17

40

MFM

5.25" FH

TM 755

43

5

981

17

33

MFM

TM 2085

74

9

1004

36

25

SCSI

5.25" HH
5.25 11 FH

TM 2128

115

9

1004

36

25

SCSI

5.25"

TM 2170

154

9

1344

36

25

SCSI

5.25 11

TM 3085

71

8

1024

17

37

MFM

3.5 X 111

TM 3085R

71

8

1024

17

37

MFM

3.5 X 111

TM 3085R

104

8

1024

26

37

RLL

3.5 X 1"

CMOS
SETTINGS

TANDY CORPORATION
25-1045

20

4

615

17

35

IDE

5.25" HH

25-1046

43

4

782

27

28

IDE

5.25" HH

25-1047

20

4

615

17

35

IDE

-

TEAC AMERICA, INC.
so 150
10

4

306

17

80

MFM

5.25 11 FH

SO 340A

43

2

1050

40

23

IDE

3.5 X 111

SO 340S

43

2

1050

40

23

SCSI

3.5 X 111

SO 380

86

4

1050

40

20

IDE

3.5 X 1"

SO 380S

86

4

1050

40

20

SCSI

3.5 X 1"

SO 510

10

4

306

17

65

MFM

5.25 11 FH

SO 520

20

4

615

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

SO 540

40

8

615

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

SO 31051-1

105

4

1381

48

-20

IDE

3.5 X 1"

5

4

153

17

65

MFM

5.25" FH

10

4

306

17

105

MFM

5.25 11 FH

4x615x17
4x615x17

12x1005x17

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
TI-5

TOKICO
OK 503-2
166 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·878l

-------

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

'----------

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

CMOS
SETTINGS

TOSHIBA AMERICA, INC.
MK 53FA {M}

43

5

830

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

MK 53FA {Rt}

64

5

830

26

30

RLL

5.25" FH

MK 53FB {M}

43

5

830

17

25

MFM

5.25" FH

MK 53FB {FQ

64

5

830

26

25

RLL

5.25" FH

MK 54FA (M}

60

7

831

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

MK 54FA {R:}

90

7

830

26

25

RLL

5.25" FH

MK 54FB {M}

60

7

830

17

25

MFM

5.25" FH

~K

54FB {FQ

90

7

830

26

25

RLL

5.25" FH

~K

56FA {M}

86

10

830

17

30

MFM

5.25" FH

MK 56FA {R}

129

10

830

26

30

RLL

5.25" FH

MK 56FB{M}

72

10

830

17

25

MFM

5.25" FH

MK 56FB {Rt}

105

10

830

26

25

RLL

5.25" FH

MK72

72

10

830

17

25

MFM

3.5

X

1"

MK 72PCR

105

10

830

26

25

RLL

3.5

X

1"

MK 130

53

9

733

17

25

MFM

3.5

X

1"

MK 134FA {1M}

44

7

733

17

25

MFM

3.5

X

1"

MK 134FA {IR}

65

7

733

26

23

RLL

3.5

X

1"

MK 153FA

74

5

830

35

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

MK 153FB

74

5

830

35

23

SCSI

5.25" FH

MK 154FA

104

7

830

35

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

MK 154FB

104

7

830

35

23

SCSI

5.25" FH

MK 156FA

145

10

830

35

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

MK 156FB

145

10

830

35

23

SCSI

5.25" FH

MK 232FB

45

3

845

35

25

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

MK 233FB

76

5

845

35

25

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

MK 234FB

101

7

845

35

25

IDE

3.5

X

1"

12x945x17

MK 234FC

101

7

845

35

25

IDE

3.5

X

1"

12x945x17

MK 250FA

382

10

1224

35

18

ESDI

5.25" FH

MK 250FB

382

10

1224

35

18

SCSI

5.25" FH

MK 355FA

459

9

1632

53

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

MK 355FB

459

9

1632

53

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

MK 358FA

676

15

1661

53

16

ESDI

5.25" FH

MK 358FB

676

15

1661

53

16

SCSI

5.25" FH

MK 556FA

152

10

830

36

23

ESDI

5.25" FH

MK 1034FC

107

4

1339

39

16

IDE

3.5"

MK 1122FC

43

5

988

17

23

IDE

2.5"

MK 2024FC

86

2

988

17

19

IDE

2.5"

16x615x17

MK 2124FC

130

6

1820

48

17

IDE

2.5"

16x1155x17

8x664x39

L-.-.

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 16l

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

TL 213

10

2

640

17

105

MFM

5.25" HH

TL 226

22

4

640

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

TL 238

22

4

640

17

85

MFM

5.25" HH

TL 240

33

6

640

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

TL 258

33

6

640

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

TL 326

22

4

640

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

TL 340

33

6

640

17

65

MFM

5.25" HH

VERTEX (also see Priam)
26
v 130

3

987

17

40

MFM

5.25" FH

V 150

43

5

987

17

40

MFM

5.25" FH

V 170

60

7

987

17

28

MFM

5.25" FH

CMOS
SETTINGS

TULIN

WESTERN DIGITAL

WD362

20

4

615

17

80

MFM

WD 382R

20

2

782

26

85

RLL

WD 383R

30

4

615

26

85

RLL

WD 384R

40

4

782

26

85

RLL

WD 544R

40

4

782

26

40

RLL

WD 582R

20

2

782

26

85

RLL

WD 383R

30

4

615

26

85

RLL

WD 384R

40

4

782

26

85

RLL

WD 93024A

20

2

782

27

28

IDE

WD 93024X

20

2

782

27

39

IDE

WD 93028A1AD

20

2

782

27

69

IDE

WD 93028X

20

2

782

27

80

IDE

WD 93034X

30

3

782

27

39

IDE

WD 93038X

30

3

782

27

80

IDE

WD 93044A

40

4

782

27

28

IDE

WD 93044X

40

4

782

27

39

IDE

WD 93048AD

40

4

782

27

69

IDE

WD 93048A

40

4

782

27

69

IDE

WD 93048X

40

4

782

27

80

IDE

x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"
3.5 x 1"

WD 95024A

20

2

782

27

28

IDE

5.25" HH

WD 95024X

20

2

782

27

39

IDE

5.25" HH

WD 95028Z

20

2

782

27

39

IDE

5.25" HH

WD 95028AD

20

2

782

27

69

IDE

3.5

WD 95028X

20

2

782

27

80

IDE

5.25" HH

WS262

20

4

615

17

80

MFM

WD 344R

40

4

782

26

40

RLL

168 Hard Drive Bible

3.5

x 1"
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734-8787

[MODEL
l!!J!MBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

J

CMOS
SETTINGS

WD 95034X

30

3

782

27

39

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WD 95044A

40

4

782

27

28

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WD 95044X

40

4

782

27

39

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WD 95048A

40

4

782

27

69

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WD 95048AD

40

4

782

27

69

IDE

3.5 X 1"

WD 95048X

40

4

782

27

80

IDE

5.25" HH

WD A8130

32

5

733

17

19

IDE

2.5"

WD AH260

63

7

1024

17

19

IDE

2.5"

WD AC140

42

5

980

17

18

IDE

3.5"

WD AC160

62

7

1024

17

17

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WD AC280

85

10

980

17

18

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WD AC2120

125

8

872

35

17

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WD AP4200

212

12

987

35

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

WD M1130-44

41

2

1104

33

19

MCA

3.5

X

1"

WD M1130-7'2

68

4

1104

32

19

MCA

3.5

X

1"

WD SC8320

320

6

2105

35

12

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

WD SC8400

400

8

1900

35

12

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

WD SP4200

209

4

1900

35

14

SCSI-2

3.5

X

1"

Condor

320

6

2105

35

13

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

Piranha 105A

105

2

1917

35

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

Piranha 105S

105

2

1917

35

15

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

Piranha 21 OA

210

4

1917

35

15

IDE

3.5

X

1"

Piranha 21 OS

210

4

1917

35

15

SCSI

3.5

X

1"

OWL I

10

4

306

17/32

65

MFM

OWL II

20

4

612

17/32

65

MFM

OWL III

40

4

888

27

38

MFM

5.25" HH
5.25 11 HH
5.25 11 HH

--

13x1000x16
13x950x33

XEBEX

YE-DATA AMERICA, INC. (also see C.ltoh)
YD-3042

44

4

788

42

28

SCSI

3.5

X

111

YD-3081 B

45

2

1057

42

28

SCSI

3.5

X

111

YD-3082

87

8

788

42

28

SCSI

3.5

X

111

YD-30828

90

4

1057

42

28

SCSI

3.5

X

111

X

111

YD-30838

136

6

1057

42

28

SCSI

3.5

YD-3084B

181

8

1057

42

28

SCSI

3.5

X

111

YD-3161 B

45

2

1057

42

19

IDE

3.5

X

111

YD-3162B

90

4

1057

42

19

IDE

3.5 x 111

YD-3181 B

45

2

1057

42

19

SCSI

3.5 x 111

YD-3182B

90

4

1057

42

19

SCSI

YD-3530

32

5

731

17

-

MFM

3.5 x 111
5.25 11 HH

'--.

©

csc

1996

Hard Drive Bible 16~

Corporate Systems Center (408) 734·8787

MODEL
NUMBER

FORMATTED
CAPACITY

NO. OF
HEADS

NO. OF
CYLINDERS

SECTORS
PER TRACK

AVERAGE
IN MS

INTERFACE

FORM
FACTOR

YD-3540

45

7

731

17

-

MFM

5.25 11 HH

ZH 3100

86

20

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X 111

121

-

20

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X 111

ZH 3240

237

-

-

ZH 3140

-

12

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X 1"

ZH 3380

332

-

-

12

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X 1"

ZH 3490

427

-

-

-

12

IDE/SCSI 3.5 X 111

CMOS
SETTINGS

ZENTEC

170 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONTROLLER INFORMATION

isted on the following pages are descriptions of common controller cards with performance ratings and jumper settings. The
jumpe:r setting listed are the default or most common configuration
we've seen.
The junlper settings needed to make the card work in your system
may be different. Use the settings shown a reference guide only. Be
sure to consult the controller card nlanual for detailed information.

L

ADAPTEC CO,NTROLLERS

Adaptee 1520
Adaptee U522
A 16-bit: controller that also supports SCSI-II. The 1520 is a hard
drive only controller. The 1522 also supports 2 floppy drives.
Default Junlpers:

©

In:

J5-2, J5-5, J5-6,
J6-1, J6-2, J6-3, J6-5,
J7-1 *,J7-2*,J7-4*,J7-6*,
J8-4,
J9-2, J9-6, J9-7 , J9-8

Notes:

* Used only on 1522 (floppy jumpers).

esc

1996

Hard Drive Bible 171

Corpora Ie Syslems Cenler (408) 143·8787

Adoptee 1540A
Adopted 1542A
A 16-bit SCSI controller. The 1540A is a hard drive only controller.
The 1542A also supports 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
In:

J1-10,J6-1,J7-1,J14-2,J15-2,J17-1 & 2*,
J18-1& 2*,J19-1 & 2*

Notes:

* Used only on 1542 (floppy jumpers).

Adoptee AHA 1542(F
A 16-bit SCSI host adapter. Supports a total of 7 internal and external devices. Also supports floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
All switches off.

Adoptee 2010A
An 8-bit controller that controls 2 hard drives only.
Default Jumpers:
None installed.
To format, use: G=C800:CCC
Notes:

172 Hard Drive Bible

Jumper E-F for removable cartridge O.
Jumper G-H for removable cartridge drive 1.
Jumper K-L for controller internal diagnostics.
Boards with PIN 401400 Rev. C or later are required for
use in AT class machines.

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Adoptee 2320A
Adoptee 2322A
Adoptee 232~~A-8
A 16-bit: ESDI controller that controls 2 hard drives at 10MHz and
supports 1:: 1 interleave. The 2322A also supports two floppy drives.
The 2322A,·8 supports data rates up to 15 MHz.
Default Junapers:
In:

J13-1 & 2,J18-1 & 2,J19-1 & 2*,J20-1 & 2*,J21-2 &3*

To forrnat, use: G=C800:5
Notes:

*2322A only for floppy control.

CCAT CONTROLLERS

CCAT 200A I,DE Card pin 6620000440
A 16-bit IDE controller that controls 2 IDE drives and 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
None installed.
To fornlat, use: G=C800:5

CONNER PERIPHERALS C'ONTROLLERS
Conner IDE Card pin 02090-002
A 16-bit IDE paddle board that controlls 2 IDE drives.
Default Jumpers:
E1, E2, and E4 installed.

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CORPORATE SYSTEM CENTER CONTROLLERS

CSC AK-47 VESA SCSI-II
A 16-bit high speed SCSI-II controller. Controls up to 7 total internal or external hard, optical, and tape drives. Also supports up to 4
floppy drives.
Memory Base Address Setting:
SW7
SWS
Address Range
Off
On
DOOO-D7FF**
On
Off
DSOO-DFFF
On
On
CSOO-CFFF
Off
Off
EOOO-E7FF
I/O Base Address Setting:
sw6
1/0 Address Range
On
ISOH-I9FH
Off
320H-33FH**
Floppy Drive Enable/Disable:
SWI
Floppy Control
On
Disable Floppy
Off
Enable Floppy
Interrupt Select
1/0 Address
ISO-19FH
320-33FH

Options:
Valid IRQ
IRQI4
IRQI5

CSC Caching ESDI Card
A I6-bit caching controller which supports up to a total of 7 ESDI
hard drive devices, and up to 4 floppy drives. Up to 32MB on board
cache.
Jumper Functions and Defaults
Jumper
WI
W2
174 Hard Drive Bible

Function
BIOS Address
BIOS Address

Default
On
On

Jumper
On
On
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Jumper
W3
W4
WS
W6
W7
W9

Default
On
Off
On
Off
On
3FX

Function
Hard Disk Enable
Fixed Disk Address
Floppy Enable
Cache Enable
DACK2 Enable
Floppy Address

Jumper
On
Off
On
On
On
1/2

IRQ Settings on SIP Switch SWl:
IRQ Level
11
12
14
15
Notes:

1

2

.3

~

5.

{1

1

8

On
Off
Off
Off

On
Off
Off
Off

Off
On
Off
Off

Off
On
Off
Off

Off
Off
On
Off

Off
Off
On
Off

Off
Off
Off
On

Off
Off
Off
On

To disable the hard drive controller: remove the jumper
from 'W# and turn ALL switches on SWI to OFF.
To disable the floppy controller: remove the jumpers
from 'W5 and W7.
To disable the Caching .Algorithm: install the jumper at W6.

CSC FostCoch'e 32
Supports up to 7 SCSI devices and 4 floppy drives. Up to 32MB on
board cache. A single 8-bit position dipswitch is used for hardware configurationsa and are shown below.
Base Addres~
SWO SWI
On
On
DOOO
Off
On
C800
Off
On
EOOO
Off
Off
D800
Bus Speed
SW4
On
Fast
Off
Faster

Notes:

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1996

Floppy Drive
SW5
On
Enabled
Off
Disabled

Module Type
SW2 SW3
On
On
256K
Off
On
1MB
On
Off
4MB

Switches 6 & 7 controll the floppy disk density and should
be left ON for standard floppy drives. Switch 8 is not in use.
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CSC FastCache 64
Supports up to 7 SCSI devices and 4 floppy drives. Up to 64MB
onboard cache. A single 8-bit position dipswitch is used for hardware
configurations and are shown below.
Interrupt
SW1 SW2
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
On

None
IRQ14
IRQ15

Bus Speed
SW4
On
Non-Std.
Off
Standard

Floppy Drive
SW3
On
Enabled
Off
Disabled

Module Type
SW% SW6
On
On
256K
Off
On
1MB
On
Off
4MB
Off
Off
16MB

Base Address
SW7 SW8 Address
Off
On
C800
On
Pn
DOOO
Off
Off
D800
On
Off
EOOO

CSC IDE FastCache 64
The IDE FastCache 64 controls up to 2 IDE drives and 4 floppy drives and can have up to 64MB of onboard cache memory.

176 Hard Drive Bible

Base Address
SW1 SW2 Address
On
C800*
Off
On
On
DOOO
Off
Off
D800
Off
On
EOOO

SIMM
SW3
On
On
Off
Off

Bus Compatibility
SW5
Off
Primary*
On
Non-Standard

Floppy Drives
SW6
On
Enabled*
Off
Disabled

Type
SW4
On
Off
On
Off

Module
256KB
1MB
4MB
16MB

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IDE Address
SW7
On
Primary*
Off
Secondary

Drive Interrupt
SW8
On
Buffered*
Off
Unbuffered

DTC CONTROLLERS

DTC 3250
An 8-bit: SCSI controller that also controls 2 floppy drives.
Default JunIpers:
In:
WI
On:

SW2-1, SW2-8, SW2-9

To fonnat, use:

GSDIAG

DTC 3180
DTC 3280
A 16-bit SCSI controller. 3280 also controls floppy drives.
Default JunIpers:
In:
WI-2 &3, W2-1 & 2*, SWI-8*, SWI-IO*
To formlat, use:
Notes:

GSDIAG program

* 3280 only for floppy drives.

DTC 3290
An EISA bus SCSI controller with up to 4MB cache RAM. Controls
up to 7 SCSI devices and two floppy drives.
Default JunIpers:
N one installed
To format, use:

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GSDIAG program

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Drc 5150
An XT (8-bit) MFM controller for 2 hard drives. 2: I interleave.
Default Jumpers:
In: WI-I & 2,W2,W3-2 & 3
On:

SW4-4

To format, use: G=C800:5

Drc 5180C Rev. C
Drc 5180C Rev. G
Drc 5180CR
Drc 5180 CRH
Drc 51801
These are I6-bit MFM hard drives, 2: I interleave controllers.
Default Jumpers:
C Rev. c:WI
C Rev. G:W2,W3,W6
CR:W4-2 & 3,W5-2 & 3
CRH:W5-I & 2,W6,W7
I:W4-2 & 3
To format, use:

G=C800:5

Drc 5187
DrC 5187-1
DrC S187CR
DrC 5187CRH
DrC 51871
These are I6-bit RLL hard drives, 2: I interleave controllers.
Default Jumpers:
87 & 87-I:WI,W2,W4,W7-7 & 8
CR:WI,W4-2 & 3,W5-I & 2,W6,W7,W8
CRH:WI,W4-I & 2,W5-2 & 3,W6,W7,W8
I:W4-2 & 3,W6,W7,W8
To format, use:
178 Hard Drive Bible

G=C800:5
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ore 5280eA-l
DTe 5280e1-1
ore 5280eRA
ore 5280CRZ
ore 52801
These are 16-bit MFM hard drives, 2: 1 interleave controllers that
also controll 2 floppy drives.
Default JUfllpers:
All Models:W5,W6
To fortnat, use:

G=C800:5

ore 5387
Ofe 5287eR
ore 528710
These are 16-bit RtL hard drive, 2: 1 interleave controllers that also
control 2 floppy drives.
Default Jutupers:
87:W3,-'W5,W6,W7
CR:W5,W6-2 & 3,W8,WIO
I:W5,W6,W8,W10
To format, use:

G=C800:5

ore 6180A
ore 6280A
A 16-bit ESDI, 1:1 interleave controller for 2 hard drives at 10MHz.
Model 6280 also controls 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
6180:W=~, SWl-4
6280:W2
To fornlat, use:
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G=C800:5
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D1e 6180-151
D1e 6280-151
A 16-bit ESDI, 1:1 interleave controller for 2 hard drives at 10MHz.
Model 62S0-1ST also controlls 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
6180-1ST:W4-2 &3, SWl-l, SWI--4, SWI-7, SWI-8
62S0-1ST: SWI-2, SWI-6, SWI-9, SWI-I0
To format, use:

G=CSOO:S

D1e 6180-151X
D1e 6280-151X
D1e 6282-24
These are 16-bit ESDI, 1: 1 interleave controllers that control 2 hard
drives. Models 62S0-1STX and 6282-24 also control 2 floppy drives.
These controllers can operate at data rates up to IS MHz.
Default Jumpers:
61S0-1STX:W4-1 & 2,WS-l & 2, SWl-l, SWI-4, SWI-7, SWl-S
6280-1STX:W4-1 & 2, WS-l & 2, SWI-2, SWI-6, SWI-9, SWI-I0
6282-24:Wl-S & 6,WI-7 & S,Wl-9 & 10,W2-21 & 22,W2-2S &26
To format, use:

G=CSOO

D1e 6290-24
D1e 6290E
EISA, ESDI, 1: 1 interleave controllers with up to 4MB cache.
Controls up to 4 ESDI drives and 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
6290-24: SWI-4, SWl-S
6290E: SWI-4
To format, use:
Notes:
180 Hard Dr'.ve Bible

G=c800:S

Supports translation tnode for large capacity drives.
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Ofe 6195
OfC 6295
EISA, ESDI, 1: 1 interleave hard drive controllers. Model 6295 also
controls 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
6195: SWI-4
6295: SWI-4, SWI-8
To format, use:
l'ifotes:

G:=C800:5

Supports translation mode for large capacity drives.

OfC 71S0
Ofe 72S0
An MFM, 1: 1 interleave hard drive controller. Model 7280 also supports 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
7180:W4-2 & 3,·W6
7280:W5,W6
To format, use:

G:=C800:5

Ofe 71S7
Dfe 7287
An RLL, 1: 1 interleave hard drive controller. Model 7287 also supports 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
7187: W4-2 & 3,W6,W7,W8
7287:W5,W6,W8
To format, use:
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DTK CONTROLLERS (Data Enterprises}
PTI-215
A I6-bit IDE controller for 2 hard drives and 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
WI-I & 2,W2-I & 2,W3-2 & 3
To format, use:

DOS

EVEREX CONTROLLERS
EVEREX EV-346
A I6-Bit, 1: 1 interleave, MFM hard drive and floppy controller.
Default Jumpers:
None installed.
To format, use:

Speedstor or Disk Manager.

Future Domain CONTROLLERS
Future Domain TMC-BB5
An 8-bit SCSI host adapter, also controls 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
WI &W2
To format, use:

Future Domain software.

Future Domain TMC-1670SVP
A I6-bit SCSI-2 host adapter, also controlls 2 floppy drives.

182 Hard Drive Bible

Default Jumpers:

None

To format, use:

Future Domain software.

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Fulure Doma;JrJ TMC- 166DDNK
Fulure Ooma;JrJ TMC- 168DONK
A 16-bit SCSI-II host adapter. The 1680 also controls 2 floppy drives.
Default ]umlpers:

None.

To format, use:

Future Domain software.

,LONGSHINE CONTROLLERS

Longsh;ne LC~;-62 I 00
A 8-bit

~,fFM

controller for 2 hard drives.

Default ]uflllpers:
1-8 heads: ]PI 1 & 2
9-16 heads:]PI 2 & 3
G=C800:5

,NCL CONTROLLERS
NOC 5125
A 16-bit MFM controller for 2 hard drives and 2 floppy drives.
Default ]umlpers:
]P5, low,er two pins jumpered.
To format, use:

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DIAGS, Speedstor, or Disk Manager.

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Corporate Systems Center (408) 743-8787

SEAGATE CONTROLLERS

Seagate ST-01
Seagate ST-02
An B-bit SCSI controller for up to 7 devices. ST-02 also supports 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
JP6-N & O,JP6-Q & R
To format, use:
Notes:

G=CBOO:5

* For ST-02 only.

Seagate ST-05X
An B-bit XT-IDE controller for up to 2 hard drives.
Default Jumpers:
None installed
To format, use:

DOS

Seagate ST-OIA
Seagate STOBA
A 16-bitAT-ide controller for up to 2 hard drives. Model ST-OBA also
controls up to 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
JP4-1 & 1*,JP5-1 & 2
To format, use:
Notes:

184 Hard Drive Bible

DOS

* For ST-OBA

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Seaga'e ST- I 1M
Seaga'e ST- I 1R
ST-IIM is an 8-bit MFM drive controller. ST-IIR is an 8-bit RLL hard
drive controller.
Default ]umlpers:
None installed.
To format, use:

G=C800:5

Seaga,e SR2 Jf-M
Seaga'e SR2 J'-R
Seaga'e SR22-M
Seaga'e SR2 Jf-R
ST-21M and ST-22M are l6-bit MFM hard drive ontrollers. ST-21R
and ST-22R are 16-bit RLL controllers. ST-22M and ST-22R also control
2 floppy drives.
Default ]umlpers:
]P4*
To format, use:
:Notes:

G=C800:5

* ST-22M & ST-22R only.

,SMSIOMTI CIONTROLLER~
SMSjOMTI 510
An 8-bit SCSI controller for 2 hard drives only.
Default ]um,pers:
Wl-2 & 3,W2-2 & 3,W3-1 & 2,W4-2 & 3
To format, llse:
:Notes:

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1996

G=C800:5 pr OMT/DISK

HA7 BIOS may cause partitioning problems with DOS
4.0 or later.

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SMSjOMTI 822
A 16-bit SCSI controller for 2 hard drives and 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
W5,W7,W17,W21,W24,W28,W32,W33-1 & 2,W35,W38-2 & 3
To format, use:
Notes:

G=C800:6

Drivers for Novell and more than 2 SCSI drives are available. May not operated in machines with 8MHz bus
speed and no wait states.

SMSjOMTI 5520
An 8-bit MFM controller for 2 hard drives only.
Default Jumpers:
None installed.
To format, use:

G=C800:6

SMS.OMTI 5527
An 8-bit RLL controller for 2 hard drives only.
Default Jumpers:
N one installed

To format, use:

G=C800:6

SMSjOMTI 8120
A 16-bit MFM controller for 2 hard drives only.
Default Jumpers:
N one installed
To format, use:
186 Hard Drive Bible

G=c8oo:6
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SMSjOMTI ~1140
SMSjOMTI 8240
A 16-bit MFM controller for 2 hard drives. Supports 1: 1 interleave
and fast (average 700Kb/sec transfer). The 8240 also supports 2 floppy
drives.
Default JunIpers:
None installed.
To fonnat, use:
Notes:

OMPI/DISK software.

Incofllpatible with some motherboards due to timing
problem., but runs solid as a rock in boards with the
original AT-IBM bus timing specifications.

SMSjOMTI 8630
A 16-bit ESDI controller for 2 hard drives and 2 floppy drives.
Operates with drive rates up to 10MHz. Supports 1: 1 interleave, and
has 32K look-ahead cache.
Default JunIpers:
W17,W20-2 &3,W23,W24,W25
To format, use:

G=CAOO:6

SMSjOMTI 8640
A 16-bit ESDI controller for 2 hard drives and 2 floppy drives.
Operates with drive rates up to 15MHZ. Supports 1: 1 interleave, and
has 32K look-ahead cache.
Default JunIpers:
W17,W20-2 &3,W23,W24,W25
To fonnat, use:
©

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1996

G=CAOO:6
Hard Drive Bible 187

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

Storage Dimension Controllers

Storage Dimension SOC-801
Storage Dimension SOC-802
An 8-bit SCSI host adapter. SDC-802 also controlls 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
SDC-80 1 : JP 1-3
SDC-802:W3
To format, use:

SpeedS tor or Disk Manager.

Ultras tor Controllers
Ultras tor 12C
AI: 1 interleave caching controller for 2 ESDI drives at up to
24MHz. Also controls up to 3 floppy drives. Up to 16MB of caching
memory can be installed.
Default Jumpers:
None installed.
To format, use:

G=C800:5

Ultras tor 12F
Ultras tor 12F-24
AI: 1 interleave controller for 2 ESDI drives at up to 22MHz. Also
controls up to 3 floppy drives. The 12F-24 supports 24MHz drives.
Default Jumpers:
N one installed.
To format, use:
188 Hard Drive Bible

G=C800:5
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Ultras tor 15C
Ultrastor 1SCM
A caching controller for 2 IDE drives and 3 floppy drives. Up to 8
MB of cache memory can be installed. The 15CM: also provides 2 serial ports, 2 parallel ports, and a game port.
Default Junipers:
None installed.
To format, use:

G=C800:5

Ultras tor 22C~
Ultras tor 22f
An ESDI bus ESDI controller for 2 hard drives only.

Supports

24MHz drives. The 22C caching controller supports up to 16MB of
cache memory.
Default Junipers:
None installed.
To fonnat, use:

G=C800:5

Ultras tor 24C~
Ultras tor 24/~
An EISA bus SCSI controller for up to 7 devices and 3 floppy drives. The 24fC supports up to 16MB of cache memory.
Default Junipers:
None installed.
To fonnat, use:
©

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G=C800:5
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Wangtee Controllers
Wangtee EV-83 I
Controls QIC-36 tape drives.
Default Jumpers:
E 3 & 4, E 8 & 9, E 11 & 12,Wl,W2,W3
Notes:

See manual for switch settings, DMA settings and inter
rupt jumpers. Most reported problems with this card are
a result of DMA interrupt problems.

Western Digital Controllers
Western Digital WD ATl40
A 16-bit adapter board for 2 AT type IDE drives and 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
Wl- 3 & 4
To format, use:

DOS

Western Digital WD AT240
A 16-bit adapter board for 2 AT type IDE drives and 2 floppy drives.
Default Jumpers:
WI-3 & 4, W2-1 & 2
To format, use:
190 Hard Drive Bible

DOS
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Western Digilfal WD AT440
A 16-bit adapter board for 2 AT type IDE drives and 2' floppy drives. This board also has 2 serial ports and 1 parallel port.
Default jumpers:
W3-3 & 4,W4-1 & 2,WT-3 & 4,W7-5 & 6,W7-7 & 8,W8-1 & 2,
W8-5 & 6,W8-9 & lO,W9-1 & 2,W9-3 & 4

To format, lIse:

DOS

WesternDig;tnl WD X1140
An 8-bit adapter board for 2 XT type IDE drives.
Default jumpers:
No jumpers on board.
To format, use:

G=C800:5

:Notes: Does not support daisy-chain cables. A separate cable must be
used for each drive.

Western Digital WD XrlS0R
An 8-bit adapter board for 1 XT type IDE drive.
Default jumpers:
Wl- 2 & 3,W2-1 & 2,W3-1 & 2

To format, use:

G=C800:5

Notes: Does not support daisy-chain cables.

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Western Digita/ WD SCS-XTAT
An 8-bit SCSI host adapter for AT and XT type computers.
Default jumpers:

See Manual.

To format, use:

See Manual.

Western Digita/ WD XTGEN
Western Digita/ WD XTGEN2
Western Digita/ WD XTGENR
XT-GEN and XT-GEN2 are 8-bit MFM controllers for 2 hard drives
only. XT-G ENR is an 8-bit RLL controller.
Default jumpers:
GEN: No jumpers on board.
GEN2: None.
GEN2R: None.
To format, use:

G=C800:5

Western Digita/ WD 1002A-FOX FOOI/003
The FOOl controls 2 floppy drives only (No BIOS on card). The
F003 includes a ROM BIOS.
Default jumpers:
W4-2 & 3

Western Digita/ WD 1002A-FOX F002/004
F002 controls 4 floppy drives only. F004 has a BIOS on card which
permits installation of 1.2 and 1.44 MB drives in XT machines that normally only support 360K or 720K drives.

192 Hard Drive Blbl.

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Default jUIDlpers:
WI-2 & 3,W2-2 & 3,W3-1 & 2,W5-2 & 3,W6-2 & 3
To format, use:
Notes:

DOS

Uses WS-37C65 chip, works well in 286/386 machines.

Western Digital WD 1002-27X
Western DigUal WD 1002A-27X
An 8-bit RLL controller for 2 hard drives only..
Default jum.pers:
1002-27X:W3,W4-2 & 3,W6-2 & 3,W8-2 & 3, SI-5, SI-6,W9
1002A-27X: WI, W2
To format, use:

G=C800:5

Western Digital WD 1002A-WXl
An 8-bit MFM controller for 2 hard drives only.
Default jumpers:
W3,W4-2 & 3,W6-2 & 3,W8-2 & 3, SI-8 (AT Mode)
To format, use:

G=C800:5

Western Digital WD 1003-WAH
A 16-bit MFM, 3: 1 interleave controller that supports 2 hard drives
only.
Default jum.pers:
W6-2 & 3,W4-2 & 3,W5-1 & 2
To format, use:
©

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DIAGS, SpeedStor, or Disk Manager.
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Western Digito/ WD 1003-WA2
Controls 2 hard drives at 3:1 interleave and 2 floppy drives.
Default jumpers:
E 2 & 3, E 4 & 5, E 7 & 8

To format, use:

DIAGS, SpeedStor, or Disk Manager.

Western Digito/ WD I 003V-MM I
Western Digito/ WD 1003V-MM2
MMI is a 16-bit MFM controller for 2 hard drives at 2:1 interleave.
MM2 also controls 2 floppy drives.
Default jumpers:
None installed.
To format, use:

DIAGS, SpeedStor, or Disk Manager.

Western Digito/ WD I 003V-SR I
Western Digito/ WD 1003V-SR2
SRI is a 16-bit controller for 2 hard drives at 2: 1 interleave. SR2
also controls 2 floppy drives.
Default jumpers:
N one installed
To format, use:

DIAGS, SpeedStor, or Disk Manager.

Western Digito/ WD 1004-27X
Western Digito/ WD 1004A-27X
An 8-bit controller for 2 hard drives only.
194 Hard Drive Bible

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Default juolpers:
W25
To format, use:

G=C800:5

Western Digital WD 1004A-WXl
An 8-bit MFM controller for 2 hard drives only.
Default jumlpers:
See manual.
To format, use:

G=C800:5

Western Digital WD 10045A-WAH
An ESDI controller for 2 hard drives only.
Default jumpers:
See manual.
To format, use:

G:=C800:5

Western Digital WD 1006V-MCI
Western Digital WD 1006 V-MCR
MCI is an MFM tnicro channel controller, and MCR is an RLL micro
channel controller.
Default jumpers:
No jumpers on board.
To format, use:
@

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System supplied software.
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Western Digital WD 1006 V-MM I
Western Digital WD 1006 V-MM2
MMI is a 16-bit MFM controller for 2 hard drives at 1:1 inteleave.
MM2 also controls 2 floppy drives.
Default jumpers:
No jumpers installed.
To format, use:

DIAGS, SpeedStorm or Disk Manager.

Western Digital WD 1006 V-SR I
Western Digital WD 1006 V-SR2
SRI is a 16-bit RLL controller for 2 hard drives at 1: 1 inteleave. SR2
also controls 2 floppy drives.
Default jumpers:
None installed.
To format, use:

C800:5

Western Digital WD 100lA-WA2
A 16-bit ESDI controller for 2 hard drives and 2 floppy drives.
Supports 1: 1 interleave, and 10MBits/sec transfer.
Default jumpers:
See manual.
To format, use:

C800:5

Western Digital WD 100lA-WAH
A 16-bit ESDI controller for 2 hard drives. 10 Mb/ps at 1:1 interleave.
196 Hard Drive Bible

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Default junIpers:
Wt-2 & 3, W2-2 & 3, W3
To format, use:

C800:5

Western Digilro/ WD lOOlV-MCl
A micro channel controller for 2 ESDI drives.
Default jUlnpers:
No jumpers on board.
To format, use:

System supplies software.

Western Digital WD l007V-SEl
Western Digital WD l007V-SE2
A 16-bit ESDI controller for 2 hard drives at 1: 1 interleave with 32K
look-ahead cache. Model SE2 also controls 2 floppy drives.
Default jumlpers:
W7-1 &

2"~V8-2

To format, use:

&

3
G=COO:5 or C800:5 is W8 jumpered to 1 & 2.

Western Digilro/ WD l009V-SEl
Western Digilro/ WD l009V-SE2
A high-speed 16-bit ESDI controller with 64K cache, 1: 1 interleave,
and up to 24Mbit/sec transfer. Available in ISA or EISA bus models.
Model SE2 also supports up to 3 floppy drives.
Default jumlpers:
W2-2 & 3 (floppy), W3-1 & 2, W7 (EISA only).
To format, use:
©

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C800:5
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Western Digital WD 7000 FASST
A 16-bit SCSI controller that supports up to 7 SCSI devices and 2
floppy drives.
Default jumpers:
SA3, SA4, SA6, SA7, SA13, SA14, SA15, SA16, Wl-l & 2, W2-3 & 4,
W2-9 & lO.W5
To format, use:

Supplied software.

Notes: Negotiates for synchronous SCSI transfer. Driver s available for
Novell and Xenix.

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CONNECTOR PINOUTS

T

he following pages contain pinout information on various interfaces.

Table A .. Pinout lor Apple's External HOI-30 Connector
Pin
1
2

3
4

5

6
7
8

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18

19
20
21
22
23

24
25
26
27
28

29
30
@

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Internal Connector
External Connector
DISK.+5
-LINK.SEL
----------------------------------DISK.+5
-DB(O)
-------------~~---------------GROUND
GROUND
------------------GROUND
-DB(I)
GROUND
TERMPWR*
--------------------------------DB(O)
-DB(2)
-DB(I)
-DB(3)
GROUND
-DB(2)
-DB(3)
-ACK
-DB(4)
GROUND
-DB(5)
-DB(4)
-DB(6)
GROUND
-DB(7)
GROUND
-DB(P)
-DB(5)
DISK.+5
GROUND
-BSY
-DB(6)
GROUND
-ATN
-ACK
-DB(7)
GROUND
-DB(P)
-MSG
GROUND
-RST
-REQ
-SEL
GROUND
-C/D
-BSY
-I/O
GROUND
-REQ
-ATN
GROUND
-C/D
---------~~-----------GROUND
-RST
GROUND
-MSG
----------------------DISK.+5 - - - - - - - - --SEL
-------------DISK.+5
-I/O
----------~-------------

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Figure B- Apple and Future Domain 2S-Pin D-Sub

When looking at
Table B, keep in
mind that the connector numbers
shown in the table
and in Figure Bare
the ones that connector manufacturers,
like AMp, use on the
connectors. These are
not the numbers
used by SUN For
whatever reason,
SUN used an unusual numbering
scheme, which differs
from the counting
scheme the connector manufacturers
use and print on the
connector bodies. So,
if you use an older
SUN device, be
extremely careful
when using factory
cables.

Pin 1

Pin 13

ALERT

•

Female Side

0000000000000
000000000000
Pin2S
Pin 13

Pin 1

Male Side

0

•••••••••
••••••••••••

0

Pin 14

Pin2S

Table B - Pinout for Apple and Future Domain
Single-Ended SCSI Connectors Shown Above
Apple Single-ended SCSI Pinout
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Signal
-REQ
-MSG
-I/O
-RST
-ACK
-BSY
GND
-DBO
GND
-DB3
-DB5
-DB6
-DB7

Pin
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Signal
RES/GND
-C/D
RES/GND
-ATN
GND
-SEL
-DBP
-DBI
-DB2
-DB4
GND
TermPwr*

Future Domain Single-ended SCSI Pinout
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Signal
GND
-DB(I)
-DB(3)
-DB(5)
-DB(7)
GND
-SEL
GND
SQare
-RST
-C/D
-I/O
GND

Pin
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Signal
-DB(O)
-DB(2)
-DB(4)
-DB(6)
-DB(P)
GND
-ATN
-MSG
-ACK
-BSY
-REQ
-GND

*Pin 25 - Termination Power is not connected in the Mac Plus
connector.
Non-Official Standard SCSI Connectors
For whatever reasons, some companies decided to introduce non-standard SCSI connectors. The most common are Future Domain's 25-pin
D-sub connector, used on their early SCSI host adapters,Apple's 25-pin
D-sub connector with a different and totally incompatible pinout
scheme, and IBM's proprietary PS/2 SCSIL connector. See above figures and tables.

200 Hard Drive Bible

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Table C- PincJut lor Single-Ended and Dillerential B-Cables
Single-ended SCSI Pinout, B-Cable

Dillerential SCSI Pinout, B-Cable

Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Pin

:~O

31
32
33
34

Signal
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND

Pin
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
Tef1l1P,N"rB 51
Tef1l1P,N"fB 52
GND
53
GND
54
GND
55
GND
56
G·ND
57
GND
58
GND
59
GND
60
GND
61
GND
62
GND
63
GND
64
GND
65
GND
66
GND
67
GND
68

Signal
GND
··DB(8)
-DB(9)
··DB(10)
-DB(II)
··DB(12)
··DB(13)
··DB(14)
··DB(15)
··DB(Pl)
-ACKB
GND
-REQB
··DB(16)
··DB(17)
.. DB(18)

Signal
GND
+DB(8)
+DB(9)
+DB(10)
+DB(II)
+DB(12)
+DB(13)
+DB(14)
+DB(15)
+DB(Pl)
+ACKB
GND
+REQB
+DB(16)
+DB(17)
+DB(18)

Pin

Signal
GND
-DB(8)
-DB(9)
-DB(10)
-DB(II)
-DB(12)
-DB(13)
-DB(14)
-DB(15)
-DB(Pl)
-ACKB
DIFFSENS
-REQB
-DB(16)
-DB(17)
-DB(18)

TermPwrB
TermPwrB

TermPwrB
TermPwrB

TermPwrB
TermPwrB

-DB(19)
-DB(20)
-DB(21)
-DB(22)
-DB(23)
-DB(P2)
-DB(24)
-DB(25)
-DB(26)
-DB(27)
-DB(28)
-DB(29)
-DB(30)
-DB(31)
-DB(P3)
GND

+DB(19)
+DB(20)
+DB(21)
+DB(22)
+DB(23)
+DB(P2)
+DB(24)
+DB(25)
+DB(26)
+DB(27)
+DB(28)
+DB(29)
+DB(30)
+DB(31)
+DB(P3)
GND

-DB(19)
-DB(20)
-DB(21)
-DB(22)
-DB(23)
-DB(P2)
-DB(24)
-DB(25)
-DB(26)
-DB(27)
-DB(28)
-DB(29)
-DB(30)
-DB(31)
-DB(P3)
GND

68-Pin Wide SCSI B; P-, and Q-Cables
The pinout for single-(~nded and differential B-cables is shown in Table
C.
The P ..cable use a much smaller high-density connector because
the smaller 3~-inch devices don't have enough mounting space to fit
an IDC connector "rith 68 pins. The connector is the same for internal
and external cables, but the internal version is unshielded with a plastic body and without llocking mechanisms. The male connector is the
cable conne:ctor, and the device has the female connector.
In 1992, there vv-as a proposed cable standardization for Wide
SCSI devices but the Q-cable did not gain industry acceptance.

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Table D - Pinout for Single-Ended and Differential P-Cables
Single-ended SCSI Pinout, P-Cable
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
. 11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34

202 Hard Drive Bible

Signal
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
TermPwr
TennPwr
Reserved
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND

Pin
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68

Signal
-DB(12)
-DB(13)
-DB(14)
-DB(15)
-DB(P1)
-DB(O)
-DB(l)
-DB(2)
-DB(3)
-DB(4)
-DB(5)
-DB(6)
-DB(7)
-DB(P)
GND
GND
TennPwr
TennPwr
Reserved
GND
-ATN
GND
-BSY
-ACK
-RST
-MSG
-SEL
-C/D
-REQ
-I/O
-DB(8)
-DB(9)
-DB(10)
-DB(ll)

Differential SCSI Pinout, P-Cable
Pin

Pin Signal
Signal
-DB(12)
+DB(12)
-DB(13)
+DB(13)
-DB(14)
+DB(14)
-DB(15)
+DB(15)
-DB(P1)
+DB(P1)
GND
GND
-DB(O)
+DB(O)
-DB(l)
+DB(l)
+DB(2)
-DB(2)
+DB(3)
-DB(3)
+DB(4)
-DB(4)
-DB(5)
+DB(5)
-DB(6)
+DB(6)
-DB(7)
+DB(7)
-DB(P)
+DB(P)
DIFFSENS
GND
TennPwr
TennPwr
TennPwr
TennPwr
Reserved
Reserved
-ATN
+ATN
GND
GND
-BSY
+BSY
-ACK
+ACK
-RST
+RST
-MSG
+MSG
-SEL
+SEL
+C/D
-C/D
+REQ
-REQ
-I/O
+1/0
GND
GND
-DB(8)
+DB(8)
-DB(9)
+DB(9)
-DB(10)
+DB(10)
-DB(ll)
+DB(ll)

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Table E- PinolfJt for SO ..Pin, Single-Eneleel anel Differential
Centronics-Syyle Connector (A Cable)
Single . .eneleel SCSI Pinout

Differential SCSI Pinout

Pin
1
2
3
4

Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Pin
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
Not 0Jnnected 38
Reserved 39
40
GND
41
GND
42
GND
GND
43
44
GND
GND
45
GND
46
GND
47
GND
48
GND
49
GND
50

Signal
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
Reserved

Signal
-DB(O)
-DB(I)
-DB(2)
-DB(3)
-DB(4)
-DB(5)
-DB(6)
-DB(7)
-DB(P)
GND
GND
Reserved
TERMPWR
Reserved
GND
-ATN
GND
-BSY
-ACK
-RST
-]\1SG
-SEL
-C/D
-REQ
-I/O

Signal
GND
+DB(O)
+DB(I)
+DB(2)
+DB(3)
+DB(4)
+DB(5)
+DB(6)
+DB(7)
+DB(P)
DIFFSENS
Reserved
TERMPWR
Reserved
+ATN
GND
+BSY
+ACK
+RST
+MSG
+SEL
+C/D
+REQ
+1/0
GND

Pin
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

Signal
GND
-DB(O)
-DB(I)
-DB(2)
-DB(3)
-DB(4)
-DB(5)
-DB(6)
-DB(7)
-DB(P)
GND
Reserved
TERMPWR
Reserved
-ATN
GND
-BSY
-ACK
-RST
-MSG
-SEL
-C/D
-REQ
-I/O
GND

Table F . . ESDI Control Signals (J' /P' )
Control Signal Name Ground
-Head Select 3
1
-Head Select 2
3
-Write Gate
5
=-~onfig/-Status Data
7
-Transfer Ack
9
-Attention
11
-Head Select 0
13
-Sector/-Address Mark
15
Found
17
-Head Select 1
19
-Index
21
-Ready
23
-Transfer Request
25
-Drive Select 1
27
-Drive Select 2
29
-Drive Select 3
31
-Read Gate
33
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Signal Pin
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34

Transmission
To Drive
To Drive
To Drive
To Controller
To Controller
To Controller
To Drive
To Controller
To Drive
To Controller
To Controller
To Drive
To Drive
To Drive
To Drive
To Drive
To Drive
Hard Drive Bible 203

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Table G- ESDI Control Signals Continued (J2/P2J
Control Signal Name Ground
-Drive Selected
-Sector Address Mark
Found
-Seek ComJ2lete
-Address Mark Enable
6
-Reserved for SteJ2 Mode
+Write Clock
-Write Clock
-Cartridge Changed
+ Read Reference Clock
12
-Read Reference Clock
15,16
+NRZ Write Data
-NRZ Write Data
+ NRZ Read Data
19
-NRZ Read Data

Signal Pin
1
2
3
4
5
7
8
9
10
11
13
14
17
18
20

Transmission
To Controller
To Controller
To Controller
To Drive
To Controller
To Drive
To Drive
To Controller
To Controller
To Controller
To Drive
To Drive
To Controller
To Controller
To Controller

Table H-IBM I/O Channel Pinout (Sides A & BJ
Pin
Al
A2
A3
A4
AS
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
All
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
A18
A19
A20
A21
A22
A23
A24
A25
A26
A27
A28
A29
A30
A31
204 Hard Drive Bible

Signal Name
/IOCHCK
SD7
SD6
SD5
SD4
SD3
SD2
SD1
SDO
/IOCHRDY
AEN
SA19
SA18
SA17
SA16
SA15
SA14
SA13
SA12
SAIl
SA10
SA9
SA8
SA7
SA6
SA5
SA4
SA3
SA2
SAl
SAO

Pin
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
B10
B11
B12
B13
B14
B15
B16
B17
B18
B19
B20
B21
B22
B23
B24
B25
B26
B27
B28
B29
B30
B31

Signal Name
GND
RESETDRV
+5VCC
IRQ9
-5VCC
DRQ2
-12VCC
OWS
+12VCC
GND
/SMEMW
/SMEMR
/1 OW
//IOR
/DACK3
DRQ3
/DACK1
DRQ1
/REFRESH
CLK
IRQ7
IRQ6
IRQ5
IRQ4
IRQ3
/DACK2
T/C
ALE
+5VCC
OSC
GND
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

Table I -IBM I/O Channel Pinout Continued (Sides C& OJ
Pin
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
C10
C11
C12
C13
C14
CIS
(:16
C17
C18
-

Signal Name
SBRE
LA23
LA22
LA21
LA20
LA19
LA18
LA17
/MEMR
/MEMW
SD08
SD09
SD10
SD11
SD12
SD13
SD14
SD15

Pin
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
D16
D17
D18

Signal Name
/MEMCS16
/IOCS16
IRQ10
IRQ11
IRQ12
IRQ15
IRQ14
/DACKO
DRQO
/DACK5
DRQ5
/DACK6
DRQ6
/DACK7
DRQ7
+5VCC
/MASTER
GND

Table J - Pinout Table lor IBM High-Density PS/2 Connector
Pin
:1
2

3

4
5

(5

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
i4
15
~l6

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
© csc 1996

Signal Name
Gl\J"D
-DB(O)
Gl\J"D
-DB(l)
Gl\J"D
-DB(2)
GND
-DB(3)
GND
-DB(4)
GND
-DB(5)
GND
-DB(6)
GND
-DB(7)
GND
-DB(P)
GND
GND
G:ND
GND
Reserved/GND
Reserved/GND
Not Connected
TERMPWR
Reserved
Reserved
GND
GND

Pin
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Signal Name
GND
-ATN
GND
GND
GND
-BSY
GND
-ACK
GND
-RST
GND
-MSG
GND
-SEL
GND
-C/D
GND
-REQ
GND
-I/O
GND
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
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Table K - IDE Interlace Pinout

Pin
01
03
05
07

09
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27

29
31
33
35
37

39

Signal Name
-Host Reset
+ Host Data 7
+ Host Data 6
+ Host Data 5
+ Host Data 4
+ Host Data 3
+ Host Data 2
+ Host Data 1
+ Host Data 0
Ground
Reserved
-Host lOW
-Host lOR
Reserved
Reserved
+Host IRQ 14
+HostADDR 1
+HostADDR 0
-Host CSO
-Host SLY/ACT

Pin
02
04
06
08
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40

Signal Name
Ground
+ Host Data 8
+ Host Data 9
+ Host Data 10
+ Host Data 11
+ Host Data 12
+ Host Data 13
+ Host Data 14
+ Host Data 15
Key
Ground
Ground
Ground
+ Host ALE
Ground
+ Host 1016
- Host PDIAG
+ HostADDR 2
- Host CSI
Ground

Table L- QIC-36 Connector Pin Assignments
The QIC-36 interface is implemented through a 50-pin dual inline
header. The suggested mating connector is a 3M PIN 3425-60XX, 342570XX or equivalent. Maximum cable length is 10 feet (3 meters).
Description
Signal
Tape Motion Enable
GOTape Direction Control
REVTrack Select 2/3
TR3Track Select 2/2
TR2Track Select 2/1
TRlTrack Select 2/0
TROReset (Initialize Drive)
RSTReserved (Not Used)
DS3Reserved (Not Used)
DS2Reserved (Not Used)
DS 1Drive Select 0
DSOHigh Write Current
HCRead Data (Pulse Output) RDPUpper Tape Position Code UTHLower Tape Position Code LTHDrive Select Response
SLDCartridge In Place
CINUnsafe (No Write Protect) USFCapstan Tachometer Pulse TCHWrite Data Signal WDAWrite Data Signal +
WDAThreshold (35% Read Margin) TDHHigh Speed Slew Select
HSDWrite Enable
WENErase Enable
EEN206 Hard Drive Bible

Source
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
C
C
C
C
C
C

Pin
2

Return
1

4

3

6
8

7

10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50

5
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27

29
31
33
35
37

39
41
43
45
47
49
©

csc

1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743-8787

Table M - SCSI Pinout - Centronics, Mac, and Differential
IDC Pin
Number

1
2

3

4
5
6
7
8

Mac DB-25
Pin Number

26
2
27
:3
28

8

21
22

-1

9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

©

Centronics
Pin Number
1

csc 1996

29
5
:30

10
23

6
:31
7
:32

11
12

:8

:33

13

9
:34
10
:35
11
:36
12
:37
13
.38
14
.39
15
40
16
41
17
·42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50

20

'7

9
24
25
14
16
17
18
6
5
4
2
19
15
1
3

Signal-Ended
Signal Name

Differential
Signal Name

Ground
-Data Bus Bit 0
Ground
-Data Bus Bit 1
Ground
-Data Bus Bit 2
Ground
-Data Bus Bit 3
Ground
-Data Bus Bit 4
Ground
-Data Bus Bit 5
Ground
-Data Bus Bit 6
Ground
-Data Bus Bit 7
Ground
-Data Bus Parity
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Not Connected
TERMPWR
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
-ATN
Ground
Ground
Ground
-BSY
Ground
-ACK
Ground
-RST
Ground
-MSG
Ground
-SEL
Ground
-C/D
Ground
-REQ
Ground
-I/O

Shield Gnd
Ground
+DB(O)
-DB(O)
+DB(I)
-DB(I)
+DB(2)
-DB(2)
+DB(3)
-DB(3)
+DB(4)
-DB(4)
+DB(5)
-DB(5)
+DB(6)
-DB(6)
+DB(7)
-DB(7)
+DB(P)
-DB(P)
DIFFSENS
Ground
Ground
Ground
TERMPWR
TERMPWR
Ground
Ground
+ATN
-ATN
Ground
Ground
+BSY
-BSY
+ACK
-ACK
+RST
-RST
+MSG
-MSG
+SEL
-SEL
+C/D
-C/D
+REQ
-REQ
+1/0
-I/O
Ground
Ground

Hard Drive Bible 207

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

Table N - SA-400 Interlace Signals anti Pin Designations
Signal Name
HD (High Density)/LSP (Speed)
In Use/Head Load
-Drive Select 3
- Index Pulse
- Drive Select 0
- Drive Select 1
- Drive Select 2
-Motor On
-Direction Select
-Step
- Write Data
- Write Gate
- Track 00
- Write Protect
- Read Data
-Side One Select
- Ready/Disk Change

Direction
Out/In
Input
Input
Output
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
Output
Output
Output
Input
Output

Signal Pin
2
4

Return Pin

6
8

5
7
9

1

3

10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34

11

13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31

33

Table 0 - ST-S06 Data Signals - J2/P2
Control Signal Name
- Drive Selected
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved (to J 1 pin 16)
Reserved
Reserved
Ground
+MFM Write Data
-MFMWrite Data
Ground
+MFM Read Data
-MFM Read Data
Ground

Ground
2
4
6
8

Signal Pin
1
3
5
7
9
10

Transmission
To Controller
- - - - - - - - - - - -

11,12

To Drive
To Drive
- - - To Controller
To Controller
- - - - - -

13
14
15,16
17
18
19,20

Figure P - Sun Microsystems' 50-Pin D-Sub Connector
Pin 33

Pin 18

00000000000000000
0000000000000000
00000000000000000
Pin SO

Pin 3.

