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ABSTRACT BOOK

ECP 2015
Abstract Book

INDEX

Keynote Speakers

4

State of the Art

24

Round Tables

35

Symposia

39

Oral Presentations

373

Posters

1277

Pre-Congress Workshop

2323

2

2015 Innexta S.r.l. - Milano
Editor: Micol Tummino, Martina Bollati, Martina Widmann
Impaginazione: Dario Colbacchini
ISBN 9788898116225

3

ABSTRACT BOOK

KEYNOTE
SPEAKERS

4

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY001
THE INFLUENCE OF PRIMED GOALS ON ORGANIZATIONAL
BEHAVIOR
Gary P. Latham , University of Toronto, Toronto – Canada

There is a "replicability crisis" in social psychology regarding the effect of primed goals on behavior. In
addition, the charge has been made that the effect, where it does exist, is so fragile as to be arguably
irrelevant. This is not the case in organizational psychology. I will review field experiments as well as
those conducted in laboratory settings showing that primed goals have an additive effect with consciously
set specific, challenging goals on the performance of employees in call centers. Moreover, the effect lasted
for a 4-day work week rather than seconds/minutes. The effect was also found for a primed learning goal
where the participants initially lacked the knowledge to perform the task. Finally, data will be reviewed
suggesting that goal setting theory explains the primed goal-performance relationship. These experiments
include exact as well as conceptual replications.

5

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY002
VALUES AND PRO-ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIONS
Linda Steg, University of Groningen, Groningen – Netherlands

Why would people act pro-environmentally, even if this is associated with somewhat higher behavioural
costs (e.g., money, time, or effort)? In this presentation, I will argue that various factors may motivate
individuals to engage in such pro-environmental actions, and that values play a key role in this respect. I
will elaborate on how values, and in particular biospheric values, encourage pro-environmental actions.
Also, I will discuss factors that may activate or deactivate biospheric values, thereby increasing the
likelihood of pro-environmental behaviour.

6

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY003
ACTION AND INTENTION UNDERSTANDING: THE NEURAL
MECHANISMS

Giacomo Rizzolatti, University of Parma, Parma – Italy

7

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY004
ACTUAL VALUES AND ATTITUDES OF CZECH CHILDREN
Lenka Šulová, Charles University in Prague, Prague - Czech Republic

The paper introduces several interesting findings of a study conducted on 2,238 Czech children and
adolescents in collaboration with the National Institute of Children and Youth Czech republic. The
research project focused on identifying value orientations of 6-15 years old children. The central role
played a family - the one in which a child lives, as well as the family the child itself is going to establish.
What kind of partner and what kind of parent do children want to be? And do they want to become
partners or parents at all? The survey was divided into five themes: 1. Family, 2. School , 3. Leisure,
which was further divided into other sub-areas: Leisure time spent individually with parents, friends and
Leisure time spent in an institution organized for leisure or informal education (institutions providing
leisure activities), 4. Media, and these phenomena are essential socialization factors in children's life. The
5th part of the research is dedicated to life values and attitudes of children and adolescents. The paper will
present selected results, explaining more general trends of contemporary children and adolescents.

8

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY005
PAYING TAXES IN A CLIMATE OF MUTUAL COOPERATION
Erich Kirchler, University of Vienna, Vienna - Austria

Tax evasion and aggressive tax planning by globally operating firms have brought taxation to the top of
the international policy agenda. How to combat non-compliance? Besides the application of deterrence
measures and the necessity of building an international consensus on developing instruments to control
and influence the strategic behavior of multinationals, it is necessary to establish a sense in society that tax
avoidance and tax evasion are wrong. Mutual cooperation between authorities and taxpayers must become
the binding social norm. Identification of citizens and residents with the norm needs to be strengthened by
establishing a synergistic interaction climate. Successful establishment of mutual cooperation depends on
power of authorities and citizens’ trust in authorities. It is argued that manifestation of legitimate power
corroborates trust in authorities. Also manifestation of coercive power can strengthen trust and a
synergistic interaction climate. However, the use of coercive power is a double-edged sword bearing the
risk of an antagonistic interaction climate of “cops and robbers”.

9

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY006
RESISTANCE TO CHANGE IN A WORLD OF CHANGE: UNRAVELLING
OUR SECRET TRAUMATIC ATTACHMENTS
Felicity de Zulueta. King’s College London, London - United Kingdom

Dr Felicity de Zulueta is an expert on attachment and the crucial role it plays in the traumatic origins of
violence as well as in its prevention. She will begin by presenting the evidence that shows the huge
importance of the first 2-3 years of life in child development. By linking these results with the high rates
of domestic violence in our society, she will outline how damage to the vital processes of attunement and
mentalisation in infancy leads to violence in the home and its transmission down the generations. Her
ending however is one of hope as she presents us with a new empowering, effective and relatively low
cost approach to healing the wounds of these traumatized families which is now used across the UK and
is being promoted in Northern Europe, Mexico, Ecuador, Greece and Italy. This particular approach,
which uses our current video devices, illustrates so well how modern technology married to the latest
neuroscientific research can promote powerful change in the field of psychotherapy across the social
divide.