Pin 18

Pinl]

•••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••••
••••••••••••••
Pinl4

208 Hard Drive Bible

Pin 50

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

TobIe P • Sun Single-Ended SCSI (oble
Pin
'I
2
3

Signal
Ground
-DB(I)
Ground
-DB(4)

4
5

Signal
Reserved
Ground
Ground
-BSY

Grou~n~d----~3~0---------G~r-o-u-n-d---------------

6

-DB(7)
Ground
Ground

'7

8
9
10
'II
12
13
14
'IS
16
'17
'18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

©

Pin
26
27
28
29

csc

31
32
33
Not Connected 34
Reserved
35
Ground
36
Ground
37
Ground
38
-RST
39
Ground
40
-C/D
41
Ground
42

-MSG
Ground
-REQ
-DB(O)
Ground
-DB(3)
Ground
-DB(6)
Ground
Ground
Reserved
TERMPWR

-DB(2)
Ground
-DB(5)
Ground
- DB(P)
Ground
Reserved

-ATN
Ground
-ACK
Ground
-SEL
Ground
-I/O

Groun-d~-----:4~3--------~G~r-o-u-n-.d;---------------

1996

44
45
46
47
48
49
50

Hard Drive Bible 209

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

210 Hard DlI'ive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

DRIVE JUMPERS

I

T

he following pages contain information on jumper settings for
common hard drives. This information has been complied from
numerous sources, including the manufacturers of the drives. When
compiling a chapter of this length, the chances for typing and
resource error is great. The authors and publisher would greatly appreciate being notified of any inaccurate or missing information. Some of
the older
drives (especially those from companies who have gone
out of business) are very difficult to obtain accurate and verifiable
specifications for. If you have access to non-copyrighted specification
sheets, etc. please send us a copy so that we may add the information
to future editions.
For .mor(~ complete information on your particular drive(s), refer to
the OEM manual available from your supplier.

Copyrighted
specifications from
Maxtor, Seagate,
Quantum and
Conner Peripherals
are reprinted with
written permission of
their technical support
departments.

ATASI3085
CDC WREN III SERIES

NC
DIAGNOSTIC OUT
DIAGNOSTIC IN

RESET

GROUND
NC
+$v

SVRET
12VRET
+12V

MOTOR START
OPl'JON

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 211

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CDC WREN III SERIES ESDI

~~~:ELEcr

CDC WREN III SERIES (SCSI JUMPER LOCATION)

OONF10URATIONS

DATACABLB

CONNECTOR

LOGICAL

DRIVE
SELECT

ADDRESS

RJMPERS

r..""'i]

'1-1.-. ·M-li""lil

0l!...~

1

~:]l

!~
'.11" ........... ..

DRlVBSELECT3

DJUVESEiLECT4
DRlVE5liLECT.5

DRIVE SBLEC1' 6
DRIVE SELECT 7

.ou.
UNYTSRLECTlERO(NOruMPER)ISrNVALTD

&,;,I1,;,Ia,;,a . . . . . . . .

I
I
Ll.!I_·_·_·~_~1!1J

2m
• •

M~~

I

3~

4 ~.""'i]
~.~

5

"DRIVE
DRIVE ID AND OPTION
SELECT
lLECTHEA~ER"'"TEATOR POWER
JUMPER ~
CE SELECT JUMPER

DRlVBSELECf'1
DRlVESBLEcr2

DRIVE SELECT 0-7
(BINARY CODED)

""PARITY CHECK

MOTOR START OPTION"· ..

~::C

JUMJ'ERSF'OR
MOTOR STAJtTOPrlON

DRJVBSI!LI!.Cf
PARlTYCHRCJ{!JILBCI"

6~

ANDTIiRMINATOR

FOWERSOURCII

7=S
• Drive ID is binary codedjumpcr position (most significant bit on left). i.e., jumper in position 2
would be Drive ID 4, no jumpers mean ID O.
•• Jumper plug instaUed means parity checking by the WREN III is enabled
••• Jumper in vertical position means terminator power (+SV) is from WREN III power connector.
Jwnper in horizontal position means terminator power is taken from interface cable.
Ifllnit is not terminated, TP jumper is to be left off.
•••• Jumper plug installed enables Motor Start Option. In this mode of operation. the drive will
wait for. Start Unit command from the Host before starting the motor. If the jumper plug is not
installed, the motor will start as soon as DC power is applied to the unit.

CDC WREN III SERIES

(SCSI JUMPER LOCATION)

CDC WREN V SERIES

~
~~

DRIVE
SELECT

JUMPERS

'"

L~-_:_lIJ

L~1~:J
[~])J

LQ_:__:j

Ir0000]1

[t:_~aJ

cal~:J
Lal~aJ

";;:;;;:====:::;;;;;::::;;;;:::::;;;;;:$

• •
• •

-421

~

DC POWER
CONNECTOR 11

TP

(4)
(4)

(2)

(3)

[I]

212 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CI1110BOA
The c/o jumper is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive 0). The drive is configured as a master, whenjumpered, and a slave when not jumpered.
The ATAIlSA jumper i!: used when when daisy-chaining two driven. This jumper may have to be
removed when this dri": is used together wiih older (Pre-ATA) drives.

CONNER CFA1275A
The c/O jumper is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive 0). The drive is configured as a master, when jumpered, and a slave when not jumpered.
The ATAliSAjumper is used when when daisy-chaining twO drives. This jumper may have to be
removed when this drive is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

ATAlCabl. Select
MISter

8m

..," g[D

CONNER CI11170A

ISAlCabie Seleel

Mu~
al",

ggO
ggo

(CP30' 7)

The c/O jumper Is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive 0). The drive is I:onfigured as a master, when jumpered, and a slave when not jumpered.
The ATAIISA jumper is used when when daisy-chaining two drives. This jumper may have to be
removed when this drive is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

CONNER CFA340A

(CP3034)

The c/O jumper is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive 0). The drive is configured as a master, when jumpered, and a slave when notjumpered.
The ATAIlSA jumper is used when when daisy-chaining two drives. This jumper may have to be
removed when this drive is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

ATAI;s;..
Jumper

CtC

J2,Plnl
4o-Pln Task File
Interface

~

J6
Standard 4-Pin

~

p~.rconn.Clor

00

1

© CSC 1996

23

4

Hard Drive Bible 213

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CFA340SjCFA 1705
SCSI Bus Address
There are three jumpers available for configuration of SCSI ID: ADDRI. ADDR 2. and ADDR
3. The following table defines the settings:

--

CONNER CFA540A

SCSI Bus
ADDK2

ADDKl

OUT
OUT

OUT

IN

IN
IN

OUT

IN
IN

IN
IN

OUT

The C/D jumper is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive D). The drive is configured as a master, when jumpered, and a slave when nOI jumpered.
The ATAlISAjumper is used when when daisy-chaining two drives. This jumper may have to be
removed when this drive Is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

IN

ADDK3

ScSllD

OUT
OUT
OUT
OUT

0
I

Z
J
4

IN
IN
IN
IN

OUT
OUT

OUT

Addresses

5
6
7

Disable Spin: A jumper in the DSPN location, disables spin up on power-on. Disabling spin up
on application of power can also be enabled by settling the DSPN bit in MODE SELECT page O.
R9Vd

J2. Pin 1
50-pin SCSI Inlerlace
Connector

J5. Pin 1
4-pin Power Connector

CONNER CFA540S
SCSI Bus Address
There are Ihree jumpers available for configuration of SCSI ID: ID I, ID2, and ID3. The
following
table defines the settings'

r==='

SCSI Bus

f-------m.-OUT

IN

CONNER CFA810A

OUT

IN
OUT

IN
OUT

IN

The C/O jumper is used to detennine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive D). The drive is configured as a master, whenjumpered. and a slave when notjumpered.
The ATAIISA jumper is used when when dalsy-chaining two drives. 1bis jumper may have to be
removed when this drive is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

1D1

I
I

OUT
OUT

IN
IN
OUT
OUT

IN
IN

Addressu·
1D3
OUT
OUT
OUT
OUT

IN
IN
IN
IN

ScSIID

a
I
2
J

4

5
6
7

Disable spin: A Jumper In Ihe OE4 locatIOn. dISables spm up on power-on. Disabling spin up on
application of power can also be enabled by setlting the DSPN bit in MODE SELECT page O.

OE4
EI

Disable S in on Power on
Term Power InfOut enable

~

~

214 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CfAB50A
'lbe C/O jumper is used to detennine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive D). The drive is c:onfigured as a masl!>r, whenjumpered. and a siave when notjumpered.
'lbe ATAIISA jumper ill used when when dB.isy-chalnlng two driveR. This jumper may have 10 be
removed when this driv" is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

CONNER CFL350A
The CFL350A drive is designed to operate either as a Master drive (C Drive) or a Slave Drive (D
Drive). Commands from the host are written in parallel to both drives. When the C/O jumper on
the drive is closed, the drive will assume the role of a master. When C/O is open, the drive will
act as a slave. In Single-drive configurations. C/O must remain in the closed (master) position.
CID

J2,Plnl

4O-PinTallkFUo
Int.rfaoe

~

J6
Standard4·Pln

~Connoc1or
ATAlCabloStItc:l

-gO]
-. g[[]

ISNCabloSelect

&

- ggO
..... ggo

Notee:

..
..

2ft. tSAMSltor/Standalone

Ale os

C/O

~
~

f!l~.

tl-

Jumper

Jumper

. ..
Ale cs

C/O

~

Jump.r

Open
10. CAM

C.~.

..
..

20. ISA Cable Seleot
tM.lteror Srave

Select

M.at.rorSla"e

CONNER

C/O

A/C OS

:~~

~

~

..

Jumper

Jumper

CI~L420A

The CFlA20A drive .is designed to operate either as a Master drive (C Drive) or a Slave Drive (D
Drive). Commands from the host are written in para1\el to both drives. When the C/O jumper on
the drive is closed, the drive will assume the role of a master. When C/O is open, the drive will
act as a slave. In Single-drive configurations. C/O must remain in the closed (master) position.
C/O

CONNER CFN170A
The CFN170A drive is designed to operate either as a Master drive (C Drive) or a Slave Drive (D
Drive). Commands from the host are written in paralIei to both drives. When the C/O jumper on
the drive is closed. the drive will assume Ihe role of a master. When C/O is open, the drive will
act as a slave. In Single-drive configurations. C/O must remain in the closed (master) position.

1•. OAM Maller!Standalon.

· ..

· ..
·· . .

~

Jumper

NO

NO OS

~.

M..ter/llt~~&elecllon

Jumper

1b. CAM Slave

OlD

28. ISA Mall,r/Stand,kln,

OlD

NO OS

OlD

ab. ISA Slav.
09

OlD

NO OS

~.

10. CAM 08bta 8Mc1

MaatarorSlav.

·· . .

Pln.l

Jumper

Opon

AlO OS

2o. ISA calM Select

Jumper

Noles:

Maater or Slave

..
·· ~

CIO NO OS

.~

Factory test point

CID

1.

CAM Master/Slandalone
AlC

3.

tL
2.

CID

~ ~

1_ _

Jumper

CAM Slave

AlC

CIO

:~

~~

-Jl~mper

ISAMa.ter
AlC

CID

4.

Jumper

ISASlavo

:

:

Open

~ Jumper
@

CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 215

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CFN170S
The following table defines the settings:

SCSIID

5
El

6
E2

E3

0
I
2
3
4
5
6
7

high
low
high
low
high
low
high
low

high
high
low
low
high
high
low
low

high
high
high
high
low
low
low
low

J3 Pin

CONNER CFN250A
The CFN250A drive is designed to operate either as a Master drive (C Drive) or a Slave Drive (0
Drive). Commands from the host are written in parallel to both drives. When the CID jumper on
the drive is closed, the drive will assume the role of a master. When CID is open, the drive will
act as a slave. In Single-drive configurations, CID must remain in the closed (master) position.

7

Master/SlaYe .electlon
(pin 28)

~2.Pln#1

+5V

jcu".nt limiting

Notes:

AlC

3. ISA Master
AlC

CID

C/O

:~

~~

tt

1_ _

Jumper

2.

4.

CAMSlav.

AlC

LED

J3.Pin B•• LED

CAM MnsterlStandalone

1.

"I

Factory teat point

CIO

J3. Pin #1

Jumper

ISASlay.

•• •

CID

t:

•

Open

-Jumper

CONNER CFN250S
The following table defines the settings:

J3 Pin
SCSIID

0

CONNER CFN340A

1
2

3
4

The CFN340A drive is designed to operate either as a Master drive (C Drive) or a Slave Drive (D
Drive). Commands from the host are written in parallel to both drives. When the CID jumper on
the drive is closed, the drive will assume the role of a master. When CID is open, the drive will
act as a slave. In Single-drive configurations, CID must remain in the closed (master) position.

5
6
7

5
El

6
E2

E3

high
low
high
low
high
low
high
low

high
high
low
low
high
high
low
low

high
high
high
high
low
low
low
low

7

FaclOry teat point

c/O
Notes:
1.

CAM Masler/Standalonl

AlC

3.

CAM Stave

AlC

CIO

~ ~

C/O

:~

~~Jumper
2.

ISA Master

AlC

C/O

1_ _

4.

Jumper

ISA Slave
:

:

Open

~Jumper

216 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CFP 1060S
SCSI Bus Address
There are Ihree jumpers available for configuralion of SCSI 10: E I, E2, and E3. The following

·~fh'm·:r~ -~

L

IN
OUT
IN

OUT
IN
IN

TJ-·-~

IN
IN
IN

6
7

"Use either bUI not both . El to E3 or OEI to 083. The OE header is not installed on drive
configuralions wilh • LED on Ihe PCBA.
Disable Spin: A jumper in the E5 or OES lucation, disable~ spin up on powcr~on. Disabling spin
up on applicalion of power can also be enahled by «llling Ihe DSPN bit in MODE SELECT
a eO.

~/OE5 S~~::~~:~
,In on Power-on
.~
in del. bv SCSIID_ __

E6

E7

CONNER CFP1060W
SCSI Bus Address
There are four jumpers available for configuration of SCSI ID: EI. E2, E3, and E4 or
alternatively pins 1,3.5, and 7 or J5. The following table defines the the relationship between the
'umoers or Ihe Dins on J5 and Ihe SCSI 10:
ID

Disable SCSI Bus Parity

0

,
2

···
5

7

10

12
13

:~~E~
::;E~

I~=~~

15

""-"
CuVopen
QuI/open

:i=~

IniGround
0",_
OvVopen

QuVopen

I~G":!~

CuI/open
OuVoptm
QuVopen

:~~:m~

QuI/open

:::~

Ic:::r=~
I~!=~

E4JP1n7
OuVopen

QuI/open
OIA/open
CuI/open

QuI/open

"""-

In/Ground
IniGrOtlnd
InlGround
IniGmuntl
IniGround
In/Ground

:~~~~

QuI/open
QuVopen

1C;;::en~

"

........

E2IPI"'

1JPln1

l~::"nd
I~~r:~~
I~~r:~

InlGround
InIGround

:~~;~~

CONNER CFJP 10805
SCSI Bus Address
Thllre are Ihree jumpers available for configuration of SCSI 10: EI, E2, and E3. The following
table defines the settings:
_;;::;==;:::=~;;;:;;;==::j
E1/o£1
OUT
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
IN

0::

~E3

sc.Ium

OUT
OUT

OUT
OUT

0
I

IN
IN

OUT
OUT

2
3

OUT
OUT

IN
IN

4

:~

:~

~

~

.Use eilher bUIIIO! bolh : EI to E3 or OEI to OE3. The OE header IS not Installed on drive
cOllfigurations with a LED on Ihe PCBA.
Disable Spin: A jumper in the E4 localion, di.nble. spin up on power-on. Disabling spin up on
applicalion of p<,wer can also be enabled by seltling Ihe DSPN bil in MODE SELECT page O.

CONNER CFP21055
SCSI Bus Address
There are Ihree jumpers available for configuration of SCSI 10: E I, E2, and E3. The following
table defines the settinlls:
EIIOEI

E3IOE3

OUT

OUT

IN

OUT

OUT
IN
OUT
IN

IN
IN
OUT

OM
IN

OUT

OUT
OUT
OUT
OUT
IN
IN

m

IN

m

m

7

I.

·Use either but not bolh _Ello E3 or OEllo OE3. The OE header not Installed on drive
configurations wilh a LED on Ihe PCBA.
Disable Spin: A jumper in the E5 localion, disable, spin up on power-on. Disabling spin up on
application of power can also be enabled by seltling Ihe DSPN bil in MODE SELECT page OOH.

@

CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 217

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CFP2107S
SCSI Bus Address
There are three jumpers available for configuration of SCSI 10: EI, E2, and E3. The following
table defmes the settinlls:
Et/O£I
OUT

CONNER CFP2107W
SCSI Bus Address
'l1Iere ate four jumpers available for configuration of SCSIlD: El. E2. and E3. and E4. The
lollowimt table defines the serf

~~:~U8

ElJPial
ooTIOPEN'
INIGROUND
OUTIOPIlN
TNfOROUND
OUT/OPEN
INfOROUHD
OUTfOPEN
IN/GROUND
OUT/OPEN
INIGROUND
OUT/OPEN
INIGROUND
OUT/OPEN
INtGROUND
OUTIOPEN
INIGROUND

.,

Add

a5

E2IPi.o3
OUTIOPEN

OUT/OPEN
OUT/OPEN
OUTIOPEN
OUTIOPEN
IN/OROUND
IN/GROUND
INIGROUND
rNlOROUND

OUTfOPBN
lNlGROUND

TNIOROUND
OUT/OPEN
OUTIOPEN
IN/OROUND
IN/GROUND

OUTIOPEN

OUTIOPSN
QUTIOPEN

INJOROUND

OUTIOPEN

OUT/OPEN

INIOROUND

OUT/Df'8N

DUTIOPEN
OUTIOPEN

INIGROUND
INIOROUND
INIOROUND
INIGROUND

:~~:g~~~

SCSllua
EWE:
OUT

Addresses·
E3IOE3
OUT

IN

OUT

OUT

OUT
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
IN

IN

OUT
OUT
IN
IN
IN
IN

IN

OUT
OUT
IN
IN

SCSI m
0

1

·Use either but not both : El to E3 or OEI to OE3. The OE header IS not mstalled on drive
configurations with a LED on the PCBA.
Disable Splm A jumper in the E5 location, disables spin up on power-on. Disabling spin up on
application of power can also be enabled by settting the DSPN bit in MODE SELECT page OOH.

SCSIm

OUTt'OPEN
OUTfQPEN

0

OUTIOPEN
OUTIOPEN
OUTIOPEN
OUTIOPEN
OUTIOPEN
0UT1OPIlN
IN/GROUND

··
·

1
2
]

,
7

JNIGROUND

9
10
II
12
IJ
14
1

INIOROUND
TN/GROUND
lNlOROUND

INIGROUND

~~~:g~~

Disable Spin. A Jumper in the E5 location. disables spm up on power·on. DisablIng spm up on
application of power can also be enabled by settting the DSPN bit in MODE SELECT page OOR.
SCSI TarminaroB
Remove In aU bUi tM lilt
drtv.lnlhect'laln

o

..Il~: iE7(_"::~

TEAMPWR
FUM

:E8(o.II.y8pln)
E5(Dlaabltl!plfl)

CONNER CFP4207S
SCSI Bus Address
There are three jumpers available for configuration of SCSI 10: E I, E2, and E3. The following
table defmes the settin2s:
SCSI Bus
EI/OEI
OUT
IN
OUT
IN
OUT

CONNER CFP4201W

IN

OUT
IN

SCSI Bus Address
There are four jumpers available for configuration of SCSI 10: EI. E2. and E3, and E4. The
followin2 Lable defines the seUinRs
SCSIBWI

ElJPlal
OUT/OPEN
IN/GROUND
OUT/OPEN
IN/GROUND
OUT/OPEN
IN/GROUND
OUT/OPEN
IN/GROUND
OUT/OPEN
IN/GROUND
OUT/OPEN
INIGRQUND
OUT/OPEN

IN/GROUND
OUT/OPEN
IN/GROUND

Add

E3IPlD3
OUT/OPEN
OUTIOPEN
INIGROUND
INJGROUND
OUTIOPEN
OUT/OPEN
INIOROUND
INIQROUND
OUTIOPBN
OUTfOPEN
IN/GROUND
TN/GROUND
OUTIOPi3N
OUT/OPEN
IN/GROUND
IN/GROUND

E..Wl.a5
OUT/OPEN

OUTIOPEN
OUTIOPEN
OUTfOPEN
INJOROUND
INIGROUND
INJOROUND
INIGROUND
OUT/OPEN
OUT/OPEN
OUT/OPEN
OUT/OPEN

i

I

IN/GROUND
IN/OROUND
IN/GROUND
IN/GROUND

""'.,

OUT/OPEN
OL'TIOPEN
OUTfOPEN
OUT/OPi3N
OUTIOPEN

OUT/OPEN

OUTIOPEN
OUT/OPEN
INIGROUND
lNIGROUND
INIGROUND
IN/GROVND
INIGROUND
IN/GROUND
IN/GROUND

(NIGR{!UNJL

E210El
OUT
OUT
IN
IN
OUT
OUT
IN
IN

AddresJu"
E3IOE3
OUT
OUT
OUT
OUT
IN
IN
IN
IN

scslm

1

·Use eIther but not both : EI to E3 or OEI to OE3. The OE header IS not mstalled on drive
configurations with a LED on the PCBA.
Disable Spin: A jumper in the E5 location, disables spin up on power-on. Disabling spin up on
application of power can also be enabled by seUting the DSPN bit in MODE SELECT page OOH.

SCSIID
0
1

2

.
]

,
,
4

9
10
II

12

i

"
14
IS

Dlsable Spin. A Jumper In the E5 locatIOn, disables spm up on power·on. Dlsabhng spm up on
.pplication of power can also be enabled by selUing the DSPN bit in MODE SELECf page OOR.
SCSI TerminatGrII.
Remove fn aIt bill !;he lilt
dlfVlllnthechaoll1

1!£1 .• E3

I

E7(DlaablePafllyloo-"

'!6 (Dalay Spin)

-.(-"

.

Plnl{lypIcI"ylndlcal~by •

!'5 (Dlaabl1 Spin)

'--eokJredltllpeonth1lcable

E7 (o. ..bIe PllrUyl

E5~~:!:: :::~;J

218 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER

C'~S 127SA

The C/D jumper is useel to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive D). The drive is configured as a master, when jumpered, anti a slave when notjumpered.
The ATAlISAjumper is used when when daisy-chaining two drives. This jumper may have to be
removed when this drive is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

CONNER CFS210A

ATAIISA
Jumper

The CID jumper is used to determine whether the drive Is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive D). The drive Is configured as a master, whenjumpered, nnd a slave when notjumpered.
The ATAlISAjumper Is used when when daisy-chaining two drives, This jumper may have to be
removed when this drive is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.
ATAIiSA
Jumper

ATAI Not Cable select

.",,,[]g
so"

gOg

at.n 000
000

AT AlCable Select

ISAlCableSelect

.,,", g[]

Mall.r

ggO

glD

om,.

ggo

s, ...

J8
Standard 4·Pln
p~8rConnector

@J
00

3
12

CONNER

4

C'~S270A

'lbe CID jumper is used to determine wheth'lr the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive D), The drive is configured as a mast,)r, when jumpered, and a slave when not jumpered.

~,,-r

~

~

~

CONNER CFS420A
The CID jumper is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive D). The drive is configured as a master, whenjumpered, and a slave when notjumpered.
The ATAIISA jumper is used when when daisy-chaining two drives. This jumper may have to be
removed when this drJve is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

~'

~

M.8terlStandalona

C/O AlCCS

.

r-l- •
l!J. •
L_ Jumper

Bllve

.....
., .