10

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY007
HOW FAR CAN WE GET? A FUTURE PERSPECTIVE ON DIVERSITY
AND COLLABORATION IN PSYCHOLOGY
Robert A. Roe, Maastricht University, Maastricht – Netherlands

11

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY008
THE ORGANIZATION OF OBJECT KNOWLEDGE IN THE BRAIN:
DOMAINS AND ATTRIBUTES
Alfonso Caramazza, University of Trento, Rovereto – Italy; Harvard University, Cambridge - United
States

12

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY009
RISK PSYCHOLOGY
Christine Roland-Lévy, University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne, Reims – France

The presentation will deal with risk psychology, essentially from the perspective of social psychology.
Besides a general introduction around the concept of risk and risk-taking a series of studies will be
presented. Based on the Social Representation Theory, risk in general will be presented. The presentation
will then develop around risk in the context of the financial and economic crisis. Examples of studies will
also present risk-taking, with financial incentives around gambling. Finally, examples of the effects of
risk-taking in sports will be presented.

13

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY010
THE VANISHING EFFECT OF RELIGIOUS IDENTITY ON PERSONAL
VALUES: A STUDY OF PROTESTANTISM, CATHOLICISM, EASTERN
ORTHODOXY, ISLAM, JUDAISM, AND NON-AFFILIATION
Shalom H. Schwartz, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem - Israel

Does people’s religion have an effect on what they consider to be the most important guiding principles in
their lives? Does belonging to one religion or another lead to emphasizing different values? This talk will
address these questions for the major Western religions. Most people, including many cross-cultural and
cultural psychologists, think that religion has a profound effect on the value priorities of individuals. Some
view religion as a critical source of value differences between nations and sub-national groups too. Are
they right? I will tackle these questions with data from representative samples in over 30 countries,
examining the value priorities of Roman Catholics, Protestants, Eastern Orthodox, Muslims, and Jews,
and of those who profess no religion.

14

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY011
EMPOWERING COACHING: THE DEVELOPMENT, DELIVERY AND
IMPACT OF A THEORY-BASED INTERVENTION TO PROMOTE
ADAPTIVE MOTIVATIONAL CLIMATES
Joan Duda, University of Birmingham, Birmingham - United Kingdom

15

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY012
SELF-REGULATION AS ORGANIZING INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT
IN CULTURAL CONTEXT
Gisela Trommsdorff, University of Konstanz, Konstanz - Germany

Self-regulation has usually been studied in Euro-American samples. This is a shortcoming which is even
more disturbing when conceiving of the self as culturally bound. Therefore, I will present culturepsychological approach conceiving of self-regulation as organizing personality development in cultural
contexts. The main focus is on the developmental conditions and the function of self-regulation for
culturally appropriate developmental outcomes. The culture-psychological and developmental relevance
of self-regulation will be underlined by selected studies. First, I will discuss different aspects of selfregulation (e.g., behavior and emotion regulation) and its functions for different domains of
developmental outcomes (e.g., social competence and academic achievement). Second, I will focus on
socialization conditions, including parenting and the cultural context, for the development of selfregulation. Further, I will relate the relevance of cultural values and modes of the self, e.g., the
independent and interdependent self-construal, for specific goals of self-regulation and the cultural
meaning of self-regulation. Based on empirical studies, associations of children`s self-regulation with
socialization conditions are discussed suggesting a theoretical framework for the development and
function of self-regulation in cultural context. I will conclude with questions on universal and culturespecific processes underlying self-regulation as organizing individual development. The general
discussion combines the lens of culture with the lens of development.

16

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY014
MULTI-CULTURAL EXPERIENCES AND IDENTITIES:
PSYCHOLOGICAL DYNAMICS AND CONSEQUENCES
Verónica Benet Martínez, Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona - Spain

This talk will review the psychological processes and consequences of being a multi-cultural individual
and/or having multicultural experiences, while integrating relevant findings and theories stemming from
cultural, personality, and social psychology.

17

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY016
REVEALING VOICE: THE CASE OF SEXUAL ORIENTATION
Anne Maas, University of Padova, Padua – Italy

It is often argued that discrimination of minority groups on the job market can be reduced through
appropriate recruitment procedures, including the reliance on audio-only interviews. But does audio
technology really prevent discrimination? I will argue here that voice contains a host of social information
that affects impressions and inferences in a pervasive and largely automatic fashion. Using auditory
gaydaras an example, I will show that people are greatly inaccurate in identifying sexual orientation on the
basis of voice alone. Yet, they draw strong inferences from masculine vs. feminine and straight vs. gay
sounding voice about the speaker’s traits, preferences, likely diseases, and leadership abilities. Voice may
even change the very meaning of what is being said.

18

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY017
FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS: A LONG-LASTING SOURCE OF WELLBEING
Eugenia Scabini, Catholic University of Milan, Milan – Italy

In recent years, family has gained a prominent place in social sciences due to the rapid or even dramatic
socio-demographic changes all over the world. In this scenario, what are the risk factors that may affect
family well-being and the resources that the family can count on to fulfill its fundamental task, which is
"to make human beings human"? The contribution involves two parts. The main findings regarding the
link between family (i.e., couple and parent-child relationship) and well-being (i.e., physical and mental
well-being) are presented in the first part, focusing on relationship quality, as well as on the constructs
developed to examine it. The recent effort made by some scholars to pay attention to positive constructs
(such as forgiveness and commitment) rather than negative constructs (such as conflict) allows a better
understanding of the components of relationships in terms of relationship health. The second part of the
contribution focuses on a perspective aimed not only at reaching a balance between the negative and the
positive aspects of the relationships, but also at understanding the relationship “in itself” and promoting
the good of the relationship. Fincham and Beach (2010) has proposed the idea of a true “positive
relationship science” whose core construct is represented by “relationship flourishing”. In this regard, the
“relational symbolic model” (Scabini & Cigoli, 2000) has provided new insights to the idea of
“relationship flourishing” by identifying the specificities of “family relationship flourishing”. According
to the “relational symbolic model”—whose core construct is “generativity”—the family is conceived as a
multigenerational system. Generativity is an outcome of family relationships if these relationships realize
their best potential; in the opposite case they produce degenerative outcomes. In this regard, generative
well-being can be considered as a form of well-being produced by flourishing family relationships.
Generative well-being occurs when family generativity (i.e., care and commitment towards the children)
and social generativity (i.e., care and commitment towards the new generations) are connected to each
other. Some research findings highlighting the two-fold role of family and social generativity are reported
in the final part of the contribution.