C/O

Ale cs

~~~'~I'll\~v. Pln~oooo ~
• • til

C/O AlC OS

J2

Optional3·Pln

• • !J

L Jumper

Power
J6

Connector

Siandard 4-Pln

Power Connector

Pin 1
(typically Indicated by a

colored stripe on data cable)

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 219

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CFS425A
The CID jumper is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive 0). The drive is configured as a master, when jumpered, and a slave when notjumpered.

C/O

CONNER CFS540A
The C/D jumpe,r is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive 0). The drive is configured as a master, when jumpered, and a slave when not jumpered.
The ATAIISA jumper is used when when dalsy-chaining two drives. This jumper may have to be
removed when this drive is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

MllltrlStandelonl

C/O AlC CS

r-l. •
l!J.
•
1

_':I'Z~

BIIVI

C/O PIC CS
I

••

I

ClO PIC

cs

::~

L-. Jumper

LJumper

J8
Standard 4-Pln
Power Connector

Pint
(typically Indicated by •

colored IIrlpa on data cable)

6~~~'Yt~
c/O

PIC

cs

Slive

MUlOrlSlandllone

c/O AlC

C/O PIC CS

: [:] [;]

LLJlJmper

~~.
fie
Jumper

II

CS

fiL

II

•

Jumper

CONNER CP2034

The CP2034 is designed to operate as a master (Drive C) or as a Slave (Drive D).
This feature is dependent on two settings; Jumper El and the finnware setting of
a feature bit. El closed and the feature bit is set. the drive will be the Master.
El open the drive will be the Slave. As a single drive. El should be closed.

CONNER CFS850A

For Master (C Drive) when El is Closed,

The CID jump'~r is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive 0). The drive is configured as a master, when jumpered, and a slave when not jumpered.
IITAIISA

Master/Slave
Select
El

place 1ge§s shown.

~~mper
For Slave (0 Drive) when El is Open.
Store Jumper as shown:

El

E2

a£..-

Jumper

Interface/Power
Connector

6~'=~,",1"
c/O

PIC CS

rei rei
• ~ l!J
I

LLJurnper

SIIVI

M.lterlSlandllontl

c/O AlC CS

~~.e

tt

220 Hard Drive Bible

Jumper

C/O AlC CS
II

~
I
••
Jumper

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CI-2044/CP2044P
The CP2124 drive is designed to operate either as a Master drive (C Drive) or a Slave Drive (0
Drive). This feature is dependent on two drive settings; the status of hardware Jumper MIS and
the firmware setting of a feature bit. When (MIS) is closed, and the feature bit is set, the drive
will assume the role of a Master Drive. When (MIS) is open, and the feature bit reset, the drive
will act as the Slave. In single drive configurations MIS must remain in the closed position.

CONNER CP2064
The CP2064 is designed to operate as a master (Drive C) or as a Slave (Drive D).
111is feature is dependent on two settings; Jumper El and the fmnware setting of
a feature bit. El closed and the feature bit is set, the drive will be the Master.
En open the drive will be the Slave. As a single drive. El should be closed.
For Master (C Drive) when El Is Closed,
place jumper as shown.
El E2

~~mper

Notes:
A. For Master (C Drive) when MIS is Closed,
place jumper as sllown.
MIS C/O

For Slave (0 Drive) when El is Open.
Store Jumper as shown:
E1 E2

~8

B=:8J..-

Jumper

Jumpe

B. II MasterlSlave lellture is selected at Pin 28

01 the Interface/power connector, jumper MIS
should be left open as ashown:
MIS C/O

B=:8J..-

Jumper

Interface/Power
Connector

CONNER CI-2084
The CP2084 drive Is designed to operate elthe'r as a Master drive (C Drive) or a Slave Drive (0
Drive). This feature is dependent on two drive settings; the status of hardware Jumper MIS and
the firmware settlni of a feature bit. When (MIS) Is closed, and the feature bit is set, the drive
will assume the role ,of a Master Drive. When (MIS) Is open, and the feature bit reset, the drive
wlll act as the Slave. In single drive configurations MIS must remain in the closed position.

CONNER CP2088

The CP2088 is designed to operate as a master (Drive C) or as a Slave (Drive D).
This feature is dependent on two settings; Jumper El and the ftrmware setting of
a feature bit. El closed and the feature bit is set, the drive will be the Master.
El open the drive will be the Slave. As a single drive. El should be closed.
Not•• :
A. For Master (C Drive) when MIS is Closed,
place Jumper as shown.
MIS C/O

~8

Jumpi'r

B. If MasterlSlave fE,ature is selected at Pin 28
01 the Interface/power connector, Jumper MIS
should be left opi,n as ashown:
MIS C/O

IS::£..--

For Master (0 Drive) when El Is Closed,
place jumper as shown.
El E2

~~mp8r

For Slave (D Drive) when El is Open.
Store Jumper as shown:
El E2

B=:8J..-

Jumps

Jumper

Interlace/Power
Connector

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 221

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CP2124
The CP2124 drive.ls designed to operate either as a Master drive (C Drive) or a Slave Drive (D
Drive). This feature is dependent on two drive settings; the status of hardware Jumper MIS and
the firmware setting of a feature bit. When (MIS) is closed, and the feature bit is set, the drive
will assume the role of a Master Drive. When (MIS) is open, and the feature bit reset, the drive
wlll act as the Slave. In single drive configurations MIS must remain in the closed position.

CONNER CP3000
There arc: four jumper options available for configuration: *HSP, CID, DSP,
and ACT.
The following table shows what the jumper settings should be for various
system configurations.
Single Drive ACT and CID Jumpered
Master Drive = CID and DSP Jumpered
Slave Drive No Jumpers installed
* Note: HSP is not used.

=
=

HDA CONNECTOR

LED DRIVE CAPABILITY

Not•• :

A. For Master (C Drive) when MIS Is Closed,
place Jumper as shown.
MIS C/O

~8

Jumper

B. If Master/Slave leature Is selected at Pin 28
01 the interface/power connector, Jumper MIS
should be left open as ashown:
MIS C/O

&8J...-

Jumper

CONNER CP 30060 SCSI
There are threejumpelll available for configuration: El, E2, and E3. These jumpers are used to
select the drive's SCSI 10. The following table defines the settings:
~

o
1

CONNER 30064

2
3
4

5

J.w:i:Ism
None

El
E2
El & E2
E3
El &E3
E2&E3
HOA CONNECTOR

ThB drive has on9 set of jUl11>8rs labeled C/O, OSP, E1.

=

Single Drive C/O Jumpered
Master. C/O and OSP Jumpered
Slave. No Jumpers Installed
E1 • Not used.

E.!

CVD

DSP

El

W

OlD

E3
E2

El

I • PJN(s): 07590·xxx, 03790'>00<
II • PIN(a): 02730'()()1,'()()2

III • PJN(I): 02730.Q03

222 Hard Drive Bible

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Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CP30064H
The drive has one set of jumpers labeled CID, OSP, E1.
Single Drive • 010 Jumpered
Master •• CID and I)SP Jumpered
Slave. No Jumpel" Installed
E1 • Not used.

CONNER CP30080
There are three jumpers available for configuration: E1 , E2, and E3. These Jumpers are used to
select the drive's SCSIID. The following table defines the settings:
~

o
1

2
3

4

5
6

JJIJDilw:

None
E1
E2
E1 & E2
E3
E1 & E3
E2& E3
HDA CONNECTOR

CONNER CP30080E
EI. E2 and E3 arc used to select the SCSIID. The drive is shipped as ID 7. with allthre. jumpers
installed.
'The following table d·"cribes the SCSIID:
SCSIID
Jumpersinstnlled

o

None
EI
E2
EI.E2
E3
EI.E3
E2.E3

CONNER CP30084
HDA CONNECTOR

The drive has one set of jumpers labeled CIO, OSP, E1.
Single Drive - CIO Jumpered
Master. CID and DSP Jumpered
Slave = No Jumpens Installed
E1 = Not used.

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 223

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CP30084E
The CIO jumper Is used to determine whether the drive Is a master (drive C) or slave (drive D).
The drive is configured as a master (drive C) when Jumpered and as a slave drive (0 drive) when
not jumpered.
J5
LEO DRIVE CAPABILrrY

HOA CONNECTOR

CONNER CP30 100 SCSI
There are three jumpers available for configuration: E1, E2, and E3. These jumpers are used to
select the drive's SCSI 10. The following table defines the settings:

s.QSlJ.Q

o
1
2
3
4
5
6

Jl.I.!nil§r
None
E1
E2
E1 & E2
E3
E1 &E3
E2& E3
HDA CONNECTOR

cJ15

CONNER (P30 104
The drive has one set of jumpers labeled CIO, DSP, E1.

CONNER CP30 104H

Single Drive • C/O Jumpered
Master. C/O and DSP Jumpered
Slave. No Jumpers Installed
E1 • Not used.

The drive has one set of jumpers labeled CID, DSP, E1.
Single Drive = CID Jumpered
Master = CIO and DSP Jumpered
Slave = No Jumpers Installed
E1 = Not used.

~~
OSP
CIO

E3
E2
Et

I. PIN(I): 07511O·)OO(,03790·lOO(
II • P/N(o): 02730,001,-002
III. PIN(a): 02730-003

224 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Syslems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CP30124
The C/o jumper is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive 0). The drive is configured as a master, when jumpered, and a slave when not jumpered.
The ATAIlSA jumper is used when when daisy-chaining two drives. If another manufacturers
drive is being connected to the conner drive, you may need to install this jumper.

CONNER CP30170E
El. E2 and E3 arc used to select the SCSI 10. The drive is shipped as 10 7. with all three jumpers
installed.
The following table describes the SCSI 10:
SCSI 10
Jumpers installed
o
None
I
EI
E2
EI.E2
E3
El. E3
E2.E3
___ HDA CONNECTOR

CONNER CI'30174£
The CID jumper is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or slave (drive D).
The drive is configured liS a master (drive C) when jurnpered and as a slave drive (0 drive) when
not jumpered.
.16
LED DRIVE CAPABILITY

CONNER CP30200

HDA CONNECTOR

There are thteo jumpers availabel (or comiiwalloDi BI,E2, aDd E3 ICC u!cd to ,elect
tho drive SCSI ID. The followIng table define.! the sonings. Note: SCSI parity is always
enabled.
The (anowin, table defines the sCltinB' for jumpeocs BI. El, and B3:

EI

El

E3

OUT

OUT
OUT

OUT
OUT
OUT
OUT

IN

IN
IN

OUT

IN

SCSIID

IN
IN
IN
IN
IN
IN
IN
Ddl)' Spin: A JUmper in the B4locauOD, dlSables!p1D up on power-oil. Dulhlllllli'PUI up on
OUT
OUT

OUT

IN

OUT

Hcalion of

wee can also be enabled b aeteda the DSPN bit ia MODE SBLEC1'page O.

E4
IN
IN

J7

DSPN

ReouJ'
SpiDDi81bled
SpiaDk.hled
Spin up onpower on
S ' Dbabled

OUT
OUT

LED
CONNECTOR

SCSI PARITY
SCSI parity b

alway~ enabled

in both dJreclion~,

cID

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 225

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CP30204
The C/O jumper is used to determine whether the drive Is·a master (drive C) or slave (drive 0).
The drive Is configured as a master (drive C) when jumpered and as a slave drive (D drive) when
not jumpered'
DSP I. SS:ThIs pair of jumpers determines the signals onJlln 3901 the Interface oonnector.
Jumper
Action
DSP SS
JI!~
• spindle sync:luonlza1lon aipI dI&abIad on pin 39.
El
DiaableSplnUp~1
X
• activily LED signal available on pin 39.
commandlllCliYBd
• Mu3lbeInDiaceIorCAM/ATAdrives.
E2
Notusad
• spindle synchronlzalon signal enabled on pin 39.
E3
Notuaad
X • activily LED signal cIsabIad Irom pin 39.
• pin 39 floating.

CONNER CP3024
There are four jumper options available for configuration: *HSP, C/O, DSP.
and ACT.
The following table shows what the jumper settings should be for various
system configurations.
Single Drive =ACT and C/O Jumpered
Master Drive = C/O and DSP Jumpered
Slave Drive =No Jumpers installed
* Note: HSP is not used.

CONNER CP30254
The C/D jumper is used to determine whether the drive is a master (drive C) or a slave
(drive 0). The drive is configured as a master, when jumpered, and a slave when notjumpered.
The ATAIlSA jumper is used when daisy-chaining two drives. This jumper may have to be removed
when this drive is used together with older (Pre-ATA) drives.

CONNER CP3040
There are four jumpers available for configuration. Three of these jumpers. EI. E2. and E3 are used to
select the drive's SCSI !D, installing E4 disables parity .The following table defines the settings
for jumpers EI E2 and E3:
El
B2
B3
SCSIID
OUT
our
our
0
our
our
IN
1
OlYr
IN
our
2
IN
IN
our
3
OUT
our
IN
4
our
IN
IN
S
IN
OUT
IN
6
IN
IN
7
IN

SCSI
TermInator,

226 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

CONNER CP3044
There are four jumpc:r options available for configuration: *HSP, CID, DSP,
and ACT.
The following table llhows what the jumper settings should be for various
system configurations.
Single Drive:: ACT and CID Jumpered
Master Drive =CID and DSP Jllmpered
Slave Drive =No Jumpers installed
* Note: HSP is not used.

CONNER CP30540

HelA CONNECTOR

SCSI Bus Address
There are three jumpers available for configuration of SCSIlD: EI, E2, and E3. The following
table defines the settin2s:

LED ORIVE C'.APABILITY

SCSIBus

El/oEI
OUT
IN
OUT

Addresses.

EZlOEZ
OUT

E3/0E3
OUT

OUT

OUT

IN

OUT

IN

IN

OUT

OUT
IN
OUT
IN

OUT
OUT
IN
IN

IN
IN
IN
IN

SeSIID

7

·Use eIther but not both : EI to E3 or OEI to OE3. The OE header IS not ,"stalled on drive
configurations with. LED On the PCBA.
DIsable Spin: A jumper in the E4 loc.tion, disables spin up on power-on. Disabling spin up on
application of power can also be enabled by settling the DSPN bit in MODE SELECT page O.
E4
E5

Disable S in on Power on

Terminators on

OE5
TERMPWR
Oulp",
Enable

j---""",.......---....,.~·-\91-·i

HDAConnector ___

.

o
r. •

a ""I~o-O-=""'"'1

J2,Pin1
50-pin SCSI
'"

...(-J4,Pin1
4·plnPower

ES
El

Drive

CONNER GP30544
c/O

Up to two drives may be daisy chaIned together utilizing the 40 pin Task File connector. Tho
maximum cablolength Is 18 inches. In order to Install more than one drive, it is necessary to set
a jumper option. Tho C/O jumper is used to determine whether the drivels master (drive C) or
slavo (drive 0). The drivels configured as a master (drive C) whon J"mpered and as a slave drive
(0 drive) whon notjumpered.
DSP " 55 This pair of Jumper. determlno, tho slanals on pin 39 of the Interface connector.
Puncllon

r--;.;;;;;DIP

II

~
·Bpi!dI'l)MInx,lmlorulpldlllbloon pin 39
A!!I!on

·ActII1i'tLEO !i!!!I'''-on pin 39.
·SpPdl. oyniIIf_o/pIenabII on pin 39
•/JiIMItLED.IIInII_flomDIn39.
.Pln3ftlollN

""-

_A
_A
_A
_A

ea
E3
E4
ES
E8

BIocI

CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 233

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

FUJITSU M265xHD

FUJITSU M265xH (REV. 03)

M265d1laterface rcA (RmIlQD 03-)

HITACHI DK514C

FUJITSU M265xS (REV. 03)

Tho terminator orthe DK!l14C mUllt be removed except for lhe lut drive of the daisy..chain.
I} SC'SIID .I (U tha Ihlplltllt)

·1) Thl te,.tnalor 0' the controller other

Mottl

:~J

"I~

\I~

thin the
or SCSI DIls1.
.ust
..-vIII.
;.
t~1!;!~.:o~h~ron~~'d Sptndl' optton.

e

dthe

I Unr Chlftlllbli

Cllt1n

(r,:en ".,.,...)

*4) Ste Sheet Ro.14.'.

HEWLETT PACKARD 97556/97558/97560

HEWLETT PACKARD 9753xS/T/D

·~T"'I9W"GIOI'

~,/'"

Packl
SINGLE eNDED DRIves. 3 PACKS

DIFFeRENTIAL QRlves Not ~'101l11d ~
tlanaotd CX'oca.cl

SIGNAL SPfCII'U flONS

DC

Po•• ,
(J2)

'rene

Opt ion.

GrovnCf
(JJ)

Connector

SLAVf SYNC

SCSI

!~~I
Uf)')u~ec,"I" U

(J4)

i

U,992 • IlVJ

",'Xc·

1

MASTER SYNC

~C~
I.
I
"992 : 00) mSEC

VOLTAGE

12V DC :1'5.
12Y RETUIlN
5Y RETURN
DC t5.

,y

,

PINS
4

7

0
0
0
0
I
I
I
I

0
0
I
I

0
I

0

0
I
0
I
0
I

2
J

0
0
I
I

O"IY!
ADDIIESS
I

,
4

8
7

236 Hard Drive Bible

PIN I: R••• tvld (Not_lIy l"o,IIe1)

Interface COMectorl and OpUon Pln·Set SelUngl

0'

PIN 2: Otlv. iniliolion
.SOT" ...... 9.
o - In""" Inl Ciollon 01 SDT" ml . . 09'
I _ Enoblt inlliollon 01 Po. . . On and RESET
PIN J: Po,lIy
0 - Pori Iy ch.CIe.", ia SYNC

SCSI-1/SCSI-2
TERMINATOR
POWER

POWER ,/
CONNECTOR

SPINDLE

10\
117SCS' ADDRESS
12

SCSI
CONNECTOR
N8I'I'OIIf, Differential: Interface, Addre •• III1d Option Connectors
POWER
CONNECTOR
SCSI
CONNECTOR

FRONT VIEW

T,;;;;;;itiilil,
LED

..

Narrow, Single-Ended: Interface, Address and Option Connectors

HEWLETT PACKARD (2244/45/46/47
WIDE DIFF!~RENTIAL
SYNC SPINDLE SIGNAL SPECIFIC.ATION. S
SLAVE SYNC

~

.

m A S T E R SYNC

{j:-:~1f {j:~':lJ
I----~
11111 •.003 mSEC

I--

11111 • 003 mSEC

.1

OPTION PINSETS
1-WRITE PROTECT
2-UNIT ATTENTION
3-SDTR
4-PARITY
5-AUTO-SPIN-UP
7-SYNC SPINDLE

~~ESERVED
~
1MUST BE OPEN)
SCSI-lISC.2!-2

~O~SCSI

11
12

POWER ,/
CONNECTOR
SCSI
CONNECTOR

ADDRESS

HEWLETT PACKARD C2490A
NARROW DIFFERENTIAL
SYNC SPINDLE SIGNAL SPECIFIC A nONS

~~,~ ~C~
MASTER SYNC

I.

• 1

9 375 • 003 mSEC

I•

9375 • 003 mSEC

.. I

o
o

0

16 - RESERVED

0

o

0

o

0

15 - RESERVED
14 - RESERVED
13 - WRITE PROTECT

o

0

o

0

12 - UNIT ATTENTION
11 - SDTR

o

0

10 - PARITY

o

0

o

0

9 - AUTO SPINUP
8 - KEY
7 - N/C

o
o

0

6 - SYNC SPINDLE SIGNAL

0

5 - KEY

o

0

4 - RESERVED

o

0

o

0

3 - UNIT SELECT 3
2 - UNIT SELECT 2

o

0

1 - UNIT SELECT

Wide, DHferentlal: Interface, Address and Option COnnectors

Narrow, DlfferenUal: Interface, Address and OpUon Connguratlons

(C\

ret

IOO~

Hard Drive Bible 237

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

HEWLETT PACKARD C2490A
WIDE DIFFERENTIAL
SYNC SPINDLE SIGNAL SPECIFICATIONS

SL~~
9375

I

003 mSEC

REMOTE

SyNC SPINDLE SIGNAL SPECIFICATIONS

~

9.375

I

003 mSEC

.1

OPTION
CONNECTOR

J2

AUTO-SPIN UP

MASTER SYNC

~C~
~~
I.
.1
I.
.1
9.375 • 003 mSEC

I.

1------1

HEWLETT PACKARD C2490A
NARRO W SINGLE ENDED
SLAVE SYNC

Mlf.:;}:1f

POWER CONNECTOR

9.375 • 003 mSEC

o

0

o

0

o

0

o
o
o

0

0

0

o

0

o

0

o

0

o

0

o
o

0

0

o

0

o

0

o

0

o

0

16 - TERMINATOR POWER
15 - TERMINATOR ENABLE
14 - RESERVED
13 - WRITE PROTECT
12 - UNIT ATTENTION
11 - SDTR
10 - PARITY
9 - AUTO SPINUP
8 - KEY
7 - SCSI PIN 29
6 - SYNC SPINDLE SIGNAL
5 - KEY
4 - RESERVED
3 - UNIT SELECT 3
2 - UNIT SELECT 2
1 _ UNIT SELECT 1

Wide, OlllerenUal: Interface, Addre.. and Option Conllgll'lUonl

NalTow, SIngle-Ended: Interface, Addresa and Option Conflgcntlons

HEWLETT PACKARD C30 10 12-Pin Version

HEWLETT PACKARD 9-Pin Version

If.=:u
'·,utl.

238 Hard Drive Bible

66, iI$EC ..I

~R

P--tt---, r

-{}1!IO~C""

I.",WI •

.G03aSec

U

UV DC.!\II
I2Y 1II!1\.tIN

Sv Af1IJIIH
SVDC .~

.1

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

IBM 0632
Suboyotolm Intortaoe Connoctor IJ3)

The 6ubs~tem Interface connector (J3)4 allows direct communications between a library
aulochan~er and the drive suba.."mbIy. The subsystem Inte~.ce cennoctor (J3) also
allow8 setUng of various opllons through a remotely mounted 6wHch cabled to the connee·
tor. The pin assignments are ShoWI' balow.

PiG
I

:~::
~J

Sipal Nam~
LlBlnterfacC'·BJccl

InstNctllhedrivetoejectthemcdlB,Drivcnactlvelowby

t"'ED""'P"'"lpc----

==c:----

PWRDNREQ

IBM 0632 (Continued)

Deftllilton

~~;::~:~~a;~v;~~:tu:a~::a:~~I~~:~~;eLm>,
Active low signal,
Instructslhe drive (0 synchronous tho cache Immediately
(trans tIll' data from the write cache to the media). Driven
active low by the subsystem and pulled up to !I volts by the

SCSI Addr... Switch (J4)
The SCSI address Of tho drive can be selected using the 4-posllion addro .. switch (J4) or
tho subsystom Into~aco connoctor (J3). Ths addr... 1s r.ad at pow.r up and when tho

-.-~

- , - _ - , - - - - drive.._ _ _ _----,-,-,-_.,_-LlBlntcrfaceBusy
SCSI TBRMl'WR

SCSI TERMPWR SRC
7
8
9
10

Not Connected
F!eservedforMf•.
FleservedforMfj.
CART_INJlRIVE

Indicates drlvelctlvlty during canridJc Insertion, spindown. and ferooval. Driven Relive low by lhe drlve and
pulled upto5 vOltsbylhe sUSSY5tem (220-0hm rtslstor).
Connects to the same pin as the SCSI connector
TBRMPWR .1&n.l.
Supplies +SV AC source voltale thrQusht holBtion diode
for TBRMPWR. Cormeclinl Pin 6 10 Pin S cnBbles the
SCSll'ERMPWR .I.n~t.
be connected.
bcconnmed.
IndlcBlelacBrtridlchasbecninscrtedlntothcdrive.
Drlven by active low by thedrlve and pulled up 10 S volU:

ROIl'

11

SCSI Ad .... Switch Setdnp
SCSI Drlv.
Switch 1 (IDO)
Add ....
o
Off Cinactive)
2

~Subs5te.m{220ohmresI5tor).

II

12
13

3

Sub RelCt
FteservedforMfg.
SCSI Parity Di ..bted
l.IBlntcrfaceSpin Mdown

connected.
lCtlvclowby
'hcsubsystemandpulledupto~voltsbythcdrive,
Instructs the drlvc 10 ipln-dawn thc medl •. Driven active

.~~_ _ _ ~Ihcsubs)'stemandpilltedupto~voltibythedrivc.

t5

~:CSI1D2

~teserveaforMf,.

SCSI IDI

17

SCSIID select bit 2. Driven active low by the subsystem
anr;l pulled up to S volts by thedrlvc.
Reaervcdrormanufacturcl"suse.ShoutdnOibeconnected.
SCSI ID select bit I. Driven active low by the subsystem

~;=CSI=Thm=in="lon=Di'='ble~~~~~~n~"1o~ny~t~driV~
•. - - - ~iCSllDO
itO. Driven acllve low by the subsystem
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ ~lIe-duDto!lvoltsbytbedrive.
20

Ground.

Ground

On (active)
OfHinactivel
On (active)
Ofr (inactive)
On (active)
(inactive)
On (active)

I

S"ltclI2 (IDI)

Swltcb 3 (1D2)

Swttch 4

Off (inactive)
Off (inactivc)
Onfactivc)
On (active) _

Off (inactivc)
Off (inactivc)

Not connected
Not connected
Notcono'f'ed
NOiconnected
Not connected
Not connected
Not connected
Not connected

O[Cjnaclivel

Off (inactivc)
OCf (inactive)
On (active)
Off (inactive)
On (llCtive)
On (active)
On (active)
7
On (activo)
On (active)
The correct SCSI addres" must be applied to the SCSI address switch or subsystem interface
c~nnector while the address is relld by the drive. The SCSI address is read by the drive approKi M
mately 1.75 seconds afler the power is applied to the drive or after a SCSI reset condition is
initiated, The address seulng must be applied to the switch or connector at least I.~ seconds after
applying drive power until the drive is powered off.
The user should only use one SCSI address source, either the SCSI addreu switch UR tbe
subsYBtem Interrace connector. The other (unused) source mild he Itt to 'n Iddrt;M of 8
The SCSI address switch is preset In the factory to SCSI address I.
4
S

arc

6

Fcatu ... Switch"" (15 and 16)

J5
Svrltch
AI

Settinl Descrtpdon
On*
On

Enable Unit Attention on POR/SCSI Reset.
Feature Switch 2 Off:
Disable Unit Attention on PORiSCSI Reset for Apple I1t1ach.
Peature Switch 20n:
SupPOrt Mode St?nsclSelccl pages for DECMattnch,
Peripheral Device Type in Inquiry data is X'07', Opticlll Memory Device.
Peripheral Device Type in Inquiry data is X'OO', Direct Address Device.
Spin automatically on powerMup or canndge insert.
No spin-up on power-up but spinMup on cartridge insen.
Force verify on Write command is default mode.
Inhibit verify on Write command is default mode.
Enable SCSI tenninatlon.
Disable SCSI tennination.
M

A2

or
On

A3

Of{'"

A4

orr

AS

On
Orr'
On

On

I Bold". Default I

IBM 0632 IrContinued)

~~E'~~'

-'~I
J5~--~1

F:".SwllchtJ

~===JLJ

IBM 0662
Electrical Connector Locations - The electrical connectors are shown below.
consisting of an option block. a SCSI connector and a power connector.

11-110

~h_.swll""
~
AI-AIO
I2UUftt'.

Off
Oa-

Off
OQ0fP
On
0fI'*
On

otr
On

SCSI TERMPWR signlll i~ disabled.
SCSI TBRMPWR liiflal is enabled.
Reserved for Manufacturer's Usc (SCSI reset CIlU.~es drive self'lest long reset).
Rcgulrcdsettin8~tdoe¬c.usedrlveself~tesl-lonlresel).

SCSI Parity is enabled.
SCSIParilylsd~.

J6
S1JI'itcb Sellin, DHc:rlpdOD
8I
0fP
Write Cache disl'lbled (WeE-O) is default mnde.
On
WriI9ClChgenl~."'''!11IlJLil.
defllll!aY!!lltm""od"".
.
_ _ _ _ _ __
otr'
Drivcinlemaltrjl,Ceiscnabled.
On
Drivcinlem.llr~cetsdisa,,,,,blerity on !he SCSI bull. An 10 d _ I t !he hIgheeI priority in 8 mUtipie device
configuration, and Is UIU8IIy used by the initiator.
S:I

0
1
2

PRIORITY

..35

~ ~:

OUT
OUT

'IN
IN
OUT

IN
IN
IN
IN

6

7

=
~

LOWEST

HIGHEST

~
OUT
IN
IN

OUT
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
IN

MAXTOR J'I1XT-7345A
Jumper Location,
Shrouded
IrrlerfaCl

MAXTOR MXT-7546A

o
J

'"

J
J

o

Jl.IIIIDer Dealanation

o
J

JZ4

JZ3

JZO

Cable 8eIiiOt

DiIIabIad*
EIIIIbIed

Jf'

J11

J1.

0
J

W\'IIItClllllle

EnabIad"
DiIIIbIed

~.

Jumper JIIIt .spMllIhIIIt

Only drMt In ling" ayatem0
MeAer In dual dri¥e.~
SIeve In dual dri¥e IYIIIIIm
DIferreIII-sjIiI Up

0
J

J
J
0

DiubIed"
EnabIId

DiubIed"
EnabIId
IIOC....... ......,
OpIIon DiNIbIed'

om....,; EnebIed

0
J
0
J
0
J

JaJ\lll'lpeNd
OaOpen
'·DIfIUt
NOTE: JU/IIPIIS J25, J22 .,. J17 fa:iDfy --.d. 00 nol use.

©

esc 1996

Hard Drive Bible 255

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743-8787

MICROPOLIS 1598-15
JY"'M'A!M""lng wi ....,.,Ttnlllndon
100. 101, IDZ • SCII Add... JUIIII*'I
The SCSI 10 (drive acldreu) jumpers ... kIenIIfted .100,101, ancIlD2. 10
oetectIon • binary • shown In the table below.
FCM' mul!lple drive Inltalllllon.. on one Holt AdllPler, eech drive _
h....
unlque~. om. .. con'Vured .. SCSIID 7 III the feotDIy.

RNlIn..... • TenIIINIDr

The II\WfIIoe TermI _ _ ryinMlllled III RNa prcwldee PI"P"I' tonninllllon ilr
the InIetfaDe . . . 'MIoIn dIIIIIy-dtelnlng multiple dIMe, leave ......mlnlllor
IMtaIIed only In the lilt ~ dtMt on tile dilly chain CIIbIr. _
the
termlnlllor from each 01 ... other .....
WI. WZ· T........ OpIiaII
WI MId Wl __ ... _
01
pow. (+$V) 11M' ... IntItrIIIce
terrMIIIlor.
1nIIIIId IIlWI (\heflalrydetlu.confrIunIIIon), end 110
jumpII' ItIMtalled IIlWl . . dIMI(IIIO'AIIea .........loMr. Th.oontlgurllllon
• UMCIIIM'PC/"T~ tI.jumper .. onWl . . . . . . . . . , ........
tarrnlnlllor power.lleJumperltlnllllldlllWlMld Wl1, end IIOjumper.1nIIIIId
III WI thedrIN ~"",,*,*,pow.lII"'on-a-rct IermInIIlI:nMldello III
the SCSl buavll1nlertlloeCOllllllClorJ1. plrt26.
Wl1· . . 0pII0n
WI 1 IIIIoWIIMI clrWlII IIIppIy InIIIfIIoIItarmlnllDr power III the SCSI bua. If WI 1
• IlOl In. . . . end WI "juInpered (\he feotDry ..... ~). thedllwl
cioeellipplySCSI bualnIioIfeoetonnlnlllorpower. Wt11houldnolbeinelllledllM'
PC/AT fippllcllllon.
(ConIJnued OII_J

MAXTOR 72 13A
JJ3 J22 J20 J1.

.YNC . . . . CCNIboI

o

Byno ..... DIMbIIId"
Bwnc Sp&nd1II Enlbled

J

SwncSiaVII
SyncMaIlor

o
J

IMttrIIIa¥t
drIVe In lInGle drtn .,...",.
Muter In dial CIM IJIIIi'II
alai. In . .

onrv

J

drive.,....

J.......... o.

""'*'*'

'.jumper ..

J

o

1:1

Wl1

o
J
Open •• DefIuII

I~I

PRIOIUTl'
IDZ

II)

0
1
2
3

L~

"e
5

7

Highet'

JUMPEA
ID'I IDO

out
out

out
out

Out
Out

In

In
In
In
In

In

out
Out
In
In

out
In
OUt
In
out
In
Out
In

MICROPOLIS 1664-7 (Continued)
"Drive Addr.- (1' (no jumper. 0.\1, DA2, or 0.\3) •••......,.. (I.e., no
drMt ........ 0.-. . . fIIcay CIOIlIgt.INw.t _ DIM AcIdI.-1. For mMY
muIIpII cIrhw In ......... drMt .......... unique ........

Ala...,..

Ion . . . . for IMrYcIrhw In. PClAT .......... __ . . . . . . DrIwIt
,..,.. . . . 0.\2; mow"jumperl..-y ............ 1nIIrfIce
0IbIe ..... ........, ........ mreof ........ unique ........ ....
dIM). PClAT oaiIIIroIer cen tw*eIY 1QPPOIt • ...-...m ~_ cIrMe.

MICROPOLIS 1664-7

..................... COIdNI 0,10II.

wa ............. control option. Ifwa .1nIIaIIed. the drM .... for.
a.t SpIndle command (..... ~ • applied) to llartthe tpIndII motor. Ifwa

DrIIfe Add.....lng ..... tnlllfllce TenMudIon
Flnt
~

r--------J-1--------~

J3

• not InMIIIed (the fIIctory default confJgunIIIon), the drive automIIIIceIIy .....
the 8PIndIe motor lit power-on. W5 .. not lnetalledfor PCMT appIcatJone.
WI • 8eIIctI ... 8IctDrInt Mode.
If W1 .1nIIaIed, the drive operaeee In the eoft~red mode. IfW1 II not
In8taIIed (the factrJey default conftguratlon). the drive opet'lltee In the hardeector mode. S1 II not lnelalledfor moet PClAT In appIlattione.

-1ector_..........

Set"

WJ, W3, .......
0pI0u
The number of bytee per . . . , m.y be epedIed ueIng the
Per 8tic:D
command or by eeIeotIng a defaulteeb confJgunIIIon wilt jurnpera W2, W3, and
W4 .. follow8:
J ..........
WI

W3

WI

Out
-Out
Out
Out
In

Out
Out
In
In
Out

Out
In
Out
In
Out

In

U
54

28
14
7

1512

588

512

578

1024

1118

2048

2232

4098

4484

256
321
31,248
31,248
• Thill. the default (factory NtIiIIIId) ClOnfguI1lllon and • recotmIeIlded for PClA.T
In

In
In

Out
In

.7
1.

applications.

256 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

NlICROPO,lIS 1924
QnM Add.Una'" """"""TIfDJIHSIAD

Up 110 eight device. (the holt and _
targeta) en be lllteched to the SCSI bus.
The 1924 drlYe he.tIIree lei jumpera -IDO. 101. and 102. n- jumpers_used
to Mllgn one of'the eight SCSI 10 lib (0 through 7) to tho drlYe. (see table)
In mulllple-deylot IYIIamI. -*' drlw InUIt hawt It own unique 10.

MICROPOLIS 1991 .

Write Protect 0pII0n
Bus Plrity Check 0pII0n (PAR)
Remo.LEO
+5

Slave Sync SIgnal (SS)
Master Sync Signal (MS)

J2 Multi-Function Connector

MICROPOllS 1991 (Continued)
_\he add,_.
Co~lIgu_/OptIon •
• &CSI Add ..... Jumpeno 111100. 101, and 102
SCSI
SCSI daYloe on one Holt Adaplor II'IUIt have 8 unlqua edd_
JUMPE
SCSI PRIORITY
ltH IDO

~
0 -r-.w..t

-unOul

I

Out
Out
Out
In
In
In
In

2
3
4

5
II

Each

I

, -7- , - - ,

HIgheIt

Out
Out

Out

In
In
Out
Out
In
In

OUt

In
In

OUt
In
Ou!
In

MICROPOLIS 1991 (Continued)

·1ntH'-T.......... I f _.... _.RNI ... RN2(cIefoulll.1he
drillepro..-_nlo'IheSCSl
........
f I l l e - . . .... not
_ . I h e _ _ not""'vIde .......
_I.
S C S I - " . . _onlylnlheend_onIheSCSlcablo; ......ve
Ihel8rmlnelonfrom_oIlhe _ _ Tho SCSI HoItAdal*rClllld and
Ihelaald.... InIhe_lhould ...... _ .
' T _ " - . W I andW2 .. leoIlheeourooolloflnlnalo,_(+5V)10,
1nIf_-..RNlandRN2;W3....-lhedriloelUppIyIng+fNtolhe
b..o.
WI
Y
N
,

WZ
N
Y
,

WI

Y

DrtYopro,ld". _ _.(1loIouIt)
_prcwIdeo_pwrvlllJ1p1n2ebRNlondRN2.
cm.IUPIIIk>I+5Vto"'buo"'Jlp1n2e.(~

• F,_O_... ~.Ajumper.W9aa1eo11lhe_groundopllon .

.u-_

F.-ground """**'1tndn 101pplQel1wde Mlpq!gelwtpre

Highest

Out
Out

f~---J-1---..:..PIn::':"·11 ~

2112AdrMIo_uoodln ••yotem. Tho_drlYeII SIMt.

~ ~~ ~ ~
2 1 3

DrlwlII_Ior:SpecllIoothoMMler_(OriveO)_one2112Adrlveil

J7.ElctemIIILEDUghI

_lora

RN (H).TermInotoro (x2)

uoed In aoy1l!oom.

• • • • • • •

... r"T"

• • • • • • •
l1IiSIJfS
l. :&i
Itlt

W10

g

COMPONENT Sill!

~=RIbbonCobie

...-...L_ _ _.::.:..._ _ _--LL-...::.-I J3.4 Pin PoworCoble

DrlwlIIS_:SpooIIIooIheSlowdrlYo(DrMt1)whontwo2112AdriYoI_
uoodlnooyotem. Tho_drlYeII MoIIIor.

:W4

ii~

W11

Jumpono
10 (0.2) • SCStlO
Partty_Plrftyenableldiubfe
SCSIII2.WrttoProtoct
Spin o. Splnde Control
SpIn t • SpIndIo DoIoy

:~~!5~;:,:~.tton Power
W4 • Bezel LED OptIon

--al

IDl.....'~-'1WOi--_ _ _ _ _ _ _--' ~:~: ~:~~§~T;:nn

L-_ _

.II

o ,--.._ _--'

'---'------'1llllJJllli

QUANTUM 3.5" 5-JUMPER

QUANTUM 8 and 10 JUMPER LOCATIONS
Eight- and Ten-Jumper Location and Settings
SCSI
Inlerfac. HIlder

3.5-lnch Five-Jump" Locations and Settings
CAUTION: Verify that no two drives on the SCSI bus have the same
address (see Table 4 for drive address information).

Lct::====::t:==_L.-T

ThMIpnperpCllltlona
_lor IIcIory UII only.

1.8)

Quantum Grind PrIx XP321118 IfICI XPMI018

258 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

QUANTUM 3.5" 6-JUMPER
Baok

of
DrIve

QUANTUM 3.5" PC-AT
Note:
The Jumper settings shown
In Table 4 do not apply to
drives Installed In Sun systems.
(See your Sun dealel' for
proper Jumper settings.)

LPS 270S. LP8 54OS.
Cluantum Lightning 385,.,.
5408. and 7308

LPS 62S. LPS 80S.
and LPS 1058

LP8120S
andlPS240S

3.5-1nch Six-jump" Locations anti Settings

Thlejoolperpoeltlon
II lor factory UII only.

3.5-Inch PC-AT Drive Jump" Block Locations

QUANTUM OSP SERIES 16-BIT
OUllllum DIP U1os. DSP 3133L S. DIP 3107L S, and DIP 301I3l. S

DD
DDD
[J ~

QUANTUM OSP SERIES 8-BIT
Quantum DSP .'01, DIP atllL .. DIP atO'lL" end DSP NUL.

DD
oDD

POW8f

COfIMCIOf

SCSI Connector

Quantum DSF Series (J 6-bit) Jumper Locations anti Settings

Do D~

SCSI

Connector

NOTE:
OrlvelClIlztllld
poIIUonIng may very.

DSP Series (8-bit) Jumper Location and Settings

@ CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 259

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

QUANTUM ELS 127AT
Jumper locotWK
is C01ISistant on
aU AT drives.
Chip location
and size may vary
depending OK

drive.

QUANTUM ELS 127
FI'OIt

of arm

An;~~~~~~n~

Jumper aHd Termi1Ultor location is
constant on all SCSI drives. Chip
location and size may vary depending
on drive.
ProOrlve Address Jumpers
A2

A1

OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON*
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON*
ON

SCSI 10

AO
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF*
ON

0

1
2
3
4
5

6*
7

.. Indicates the factory default jumper setting.
ON indicates that the jumper is conneded.
OFF indicates that the jumper is not installed.

QUANTUM ELS 110AT
Jumper location
is consistaKt on
aU AT drives.
Chip locotWK
and size may vary
depending OK

drive.

QUANTUM ELS 170
FI'OIt

of DrIYI
AFi;~~~~~~~~

Jumper aHd Termi1Ultor location is
consta"t on all SCSI drives. Chip
location a"d size may vary depending
on drive.
ProOrive Address Jumpers
A2

A1

OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON*
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON*
ON

AO
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF*
ON

SCSI 10
0

1
2
3
4
5

6*
7

.. Indicates the factory default jumper setting.
ON indicates that the jumper is conneded.
OFF i"dicates that the jumper is not installed.

260 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

QUANTUNI ELS 42
laCk

ofDrln

Fl'OIIt
of DrIIII

AFi~~~~~~~~

Jumper and Termi1Ullor location is
consfa"t ott all SCSI drives. Chip
location and size may vary dependi1l/f
0" drive.
ProDrive Address Jumpers

A2

AI

AO

OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON*
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON*
ON

OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF*
ON

SCSI 10

QUANTUM ELS 42AT
0

Jumper location

1
2
3
4
5

all AT drives.
Chip location
and size may va"

6*

is c01lsistm.t ott

depend;", ott

drive.

7

* Indicates the factory default jumper setti1l/f.
ON indicates that tM jumper is connected.
OFF indicates that the jumper is not installed.

QUANTUM ELS 85
FI'OIt
of DrIve
Af'i~~~~~~!!!l!!lrti~

Jumper and Terminator location is
consta"t ott all SCSI drives. Chip
location and size may vary dependi1l/f
ott drive.
ProOrtve Address Jumpors

A2

AI

AO

OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON*
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON*
ON

OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF*
ON

SCSI 10

QUANTUM ELS 85AT
Jumper location

0

is COIISista1lt ott

1
2
3
4
5

all AT drives.
Chip location
and size may va"
dependi", ott

drive.

6*
7

* Indicates the factory default jumper setti1l/f.
ON indicates that the jumper is cottnected.
OFF indicates that the jumper is not installed.

@

esc

1996

Hard Drive Bible 261

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

QUANTUM GO DRIVE AT

QUANTUM EUROPA SERIES

Quantum Go-Drive ATJumper Block Locations

Jumper Locations for the Quantum Europa Series

QUANTUM LPS/MAVERICK

Front
of

QUANTUM GO DRIVE GLS/DAYTONA

Drlv.
IDE BUI Interface
(J11 Section C)

Quantum ProOrIve LPS 1278, LP8 1708,
LPS 340S, Maverick 2708, and 540S

Quantum ProDrive LPS 1275. LPS 1705. LPS 3405. Quantum
Maverick 270S. and 5405 Jumper Location and Settings
The black jumper body indicates that a jumper is installed (the setting is
ON).

Quantum Go-Drive GLS and Quantum Daytona ATJumper Locations

262 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

QUANTUM LPS 105AT
/f4mjJer lo.catUm

isCOllSistanton
all AT dri:ves.
Chip locafion
and size may IJQry
dependi"8' on
drive.

QUANTUM LPS 120AT
Jf4mjJer locatUm

is COIISistant on
all AT drives.
Chip locatUm
and size may vary
depending on
drive.

QUANTUM LPS 240AT
Jf4mjJer iMltUm

is COIISistall t on
all AT drivI~.
Chip locati.'»I
and size nulY IJQry
depending 1'»1
drive.

QUANTUM LPS 525
fl'Dllt
of DrIn
AFi~~~~r!!!!!!!!j~~

Jumper and Terminator location is
constant on all SCSI drives. Chip
location and size·may vary depending
on drive.
ProDflve Address Jumpers
A2

A1

OFF'
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON"
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON"
ON

AO
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF"
ON

SCSI 10
0

1
2
3
4
5
6*
7

.. Indicates the factory default jumper setting.
ON indicates that the jumper is connected.
OFF indicates that the jumper is not installed.

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bibl. 263

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

QUANTUM LPS 52AT
Jumper location
is COIfSistant 011

all AT drives.
Chip location
and size may vary
depending 011
drive.

QUANTUM LPS 525AT
all AT drives.
Chip locatiotl
and size may vary
depending 011
drive.

QUANTUM LPS BOAT
Jumper Iocatiotl
is COIfSistant 011

all AT drives.
Chip location
and size may vary
depending 011
drive.

QUANTUM PO 1050
Froid
of DrIIe
A1""i;~~~~~!!!!!!!!!j~F11

Jumper and Terminator location is
constant on all SCSI drives. Chip
location and memoy vary Upending
on drive.
ProOrlV8 Addren Jump811
A2

A1

OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON*
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON*
ON

AO
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF·
ON

SCSI 10
0

1
2
3

4
5
6*

7

.. Indicates the factory default jumper setting.
ON indicates that the jumper is connected.
OFF indicates that the jumper is not installed.

264 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

QUANTUMr PO 120AT
Jumper ioIwtioH
is COIfSista"t Oft
all AT dril/JeS.
Chip locai'Um
alld size "laY tlQry
depe1ldi", on

drive.

QUANTUM PO 1225
Front
of DrIYe
A~~~~~Jl!!!!!!~~~

Jumper and Terminator locatitm is
constant on all SCSI drives. Chip
location and size may vary depending
on drive.
ProDrlv8 Address Jumpers
A2

AI

OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON·
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON*
ON

AO
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF·
ON

SCSIID
0

1
2
3
4
5

6*
7

.. Indicates the factory default jumper setting.
ON indicates that the jumper is connected.
OFF indicates that the jumper is not installed.

QUANTUM PO 110AT
Jllmper loctltUm
is COIfSista"t Oft

all AT drivltS.
Chip locatUm
alld size mtlY tlQry
depe1lding tm
drive.

QUANTUM PO 210AT
Jumper locatioH
is COIfSistant Oft

all AT drives.
Chip IocatioH
and size may tlQry
depe1ldi", Oft
drive.

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 265

Corporate Systems

Cen~er

(408) 743·8787

QUANTUM PO 700
FI'OId
of DrIYe
AiiF',li;~~~~~~~eq

Jumper and Terminator location is
constant on all SCSI drives. Chip
location and size may vary depending
on drive.
ProDrive Address Jumpers

QUANTUM PO 425AT/425iAT
/lImper locatiolt
is cmtSistant 011
alJ AT drives.
Chip location
and size may vary
depending 011
drive.

A2

A1

OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON·
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON·
ON

SCSIID

AO
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON

0

1
2

OFF*

ON

3
4
5
6·
7

.. Indicates the factory dejault jumper setting.
ON indicates that the jumper is connected.
OFF indicates that the jumper is not installed.

QUANTUM PROORIVE ELS
DC Power
Connector

QUANTUM PROORIVE
SCSI-Bus
Interface Header
SCSI-BusTermlnating
Resistor Packs

Quantum ProDrive ELS 42S, ELS 85S,
ELS 127S, and ELS 170S

Quantum ProDri"e ELS Jumper Location and Settings

SCII-Bu.

....., c.tt)

Qu.rtntum ProDri"e LPS 525S. 700S, 1050S, 1225S.
and 1800S Optiom
266 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

QUANTUM PRODRIVEjLIGHTNING
J5 AdJ,'ess Option

SEA GATE 31230WjWCjWD
(ST-31230W/WD only)
(TOP)
=(

Auxiliary

d:~,:~ ~:~!.

Back
of
Drive

ij

1I1"11I1I""lIlllIlIlIrllll"l)""~: :~~Jl'-o"""o"'o-o-~

II

I

'--G-C>-"

Auxiliary option header
pin-11 +Sv
pin-lO GND
SCSI ID - 8
SCSI ID • 4
or pin-6 REFIND+
SCSI ID - 2 - - - - - - - '
SCSI ID - 1 - - - - - - - - - '
SCSI ID - 0 (none)

I
SCSI-Bus Interface Header (J1)

The PCB address jumpers (AO. AI. and A2) must be removed if the J5
remote address c:onnector is used.

REAR VIEW

(ST-31230WC only)

80 pin I/O and DC Power Wall/bracket Connection
Female
/-\
TOP (HDA)
-===-==/ 11111111111111111111111111111111111111 \ - - (\-1
401>
BOTTOM

~

J1

Notes on 80 pin I/O connector:
pins 1 - 4 - +12v
41 - 44 " 12v GND
34 - 36 - +Sv
74 - 76 - 5v GND
77 - LEDC
37 • SYNC
78 " DLYDST
38 • MTRON
79 - SCSIA1
39 - SCSIAO
80 - SCSIA3
40 " SCSIA2
~Iating

NC connector: AMP US pin: 2-557103-1 straight-in, Male 80-pin
2-557101-1 right angle to PCB

SEAGATE 3491A
TOP

4-pin DC
Power
4
1/- - 3 - 2- 1 -\

r====
--==-p:::: ::::::::::::1 fL~~~J=

SEAGATE STl1200N

(pin-·20 missing
for keying purpos(~s)
(Options jumper lo,~ated on bott.om)
(back of drive)
Master OFF, Slave ON - - - - - - - 80-07
Slave Present Olq (standard)
o-()
Cable Select
r~
Slave Present ON' for _ _ _-1
drives that don't have
the -DASP signnl (use
only ONE of tho Slave
Preset choices)

.: :. .: :. .: :. 2~=~1

(front of drive)

fO pin I/0 Cable Oonn.otiOll.

0
0

I

S
i
n
g
1
e

0
1

I

1
0

J

1, """"""""""" ;}-L~.!.!-~.J­

I

M S
a 1
s a
t
v
e e
r

TOP (RDA)

t=:::J t=;:::J t=::J
LTerminatirtg Re81etoraJ

~

I

RIGHT SIDE VIEW

E}r------- ,.._-_~TO-.-CIWA-I_j~
DR'~ermin.tor Power JW"'''@'lli'ilR••• rved·BO'l'TOM
B~~K

Terminator Power

Factory U.a
Parity inable

Termination

L.:.

Pow.r~.ource

' .. -

[:]0

~

Start Delay (12 •• C8 • ID)

Motor Start
Write Prote~t

Table

.... _PWA edge_

:B

A

B

Default

II""~L-EI'"I'-S'-D'-V'-""""I1!

:~~: --P-W-A

It theae ID jumper. an u.,d,
tAen 10 jumpen .hown in tront
view ARE NOT USED.

:::DA)

Note:

J5

~

On early drive.

with fCBN 75782395 or

#75762485 ID jumpara are

8-0:~~~

ID 1

J10 I2L ID 4

ID 4

ID 1

reveraed.

II

FRO:~~~;j\;:;;.!I_ _ _TO_P_CHD_A_I_J..' ...,E:J~DJ

UH~

i~ ~ ::J
~ IIL:=~ ::~~~·~D

ID 1

Cpin-'

+5vl

Spindle synohronization
(pin-6 REF SIG+)

@

CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 267

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

SEAGATE ST1144A
===PWA.================================================

r .................... ,

SEAGATE ST1144A-32

o

0

o
o
o
o

0
0
0
0

tWill Lif"T:::'~F:::::'~:')

r· ..... .' ............. ,
0
0
0
0
0

\

L~-1!-~2J

Master on (Slave off) - Slave Present ----------Reserved
- - - Remote LED

=PWA
o
o
o
o
o

/

................... 1

2
4

6
8
10

~~~

..... i.' c~bi~

I
1 II ~

/

.c~~~~~~or

\

L~-1!-~2J

,-closed O.~.n

S

M

i
n
9
1

a
s
t
e

e

r

S

1

a
v

e

1-closed O-open
Life-Test (Factory use)
Master on (Slave off) - Slave Present ----------Reserved
Remote LED

S

M

i

a
s

n
9
1
e

S
1

a

t

v

e

e

r

SEAGATE ST11910ND (Continued)
(ST-11900N only)
If the... ID jumpera are uM,
tun ID jupera abow 1ft front
view A'RI ROT WID.
PIC*'!'

or

SEAGATE ST1191 OND
I

lIAR VIlli

I

(ST·1UOOII onlyl

/

I

\

TOI' (_I

--((Jllllllllllllllllllo)~

Rot.. OD 80 pia. I/O coaDeCtor I
piJ:ull- "-+12v
41-U-12vCIID
3t .. U. +5v
74 .. n· SvCJID
3'7. SYIIC
77· LIDC
31 • ..,...
78 • m.YDST
39' • IC81AO
71 • IC8W
CO • SClW
10 • 8C8W

c:"1

lAC!

~

(80th

J2

'r!J

ID 1
If thea. 'ID jUIIpU are \&Md, tb.a

_1.

.... _

on1

J5 Drive ID Select and
Configuration Select Header

71

71

:8 8:

'I
40-pin I/O Cable Connector

r.:J

o

J41 : : : : : ::: : : . : : : : : : : : 11 / - - - - \

0

a

0
0

0

I

0
0

I

J6 (located on side
near rear)
o 01

+Sv
01
0

Remote LEDI J
Connection

U.!!-~2J=~;:c;:~~~)

(pin 20 missing for
keying purposes)

---0 0

DC Power

l/Reserved
Jumper
Position

J5
.JUMPER I FUNCTION:
A
REFSIG: This location provides a port for external connection
of the synchronized spindle reference signal (pin-1) and ground
(pin-2). The reference signal is bi-directional, single-ended, and
terminated without an external resistor. It is also available on J4
pin-28 i f the factory jumper is installed. The drive will
I~elf-determine if it is a master of slave for spindle synchronization.

~

.77 11111
, 1

r

I

If tHH m jlllOplr are IIHII,
til.. ID jllJlllU'l IIIIwD 111 r19ltt 11ft
yl... AltlIIOf IIIID.

11'I't.::L a.ote

m
ID 2::J

ID'

13
HOST SLV/ACT: When this shunt is installed, -SLAVE PRESENT
(provided by the output of a 74HCT14) is applied to J4 pin-39 for
,.ystems that require this signal from the Master drive. If jumper "B"
Ls installed, then jumper "E" must not be installed.
C
MASTER: When this shunt is installed, the drive is configured
as the Master. When not installed, the drive is a Slave.

LID
l,ll1111e IJ1IchroeiutiOIl

SLAVE PRESENT: When installed, this shunt indicates to the
drive that a Slave is present. This shunt must be installed on
the Master drive in a two-drive system.

J)

I~aster

E
ACTIVE: When this shunt is installed, DASP- is made present on
.J4 pin-39. If "E" is installed, then "B" must not be installed.

SEAGATE ST1480A (Continued)
This figure and the following description of each jumper position
is only valid on drives that have J6 with 6 pins /2x3). ~~>l

sellicTand I

J5 Drive 10
Configuration Select Header

J6 (located on side
near rear)

--.-_
... - -

0'001

+Sv w+_a a a

4o-pin I/O Cable Connector

0 0 0 a 01

-:-;-;--

J~~/L-;;;;-;;-;;J\~
~~~~~~tr~~j-'J 1~~~~~~·d
(pin 20 mienng for
'-(}-G-12 ( s e p
Position
keying purposes)

DC Power

ATA mode

]
~~
[ ------'

o-C·®tr-o'

o B-o

0

A

0

SEAGATE ST1480N
il

0

F

REAR VIEW

II

Defaults shown in solid Hnes-

J5 Jumper
A
OFF
OFF

ON*
C
ON

"

ON"

B
OFF
ON
OFF

Function Description
(A ..vertical, pins 9 &: 10; a.horizontal, pins 8
Drive is the slave (Drive IJ.

ol"ive is the master (Drive OJ with slave (Drive
Drive s the master (Drive 0).

Ii:

:-;-''-'-:",:

J!lf~~~l=~

10)
1)

present.

111"'1-LE-FT-S-I-DE-VI-Ew"'IIll

(e-horizontal, pins 5 &: 7)
Slave (Drive 1) Present is connected to J4 pin 39. Jumpers
"D" or "EN cannot be installed if jumper "C" is installed.
(D.. verticlll,

~=(L-~--!-o---o-~J-

1-:' - ;- :: - '- ::=:

LTerminating ResistorsJ

12345678

pins 5 fit. 6)

FRONT

t'ASP- is connected to J4 pl.n 39. Jumpera "C", "0". "F", or
"G" cannot be inatalled if jumper "E" is installed.

J6

OF

E:l
-1-

DRIVE Factory Use J~
Motor Start ::J
Start Delay

REFSIQ i8 not connected to J4 pin 39.

"ON

50 pin I/O Cable conne~tion

IE-horizontal, pins 3 &. 51
REFSla is connected to J4 pin 39. Jumpers "C" I "D" I "FH,
c·r "a" cannot be installed if jumper "E" is instill led.

I ~Il
l:

Write Protect

. __~~~~__",,_

P-W-A-

Terminator Power (see below)
Terminator Power (see below)
Reserved
Parity

~

BACK
OF

DRIVE

Termination Power-source Table 1

REFSIG ill not connected to J4 pin 39.

"

ON"

78

IF_vert.ical, pins 3 & 4)
No externaJ reference for ltEFSIQ. Jumpers "E" I "G" I or "H"
cannot be installed if jumper "F" is installed.

o~~]

'Ihis location provides a pc)rt for external connection of
the synchronized spindle rc~ference signal (pin 31 a.nd
ground (pin 4) .
CO

ON

(a_horizontal, pins 1 fit. 3)
REFSIG is connected to J4 pin 28. Jumpers "E" or "F" cannot
te installed i f jumper "G" is installed.
REFSIO is not connected to J4 pin 28.

78

.11:11 11:11.
[~]o

A

il

78

r.::;]
0

0

A Drive Supplies Own
B Drive Supplies Bus
C BUB Supplies Drive

C

b.=====P=W=,_----......===-'
RIGHT SIDE VIEW II

B~~K

J5

DRIVE

r~]

J IL

ID 4

P-W-lI

A================

ID 1
ID 2

F~~NT

DRIVE

If these ID jumpers are used,

then ID jumpers shown in front
view ARE NOT USED.

FRONT VIEW II

~
1
J7 ::::,

J'I'l
l:

ID 1
ID 2::J
ID4

© CSC 1996

If these ID jumper are used,
then ID jumpers shown in right sid..
view ARE NOT USED.

P-W=1>;,....,=======
Remote LED
Spindle Synchronization

Hard Drive Bible 271

Corporate Sy:s t ems Center (408) 743·8787

SEAGATE ST15150W
!
II

(;~;~t.:J

REAR VIEW ..

below)

t~-J4_1l

~~~ ~:e!-; elow)

(TOP)

-\mlmml'1mill)-rf~
'~7]/---:\~::~n
L' '- . U

J

J

~~!:;~~;r~~~" '1if,~:!":d
U:~;:~ :Jj'Wl
pin I/O cabl;.J--1
Connection

SEAGATE ST15150N

68

~g~~ ig : :

R;:!'"r!:~tora

anode (pos) 1

Enable

m~ ~g : ~ ~none)

JOl _ Terminator Power Jumpers

0 0 0 -G-G-12

~~~!~~U~i.~~~

Delay ~tor Start
(10 Bec ~r I~rart

I

I

T~rminator

[;::;]

SCSI bUB. power from pin 26 on the

Torminator to the SCSI bUB on pin 26.

r.II. *

Terminator
drive.
power to the SCSI bus and

r;r.J*

l~.B.

lL:J::

l;j;1

*

Valid for 8ingle ended drive " only.

SEAGATE ST151N

~.....
pin I/O Cable Connection

~}-Gooo\-

S~12J

RIGHT SlOB VIEW

l

J2

\,;;J

DRIVE

12345678

SCSl Connector

Parity
Check enable
s
Not
Used
D:r:ive ID's, I D 0 (none) f or single drive system

TOI1 (HDA)
IIOT'I'OH

::::'.::~:~
=~ mi iI ~ -,. ,.- ~~'
parit~e:~~ ~ ~ :~~; ~~;~~

BACK
OF.h1

5

· j1I~L~;.tor T!~~:~~t:~' :aCk

REAR VIEW

I II I •• I II I •

j/~ogr
~.

~ ~ ~ ~ o~o=--r=r7:7:7.7.7.7.7:7:~:~:~:~:~:;';'~'='='=======~I~::~~

SEAGATE ST15230N
J![, ,,,::,::::,

*

.r.1
.l.J

2 r:'I

Te~!~:~~~) power from the drive.

fO

.

Write Protect Enable

Terminator
(default) power from . the clrive.

Enable Drive Terminator.

1'.1

.

_.

TOP (

PIlOIIT

or

DRIW

(12 am • 10)

Write Protect

Terminatio

__

n

Power~

.auree Table

.... - -•... --PMA e d g e -

1

~

1 2

:IEJ

r.::;]

I

B
efault
_________
LBPT SlOB Vln

TOP (IIDA)

FRONT

D~iVE _~-pn-.w.;A.o

FRON'l~

BO'I"l'OH

VIEW

a
J:

r;....",.~~
~ t--

enrveer

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

SEAGATE ST31230N
[REAR VIEW]
50 pin I/O Cable Connection

I

J1:::: """"""""" ~}rr-U-:J[RIGHT

smB

VIEW

0

BACK

II
J2

TOP (HDA)

FRONT

D~i~v:or::rator Power :IJ~"I"~'iLl En::~A~~D~ivE

SEAGATE ST31230W/WD/WC

ill'

Termirator Power
Reserved
Padty Enable

*

Start Delay (12 sees
Motor Start
Write Protect

BACK
OF

:;:~~~:,;~~wer-[;:;D'::;~ =i~: ~
a~!o

o~~]

ID)

J2

ORIV:erminator

!

12345678

lli'

:J

L

TOP (HDA)

FRONT

BOTTOM

ORIVE

P=W=A=====-_ _ _ OF

powerillJ'II"~'il Reserved

Terminator Power
Enable T-Res
Parity Enable

C Bus Supplies Drive

0co

\,j
i.:.I

Start Delay (12 sees. 10)
Motor Start
Write Protect

-Default

I[LEFT SIDE3I

(ST-31230N) If these 10 jumpers are used,
then 10 jumpers shown in front

Termination Power-source Table
- - .... - - .... --PWA edge _ _

view ARE NOT USED.

:~~::

__P.W~A ::T~:DA)__~:~~:E
ID 1

FRONT VIr!]

11

;~I~

12

:B

ID.

B
Oefau1t-----------'

Note: The model ST-31230WC drive cannot furnish terminator power,
because no pins on the eo pin I/O connector are devoted to terminator
power.

(ST-31230N)

eserVSd. Shippnd with cover installed.
Do not remove. Do not inetall jumpers

-----=--c8J
"" '"""
234 ~
TOP (HDA)

1 2

12

1

J: D4Jw w
ilL: Reserved

"ED J BOTTOM

10 2:J
10 1

II

FRONT VIEW

I

(Both ST-31230W and ST-31230WC)

Remote J.ED (pin-) +5v)
Reserved

TOP (HOA)

If~~e~~~/gs~~~per are used, then 10 jumpers shown in left side view J5

•

~;L

J6

~

BOTTOM

~~

LEOJ

Auxiliary option header
pin-ll +5v

pin-10 GND

SCSI 10 • 8

or pin-8 BUSY

SCSI 10 • 4 _ _-,--...J

====:J

or pin-6 REFIND+

~g~~ ~~ : ~

SCSI 10 • 0 (none)

If these IO jumper are used, then
ID jumpers shown in left side view JS
or 80 pin I/O cable ARE NOT USED.

SEAGATE S'T32550N
50 pin I/O Cable Connection

I
'1
j _ _ _\
{::":::::",,,,,,,,,,,,;~Ll 0 0 0 0 J=
~

Terminator options
o 0
(0 0)

1

F~

2=1

[

2

A
A
B
C
D
E

..
..
..
..
..

6i

(0 0)

-

~ ~

2

(single-ended)

a

0

Fai~

~~

0

0

~

-K]

~::.L;;a

1

BOTTOM

These pins not on differential
model NO

1

BCD

._---

Term. power
Term. power
Term. power
Term. power
Enable SCSI

a====

BACK
OF
I/O
DRIVE

~Fai

-1

TOP (HDA)

-5--G-G-12

SEAGATE ST32550N (Continued)
pins

fO=O=t

2

~ ~

1

E

from drive (default)
to SCSI bus (only option available for differential NO)
from SCSI bus
to SCSI bus and drive
terminator (jumper on pina 5-6)

J2

1 .. 2 Reserved
3 Parity Disable
4 Write Protect

1234567B9
-P=W=A
::::::,,:

BOTTOM

-.lJ
Reserved 7-9
=:::::J1\ ~Ul_
C_ Delay Motor St.art
-

FRONT
OF
DRIVE

+12v
+5v
SYNC
MTRON
SCSlAO
SCSIA2

Mating WC connector: AMP

I

RIGHT SIDE VIEW

~

D~ivE

J2

It:J

74 - 16
77
78
79
BO

•
•
•
•
•

5v GND
LEDC
DLYDST
SCSIA1
SCSIA3

us pin: 2-557103-1 straight-in, Male BO-pin

II
123456789
. . . .•••..

1-2 Reserved
3 Parity Disable
4 Write Protect

-.lJ~ ~l1L.
=:::::J
t..:::::=

TOP (HDA)
P=W=A

BOTTOM

FRONT
OF
DRIVE

Reserved 7-9
Delay Motor Start 6
Motor Start Enable 5

6
Motor Start Enable 5

I

FRONT VIEW

III if!'" ,~, ,...,,"'"'

II

TOP (HDA)
=P=W=A=
BO::::
rved
No connection
Ground
Unit Active LED pin (+)
SSREF (+) spindle sync
Vendor Unique
Fault LED pin (+)

© CSC 1996

44 • 12v GNO

41 -

2-557101-1 right angle to PCB

BACK
TOP (HDA)

1 - 4.
34 - 36 •
37 •
38 •
39 •
40 •

~ ~g ~

!!!J
1

II r;-

iii ii: :: :,I--

~

J4

(J4 top row)

(J4 bottom row)

Hard Drive Bible 273

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

SEAGATE ST32550WfWD (Continued)
pins

1 - 4.
34 - 36 •
37 •
38 •
39 •
40 •

41 - 44
74 - 76
77
78
79
80

+12v
+Sv
SYNC
MTRON
SCSlAO
SCSIA2

•
•
•
•
-

12v GND
5v GND
LEDC
DLYDST
SCSIA1
SCSIA3

Mating WC connector: AMP US pin: 2-557103-1 straight-in, Male 80-pin
2-557101-1 right angle to PCB

SEAGATE ST32550WfWD
(ST-32550W only)

(TOP)

J

68 pin I/O Cable
Connection

:~~]/L~~
5--'I

~'. S~, ,.=,~'"'

~ ig ~

:-:;;;;~-===fi~~JillJJill~1
I" "

00
00

2

1

-P=W=l\i===A========-NO

E

A - Term. power from drive (default)
B - Term. power to SCSI bus (only option avaUable for
differential WD)
C - Term. power from SCSI bus
D - Term. power to SCSI bus and drive
E - Enable SCSI terminator (jumper on pins 5-6)

REAR VIEW]

123456789

eJ

(single-ended)
0

2-1
2
1
2
ABC

II

I

4 Write Protect

1

2

o 0

-

0
0

3

J2

.........
1-2 Reserved --.U
Parity Disable =.l

D~ivE

Irr= ig ~

J5

-( 1I1I1I0811111111111I1jIlIl1l8 1 ).I,;":
\
- - I L" _

~

BACK

Ir;= :: :

"

,

"

GrOUnd~

(J4 top row)

If-" '" bo,,~ =.,

Unit Active LED pin (+)
SSREF (+) spindle sync
Vendor Unique
Fault LED pin (+)

(ST-32550WC only)

80 pin I/O and DC Power Wall/bracket Connection
Female
J1
/-\
TOP (HDA)
~=-/ IIIIIIIIIHIIHIIIIIIIIHNHIIIIIIII \ - - (\-1
40/)
BOTTOM

I

Notes on 80 pin I/O connector:

SEAGATYE ST3390N
1

50 pin BCSI Intert::. p:~:r connector

ReaX' View

::::,";-1:1: I: I: 1111: 11111: III:: 11H-~~~2tc:::} c:::} c:::}
Terminating Resistor Packs
(TOP)

..

SEAGATE ST3295A
4-pin DC
Power
/-4-3-2-1-\
1::::::::::'::::::::1rLO 0 0 0
•
i
•
S-G-G-12
(pin-20 missing
for keying purposes)

~

r

(Options jumper located on bottom)
(back of drive)
Master OFF, Slave ON
80-07
Slave Present ON (standard) - - - - 0-0

::=::::...r .:. .:. .:. 2~:~1(front

Add . . . .

~~ !

ill
0 0 0

Ri9htD:i::..~f

TOP

cable Select
I
Slave Present ON for
dri ves that don't have
the -DASP signal (use
only ONE of the Slave
Preset choices)
Spare jumper stored on pins 1-3

~CSI

of drive)

0/0

connector

(TOP)

Active/panlv. Termination
Active I Pins 1 " 2 ahorted
only (+2. 85V to
110 0) for PAST
SCSI;
Pine 2 &. 4. ahorted
AND pine 5 &. 6 shorted
(+5V and OND to
220/330 OJ .eor
etandard SCSI.

0
0

0
1

1
0

I

I

I

S
i
n
g

1
e

M S
a 1
s a
t
v
e e
r

Terminator Power; Prom SCSI Connector
Pins 1 , 2
Prom Power Connector
Pine 1 " 3
To SCSI Connector Only - - - - Pine 3 &. 4

'r~ :~;;rD~~ru:~~~~~.~~~.~.~:~~

i : ! AND

Terminating Reehtorll not Installed - Pine 2 " 4.
SCSI to'. (none for 100)
not uaed i t 10 •• t on .ide jumpers

1 §oR:B:r: d
,~ ~ ~ ~~

Ext. Spindle Clock Synch
R~~~: i=oClock Ground

(TOP)

10~O~1
l-'8mot8-LBO
~ Ext. Spindle Clock Synch
pin~5 is Clock Ground
Remote Start Enable
parity Enable

274 Hard Drive Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

SEAGATE ST3391A
TOP

==-

4-pin DC
Power
/-4-3-2-1-\

~

::::::::::'::::::::l~LO
0 0
}

° J=

I
5-G-G-12
(pin-20 missing
for keying purposes)

(Options jumper located on bottom)
(back of drive)
Master OFF, Sluve ON - - - - - - - 80-07
Slave Present ON (standard) - - - - 0-0

0
0

.r=
.:. .:. .:. 2~=~1(front of drive)
J

0
1

I

I

Cable Select
Slave Present ON for _ _ _
drives that dem't have
the -DASP signal (use
only ONE of the Slave
Preset choiceEI)

S
i
n
9
1
e

M

a
s
t
e
r

1

0

I

SEAGATE ST3660A

S
1
a
v
e

TOP

4-pin DC
Power
/-4-3-2-1-\

- - - - l ! : : : : : : : : : : . : : : : : : : : l r L O 0 0 0 lI
. 5-G-G-l2 J

(pin-20 missing
for keying purposes)

(Options jumper located on bottom)
(back of drive)
Master OFF, Slave ON
80-07
Slave Present ON (standard) - - - - 0-0
Cable Select
, - - .:. .:. .:.
Slave Present ON for
drives that don I t have
the -DASP Signal (use
only ONE of the Slave
Preset choices)
Spare jumper stored on pins 1-3

=====--r-

o

2~=~1

o

0
1

S

M

I

(front of drive)

1
0

I I

a

i

n

s

S

1

a

9 t v
lee

e

r

SEAGATE Sr41800W
40 fo3 Terminator

J4A

Power Source (see below)
J4B

20 01

o

0
o 0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

A

Roo
F

0

0

=I=+=H1I'(~lFm""""'"''''
SCSI Cable Connector

=SA4=12F=F1

I

";)

Power
-r12-G-G-5

6S-pin

\~I

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

Spindle Synch Cable Connector

-

Te~~~~.:a~~~: E~;~~:' bottom: ground)
- - - LED Cemnection (g: ground pin)
Activity (A-G)
Ready (R-G)
Fault (F-G)
Reserved
Write Protect Enable
Spinup Delay
SCSI ID
(10 secs * 10)
Motor Start option enable
Parity check DISable
Reserved

Terminator Power Source

Optio~-------------------'

Initiator supplies power over the SCSI Bus for terminators.
Drive supplies no terminator power.
& 2 - Drive supplies power for its own te~1llinator resistor-paks
but not to SCSI Bus. This is the factory setting.
3
1~ _ Drive supplies power for external terminator at end of the
2 & 4
daisy chain. Terminator' resistor-paks must be removed.
This option is recommended only for last drive on daisy
chain.
2 & 4 -

---S'r410BOOW-D-d-r-iv-e-s-a-r-e-ahipped without terminators and have
empty terminator sockets on the PCB. You must provide
termination resistor!! for these drives.

SEAGATE ST41080N
40fo3 Terminator

Power Source (see below)

20 01

J4A

o

0

0

0

0

0

o 0 0 0 0 0

A

Roo
F

0

J4B

Power

0

12-G-G-S

::::::::::::::::::::::::1
421

0
0

0
0

0
0

0
0

0000
\----/

SCSI Cable Connector

ill

L-_ _ _ _

L..-_ _ _

Spindle Synch Cable Connector
(top pin: SSREF, bottom: ground)
Terminator Enable
LED Connection (g: ground pin)

Act~~!~~ ~~=g~
Fault (F-G)