19

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY018
HEALTH BEHAVIOUR CHANGE: CONSTRUCTS, MECHANISMS, AND
INTERVENTIONS
Ralf Schwarzer , Free University of Berlin, Berlin – Germany

Health-compromising behaviors are difficult to change. Theories assume that an individual’s intention to
change is the best direct predictor of actual change. But people often do not behave in accordance with
their intentions. This discrepancy between intention and behavior is due to several reasons. For example,
unforeseen barriers could emerge, or people might give in to temptations. Therefore, intention needs to be
supplemented by other, more proximal factors that might compromise or facilitate the translation of
intentions into action. Some of these post-intentional factors have been identified, such as perceived selfefficacy and strategic planning. They help to bridge the intention-behavior gap. The Health Action Process
Approach (HAPA) suggests a distinction between (a) pre-intentional motivation processes that lead to a
behavioral intention, and (b) post-intentional volition processes that lead to the actual health behavior. In
this presentation, studies are reported that examine the role of constructs, mechanisms, and interventions
in the initiation and adherence to health behaviors (e.g., physical exercise, dietary behaviors, dental
flossing). The general aim is to examine the effects of psychological constructs on health behavior change,
based on various behaviors, time spans, and study participants from different countries.

20

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY019
TOWARDS STRESS-MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY: PERSPECTIVES
ON MEASURING AND ENHANCING THE HUMAN LIFE POTENTIAL
Anna B. Leonova, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow - Russian Federation

The proposed hierarchical approach to construction of stress assessment and prevention programs
integrates findings from three domains of contemporary stress research: ecological, transactional and
regulatory paradigms (Leonova, 2003). Within this integrative framework, two complex psychological
technologies – “Managerial Stress Survey” (MSS,) and “Individual Stress Resistance Promotion”
(STRESIS) – have been developed and empirically validated (Leonova, 2007, 2012). We demonstrate
how a rigorous implementation of this approach opens new perspectives on increasing human adaptation
potential and wellbeing in different job/life situations. In particular, these technologies significantly
enhance the motivational, self-regulatory and cognitive resources of the person.

21

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

01 - 20

KEY020
TRANSFORMING EVIL INTO HEROISM
Philip G. Zimbardo, Stanford University, Stanford - United States

22

KEYNOTE
SPEAKERS
INDEX
Latham Gary P.
Steg Linda
Rizzolatti Giacomo
Šulová Lenka
Kirchler Erich
de Zulueta Felicity
Roe Robert A.
Caramazza Alfonso
Roland-Lévy Christine
Schwartz Shalom H.
Duda Joan
Trommsdorff Gisela
Benet Martinez Verónica
Maas Anne
Scabini Eugenia
Schwarzer Ralf
Leonova Anna B.
Zimbardo Philip G.

KEY001
KEY002
KEY003
KEY004
KEY005
KEY006
KEY007
KEY008
KEY009
KEY010
KEY011
KEY012
KEY014
KEY016
KEY017
KEY018
KEY019
KEY020

23

ABSTRACT BOOK

STATE
OF THE ART

24

STATE OF THE ART

001 - 008

SA001
COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIAL WELL-BEING. ECPA
(EUROPEAN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY ASSOCIATION) EFPA
ASSOCIATE MEMBER COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY STATE OF ART
Caterina Arcidiacono, Past President of ECPA (European Community Psychology Association),
University of Naples Federico II, Naples – Italy

Community Psychology as well as the professional role of Community psychologists is a topic of
increasing interest in our scientific domain. Community Psychology analyses the interaction among
individual and social factors while proposing tools for social change as well as promoting justice, peace,
democracy and social solidarity; it is a new discipline that pursues social transformative goals. Our
question is why should psychology be interested in these objectives, given its natural inclination to study
either individual well-being or psychic diseases. Our concern is to embed peoples’ individual, biological
and psychological features in social context. Moreover, the aims and goals of Community psychology are
to meet the changes of contemporary society. Being aware of the relationship between individuals and
contexts, Community psychologists propose visions for the future of individuals, relationship and contexts
by working as catalysts of social change and well-being. In that regard, Community psychologists propose
visions, strategies and methods for working in health, social and educational contexts.The state of art
proposed by ECPA (European Association of Community Psychology) will define goals and instruments
of Community psychology to explore the need of specific training and development of peculiar
competences. This state of art will also deepen what characterizes and makes the psychological
competence peculiar for social well-being. How to act as experts on the interaction between individuals
and contexts, and which contribution can psychology gain from the community psychology
approach?Which professional training for the development of plans of action for Community
psychologists in social setting as well as the dissemination of community psychology knowledge in the
wider social field? An open debate on these subjects will be opened with all the audience.

25

STATE OF THE ART

001 - 008

SA002
PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH ON SUBSTANTIAL ORGANIZATIONAL
DEMOCRACY: INDIVIDUAL, SOCIAL AND SOCIETAL OUTCOMES
Wolfgang G. Weber, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck – Austria

While several well-known research reviews focused upon moderate forms employees’ participation on the
level of the workplace autonomy/control/decision latitude or the (self-managed/semi-autonomous) work
group (see Theorell 2004 for a review), only little research exists on substantive democratic structures,
where employees exercise influence over tactical or strategic decision-making in contemporary firms (for
the latest, only limited, reviews see Freeman, 2007; Kruse, 2002). Concerning crucial predictors, the big
majority of extant studies of organizational participation effects is based on restricted levels both of
structurally anchored participation and employees’ individual participation in democratic decision making.
In consequence, little is actually known about whether substantial organizational democracy, also
compared to restricted levels of participation, is associated with potential outcomes like work motivation,
value orientations, and organizational behaviour of employees, positively, and whether this may foster
engaged citizenship orientations within and beyond the workplace (see Pircher-Verdorfer et al., 2013).
This state of the art contribution intents to reduce this serious organizational psychological knowledge
gap. Design/Methodology - Based on an empirically tested typology of high participative and democratic
enterprises (Weber et al., 2008; e.g. representative democracies like workers’ cooperatives, democratic
reform enterprises, and basis-democratic employee-owned self-governed firms), an extensive free
category literature recherché using PsycINFO and related sources (PsycArticles, Psyndex etc.) provided
several hundreds of publications (1975 – Sept 2014), out of which only 52 publications proved congruent
with our strict criteria of in-/exclusion (democratic organizational features beyond workplace or work
group participation, psychological correlates and outcomes, quantitative data analysis incl. significance
testing). Results - The results indicate that structurally anchored organizational democracy and perceived
individual participation in democratic decision making is linked differentially with nine areas of
outcomes. For example, reviewing the respective studies revealed that mere employee ownership does not
guarantee that corresponding workers perceive a high level of individual influence and participation in
tactical or strategic decisions. Whether this is the case or not depends also on the concrete system of
representative or direct organizational democracy and further factors (like the following). Both
representative and direct participation are positively associated with ethical organizational climate which
also seems to represent a mediator concerning outcomes like commitment and prosocial work behaviours.
Further, perceived direct participation is much more frequently related to several indicators of satisfaction,
job involvement, and organizational commitment (instrumental model sensu Klein, 1987) than pure
employee ownership status (intrinsic model) as the majority of findings shows. Mixed results support
Pateman’s (1970) spillover hypotheses, partially, which lets assume that several third variables may
influence the positive interrelation between organizational democracy, prosocial work behaviours and
civic orientations toward societal or cosmopolitan issues. Further, only a few existing findings concerning
health factors in democratic enterprises do not provide a clear picture whether structurally anchored
democracy on the level of the organization is related to indicators of stress and health or not. While the
spillover hypothesis framework (Pateman, 1970; cf. Weber et al., 2009), Klein’s (1987) three motivation
models of employee ownership, the three-component model of organizational commitment (Meyer et al.,
1993), or the concept of (individual!) psychological ownership (Pierce et al, 1991; 2001) each were
addressed by five publications or more, surprisingly, the literature recherché indicates that several
26

STATE OF THE ART

001 - 008

prominent psychological theories or models that might prove highly relevant for the explanation of studied
phenomena are nearly not considered within the reviewed studies (e.g., self-determination theory, theory
of agency, activity/action theory, shared/distributed leadership and a lot of social-psychological concepts
dealing with group and inter-group behaviour; for a discussion of possible theoretical advance in
organizational participation theory see Weber & Jeppesen, 2014). Additionally, several methodological
weaknesses were identified, e. g., complex constructs are often operationalised only superficially or
questionably by means of a few or very heterogeneous items. Only a few longitudinal studies (which are
not in accordance with present methodological standards) or multi-level studies were identified and nearly
no quantifying process studies investigated the development of in-/dependent variables including their
backlashs on democratic practices and structures. Further, we found a few hints on several mediators or
moderators that need further investigation, like economic situation of the firm, ethically-oriented
organizational climate, psychological ownership, attitudes toward participation, or work stress.
Limitations - Because nearly all existing studies use cross-sectional design, findings of this review allow
no causal inferences, on the one hand. However, because democratic structure or individually perceived
participation were significantly associated with hypothesized outcomes in several of the subject areas
considered, the possibility of causal effects of organizational democracy could not be falsified, on the
other hand. Research/Practical Implications - Notwithstanding that, several findings provide hints how
organizational structures and cultures can be improved to foster employees’ satisfaction with their
organization, work motivation, affective and normative commitment, job involvement, or prosocial and
civic orientations. Further, a lot of possible differences between democratically structured and
conventional enterprises seem to be nearly not researched, e.g. concerning organizational resilience, moral
competences, collective psychological ownership, innovativeness, collective artefacts and knowledge
exchange, emotional work, burnout, mobbing. Several propositions will be presented for future research.