~~~~~v~~otect

Enable

SCSI ID
Reserved

Spinup Delay
(10 secs ~ 10)
Motor Start option enable
Parity check DISable
Reserved

Terminator Power Source Options
2

&

1

&

4 - Initiator supplies power over the SCSI Bus for terminators.
Drive supplies no terminator power.
2 - Drive supplies power for its own terminator resistor-pake
but not to SCSI Bus. This is the factory setting.

1 I< 3

AND - Drive supplies power for external terminator at end of the
2 I< 4
daisy chain. Ter1llinator resistor-paks must be removed.
Thie option is recommended only for last drive on daisy
chain.
ST410S00ND drives are shipped without terminators and have
empty ter1llinator sockets on the PCB. You must provide
termination resistors for these drives.

© CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 275

Corporate Sy'stems Center (408) 743·8787

SEAGATE ST41600N
a

0

a a

0

@~;~B
n a

p

00

T[
ill
421

some l6-pin configurations may not have these pins.

-HI L

.~---------------=====-=~ /-4-3-2-1-\
:: :SCSI:Cable:::::::::::::: :1~~~~2.r-

~=

@
I [
o

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ l~: ~

0

4 21M P

r=::=t r=::=t r=::=t
Terminator Resistor SIPS

II L':: ::~:";~."

----

---t

Power

10
~~
~i LJ--1
Terminator DIPS

Power

0

0

0

0

2-G-G-S
a I
00
P=W"~:::::::::::::::::::. :::::1 H " 1
0000
\----1

a a a 0 0

SEAGATE ST41200N

r
wl.:=I

This T-RES only on Differential model
(see below for T-RES descriptions)
Terminator Power Source (see below)-

Spindle Sync ,

SCSI Cable Connector
Master off/Slave on - Spindle Sync
Write Protect option enable
SCSI 10
Spinup Delay (10 secs * 10)
Motor Start option enable
Parity check DISable
Sweep Cycle enable

Terminator Power Source Options
2

&

1

&

4 - Initiator supplies power over the SCSI Bus for terminators.
Drive supplies no terminator power.
2 - Drive supplies power for its own terminator resistor-paks
but not to SCSI Bus. This is the factory setting.

1 & 3

De1.y { "

880 •

IDI

Parity option enable
Motor Start option enable
Drive ID's, ID 0 (none) i f only SCSI device

~::t~:~~~ ~~::~ ~~~~ ~~!v(l~::~t~~~t~ontal)

AND - Drive supplies power for external terminator at end of the
2 & 4
daisy chain. Terminator resistor-paks must be removed.
This option is recommended only for last drive on daisy
chain.
T-RES descriptions: ST41600N
ST41601N
ST41600ND
ST41601ND

1
2
2
2

DIP
SIPs
DIPs
DIPs

SEAGATE ST43400N

SEAGATE ST42000N

r

o 0 0 0

0

00

0

421

-

Power

SCSI Cable Connector
Master off/Slave on - Spindle Sync
Write Protect option enable
SCSI 10
Spinup Delay (10 secs * 10)
Motor Start option enable
Parity check DISable
Sweep Cycle enable

a 0 n 0 00

0

0

0

B

Terminator DIPgJ

~::::!:::::!:::::::::!.:::l

T[
ill

---l

Power

o·

0

0

0

~12--
If you

n(~ed

a manual for a difficult to find drive (including those not
listed in the jumpers section), try our automatic document printer. To
install the document printer, type:
HDBDOC
or select it from the Windows file manager. The document printer
includes manuals for CSC products, including the disk drives sold by

esc.
DISCLAIMER
CSC, DTC, Maxtor Corporation, and Seagate Technology expressly
disclaim any liability which filay arise from the use of the software
@

CSC 1996

Hard Drive Bible 313

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

included with the Hard Drive Bible. To the best of our knowledge, this
software is workable and free of any major bugs, but no guarantee of
performance of fitness for any particular application is made. This software is provided free of charge, but may not be duplicated without consent as listed below.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE
These programs are copyrighted by their respective authors and may
not be reproduced in any form without proper written consent. The
software enclosed is protected by US copyright law. Additional copyright and disclaimer notices may be contained in the files.
This list of the most commonly used CD-ROM files is provided by
Maxtor Corporation:
1ADAY10.ZIP
MAIN
116K 09/92 Run files daily, weekly, monthly
Runs files once a day, weekly, or on a certain day of the month.
2S0CKET.DOC
PCMCIA
2.7K 11/94 Socket App for >= 10MB flashcards
2-Socket application for 10MB or greater Flashcards. This docu
ment is in WS for Windows 2.0 Format.
3DRVS260.ZIP
MAIN
73K 11/93 Driver for 3 drives in one system
Device driver to add a 2nd 16bit HDD interface to your DOS AT
(286+) system. Windows compatible.
Shareware, version 2.60 by Dustbowl Designs
4DRVU100.ZIP
MAIN
32K 11/93 Inquiry utility for up to 4 drives
Inquiry for drives on both primary and secondary drive ports.
Shareware, V1.0 by Dustbowl Designs.
4SPD100.ZIP
MAIN
64K 11/93 Graphical HDD data transfer rate test utility
Graphical Hard Drive Test utility.
Shareware, V1.0 by Dustbowl Designs
7000LLF .EXE
MAIN
47K 03/967000 A series Low Level Format program
Self-extracting zip fue.
314 Hard Dr'lve Bible

© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

7000LLF.EXE
MAIN
47K 03/96 7000A series Low Level format program.
Self-extracting zip fue.
ACCULOG.1XT
3RDPARTY
5.9 110/93 Acculogic IDE controller card docu1nentation.
Al\lIGA.ZIP
MAIN
3.5K 12/93 Notes on installing IDE & SCSI's on Amiga
Amiga computer installation notes and tips.
AN001HP.DIOC
PCMCIA
15K 1MB Flashcard install into HP 95LX PC
1MB Flashcard installation procedure for HP 95LX Palmtop PC.
This document is in MS Word for Windows 2.0 format.
AN002HP.DOC
PCMCIA.
12K 11/94 2MB+ Flashcard install into PP 95LS PC
2MB thru 20MB Flashcard installation procedure for HP 95LX
Palmtop PC. This document is in MS Word forWindows 2.0 format.
AN003HP.DOC
PCMCIA
12K II/941MB Flashcard install into HP xOOLX PC
1MB Flashcard installation procedure for HP 100LX/200LX
Palmtop. This document is in MS Word for Windows 2.0 format
AN004HP.DOC
PCMCIA
10K 11/94 2MB+ Flashcard install into HP xOOLX PC
2MB thru 20MB Flashcard installation procedure for HP 100
LX/200LX Palmtop PC. This document is in MS Word for Windows
2.0 format.
ASPITOOL.ZIP
MAIN
2.4K 06/92 Tahiti Temp (TX-TEMP) /Scan
(SCANS The To Files (rx-TEMP/SCANSCSI) are to little tools to
check the temperature of a MaxOptix Tahiti Sub-System
(TX-TEMP) and Scanning all Host Adapters for SCSI-Devices
(SCANSCSI). All you need is an ASPI-DOS Driver installed for
each Host Adapter.
Christoph Kummer/datacomp ag/Switzerland

©

esc 1996

Hard Drive Bible 315

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

AT_V 1. ZIP
MAIN
11K 09/92 ASPI-TOOLS
ASPI-Tool contains some programs such as SCSISCAN,
UNITATTN.EXE,TX-TEMP.EX, FMT-512, FMT-1024. Please
put this file on the Banyon for Michael Davis, Maxtor UK.
AUTOCORE.EXE
MAIN
101K 02/95 Runs CORETEST in "automatic" mode. That is,
it executes Coretest several times changing bl size each time.
CORETESTTEST UTILIlY
BEEPCODE.DOC
MAIN
652 11/93 Beep error codes for AMI BIOS's
List of what errors the Beep codes stand for in the American
Megatrends International BIOS.
MAIN
BIOSBNC.ZIP
159K 08/93 BIOS Bench Mark
Maxtor's BIOS Benchmark Program. Sorry, no documents,
how to use it and interpretation of results is up to you.
OTT140.ZIP
MAIN
81K 10/93 Boot Mgt Pgm
Manages boot up environments, ie: different CONFIG.SYS and
AUTO EXEC. BAT
CACHE.EXE
MAIN
3.6K 08/93 Thrn 7000A CACHE on or off.
CARDl12.EXE
PCMCIA
49K 06/94 Cardlock - Lock access to MobileMax Drvs
Cardlock V1.12 Limits access to your MobileMax card with
single or multiple passwords.
CARDTALK.EXE
PCMCIA
618K 11/94 Cardtalk V2. 20.15 drivers for deskrunner
CardtalkV2.20.15 drivers for Maxtor's Deskrunner PC/AT
PCMCIA adapter.
Self-extracting ZIP file.
CLEANl12.ZIP
MAIN
271K 03/94 McAffee Virus Clean Vl12.

316 Hard Drive Bible

©

csc

1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

PCMCIA
COMPORT.DOC
4.2K 11/94 Deskrunner COM Port problem tips
Som(~ solutions for COM port problems encountered while
installing Deskrunner. This document is in M:S Word for
Windows 2.0 format.
CORETEST.EXE
MAIN
64K 05/88 CORETEST - Hard disk benchmark utility.
CT-303.EXE
PCMCIA.
944K 07/94 CardtalkV3.03 for Maxtor Deskrunner
Self-extracting ZIP file.
DBK310.ZIP
PCMCIA
1.1 05/95 Latest release of Desk Runner Drivers.
5/11/95
DESKRUNR.TXT
PCMCIA
4.7K 01/94 PC/AT Adapter for desktop computers.
DISABLE
MAIN
23K 10/93 MAC pgm. Make MXT drives MAC Compat.
Makes MXT-1240s & nlxt-540S1 Macintosh compatible by
disabling Unit Attention. MAC Pgm should have Extent of NIT!
DISK.lD
PCMCIA
63 07/94 Correct ID file for DRUNR303.EXE.
DMOS2INS.TXT
MAIN
4.4K 04/95 Installation procedure for Disk Manager and OS
Written by: David Meisner.
For r,eference only. Contact IBM for support.
DO-ONCI4.ZIP
MAIN
10K 10/92 Run a file once a day or week
Runs a file once a day or once a week on bootup, for instance;
CHKDSK 1st thing in the morning or a Virus Check every
:Monday.
DQWIK211..ZIP
MAIN
129K 08/94 DiskQwik v2.11 - D.Driver activates IDE block
mode transfer.

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DRS120.ZIP
MAIN
114K 02/92 Data Recovery Software. Reads BAD disks.
DRVSYS.TXT
PCMCIA
2.0K 11/94 Adjusting CardTalk Drv Letter Assignment
How to use DRIVER.SYS to reassign the drive letter for your
PCMCIA Hardrive in a DESKRUNNER PCMCIAAdapter.
DSKPDR.EXE
MAIN
69K 10/93 HDD Diagnostic Pgm V1.6 Self-extracting
Tests IDE drives, either destructive or non-destructive.
By Larry Clanton
Self-extracting Zip file.
DSK_APP.DOC
PCMCIA
5.2K 11/94 Deskrunner installation tips
Troubleshooting tips for installing MobileMax 1.8" hard drive
disks into Deskrunner PC/AT to PCMCIA adapter. This
document is in MS Word for Windows 2.0 format.
DUGIDE10.ZIP
MAIN
12K 01/93 Show the IDE disk info. Includes C source code.
DYNABOOT.ZIP
MAIN
32K 10/93 Boot Mgr Pgm
Boot up management, ie: different AUTOEXEC.BAT and
CONFIG.SYS flIes.
ESDI. ZIP
MAIN
13K 08/93 Spec & Jumpers for ESDI drives
Specifications & jumpers for all ESDI drives.
ESDIDISK.EXE
MAIN
63K 08/93 Compsurf Nove1l2.15C w/WD1007-9 Cdr
A version of "Compsurf" to initialize Maxtor ESDI drives for
Novell Versions 2.15 to 2.2 (use this instead of the Novell
supplied version of Compsurf). ESDI controllers ONLY!
ESTIM 11.ZIP
MAIN
22K 11/94 Estimate storage needs for back-up of files on
hard disk.

318 Hard Drive Bible

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FAQ20A.ZIP
MAIN
22K 07/92 Frequently Asked Questions about OS/2 v2.0
FBECCS.ZIP
MAIN
11K 10/93 FBE Config Control Sys V1.5
Boot manager prograrrl.
FIPS12.ZIP
MAIN
104K 11/94 :FIPS: Nondestructive partition split utility.
FLEXP300.Z][P
MAIN
217K 07/93 Flexiback: Plus:
Hard disk backup with compression.
FRE561.ZIP
MAIN
20K 01/94 Multi-drive disk space check info with graphic
display.
GEOCLOCK.ZIP
MAIN
103K 10/93 Colorful world clock/map
Shows world map with daylite/night time shadow.
GREENDRV.ZIP
MAIN
11K 04/94 To place 7000A drives in "sleep mode".
Programmable standby mode. Cause drive to spin down and
park ;after X amount of time with no activity. X = 20 sec. to
21.2 lminutes. Energy Star compiant,AKA Green PC. (Replaces
SPINDOWN.EXE).
Version 2.2 by Sean Dykstra
HIDDIR.ZIP
MAIN
45K 08/93 Creates and manipulates hidden Dir's.
Creates and manipulates Hidden directories under the MS/PC
DOS environlnent. Great for parents with curious kids, and
vice versa. Doesn't show up in DOS nor in Windows, but are
nonetheless still accessible. Source code included, Quick
Pascal 1.0
IDE.DOC
IDE
2.7K 01/94 Generic "J-IowTo" IDE installation
IDE Installation example.

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IDE.EXE
MAIN
59K 02/94 Self-Extracting ZIP of all IDE drives
Same as the IDE.ZIP file. All IDE drive specifications, jumpers,
and parameters.
IDE.ZIP
IDE
69K 09/94 Data on all Maxtor IDE drives
Specifications, parameters and jumper settings for Maxtor IDE
drives.
IDE.ZIP
MAIN
56K 02/94 Specs & Jumpers for all IDE Drives
Specifications & jumper settings for all IDE Drives.
IDEIDI50.ZIP
MAIN
25K 08/93 Displays info on IDE drives.
IDEINFI0.ZIP
MAIN
30K 08/94 Displays info on IDE drives, includingATA-2.
IDEINFO.ZIP
MAIN
3.8K 01/93 Excellent utility reads IDE firmware.
IDENTIFY .EXE
MAIN
27K 03/94 To identify IDE drives, Cyl, Hds, Sect.
Identify IDE drives, finds cylinders, heads, sectors per track
etc., also shows serial number.
IDE_CMOS.TXT
IDE
6.7K 09/94 Parameter listing for IDE drives
List of CMOS parameter settings for all IDE drives.
IDE_CMOS.TXT
MAIN
6.7K 09/94 CMOS Parameters for all IDE Drives
CMOS setup parameters for all Maxtor IDE drives.
IDE_CTLR.TXT
IDE
1.9K 09/93 Maxtor IDE adapter card
Jumper settings,ANSII drawing for Maxtor IDE adapter card.
LXTLLF .EXE
MAIN
37K 03/96 Low Level format program for LXT-xxxA drives.
Self-extracting file.
320 Hard Drive Bible

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IXTLLF.EXE:
IDE
37K 03/96 Low Level format program for LXT-xxxA drives.
Self-e:xtracting file.
MAX-AT. ZIP
MAIN
85K 10/93 Maxtor IDE test program
.Maxtor IDE drive test program.
MAXBLAST.EXE
MAIN
354K 05/95 Ontrack's Disk Manager v6.03.05
Max-Blast software is required to install drives larger than 528
megabytes on a standard IDE interface or on an older BIOS.
NOTE: *If you are using an EIDE interface this file is NOT
required, use the driv{~rs provided with your interface for
corf(~ct installation.
* Providing your BIOS or interface support LBA.
USE)~GE: MAXBLAST-d
This creates the sub-directory for OS/2
MAXOPTIC"ZIP
MWN
815 05/93 Diagnostic Utility for Maxoptic Products
Read, write, compare, low-level format any Maxoptics products Tahiti, RXT, etc.
MAXTEST.Z,IP
MAIN
131 K 10/93 Test/Modify SCSI Drives
This is a test program for MAXTOR SCSI drives. This program
must: be used with the Adaptec 154XX Or Bustek 54XX. For
more information on this program call Tech Support at
1-800-2MAXTOR. (If you don't have PKZIp, DI, MAXTESTS.EXE)
MAXTESTS.EXE
MAIN
134K 10/93 MAXTEST (Self-extracting ZIP)
To rnodify SCSI drive data table (capacity, bytes per sector, etc).
Must be used with and Adaptec 154X controller (or compatible).
Self-(~xtracting Zip file.
MINISCRB.ZIP
MAIN
56K 04/94 Text file on all MiniScribe drives
Cov(~rs all MiniScribe drives. May not cover all jumpers tho!
Call 800-262-9867, Option 3 for FAX info Miniscribe jumper
setting info.
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MXLINIT.EXT
PCMCIA
21K 03/94 Initialize MobileMAX 105MB Drive
To initialize the MobileMAX CMXL-I05) PCMCIA drive.
MXTA_53.EXE
MAIN
41K 03/94 MXT540A/AL Firmware Rev 5.3
MXT540A/AL Firmware Rev 5.3 code.
MXTA_54.EXE
MAIN
40K 03/94 MXT540A/AL Firnlware Rev 5.3
Firmware Upgrade for MXT_540AT Drive. Use only if you
have a problem, or it is recommended by a technician.
Self-extracting ZIP file.
MXT~55.EXE

MAIN
40K 03/94 MXT 540A/AL Finnware Rev 5.5
Firmware Upgrade for MXT-540AT Drive. Use only if you
have a problem, should be recommended by a technician.
Self-extracting ZIP file.

MXTA_60.EXE
MAIN
41K 03/94 MXT 540A/AL Finnware Rev 6.0
Firmware Upgrade for MXT-540AT Drive. Use only if you have a
problem, or it is recommended by a technician.
Self-extracting ZIP file.
MXTLLF.EXE
MAIN
30K 04/96 Low Level Format FOR MXT6540A/AL ONLY"M
Self-extracting zip file.
MXTLLF.EXE
IDE
30K 04/96 Low Level Format FOR MXT6540A/AL ONLY
Self-extracting zip file
MAIN
MXT_I-5.ZIP
205K 01/94 MXT·540/1240S Firmware Upgrade to V1.5
MXT-540S/SL MXT-1240S Firnlware upgrade Version 1.5.
MAIN
MXT_SPIN.ZIP
175 04/94 MXTxxxxS Spinup delay program
Spinup delay modification for MXT1240S & MXT540S/SL
drives. For use if you don't have a big enough power supply
to power more than one SCSI drive up at a time. Inserts a 11-13
second spinup delay between drives.
322 Hard Drive Bible

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()MNIBK.D<)C
PCMCIA
4.0K 11/94 l\1XL install tips for HP OmniBook300/430 into
HP C)mniBook ~~00/430 laptop systems.
This document is in MS Word for Windows 2.0 format.
()NBOOT.ZIP
M[AlN
5.4K 10/93 Control autoexec program executions
Have AUTO EXEC programs run daily, on Warmboot only, or on
Coldboot only.
PCMCIA
()S2IBM75.DOC
6.6K 11/94 l\1XL install for IBM Thinkpad 750 - OS/2
Tips for MXL drive install into IBM Thinkpad 750 using
OS/2. This document is in MS Word for Windows 2.0 format.
()S2TOSH.DOC
PCMCIA
7.1K 11/94 MXL install tips for Toshiba - OS/2
Configuration of MXL hard drive in Toshiba T4500,T4600,
T4700 systems running OS/2 ver 2.1. This document is in
MS ~Vord for Windows 2.0 format
PARKIT.ZIP
MAIN
9.4K 09/92 HDD Head park pgm
Hard Disk Head parking utility VI. 0 by Andrew Appel.
PART .ZIP
MAIN
23K 01/94 Provides HD partition table & controller info.
PC-PARK. ZIP
MAIN
1.1 K 09/92 Head Parking Pgm from PC Mag
PC Magazine HDD head parking program.
PCMATA.SYS
18K 04/95

MAIN

PCMCIA.EXE PCMCIA
9.0K 01/94 Se]f-Extract file of all PCMCI devices
Self-extracting ZIP file of all PCMCIA devices (MobileMax,
MobileMax Flash, DeskRunner)
PCMCIA.ZIP
PCMCIA
6.0K 01/94 ZIP file of all PCMCIA devices.
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PKUNZIP .EXE
MAIN
28K 03/93 PKUNZIP.EXE V2.04G
PKUNZIPV2.04G 2.1.93.
PKZ204G.EXE
MAIN
197K 03/93 Self-extracting PKZIP V2.04G 2/1/93
PKZIP V2.04G 2/1/93 self-extracting file. Contains PKZIp,
PKUNZIp, etc.
PLUGNGO.TXT
3RDPARTY
1.2K 05/94 Plug N Go External Parallel IDE Adapter
Adapter to allow use of a I" high 3.5" IDE drive in an external
cabinet w/power supply, IDE to Parallel adapter and software to
install.
PRESZII0.ZIP
MAIN
58K 12/94 The Partition Resizer.
Safe HD repartitioning.
QDPMII0l.ZIP
MAIN
70K 03/93 QuarterDeck DOS Protected Mode Interface
DOS Protected Mode Interface VO.9 by QuarterDeck. A
companion to QEMM386. Allows PKZIP/UNZIP to use EMS/UMB
memory and speed up execution dramaticly! ZIP'd w/V2.04G.
MAIN
QINF042.ZIP
55K 10/93 Quick Info, on Drives, CPU, Speed, etc
Nice display of Drives with usage and space left, CPU type,
speed, etc.
MAIN
RDP391.LHA
98K 05/93 Amiga IDE read multiple ftx V3.91
Latest version of RDPREP for Amiga. Fixes read multiple
problems by informing the Anliga to only use 255 sector
blocks instead of 256. This keeps the data intact.
REBOOTER.ZIP
MAIN
3.6K 10/93 How to build an auto-builder for a BBS.
How-to-text ftle. If your BBS hangs while no one is around,
build this device to automatically reboot the system.
RIPTMI53.ZIP
MAIN
584K 01/94 Ripterm v1.53
RIP graphics communication package. Try it on this BBS!
324 Hard Drive Bible

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R_UTILS.ZIP
3RDPARTY
110K 10/93 Reynolds Data Recovery Utility Demo.
SALES. ZIP
MAIN
I.5K 10/93 Maxtor Nat'l sales office listing
Maxtor Sales Office Information.
SCABV112.ZIP
MAIN
252K 03/94 McAfee vi.rus scanner (Feb 1994).
SCN-216E.ZJ[P
MAIN
;364K 02/95 VirusScan for DOS new version 2.1.5
(216)02/23/95 by McAfee, Inc.
Scans and cleans PC's/LAN's for known and new viruses.
Requires DOS 3.0+
SCOPE140.EXE
MAIN
99K 10/93 RS232 Data Analyzer Scope SelfExtracting
View RS232 data streams to analyze modem/comm problems.
V1.40
SCSLDOC
MAIN
1.7K 01/94 Generic "How To" SCSI Installation.
SCSI.DOC
SCSI
1.7K 01/94 Generic "How To" SCSI Installation.
SCSI installation example.
SCSI.ZIP
MAIN
205K 05/93 Specs & Jumpers for all SCSI Drives
Specifications & jumper settings for all SCSI Drives.
SCSLZIP
SCSI
205K 11/93 Specs & jumpers for all SCSI Drives.
SCSI2GO.DC)C
PCMCIA
3.2K 11/94 MXL install for FD SCSI2GO w /Deskrunner
Configuration of Future Domain SCSI2GO PCMCIA
Controller Kit with the Mobilemax Deskrunner. This document
is in ]\1S Word for Windows 2.0 format
SEEKTIME.TXT
MAIN
3.5K 08/93 How drive seek times are deternlined
Document explaining seektime measurment.
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SIDE3.TXT
IDE
1.8K 12/93 Acculogic sIDE-3 IDE Adapter card
IDE-3 Adapter. ANSII Drawing, jumpers, etc.
SMRTDTXT.ZIP
MAIN
9.4K 09/92 Text File:MS SMARTDRNE.SYS & DblBuffer
Text file from MicroSoft about using Smartdrive & Double
Buffering
SPINUP.EXE
MAIN
42K 05/93 For Panther drives to set Spinup option
For Panther PO-12S or PI-17S drives with "Origional"PCBs.
This program sets the Spinup Option to spin when power is
applied, or spin up by SCSI ID sequence, or spin up each
drive in 13 second intervals. Panther drives with "Common"
PCBs use jumpers and don't need this program.
STACK. ZIP
PCMCIA
177K 05/95 Stacker files, preloaded on flashcards.
TCAL

MAIN
24K 07/94 MXT-S Thermal Calib. on/off for MAC
For MXT-1240S & MXT-540SL Drives. For Macintosh computers
Turn TCAL on or off for data streaming. Caution! Let drive
"warm up" for about 1 hour before using. Do NOT leaveTCAL
disable for too long, or drive crash will result.

TCAL.EXE
MAIN
24K 07/94 Thrn MXT-S Thermal Calibration on/off
For MXT-1240S & MXT-540SL drives. Turn T-Cal on or off from
this program. Use with caution, let drive "warm up" for
leastone hour befor using. Leaving TCAL off too long (> 1 hr)
could crash the drive!!! Self-extracting zip file.
PCMCIA
TFFS325.ZIP
533K 04/95 True Flash Driver v3.2.05
USEAGE: PKUNZIPTFFS325.ZIP
MAIN
TIMEPARK.ZIP
8.9K 09/92 HDD timed head parking pgm
HDD head parking program, moves heads to parking zone after
selectable period of HDD inactivity.
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UNITATTN.EXE
MAIN
2.3K 0892 Checking UNIT-ATTENTION on SCSI Device
This program is for checking the Unit-Attention (enabled or
disabled) on every connected SCSI device supported by the
Adapltec-ASPI-Driver.
USABBS.ZIP
MAIN
72K 01/95 An extensive listing of USA BBS's!
USAFAX.ZIP
MAIN
48K 01/95 Over 100,000 FAX numbers! A must have!
UU520.ZIP
MAIN
32K 06/94 YYENCODE/UUDECODE for DOS V5.20
For ASCII encoding and decoding of binary files. Useful
for exchanging Jiles through Internet EMail attachments when
binary attachtnents won't work.
V10N04.ZIP
MAIN
61 K 10/93 PCMag 2/26/92 Incl. MBOOT Boot Manager Program
PC Magazine Vol 10, Number 4. Includes MB()OT boot manager
program.
VIRSIM2C.Z][P
MAIN
65K 11/94 Virus Simulator Ver 2C
Audit and demonstrate anti-virus protection.
Rosenthal Engineering's absolute neccessity for anyone serious
about virus defense, security and training. "Unreservedly
recofl1mended!" by COlmputer Virus Developments Quarterly.
Used in tests conducted by National Software Testing Labs for
Softw'are Digest and PC Digest. Written about in Computerworld,
Virus Bulletin,Virus News Int.,Telecomputing, etc.
WASTED10.ZIP
MAIN
28K ]l2/94 Reports disk space WASTED due to cluster size.
MAIN
789 011/94 Win forWkGrps Fast File Access "Fix"
If you're having problems with Windows for Workgroups,
"Fast File Access" not working or working slowly, try these
changes .....
WF'WIN5.ZIP
MAIN
952K 03/95 IBM Driver for OS/2 for drives larger than 528
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PCMCIA
WPAPERS.ZIP
33K 04/94 PCMCIA White Papers (about PCMCIA)
PCMCIA Whitepapers

328 Hard Drive Blbl.

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SYSTEM NOTES

se the following pages to enter data pertaining to your system.
This information may be required if you need to call a dealer for
technical assistance or if you have a system failure.

U

Computer
Make:

~_____ ~ _ ~ _______ ~__~____~~___ ~

_________ ~ __________________~___ _
Serial Number: __________ --_____ ~_________ -- ~ --

~Model:

Monitor
___________ ~ _________ _
_Model: ~~ ______ ~_~ _ _ - ___ -~~---~------Serial Number: _~ ____ ~ _______
~Make: ~

System BIOS
Make: ___________
Version: _________ ~________~______ ~_________~ ____ ~_

Motherboard
Make:-~-------------~~-­

Model:
Serial Number: ____________ ~ ______
Bus Speed: _____________
Wait States: _ __
Memory Installed:

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Floppy Drive A
Make: ~_~ ______
Model: _________________ ~__
Capacity: _______________________ ~ ____________ ~ ____~______~_ _ ~ ___________~_______
Serial Number:

Floppy Drive B
Make : ____________ ~ ___________
Capacity:
Serial Number: ___________________ ~ _____ ~ ______ _

Extended Floppy # 1
Make: _
Model:
Capacity: _
Serial Number:

Extended Floppy #2
Make:
Model:
Capacity:
Serial Number:

Hord Drive # 1
Make:
Model:
Capacity:
Serial Number:
Heads:
Cylinders:
Sectors per Track:

------------------------

Hord Drive #2
Make:
Model:
Capacity: _
Serial Number:
Heads:
Cylinders: _____ ____________ _____________________~_ ~____~ _______________~ ___________~__ _
Sectors per Track: __
330 Hard Drive Bible

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Tape Backup
Make:
Model: ---- ----~-----~~----- ---Capacity: ------~Serial Number:~----------~--------You tuay use the spaces below to paste a printout of your
AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files.

AUTOEXEC.BAT

CONFIG.SYS

Software
Program: -~-~ ~-----------------------­
Version: --~--------Serial Number:-------- ------------©

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Program:
Version:
Serial Number:

------ --------

-

----------------------

Program:_
Version:
Serial Number:
Program:
Version:
Serial Number:
Program:
Version:
Serial Number:
Program:
Version:
Serial Number:
Program: __________________ _
Version:
Serial Number:
Program: _
Version:
Serial Number:
Program: _____ __
Version:
Serial Number:

332 Hard Drive Bible

-----------------------------

-

------

---- --- ---

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INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS

~)

the best of our knowledge these

.1 numbers are correct; but CSC can-

not assume liability for their use.
#1 Components,lnc ...... (800)424-6780
1776Inc ......................... (310)215-1776
Tech SuppOtt............ (31 0)215-1776
3COM Corporation ....... (800)876-3266
3D Visions-Stanford ........ (800)729-4723
3E Corporation .............. (800)682-5175
3G GrapWcs ................... (800)456-0234
Tech Support ........... (206)774-3518
3M Company. ................. (512)984-3897
~~M Corporation ............. (800)362-3456
Tech Support.. .......... (800)362-3455
3M Data Produc:ts-CA...... (800)328-9438
3M Data Produc:ts-MN.....(612)736-1866
3M Electrical Prods-TX ... (800)225-5373
3PM Planet,lnc .............. (319)393-7932
7-Sigma........................... (612)721-4280
A Bit Better Sfu;vr Publ..(206)627-6111
A C Technology.............. (714)228-1633
A Cad-Group .................. (404)315-8901
AJ Computer Supplies .. (714)895-5802
A-Comm Electronics ...... (201)334-3017
A-Matic International. .... (818)855-8888
A.C. Powerline ............... (716)288-6870
A.J. Post........................... (508)393-7192
A4Tech Corporation ...... (714)468-0071
AA Computech .............. (800)360-6801
lech Support. ............ (805)257-6804
AAA. International Co .... (714)951-0747
Aadtech Micro Sys ......... (415)659-0756
AamazingTechnologies.(714)255-1688
ABA Systems/USA,lnc ... (801)561-8681
AbacusAccounting Sys .(403)489-5994
Abacus Concepts ........... (800)666-7828
Tech Suppo:rt ............ (510)540-1949
Abacus Concepts ........... (800)666-7828
Abacus Soware ............ (800)451-4319
Abaton-Everex Systems .(800)821-0806
Tech Support ............ (800)821-0806
Abbott Systems .............. (800)552-9157
Tech Support.. .......... (914)747-4171
ABC Computer Corp ..... (310)325-4005
ABC Products ................. (714)373-9898
© CSC 1996

ABC Systems & Devel. ... (508)463-8602
Abekas Video Systems .... ( 415)369-5111
Aberdeen ........................ (800)552-6868
Tech Support............(213)725-3360
ABL Electronics Corp .... (410)584-2700
Able Soft .......................... (800)545-9009
Above Dariana SWr ....... (800)892-9950
Above Soware .............. (714)851-2283
Tech Support ............ (714)851-2283
Abra MacDabra Swr.... (408)737-9454
Abaracadata .................... (800)451-4871
Tech Support............ (503)342-3030
Abrams Creative Serv......(818)343-6365
ABS CmptrTechnology.. (800)876-8088
Tech Support............ (800)876-8088
AC & DC ......................... (818)336-1388
ACC-Alamo City Cmptr.. (512)545-1010
ACC Microelectronics... (408)980-0622
Access Cmptr Compont.(800)332-3778
Tech Support ............ (214)380-8010
Access Technology; Inc .. (508)655-9191
Acco USA, Inc ................ (708)541-9500
Accolade ......................... (800)245-7744
Tech Support ............ (408)296-8400
Accts Microsystems ....... (206)643-2050
AcctonTechnology......... ( 408)452-4900
Tech Support............ (800)926-9288
Accufast Products .......... (800)447-9990
Acculogic ....................... (714)454-2441
Accurite Technologies ... ( 408)433-1980
Ace Soware Corp ........ (408)232-0300
Tech Support ............ (408)232-0303
Ace Technologoes, Inc ... ( 408)734-0100
........................................ (800)825-9977
Acecad Inc ..................... (800)676-4223
Tech Support ............ (408)655-9911
Acer America................... (800)848-2237
Acer Peripherals ............ (609)924-1153
AcerTechnologies Corp .(800)833-8241
AcWeva Computer......... (800)388-2918
Tech Support............ (408)894-0200
Aci Us, Inc ...................... ( 408)252-4444
Tech Support............ (408)252-4444
ACL Inc .......................... (800)782-8420
ACM, Inc ........................ (800)342-6626
Acme Electric Corp ....... (800)325-5848

Accoustic Research ....... (800)225-9847
AcrossTheOcean Import .(415)660-7804
Action Communications.. (612)636-3559
Action Electronics Co ... (818)813-1500
Action Multimedia......... (800)322-3132
Action Plus Soware ..... (801)255-0600
Tech Support............. (801)255-0600
Activisilin ........................ (31 0)207-4500
........................................ (310)479-5644
Tech Support............. (310)479-5644
Actix Systems,lnc .......... (800)820-1276
Acucobol, Inc ................. (800)262-6585
Acumos,lnc .................... ( 415)570-0535
Acxiom Corporation ..... (501 )329-6836
AD Costas Projects ........ (415)462-3111
Tech Support ............ (415)426-5040
Ad Lib, Inc ...................... (800)463-2686
Tech Support ............ ( 418)529-6252
Ad Lib Multimedia,lnc .. (418)529-9676
Ad Research ................... (800)926-7365
Tech Support ............ (800)873-7365
Adaptec .......................... (408)945-8600
Adaptive Soware .......... (714)729-3180
Adaptive Technologies ... (805)448-8832
ADDA Technologies ....... (51 0)770-9899
Addison-Wesley Publ.. .....(800)447-2226
ADDS .............................. (800)645-6504
AddTech Group ............. (510)623-7583
AdtronTechnologyCo .... (510)770-0120
Allegro MicroSystems .... (508)853-5000
ADI Systems, Inc ............ (800)228-0530
ADllExecufold............... (209)683-2126
ADIC. .............................. (800)336-1233
Adisoft, Inc ..................... (510)483-5605
AdjileSystems ................. (800)347-7621
Adobe Systems, Inc ........ (800)447-3577
Tech Support - MAC.(408)986-6500
Tech Support - pc. ... (408)986-6530
AdRem Technologies ..... ( 416)886-7899
Adtran/P1T. .................... (205)971-8000
Adv. Instit'l Mgmt. SWr.. (516)496-7700
Advanced Cmptr Cable.(800)626-3608
AdvancedCmptrInnov.... (716)383-1939
AdvancedCmptrTech ..... (212)679-4040
Advanced Digital Info .... (800)336-1233
Advanced Digital Sys ...... (800)888-5244
Hard Drive Bible 333

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Tech Support ............ (800)888-5244
Advanced Electr. Supp .... (800)446-2377
Advanced Gravis BC ...... (800)663-8558
Tech Support............ (604)431-1807
Advanced Hrdwr Arch .... (208)883-8000
Tech Support............ (208)883-8001
Advance Input Devises .(208)765-8000
Adv. Integration Rsrch ... (408)428-0800
Advanced Logic Rsrch ... (800)444-4257
Tech Support............ (714)458-1952
Advanced Matrix Tech ... (800)637-7878
Adv. Micro Cmptr Sys .... (800)866-0829
Tech Support ............ (302)368-9300
Adv. Micro Devices ........ (408)732-2400
Adv. Micro Technology... (714)598-6124
Adv. Microcmptr Sys ...... (305)784-0900
Advanced Network. ....... ( 408)779-2209
Advanced Software ........ (800)346-5392
Tech Support ............ (408)733-0745
Adv.Tech & Sevices ....... (310)676-0487
Tech Support............ (310)676-0487
Advanced Technology.... ( 408)942-1780
Advanced Vision Rsrch .. (800)544-6243
Tech Support ............ (800)544-6243
Adweeks Mktg Cmptrs .. (800)722-6658
AEC Management.. ........ (800)346-9413
Tech Support ............ (703)450-2318
AEC Sofuvare ................. (800)346-9413
Tech Support............ (703)450-2318
AER Energy Resources .. (404)433-2127
Aeronics ......................... (512)258-2303
AESp, Inc ......................... (305)944-7710
Aetech ............................ (619)755-1277
Mfmity............................ (800)367-6771
Tech Support ............ (303)442-4840
After HolU'S Sftwr-Aldus ...(619)558-6000
Tech Support ............ (619)558-6000
AgData ............................ (209)784-5500
AGELogic,Inc ................. (619)455-8600
Agfa Compugraphics ..... (800)424-8973
Tech Support............ (800)937-7787
Agfa Division .................. (914)365-0190
Agfa Division .................. (800)424-8973
Ags Computers .............. (908)654-4321
Agsadivision ................... (508)658-5600
Ahead Systems, Inc ........ (510)623-0900
Al Today......................... (304)%5-5548
Aicom Corporation........ (408)453-8251
Aim Motherboard Corp .(800)786-2566
Aim Tech ........................ (603)883-0220
Tech Support............ (603)883-0200
AIQ Systems ................... (800)332-2999
Tech Support ............ (702)831-2999
Aitech InternationaL ...... (800)882-8184
AJM, Inc .. "....................... ( 408)980-8631
AJS Publishing ................ (310)215-9145
Al Expert Magazine ....... (415)905-2200
Alacrity Systems, Inc ...... (908)813-2400
Aladdin Sftwr Security. .. (516)424-5100
Aladdin Systems ............. (408)761-6200
Tech Support ............. (408)761-6200
Alamo Components ...... (800)890-8900
Aldridge Company,The. (800)548-5019
Aldus Corp. (Adobe) ...... (800)628-2320
Tech Support ............ (800)628-2320
Alexander Batteries ....... (515)423-8955
334 Hard Drive Bible

Alf Products, Inc ............ (800)321-4668
Alia Power, Inc .............. (818)937-6529
Alias Research ................ (800)267-8697
Tech Support............ (800)267-8697
Aiisa Systems .................. (800)992-5472
Alki Software Corp ........ (206)286-2600
All Computers ................ (800)387-2744
Tech Support............ (416)960-0111
All Electronics ................ (818)904-0524
Allegro Microsystems .... (508)853-5000
Allen Communication ... (801)537-7800
Allied Cmptr Services .... (319)378-1383
Allied Telesis (AT!) ......... (800)424-4284
Tech Support............ (206)821-2056
AllMicro .......................... (800)653-4933
Alloy Cmptr Products .... (508)486-0900
Tech Support............. (508)486-0900
Allsop, Inc ....................... (206)734-9090
Allstate Office Supply. ... (714)692-9100
Alltech Electronics ......... (714)543-50 11
Alltel Corporation.......... (216)650-7000
Almo Distributing .......... (303)595-7000
Tech Support ............ (617)272-3680
Alpha Systems Lab, Inc .. (714)252-0117
Alpha Teclmologies ........ (206)647-2360
Alphatronix .................... (800)849-2611
Alpha Wire Corp ............ (906)925-8000
Alps America.................. (800)950-2577
Tech Support ............ (800)950-2577
ALR ................................. (714)581-6770
Alsoft ............................... (800)257-6381
Tech Support............ (713)353-1510
Alsys ............................... (617)270-0030
Altec L'lnsing .................. (800)648-6663
Tech Support ............ (800)648-6663
Altec Lansing Consumer... (800)648-6663
Tech Support ............ (800)648-6663
Altech, Inc ...................... (314)576-5100
Alternative Cmptr Prod.... (805)522-4984
Altex Electronics-Austin.... (512)832-9131
Altex Elect.ronics-Corp..... (512)655-8882
Altex Electronics-Dallas... ,(214)386-8882
Altex Elcctronics-SanAnt..(800)531-5369
Altima Systems, Inc ........ (800)356-9990
Altos Computer Sys ....... (800)258-6787
Altron, Inc ...................... (800)678-8802
Altsys .............................. (214)680-2060
Tech Support............ (214)680-2093
Altus Systems ................. (800)522-5887
Tech Support ............ (909)598-7769
Aluminum Filter Co ....... (805)684-7651
Alunmi Computer Grp .. (800)387-9785
Always Technologies .....(818)597-1400
Tech Support ............ (818)597-9595
Alysis .............................. (800)825-9747
Tech Support............ (800)825-9747
Alywa Computer Corp .. (713)440-1393
AM Electronics (AME) ... (408)955-9666
Ama Inc .......................... (416)897-2153
Amatix, Inc ..................... (800)869-0744
Amax Applied Tech ........ (818)300-8828
Amax Engineering Corp.. (800)888-2629
AMAZE!-Delrina Sftwr.... (800)367-4802
Tech Support............ (416)441-4628
AMBI Circuit Board Elec ... (800)879-2624
Ambra Computer Corp ... (800)252-6272