27

STATE OF THE ART

001 - 008

SA003
EMOTION DYSREGULATION – MECHANISMS AND TREATMENT
Christian Schmahl, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg – Germany

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is characterized by severe functional impairments, a high risk of
suicide, extensive use of treatment, harm to others, and high costs to society. Current theories view
dysfunctions in emotion processing and social interaction as core mechanisms of BPD. This often leads to
prototypical behavioral patterns such as non-suicidal self-injury, high-risk behavior, and impulsive
aggression. Research on psychological and neural mechanisms of BPD points towards an interplay
between dysfunctional information processing, impairments of fronto-limbic circuits, and learned
maladaptive behaviors. This presentation will give an overview of the latest research on mechanisms of
emotion dysregulation and disturbed social interaction in BPD. Further, it will delineate new avenues of
treatment approaches for BPD which combine the understanding of neurobiological and psychotherapy
mechanisms. Examples of this, which will be depicted in the presentation, are fMRI-based neurofeedback,
effects of DBT on neural mechanisms of emotion regulation, and computer-based training of social
interaction.

28

STATE OF THE ART

001 - 008

SA004
COGNITIVE THERAPY: THE STATE OF ART
Antonio Semerari, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan – Italy

Cognitive psychotherapy has been recently witness to the development of many new techniques and
interventions, which make uncertain the existence of a unified theoretical model. In order to clarify the
state of art, we will distinguish between strategic goals and techniques and tactics in psychotherapy which
help to pursue these goals. Traditionally, Standard Cognitive Therapy had two main strategic goals:
patient’s awareness of his/her way of functioning, and cognitive changes. More recently the focus on the
self-maintaining processes of many disorders has led to add further strategic goals: acceptancy and the
development of functional skills. Therefore, the overall picture of the procedure and techniques can be
currently attributed to four strategic goals: awareness of the process underlying different disorders,
cognitive changes, acceptancy, development of functional skills. The possibility of the development of a
unified approach will be discussed on this light.

29

STATE OF THE ART

001 - 008

SA005
STIMULATING THE BRAIN, STIMULATING THE MIND
Giuseppe Vallar, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan – Italy

In the last two decades, there has been an explosion of studies in healthy participants and neurological
patients with focal lesions and neural dysfunctions, using non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS:
transcranial Magnetic/ Electrical Stimulation, TMS, tES) techniques, in order to temporarily interfere with
behavior, with the aim of elucidating the neurofunctional basis of cognition. More recently, NIBS have
been used as adjuvant treatments for improving and rehabilitating neuropsychological deficits such as
aphasia, apraxia, and unilateral spatial neglect. NIBS are currently also used for attempting to increase
level of performance, and for modulating higher aspects of behavior in healthy participants. These diverse
sources of evidence, firstly, further elucidate the multi-componential architecture of the mind, and its
neural basis, as experimental psychology and neuropsychology have done since their inception in the
second half of the 1800. Secondly, the increasing amount of evidence that NIBS may selectively modulate
and improve aspects of behavior of patients with a variety of neuropsychological and neurological deficits,
both alone, and as adjuvant to behavioral treatments, opens novel perspectives to neurorehabilitation.
These issues shall be illustrated and discussed through the results of experimental studies concerning the
effects of NIBS on motor planning and execution in healthy participants, on ideomotor apraxia in braindamaged patients, and on deficits of visuo-motor adaptation to a displaced visual scene. The emerging
pattern in adult humans is that behavior and its neural bases may be modulated by NIBS, both increasing
and decreasing level of performance, through effects on the stimulated cortical areas, and a set of
connected regions, showing a remarkable amount of behavioral and neural plasticity, while basically
preserving the functional architecture of cognitive and sensorimotor processes.

30

STATE OF THE ART

001 - 008

SA006
PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY: PRESENT AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS
Luigi Grassi, University of Ferrara; S. Anna Hospital, Ferrara - Italy

Over the last 30 years, a number of studies in psycho-oncology literature have indicated the need for a
multidimensional approach to cancer, by taking into account the physical, psychological, interpersonal and
spiritual implications determined by the disease and its treatment. At least 30-40% cancer patients and
their families present in fact, emotional disorders that are associated to maladjustment, reduction of
quality of life, longer rehabilitation time, poor adherence to treatment and abnormal illness behavior.
Various types of psychosocial interventions have also been shown to be effective in reducing
psychological symptoms and improving quality of life among cancer patients and their families.
Psychosocial oncology, as the specialty aiming at studying the psychological, social and spiritual factors
in cancer, has today a specific and unquestionable role, with psychosocial domains, including screening
for distress, assessment and proper treatment, to be mandatorily integrated into routine care across the
trajectory of cancer. Psycho-oncology has rapidly developed throughout the world and psycho-oncology
services, programs and/or departments are available in most countries with the mission of providing
specific activities in terms of clinical care, education and research. Guidelines and recommendations on
psychosocial care in cancer have been also developed and endorsed by the national scientific societies of
psycho-oncology (e.g. Canadian Association of Psychosocial Oncology; Italian Society of PsychoOncology) as well as national and international institutions (e.g. USA National Comprehensive Cancer
Network Distress Management Panel; Council of the European Union Commission).

31

STATE OF THE ART

001 - 008

SA007
EMDR TREATMENT OF TRAUMA AND PTSD IN BORDERLINE
PERSONALITY DISORDER: CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS AND
ASSESSMENT FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SYMPTOMATOLOGY
Dolores Mosquera, Institute for the Study of Trauma and Personality Disorders (INTRA-TP) -

Spain

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) presents great challenges for clinicians. Patients with this
diagnosis are known for being impulsive, reactive and highly sensitive. They often present with high risk
behaviors, impulsivity, self-harming behaviors and a history of or risk of suicide attempts. PTSD and
complex trauma issues need to be considered in the understanding and management of this population.
Sometimes it can be difficult for clinicians to establish the connecting thread between the patient's
symptoms (including the frequent difficulties they present in the therapeutic relationship) and the early
environments in which they grew up, characterized by a high rate of attachment disruptions and severe
traumatic events. People with BPD and a history of complex trauma have many difficulties with selfregulation and relating to others. The management of these self-regulation and relational difficulties are
central aspects in the specific treatment of trauma and in general treatment of BPD. BPD symptoms can
be treated effectively by reprocessing core targets with EMDR. The treatment of some of the most
problematic symptoms such as impulsivity, self-harm, chronic emptiness, pathological idealization and
dependence will be illustrated throughout clinical video examples.

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SA008
EMDR THERAPY 2015
Udi Oren, President of EMDR Europe Association

EMDR Therapy has come a long way since the publication of the first EMDR related article 26 years ago,
to being integrated in to the WHO guidelines for the treatment of PTSD in 2013.. While pointing to
several mile stones in its development, the lecture will focus on recent developments in the EMDR world:
1) the current support for the Adaptive Information Processing Model (the theoretical basis of EMDR
Therapy),including the ACE study; 2) recent publications on EMDR Therapy focused research, including
findings regarding major mental illnesses; 3) major developments in EMDR Therapy practice, including
acute and group protocols; and 4) the spread of EMDR Therapy in the world. The lecture will end with a
vision ofpossible future developments in the EMDR world and their potential impact on different areas
includingmental health, health, education and world peace.

33

STATE OF THE ART

STATE OF
THE ART
INDEX
Arcidiacono Caterina
Weber Wolfgang G.
Schmahl Christian
Semerari Antonio
Vallar Giuseppe
Grassi Luigi
Mosquera Dolores
Oren Udi

SA001
SA002
SA003
SA004
SA005
SA006
SA007
SA008

34

INDEX

ABSTRACT BOOK

ROUND TABLES

35

ROUND TABLES 000 - 003

RT001
HOW TO PROMOTE THE RESEARCH-PRACTICE TRANSFER: PANEL
DISCUSSION WITH THE EFPA-EAWOP STANDING COMMITTEE ON
WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
With the move towards evidence-based management, there has also been a push for improving the
research-practice link in work and organizational psychology. One response to this push has been the
establishment of the EFPA-EAWOP Standing Committee on Work and Organizational Psychology.
Through this Standing Committee we hope to bridge the gap between science and policy (practice) by
disseminating scientific findings in a comprehensible way to policy makers and regulators of the EU. The
committee will provide a statement on how they see their role in supporting policy-making on issues
related to individual and organizational factors impacting on worker‘s well-being and performance. This
will be followed by a moderated discussion among the panel members on questions such as prioritizing
topics, the speed-quality trade-off for providing information to policy-makers on short-term notice, the
difficulty of providing general, simple, and exact evidence, and the implications on research, for instance
focusing more on "wise interventions" (Walton, 2014). Finally there will be ample opportunity for the
audience to interact with the panel.

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RT002
PROMOTING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN PSYCHOLOGY
Evidence-based practice is a systematic approach to clinical problem solving which allows the integration
of the best available research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. The Board of Scientific
Affairs has undertaken to explore the current state of affairs with regard to Evidence-based Practice in
Psychology in all EFPA member states. As part of this work, the Board has adopted the following
definition, an extension of the American Psychological Association’s (APA) definition for all areas of
psychology: “Evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP) is the integration of the best available
research with shared professional expertise in the context of client characteristics, culture, and
preferences”. The aim of this Roundtable Discussion is to stimulate debate and seek information and
feedback around the following four broad areas: (1) Education / training at graduate / postgrad level: (a) Is
EBPP part of graduate/postgraduate/professional training? If it is, how is this training conducted? (2)
Promotion of EBPP: (a) What does the organization do? (b) In what ways is EBPP promoted in your
country? (c) Do you anticipate or have encountered problems implementing EBP? (d) Are there working
groups in your association to promote EBPP? (e) Does your organization have an agreed definition of
EBPP? (f) Does our definition encapsulate yours? Where do you see deviations? (3) Regulation of EBPP:
(a) Is the delivery of psychological services regulated? By whom and how? (4) Monitoring EBPP: (a)
Does continued professional training (CPD), allowing clinicians to keep up with research in their field,
exist in your country? (b) To what extent is CPD monitored? (c) Who monitors? (d) Does member
association support members in their CPD?

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RT003
FINAL DRAFT OF THE INTERNATIONAL DECLARATION ON CORE
COMPETENCES IN PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
The International Project on Competences in Psychology (IPCP) has worked for two years to achieve an
international agreement on which core competences shall be included in what is now being called the
“International Declaration on Core Competences in Professional Psychology”. The project started with a
working conference in July 2013, with representation from major international and regional psychology
associations, and from some national associations. The project has since then been discussed at several
open meetings held in various sites globally, and been reviewed in two rounds of consultations in a
Reference Group consisting of 275 colleagues from all over the world. A “Final Draft” of the Declaration
will be presented and discussed. The process will then enter internal phases of consultations in the
International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP) and the International Union of Psychological
Science (IUPsyS). Hopefully the Declaration can be accepted by IAAP and IUPsyS in Yokohama 2016 in
conjunction with the IPC2016 there.