Amcom Corporation..... (800)320-4723
Amdahl Corp ................. (800)538-8460
Amdek Corporation ...... (800)800-9973
Tech Support............ (800)800-9973
AME, Inc ......................... (408)955-9666
AMEC Cmptr Eronom ... (800)759-5060
American Grp. Cmptr.... (800)288-8025
Tech Support............ (818)765-3887
American Business Sys .. (508)250-9600
American Cmptr Engnrs ..(619)587-9002
American Cmptr Exprss.. (800)533-4604
American Cmptr Hrdwr... (800)447-1237
American Cmptr Repair. .. (211)539-1010
American Cmptr Rsrces... (203)380-4600
American Covers, Inc .... (800)228-8967
Tech Support............ (800)228-8987
American Cybernetics ... (800)221-9280
American Databankers .....(800)323-7767
American Digicom Corp.. (408)245-1580
American Digital. ........... (617)449-9292
American Ed. Service ..... (703)256-5315
American Elect. Heater. .... (313)875-2502
American Enhance,Inc .... (510)438-9180
Amer. Financial Equip .. (513)436-0110
American Flmdware ...... (800)551-4458
Amer. Healthware Sys .... (718)435-6300
American Inkjet Corp .. (508)667-0600
Amer. Laubscher Corp ...(516)694-5900
Amer. Magnetics Corp ... (213)775-8651
American Mngmt Sys .... (800)826-4395
American Microsys ........ (800)648-4452
Amer. Nat. Standard Inst...(212)642-4900
American On-Line .......... (919)942-0220
Tech Support ............ (919)942-0220
Amer. Power Conversion .(800)800-4272
Tech Support............ (800)800-4272
American ProImage ....... (310)949-9797
American Reliance, Inc .. (800)654-9838
American Rsrch. Corp .... (800)423-3877
American Ribbon ........... (800)327-1013
American Serv. Resource ..(800)333-1157
Amer. Small Bus. Cmptr. ... (918)825-4844
Tech Support............ (918)825-4844
American Software, Inc.... ( 404)261-4381
Tech Support............ (404)261-4381
Amer. SlUltek Int'l Corp .... (800)888-7813
American Systec Corp ... (714)993-0882
American Trader's Post..(301)695-8438
Ameritech ...................... (312)750-5000
Ames Supply Company.(800)323-3856
Aemteck, Inc .................. (212)935-8640
Amherst Inti Corp ......... (800)547-5600
Amita Corporation ......... (512)218-8857
Amkty Systems, Inc ........ (714)727-0788
AMP. ................................ (717)564-0100
........................................ (800)522-6752
Ampex ........................... (800)262-6739
Amphenol Corporation.(203)281-3200
Amplicom ...................... (619)693-9127
Ampro Computers, Inc .. (800)966-5200
Amprobe Instrument..... (516)593-5600
Amptron International. .(818)912-5789
AMR ................................ ( 408)732-2400
........................................ (800)538-8450
AmRam .......................... (408)559-0603
Amrel Technology, Inc ... (818)575-5110
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
AMRIS Training Systems.(800)842-3693
AMS ................................. (305)784-0900
......................... ,.............. (800)886-3536
Amstrad Inc ..... ,.............. (800)999-0174
Amtec Cmptr Services ... (515)270-2480
AmTech Organiization .... (617)344-1 550
Amtron Inc ...................... (213)721-1717
Anacapa Micro Prods .... (805)339-0305
Anacom General Corp .. (714)774-8080
Anacomp, Inc .. ".............. (317)844-9666
Analog & Digital Periph.(513)339-2241
Analog Devices, Inc ....... (800)426-2564
Analog Technology Ctr.. (603)673-0404
AnalogTechnology Corp.(818)357-0098
Analogic Corporation.... (800)343-8333
Analysts Int'I. Corp ......... (800)328-9929
Analytical Software ........ (206)362-2855
AnaTek Corporation ...... (800)999-0304
Ancot Corporation ......... ( 415)322-5322
Anderson Bell ................. (303)940-0595
Andgate Systems Corp ... (714)468-3084
Ando Corporation ......... (301)294-3365
Andor Systems, Inc ........ (408)996-9010
Andrew Corpo:ration ..... (310)320-7126
Andromeda Research.... (513)831-9708
Tech Suppo:rt.. .......... (513)831-7562
Andromeda Systems ...... (818)709-7600
Angelica Uniform Grp ... (800)222-3112
Angia Commmllcations.(801)371-0488
ANGOSS Software ......... (416)593-1122
AnixTech Corporation.. (408)737-9935
Anixter Brothers, Inc ..... (708)677-2600
Anjene IntemationaI. ..... (908)704-0304
Ann Arbor Software ....... (800)345-6777
Annabooks ...... ,.............. (800)462-1042
Answer Computer......... (800)677-2679
AnswerSet Corporation .. (408)996-8683
Antec, Inc ....................... (510)770-9590
Tech Support............ (510)770-1200
Antex Electronics corp .. cnO)532-3092
Anthem Technology Sys. (800)359-3580
Anthes Universal,Inc ..... (800)828-0308
Anthro Co ....................... (800)325-3841
Anvil Cases ..................... (800)359-2684
AOC Int'l (USA)Ltd........ (800)433-7516
Aox Inc ........................... (800)232-1269
Tech Support ............ (800)726-0269
Apex Computt:r............. (800)654-8222
Apex Data ........................ (800)841-2739
Tech Support............ (800)841-2739
Apex Software ............... (800)858-2739
Tech Support ............ (412)681-4343
Apian Softwart: ............... (800)237-4565
Aplus Computer............. (800)886-2671
Tech Support............ (800)886-35:~6
APM Tedmologies ......... (404)476-3596
Appian............................ (800)422-7369
Appian Technology, Inc .(408)730-5400
Apple Computer, Inc ..... (800)776-2333
Tech Support ............ (800)767-2775
Applications Techniques.(800)433-5201
Tech Support ............ (506)433-8464
Applied Bus. Technology.(212)219-8945
Applied Cmptl' Servs ..... (800)525-2400
Applied CmptrTech ...... (214)271-6550
Applied Conce:pts, Inc ... (800)393-2277
©

esc

1996

Applied Data Comm ...... (714)731-9000
Tech Support............ (800)422-3635
Applied Design Co ........ (612)378-0094
Applied Instruments ...... (5 10)490-7117
Applied Magnetics Corp.(800)328-5640
Applied Microsystems ... (800)426-3925
Applied Optical Media.. (800)321-7259
Tech Support ............ (800)321-7259
Applix, Inc ...................... (508)870-0300
Tech Support............ (800)827-7549
Appoint .......................... (800)448-1184
Tech Support ............ (800)448-1184
APPRO International ..... (408)985-5359
Tech Support........... "(408)448-6093
Approach Software-Lotus ..(800)277-7622
Tech Support ............ (508)988-2500
Apricom ......................... (619)271-4880
APS Packaging Systems .. (201)575-1040
APS Technologies ........... (800)235-2753
Aptech Systems .............. (800)443-3732
Aquidneck Sys. Int'l.. ...... (401)295-2691
AR Industries (CP+) ....... (800)274-4277
Tech Support ............ (800)274-4277
Arabesque Software ....... (800)457-4243
Tech Support............ (206)885-0559
Arbor Image Corp .......... (313)741-8700
Arche Technologies ........ (5 10)623-8100
Tech Support............ (800)322-2724
Archive Corporation ...... (714)890-8602
Archive Sftwr-Conner.... (800)821-8782
Tech Support ............ (800)227-6296
Archive Technology........ (800)537-2724
ArchtekAmerica Corp ... (818)912-9800
Arco Electronics, Inc ..... (305)925-2688
Arcom Electronics, Inc .. ( 408)452-0678
AreaTV & Computers ... (814)453-3918
Areal Technology, Inc ..... ( 408)436-6800
Tech Support ............ ( 408)436-6843
ARES Microdevelpmnt ... (800)322-3200
Ares Software .................. (800)783-2737
Tech Support ............ (415)578-9090
Arion Technologies, Inc .. (203)775-6939
Aris Entertainment......... (310)821-0234
Arista Enterprises ........... (800)274-7824
Tech Support ............ (800)274-7824
Aristo Computers, Inc ... (800)327-4786
Aristosoft, Inc .................. (800)338-2629
Arity................................ (800)722-7489
Arix Corporation ........... (408)432-1200
ARK Multimedia Publ.." .(804)220-4722
ArkayTechnologies, Inc .. (800)786-2419
Arkenstone Inc ............ ".(408)752-2200
Arkwright Inc ................. (800)548-5 105
Arlington Cmptr Prods .. (800)548-5105
Tech Support............ (708)228-1470
Arlington Elect.Whlsale .. (703)524-2412
Amet Corporation .......... (800)377-6686
Tech Support.......... ". (800)366-8844
Aropa Corporation ......... (408)734-2001
Array Analysis ............... ". (800)45 1-85 14
Arrow Electronics, Inc ... (800)932-7769
Arrowfield Int'l, Inc ....... (714)669-0101
Ars Nova Software ......... (800)445-4866
Tech Support ............ (206)889-0927
Attek Cmptr Systems ..... (5 10)490-8402
Attful Applications ......... ( 416)920-7395

Arthur Anderson & Co .. (800)458-8851
Arthur Dent Associates .. (508)858-3742
Articulate Systems ......... (800)443-7077
Tech Support............ (617)935-2220
Artisoft ............................ (800)846-9726
Tech Support ............ (602)670-7000
Artist Graphics ............... (800)627-8478
Artnet InternationaL ...... (203)348-1141
Asante Technologies ...... (800)662-9686
Tech Support............ (800)662-7464
ASCII Group, Inc.,The ... (301)718-2600
Ascom Timeplex, Inc ..... (800)669-2298
ASD Software, Inc .......... (900)624-2594
Tech Support............ (900)624-2594
Asean CmptrTechn ........ (909)598-2828
Tech Support............ (909)598-5498
Ashby Industries, Inc ..... (405)722-1705
Ashton-Tate (Borland) .... ( 408)431-1000
Asia Communications .... (5 14)434-9373
Asia Source ..................... (5 10)226-8000
Tech Support ............ (510)226-8878
Asian Computer Corp ... (818)575-5271
Asian Micro Sources ...... (5 10)376-9111
AsianSource Cmptr Prod.(708)475-1900
Asiatek Inc ...................... (818)333-3802
AS] Support Services ..... (800)262-0089
Ask Computer Systems .(415)969-4442
Ask-Me Information Ctr.(612)531-0603
AskSam Systems ............. (800)800-1997
ASP Cmptr Products ...... (800)445-6190
Tech Support ............ (408)746-2965
Aspect Telecomm ........... (800)541-7799
Aspen Imaging Int'I.. ..... (800)955-5555
Assoc. For Cmpt'g Mach.. (212)869-7440
Assoc. Data Services ....... (800)772-9812
Assoc. Distr. Logistics ..... (800)443-3443
Associated Research ...... (800)858-8378
Associates Cmptr Supply .. (718)543-3364
Assoc. of Shareware Prof.(317)322-2000
AST Computer............... (800)876-4278
AST Research, Inc .......... (800)876-4278
Astea International.. ....... (617)275-5440
Astec Co ......................... (201)595-7001
Astec Standard Power.... (619)757-1880
Astra Computer Prods ... (619)278-2682
Astro Memory Prods ...... (800)652-7876
Astrocom Corporation .. (612)227-8651
Astrotech Int'l Corp ....... (412)391-1896
Asymetrix ....................... (206)637-1500
AT &T Paradyne ............ (800)482-3333
At&T ............................... (201)331-4134
AT&T Capital Corp ........ (800)874-7123
AT&T Computer Sys ...... (800)247-1212
AT&T Lang. line Serv.......(800)752-6096
AT&T Microelectronics. (800)372-2447
AT&T Natl Parts Sales Ctr ..(800)222-7278
AT&T/NCR Crisis Mgmt..(800)626-3495
Atari Corporation ........... (800)443-8020
Atech Software ............... (818)765-5311
Aten Research, Inc ......... (800)755-0561
ATG Cygnet .................... (800)729-4638
Athana Inc ...................... (800)421-1591
ATI Technologies ............ ( 416)882-2600
ATI Technologies, Inc ..... (800)955-5284
ATI Technologies, Inc ..... ( 416)882-2600
Atkins/.Tones Cmptr Serv.(714)953-4351
Hard Drive Bible 335

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Atlantic Cmptr Prods ..... (800)245-2284
Atlantic Inc ..................... (31 0)273-3163
Atlantic Scientific Corp. (800)544-4737
Atlantis Laser Center...... (800)733-9155
Atlas Business Solutions .. (708)208-1373
Atlas Micro Distributing.. (310)530-6300
Atmel Corporation ......... ( 408)441-0311
Atrix International Inc ...(800)222-6154
Attachmate Corporation.(800)426-6283
Attain .............................. (617)776-1110
Attitash Software ............ (800)736-4198
Attitude Inc .................... (714)680-8112
AlTO Technology, Inc ... (716)688-4259
Audio Digital Imaging .... (708)439-1335
Aurora Cmptr & Access .. (800)852-3344
Aunlm Software, Inc ...... (408)562-6370
Austek Microsystems ..... (408)968-8556
Austin Direct, Inc ........... (800)752-4171
Austin Marsh Comm ...... (416)840-7840
Auto Trol Technology..... (303)452-4919
AutoDesk Inc ................. (800)228-3601
Tech Support ............ (800)873-3375
Autodesk Retail Prods ... (800)228-3601
Tech Support............ (206)487-2934
Automap ......................... (800)440-6277
Tech Support. ........... (800)441-6277
Automated Crtrdge Lib .. (800)536-2251
Automated Design Sys ... (800)366-2552
Automated Tech. System..(516)231-7777
Automatic Data Process'g .(201)994-5000
Automatic TooVConnect.(800)524-2857
Automation Technology. .. (800)777-6368
Automatrix Inc ............... (508)667-7900
Automecha Ltd ............... (800)447-9990
AutoSoft, Inc ................... ( 404)594-8855
Autrec, Inc ...................... (919)759-9493
Autumn 100 Software .... (303)494-8865
Auva Computer, Inc ....... (714)562-6999
Ava Instnlmentation ...... (408)336-2281
Avalan Technology......... (800)441-2281
Avalon Hill Game Co ..... (410)254-9200
Avance Logic Inc ........... (510)226-9555
Avanpro .......................... (213)454-3866
Avant Industries, Inc ...... (818)330-0166
Avant-Garde Computing. (609)778-7000
Avantek Security............ (408)727-0700
Avantos Performance Sys .. (510)654-4600
Tech Support............ (510)654-4727
Avatar/DCA. ................... (800)348-3221
Tech Support ............ (404)740-0300
Avery Dennison............. (818)858-8214
Avery International. ....... (800)252-8379
Tech Support ............ (214)888-2699
Avery labeL .................. (800)252-8379
Tech Support ............ (214)888-2699
Avex Electronics Corp ... (800)877-7623
AVI Systems Inc ............. (510)535-1020
Avnet, Inc ....................... (516)466-7000
Avocet............................ (800)448-8500
Tech Support ............ (207)236-6010
AVR Technology Inc ...... (408)434-1115
Award Software, Ltd...... (415)968-4433
Tech Support............ (408)370-7979
AXA Corporation ........... (714)757-1500
Axelen Inc ...................... (206)643-2781
Axik Computer............... (408)735-1234
336 Hard Drive Bible

Tech Support ............ (408)735-1437
Axion .............................. (800)829-4664
Axis Communications ... (508)777-7957
Axonix Corporation ...... (800)866-9797
Axxion Group Corp ...... (800)828-6475
Axxis Software ............... (800)394-3549
Aydin Corporation ......... (215)657-7510
Az-Tech Software ........... (816)776-2700
Azerty Inc ....................... (800)888-8080
Tech Support............ (716)662-7616
Azure Technologies ........ (800)233-3800
B&B Electronics Mfg...... (815)434-0846
B&K Precision ................ (312)889-1448
B & C Microsytems ........ (408)730-5511
Babbages Inc .................. (800)288-9020
BackThnl Future Micro .. (20 1)644-9587
Baggerty &Assoc., Inc ... (808)875-2510
Baker & Taylor Aff. Label. .(800)775-4200
........................................ (415)721-3333
........................................ (415)392-4357
Tech Support ............ (415)721-3333
........................................ (415)392-4357
Baler Software ................ (800)327-6108
Tech Support............ (708)506-1770
Ball Aerospace ................ (505)298-5445
BaIt, Inc ........................... (817)697-4953
Banctec Inc .................... (800)527-5918
Banctec Service Corp .... (800)435-7832
Bandy Inc ....................... (214)272-5455
Banner Band ................... (800)333-0549
Banner Blue Software .... (510)794-6850
Tech Support............ (510)794-6850
Bantam Electronic Pub!.. (212)765-6500
Banyan Systems Inc ....... (508)898-1 000
Bar-Tec Inc ..................... (800)433-1409
Tech Support ............ (800)356-1695
Barbados Ind. Devel. ...... (212)867-6420
Barbey Electronics ......... (215)376-7451
Barcode Industries, Inc ... (301)498-5400
Tech Support ............ (301 )498-6498
Barouh Easton Ltd .......... (800)268-9955
Barrister Info. System ..... (716)845-5010
Barrons Educational Serv.(800)645-3476
Baseline Publishing ........ (901)527-2501
Tech Support ............ (901)527-2501
BASF ............................... (800)669-2273
Tech Support ............ (800)225-4350
Basic + Micro Products. (510)887-8186
Basic Computer.............. (216)873-1 000
Basic Needs .................... (800)633-3703
Tech Support ............ (800)633-3703
Basic Systems, Inc .......... (305)584-5422
Basmark. ......................... (216)621-7650
Battelle Memorial Inst... (614)424-6424
Battery Biz ...................... (800)848-6782
Battery Power Inc .......... (800)949-1000
Battery Specialties.......... (800)854-5759
BatteryTechnology Inc ... (800)982-8284
Bay Technical Assoc ....... (800)523-2702
Baysoft ............................ ( 415)527-3300
Bayware Inc ................... (415)312-0980
BCC Advanced Research.(714)752-0526
BCTOP Inc ..................... (213)383-0791
Beacon Software, Inc .....(800)753-2322
Beacon Technology. ....... (719)594-4884
Tech Support............ (719)594-4884

Beame &Whiteside Sftwr..(416)765-0822
Bear RockTechnology.... (916)622-4640
Beaver Computer Corp. (800)827-4222
BEC ................................. (714)731-6116
BEC Computer............... (408)954-8828
BEC Inc. Cert. Calib. Labs.(800)523-3808
BEC Lynkers ................... (714)731-6117
Backman Industrial ........ (800)854-2708
Bedford Cmptr Systems.. (714)586-3700
Bel Merit Corporation ... (714)586-3700
Belden Wire and Cable ... (800)235-3361
Belgian For.Trade Office. (213)857-1244
Belkin Components ....... (800)223-5546
Tech Support............ (310)898-1100
Bell & Howell Prods Co .. (708)933-3125
BellAtlantic Bus. System.. (800)634-9827
Tech Support ............ (215)296-6180
Bell Atlantic Corp ........... (215)963-6000
Bell Atlantic CTS-MA...... (800)688-1492
Bell Atlantic CTS-CA....... (800)345-7950
Bell Atlantic CTS-CA....... (500)350-3475
Bell Atlantic CTS-PA....... (800)888-2622
BellAtlantic CTS-ESS-WI ..(800)888-2622
Bell Industries, Inc ......... (310)826-2355
Bell of Pennsylvania....... (215)466-7978
Bendata Mgt Systems ..... (719)731-5007
Benedict Computers ...... (800)346-5186
Benefit Concept Sys ....... (401)438-7100
Bentley Company........... (617)221-8590
Berkeley Systems Design.(800)877-5535
Tech Support............ (510)540-5535
Berkshire Products, Inc .. (404)271-0088
Berg Electronics ............. (717)938-7620
........................................ (800)237-2374
Best Cmptr Supplies ...... (800)544-3470
Tech Support............ (702)826-4393
Best Data Products, Inc .. (818)773-9600
Tech Support ............ (818)773-9600
Best PC Supply, Inc ........ ( 415)875-6888
Best PowerTechnology.. (800)356-5794
Tech Support ............ (800)356-5737
Best Programs, Inc ......... (703)820-9300
BetaAutomation Inc ...... (800)421-8462
Bethesda Softworks ....... (301)926-8300
Tech Support ............ (301)963-2002
Better Business Systems .. (800)829-9991
Tech Support ............ (818)373-7525
BGS Systems ................... (617)891-0000
BGW Systems Inc .......... (310)973-8090
Bi-Link Computer, Inc .... (800)888-5369
Tech Support............ (31 0)695-5166
Biblesoft......................... (800)877-0778
Big Blue Products Inc .... (516)261-1000
Binary Research ............. (215)233-3200
Biomation ....................... (800)934-2466
Birmingham Data Sys .... (313)362-0860
BisTechnology Inc ......... (818)856-5888
Bit 3 Computer Corp .... (612)881-6955
BIT Computer Inc ......... (800)935-0209
Bit Software Inc ............. (510)490-2928
Tech Support............ (510)490-9470
Bits Technical Corp ........ (713)981-1166
Bitstream Inc .................. (800)223-3176
Tech Support............ (617)497-7514
Bitwise Designs, Inc ....... (800)367-5906
Biz Base-Santa Fe Sftwr.. (800)833-8892
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Tech Support............ (619)673-7355
BJS Electronics, ][nc ........ (408)456-8989
Black & White Int'I. ........ (800)932-9202
Black Box Corporation .. (800)321-0746
Tech Support ........... ( 412)746-5565
BlackCurrantTechnology.. (714)432-6514
Blackship Cmptr Sys ...... (800)877-6249
Blaise Computing.......... (800)333-8087
BleuelAssociates Inc ..... (818)907-7162
BLOC Publishing Corp .. (305)445-0903
Blue Fin Technologies .... (603)433-2223
Blue Line Comm ............ (800)258-7810
Blue Rose Computer...... (800)685-3035
Bluebird Systems ........... (619)438-2220
Bluelynx......................... (800)8324526
Tech Support. ........... (800)642-5888
Bluesky Software ........... (800)6774946
Blythe Software" ............. (800)346-6647
BMIInc ............. "............. (415)570-5355
Board Exchange: Inc ...... (407)678-2269
Boardwatch Magazine ... (303)973-6038
Boca Research ............... (407)997-6227
lech Support. ........... (407)241-8088
BodyCello ........ ".............. (619)578-6969
Bogen Communication. (201)935-8500
Bolt Beranek & Newman ..(617)873-2000
Bolt Systems ..... '.............. (301 )656-7133
Bondhus Corporation .... (800)328-8310
Bondwell Industrial Co. (800)627-6888
Tech Support ............ (800)2884388
BookTech Distributing .. (303)329-0300
BooleAnd Babbage, Inc .. (800)222-6653
Boonton Elect. Corp ...... (201 )584-1077
Borland ........................... (800)841-8180
Tech Support ............ (408)461-9155
Bostek. ............................ (800)926-7835
Boston Bus. Computing.(508)470-0444
Boston Cmptr Exchange.(800)262-6399
Botton Line Industries ... (818)700-1922
Bourbaki ......................... (208)342-5849
Bowers Development.. .. (508)369-8175
Bracking,Jim .................. (4:08)725-0628
Brand Technologies ........ (818)4074040
Tech Suppolt............ (818)4074040
Bravo Communication ... (800)366-0297
Bravo Technology........... (510)841-8552
Tech Support. ........... (510)841-8552
BRC Electronics ............. (800)255-3027
Bretford Manufacturing.(708)678-2545
Brian Instruments, Inc ... (714)992-5540
Brian R.White Co ........... (707)462-9795
Brier Technology............ (408)435-8463
Tech Support. ........... ( 404)564-5550
Bright Star Technology... (206)451-3697
Brightbill Roberts ........... (800)444-3490
Brightwork Devdpment..(800)552-9876
Tech Suppollt. ........... (908)530-9650
Brim Electronic:s Inc ...... (201)796-2886
Broadtech Int'I. .............. (714)773-1820
Broadview Associates .... (201)461-7929
Brock Control Systems .. (800)221-0775
Broderbund Software .... (800)521-6263
Tech Support ............ (415)3824700
Brooks Electronics ......... (800)052-3010
Brooks Power Systems ... (800)523-1551
Brother InternationaI. .... (908)356-8880
© CSC 1996

Brown-Wagh .................. (408)378-3838
Tech Support ............ (408)378-3838
Brown-Wagh Publ. ......... ( 408)378-3838
Tech Support ............ ( 408)378-3838
Bruce Krobusek ............. (716)258-8722
BSE Company................. (7 14)258-8722
BSI (Broadax Sys.) .......... (800)8724547
Tech Support............ (818)442-7038
BSM Computers ............. (800)888-3475
BTECH Inc ..................... (201)428-1779
Budget Computer........... (800)370-1212
Tech Support ............ (800)370-1313
Buerg Software .............. (707)778-1811
Buffalo Creek Software .. (515)255-9552
Buffalo Products Inc ...... (800)345-2356
Tech Support............ (800)345-2027
Bull HN Info. System ...... (800)999-2181
Tech Support ............ (800)2264357
Bull Information Sys ....... (800)233-2855
Bulldog Cmptr Prods ..... (800)438-6039
Bullseye Software .......... (702)831-2523
Bureau Development.. ... (201)808-2700
Tech Support ............ (201)808-2700
Bureau of Elect. Publ.. ... (800)8284766
Tech Support ............ (201)808-2700
Burndy Corporation ...... (203)8384444
Burr-Brown Corp ........... (800)227-3947
Burroughs Corp ............. (800)247-5617
Bus Cmptr Systems ........ (212)6274485
Buse Communications .. ,,(800)521-1117
Business Cmptr Sys ........ (800)333-2955
Tech Support............ (804)420-6658
Business Credit Leasing.(800)328-5371
Business Develop. Int'1...(201)891-1040
Business Logistics Serv... (901)395-7112
Business Sense Inc ......... (801)963-1384
Business Sys. Direct.. ..... (800)7774068
Business Vision Mgt Sys.(414)629-3233
BusinessWare Inc ........... (714)492-8958
BusinessWise, Inc ........... ( 408)866-5960
BusLogic Inc .................. (408)492-9090
Button Ware Inc ............. (214)713-6370
Tech Support............ (900)555-8800
Bux Tek Corporation ..... (408)492-9090
Buzzwords, Int'I. ............. (314)334-6317
Byte Brothers ................. (206)271-9567
Byte Info. Exch (BIX) ..... (603)924-7681
BYTE Magazine .............. (603)924-9281
Bytel Corporation .......... (415)527-1157
Bytronix Corporation .... (714)879-0810
C C Steven &Associates.. (805)658-0207
C H Products .................. (619)598-2518
C HoelzieAssociates ...... (714)251-9000
C] Carrigan Ent.. ........... (714)598-1276
C Source ......................... (816)478-1888
C&D Charter Pwr. Sys .... (215)828-9000
C&F Associates ............... (800)688-9112
C&S Sales Inc ................. (800)292-7711
G88 International Corp .. (408)956-8345
C-TechAssociates Inc .... (201)726-9000
C-Tech Electronics, Inc .. (800)347-4017
C Itoh ElectrOnics, Inc ... (213)327-9100
C2 Micro Systems Inc .... (510)683-8888
CA Retail Solutions ........ (800)668-3767
CA Technology, Ltd........ (212)260-7661
Cabinets Galore Inc ....... (619)586-0555

Cable Connection.......... ( 408)395-6700
Cable Systems, Inc ......... (617)389-7080
Cable-Tech ...................... (817)477-5013
Cables To Go .................. (800)225-8646
Cabletron Systems ......... (603)332-9400
CableWorks.................... (619)450-1929
CablExpress .................... (315)476-3000
Cache Computers Inc ... (510)226-9922
CACI International Inc .. (703)841-7800
CAD & Graphic Cmptrs. (800)288-1611
Tech Support ............ (415)647-9671
CAD Warehouse ............. (800)487-0485
Tech Support............ (216)487-0631
Cadec Systems, Inc ........ (800)223-3220
Cadence Design Sys ....... ( 408)943-1234
CADRE Technology........ (800)548-7645
Caere Corporation......... (800)535-7226
Tech Support ............ (800)462-2373
CAP Technology Inc ...... (800)289-8299
Cahners Publishing Co .. (617)694-3030
Caig Laboratories ........... (619)451-1799
Cal-Abco ......................... (800)669-2226
Calan, Inc ........................ (800)544-3392
Calcomp ......................... (800)541-7877
Tech Support............ (800)225-2667
Calculus .......................... (305)481-2334
Calculus Inc .................... (305)481-2334
Calera Recognition Sys .. (800)422-5372
Tech Support ............ ( 408)702-0999
Caliper Computer Corp .. (213)727-8530
California Peripherals .... (213)538-1030
California Sftwr Prods .... (714)973-0440
Calif. Switch & Signal.. ... (310)538-9830
Calluna Technology........ (408)4534753
CalSOFT Technology...... (805)497-8054
Caltex Software .............. (214)522-9840
Caltronex ........................ (716)359-9780
Calyx Corporation ......... (800)558-2208
Tech Support............ (800)866-1 008
Calzone Case Co ............ (203)367-5766
Cambria Corporation.... (609)665-3600
Cambridge Elect. Labs ... (617)629-2805
Cameo Communication.. (603)465-2940
Camintonn Corporation.. (800)843-8336
Campbell Services Inc ... (800)345-6747
Tech Support............ (810)559-5955
Canada, External Mfairs.(613)993-6576
Canon............................. (516)488-6700
Canon (Printers) ............ (800)8484123
Tech Support ............ (800)423-2366
Cannon-Still Video!East..(714)753-7002
Cannon-5tillVideo/West .. (714)7534002
Tech Support............ (714)7534323
Canon Cmptr Systems ... (800)423-2366
Tech Support............ (800)423-2366
Canon USA(East) ............ (800)221-3333
Tech Support............ (908)521-7000
Canon USA(Mid West) ... (708)250-6200
Tech Support............ (705)250-6200
Canon USA(South East) .. (404)448-1430
Tech Support ............ ( 404)448-1430
Canon USA(South West) .(214)830-9600
Tech Support............ (214)830-9600
Canon USA(West) .......... (714)753-4200
Tech Support ............ (714)753-4200
CanTech ......................... (800)255-3999
Hard Drive Bible 337

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Capital Data.................... (517)371-3700
Capricorn Systems ......... (804)355-9371
Capstone Technology..... (5 10)438-3500
Tech Support............. (305)373-7770
Cardiff Software Inc ....... (800)659-8755
Cardinal Teclmologies .... (717)293-3049
Tech Support ............ (717)293-3124
Caritech Cmptr Corp .... (915)584-9817
Carlisle Memory Prods .. (800)433-7632
CarNel Enterprises Inc .. (800)962-1450
Carroll Touch ................. (5 12)244-3500
Cartridge Teclmologies .. (800)869-8570
Carvey Databook, Inc .... (716)8894204
Casady & Green............. (800)3594920
Tech Support............ ( 408)484-9228
Case Logic Inc ............... (303)530-3800
Casecom Inc .................. (408)942-5416
Casecom Teclmology..... (5 10)490-7122
Caseworks, Inc ............... (800)635-1577
Casio ............................... (201)361-5400
Tech Support............ (201 )361-5400
Castelle ........................... ( 408)496-0474
Tech Support ............ (408)496-0474
Catalyst Seminconductor.. ( 408)748-7700
Catalytix ......................... (617)738-1516
Catspaw.......................... (719)539-3884
Cayman Systems ............ (800)473-4776
Tech Support ............ (617)932-1100
CBMAmerica Corp ........ (800)421-6516
Tech Support............ (310)767-7838
CCMail ........................... (800)448-2500
Tech Support ............ (800)448-2500
CCI .................................. (604)465-1 540
CD Systems .................... (909)595-5736
CD Teclmologies ............ ( 408)752-8500
Tech Support............ (408)752-8499
CD-ROM Direct.. ............ (800)332-2404
CDB Systems,lnc ........... (303)444-7463
CDC (Imprimis) ............. (800)852-3475
CDCE Inc ....................... (714)630-4633
CE Software .................... (515)224-1955
Celestica ......................... (800)461-2913
Cellular Data Inc ............ ( 415)856-9800
Cellular Dig. Packet Data. (206)828-8691
Cellular Product Dist ..... (310)312-0909
CenTech......................... (800)255-3999
Centel Corporation ....... (800)323-2174
Centon Electronics Inc .. (714)855-9111
Centennial Teclmology.. (508)670-0646
Central Cmptr Prods ..... (800)456-4123
Tech Support............ (805)5244189
Central Data................... (800)482-031 5
Central POint.. ................ (800)4454208
Tech Support............ (503)690-8080
, Centrepoint S-WTech.... (613)235-7054
Centron Software .......... (800)848-2424
Tech Support............ (800)848-2424
Century Cmptr Mktg ..... (310)827-0999
Century Data Systems ... (919)821-5696
Century Microelect ....... (408)748-7788
Century Software ........... (801 )268-3088
Tech Support ............ (801)268-3088
CERA Inc ........................ (800)966-3070
Ceres Software ............... (800)8774292
Tech Support ............ (503)245-9011
Cermetek Microelect.. ... ( 408)752-5000
338 Hard Drive Bible

Cerner Corporation ....... (816)221-1024
Certified Mgt Software .. (801)534-1231
Certus Int'l-Semamtic .... (800)441-7234
CH Ellis Company Inc ... (317)636-3351
CH Products .................. (800)624-5804
Tech Support ............ (619)598-2518
Chain Store Guide ......... (800)927-9292
Champion Bus. Sys ......... (303)792-3606
Champion Duplicators .. (800)752-2145
CHAMPS Inc ................... (904)795-2362
Chancery Software Ltd .. (604)294-1233
Chang Laboratories ....... (408)727-8096
Tech Support ............ (408)727-8096
Chaplet Systems ............. (408)732-7950
Chapman Corporation .. (207)773-4726
Charles Charles & Assoc. (800)348-1354
Chatsworth Prods. Inc ... (818)882-8596
CheckFree ...................... (614)899-7500
CheckMark Software ..... (800)444-9922
Tech Support ............ (303)225-0387
Checkmate Teclmology. (602)966-5802
CheckSmn ...................... (206)653-4861
ChemCorp ..................... (510)226-6280
Chemimnics Inc ............ (800)645-5244
Tech Support ............ (800)424-9300
Chen &Associates ......... (504)928-5765
CHEQsys ........................ (416)475-4121
Cherry Electrical Prods. (708)662-9200
Cheyenne Software ....... (800)243-9832
Tech Support............ (800)243-9832
CHI/COR Info. Mgmt.. ... (312)322-0150
Chic Teclmology Corp ... (206)833-4836
Chicago Case Company... (312)927-1600
Chicony America Inc ..... (714)380-0928
Chinon America............. (800)441-0222
Tech Support............ (800)441-0222
Chips &Teclmology....... (408)434-0600
Chips For Less ................ (214)250-0009
Tech Support ............ (214)250-9335
ChipSoft, Inc. (Intuit) ..... (619)453-4446
Tech Support............ (619)550-5009
Chisholm ........................ (800)888-4210
Chloride Power Elect.. .. (800)333-0529
Choice Courier Sys ........ (212)370-1999
Choice Technical Serv.... (714)522-8123
CHRONOS Software ...... (415)626-4244
Chrysler 1st Commercial.(215)437-8680
Chuck Atkinson Prog ..... (800)826-5009
Ci Design Company, Inc .. (714)261-5524
CIBD ............................... (5 10)676-6466
CIE America, Inc ............. (714)833-8445
CIM Engineering,lnc ..... (415)578-9998
Cimmetry Systems Inc .. (514)735-3219
Cincinnati Bell Inc ......... (513)397-9900
Cincinnati Milacron Inc.(513)841-8100
Cincom Systems Inc ...... (513)662-2300
CIO Publishing ............... (508)872-8200
Ciprico Inc ..................... (800)727-4669
Circle Computer Inc ...... (617)821-4114
Circo Computer Sys ...... (800)678-1688
Circuit Repair Corp ....... (508)948-7973
Circuit Test. .................... (510)463-2432
Cirris Systems Corp ....... (800)441-9910
Cirnls Logic .................... (5 10)623-8300
........................................ (800)424-7787
Cirvis Inc ........................ (714)891-2000

Citel America Inc ........... (800)248-3548
CitizenAmerica.............. (800)556-1234
Tech Support ............ (310)453-0614
Citrix Systems ................ (800)437-7503
Tech Support ............ (800)437-7503
CJF Enterprises Inc ........ (305)491-1850
Clarify Inc ....................... ( 408)428-2000
Clarion Software ............ (800)354-5444
Tech Support............ (305)785-4556
Claris Corporation ......... (800)325-2747
Tech Support............ (408)727-9054
Clarity............................. (800)235-6736
Clark Development Co .. (801)261-1686
Clary Corporation .......... (818)359-4486
Clear Software ............... (800)338-1759
Tech Support ............ (617)965-5019
Cleo Communicatlons ... (800)233-2536
Tech Support ............ (313)662-4194
Cliff Notes ...................... (800)228-4078
Tech Support............ ( 402)421-8324
Clipper Products ............ (5 13)528-7011
Clone Teclmologies ....... (314)365-2050
Clovis .............................. (508)486-0005
CMD Teclmology Inc ..... (800)426-3832
CMG Computer Prods ... (5 12)329-8220
CMI Communications ... (800)825-5150
CMO............................... (800)233-8950
Tech Support ............ (800)221-4283
CMP Publications ........... (5 16)562-5000
CMS Enhancements ....... (714)222-6000
........................................ (800)555-1671
Tech Support............ (714)222-6000
CMX................................... (800)668-6413
Tech Support ............ (800)285-2699
CNet Teclmology. .......... (800)486-2638
Tech Support ............ ( 408)954-8800
CNS ................................. (800)843-2978
CNS Inc .......................... (201)625-4056
Coactive Computing..... (415)802-2882
Tech Support............ (415)802-2882
Coast Computer Power.(800)822-2587
Coastal Electronics ......... (912)352-1444
Cobalt Blue ..................... (404)518-1116
Coconut Computlng ...... (619)456-2002
Coda Music Software ..... (612)854-1288
Tech Support............ (612)854-9649
Codenoll ......................... (914)965-6300
Coefficient Systems ....... (800)833-4220
Cognitech-Shopwr Help....(800)4874275
Tech Support ............ (800)487-4275
Cognitive Systems, Inc ... (203)773-0726
Cognitronics Corp ......... (800)243-2594
Colad Group Inc ............ (716)849-1776
Color Age Incorporated... (800)873-4367
Colorado Memory.......... (303)669-8000
Tech Support............. (303)635-1501
Colorado Tech Designs .. (303)449-0963
Colorage ......................... (800)437-3336
Tech Support............ (508)663-8213
Columbia Data Systems.(407)869-6700
Columbia Power!Data ... (206)576-5045
Tech Support............ (800)791-1181
Comarco, Inc .................. (714)921-0672
Comb .............................. (800)328-0609
Comclok Inc .................. (714)991-1580
Comdale Teclmologies ... ( 416)252-2424
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Comdisco Parts .............. (800)635-2211
Comedge Inc ................. (818)336-7522
Comlite Systems Inc ...... (800):~54-3821
Command COIll1TI. Inc ... (800)288-349 Jl
Tech Support.. .......... (303)752-1422
Command Cmptr Corp.(201)288-7000
Command Sftwr Sys ...... (407)575-3200
Command Technology... (800)336-3320
Commax Technologies .. (800)526-6629
Tech Support. ........... ( 408)435-8272
Commadore Bus. Mach .. (614)666-7950
Common Cents Sftwr.... (719)4814682
C.omnwlth of Puerto Rico.(212)245-1200
Commstar, Inc ................ (612)941-8188
Comm. Automation....... (215)776-6669
Comm. Research Group ....(504)923-0888
Comm.Tech Group ........ (800)626-2715
Comm. Test Design........ (800)223-3910
COMP USA. .................... (800)541-7638
COMPAC Micrm:~lect.. .... (510)656-3333
Compact Disk Ploducts .. (908)290-8087
Tech Support. ........... (212)737-8400
Compaq........................... (800)888-5858
Tech Support............ (800)345-1518
Compatible Systems ...... (800)356-0283
CompEd Inc ................... (800)456-5338
Compeq USA Ltd........... (800)852-0105
Tech Support. ........... (714)404-1619
Compexlechnology...... (818)855-7988
Compex, Inc .................. (714)630-7302
Complementary Solutions.(404)454-8033
Complete Computer...... (415)549-3153
Complete PC,The .......... (407)997-9683
Complex, Inc .................. (714)630-7302
lech Support............ (714)630-5451
Complus .......................... (510)623-1000
Compo Group li1c ......... (203)222-1335
Component Sales Corp. (408)894-1870
Comport......................... ( 408)437-2404
Comprehensive Sftwr.... (213)318-2561
lech Support.. .......... (213)214-1461
Compro Cmptr Services.(412)255-3616
Compsee, Inc ................. (407)724-4321
Compteck Research, Inc.(716)842-2700
Compton's NewMedia... (619)929-2626
lech Support............ (619)929-2626
Comptronics ................... (919)779-7268
Compu-D Intenlational. (818)787-3282
Compu-Gard Inc ............ (508)761-4520
Compu-Tek International.(800)531-O 190
Tech Support............ (214)994-0193
CompuAdd Corp ........... (800)925-3000
Tech Support ............ (800)925-0995
CompuCase .................... (800)255-9617
CompuClassics ............... (800)733-3888
CompuClean .................. (800)444-9038
Compucom Systems ...... (609)848-2300
CompuCover.................. (800)874-6391
Tech SuppOtt............ (904)863-2200
CompuD International..(800)929-9333
Tech SuppOtt ............ (818)787-3282
Compudyne ................... (800)486-8810
Tech Support ............ (800)447-3895
CompuLan Tec1mology.. (800)486-8810
Tech Support ............ (408)954-8864
Compulaw...................... (800)559-4991
© CSC 1996

Tech Support ............. (800)533-7839
CompuLink Mgt. Ctr....... (310)212-5465
Tech Support ............. (31 0)212-5465
Compulits Inc ................. (317)581-7600
CompuMedia Techn ....... (510)656-9811
Compumetrics Inc ......... (212)323-8150
CompuRegister Corp ..... (314)365-2050
CompUSA, Inc ................ (800)266-7872
CompuServe ................... (800)848-8199
Tech Support ............. (800)848-8199
Compusol Inc ................. (714)253-9533
ComputAbility Cons ...... (800)588-0003
Compute Publications ... (212)496-6100
Computeach ................... (206)885-0517
Tech Support ............ (206)885-0517
Cmptr & Control Sol. .... (800)782-3525
Cmptr & Monitor Maint.. (800)4664411
Computer Aided Mgt ..... (707)795-4100
Computer Analysis ......... (808)848-4878
Computer Assistance ..... (503)895-3347
Computer Associates ..... (706)505-6000
Computer Assoc. Int'l. ... (800)531-5236
Tech Support............ (406)432-1764
Cmptr Automation ......... (714)833-8830
Cmptr Auxillary Prods ... (714)465-0911
Computer Bay................. (414)357-7705
Computer Boards ........... (508)261-1123
Computer Book Club .... (717)794-2191
Cmptr Bus. Services ....... (800)343-8014
Tech Support............ (317)758-9612
Cmptr Buyers Guide ...... (212)807-8220
Cmptr Buying World ...... (617)246-3800
Cmptr Cable & Conn .... (201)993-9285
Computer Care .............. (703)528-8700
Computer Care Inc ........ (800)552-4283
Computer Channel Inc .. (516)921-5170
Computer Classifieds ..... (206)643-2316
Computer Clipboard..... (800)777-4932
Cmptr Comm Specials ... ( 404)441-3114
Cmptr Commodities Int'1.(800)365-3475
Cmptr Comm ................. (800)421-1178
Cmptr Compnent Source.(800)356-1227
Cmptr Compnents ......... (800)356-1227
Computer Connection ... (800)552-2331
Cmptr Connection Corp.(612)884-0758
Computer Control Sys ... (904)752-0912
Cmptr Covers Unltd ...... (800)722-6837
Computer Coverup ....... (312)327-9200
Computer Craftsmen ...... ( 414)567-1700
Computer Currents ....... (415)547-6800
Computer Data Sys ........ (301)921-7000
Computer DataVault.. .... (714)362-3839
Computer Design Mag .. (800)225-0556
Computer Dis.Wrhse .... (800)7264239
Tech Support ............ (706)291-7575
Computer Doctor.......... (512)467-9355
Computer Doctors ......... (301)474-3095
Computer Dynamics ...... (803)877-8700
Computer Exchange ...... (404)446-7960
Computer Expressions .. (800)443-8278
Cmptr Factory Outlet.. ... (800)486-9975
Tech Support ............ (602)829-7751
Computer Field Serv...... (617)246-4090
Computer Fixer.............. (215)568-1100
Computer Friends, Inc ... (800)547-3303
Computer Fun ................ (619)279-1919

Computer Gate Int'l.. ..... ( 408)730-0673
Cmptr Hand Holding ..... ( 415)882-0517
Cmptr Horizons Corp .... (800)8474092
Computer Hot line ........ (214)233-5131
Computer Hotline Mag .. (800)866-3241
Cmptr Identics Corp ..... (800)343-0846
Computer Ind. Almanac. (800)3 77-6810
Computer Innovations ... (908)542-5930
Tech Support ............ (201)542-5920
Computer Intelligence ... (619)450-1667
Tech Support............. (609)450-0255
Computer Labs Inc ........ (315)635-7236
Computer Lang. Mag ...... (800)525-0643
Computer Law &Tax..... (212)879-3325
Cmptr Law Strategist.. ... (212)741-8300
Computer Law Sys ......... (800)328-1913
Computer library........... (212)5034400
Cmptr Locators Int'l. ..... ( 407)627-7797
Computer Logic Ltd ...... (800)359-0599
Computer Logistics Ltd.(216)349-8600
Computer Maint. Plus .... (303)427-5181
Computer Maint. Serv.... (800)3334267
Cmptr Maint.Training .... (800)952-5977
Computer Mgt Service .. (510)732-0644
Computer Marketplace. (800)858-1144
Computer Media & Serv. .(800)798-9078
Computer Modules Inc.(408)496-1881
Cmptr Mnthly/Reseller.. (205)988-9708
Cmptr Music Supply...... (714)594-5051
Tech Support ............ (714)594-6821
Cmptr Netwrk Serv-CNS.(303)682-0090
Cmptr NetworkTech ..... (800)638-8324
Computer Parts Outlet...(800)475-1655
Cmpter Parts Unlimited.(818)879-1100
Cmptr Periph. Repair..... ( 407)486-0011
Computer Place,The ...... (602)962-1030
Computer Power, Inc ..... (800)526-5088
Tech Support ............ (908)638-8600
Computer Products ....... (305)974-5500
Computer Prods Corp ... (800)3384273
Cmptr. Prods. Plus (CP+).(800)2744277
Tech Support............ (800)2744277
Computer Publishers ..... (708)390-7000
Computer Publ. & Adv. .. (914)833-0600
Computer Publ. Ent.. ..... (619)576-0353
Computer Recyclers ...... (800)466-6449
Cmptr Ref. Products ...... (206)869-7840
Computer Renaissance .. (612)942-5062
Cmptr RepssAssn .......... (407)788-3666
Computer Research ....... (800)245-2710
Cmptr Reseller News Mag.(516)562-5000
Computer Reset ............. (214)276-8072
Computer Resources ..... (800)662-0034
Cmptr Retail Week Mag.(516)562-5000
Computer Sales Prof...... (800)950-6660
Cmptr Sciences Corp .... (213)615-0311
Cmptr Service & Maint...(619)944-1228
Computer Service Ctr.... (201)843-6290
Computer Service Exp .. (502)366-3188
Computer Servo Labs ...... (800)220-6860
Computer Servo Supply... (800)255-7815
Computer Servo Tech ...... (214)241-2662
Computer Servo Group ... (212)819-0122
Cmptr Shopper Mag...... (305)269-3211
Computer Site Tech ....... (305)425-0638
Computer Solutions ....... (20 1)672-6000
Hard Drive Bible 339