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SYMPOSIA

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IS001
SUPPORTING PARENTS WITH EVIDENCE-BASED
INTERVENTIONS
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Lavinia Barone, University of Pavia, Pavia - Italy
Femmie Juffer, Leiden University, Leiden - Netherlands
Francesca Lionetti, University of Pavia, Pavia - Italy
George Downing, University of Paris 8, Paris - France
Maria Jose Rodrigo, University of La Laguna, Tenerife - Spain
Maria Jose Rodrigo, University of La Laguna, Tenerife - Spain

Nowadays Europe is facing with major social challenges, as promoting inclusive, innovative and
secure societies. For children's well-being, promoting a secure society is related to the promotion of
the quality of family relationships. In this context there has been recently a change of perspective in
program promoting the quality of the parent-child relationship from vulnerability to resources, with
the aim of preventing potentially at risk contexts to became harmful conditions for the family and the
child (Downing, 2007; Juffer et al., 2008; Rodrigo et al., 2012; Barone & Lionetti, 2013).
Meta-analytic inquiries report that preventive interventions on parenting are effective in enhancing
parental sensitivity (Bakermans-Kranenburg et al., 2003) and in reducing children's social-emotional
and behavioural problems. They thus act on one of the major children's social capital, i.e. the family,
in order to promote social inclusion and adequate social relationships (Pettit & Collins, 2011), with
major economic returns for the society and welfare (Heckman & Masterov, 2007).
As a witness of the increasing interest of Europe in prevention programs and practices, aiming at
bridging the gap between science and practice, the main aim of the current symposium is to bring
together the contribution in parenting program from four of the major European Countries, i.e. The
Netherlands, France, Spain and Italy. Parenting program interventions for improving the parent-child
relationship will be presented, and results sustaining their efficacy and/or effectiveness discussed.

ATTACHMENT-BASED-INTERVENTIONS: EVIDENCE FROM RESEARCH AND
PRACTICE
Femmie Juffer, Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marinus H. van IJzendoorn
Central to early-attachment based interventions is the assumption that a secure attachment relationship
is an important basis for future development, especially in domains closely related to attachment, such
as social behaviour. Thanks to attachment-based interventions, introduced in the current presentation,
parents are supported to interact with their children in a sensitive way and to cope with emerging
difficult behaviour.

VIDEO-INTERVENTION THERAPY FOR PARENT-INFANT, PARENT-CHILD AND
COUPLE RELATIONSHIPS
George Dpwning
Video Intervention Therapy is one of the most widely practiced of today’s video-based methods. It is
used in psychiatric services, substance abuse centers, home visiting programs, special programs for
adolescent mothers, centers for autism and other disabilities, adoption and foster care, among other
settings. This talk will give an overview with video illustrations.
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AN EVIDENCE BASED GROUP INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR AT RISK FAMILIES
WITH YOUNG CHILDREN
Maria Jose Rodrigo, Miriam Alvarez, Sonia Byrne
We present the evaluation of ‘‘Growing up Happily in the Family’’ program for at-risk parents and
their children aged 0–6 implemented in several Spanish Autonomic Communities. We also report the
moderating effects of individual, family, neighborhood, group and facilitator characteristics on
program results.

PROMOTING POSITIVE PARENTING: AN ATTACHMENT-BASED INTERVENTION
WITH ADOPTIVE FAMILIES
Francesca Lionetti, Cinzia Alagna, Antonia Dellagiulia, Laura Rigobello, Lavinia Barone
An attachment-based intervention for adoptive families will be presented. The intervention is adapted
from the Video-feedback Intervention to Promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (Juffer
et al., 2008) and currently extended to the adoption context, involving families of children who
experienced multiple attachment ruptures.

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IS002
BASIC DIMENSIONS OF SOCIAL JUDGMENT
A18. General issues and basic processes - Social judgment, impression formation, impression
management
Convenor
Presenters

Patrizia Catellani, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Andrea Abele , University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen - Germany
Bogdan Wojciszke, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Sopot - Poland
Marco Brambilla, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Mauro Bertolotti , Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Nicole Hauke , University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen - Germany
Patrizia Catellani, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy

Research on the basic dimensions of social judgment greatly contributes to the advancement of our
knowledge of self- and social perception, impression formation, stereotyping, information processing,
and impression management through communication. This symposium presents recent developments
in research on the basic dimensions of social judgment, connecting different areas of social cognition
where these dimensions play a relevant role. In the first contribution the focus is on the definition and
distinction of the basic dimensions and their components. Recent findings indicate that, within the
broader domains of agency and communion, competence, assertiveness, sociability, and morality have
distinctive importance in social judgments of others and of ourselves. The role of the basic dimensions
in social interactions is then discussed, highlighting how the perspective taken by social actors
influences their perception of others. The distinctive role of the morality sub-dimension in impression
formation as well as in reputation monitoring is then focused on. Finally, the role of the basic
dimensions and their components in communication and impression management are discussed,
focusing on how each dimension can be affected by attacks and defences.

COMMUNION, AGENCY, AND SELF-ESTEEM. A LOOK FROM THE SUBCOMPONENTS
Andrea Abele & Nicole Hauke
Agency and communion are the fundamental dimensions of social judgment and agency dominates
self-perception and self-esteem. We argue and show that agency (assertiveness and competence) and
communion (morality and warmth) may be subdivided in two components with morality and
assertiveness being more strongly related to self-esteem than warmth and competence.

THE DISTINCTIVE ROLE OF MORALITY IN SOCIAL JUDGMENT
Marco Brambilla
We investigated the distinct roles played by morality, sociability, and competence in forming
impressions. Results show that morality and sociability make unique contributions to social judgment
and that morality has a primary role over sociability and competence in the impressions that we form
and the evaluations that we make of people.