Corporate :Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Computer Support ........ (214)661-8960
Tech Support ............ (214)661-8960
Cmptr Support Prods .... (506)281-6554
Computer Sys.Advisors. (800)537-4262
Computer Sys Assoc ...... (704)871-8367
Computer Sys. News ...... (516)3654600
Computer Sys. Repair..... (310)217-8901
Computer Task Group ... (716)882-8000
CmptrTechn. Review..... (310)208-1335
ComputerTechn Serv. ... (714)855-8667
CmptrTerminal Serv...... (916)3684300
CmptrTime ofAmerica.(800)456-1159
Tech Support ............ (614)759-0 100
Computer Trade Exch .... (201)226-1528
Comput(~rTrading Int'1..(818)764-0615
Computer Trend Inc ...... (205)442-6376
ComputerEasy Int'l. ....... (602)829-9614
ComputerGear............... (800)234-3434
Computerland Corp ...... (510)734-4000
Tech Support............ (800)922-5263
ComputerLand Corp ..... (201)575-7110
Cmptrlnd Depot Repair .. (800)445-6879
Computers For Less ....... (800)634-1415
Tech Support............ (714)975-0542
Computers Inc ............... (800)637-4832
Computers Plus .............. (401)434-9180
Computervision............. (619)535-1527
Computerwise Inc ......... (913)829-0600
Computerworld ............. (508)879-0700
Computime Inc .............. (800)423-8826
Computone .................... (800)541-9915
Computone Corp .......... (800)241-3946
Tech Support............ (404)475-2725
Computrac, Inc .............. (214)2344241
CompuTrend Sys. Inc .... (818)333-5121
Comshare ....................... (313)9944800
Comtech Publishing ...... (800)456-7005
Comtrade ....................... (800)969-2123
Tech Support............ (800)8994508
Comtrol Corporation ..... (800)926-6876
Concentric Data ............(800)325-9035
Tech Support............ (800)325-9035
Concept Omega Corp ... (800)524-9035
Conceptual Software ..... (713)6674222
Concurrent Computer... (908)758-7000
Concurrent Computer.. .(908)8704128
Concurrent Controls ...... (800)487-2249
Conde Systems ............... (800)826-6332
Tech Support ............ (205)633-3876
Conductive Containers .. (800)327-2329
Conley............................. (212)682-0 162
Conlux USA Corporation. (800)792-0 10 1
Connect .......................... (415)435-7446
Connect Software .......... (800)234-9497
Tech Support............ (800)234-9497
Connect Tech Inc ........... (519)836-1291
Connect-Air Int'l. ........... (800)247-1978
Connectix Corporation. (800)950-5880
Tech Support............ (800)950-5880
Connector Rsrce. Unltd.(408)942-9077
Conner International.. ... (408)4564415
Conner Peripherals ........ (408)433-3340
........................................ (408)456-3200
Conner/Maynard Electr. (800)227-6296
Connexperts .................. (800)433-5373
Tech Support ............ (214)352-2281
340 Hard Drive Bible

Consmi Development. .. (310)835-9687
Tech Support............ (800)654-8829
Consolidated Electr........ (513)252-5662
Consultex....................... (800)243-3338
Consulting Spectrum ..... (214)484-9330
Consultronics ................. (800)267-7255
Consumer Tech NW ...... (800)356-3983
Consumers Software ..... (604)6884548
Contact East. .................. (800)225-5334
Contact Software Int'l. ... (800)365-0606
Tech Support ............ (800)365-0606
Contek Int'l Corp ........... (203)8534313
Contemporary Cmptr.... (516)563-8880
Continental Info. Sys ...... (315)437-1900
Continental Resources ... (800)937-4688
Contingency Planning ... (516)997-1100
Control Cable ................. ( 410)2984411
Control Concepts Corp.(800)288-6169
Control Data Corp ......... (612)853-8100
Control Technology........ ( 405)840-3163
Controlled Power Co ..... (313)528-3700
Convergent World .......... (800)888-5093
Conversion Systems ....... (714)870-1626
Convex Corporation...... (800)642-0602
Conway Engineering ..... (51 0)5684028
Cook's Computer Maint..(805)323-6036
Cooper Industries .......... (317)983-5200
Coordinated Service ...... (508)486-0388
Copam USA, Inc ............. (800)828-4200
Copia International........ (706)682-8898
CopyTechnologies ........ (714)975-1477
Cordata........................... (213)603-290 1
Core InternationaL ........ (407)997-6044
Tech Support ............ ( 407)997-6033
Core Software Inc .......... (713)292-2177
Corel Systems Corp ....... (800)772-6735
Tech Support ............ (613)726-1990
Corim Int'l Corp ............ (212)883-0030
Cornell Computer Sys ... (800)886-7200
Cornerstone Data Sys .... (714)772-5527
Cornerstone Imaging .... (408)435-8900
Tech Support ............ (408)435-8900
CornerstoneTeclmology..(800)562-2552
Tech Support ............( 408)435-8900
Corollary Inc .................. (714)2504040
Coromandel Industries .. (800)535-3267
Tech Support ............(718)793-7966
Corporate Mgt. & Mktg .. (201)989-0229
Corporate Microsystems.(603)448-5193
Corporate Software ....... (617)821-4500
Corporate Systems Center.(408)734-3475
Cortex Corporation....... (612)894-3354
Corvus Systems, Inc ....... (800)426-7887
Cosmi .......... """"'"'''''' .. (800)292-6967
Cosmic Enterprises ........ (800)292-6967
Costa Dist., West ............. (800)926-7829
CoStar............................. (800)426-7827
Tech Support ............ (203)661-9700
Costas Systems ............... (510)443-2332
Costem Inc ..................... (408)734-9235
Cougar Mountain Sftwr. (800)388-3038
Tech Support............ (800)727-9912
Counter Peripherals ....... (800)222-5871
Courseware Technology..(800)736-1936
........................................ (619)452-2726
Courtland Group Inc ..... (410)730-7668

CPE Inc ........................... (214)313-1133
Cpl. ................................. (805)499-6021
Cpt Corporation ............ (612)937-8000
CPU Products ................. (316)788-3749
CraneIInc ....................... (800)727-2635
Cray Research ................. (612)452-6650
CRC Systems Ltd............ (800)231-0743
Creative Cmptr Apps ..... (818)880-6700
Creative Controllers ....... (800)950-6224
Creative Data Products .. (800)366-1020
Creative Labs .................. ( 405)742-6622
Creative Multimedia...... (503)2414351
Tech Support ............ (503)241-1530
Creative Programming ... (214)416-6447
Creotec Corporation ...... (214)717-1272
Crescent Project Mgt ..... (415)493-4787
Crescent Software ......... (203)438-5300
Cresta Batteries.............. (800)638-7120
Crisis Computer Corp ... (800)726-0726
Tech Support ............ (800)729-0729
CRM Cmptr Parts-ON.... (800)284-2865
CRM Cmptr PartsFL. ...... (800)759-5539
Crosby Creations ........... (800)842-8445
Crosfield Dicomed......... (612)895-3000
Crossly Group Inc The .. (404)751-3703
Crosstalk Comm ............ (404)4424000
CrossTies ........................ (214)732-9060
Tech Support............ (214)732-9060
Crown Mats & Matting .. (800)628-5463
Crump Electronics ......... (303)9364407
Cnltchfield-Hardware .... (800)537-4050
Crutchfield-Software ...... (800)5384050
Crystal Computer Sys .... (310)946-1447
Crystal Semiconductor.. (512)445-7222
Crystal Services .............. (604)681-3435
Tech Support............ (604)681-3435
CrystalGraphics Inc ....... (408)496-6175
CS Electronics ................ (714)259-9100
CSC CompuSource ........ (919)460-1234
CSP Inc ........................... (617)272-6020
CSR. ................................ (201)671-7711
CSS Laboratories, Inc ..... (714)852-8161
CST Inc ........................... (214)241-2662
CTC Corporation........... (51 0)770-8787
en..................................(703)264-8900
CTS Services .................. (508)528-7720
CTSI International Inc ... (516)467-1281
CTX International .......... (800)282-2205
Tech Support ............ (800)282-2205
Cubix Corporation ........(800)829-0550
CUE Paging Corp ........... (800)858-8828
Cuesta Systems Corp ..... (800)332-3440
CUI ................................. (800)458-6686
Tech Support............ (408)988-2703
Cullinet Software ........... (617)329-7700
Cumulus ......................... (216)464-2211
Curtis Inc ........................ (612)631-9512
Curtis Mfg. Company..... (800)955-5544
Tech Support ............ (603)532-4123
Custom Application...... (508)667-8585
Tech Support............ (508)663-8213
Custom Cmptr Cable ..... (612)941-5651
Custom Real-Time Soft.. (201)228-7623
Cust. Satisfaction Rsrch .. (913)894-6166
Customer Servo Institute.(30 1)585-0730
Cut Craft Inc .................. (817)332-6151
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
CW Electronics .............. (303)832-1111
CWay Software ............... (215)368-9494
Tech Support. ........... (215)368-7233
CXR Digilog ................... (408)435-8520
CyberTechnics Corp ..... (408)986-9686
Cybex Corporation........ (205)534-0011
Cyborg Corporation...... (617)964-9020
Cycare Systems .............. (800)545-2483
Cyclades Corporation .... (510)770-9727
Cyco Internationa1.. ....... (800)323-2926
Cylix Corporatilon.......... (805)379-3155
Cyma Systems Inc .......... (800)292-2962
Cypress Research........... (408)752-2700
Tech Support............ (408)752-2700
Cyrix Corporation......... (800)462-9749
Tech Support............ (800)462-9749
D-C-Drives ....... ,.............. (800)473-0960
Tech Support............ (713)333-2099
D-link Systems, Inc ........ (714)455-1688
Da Vinci Systems ............ (919)781-5924
DacEasy, Inc ................... (800)322-3279
Tech Support............ (214)248-0205
Daewoo Int'l Corp ......... (201)935-8700
Dairyland Cmptr Cnsult. .. (800)323-6987
Daisy Disc Corporatlon... (800)537-3475
Dai.sycom........ ,.............. (214)881-4700
Dak Industries, Inc ......... (800)325-0800
DakTech Inc ................... (800)325-3238
Dal.co Electronics ........... (800)445-5342
Tech Support............ (800)543-2526
Dallas Digital Corp ......... (800)842-6333
Dallas Fax Inc." ............... (214)699-8999
Dallas Semiconductor.... (214)450-0400
Damark InternationaL .... (800)729-9000
Dana Commercial Credit..(313)689-7000
Danish Consulate Gen ... (213)387-4277
Danpex Corporatlon...... (408)437-7557
Dantona Industries Inc .. (516)596-1515
Dantz Development.. .... (510)849-0293
Tech Support............ (51 0)849-0293
Danwill Industrial Ltd.... (818)810-8880
Dariana Software ........... (714)236-1380
Tech Support............ (714)236-1380
Darius Technology Inc ... (206)483-8889
Dash Computt~r Inc ....... ( 408)773-1488
Dat Entry Inc .................. (407)339-5062
Data 3 Systems ............... (707)528-6560
DataAccess Corp ........... (800)451-3539
Tech Support............ (305)232-3142
Data Accessodes Cor...... ( 416)292-9963
Data Base Solutions ....... (800)336-6060
Data Code ....................... (516)331-7848
Data Communications ... (212)512-6950
Data Comm. 2000 .......... (714)255-7090
Data Connections .......... (800)225-1855
Data Depot.. ................... (800)767-3424
Tech Support............ (800)775-3825
Data Engineering........... (603)893-3374
Data Entry Systems, Inc.(205)539-2483
Data Envelope & Pkg..... (800)544-4417
Data Exchangt~ Corp ...... (805)388-1711
Data General Corp ......... (508)366-8911
Data I/O.......................... (800)332-8246
........................................ (206)881-6444
DataMate NorthAmerlca.. (310)316-5161
Data Pad Corporation .... (800)755-8218
© CSC 1996

Data Plus, Inc .................. (713)641-6158
Data Pro .......................... (908)756-7300
Data ProAcctg Software...(800)836-6377
Tech Support............ (813)888-5847
Data Processing Security..(817)457-9400
Data Quest Hawaii ......... (808)545-5482
Data Race ....................... (210)558-1900
Tech Support............ (210)558-1900
Data Recording Prods .. ".(310)633-7198
Data Retrieval Serv-FL..".(800)952-7530
Data Retrieval Serv-CA. .. (800)942-4472
Data Services Corp ........ (404)246-3700
Data Set Cable Co.......... (800)344-9684
Data Shield ..................... (312)329-1601
Data Solutions ................ (714)637-5060
Data Spec ....................... (800)431-8124
Tech Support............ (818)772-9977
Data Storage Mktg-CO ... (800)543-6090
Tech Support ............ (800)543-6098
Data Storage Mktg-NJ..... (800)424-2203
Data Storage Mktg-TX ... (800)654-6311
Data Sys/Micro Connect.. (800)445-3282
Data Technology............. ( 408)942-4000
Tech Support ............ (408)942-4000
Data Transforms ........... ,.. (303)832-1501
Data Translation .............. (508)481-3700
Tech Support ............ (508)481-3700
Data Viz .......................... (800)733-0030
Tech Support............ (203)268-4000
Data Watch..................... (919)549-0711
Tech Support ............ (919)549-0711
Data-Cal Corporation ..... (800)223-0123
Data-Doc Electronics ..... (512)928-8926
Tech Support............ (512)928-8926
Data/Ware Devel. Inc ..... (619)453-7660
Database Applications .... (609)924-2900
Database Prog. & Design.. ( 415)905-2200
Dataability Sftwr Sys ...... (212)807-7800
Datacap Inc .................... (914)332-7515
Datacap Systems, Inc ..... (215)699-7051
Datacom Technologies ... (800)468-5557
Datadesk InternationaL. (804)477-3473
Tech Support ............ (503)692-9601
DataEase International. .. (800)243-5123
Tech Support............. (203)374-2825
DataExpert Corp ............ (408)737-0880
Datafix Inc ...................... (501)562-3554
Datagate Inc ................... ( 408)946-6222
Dataguard Recvry Serv:. (800)325-3977
DataJets InternationaL ... (714)630-6662
Datalight ......................... (360)435-8086
Datalynx Marketing ....... (604)765-1162
Datamar Systems ............ (800)223-9963
Datamate ........................ (918)664-7276
Datamation..................... (617)964-3030
Datapath Technologies .. (51 0)651-5580
Datapoint Corporation .. (512)593-7000
Datapro Info. Serv.......... (609)764-0100
Datapro Research Grp ... (800)328-2776
Dataproducts (CA) ......... (818)887-8440
Dataproducts (NH) ........ (603)673-9100
Dataq Instruments Inc ... (216)668-1444
Dataquest/Ledgeway ..... (506)370-5555
Datashieldffripp lite ...... (312)329-1777
Tech Support ............ (312)329-1602
Datasouth Cmptr Corp .. (800)476-2450

DataSpec/ORA Electr..... (800)431-8124
Datastor.......................... (714)833-8000
Datastorm Technologies..(314)443-3282
Tech Support ............ (314)875-0530
Datasure Technologies ... (510)935-9899
DataSym Inc ................... (519)758-5800
Datatech Depot Inc ....... (714)970-1600
Datatek Periph. Services .. (800)829-2099
Datatran Corporation .... (303)778-0870
DataTrek Corporation ... (219)522-8000
Datatronics Inc .............. (713)367-0567
Dataviz ............................ (800)733-0030
Tech Support ............ (203)268-0030
Dataware ........................ (800)426-4844
Datawatch ...................... (919)549-0711
DATEC (WA) .................. (800)525-9905
DATEC (OR) .............. '" .. (503)641-6644
Datel ............................... (508)339-3000
Dauphin Technology ..... (708)627-4004
David Smith Software .... (508)249-9056
David Systems, Inc ......... (800)762-7848
Tech Support ............ ( 408)541-6884
Davidson &Associates ... (800)545-7677
Tech Support ............ (310)793-0600
Davox Corporation ........ (508)667-4455
DayFlo Software ............. (714)474-1364
Dayna Communicatlons..(801)269-7200
Tech Support ............ (801)269-7200
DayStar Digital ............... (800)962-2077
Tech Support ............ (800)960-2077
DBMS .............................. ( 415)358-9500
DC Battery Products ...... (612)616-7478
DCA ................................ (404)740-0300
Tech Support ............ (404)740-0300
DCA/Crosstalk Comm ... (800)348-3221
Tech Support ............ (404)442-3210
DCI Companies .............. (800)234-2202
DCM Data Products....... (817)870-2202
DCSI. ............................... (703)823-8886
DD & TT Ent. USA ......... (213)780-0099
Tech Support ............ (213)780-0099
DDC Publishing ............. (800)528-3897
Tech Support ............ (800)528-3897
DEVC Professional.. ....... (215)957-1500
Decision Inc ................... (903)586-0556
Decision Industries ........ (215)674-3300
Dee One Systems ........... (800)831-8808
Dee Van Enterprise USA .. (800)878-0691
Deerfield Systems Inc .... (800)356-8170
Dees Comm. Eng ............ (604)946-8433
Delkin Services Inc ........ (619)571-1234
Dell Computer Corp ...... (800)426-5150
Tech Support ............ (800)624-9896
DeLorme Mapping ........ (207)865-1234
Delphi ............................. (800)695-4005
Delphi Data.................... (800)335-7445
Delrina Technology........ (800)268-6082
Tech Support ............ (800)268-6082
Delta Computer Inc ....... (201)440-8585
Delta Phase Int'1.. ........... (714)768-6842
Delta Products ............... (706)487-1037
Delta Technology Int'I ... (715)832-7575
Delta Warranty ............... (206)391-2000
DeltaPoint Inc ................ ( 408)648-4000
Tech Support ............ (408)375-4700
Deltec Corporation........ (800)854-2658
Hard Drive Bible 341

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743-8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Deltron Inc ..................... (800)523-2332
Demosource ................... (800)283-4759
Dempa Publications ...... (212)752-3003
Deneba Software ........... (305)596-5644
Tech Support ............ (305)596-5644
Departme:ntal Techn ...... (20 1)786-5838
Depot America............... (800)648-6833
Desco Industries ............ (714)598-2753
DeScribe, Inc .................. (800)448-1586
Tech Support ............ (916)646-1111
Design Creations ............ (209)532-8413
Design Science .............. (800)827-0685
Tech Support ............ (213)433-6969
DesignCAD ..................... (918)825-4844
DeskTop Graphics ........ (817)346-0556
Deskin Research Grp ..... ( 408)496-5300
Desktop AI ...................... (203)255-3400
Desktop Sales Inc ........... (708)272-9695
DestinyTechn. Corp ...... ( 408)262-9400
DEW Int'I Corp .............. (800)326-7114
DF Blumberg & Assoc ... (215)643-9060
DFM Systems, Inc ........... (800)922-4336
DH Serv .......................... (800)548-7862
DHTechnology .............. (619)451-3485
DIIAN Controls .............. (800)878-3134
Diagnostic Technology .. ( 416)542-8674
DiagSoft Inc ................... (800)342-4763
Tech Support ............ ( 408)438-8247
Diamond Cmptr Sys ...... (408)736-2000
Tech Support ............ ( 408)736-2000
Diamond Data Mgt ........ (800)955-3330
Diamond Flower Inst .... (916)568-1234
Diamond Systems .......... (904)241-4550
Dianachart Inc ............... (201)625-2299
DIC Digital ..................... (201)224-9344
Dick Berg &Associates .. (619)452-2745
Diebold .......................... (216)489-4110
Digi-Data Corporation ...(800)782-6395
Digi-Key Corporation .... (800)344-4539
Digiboard, Inc ................. (800)344-4273
Tech Support ............ (612)943-9020
Digicom Systems Inc ..... (800)833-8900
Digit Head Inc ................ (703)524-0101
Digital Comm. (DCA) .... (800)348-3221
Digital Computer Serv... (215)358-6045
Digital Data Systems ...... (800)762-7811
Digital Dynamics ........... (714)529-6328
Digital Engineering ........ (713)271-5200
Tech Support ............ (713)271-5200
Digital Equip. Corp-MA.. (800)332-7378
Digital Equip. Corp-MAo .(800)332-4636
Digital Equip. Corp-MAo .(800)354-9000
Digital Equip. Corp-MAo .(508)841-3627
Digital Equip. Corp-NH .. (800)354-9000
Digital Data Recovery.... (414)353-1219
Digital Mind ................... ( 407)354-0045
Digital News & Reviews .(617)964-3030
Digital Processing Sys .... (606)371-5533
Digital Products Inc ....... (800)243-2337
Digital Products, Inc ...... (800)243-3333
Digital Research ............. (800)848-1498
Digital Review ................ (617)964-3030
Digital Solutions Inc ...... (916)773-1551
Digital Storage Inc .......... (800)232-3475
Digital Sys. Research ...... (714)455-1620
Digital Typeface Corp .... (612)944-9264
342 Hard Drive Bible

Tech Support ............ (612)941-8652
Digital Vision .................. (617)329-5400
Tech Support ............ (617)329-5400
Digitalk ........................... (800)531-2344
Tech Support ............ (714)513-3000
Digitech Industries Inc .. (203)797-2676
Digitronix Inc. ............... (402)339-5340
Digitz .............................. (919)828-5227
DigiVox Corporation ..... ( 415)494-6200
Digix America Corp .......(305)593-8070
Direct Drives .................. (708)481-1111
DISC ............................... (800)669-2333
Disc &Tape Services ..... (603)889-5722
Disc Distributing Corp .. (800)688-4545
Disc Manufacturing Inc.(302)479-2500
Disc Tec .......................... (407)671-5500
Dismimagery.................. (212)675-8500
Discis Knowledge Rsrch.(800)567-4321
Discount Micro .............. (800)574-3325
Tech Support ............ (714)827-7090
Discoversoft Inc ............. (510)814-1690
Discus Knowledge Rsrch.(416)250-6537
Tech Support ............ (416)250-6537
Disk Drive Repair .......... (206)575-3181
Disk Software ................. (800)635-7760
Disk Technologies .......... ( 407)645-0001
........................................ (800)553-0337
Disk's & Labels To Go .... (800)426-3303
Diskette Connection ...... (800)654-4058
Diskettes Unlimited ....... (800)364-3475
Disks & Labels To Go .... (609)265-1500
Disney Cmptr Software.(818)841-3326
Tech Support ............ (818)841-3326
Display Technologies ..... (708)931-2136
Distinct Corporation ..... (408)741-0781
Distr. Logic Corp ............ (714)476-0303
Distr. Processing Tech .... ( 407)830-5522
Distributed Technology .(206)395-7800
Ditek International ........ ( 416)479-1990
DiVA ............................... (800)949-2843
Diverse Business Grp .... (604)596-6088
Diversified Case Co ....... (315)736-3028
Diversified Technology.. (800)443-2667
Diesko Associates ........... (201 )435-8401
DM .................................. (516)462-0440
DM .................................. (800)821-3354
DNA Networks, Inc ........ (800)999-3622
Document Management..(602)224-9777
Document Storage Sys ... (303)757-1455
DocuPoint Inc ................ (510)770-1189
Dolch Computer Sys ..... (800)538-7506
Dominion Blueline Inc .. (416)444-6621
DotShop Inc ................... (800)487-6025
Dover Electr. Mfg ............ (303)772-5933
Dovetail Comm .............. (800)432-1414
Dow Jones & Company.. (800)922-0358
DP NemethAssociates ... (609)737-1166
DP Tech .......................... (713)492-1894
DP-Tek, Inc ..................... (800)727-3130
DPT-Distr. Process Tech.. ( 407)830-5522
Tech Support ............ (407)830-5522
Dr. Dobb'sJoumal.......... (415)358-9500
Dr.T's Music Software ... (617)455-1454
Dragon Systems Inc ....... (617)965-5200
Dranetz Technology....... (800)372-6832
Dresselhaus Cmptr Prod .(800)368-7737

Tech Support ............ (909)945-5600
Drexler Technology ....... (415)969-7277
Drive Repair Serv. Co ..... (51 0)430-0595
DSA Systems .................. (508)477-2540
DSC Communications ... (214)519-3000
DSE Inc ........................... (808)578-0237
DSG Communications ... (306)665-61 07
DSK Inc .......................... (801)224-4828
DSP Solutions ................. ( 415)494-8086
Tech Support ............ (415)494-8088
DST Systems .................. (816)221-5545
DTK Computer Inc ....... (818)810-6880
Dual Group, Inc .............(31 0)542-0788
Duble-Click Software .... (800)359-9079
Tech Support ............ (800)266-9525
Dudley Software .............no main number
Tech Support ............ (615)966-3667
Duffy ConSUlting Grp .... ( 416)966-4015
Dukane Corporation ..... (708)584-2300
Dumont Oscilloscope ... (201)575-8666
Duplication Technology.(303)444-6157
Duracell Inc .................... (203)796-4000
Durham Off. Mach. Spec..( 408)462-4989
Dustin Discount Sftwre.(800)274-6611
DW Smith &Associates.(415)349-7725
Dyatron Corporation ..... (800)334-3471
Dyna Micro, Inc ............. ( 408)943-0100
Dynamic Electronics Inc ..(714)855-0411
Dynamic Pathways ........ (714)720-8462
Dynamic Power System ..(800)422-0708
Dynatech Cmptr Power.(800)638-9098
Dynatech Corporation ... (617)272-6100
DynaTek Auto. Systems .. ( 416)636-3000
Dynaware USA ............... (415)349-5700
Dytel Inc ........................ (708)519-9850
E-Cam Technology Inc ... (602)443-1949
E-Comms ........................ (800)247-1431
E-Machines ..................... (800)344-7274
Tech Support ............ (800)344-7274
E-Systems ........................ (214)661-1 000
E-Tech Research Inc ......(408)988-8108
E-Toor Corporation........ (818)333-5521
E-WARE .......................... (714)236-1380
Tech Support ............ (714)236-1380
Eagle Electronics ........... (800)992-3191
Eagle Petionn.Software .. (214)539-7855
Eagle Technology ........... (800)733-2453
Tech Support ............ (800)726-5267
Easel Corporation .......... (617)221-2100
Eastern Time Designs .... (603)645-6578
Easterntech Corp ........... (800)289-8128
Tech Support ............ (800)685-5006
Eastman Kodak .............. (716)724-4000
Easy Automation Sys ...... (800)627-3274
Tech Support ............ (404)840-0475
EAZY............................... (412)746-5500
EBS Consulting .............. (215)493-7315
Eclipse Marketing Inc .... (800)284-0779
Tech Support ............ (506)598-9640
Eclipse Systems .............. (312)541-0260
Ecol 2 ............................. (408)456-0272
Edgell Enterprises .......... (201 )895-3300
Edimax Computer Co ... (408)496-1105
Edison Technologies ...... (800)334-7668
Edmark ........................... (800)426-0856
Tech Support ............ (206)556-8400
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Edmund Scientific ......... (609)573-6250
EDP Rsrch & Devel.. ...... (203)399-5018
EDS Corporation ............ (214)661-6000
Educom USA IlllC ............ (800)553-2212
Educational Systems ...... (800)553-2212
EECO Inc ........ "............... (714)835-6000
EF Industries .................. (310)523-2290
EFA Corp. of America .... (301)670-6166
EFAR Microsystems Inc.(408)452-1888
Effi.cient Field Service .... (800)257-4745
Fifron Sales .................... (714)962-1016
EFI Electronics ............... (800)877-1174
Tech Support ............ (800)877-1174
Egghead DiscOlmt Sftwr.. (206)391-0800
Eicon Technology .......... (514)631-2592
FlD Center ..................... (408)733-5501
Eight Htmdred Sftwr ..... (800)888-4880
EJ Bilingual Inc ............... (310)320-8139
EKD Cmptr Sales/Supp.(516)736-0500
El Camino Rsrcs Ltd ...... (818)226-6600
Elan Computer Grp ....... «i15)964-2200
Elan Software Corp ........ (800)654-3526
Tech Support ............ (310)459-1222
E1cee Computek, Inc ..... (407)750-8061
Elco ................................. (818)284-2181
........................................ (814)643-0700
........................................ (818)284-7018
..... ".................................. (800)653-3526
Elecom Computer Prod .. (31 0)802-0077
Electrified Discotmters .. (800)678-8585
Electro Media Publ ........ (408)374-9804
Electro Products Inc ...... (800)423-0646
Electro Rent Corp .......... (818)787-2100
Electro Standards Lab .... (401)943-1164
Electro Static Techn ....... (207)795-641.6
Electro Tech Industries .. (619)745-3575
Electro-Tech Systems ..... (215)887-2196
Electrodata Inc. .............. (800)441-6336
Electrografics Int'l. ......... (215)443-5190
Tech Support ............ (215)443-9564
Electrohome Projection .. (519)744-7111
Electromatic .................. .008)882-5757
Electronic Arts Distr ...... (800)448-8822
Tech Support ............ (415)572-2787
Electronic Assist. Corp ... (817)778-7978
Electronic Associates ..... (908)229-1100
Electronic Buye:rs' Mag .. (516)562-5000
Electronic City ............... (602)622-1173
Electronic Data Assoc .... (816)966-0669
Electronic Eng. Times ..... (516)562-5000
Electronic Ind.Assoc ...... (202)457-4500
Electronic Mktg. Grp ..... (800)955-2688
Electronic News ............ (800)883-6397
Electronic Prods. Mag .... (516)227-1300
Electronic Prods Serv .... (404)448-0748
Electronic Services ........ (313)341-1821
Electronic Specialists ..... (508)655-1532
Electronic Speech Sys ... (510)783-3100
Electronics of Salina ...... (913)827-7377
Electronics Unlimited .... (216)835-0520
Electroservice I.abs ........ (800)336-4375
Elegant Graphics Corp .. (303)879-4334
Elek-Tek, Inc ................... (800)395-1000
Elektro Assemblies ......... (800)533-1558
Elenco Electronics ......... (708)541-3800
Elesys .............................. (800)637-0500
© CSC 1996

Eletch Electronics, Inc ... (71.4)385-1707
Equilibrium .................... (415)332-4343
Elgar Corporation .......... (619)450-0085
Tech Support ............ (415)332-4343
Equinox .......................... (305)255-3500
Elisa Technology Inc ...... (51. 0)651-5817
Elite ................................. (310)370-2762
Equinox Systems Inc ..... (800)275-3500
Tech Support ............ (305)255-3500
Elite Microelectronics .... ( 408)943-0500 \
ERA................................. (312)649-1333
Elitegroup Cmptr Sys .... (510)226-7333
Tech Support ............ (510)226-7333
Ergo Computing, Inc ..... (508)535-7510
Elographics, Inc .............. (615)482-4100 Ergo Management Co .... (800)348-8633
ELSA America Inc ........... (415)615-7799 Ergo Systems Inc ............ (203)282-9767
ELT Systems of CA ....... ,.(510)226-9057
Ergodyne ........................ (612)642-9889
Eltrex Industries Inc .... ".(716)454-6100
Ergotron ......................... (800)888-8458
Elvo ................................. (914)241-1008
ErgoViewTechnologies.(212)995-2673
Elxsi Corporation ........... ( 408)994-9301
ERM/Crazy Bob's ........... (800)776-5865
Tech Support ............ (617)662-2046
EMAC/EVEREX .............. (510)498-4411
Tech Support ............ (510)498-4411
Ero Surge Inc ................. (908)776-4220
Emax International Inc .. (310)637-6380 ERS Electr. Repair Serv... (210)623-4420
EMC Corporation ........... (800)222-3622 Escaa Corporation.......... (206)822-6800
ESCOD Industries .......... (800)533-4736
Emerald Intelligence .... ".(313)663-8757
Emerald Systems ............(800)767-2587
Esico-Triton .................... (203)526-5361
Tech Support ............ (800)366-4349
Esker............................... ( 415)341-9065
Emerging Techn. Cons ... (303)447-9495
Tech Support ............ (415)341-9065
Emerson Cmptr Corp .... (800)222-5877
ESofi Product Support ... (303)699-6565
ESP Inc ........................... (800)338-4353
Emerson Cmptr Pwr ..... (800)222-5877
Tech Support ............ (800)222-5877
Etak Inc .......................... (415)328-3825
ETC Computer Inc ........ (51 0)226-6250
Emerson Electric ........... (314)553-2000
Emery World Wide ......... (800)443-6379
ETCON Corporation ..... (708)325-6100
Eteq Microsystems, Inc .. (408)432-8147
EMLAssociates ............... (617)341-0781
Empac Int'l Corp ............ (510)683-8800 ETN Corporation ........... (800)326-9273
Empress Software Inc .... (301)220-1919 ETS Incorporated........ no main number
Tech Support ............ (801)265-2490
Emulex Corporation ...... (800)368-5393
Enable Software ............. (800)888-0684
European Cmptr Mkt .... (619)929-0955
European Cmptr Source .(708)475-1900
Tech Support ............ (518)877-8236
Evans & Sutherland Co .(801)582-5847
ENCAD ........................... (619)578-4070
Everest Cmptr Corp ....... (408)997-1674
EndosureTechnologies.... (313)481-2200
Everex ............................ (800)821-0806
Encore Computer Corp ... (508)460-0500
Endl Publications ........... (408)867-6642
Tech Support ............ (510)498-4411
Enertronics Research ..... (314)427-7578 Everfit Cmptr Supply..... ( 408)894-9003
Evergreen Technologies... (800)733-0934
Engage Comm ................ (408)688-1021
Engineered Data Prods .. (800)432-1337
Evolution Computing .... (800)874-4028
Eng. Computers & Apps...(800)950-1217
Tech Support ............ (800)874-4028
Engineering Services ..... (800)525-5608
Evtek Corporation ......... (216)267-8499
English Knowledge Sys.(408)438-6922
Ex Machina Inc .............. (718)965-0309
Enhance Memory Prods...(800)343-O 100
Ex-Cel Solutions ............. ( 402)333-6541
Tech Support ............ (818)343-3066
Exabyte ........................... (800)445-7736
Enigma Logic Inc ........... (415)827-5707
Tech Support ............ (913)492-6002
Excalibur Comm............ (918)496-7881
Enlight Corporations ..... (31 0)693-8885
Excel,lnc ........................ (800)624-2001
Enterprise Sys.]oumal...(214)343-3717
Entrepreneur.................. (714)261-2325
Excelan (Novell) ............ (408)434-2300
Entropy Engineering ..... (301)770-6886
Tech Support ............ (800)638-9273
Excelta Corporation ...... (805)686-4686
Envelope Manager ........ ,,(415)321-2640
Executive Systems Inc ... (805)541-0604
Environgen ..................... (714)863-7474
Tech Support ............. (714)863-7474
EXPO Electro-OpticaL .... (800)663-3936
Envisions Sol. Techn ...... ,,(800)365-7226
Exide Electronics Grp .... (919)870-3285
Tech Support ............ ( 415)692-9067
Exima International.. ..... ( 408)970-9225
EO (AT&1) ..................... (800)458-0880
ExMachina...................... (718)965-0309
Tech Support ............ (800)458-0880
EXP Computer............... (516)496-3703
EOS Distributing ............ (913)827-7377
Experience in Software.(800)678-7008
EOS Technology............. ( 408)727-0111
Experience Software ..... (303)796-0790
EPE Technologies, Inc .... (714)557-1636
Expert Software ............. (305)567-9990
ExperVision Inc ............. (800)732-3897
EPrinceton Cmptr Supp ...(609)921-8889
Tech Support ............ ( 408)428-9234
Epsilon Data Mgmt ........ (800)225-3333
Expo Tech ....................... (800)284-3976
EpsonAmerica, OEM Div.(213)782-0770
Exponent Corporation .. (20 1)808-9423
Epson America, Inc ........ (800)289-3776
Tech Support ............ (800)922-8911
Tech Support ............ (201)808-9423
Epson Direct .................. (800)374-7300
Express Cmptr Supply... (800)342-4542
Exsel Inc ......................... (800)624-2001
Tech Support ............ (800)922-8911
Hard Drive Bible 343

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Tech Support ............ (800)624-2001
Exsys ............................... (505)256-8356
Extech Instruments ....... (617)890-7440
Extended Systems Inc ... (800)235-7576
Exxus Direct .................. (800)557-1000
Tech Support ............ (800)557-4000
EyeTel Comm. Inc .......... (604)984-2522
EZI America Corporate.. (805)987-5885
EZX Publishing .............. (713)280-9900
F Systems Industries ...... (800)432-8051
Facit, Inc ......................... (603)647-2700
Fairchild Defense ........... (301)428-6677
Faircom .......................... (314)445-6833
Tech Support ............ (800)234-8180
Fairhaven Software ........ (800)582-4747
Tech Support ............ (617)341-1969
Falcon Systems ............... (800)326-1002
Falltech Electronics ........ (714)543-5011
Fam. & Home Off. Comp..(212)505-3580
Family Scrapbook .......... (904)247-0062
Farallon Computing ....... (510)814-5000
Tech Support ............ (510)814-5000
Fargo Electronics Inc ..... (800)327-4622
FarPoint Comm .............. (805)726-4420
FAST Electronic U.......... (508)655-3278
FAX-Stor Corporation .... (408)287-2700
Faxback Inc .................... (503)645-1114
FDKAmerica,lnc ........... (408)432-8331
FDP Corporation............ (305)858-8200
FEC ................................. (714)692-1170
Fedco Electronics, Inc ... (703)689-7711
Federal Computer Week .(703)876-5100
Fellowes ......................... (708)893-1600
FessendenTechnology... (417)485-2501
FFE Software .................. (510)232-6800
Fiber Instnlment Sales... (800)445-290 1
FiberOptic Netwrk So1..(508)842-4744
Ficus Systems ................. (617)938-7055
Tech Support ............ (617)938-7055
Fidelity International ..... (908)828-7948
Fidelity Prof Develpmnt ... (612)897-3875
Fieldpiece Instruments .. (714)992-1239
Fieldtex Products Inc .... (716)473-5237
Fifth Generation Sys ...... (800)873-4384
Tech Support ............ (800)766-7283
Fifth Generation Sys ...... (504)291-7221
Tech Support ............ (504)291-7221
Filenet Corporation ....... (714)966-3400
Finalsoft Corporation ..... (800)232-8228
First Byte ........................ (800)545-7677
Tech Support ............ (800)556-6141
First Financial Mgt ......... (404)321-0120
First Int'l Computer....... (510)475-7885
First Source Int'I ............ (800)535-5892
FtrSt Uniteu Leasing Cotp..(708)615-0992
Fischer International.. .... (813)643-1500
Fiserv; Inc ........................ (800)558-8413
FIT Software ................... ( 408)562-5990
Tech Support ............ ( 408)562-5990
Flagship Accounting ...... (214)248-0305
Flagship Group, The ....... (214)342-2801
Flagstaff Engineering ..... (602)779-3341
Flambeaux Software ...... (800)833-7355
Fleetmasters-Comtech... (310)539-7900
Fleming Software ........... (703)591-6451
Flexistand Inc ................ (908)421-6868
344 Hard Drive Bible

FlexstarTechnology....... (510)440-0170
Flight Form Cases .......... (206)435-6688
Flip Track One ................ (800)424-8668
Floating Point Sys Co ..... (503)641-3151
Tech Support ............ (503)641-3151
Fluke,]ohn Mfg .............. (800)443-5853
Flytech Techn. Co. Ltd .... ( 408)727-7373
Focus Electronics Corp.(714)468-5533
Focus Info. Sys ................ (510)657-2845
Focus Microsys ............... ( 408)436-2336
Folex Film Systems ........ (800)631-1150
Folio Corporation .......... (801)375-3700
Footprint Software ......... ( 416)860-0477
Fora Inc .......................... (408)944-0393
Forbin Project. ............... (319)266-0543
Foresight Resources ...... (800)231-8574
Tech Support ............ (816)891-8418
FormaISoft...................... (800)962-7118
FormGen Corporation ... (416)857-4141
Formgen, Inc .................. (602)443-4109
Tech Support ............ (602)443-4109
Formax Cmptr Corp ...... (908)874-7122
Fort's Software ............... (913)537-2897
Forte Computer Serv..... (708)985-7222
Fortron/Source Corp ..... (510)373-1008
ForvalAmerica Inc ......... (408)452-8887
ForvalAmerica, Inc ........ (801)561-8080
Fotec Inc ........................ (800)537-8254
Foundationware ............. (216)752-8181
Fountain Technology ..... (908)563-4800
Four Seasons Publ. ......... (212)599-2141
Fourgen Software, Inc .... (800)333-4436
Tech Support ............ (800)444-3398
Fourth Party Maint.. ....... (416)479-1910
Fox Software .................. (419)874-0162
Foxconn Int'l, Inc ........... (408)749-1228
Fractal Design Corp ....... (408)688-8800
Tech Support ............ (408)688-5300
Frame Technology.......... ( 408)975-6000
Tech Support ............ ( 408)975-6466
Franklin Datacom .......... (805)373-8688
Franklin Electr. Publ. ...... (609)261-4800
Franklin Quest Co .......... (804)975-9999
Tech Support ............ (801)975-9999
Frederick Engineering ... ( 410)290-9000
Free CmptrTechn .......... ( 408)945-1118
FreeSoft Company ......... (412)846-2700
French Expositions in US.(212)265-5676
Fresh Technology Grp ... (602)497-4200
Tech Support ............ (602)497-4235
Fridays Electronics ......... (800)488-6575
Tech Support ............ (408)294-5295
Friendly Software Store.(800)848-0486
Tech Support ............ ( 415)593-8275
Frontline Network Sys ... (508)393-1911
Frontline Systems .......... (800)451-0303
Frontline Test Equip ....... (708)653-8570
Frost & Sullivan, Inc ....... (800)435-1080
FRS Inc ........................... (916)928-1107
Fry's Electronics ............. ( 415)496-6100
Frye Computer............... (800)234-3793
FTG Data Systems .......... (800)962-3900
FTP Software Inc ........... (508)685-4000
Fuji. ................................. (510)438-9700
Fuji Photo Film USA ...... (914)789-8100
Fujikama USA ................. (708)832-1166

Fujikura America, Inc ..... ( 404)956-7200
Fujitsu America .............. (800)626-4686
Tech Support ............ (408)432-1300
Fujitsu Computer Prod.. (800)626-4686
Tech Support ............ ( 408)894-3950
Fujitsu Microelectronics... (800)637-0683
Tech Support ............ (800)642-7616
Fujitsu Personal Sys ....... (408)982-5900
Tech Support ............ ( 408)764-9388
Fullmark International. .. (800)233-3855
FuncKey Enterprises ..... (800)255-4433
Funk Software .............. no main number
Tech Support ............ (617)497-6339
Futaba Corp ofAmerica ..(714)455-9888
Future Graphics Inc ...... (818)341-6314
Future Soft Eng. Inc ....... (713)496-9400
Tech Support ............ (713)496-9400
Future Solutions ............. (800)886-1278
Tech Support ............ (510)440-1210
FutureComm, Inc ........... (203)932-4881
FutureSoft Inc ................ (713)496-9400
Futurmaster USA ........... (305)371-4555
Futurus Corporation ..... (800)327-8296
G & H Ribbons, Inc ....... (215)953-1970
G C 1............................... (505)522-4600
Tech Support ............ (800)874-2383
Galacticomm Inc ........... (305)583-5990
Galaxy Appl. Eng ............ (415)347-9953
Galaxy Cmptr Serv ........ (612)688-7454
Galaxy Computers ........ (800)771-4049
Galizia Inc ...................... (310)763-2184
Gallant Intellgnt Cmptrs...(800)848-8088
Tech Support ............ (818)575-3781
Gama Computers Inc .... (602)741-9550
Gamatek. ........................ (800)927-4263
Tech Support ............ (800)927-4263
GammaLink.................... ( 408)744-1400
Tech Support ............ (408)745-2250
Gandalf........................... (708)517-3615
Gandalf Premier............. (310)312-9522
GandalfTechnologies .... (613)723-6500
Gap Development ......... (714)496-3774
Gartech .......................... (612)379-7930
Gates Distributing .......... (800)332-2222
Gates FA Distributing .... (800)332-2222
Gateway 2000 ................ (800)846-2000
........................................ (605)232-2000
Gateway Book Binding ... (204)663-9214
Gateway Electronics-MO.. (314)427-6116
Gateway Electronics-CO...(303)458-5444
Gateway Electronics-CA ...(619)279-6802
Gazelle Systems ............. (800)786-3278
Tech Support ............ (801)377-1289
GBC Technologies ......... (800)229-2296
GBM Design/COS .......... (310)677-8801
GC(fhorsen ................... (800)435-2931
GeC Technologies ......... (800)422-7777
Tech Support ............ (617)275-1795
GDT Softworks .............. (800)663-6222
Tech Support ............ (604)299-3379
GE Rental/Lease ............. (800)437-3687
GEC P1essey Semicond.. ( 408)438-2900
Geller Software Labs ..... (201)746-7402
Gemini Inc ..................... (800)533-3631
Gemplus Card Int'1.. ...... (301)990-8800
Gen 2 Ventures .............. ( 408)446-2277
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743-8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Genamation Industries .. (416)475-9434
Genemax Monitor'g Sys..(416)923-9000
General Cmptr Corp ..... (800)521-4548
Genl Datacomm Ind...... (203)574-1118
Genl Diagnosti1cs Inc ..... (310)715-1222
General Disk Corp ......... (408)432-0505
General Electric ............. (800)543-0440
General Parametrics ...... (510)524-3950
General Power Corp ..... (800)854-3469
General Ribbon .............. (800)423-5400
General Sales Equip ....... (310)828-2577
General Semicond. Ind .. (602)968-3101
Genl Services Admin ..... (202)472-2205
General Signal Corp ...... (203)357-8800
Generic Software, Inc .... (800)228-3601
Genesis Develprnnt Cotp..(80 1)568-1212
Genesis Integrated Sys .. (612)544-4445
Genesis Technology....... (510)782-4800
Genesoft......................... (714)394-0010
Gerucom......... ,............... (800)535-4364
Tech Support ............ (703)949-1031
Genigraphics Corp ........ (800)638-7348
Tech Support ............ (203)925-1919
GeniscoTechn. Corp ..... (619)661-5100
Genoa............................. (408)432-9090
Genovation, Inc .............. (714)833-3355
Genus Microprgram ...... (800)227-0918
Tech Support ............ (713)977-0680
Geocomp ....................... (800)822-2669
Georgans Industries ...... (800)255-5350
GeoSystems .... "............... (717)293-7500
GeoWorks ....................... (510)814-1660
Tech Support ............ (510)644-0883
Gerber Scientific ............ (203)644-1551
GETC .............. "............... (604)684-3230
Gibson Researc::h ............ (800)736-0637
Tech Support ............ (714)362-8900
Giga-ByteTechn. Co ....... (818)854-9334
Gigatek Memory Sys ..... (619)438-9010
GigaTrend Inc ................ (619)931-9122
Tech Support ............ (619)931-9122
Gilmore Systems ............ (805)379-3210
Gimpel Software ............ (215)584-4261
Gizmo Technology......... (510)623-7899
Glenco Engineering ...... (800)562-2543
Tech Support ............ (708)808-0315
Glendale Technology ..... (708)305-9100
GlennA Barber &Assoc ...(818)951-4744
Global Cmptr Supply .... (800)845-6225
Global Eng. D<.x:uments ... (800)854-7179
Global Specialties .......... (800)345-6251
GlobalVtllage Comms ..... (800)736-4821
Tech Support ............ (415)390-8300
Globalink, Inc ................. (800)255-5660
Globe Manufacturing .... (800)227-3258
Tech Support ............ (908)232-7301
GlobeTech Int'l .............. (800)654-7314
GMCTechn. Corp .......... (818)401-3743
GMP ................................ (215)357-5500
GN Navte1 ...................... (800)262-8835
GN Navtel Limited ........ (800)262-8835
Go Corporation ............. (415)345-7400
GO Technology .............. (702)831-3100
Tech Support ............ (702)832-7762
Gold Disk ....................... (310)320-5080
Gold Disk, Inc ................ (800)465-3375
© CSC 1996

Tech Support ............ (416)602-4357
Gold Hill Computers ..... (617)621-3300
GoldDisk (AMI) ............. (800)465-3375
Tech Support ............ (905)602-4357
GoldDisk (MAC) ............ (800)465-3375
Tech Support ............ (905)602-0395
GoldDisk (PC) ................ (800)465-3375
Tech Support ............ (900)602-5292
Golden Bow Systems .... (800)284-3269
Golden Coast Electr....... (619)268-8447
Golden Image Techn ..... (800)327-4482
Golden Power Sys ......... (805)582-4400
Golden Ribbon .............. (303)443-6966
Golden Star Inc .............. (800)821-2792
Golden Triangle ............. (800)326-1858
Golden-Lee Book Distr.... (718)857-6333
Goldstar Precision Co ... (619)268-8447
GoldstarTechn. Corp ..... (800)777-1192
Tech Support ............ (800)777-1192
Good Software ............. ".(214)713-6370
Tech Support ............ (214)713-6370
Gorrell's Cmptr Serv...... (606)299-8468
Gotoless Conversion ..... (214)625-2323
Gould Inc ....................... (216)328-7000
Governmnt Cmptr News..(301)650-2000
GRACE Electr. Materials... (617)935-4850
Gradco Inc ...................... (714)770-1223
GrafPoint ........................ (800)426-2230
Graham Magnetics Inc.... (817)868-5000
Granite Corporation ...... (818)887-5533
Grapevine LAN Prods .... (206)869-2707
Tech Support ............ (206)836-8822
Graphic Ent. of Ohio ..... (800)321-9874
Tech Support ............ (216)456-5107
Graphic Software Sys .... (503)641-2200
GRAPHIC TECH ............. (413)536-7800
Graphic Utilities, Inc ...... (800)669-4723
Graphics Development ... (800)969-4434
Graphics Simulations ..... (214)699-7400
Tech Support ............ (214)699-7400
Graphsoft ....................... (30 1)461-9488
Graybar Electric Co ....... (800)825-5517
Graymark ....................... (800)854-7393
Great Amer. Software ..... (603)889-5400
Great Eastern Techn ...... (800)875-0025
Great Falls Cmptr .......... (703)759-5570
Great Plain Software ...... (701)281-0550
Tech Support ............ (800)456-0025
Great Software Ideas ..... (800)486-7800
Tech Support ............ (714)261-9744
Great Tek Inc .................. ( 408)943-1005
Great Wave Software ...... ( 408)438-1990
Tech Support ............ (408)438-1990
Greatlink Electr. USA ..... (510)683-0655
Greco Systems ............... (800)234-7326
Greengage Dvlp11ll1t Corp.(408)243-8960
Greenleaf Int'l Inc ......... (408)734-8888
Greenleaf Software ........ (800)524-9830
........................................ (800)523-9830
Greystone Peripherals ... ( 408)866-4739
GRID Systems ................ (800)326-4743
Groller Electr. Publ. ..... ".. (800)356-5590
Tech Support ............ (800)356-5590
Group 1 Software .......... (301)731-2300
Tech Support ............ (301)731-2300
Group 4 Electronics ...... (800)229-7189

Group One Elec. Co ...... (818)993-4575
Group Technologies ...... (800)476-8781
Tech Support ............ (703)841-4357
GroupThree Electronics ... (31 0)781-9191
Gruber Industries Inc .... (602)863-2655
Gryphon Software ......... (619)536-8815
Tech Support ............ (619)536-8815
GST, Inc .......................... (714)739-0106
GTCO Corporation ........ (301)381-6688
GTE Corporation ........... (203)965-2000
GTE Electr. Repair Serv ... (714)945-2313
GTE Supply Electr. Repair..(214)615-7599
GUIS America, Inc .......... (714)590-0801
Gupta Technologies ....... (800)876-3267
Tech Support ............ (415)321-4484
GW Computer Sys ......... (604)244-7118
H & H Enterprises ......... (702)876-6292
H&J Electronics Int'l. ..... (800)275-2447
H.Al1en & Company ...... (708)769-4040
H. Co. Memory Prods .... (714)833-3222
H. Co. Mem. Upgrades ... (800)726-2477
Tech Support ............ (714)833-3364
Ha-Lo Adv. Specialtie ...... (708)676-5305
Hadron, Inc .................... (703)359-6201
Hahn & Company ......... (503)248-0262
Halcyon Software .......... ( 408)378-9898
Haliburton NUS Environ ...(301)258-6000
Haltek Electronics ......... (415)969-0510
Hamilton Dig. Controls .... (315)797-2370
Hamilton TeL .................. (800)363-7626
Hampton Bus. Mach ...... (800)974-2402
Hand Held Products ...... (704)541-1380
Handok Company, Ltd ... (408)736-3191
Hands On Learning ........ (617)272-0068
Handtop Computers ..... (818)884-4076
Hanson Data Sys ............ (800)879-1371
Harbor Electronics ........ (203)438-9625
Hard DriveAssoc ........... (503)233-2821
Hard Drive Super Souoce ...(800)252-9777
Tech Support ............ (408)739-4110
Hard Drive Whsle .......... (408)559-1773
Hard Drives Int'I ............ (800)927-7848
Hardigg Cases ................ (413)665-2163
HARDISKTechnology ... (408)374-5157
Hardware House-AR ...... (501)225-4477
Hardware House-IN ....... (317)842-8244
Hardware House-KY...... (502)425-1402
Hardware House-NE ...... (402)498-5677
Hardware House-OH ..... (513)489-0668
Hardware Hse-Memphis ...(901)756-6677
Hardware Hse-Nashville ....(615)356-2888
Hadey Systems Inc ........ (800)237-2885
Harmony Computers .... (718)692-2828
Tech Support ............ (800)441-1144
HarrisAdacom Networlc.(214)386-2000
Harris Corporation ........ (407)727-9100
Harvard Bus. Systems ..... (800)288-7750
Tech Support ............ (310)207-7750
Harvard Softworks ........ (513)748-0390
Hauppauge CmptrWo!ks ..(800)443-6284
Tech Support ............ (516)434-3197
HavenTree Software ...... (800)267-0668
Tech Support ............ (613)544-6035
Hawaii Sftwr Servo Ctr.... (808)733-2042
Hawk Computers .......... (408)436-8999
Hawk Data Systems ....... (805)371-1764
Hard Drive Bible 345

Corpora Ie Syslems Cenl.r (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Hayes Microcomp. Prod ..(800)874-2937
Tech Support ............ (404)441-1617
HB CmptrTechn. Co ...... (310)644-2602
HCI ................................. (800)486-000 1
HCR Corporation........... ( 416)922-1937
Tech Support ............ (800)567-4357
HD Computer ................ (800)347-0493
Tech Support ............ (800)676-0164
HDC Computer Corp .... (800)321-4606
Health Care Keybrd Co.(414)253-4131
Health Software, Inc ...... (216)759-21 03
Healthkit......................... (800)253-0570
HE[ FastPoint light Pens .. (612)443-2500
Helix Software Co .......... (800)451-0551
Tech Support ............ (718)392-3735
Helix Tec1mologies ........ (800)364-4354
Tech Support ............ (200)451-0551
Help Desk Institute ....... (800)248-5667
Hercules CmptrTechn .. (800)532-0600
Tech Support ............ (510)623-6050
Heritage Cmptr Parts ..... (800)828-8266
Hermann Marketing ...... (800)523-9009
Hermeneutika ................ (206)824-9673
Hersey Micro Consult ... (313)994-3259
Hetra Cmptr & Comm .. (800)327-0661
Hewlett-Packard Co ....... (800)544-9976
Hewiett-PdckardWldwide ..(415)986-5600
H-P, Disk Memory........... (208)396-6000
Tech Support ............ (208)323-2551
Hexacon Electric Co ...... (908)245-6200
Hi Tech Expressions ...... (800)216-1750
Tech Support ............ (305)581-4240
Hi-Tech A.,set Recovery .(805)966-5454
Hi-Tech Cmptr Prods ..... (800)950-6991
Hi-TECH Connections ... (215)372-1401
Hi-Tech USA ................... (800)831-2888
Tech Support ............ (408)956-8285
Hi-Techniques Inc .......... (800)248-1633
Hi-TEK Services Inc ....... (800)285-3508
High Techn. Developmnt..(808)625-5293
Highland Products Inc ... (201)366-0156
Hilgraeve ........................ (313)243-0576
Tech Support ............ (313)243-0576
Hillside Electr. Corp ....... (413)238-5566
Hirose Electric, Inc ........ (805)522-7958
Hitachi (NY) ................... (800)536-6721
Tech Support ............ (800)536-6721
Hitachi (CA) ................... (51 0)785-9770
Hitachi America (CA) ..... (800)448-2244
HitachiAmerica (NY) .... (914)332-5800
Tech Support ............ (800)323-9712
Hitachi Home Electr...... (800)369-0422
Tech Support ............ (800)241-6558
HMC-HUB Material Co ... (800)482-4440
Hokkins Systemation ..... (408)436-8303
Holmes Microsys ........... (801)975-9929
Home Office Cmpting ... (212)505-3688
Honeywell ...................... (612)870-5431
Tech Support ............ (612)782-7646
Honeywell, Inc ............... (800)445-6939
Honeywell-IAe. .............. (602)789-5393
Hong KongTrade ........... (213)622-3194
Hooleon Corporation .... (800)937-1337
Hooper Int'l, Inc ............ (407)851-3100
Tech Support ............ ( 407)851-3100
Hopkins .......................... (800)397-9211
346 Hard Drive Bible

Tech Support ............ (800)397-9211
Hoppecke Battery Sys ... (201)492-0045
Horizon Technology ...... (800)888-9600
Horizon USA Data Supp... (209)848-1001
HometTechnology USA...(818)333-9667
Tech Support ............ (818)572-3784
Hotronic Inc ................... (408)378-3888
House of Batteries .......... (800)432-3385
Houston Cmptr Serv...... (713)493-9900
Houston Data Ctr. Inc .... (713)880-0042
Houston Instruments ..... (800)444-3425
Tech Support ............ (800)444-3425
Howard W Sams ............. (800)428-7267
Howe Industries Inc ...... (800)322-1830
HSC Software ................. (310)392-8441
Tech Support ............ (31 0)392-8441
Hubbell Inc .................... (203)337-3100
Hughes Lan Systems ...... ( 415)966-7300
Humana Cmptr Publ.. ... (403)245-2194
Humancad-Bio Mech ..... (516)752-3550
Huron Cmptr ofPA ....... (412)776-6110
Husky Computers .......... (800)486-7774
Hutchinson Technology .. (612)587-3797
Hy-Tronix Instrument .... (800)835-1 005
Hydra Systems ................ ( 408)253-5800
Hyperception Inc .......... (214)343-8525
HyperGlot Software ....... (800)726-5087
Tech Support ............ (615)584-4379
Hyperkinetic .................. (714)935-0823
Hyperpress Publishing .. (800)633-4252
Tech Support ............ ( 415)345-4620
Hypro Systems ............... (310)473-2937
Hysung ........................... (408)733-0810
HytUldal Electr.America ... (800)289-4986
Tech Support ............ (800)289-4986
I-Data Inc ........................ (516)351-1333
I/O Design ...................... (800)241-2122
Tech Support ............ (800)24J-2122
IBe. ................................. (800)654-3790
IBC/Integrated Bus Cmptr..(818)882-9007
IBEX Technologies Inc ... (916)921-4342
Ibis Software .................. (415)546-1917
Tech Support ............ (415)546-0405
IBM Corporation (0N) .. (416)946-9000
IBM Corporation (GA) ... (800)426-9402
Auth. Dealer Locator.... (800)447-4700
CAD Assistance ............ (303)924-7262
Cust. Relations Dept.. .. (201 )930-3443
Direct ........................... (800)426-2968
Tech Support ............(800)426-7763
Disabilities/Sp. Needlnfb..(800)426-2133
Educational Dept.. ....... (800)222-7257
Employee Sales Dept... (800)426-3675
General Information .... (800)426-3333
Ind Developer Reg ...... (800)982-6408
Industrial PC Support .. (800)526-6602
Indust. PC Tech Supp ... (800)241-1620
Lookup & Part # ID ..... (303)924-4015
Maint.Agreemnts Dept.. (800)624-6875
Mfg. Systems Info ......... (800)526-6602
Multi-Media Mktg line .. (800)426-9402
Multi-Media Tech Supp...(800)241-1620
NSD Hdwr Setv/PC Rpr ..(800)426-7378
OS/2 Prods. Order Ctr.(800)342-6672
Parts Order Line .......... (303)924-4100
PC Prod Info Faxback .(800)426-4329

PCTech Supprt Faxback.(800)426-3395
PC Direct Mail Order... (800)426-2968
Personal Sys Help line..(800)772-2227
Product Info Line ........ (800)426-7699
PS/1 BBS ....................... ( 404)835-8230
PS/l Dealer Locator .... (800)426-3377
Software Supp/Serv..... (800)336-5430
Software Supp Line ..... (800)237~5511
Storage Systems Div .... (507)253-1897
Tech Support ............ (507)253-5005
Technical Manuals ....... (800)426-7282
IBM Corporation (NY) .. (914)288-3000
IBM Desktop Software .. (800)426-7699
IBM National Distr. Div.. (800)426-9397
IBM OEM Division ......... (914)288-3000
IBM Pers. Sys. Card Rpr.. (800)759-6995
liM Pers SysTech Sol Mag .(800)551-2832
liMTechnical Directory..(800)426-7282
IC Designs ...................... (206)821-9202
Tech Support ............ (206)821-8218
learus Corporation ........ (301)881-9350
ICM Int'l Components ... (800)748-6232
leom Simulations ........... (800)877-4266
leon Computer Corp ..... (800)966-4266
ICON CS Canada Inc ..... (613)722-0115
Icons International ........ (800)959-4266
Icot Corporation ............ (800)227-8068
ICSElectro-Pac Division .(708)543-6200
ICS Inc ............................ (805)257-6900
ID Systems ..................... (603)924-9631
IDE ................................. (612)946-4100
Idea Courier................... (800)528-1400
IDEA Servcom Inc ......... (602)894-7000
Ideal Industries Inc ........ (800)435-0705
Ideassociates .................. (508)663-6878
Idek-liyama NorthAmer ..(800)394-4335
Identica .......................... (408)727-2600
Tech Support ............ ( 408)727-2600
Identity SysTechnology... (214)235-3330
IDER ............................... (800)622-4337
Tech Support ............ (818)288-4008
IEEE Cmptr Graphics .... (714)821-8380
IEEE Cinptr Soc. Press ... (714)821-8380
IEEE Service Center....... (201)981-0060
lET Labs .......................... (800)899-8438
lEV Corporation ............ (800)438-6161
Ikon Corporation .......... (408)779-7466
Iliad Group ..................... (415)563-2053
Image Club Graphics ..... ( 403)262-8008
Tech Support ............ ( 403)262-8008
Image Research Corp .... (602)998-1113
Image Smith ................... (310)325-1359
Tech Support ............ (310)325-1359
Image-In ......................... (800)345-3540
Imageline ....................... (804)644-0766
ImageSoft Inc ................. (800)245-8840
ImageWare Software ..... (619)457-8600
Image Club Graphics ..... (403)262-8008
Imagine That .................. ( 408)365-0305
Imaging Magazine .......... (212)691-8215
IMC Networks Corp ...... (800)624-1070
IMP ................................. (408)432-9100
Impact. ........................... (800)777-4323
Tech Support ............ (512)966-3621
Implements .................... (508)358-5858
Impulse Software ........... (800)328-0184
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Tech Support ............ (612)566-0221
IMSI Sofiware ................. (800)833-8082
Tech Support ............ (415)454-7101
In Focus Syste:ms Inc ..... (800)327-7231
In Shape Co. Ltd ............ (408)432-9025
In Win Development.. ... (818)333-1986
lnaCom ........................... (402)392-3900
Inacomp Cmptr Ctrs ..... (313)649-5580
Inbit ................................ (415)967-1788
Incas Corporation .......... (818)332-3443
Incas Corp. USA ............. (609)424-7811
Incider......................... " .(603)924-9471
Incomm Data Systems ... (708)459-8881
Incomnet........................ (818)887-3400
Independt Cmptr Supp.... (215)687-0900
Index Applications ......... (512)822-4818
Individual Softwar.......... (800)822-3522
Tech Support............ (800)331-3313
Inductel, Inc ................... (800)367-4497
Indus International ........ (608)786-0300
Indus-TooL .....................(800)662-5021
Ind. Commercial Elect...(800)442-3462
Industrial CPU Sys. Int'1.(714)957-2815
Industrious Soft.............. (31 0)330-7602
Inference Corporation ... (310)322-0200
Infinite Solutions ............ (713)492-1894
Infiniti Manufacturing .... (818)960-4509
Infbdata........................... (703)578-3430
Infoextend ...................... (619)587-9140
Infomatic Power Sys ...... (310)948-2217
Infonetics ....................... (508)393-8088
Inforite Corporation ...... (800)366-46:~5
Tech Support ............ (800)36&4635
Information Builders ..... (800)444-4303
Information Center........ (617)542-0146
Information Concepts ... (202)682-0330
Infurmation Consultants . .014)859-7123
Information Machines ... (818)884-5779
Information Pkg. Corp ... (800)776-7633
Information Processing.(407)331-5200
Information Science ...... (201)592-0009
Information Stmtagies ... (212)971-5000
Information Sys. Cons .... (214)490-1881
Informationweek. .......... (516)365-4600
Wormix Software/IBM ...(800)274-8184
Tech Support.. .......... (800)274-8184
Informtech Int'll. ............. (31 0)836-8993
InfoShare ........................ (703)791-2910
Infoworld .......................(415)572-7341
Infralink .......................... (703)522-4412
Ingram Micro ... ,,, ............ (714)566-1000
Ingram/Micro D. ............ (714)566-1000
Inland Data Pak .............. (313)583-6220
Inline Design .................. (617)935-1515
Tech Support............ (617)935-1515
Inline, Inc ......... "............. (800)882-7117
Inmac .............................. ( 408)435-1700
Innotech Inc ................... (416)492-3838
Innovative Concepts ...... ( 408)436-1777
Innov. Data Design-IDD.(510)680-6818
1ech Support.. .......... (510)680-6818
Innovative Mfg ............... (305)836-1 035
Innovative Resources .... (612)377-5701
Innovative Techn ........... (713)583-1141
Innovative Techn ........... (800)647-8877
Innovative Techn ........... (800)253-4001
© CSC 1996

Tech Support ............ (405)243-0030
Inovatic ........................... (703)522-3053
Inset Systems ................. (800)828-0068
Tech Support ............ (203)740-2400
Insight Development..... (800)825-4115
Tech SuppOlt ............ (303)339-7072
Insight International.. .... (800)927-7848
Insight Resource ............ (914)332-1589
Insignia Solutions ........... (800)848-7677
Tech Support ............ ( 415)694-7694
Insite Peripherals ........ ".. ( 408)946-8080
Instant Replay. ............... (801)272-0671
Instaplan......................... (415)389-1414
Institute for VAR Devel. .(702)656-7611
Institiute,The ................. (212)705-7555
Instnlctware Inc ............ (800)267-0101
Instrmt. Repair Labs ...... (800)345-6140
Instrument Specialties ... (717)424-851 0
InstrumentMart .............. (516)487-7430
Instnlments & Equip ..... (201)579-0009
Int'l Electr. Research ...... (818)848-8872
Intcomex ........................ (305)477-6230
Intec Computer Serv. .... (800)225-1187
Integral Systems ............. (51 0)939-3900
Integrated Circuit Sys .... (215)666-1900
Integrtd Cmptr Solution ..(20 1)808-9646
Integrated Cmptr Serv." .(818)960-1921
Integrated Data Tech ..... (215)726-6124
Integrated Devel. Corp .. (603)329-5522
Integrated Device Tech .. (408)727-6116
Integrated Electronics .".(303)292-5537
Integrnted Inference Mach.(714)978-6776
Tech Support ............ (714)978-6202
Integrated Info. Techn .... (800)832-0770
Tech Support ............ (408)727-1676
Integrated Workstations ... (800)832-6526
Integrix .......................... (800)300-8288
Intek ...............................(206)455-9935
Intel Corporation ........... (800)538-3373
Tech Support ............ (503)629-7000
Intel PCEO..................... (800)538-3373
Tech Support ............ (503)629-7000
Intelecsis, Inc ................. (512)682-0649
Intelect ........................... (310)828-7310
Intellicom ....................... (800)992-2882
Tech Support........... ,,(818)407-3900
Intellicorp ....................... ( 415)965-5500
Intelligence Technology ....(214)250-4277
Intlligenceware .............. (310)417-8896
Intelligent Controls ........ (206)771-8107
Intelligent Electronics .... (215)458-5500
Intell. Instrumentation ... (602)624-2434
Intelligent Sys. Master..... (404)381-2900
IntelliMedia.................... (800)706-0077
Tech Support ............ (616)925-3675
IntelliPower Inc ............. (714)587-0155
Intellisystems,lnc .......... (818)341-7000
Intelogic Trace Inc ......... (800)531-7186
InterAct .......................... (304)258-1611
Interacter Inc ................. (203)630-0199
Interactive Imaging ....... (813)996-4316
InterActive Inc ............... (606)363-5117
Interactive Multimedia.. (410)626-1380
Interactive Sfiwr Eng ..... (805)685-1 006
Interactive Sys. Corp ...... (213)453-8649
Interactive Training ........ (503)681-0343

Interchange Standards ... (800)423-7823
InterComp Inc ............... (408)928-1588
InterconAssociates ........ (716)244-1250
Interex Cmptr Prods ...... (316)524-4747
Interlace Electronics ...... (503)393-2838
Interlace Group,The ...... (617)449-6600
Interlace Systems ........... (800)544-4072
Interface Technologies ... (314)434-0046
Intergral Peripherals ...... (303)449-8009
Intergraph ...................... (213)479-3400
Interleaf, Inc ................... (617)290-0710
Intermatic Inc ................ (805)675-2321
Intermec ........................ (206)348-2600
Intermetrics ................... (617)661-1840
Int'1. Power Machines .... (214)272-8000
Int'1. Business Sofiware .. (408)522-8001
In1'1. Buyers Market ........ (702)647-3632
Int'1. Compliance ............ (817)491-3696
Int'1. Computer Center... (818)894-2222
Int'1. Computer Power.... (818)443-7557
In1'1. Data Corporation ... (508)879-0700
In1'1. Data Engineering ... (602)946-4100
Int'1. Data Sciences ......... (800)437-3282
Int'1. Keytech Corp ......... (714)596-6219
In1'1. Meta Systems ......... (213)375-4700
Int'1. Open Systems ........ (508)535-2080
Int'!. Power Machines .... (800)527-1208
Int'1. Software ................. (305)823-8088
In1'1. Technical Systems .. (206)486-9031
In1'I.Transware ............... (415)903-2300
Tech Support ............ ( 415)903-2300
In1'1. Cmptr. & Comm .... (310)836-7561
Interphase Corporation.(214)919-9000
InterPlay Productions .... (800)969-4263
Tech Support ............ (714)553-6676
Interpos Systems Inc ..... (416)513-9209
Interpreter...................... (800)232-4687
Intersecting Concepts ... (805)373-3900
Intersolv (Sage Software).. (301)230-3200
Tech Support ............ (800)443-1601
Intersolve (Polytron) ...... (503)645-1150
Tech Support ............ (800)548-4000
Intex Solutions Inc ........ (617)449-6222
Intra Electronics US ....... (408)744-1706
Intuit. .............................. (800)624-8742
Tech Support ............ (415)858-6010
InView System Inc ......... (508)428-5688
Invisible Software .......... (415)570-5967
Invisible Software Inc .... (800)982-2962
IOcomm In1'1. Techn ...... (213)644-6100
loline .............................. (206)821-2140
IOMEGA. ........................ (800)456-5522
Tech Support............ (800)456-5522
Ion Systems .................... (800)367-2452
Iowa America................. (800)920-2673
IPC Corporation Ltd ...... (404)594-8281
IPL Systems, Inc ............. (800)338-8475
Tech Support ............ (617)487-2057
IPX Infomatic Pwr. Sys .. (310)946-2217
IQ Engineering .............. (800)765-3668
IQ Software .................... (404)446-8880
IQ Technologies ............. (800)752-6526
Tech Support ............ (206)823-2273
IQIAccessories .............. (415)567-3500
IQV Corporation ........... (708)253-5196
Iris Software Products ... (617)341-1990
Hard Drive Bible 347

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

Corporate :Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
MacShack Inc ................. (716)344-9230
Macuser.......................... (415)378-5600
Madge Networks ............ (800)876-2343
Tech Support............ (800)876-2343
MAG InnoVision Inc ...... (800)827-3998
Tech Support ............ (714)751-2008
Magee Enterprises, Inc .. (800)662-4330
Tech Support ............ (404)662-5387
Magic RAM ..................... (213)413-9999
Magic Software Ent.. ...... (714)250-1718
Magic Solutions, Inc ...... (201)529-5533
Magma Sftwre Solutions.. (201)912-0192
Magna............................. ( 408)282-0900
Tech Support............ ( 408)879-7911
Magnetic Data, Inc ......... (800)328-3441
Magnetic RecoveryTechn.(805)257-2261
Magni Systems, Inc ........ (503)626-8400
Magretech Inc ................ (805)685-4551
Magus DataTec1m .......... (416)513-0823
MAl Systems ................... (714)731-0201
Main Boards ................... (800)359-0201
Main Source Electr......... (800)456-6246
Tech Support ............ (813)351-8420
MainLan Inc ................... (214)248-0305
Mainlan, Inc .................... ( 407)331-4400
Mainline Cmptr Repair..... (215)644-0534
Mainstay Software .......... (805)484-9400
Tech Support............ (805)484-9400
Mainstream Software ..... (214)934-8906
Maintech........................ (800)426-8324
Maintenance Etc ............ (713)520-6567
Maint. Troubleshooting .. (302)738-0532
Mallard Software ............ (214)436-0044
Tech Support ............ (214)219-0242
Man & Machine Inc ....... (301)277-3760
Mandax Computer ........(206)867-1973
Manhatttan Electr. Cable... (800)228-6322
Mannesmann Tally.......... (206)251-5609
Mansfield Software Grp.(203)429-8402
Mantis Computer Parts .. (800)252-9989
Manugistics .................... (800)592-0050
Manusoft Corporation ... (818)304-2762
Manzana Microsystems .. (805)968-1387
Manzanita Sftwr Sys ....... (800)447-5700
Tech Support ............ (800)447-5700
Maple Systems ............... (408)456-0355
Mapinfo Corporation ..... (518)274-6000
Marc1yn ........................... ( 408)739-2443
Marconi Circuit Techn ... (516)293-8686
Mark IV Industries ......... (716)689-4972
Mark of the Unicorn ...... (617)576-2760
Market Intelligence ........ (415)961-9000
Marlin P. Jones & Assoc .. ( 407)848-8236
Marshall Industries ........ (800)522-0084
Marstek lnc .................... (714)833-7740
Martin Info Systems ....... (808)733-2003
Martin Marietta Corp ..... (301)897-6000
Masque Publishing ......... (800)765-4223
Mass Memory Systems .. (800)347-5722
Mass Micro Systems ....... (800)522-7970
Tech Support ............ (800)522-7970
Masstor Systems Corp ... (408)955-0160
Master Bond Inc ............ (201)343-8963

Mastertronics ................. (714)833-8710
Tech Support ............ (714)833-8710
Math Soft Inc ................. (800)628-4223
Mathematica................... (813)682-1128
Tech Support............ (813)682-1130
MathSoft, Inc .................. (800)628-4223
Tech Support ............ (617)577-1778
Matrix Digital Prods ...... (818)566-8567
Matrox Electronic Sys ... (800)663-8765
Tech Support ............ (800)663-8765
Matrox Graphic Inc ....... (800)361-1409
Tech Support ............ (514)685-0270
Matter of FAX ................. (800)433-3329
Tech Support ............ (212)431-5426
Maui Research &Techn....(800)875-2320
Max Software Consult...(301)828-5935
Max Systems ................... ( 407)877-3807
Maxa ............................... (818)543-1300
Maxcard .......................... (503)593-6027
MaxConcepts ................. (619)530-9062
Maxell ............................. (800)325-7717
Tech Support ............ (800)533-2836
Maxell Corp/America .... (800)533-2836
Maxi Switch, Inc ............ (602)294-5450
Maxim Technology. ........ (800)755-1 008
Maximus ......................... (800)394-6299
Tech Support ............ (800)894-0142
Maxis Software .............. (800)366-2947
Tech Support ............ (510)253-3755
Maxoptix Corporation... (800)848-3092
Maxspeed ....................... (415)345-5447
Maxtor CO - Miniscribe....(303)651-6000
Tech Support............ (800)356-5333
Maxtor Corporatio ......... (800)262-9867
Tech Support ............ (800)262-9867
Maxtron .......................... (818)350-5706
MAXX Memory Prods ... (800)748-6629
Maya Electronic Prod .... (915)590-8880
Mayesys Corporation .....(301)961-4899
Maynard Electronics ...... (800)821-8782
Maysteel Corporation.... (414)629-5535
MBS ................................. (800)944-3808
Tech Support ............ (301)762-7405
MBS Technologies .......... (800)860-8700
Tech Support............ (800)860-8703
McAfee Associates .......... ( 408)988-3832
McArthur Associates ...... (914)279-8049
McCarty Associates ........ (203)388-6994
MCCI ............................... ( 408)954-8070
McClure Consultants ..... (708)382-6233
McDonnell Douglas ....... (314)232-0232
McGraw Hill ................... (800)262-4729
McGraw-HillTechNet Glp.(212)512-4604
McGraw-Hill Cmptr Publ. .. ( 415)513-6800
McGraw-Hill/Data Comm .(800)822-8158
MCI Commun. Corp ...... (202)872-1600
MCM Electronics ........... (800)543-4330
McNeil &Associates ...... (612)428-4068
MCR Computer Serv ..... (800)849-9595
MCR Marketing Inc ....... (513)861-3046
MCSITechnologies, Inc .(301)495-4444
McTronic Systems .......... (713)462-7687
McWains Chelsea ........... (201)993-5700

Measurex Corporation... ( 408)255-1500
MECA Software .............. (800)820-7458
Tech Support ............ (203)255-7562
MECC (MN) .................... (612)569-1529
Tech Support............ (612)569-1678
MECC (CA) ..................... (800)685-6322
Meckler Corporation..... (203)226-6967
Mectel International. ..... (800)248-0255
Media 4 Less ................... (800)621-6827
Media Cybernetics ......... (800)992-4256
Media Factory................. (800)879-9536
Tech Support ............ (408)456-9182
Media Products .............. ( 408)432-1711
Media Resources ............(714)256-5048
Media Source .................. (800)356-2553
Media Value ..................... (800)845-3472
Media Vision Resource ... (800)845-5870
Tech Support ............. (800)638-2807
MediaLogic, Inc .............. (508)695-2006
MediaShare Corp ............ (619)931-7171
Medical Sys. & Mgt.. ....... (310)914-1600
Mega Drive Systems ....... (800)322-4744
Tech Support ............. (31 0)970-8000
Mega Drive Systems ....... (310)847-0006
Mega PC Technology. ..... (714)850-1044
Megadata Corporation ... (516)589-6800
MegaHaus ....................... (800)426-0560
Tech Support ............ (713)333-1944
Megahertz ....................... (800)527-8677
Tech Support............ (800)527-8677
Megasource .................... (800)473-9728
Megatel Cmptr Corp ...... (416)245-2953
MEl/Micro Center.......... (800)634-3478
Meirick Inc ..................... (800)735-5069
Melard Technologies ...... (914)273-4488
Meltek Inc ...................... ( 408)438-4986
Memorex Cmptr Supp ... (408)957-1000
MemorexTelex Corp ..... (918)627-2333
Memory Express ............ (800)877-8188
Memory Media Prods .... (714)669-1800
Memory Prods & More .(714)753-1200
MemoryTechnology Inc ..(303)786-8080
Memsoft Inc ................... (407)997-6655
Menai. ............................. (415)617-5730
Mendon Optronics Inc ..(716)248-8480
Mentor Electronics ......... (216)951-1884
Mentor Graphics Corp .. (503)685-7000
Mentor Market Research ..( 408)268-6333
Merchant Systems .......... (602)951-9390
Mercury Cmptr Sys ........ (508)458-3100
Mercury Technologies .... (514)747-0254
Mergent InternationaL ... (800)688-3227
Tech Support............ (800)688-3227
Meridian Data ................ (800)767-2537
Tech Support ............ (800)755-8324
Merisel. ........................... (800)542-9955
Merit Software ............... (214)385-2353
Tech Support ............ (214)385-2957
Meritec ........................... (216)354-3148
Merlin Software ............. (206)361-0093
Merrill & Bryan Ent ....... (619)689-8611
Merritt Cmptr Prods ...... (214)339-0753
MESA Distribution ......... (800)388-3339

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Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Mete Software ................. (800)767-6292
Metean Info. Tec:hn ........ (416)881-9955
Metheus Corporation.... (800)638-4387
Methode Electronics ...... (800)323-6858
Metra Info. Syswms ........ (408)730-9188
Metrix Cust. Supp. Sys ... (414)798-8560
Metrix Network Sys ....... (603)888-7000
Metro Data-Vac .............. (914)357-1600
Metro Software .............. (602)292-0313
Metromedia Paging Serv. .. (201)462-4966
Metropolis Softw·are ...... (415)322-2001
MetroTel Corporation .... (516)937-3420
MetroVision Microsys .... (800)875-2099
MeU1.Ull Instrumentation.. ( 415)969-5500
Metz Software ................. (206)641-4525
Tech Support ............ (206)641-4525
Mextel. ............................ (708)595-4146
MFS Inc .......................... (800)456-2159
MGI Group Int'll Inc ....... (310)352-3100
MGV Manufacturing ...... (205)772-1100
MIC Media Corp ............ (510)226-0606
Micom Systems, Inc ....... (805)583-8600
Micro 2000 Inc ............... (818)547-0125
Micro Accessories Inc .... (800)777-6687
Micro Care Corp ............ (800)638-0125
Micro Central ................. (800)836-4276
Micro Chan. Devel.Assoc.. (916)222-2262
Micro Computer Cable .. (313)946-9700
Micro Connectors Inc ... (510)839-8112
Micro Data..................... (800)539-0123
Micro Data Bas(~ Sys ...... (317)463-2581
Micro Design Inc ........... (215)884-1112
Micro Design Int'I,lnc ... (800)241-1853
Miao Display-RangerTech.(612)437-2233
Micro Electronic Techn .. (800)468-0252
Micro Electr. WinBook ... (800)468-0252
Micro Exchang(~ Corp ... (201)284-1200
Micro Fine Int'l Inc ........ (718)358-3870
Micro Focus ................... (415)856-4161
Micro House .................... (800)926-8299
Tech SuppOtt............ (303)443-3389
Micro Industries Corp ... (614)548-7878
Micro Informatica .......... (305)377-1930
Micro League Sports ...... (302)368-9990
Micro Mart Inc ............... (508)888-2225
Micro Media Int'! ........... (714)588-9882
Micro Medic Inc ............ (714)581-3651
Micro Medics .................. (313)759-0231
Micro Palms Cmptr........ (813)530-0128
Micro Power Electr........ (800)642-7612
Micro Professionals ........ (800)800-8300
Micro Security Sys ......... (801)575-6600
Micro Service Express... (214)239-7033
Micro Solutions .............. (815)756-3411
Micro Star....................... (619)731-4949
Micro Supply. ................. ( 408)954-0640
Tech Support. ........... (408)954-0640
MICRO SUPPLy ............. (206)885-5420
Micro Systems ................. (800)548-5182
Micro Technology........... (201)340-0442
Micro X-Press ................. (800)875-9737
Tech Support. ........... (317)328-5784
Micro-Integration........... (301)777-3307
Micro-Integration, Inc .... (301)746-5888
Micro-Term,lnc .............. (314)822-4111
MicroAge Cmptr Ctrs .... (602)929-2416
© CSC 1996

Microbase Info. Sys ........ (310)479-1239
Microbilt Corporation... (404)955-0313
MicroBiz Corporation.... (800)6378268
Tech Support ............ (914)425-3789
MicroClean Inc .............. (408)412-0611
Microcom-Carbon Copy. .. (800)8228224
Tech Support............ (617)551-1414
Microcom-Hardware ..... (800)822-1125
Tech Support ............ (617)551-1313
Microcomputer Access .. (800)521-8270
Tech Support ............ (310)645-9400
Microcmptr Concepts ... (800)772-3914
MicrocmptrTechn. Serv. .. (508)796-9912
Microdynamics Inc ........ (214)343-1170
Microdyne Corp-LAN..... (800)255-3967
Tech Support ............ (800)255-3967
Microdyne Corp-LAN..... (800)255-3967
Tech Support............ (800)255-3967
Microfield Graphics ....... (503)626-9393
MicroGate Corp ............. (512)345-7791
Micrografx, Inc ............... (800)733-3729
Tech Support............ (214)234-2694
Microld ........................... ( 408)395-4096
Microid Research, Inc .... ( 408)727-6991
Miaolink/Miao Fihnware.. (800)767-5465
Microlog Corporation.... (800)333-6564
Micrologic ...................... (201)342-6518
Micrologic Software ...... (510)652-5464
Tech Support ............. (510)652-5464
Micrologic Systems ....... (903)561-0007
Microlytics ...................... (800)828-6293
Tech Support ............ (716)248-9150
MicroMaid Inc ................ (800)369-7079
MicroMaps Software ...... (800)334-4291
Tech Support............ (609)397-1611
Micromation Techn........ ( 408)739-2999
Micromax Distr.............. (800)795-6299
Micron Computer.......... (800)438-3343
Micron Technology. ....... (800)642-7661
Micronet Cmptr Sys ....... (714)739-2244
MicroNetTechnology. .... (714)453-6100
Tech Support ............ (714)453-6060
Micronics Computers .... (51 0)651-2300
Tech Support ............ (510)651-2322
MicroPen Cmptr Corp ... (408)734-4181
Microplex Systems Ltd .. (604)875-1461
Micropolis Corp ............. (818)709-3388
Tech Support ............ (818)709-3325
Micropost Corporation .. (604)682-6258
MicroProcessors Unltd .. (918)267-4961
Tech Support ............ (918)267-3879
Microprose Software ..... (800)876-1151
Tech Support............ (410)771-1151
Microref/Educat'l Sftwr .(708)498-3780
Microrim........................ (800)248-2001
Tech Support ............ (206)649-9551
Micros Systems, Inc ....... (301)210-6000
Microseconds Int'l. ........ (619)756-0765
Microseeds Publ. ........... (813)882-8635
MicroServ Inc ................. (800)736-3599
MicroSlate Inc ................ (514)444-3680
MicroSoft Corporation .. (800)426-9400
Access ........................... (206)635-7050
Auth Train'g Ctr. Prog...... (800)426-9400
Basic PDS ..................... (206)635-7053
CD-ROM Installation .... (206)635-7033

Certified Professionals ....(800)765-7768
Consulting Services ..... (800)922-9446
Delta ............................. (206)635-7019
Developer Network .... (800)759-5474
Download Serv-USA .... (206)935-6735
Excel for Macintosh .... (206)635-7080
Excel rorWmdows/OS/2 .(206)635-7070
Excel SDK .................... (206)635-7048
FastTIpsAdvanced Sys ....(800)936-4400
FastTIps, DesktopApps... (800)936-4100
Fast Tips, Devel. Tools ... (800)936-4300
Fast Tips, Pers Op Sys .. (800)936-4200
FORTRAN .................... (206)635-7015
Fonun on CompuSetve..(800)848-8199
Fox prods, Macintosh .. (206)635-7192
Fox prods,DOS/Win .... (206)635-7191
Hrdwre-Mouse,BPoint.....(206)635-7040
MaaoAssembler-MASM.(206)646-5109
Money .......................... (206)635-7131
MS-DOS 6.0/.2 Upgrades .(206)646-51 04
Multimedia Products ... (206)635-7172
Office for Macintosh ... (206)635-7055
Office forWindows ..... (206)635-7058
Online-WmTech Supp ...(800)443-4672
PowerPoint .................. (206)635-7145
Premier Supp,lSales&Inib.(800)936-3500
Priority Comprehensive.. (900)555-2100
Pr. Comprehensive - CC ..(800)935-5900
Pro Desktop Apps .......... (900)555-2000
Pr. Desktop Apps - CC ....(800)936-5700
Pr. Develop w/DeSktpCC(800)936-5800
Pr. Develop w/DeSktop .. (900)555-2300
Pr. Personal Op SyS-C:C .. (800)936-5700
Pro Personal Op Sys ...... (900)555-2000
Profiler.......................... (206)635-7015
Profit. ............................ (800)723-3333
Project .......................... (206)635-7155
Publisher ...................... (206)635-7140
QuickBasic ................... (206)646-5101
QuickC. ........................ (206)635-7010
Schedule ...................... (206)635-7049
Sol. Provider Sales & Infb ..(800)426-9400
Supp. Ntwtk Sales & Infb.(800)936-3500
Switcher Line ............... (206)635-7041
TechNet ........................ (800)344-2121
Test forWindows ......... (206)635-7052
1T!IDD-TextTelephone .(206)635-4948
Video for Windows ...... (206)635-7172
Visual Basic ................... (206)646-5105
VtsUal Basic ProfToolkt ...(206)646-5105
Visual C/C+ .................. (206)635-7007
Wm Entertainment Prods.(206)637-9308
Win NT-Install Supp ..... (206)635-7018
Win Sftwre Devel. Kit..(206)635-3329
Win/Win forWorkgrp .. (206)637-7098
Word for MS-DOS ......... (206)635-7210
Word for the Mac ......... (206)635-7200
Word for Windows ....... (206)462-9673
Works for the Mac ....... (206)635-7160
Works for MS-DOS ....... (206)635-7150
Works forWindows ..... (206)635-7130
Microsoft Press .............. (800)426-9400
Tech Support ............ (206)635-3313
Microsoft Sys]ournai ..... (415)535-8950
Microspeed .................... (800)232-7888
Tech Support ............ (800)232-7888
Hard Drive Bible 351

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Microspot ....................... (800)622-7568
Tech Support ............ (408)257-4000
MicroStep Inc ................ (818)336-8991
MicroSupply (WA) ......... (206)885-5420
MicroSupply (CO) ......... (303)792-5474
Microsystems Devel ...... ( 408)296-4000
MicroTac Software ......... (800)366-4170
Tech Support ............ (619)271-5700
Microtech Conversn Sys ... (800)223-3693
Microtech International .. (800)666-9689
Tech Support ............ (800)626-4276
Microtek Lab .................. (800)654-4160
Tech Support ............ (310)297-5100
Microtest ........................ (800)526-9675
Microtimes ..................... (51 0)934-3700
MicroTouch Systems ..... (800)866-6873
Microtrace Inc ................ (317)842-0772
Microvitec Inc ................ (404)991-2246
Microvoice Corp ............ 014)588-2739
Microware Distributors.(800)777-9511
Tech Support ............ (800)888-4797
Microware Techn. Dist ... (800)382-2405
MicroWay, Inc ................. (508)746-7341
MicroWest Spacesaver... (800)969-9699
MICS Computers Inc ..... (310)325-4520
Midern Computer Inc ... (818)964-8682
MIDI Land Inc ................ 014)595-0708
Midisoft Corporation ..... (800)776-6434
Tech Support ............ (206)881-7176
Midland ComputerMart.(800)407-0700
Tech Support .......... .. 008)967-0746
Midwest ('--111ptr Support .. ( 419)259-2600
Midwest Cmptr Works ... (800)669-5208
Midwest Micro ............... (800)312-8822
Tech Support ............ (800)243-0313
Midwestern Diskette ..... (800)221-6332
Tech Support ............ (515)782-5190
Migraph, Inc ................... (206)838-4677
Mikael Blaisdell&Assoc .. (510)865-4515
Milan Technology........... ( 408)752-2770
Miles Tek ........................ (800)524-7444
Miller Freeman Publ.. .... (415)397-1881
Miltope Corporation ..... (516)420-0200
Mind Path Technologies.(214)233-9296
Mind's Eye ..................... (617)935-2679
Mindflight Technology... (604)434-6463
Mini-Micro Supply Co .... ( 408)456-9500
Minolta Corporaation .... (201 )825-4000
Minta Technologies Co .. (201)329-2020
Minuteman UPS ............. (800)238-7272
MIPS Tedmologies, Inc .. ( 415)960-1980
MIPSI Systems, Inc ......... (800)727-6774
Mirage Computer .......... (800)666-8098
Tech Support ............ (909)598-2602
Miramar Systems ............ (805)966-2432
Tech Support ............ (805)966-2432
Mirror Technologies ....... (800)654-5294
Tech Support ............ (612)633-2105
Mirus .............................. (408)944-9770
MIS Computer Systems.(408)730-9188
Misco .............................. (908)876-4726
MissionSix Devel Corp .. ( 408)722-9211
Mita Copystar America .. (201)806-8444
Mitel Corporation .......... (613)592-2122
Mitsuba Corporation .... .014)392-2000
Mitsubishi Electronics ... (800)843-2515
352 Hard Drive Bible

Tech Support ............ (800)344-6352
Mitsubishi Electr Amer ..014)220-2500
Mitsubishi Int'l Corp ...... (914)997-4960
Mitsubishi Rayon Co ...... (213)627-7120
Mitsmni Electr COtp-NY.....(516)752-7730
Tech Support ............ ( 408)970-9699
MitsLUni Electr Cotp-TX ....(214)550-7300
Mix Software .................. (800)333-0330
Tech Support ............ (214)783-6001
MM Newman Corp ........ (617)631-7100
MMB Devel Corp ........... (310)318-1322
MMCAd Systems ........... (408)263-0781
MMF Industries .............. (800)445-8293
Mobile Cmptr Recovery .. (800)688-6262
Mod-Tap ......................... (508)772-5630
Modem Office Techn ..... (216)696-7000
Modgraph, Inc ................ (617)229-4800
Modumend .................... (800)350-5558
Monitech ........................ (800)332-9349
Moniterm Corporation .. (800)343-4969
Monitor Maint. Corp ...... (617)961-2600
Monogram Media .......... (414)887-7744
Monotype Typography .. (800)666-6897
Tech Support ............ (800)666-6897
Monster Design ............. (415)871-6000
Tech Support ............ (415)871-6000
Montech ......................... (508)663-5015
Monterey Cmptr Consult..(408)646-1147
Monterey Electronics .... (408)437-5496
Moon Valley Software .... (800)473-5509
Tech Support ............ (800)473-5509
Moore Bus. Fonns & Sys ..008)480-3000
........ ·· ..............................008)615-6000
Morelli Associates .......... (508)543-4105
Morgan Davis Group ..... (619)670-0563
Morris Video ................... (31 0)533-4800
Tech Support ............ (310)533-4800
Morrow Cmptr Corp ..... (800)859-6849
Tech Support ............ (212)360-0580
Morse Technology, Inc ... (818)854-8688
Mortice Kern Systems ... (519)884-2251
Tech Support ............ (519)884-2270
Morton Management. .... (800)548-5744
Moses Computers .......... ( 408)358-1550
MOST Inc ..................... .. 014)898-9400
MotherboardWarehouse .. (800)486-9975
Tech Support ............ (602)829-7751
Motion Works Inc .......... (604)685-9975
Motor Management.. ..... (800)548-5744
Motorola Codex ............. (508)261-4307
Motorola Inc. (lL) ........ ... 008)576-5304
Tech Support ............ (800)311-6456
Motorola Inc. (TX) ......... (512)891-2000
Motorola Mobile Data.... (800)247-2346
MOlmtainGate ............... (800)556-0222
Mountain Ntw1k Solution.(800)458-0300
Tech Support ............ ( 408)438-7897
Mouse Systems Corp ..... (510)656-1117
Tech Support ............ (510)656-1117
Mouser Electronics ........ (800)346-6873
Movonics ........................ ( 415)960-1250
MP Systems .................... (214)385-2221
MPS Multimedia............. (800)533-4677
Tech Support ............(602)829-7751
Mr. Software, Inc ............ (212)947-6272
MSI Data Corporation .. .014)549-6000

MST Distribution ........... (216)248-2533
M-Systems ...................... (408)654-5820
Mueller ........................... (216)771-5225
MuellerTechn Research.008)726-0709
Multi Connection Tec1m... (510)670-0633
Multi-Ad Services ........... (800)447-1950
Multi-Dimension Resrch .. (818)337-6860
Multi-Industry Tech ........ (31 0)921-6669
Multi-Link Inc ................. (800)535-4651
Multi-Net Comm ............ (503)883-8099
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. (800)328-9717
MultiLing International .. (801)377-7077
Multimedia Direct.......... (800)386-3342
Multimedia Warehouse .. (800)683-2868
Muliple Zones ................ (800)258-2088
MultiTech Systems ......... (800)328-9717
MultiWriter Software ..... (201)833-1333
Murata Business Sys ....... (214)403-3300
Mustang Software, Inc ... (800)999-9619
Tech Support ............ (805)873-2550
Mustek Inc ..................... (800)468-7835
Tech Support ........... .014)250-4880
Mux Lab ......................... (800)361-1965
Mylex Corporation ........ (800)776-9539
Tech Support ............ (510)796-6100
Myoda Inc ..................... .008)369-5199
Myried Inc ...................... (510)659-8782
MySoftware Company... (303)522-3000
Tech Support ............ (303)522-3000
Nada Concepts .............. (612)623-0711
Nanao USA Corporation .. (213)325-5202
Nantucket Corporation.(310)390-7923
Nashua Corporation ...... (800)258-1370
NatlAssoc ofServ Mgr .. 008)310-9930
National Micronetics ..... (914)338-0333
National Advancement .. (800)832-4787
Natl Bureau ofStandards... (301)975-6776
Natl Business Assoc ....... (214)991-5381
Natl Communications ... (201)733-9200
Natl Computer Distrib ... (305)967-2397
National Computer Sys .(612)829-3000
Natl Customer Eng ........ (619)452-7974
National Data Corp ........ ( 404)728-2000
National Datacomputer.(508)663-7677
National Design Inc ....... (512)329-5055
National Instruments ..... (800)433-3488
Natl Inventory Exchange .(800)633-2869
Natl Peripheral Service .. (800)628-9025
Natl Semiconductor....... (408)721-5000
Tech Support ............ (404)564-5699
Natl Service Network. ... (206)845-1288
Natl Soft.Testing Labs .... (215)941-9600
Natl Standards Institute .(212)642-4900
Natl Technical Info Serv.003)487-4650
National TeleVAR............ (800)468-1732
Nationwide Cmptr Dist.(800)777-1054
Tech Support ............ (201)659-2977
Natl SftwrTesting Lab .... (215)941-9600
Natter Manufacturing .... (80 1)561-9261
Navacor InCorp ............. ( 408)441-6500
NavPress Software ......... (719)598-1212
NBI,Inc ........................... (303)444-5710
Tech Support ............ (800)225-5824
NCI ................................. (303)650-5522
NCLAmerica .................. ( 408)734-1006
NCR Corporation ........... (316)636-8000
© CSC 1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
NCR Corp-Ed Services ... (800)845-2273
NCR Direct Connect.. ...(800)627-8076
Tech Support ............ (800)531-2222
NCR Microelectronics ... (800)334-5454
NCR Wrldwde Serv. Parts...(800)367-1842
NDC Commmllcations .. (408)428-9108
Tech Support ............ (800)323-7325
Neamco .......................... (617)269-7600
NEC Technologies Inc ... (800)632-4636
Tech Support ............ (800)388-8888
Needham's Electronics .. (916)924-8037
NEI.. ................................ (714)753-8588
Nesco Battery Systems .. (800)423-2664
Net Computers Int'1.. .... (214)386-9310
Tech Support ............ (214)386-9337
Net Soft ......... "................ (818)572-0607
NET-Source Inc .............. (408)246-6679
Netalliance ..................... (206)637-3305
NetFrame Systems .........(800)737-8377
Netherlands Ch. IOf Comm .(404)523-4400
Netline ............ "............... (703)760-0660
NETS Electronics Inc ..... (800)633-7999
Network. ........................ (508)568-0933
Network Comm. Corp ... (800)451-1984
Network Equip Tech ...... (415)366-4400
Network Exprt:ss ........... (800)33-9899
Tech Support ............ (813)359-2876
Network General.. ......... (708)574-3399
Network Interfu.ce Corp..(913)894-2277
Network Security Sys .... (800)755-7078
Tech Support ............ (800)755-7078
Network Systems Corp .(612)424-4888
Network Technologies .. (800)742-8324
Networth ........ ".............. (800)544-5255
Neuralytic Systems ......... (415)321-3777
Nevada Computer.......... (800)654-7762
New England SlOftware .. (203)625-0062
Nevv Horizn Onptr 1m Ctr.(714)556-1220
New Media Corp ........... (714)453-0100
Tech Support.. .......... (714)753-0100
New Media Grapllics ..... (508)663-0666
New MMI. ...................... (800)221-4283
New Quest Technology. (80 1)975-9992
New Vision Technology.(613)727-8184
Tech Suppolt ............ (613)727-0884
New World Tedmology.(800)443-8885
Newer Technology......... (316)685-4904
NewGen Systems Corp .(714)641-8600
Tech Support ............ (714)641-8600
NewMedia Magazine ..... (415)573-5170
Neworg Inc .................... (804)358-5626
NewQuestTechnology.. (613)727-8184
Nexgen Microsystems ... (408)435-0202
Next Computer Corp .... (415)366-0900
Next Generation Sftwr .. (404)365-8258
Nial Systems ................... (613)234-4188
Nicllimen America Inc ... (312)938-8887
Nikon Electr. Imaging ....(516)547-4350
Nilkon Precision ............. (800)446-4566
Nimax Inc ....................... (619)566-4800
Ninga Software Corp ..... (403)265-6611
Nisca Inc ........................ (214)242-9696
Nissei Sangyo America .. (617)893-5700
Nissho Electronics -USA ... (714)261-8811
Nisus ............................... (800)922-2993
Tech SupporL .......... (619)481-1477
© CSC 1996

Nitek Inc ..................... "... (602)285-5662
NMB Technologies ......... (818)341-3355
No Hands Software ........ (800)598-3921
Tech Support ............. ( 415)321-2925
No-Brainer Software ...... (800)748-4499
Noesis .......................... ,.. (213)399-8208
Noetic Technologies ... ".. (800)780-6343
Noice Cancellat'n Techn ..( 410)636-8700
Tech Support ............ (410)636-8700
Nolo Press ...................... (800)992-6656
Tech Support ............ (800)992-6656
Nomai. ............................ (800)556-6624
NOMDA/NlA .................. (816)941-3100
NoRad Corporation ....... (800)262-3260
Norcom .......................... (907)780-6464
Nordisk Systems ............ (805)485-4778
Norick Data Systems ..... (405)947-7560
Nortek Computers-ON .. (705)474-2058
Nortek Computers-FL ... (305)351-4500
North American hlfoNet, .(707)765-1999
North Hills Electronics .. (516)671-5700
North-East Microcmptr .. ( 416)513-6800
Northeast Techn Serv .. ".(800)647-9725
Northeastern Sonics ....... (800)243-2452
Northern Technologies ... (800)727-9119
Northern Telecom Ltd ... (416)897-9000
Northgate Cmptr Sys ..... (800)548-1993
Tech Support ............ (800)446-5037
Northstar Matrix-Serv.... (800)969-0009
Norton-Lambert ............. (805)964-6767
Tech Support ............ (805)964-6767
Noteable Computers ..... (800)274-4124
NoteStar Computers ...... (908)651-8686
Notework Corporation .(617)734-4317
Nova Techn Services ...... (800)523-2773
Novacor Inc ................... (800)486-6682
NovaStor Corporation ... (818)707-9900
Novell Desktop Sys ........ (800)768-9771
Novell Inc. (UT) .............(800)638-9273
Tech Support ............ (800)453-1267
Novell Inc. (CA) ............ ,,(800)638-9273
Tech Support ............ (800)453-1267
Now Software ................ (503)274-2800
Tech Support ............ (503)274-2800
Noyes Fiber Systems ..... (603)528-7780
NPA Systems .................. (800)873-6724
NPA West ....................... (800)999-4672
NRD Inc ......................... (716)773-7634
NRG Data Corporation.. (408)727-9700
NRI .................................(202)244-1600
NSM Information Sys ..... (516)261-7700
NSSI/Deltek ................... (800)755-7078
NSTS ............................... ( 404)923-1383
NTE Electronics Inc ....... (800)631-1250
Ntergaid, Inc .................. (203)368-0632
NTR Computer .............. (408)727-4500
Nu Data .......................... (908)842-5757
NUIQ Software, Inc ....... (914)833-3479
Number 9 Cmptr Corp .(800)438-6463
Tech Support ............ (617)674-0009
Numonics Corporation .(215)362-2766
NUS ................................ (800)247-8818
NUS Training Corp ......... (800)848-1717
NView Corporation .......(800)736-8439
NYCE ............................. (516)997-7170
Nynex Corporation ....... (914)741-4700

O'Neill Comm ................ (800)624-5296
Tech Support ............ (215)957-5408
O.K. Industries ............... (914)969-6800
Oakland Group .............. (617)491-7311
OAZ Communications .. (408)745-1750
OBI Distributors, Inc ...... (714)259-1925
Objective Software ........ ( 415)324-3333
Occarn Research ........... (617)923-3545
Tech Support ............ (617)923-3903
Ocean Information Sys .. (800)325-2496
Ocean Interlace Co ....... (714)595-1212
Ocean Isle Software ...... ( 407)770-4777
Tech Support ............ ( 407)770-4777
OCEAN Microsystems ... ( 408)374-8300
OCLI (Opt Coat'g Lab) .. (707)545-6440
Ocron, Inc ...................... ( 408)980-8900
Octocom Systems Inc .... (508)441-2181
Octophase Techn Corp .. ( 408)954-1240
OCTuS Inc ...................... (619)452-9400
Odestus Corporation ..... (708)498-5615
Tech Support ............ (708)798-8852
Odetics Inc ..................... (714)774-6900
Odyssey Development..(303)394-0091
OEl\1 Parts Repair Depot. .(800)422-2115
Office Automation Sys ... (619)452-9400
Office Publications, Inc .. (203)327-9670
om ............................... (508)695-6606
Oki Semiconductor ....... (800)832-6654
Okidata Corporation ...... (800)654-3282
Tech Support ............ (609)273-0300
Okna............................... (20 1)909-8600
Olduvai ........................... (800)822-0772
Tech Support ............ (305)670-1112
Olicom USA ................... (800)654-2661
Tech Support ............ (800)654-2661
Olivetti............................ ( 408)996-3867
Olivetti Office USA ........ (201)526-8200
Olivetti/lSC. .................... (509)927-5622
Olympus ......................... (800)347-4027
Omega Techn!faiwan .... (305)597-5564
Omni CEO ...................... (508)937-5004
Omni Labs ...................... (800)706-3342
Tech Support ............ (415)788-1345
Omni-Data Comms ........ (800)922-2329
Omnicomp Grapllics ..... (713)464-2990
Omniprint Inc ................ (800)878-6800
Omnitech Gencorp ....... (305)599-9898
OmniTel Inc ................... (51 0)490-2202
Omnium Corporation ... (715)268-8500
Omron Electrorlics, Inc .. (708)843-7900
Omron OfficeAuto Prod..(408)727-1444
On Board Cmptr Serv.... (203)881-0555
ON Technology.............. (800)767-6683
Tech Support ............ (800)767-6683
On Time Mac Service .... ( 415)367-6263
On-Line Data .................. (519)579-3930
On-Line Power Co ......... (213)721-5017
On-Line Software Int'I ... (201)592-0009
On-Line/AAA Power....... (213)721-5017
OnDisk Info Systems ..... (800)654-3146
Oneac Corporation........ (708)816-6000
Online Press Inc ............ (206)641-3434
Online, USA .................... (303)932-1900
Ontrack Computer Sys .. (800)752-1333
Tech Support ............ (612)937-2121
Opcode Systems ............ ( 415)856-3333
Hard Drive Bible 353

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDUSTRY PHONE NUMBERS
Tech Support ............ (415)369-1676
Open Systems ................ (800)328-2276
Tech Support ............ (800)582-5000
Open Text Corporation .(519)571-7711
Opt-Tech Data Process'g .. (702)588-3737
OPri, Inc ......................... ( 408)980-8178
Optibase, Inc .................. (818)719-6566
Optical Access Int'l. ....... (800)433-5133
Optical Cable Corp ........ (703)265-0690
Optical Data Systems .... (214)234-6400
Optical Devices, Inc ...... (805)987-8801
Optical Storage Corp ..... (310)791-2028
Optical Stor.TradeAssoc .. (805)569-2541
OptimaTechn Corp ....... (714)476-0515
Optiquest, Inc ................ (310)948-1185
Opus Computer Prods .. (216)248-9264
OR Cmptr Keyboards .... (604)879-9815
ORA Electronics ............. (818)772-9977
Tech Support ............ (818)772-9977
Oracle Corporation ....... (415)506-2200
Orange Micro, Inc .......... (714)779-2772
Orbit Industries, Inc ....... (604)582-6301
Orca Technology Corp .. ( 408)441-1111
Orchid Technology ........ (800)767-2443
Tech Support ............ (510)683-0323
Oregon Software ............ (503)624-6883
Orevox USA Corp .......... (818)333-6803
Orientec Corp/America.(818)442-1818
Origin Systems, Inc ........ (512)328-5490
Tech Support ............ (512)328-0282
OS Computer City ......... (800)938-6722
OS/2 2.0 Applications ... (800)426-3333
Osborne/McGraw Hill... (800)227-0900
Oscan ElectrTER

A Winchester disk drive with 5-1/4 or 3 1/2 inch

diameter disks.

MNEUMONIC
MO

A shortened abbreviation for a series of codes.

See MAGNETO-OPTICAL.

MODIFIED FREQUENCY MODULA TlON

A method of recording digital data,
using a particular CODE to get the flux reversal times from the data
pattern. MFM recording is self-clocking because the CODE guarantees
tinling inforlll1ation for the playback process. The controller is thus
able to synchronize directly from the data. This method has a maximun} of bit of data w'ith each flux reversal. See NRZ and RLL.
©

csc

1996

Hard Drive Bible 403

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

MOTHERBOARD

The main circuit board in a computer on which the
CPU, main memory, system BIOS and any other built-in electronics
reside.

MULTIPROCESSOR

A computer containing two or more processors.

MULTITASKING

The ability of a computer system to execute more than
one program or program task sinlultaneously. Windows 95, OS/2 and
UNIX are examples of multitasking programs.

MULTIUSER

The ability of a computer system to execute programs for
more than one user at a time.

NETWARE

A network operating system developed by Novell

Corporation.

NEXUS

The link between initiator, target and logical unit used to identify and I/O process. An 1_T _L (initiator, target, logical unit) nexus is
the most basic type of SCSI link. To send multiple I/O processes to the
same target and logical unit, an 1_T_L_ Q (initiator, target, logical unit,
queue) nexus is used.

NOISE

Unwanted and usually interfering elctrical signals that interfere with information signals (similar to radio static or TV interference). Sources of noise in computers can be power supplies, ground
loops, radio interference, cable routing, etc.

NRl (NON-RETURN TO lERO)

1) User digital data bits. 2) A method of
magnetic recording of digital data in which a flux reversal denotes a
one bit, and no flux reversal a zero bit, NRZ recording requires an
accompanying or synchronization clock to define each cell time
unlike MFM or RLL recording.

ODD PARITY

See

PARITY CHECKING.

OFF LINE

Processing or peripheral operations performed while not
connected to the system CPU via the system bus.

ONE-OFF
ONLINE
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A master CD-R usually intended for duplication purposes.
Existing on a BBS.
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OPEN COLLE'CTOR A type of output structure found in certain bipolar
logic families. The device has NPN transistor with grounded emitter
that enabh~s it to output to a low voltage level only. When the device
is inactive, an external resistor holds the device output at a high voltage level.
OPERA TlNG SYSTEM An operating system is a program which acts as
an interface between the user of a computer and the computer hardware. The purpose of the operating system is to provide an environment in which a user may run programs. The goal of the operating system is to enable the user to conveniently use the computer's
resources such as the CPU, memory, storage devices and printers.
OR

A binary operation that compares two bits and yields a 1 if at
least one of the bits being compared is set to 1.

OS/2 A 11l1ultitasking operating system for the PC developed by IBM
Corporation.

OUTPUT

Processing data being transferred out of the computer system to peripherals (i.e., disk, printer, etc.). This includes responses to
user commands or queries.

OVERHEAD
Time lost during an operation due to error checking or
other tasks that hinde~r the completion of the operation.
PARALLEL

Sending bits in groups. See SERIAL.

PARITY

A computer data checking method using an extra bit in
which the total number of binary 1 's (or O's) in a byte is always odd
or always even; thus, in a odd parity scheme, every byte has eight bits
of data and one parity bit. If using odd parity and the number of 1 bits
comprising the byte of data is not odd, the 9th or parity bit is set to 1
to create the odd parity. In this way, a byte of data can be checked for
accurate transmission by simply counting the bits for an odd parity
indication. If the count is ever even, an error is indicated.

PARITY CHEC/flING

See

PARITY.

PARKING

Parking the disk drive heads means the recording heads are
flloved so that they are not over the platter's data area. Many drives
have an auto-park feature where the heads are automatically parked
when the power to the drive is shut off. Other drives require the user
to run some: kind of parking software to park the heads.
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PARTITIONING

Method for dividing an area on disk drive for use by
more than one disk operating system or for dividing large disk drives
into areas which the File Allocation Table (FAT) can deal with when in
use. The current IBM DOS maximum partition size is 2000MB.

PASSIVE TERMINA TlON

The most common way of reduceing noise on
a cable. Network cables and SCSI cables use resistive passive termination.

PASSIVE TERMINATOR

A terminator that provides a fixed-value impedance match between the end of the SCSI bus and the cable. Passive
terminators are comprised only of resistors and are susceptible to variations in the power supplied by the host adapter. See ACTIVE TERMINATOR and FORCED-PERFECT TERMINATOR.

PATH

The DOS term "path" has three definitions and each involves
directories. A PATH may be defined as: 1) the names of the chain of
directories leading to a file; 2) the complete file or directory name; 3)
a DOS command.

P-CABLE

A 68-wire cable used for 16-bit SCSI-3 buses. P-cables can
be used with Q-cables for 32-bit SCSI-3 buses.

PCI

See PERIPHERAL COMPONENT INTERCONNECT.

PERIPHERAL COMPONENT INTERCONNECT

A 32-bit local bus developed by
Intel that allows peripherals to communicate directly with the CPU.

PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT

Auxiliary memory, displays, printers, disk drives and other equipment usually attached to a computer systems' CPU
by controllers and cables (they are often packaged together in a desktop computer).

PIO

See PROGRAMMED INPUT/OUTPUT.

PIPELINE

A channel used to transfer commands, data or signals.

PLATED THIN FILM DISKS

Magnetic disk memory media having its surface plated with a thin coating of metallic alloy instead of being coated with oxide.

PLATTER

The round magnetic disk surfaces used for read/write operations in a hard disk system.
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PLUG-AND-PLA Y

An Intel/Microsoft standard for configuring add-on
cards and other devices so that user intervention is minimized. No
Inore switches, jumpc:~rs and wheels to fiddle with.

PLUG-IN CARD

See ADD-ON.

POLLING

A technique that discerns which of several devices on a connection is trying to get the processor's attention.

POSTSCRIPT
ics to be

bc:~

A printer language used to describe the text and graphprinted.

PRECOMPENSA TlON

Applied to write data by the controller in order to
partially alleviate bit shift which causes adjacent 1 's written on magnetic data physically to move apart. When adjacent 1 's are sensed by
the controller, preconlpensation is used to write them closer together
on the disk, thus fighting the repelling effect caused by the recording.
Precompensation is only required on some oxide media drives.

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE A method of doing a scheduled routine
observation or exchanging a part, prior to a breakdown of a piece of
equipment.
PRINTED CIRfCUIT BOARD

A circuit board IC and other components, like

the one attached to a drive. Also called PCB.

PROCESSING (DATA PROCESSING)

The process of computer handling,
manipulating and modifying data such as arithm.etic calculation, file
lookup and updating, or word processing.

PROGRAM

A sequence of instructions stored in memory and execut-

ed by a processor ot' microprocessor. See also APPLICATION PROGRAMS.

PROGRAMMED INPUT/OUTPUT

A method of transferring data from a
device to the host computer's memory that requires the CPU to perform the transfer. PIO is slower than DMA.

PROTOCOL A set of conventions governing the format of messages to
be exchanged within a com:munications system.
,-TO-A TRANSITION CABLE

An adapter used to connect 8-bit SCSI-l
devices using A-cables to a 16- or 32-bit SCSI-3 device using P-cables.
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Q-CABLE

A 68-wire cable used in conjunction with a P-cable for 32bit SCSI-3 buses.

QUARTER-INCH CARTRIDGE (QIC)

A tape format used for backing up

data. QIC tape is 1/4 inch.

QUEUING

Grouping a series of commands in order to send them as a
single command, thereby reducing data transfer overhead.

RADIAL

A way of connecting multiple drives to one controller. In
radial operation, all output signals are active even if the drive is not
selected. See DAISY CHAIN.

RAID

See

REDUNDANT ARRAY OF INEXPENSIVE DRIVES.

RAM

See

RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY

RAM DISK

A system where part of the computer's random access
memory is used to simulate a disk drive. The RAM disk and its contents will disappear if power is lost or the system is restarted. RAM is
far faster (microseconds ACCESS TIME) than disks (milliseconds), so
APPLICATION PROGRAMS which access the disk run faster.

RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY

Memory where any locatiom can be read
from or written to in a random order. Random access memory usually refers to volatile memory where the contents are lost when power
is removed. The user addressable memory of a computer is random
access memory.

READ

To access a storage location and obtain previously recorded

data.

READ-INTENSIVE A process that requires a lot of reading of data from
a device such as a hard. disk.
READ-ONLY

Something that can only be read from, not written to.

READ ONLY MEMORY

A chip that can be programmed once with bits
of information. This chip retains this information even if the power is
turned off. When this information is programmed into the ROM, it is
called burning the ROM.

RECALIBRATE
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which the heads are returned to track 0 (outermost track).

RECORD

A single unit made up of logically related fields.

REDUCED WRITE CURRENT A signal input (to some older drives) which
decreases the amplitude of the write current at the actual drive head.
Normally this signal is specified to be used during inner track write
operations 1to lessen the effect of adjacent "bit" crowding. Most drives
today provide this internally and do not require controller intervention.
REDUCED WRITECURRENT To tninimize the effects of peak shift, on some
drives, the lnagnitude of the: write current is reduced on some of the
innermost ltracks. When installing a drive in a system, the number
requested is the first track number to begin the area of reduced write
current, that track and all subsequent tracks will be written with
reduced write current.

REDUNDANT ARRA Y OF INEXPENSIVE DRIVES

A collection of storage
devices configured to provide higher data transfer rates and/or data
recovery capability. Also called RAID.

REGULAR SCSI

8-bit SCSI.

RESOLUTION

With regards to magnetic recording, the band width (or
frequency response) of the recording heads.

RF

Radio Frequency.

RIBBON CABLE

A group of wires arranged in rows that comprise a single flat cable resembling a ribbon.

RLL

See RUN LENGTH LIMITED CODE.

ROM

See READ ONlY MEMORY.

ROTATIONAL SPEED

The speed at which the media spins. On 5 1/4" or
3 1/2" Winchester drives it is usually 3600 rpm.

ROUND-ROBIN

A method of guaranteeing that a number of devices
will have an opportunity to be serviced. The round-robin method simply requires that every device is serviced in turn. After the last device
is serviced, the process begins again with the first one.
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RUN LENGTH LIMITED CODE

1) A method of recording digital data,
whereby the combinations of flux reversals are coded/decoded to
allow greater than one (1) bit of information per flux reversal. This
compression of information increases data capacity by approximately
50 percent. 2) A scheme of encoding designed to operate with the
ST412 interface at a dial transfer rate of 7.5 megabit/sec. The technical name of this specific RLL CODE used is "two, seven".

SASI
SC

Shugart Associates System Interface. The predecessor to SCSI.
See

SCAM

SELCTOR CHANNEL.

See

SCO UNIX

SCSI CONFIGUREDAUTO-MAGICALLY.
A version, or flavor, of UNIX developed by Santa Cruz

Operations.

SCSI

Small Computer Systems Interface. An intelligent bus for transmitting data and commands between a variety of devices. The current
"high end" CPU-to-drive interface. See SCSI-II, SCSI III, FAST SCSI,
WIDE SCSI, FAST WIDE SCSI, FAST-20 and FAST-40 for various types of
SCSIs available.

SCSI-II The second generation of SCSI; includes many improvements
to SCSI-I, including FAST SCSI, WIDE SCSI, and mandatory parity checking.

SCSI-III

Commonly used to refered to "Wide SCSI", although this is
not the correct definition. SCSI-III is the third generation of SCSI;
introduces FAST-20 and FAST-40 as improvements to the parallel bus.
The standard also includes a number of specifications for high-speed
serial bus architecture such as SSA, FIBRE CHANNEL, and IEEE 1394.

SCSI BIOS A chip on the host adapter that contains programs for communicating with the adapter and the bus.
SCSI CONFIGURED AUTO-MAGICALLY

A pending standard that will give
SCSI devices the ability to automatically select their SCSI IDs.

SCSI 10

A number used on SCSI devices to uniquely identify them
among other devices on the bus. Also referred to as a device ID.

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SECTOR

A sector is a section of a tfack whose size is determined by
formatting. When used as an address component, sector and location
refer to the sequence number of the sector around the track.
Typically, one sector stores one user record of data. Drives typically
are fornlattled from 17 to 26 sectors per track. Determining how many
sectors per track to use depends on the system type, the controller
capabilities and the drive encoding method and interface.

SECTOR-SLIP

Sector-slip allows any sector with a defect to be mapped
and bypass1ed. The next contguous sector is given that sector address.

SEEK

The radial nlovement of the heads to a specified track address.

SEEK COMPLETE
An ST506 interface signal fronl drive to controller
which indicates that read/write heads have settled on the desired
track and completed the seek.
SELECTOR CHANNEL

An intelligent bus used on the IBM 360 mainframe.

SEQUENTIAL ACCESS

Writing or reading data in a sequential order, such
as reading data blocks stored one after the other on magnetic tape
(the opposite of random access).

SERIAL

Sending bits individually, one after the other. See also PAR-

ALLEL.

SERIAL STORAGE ARCHITECTURE

A high-speed serial communication bus

developed by IBM for sending commands, data and status signals
between devices.

SERVO TRACK

A prerecorded reference track on the dedicated servo

surface of a closed-loop disk drive. All data track pOSitions are compared to their corresponding servo track to determine "off-track/ontrack" postition.
Information writt(~n on the servo surface that the electronics of the
drive uses to position the heads over the correct data track. This information is 'IVritten on the drive by the servo track writer.

SETUP

Program used by AT type computers to store configuration in
CMOS. This program is sometimes found in the system BIOS and can
be accessed from the keyboard. On other systems, the program is on
diskette.

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SHIELDED

Containing a metal cover to keep out unwanted interference from the environlnent. A shielded connector has a metal cover.
A shielded cable has a foil wrapping or braided metal sleeve under the
plastic covering.

SHROUDED HEADER CONNECTOR

A device connector with a plastic

guard around its perimeter. The shroud ensures that all the pins on a
cable are plugged into the device. Shrouded connectors also have a
notch on one side so that the cable can only be inserted in one direction.

SILICON

Semiconductor substrate material generally used to manufacture microprocessors and other integrated circuit chips.

SINGLE-ENDED

A SCSI bus configuration in which each signal is carried by a signal wire. Single-ended buses are more susceptible to
noice than differential buses.

SINGLE-TASKING

The ability to perform only one process at a time.
DOS is a single-tasking operating system.

SKEWING

Some low-level formatting routines may ask for a Head
and/or Cylinder Skew value. The value will represent the number of
sectors being skewed to compensate for head switching time of the
drive and/or track-to-track seek time allowing for continuous
read/write operation without losing disk revolutions.

SLAVE DRIVE

The secondary drive installed in a IDE system. For exam-

ple, drive D:.

SMD (STORAGE MODULE DEVICE)

An 8" mainframe and minicomputer

disk drive interface standard.

SMD (SURFACE MOUNTED DEVICE)

A CHIP in a smaller integrated surface

package, without connection leads.

SNAIL-MAIL

Regular old, lick the stamp, seal the envelope, and then
sit and wait for several days mail. See E-MAIL.

SOFT ERROR

A bit error during playback which can be corrected by

repeated attempts to read.

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SOFT SECTOR MODE

A convention, defined by software, of setting a
variable number of sectors per track in direct relationship to the
drive's FCI rating in regards to the area of media that passes beneath
the head. This scheme takes advantage of the fact that, in actual surface area, the outermost tracks are longer than the innermost.

SOFTWARE APPLICATION PROGRAMS

The Disc Operating System and
other programs (as opposed to HARDWARE). The instructions or programs, usually stored on floppy or hard disks, which are used to direct
the operations of a computer, or other hardware.

SOFTWARE PATCH
Software modification which allows or adds function not otherwise available using the standard software program.
SOLID-STATE
SOUND

CAR£~

SPINDLE

Electronics not utilizing vacuum tubes.
An add-on card used to play and/or record audio.

The rotating hub structure to which the disks are attached.

SPINDLE MO:rOR The spindle motor is the electro-mechanical part of
the disk drilve that rotates the platters.
SSA

See

SERIAL STORAGE ARCHITECTURE.

5T-506/ST-4112 INTERFACE

An early industry standard interface
between a hard disk and hard disk controller. In the ST-506/St-412
interface, the "intelligence" is on the controller rather than on the
drive. See ][NTERFACE STANDARD, ESDI, and SCSI.

STAND-ALONE

Able to operate without support.

STEP

An increment or decrement of the head positioning arm to
luove the heads in or out, respectively, one track from their current
pOSition. In buffered mode (open loop drives), the head motion is
postponed until the last of a string of step pulses has been received.

STEPPER MOTOR The stepper motor is the electro-mechanical part of
the disk drive that positions the heads by step pulse on the tracks of
the disk to read and write data.
,STEP PULSE

The trigger pulse sent from the controller to the stepper
motor on the step interface Signal line to initiate a step operation.
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STEP TIME

The time required by the drive to step the heads from the
current cylinder position to a target cylinder.

STlCTlON

A slang term used in the drive industry to describe the con-

dition when Winchester heads become "stuck" to a disk. This occurs
when the disk lubricant hardens under the head.

STORAGE CAPACITY

Amount of data that can be stored in a memory,
usually specified in kilobytes (KB) for main memory and floppy disk
drives and megabytes (MB) for hard disk and tape drives.

STORAGE DENSITY

Usually refers to recording density (BPI, TPI, or
their product, AREAL DENSITY).

STORAGE LOCA TlON
A memory location, identified by an ADDRESS,
where information is to be read or written.
STORAGE MODULE DRIVE

Storage module drive interface. An interface,
used in larger disk drives, i.e., 8" & 14" drives.

SUSTAINED SPEED

The rate at which data can be transferred continuously. See BURST SPEED.

SYNC

Shortened form of synchronized. Events that happen at the
same time.

SYNCHRONOUS DATA

Data sent, usually in serial mode, with a clock

pulse.

SYNCHRONOUS TRANSFER

A method of sending data that allows many

bytes of data to be sent before acknowledgment is received from the
target. Only data can be sent in synchronous mode. Commands, messages and status must be transmitted in asynchronous mode.

SYNCHRONOUS TRANSFER NEGOTIA TlON

The process of determining if a
target is able to send/receive data using synchronous transfers.

TAPE DRIVE

A sequential access memory device whose magnetic
media is tape in a cassette, reel or continuous loop.

TARGET

A device that responds to commands from a device (initia-

tor).
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TERMINAL

A screen and keyboard combination device used to interact with a computer. Terminals are usually used to access a mainframe
computer.

TERMINATE AIND STAY RESIDENT

A program that resides dormant in the
computer's memory until triggered by another program or by a
device. Also called TSR.

TERMINATION

A technique used to reduce echoing, ringing, and noise
on a transm.ission line.

TERMINATOR

1) An electrical circuit attached to each end of a SCSI
bus to minilmize signal reflections and extraneous noise. SCSI defines
passive, active and forced-perfect termination schemes. 2) A movie
starring Arnold.

TERMPWR

Terminator power.

THIN FILM HEADS

A read/write head whose read/write element is
deposited using integrated circuit techniques rather than being manually fabricated by grinding ferrite and hand winding coils.

THIRD·PARTY DMA
TPI

See

DMA.

Tracks per inch.

TRACK

The radial position of the heads over the disk surface. A track
is the circuJlar ring traced over the disk surface by a head as the disk
rotates under the heads.

TRACK ACCESS TIME

See AVERAGE ACCESS TIME.

TRACK FOLLOWING SERVO

A closed-loop positioner control system that
continuously corrects the position of the disk drive's heads by utilizing a reference track and a feedback loop in the head positioning system. See also CLOSED LOOP.

TRACK PI TCfjr

Distance from centerline to centerline of adjacent
tracks (TPI divided into 1.0). New drives have track pitches approaching 3000 TPI.

TRACKS PER J'NCH
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Track density, number of tracks per inch.
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TRACK WIDTH

Width of data track. Also called core width of

Read/Write Head.

TRACK ZERO

Track zero is the outermost data track on a disk drive.
In the ST-506 interface, the interface signal denotes that the heads are
positioned at the outermost cylinder.

TRACK ZERO DETECTOR

An obsolete technology that RECALIBRATES by
sensing when infrared beams between an LED and infrared sensitive
photo-transistor are blocked by the track zero interrupter (TZI). In
newer drives, the track position is encoded in the servo signals.

TRANSLA TlON In IDE applications, the conversion from physical head,
sector, and track numbers to their logical equivilents.
TRUNCATION

In IDE applications, cylinder truncation can limit drive
capacity. This occurs in older machines which do not have a BIOS supporting more than 1024 cylinders.

TSR

See

TERMINATE AND STAY RESIDENT.

TUNNEL ERASE

An erase scheme where both sides of the recorded data
are erased when writing data to elimate track to track interference.
This is primarily used on floppy disk drives.

TWISTED PAIR

Two wires twisted together to reduce susceptibility to

RF noise.

TWISTED·PAIR FLAT CABLE

A group of twisted pairs of wires arranged
in rows that comprise a single flate cable. Twisted-pair flat cables are
less susceptible to noise than are ribbon cables.

ULTRASCSI
UMB

See

FAST-20.

Upper Memory Block. See UPPER MEMORY.

UNFORMATTED (CAPACITY)
Drive byte capacity before formatting.
Maximum capacity of a disk drive before formatting = (bits per track)
x # of heads x # of cylinders. See MEGABYTE.
UNIX A multitasking operating system used on a variety of computer
types, including PCs.
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UPGRADE PATH

Generally, with disk products, a family having multipIe products with varying capacities such that the system storage
capacity can increase with changing application requirements simply
by using a different disk drive within the product family.

UPPER MEMORY
Memroy in the PC that is between 640K and 1 MB.
This nlemory area is used for BIOS addresses and can be used to store
TSRs and other drivers. Upper memory is divided into 64K subsections called upper memory blocks (UMBs).
USENET

A collection of message areas accessed via Internet.

VERIFICA TlON

This feature lets the computer go back and read what
it just wrolte to disk to ensure the data was written correctly.

VIDEO ELECTRONICS STANDARDS ASSOCIATION (VESA)

A standards body
that promotes video hardware and software specifications. VESA is
also the organization governing the VL-BUS.

VL-BUS (VLI)

VESA Local Bus. A 32-bit local bus promoted by VESA
for communicating directly to the CPU rather than through the ISA or
EISA bus.

VOICE COIL JVlOTOR

An electro-magnetic positioning motor in the rigid
disk drive similar to that used in audio speakers. A wire coil is placed
in a stationary magnetic field. When current is passed through the
coil, the re:sultant flux causes the coil to move. In a disk drive, the
CARRIAGE ASSEMBLY is attached to the voice coil motor. Either a
straight line (linear) or circular (rotary) design 1nay be employed to
position the heads on the disk's surface.

VOLATILE MEMORY

Memory that will be erased if power is lost.
Typically, lVIAIN MEMORY is volatile, and AUXILIARY MEMORY is nonvolatile and can be used for permanent (but changeable at will) storage fo programs and data.

WAN

Acronym for Wide Area Network.

WEDGE SER\'O SYSTEM

A certain part of each TRACK contains servo
positioning data. Gaps between each sector contain servo data to
lnaintain head stack pOSition on that cylinder. Identical to EMBEDDED
SERVO.

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WIDE SCSI

A 16-bit implementation of the SCSI-II standard, common-

ly referred to as SCSI-III. 68 pin connectors are commonly used with
WIDE SCSI. MAximum transfer rates are 20-40Mbytes/sec.

WINCHESTER DRIVE

A disk drive with a Winchester style (floats on air)

heads and non-removable (fixed) disks sealed in a contaiment-free
housing.

WINDOWS

A multitasking operating system for the PC developed by

Microsoft Corporation.

WINDOWS NT

A high-end, cross-platform, multitasking operating system also developed by Microsoft Corporation.

WORD

Number of bits processed in parallel (in a single operation)
by a CPU. Standard word lengths are 8, 16,32 and 64 bits (1,2,4 or 8
bytes).

WORM

See WRITE ONCE, READ MANY.

WRITE

To access a storage location and store data on the magnetic

surface.

WRITE CURRENT

The amount of electrical current used to drive a magnetic recording head. The amount of write current necessary to saturate the magnetic media in different cell location vary.

WRITE FAULT

Disc drive interface signal to the controller used to
inhibit further writing when a condition exists in the drive, which, if
not detected, would cause improper writing on the disk. A "Write
Fault Error" may occur if an operating system detects this bit is set or
is unable to verify data written to a disk.

WRITE-INTENSIVE

A process that requires a lot of writing of data to a

device such as a hard disk.

WRITE ONCE, READ MANY

A storage medium that can be written to only

once, but read many times. Also called WORM.

lOR

A binary operation that compares two bits and yields a 1 only

if the bits being compared are different.

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XSMD

Extended storage m.odule drive interface. A popular electrical
interface for 8" drives used in minicomputer and mainframe applications.

X3. 13 1.. I 986

The document describing the specifications of the SCSI-

1 standard.

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INDEX

A-cable ............................................ 377, 397,407
Access Fixed Disk ......................................... 109
AccessTim(~ ...... 2, 7,53,119,283,377,380,394,
408,415
Acculogic ............................................... 315,326
Acculogic IDE ............................................... 315
Active Terminator........................... 377, 394, 406
Actuator ....... 10-11, 13,22,39,377,383-384,397
Adaptec AHA. ................................................. 172
Adaptec Controllers ...................................... 171
Adaptec SCSI Programming Interface ........... 378
Adaptec-ASPI-Driver...................................... 327
.Adapter .................................................. 45, 47, 49
Address ..... 29-30, 35··37, 39,41-42,49,53,55-56,
69,72,92,96,104-105,108,174-177,378,
381,~)85-387, 390, 393-394, 398,411,414
Address Access .............................................. 394
Address Mark ......................................... 378, 387
Adjustable Interleaving ................................. 378
AK-47 ..................................................... 104, 174
AK-47 ISA SCSI-II Controller ............................. v
Allocation Length ................................. 34-3 5, 38
American Broadcasting Corporation ................ 2
American National Standards Institute ... 19, 43,378
American Signal Corps ..................................... 2
Amiga IDE .. ".................................................. 324
Amphenol .. ".................................................... 65
ANSI ............ "............................................... 9,378
ANSI SCSI .................................................. 23, 43
ANSI SCSI-II" ..................................................... 23
ANSII ..................................................... 320, 326
API-Application Progralnming Interface ....... 379
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A.ppel,Andrew ............................................... 323
Apple Computer .................................. 6, 45, 282
Apple Hard Drive Toolkit ................................ 81
Apple Macintosh ............................ 23, 79, 81, 91
Apple Macintosh System Disks ....................... 81
Application Program .............. 379, 384, 387, 400
Application Programs ............. 379,384,387,400,
407-408,413
Archive .............................. 25, 117,305-306,309
Archive DDS-2 ............................................... 305
Areal Density.................................. 379, 397, 414
ARRL ............................................................... 22
ASCII ...................................................... 327, 379
ASIC ................................................................ 13
ASME-American Society Mechanical Engineers...... 379
ASPI ........................................ 84-85, 91, 378-379
ASPI-DOS Driver............................................ 315
ASPI-TOOLS ................................................... 316
ASPI4DOS ........................................................ 61
ASPIDISK ......................................................... 61
ASPITOOL ..................................................... 315
Asynchronous .................................. 91, 379, 414
AT Adapter ..................................................... 317
AT Clock Stretch ............................................. 96
AT Interface ............................................. 20,379
AT Mode ........................................................ 193
AT-Bus .............................................................. 52
AT-IDE ............................................................ 184
ATA Packet Interface ....................................... 30
ATAPI. ...................................... 22, 25, 30-31, 379
A1MI CD-ROM ............................................... 31
AttemptingTo Recover Allocation Unit XXX..... 107
Hard Drive Bible 421

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDEX
Autloader P .................................................... 306
Autocorc ....................................................... 316
Autodctection ............................................... 380
AUTOEXEC.BAT .............. 119, 316, 318, 323, 331
Automatic Backup of Files ............................. 379
Auxiliary Memory ............ 380, 389-390, 406, 417
Auxiliary Storage Devices ............................. 380
Average Access Time ..................................... 380
Average Data Transfer Rate ..................... 311-312
Azimuth.......................................................... 380
B-Cable .......................................................... 380
B-DOS ............................................................ 381
Backup ...............70,290-291,304-305,319,331,380
Backward Compatibility................................ 380
Baloney Slicer ................................................ 2-3
Barrier ...................................................... 75, 101
BaseAddress ...................... 55, 105, 108, 174-176
Base Address Floppy Drive ......... :.................. 175
Base Address SIMM Type ............................... 176
Basic Drive Operation ............................... 9, 377
Baud Rate ...................................................... 380
BCAI-Byte Count After Index ........................ 381
BDOS ............................................................. 381
BDOS-The Basic Disk Operating System ....... 381
Beep .... ,.......................................................... 316
Beepcode ...................................................... 316
BFI ................................................................. 396
Bi-Directional Bus ......................................... 381
Binary..... 15, 61,327,378,381,383-386,389,405,418
BIOS Address ................................................. 381
BIOS Basic Input ........................................... 381
BIOS Bench Mark .......................................... 316
BIOS Benchmark Program ............................ 316
BIOS ROM .......................... 20, 56-57,60,72,100
BIOS Sign-On Banner .................................... 104
Bit ...... 5-6, 16-17,23,27,30,34-42,44,52,83-86,
282-284,379-382,388,390-391,394-396,
402-405,407,409-410,412,418-419
Bit Cell Length Physical ................................ 381
Bit Cell Time .................................................. 381
Bit Density Expressed ................................... 381
Bit Jitter ......................................................... 381
Bit Shift ............................................ 27, 382,407
Bits Per Inch .................................. 379, 381, 388
Boards ........ 49-50, 52, 55-58,63,72,96,102-104,
118,172,187
422 Hard Drive Bible

Bodo, Martin ...................................................... 3
Boot .... 57, 59,61-63,76,80,85,101,103,105-107,
109,316,318-319,327,382
Boot Mgr Pgm ............................................... 318
Boot Transfer ................................................. 382
Bootup ................................................... 317,382
Buffers ........ ,...................................... 63, 119, 121
Building a Real Multimedia PC ..................... 284
Bulletin Board System ................................... 382
Burst Speed ................................................... 382
Bus
............... 23, 30, 33, 38, 44, 49-53, 55-56
58,62-63,65,71,74,79-80,91-92,96,99-100,
102-103,105,109,175-177,186-187,189,197,
304-305,329,377,379,381-383,389,392-394,
398-399,401,403-404,406,410-412,415,417
Bus Clock Speed ........................................ 58, 96
Bus Compatibility Floppy Drives .................. 176
Bus Mastering .......... 30, 50, 53, 99, 383, 389, 394
Bus Mastering Compatibility........................... 99
Bus Scan .................................................. 91, 109
Bus Slots ........................................................ 383
Bus Speed ... 52-53,63,92,175-176,186,305,329
Bus Wait States ........................................... 58, 96
Byte Definition ................................................ 35
Bytes .... 4-5, 29-30, 36-37,42,72,87, 113, 119,281,
321,382-383,386,395-396,400,403,414,418
Cable .......... 22-25, 44-45, 60-61, 63-68, 79-81, 93,
95-96,102-103,105,191,377,380,390,394,
401,404,406-409,412,416
Cabling ..... 45, 63-65, 67, 79, 82, 95, 97,102,104,
107-109
Cache ............ 86-87,118-121,174-177,180,187,
189,197,288,316,383,389
Cache Programs ............................................ 120
Caching Algorithm ........................................ 175
CAM-Common Access Method ...................... 383
Capacity..... 3-7, 10, 13, 15-17,21-22,25,29-30,33,
35,37,53,59,70-75,84,89,100-102,111-112,
114,180-181,279,287,289-292,304-309,311-312,
321,330-331,383,385,392,394,400,410,414,
416-417,419
Capacity Amount ................................... 383, 414
Cardlock ........................................................ 316
Cards ........ 2-3, 6,16,45,49,52,56-58,62,69,84,
91-92,96,99-101,103-105,171,378,383
385,388,400,407
©

csc

1996

Corporate Systems Center (408) 743·8787

INDEX
Cardtalk V2. ,................................................... 316
CardtalkV3.,................................................... 317
Cal°riage ... 9-13, 113,293,380,383,396-397,417
Ca1~riage Ass fembly ................... 383, 396-397,417
Cartridge .............. 8, 172,288-289, 291, 293-294,
306-310, 408
Cartridge Type Length Tracks Capacity ... 307-308
CCAT Controllers .......................................... 173
CCS ................................................................. 383
CD Handling Hazards .................................... 285
CD MEDIA ...................................... 279, 281-282
CD-ROM Standards ...,..................................... 280
CD-audio ........................................................ 291
CD-I ............ ,............................................ 281-282
CD-R Compact Disk Recordable ................... 383
CD-ROM ..... 6-7,22,30-31,43,70,84-85,97, 117,
279-285,290-291,314,379,384-385,
392-393,401-402
CD-ROM-Compact Disc Read Only Memory.... 384
CD-ROM Drive ......... 280, 282-283, 290, 393,401
CD-ROM Duplicator ........................................ vii
CD-ROM Drive Operation ............................. 280
CD-ROM Towers ............................................. viii
CD-ROM XA ................................................... 281
CD-WO .......................................................... 284
CD-Writers .................................................... 307
CDC Wren HI Series ............................... 211-212
CDC Wren V Series ........................................ 212
Cell ...................................... 16-17, 381,404,418
Central Processor Unit .................... 384-385, 403
Centronics .............................. ,........ 67-68, 79, 81
Centronics Cable ........................................ 67-68
Centronics SCSI Cable ........... ,........................ 68
Check Condition ................................... 37-38, 40
Check FDISK................................... 106-1 07, 109
Checking Unit-Attention ............................... 327
Chkdsk................................................... 108, 317
Choosing a CD-ROM Drive ........................... 283
Choosing a Hard Drive And Controller........... 51
Clanton, Larry ............................................... 318
Clock Rate ..................................... 384, 392,400
Closed Loop ................ 4, 280, 289, 384, 396,415
Cluster Size ., .................................................. 384
CMOS Drive Type Tables ........ '......................... 99
CMOS Paralneters .................................. 111, 320
CMOS Setup ...................... 50, 58, 72, 74, 96, 320
©

csc 1996

Coded Information Interchange .................... 379
Coldboot ....................................................... 323
Command ..... 24, 33-42,69,71,73-74,77,85,89,
91,106-109,117,119,304,379,383-385,
406,408
Command Chaining Combining ................... 385
Command Descriptor Block .................... 38, 385
Command Op Code ........................................ 33
C()mmand-A .................................................... 81
Common Access Method .............................. 385
Common Command Set ........................ 383, 385
Common Error Messages ........................ 99, 107
Common Installation Problems ............... 95, 104
Compact Disk Read Only Memory ............... 279
Compaq Computer ......................................... 20
Compaq DOS ................................................ 10 1
Compsurf Failure .......................................... 100
Compsurf Novell ..................................... 89, 318
Connector Pinout ............................................. 61
Connectors ...... 44-45, 65, 79, 377, 383, 386, 391,
397,412,418
Conner IDE Card ........................................... 173
Conner Peripherals .................... 6-7, 20, 173, 211
Conner Peripherals Controllers .................... 173
Control Cable ....................................... 22,64-66
Controller ....... 20,22-25,29,44-45, 50-53, 55-59,
61,63-65,69,71-74,76,79,83-86,89,91-92,
95-97,99-109, 114, 118-121, 171-175, 177-189,
192-198,288,293,303-307,311,315,321,323,
325,378,380-381,385,387-390,398-401,403,
407-409,411,413,418
Controller Information ........................... .55, 171
Controller Kit ................................................ 325
Controller Setup ...................................... 55, 305
Converting Imprimis to Seagate Numbers ...... 115
Copyright Notice .......................................... 314
Core InternationaL ........................................ 117
Core Memory ................................................ 386
Coretest .......................................... 117, 316-317
Correct Enclosure Cabling .............................. 67
Correct ID ..................................................... 317
Co