HOW MUCH ARE WE CONCERNED IF OTHERS THINK WE ARE IMMORAL, COLD,
INCOMPETENT OR UNASSERTIVE?
Nicole Hauke & Andrea Abele
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We investigate if negative impressions that others form of the self lead to different concerns in
dependence on the content of this negative impression. Since people are primarily interested in the
communal traits of others, particularly in their morality, people should be especially concerned when
others form a negative moral impression of them.

COMMUNION AND AGENCY AS BASIC DIMENSIONS OF SOCIAL COGNITION
Bogdan Wojciszke
The emergence of agency and communion as basic content dimensions of social cognition is explained
as a consequence of two perspectives universally present in social interaction – the agent perspective
(of a person who performs an action) and the recipient perspective (of a person at whom the action is
directed and who experiences it outcomes).

THE EFFECTS OF ATTACKS AND DEFENCES ON AGENCY AND COMMUNION
DIMENSIONS Patrizia Catellani & Mauro Bertolotti
We investigated how communication affects the perception of agency and communion, and their subdimensions. Results show that attacks and defences focusing on a person’s morality, sociability,
competence, and assertiveness have different effects on social judgments, depending on the
importance attributed to each dimension and the professional category the target belongs to.

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IS003
INTERGROUP CONFLICTS: CLASSIC THEORIES AND CURRENT
PROBLEMS
C05. Culture and society - Group processes and intergroup relations
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Francesco Paolo Colucci, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Keren Sharvit, University of Haifa, Haifa - Israel
Loris Vezzali, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia - Italy
Michael Skey, University of East Anglia, Norwich - United Kingdom
Monica Colombo, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Simona Sacchi, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Monica Colombo , University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy

Intergroup conflicts have the same importance today that Lewin attributed to them in 1946, but the
current situation is profoundly different from what it was seventy years ago, and it is aggravated by a
persistent phase of recession, not of development as in the post-war period. Intergroup conflict here
does not denote the more general in-group/out-group bias, but rather real conflicts and the problem
should be situated.
From the psychosocial point of view, this raises important issues that should be considered in order to
understand intergroup conflicts: the problems of social identity and its relation to national identity, the
perceived threat to security, the coping with distress from open conflict, the social perception in
intergroup relations, the different methodological approach to this topic, and not least the intervention
to implement contact between group. The symposium will discuss about these topics, building on the
classic theories of Lewin, Allport, and Tajfel, and considering the contribution of recent theoretical
and methodological developments.

A SENSE OF WHERE YOU BELONG IN THE WORLD: EXPLORING THE LINKS
BETWEEN NATIONAL BELONGING AND ONTOLOGICAL SECURITY IN AN ERA OF
MASS MOBILITY. Michael Skey
Recent debates around globalisation often overlook what 'thick' attachments to the nation offer. Using
the concept of ontological security and data from a series of group interviews with members of the
ethnic majority in England, I show how the take-for-granted idea of the nation continues to inform a
wider sense of self, community and place.

THE ETHOS OF CONFLICT AND ITS ROLE IN COPING WITH DISTRESS IN
INTRACTABLE CONFLICT
Keren Sharvit
The presentation will introduce the concept of Ethos of Conflict (EOC), which refers to a system of
shared societal beliefs characterizing groups involved in intractable conflicts. The findings of the
research program show that the EOC can serve as a barrier to collective guilt and shame in the face of
harmful actions by one's ingroup.

INTERGROUP RELATIONS, NEW RACISM AND THE ETHNICIZATION OF SOCIAL
CONFLICTS: A CRITICAL DISCOURSE ACCOUNT.
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Monica Colombo
Critical discourse analysis has focused on the role exerted by the political elites and the media in the
legitimization of xenophobia and ethnic dominance. Evidence of overt and covert forms of racist
discourse will be presented. The implications of a critical discourse approach to the the study of
interethnic relations will be discussed.

HOW PHILOSOPHY CAN INFORM PSYCHOLOGY: SUPEREROGATION AND SOCIAL
PERCEPTION
Simona Sacchi, Andrea Manfrinati, Marco Brambilla, Francesco Paolo Colucci
We investigated the effect of an individual’s hypermoral behaviour on group perception. Study 1
showed that participants perceived a moral agent as positive as the hypermoral one but they perceived
the moral agent’s group better than the hypermoral agent’s group. Study 2 and 3 showed the
consistency of the results across different intergroup situations.

AN INNOVATIVE INTERVENTION TO IMPLEMENT EXTENDED CONTACT AND
FOSTER THE DEVELOPMENT OF CROSS-GROUP FRIENDSHIPS AMONG YOUNG
CHILDREN
Loris Vezzali, Sofia Stathi, Dino Giovannini
We conducted an extended contact longitudinal intervention aimed at increasing cross-group
friendships among young children. The intervention fostered the intention to meet outgroup members.
Ingroup/outgroup norms and behavioural intentions mediated the effects of the intervention on the
formation of cross-group friendships.

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IS004
RESOURCE PROMOTION IN CHRONIC DISEASE ACROSS THE
LIFE SPAN: INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONAL DIMENSIONS
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
E13. Health and clinical intervention - Psycho-oncology and psychological support in chronic disease
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Antonella Delle Fave, University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Ernst Bohlmeijer, University of Twente, Enschede - Netherlands
Evangelos C. Karademas, University of Crete, Rethymnon - Greece
Lotta Uusitalo-Malmivaara, University of Helsinki, Helsinki - Finland
Marta Bassi, University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Ulrich Wiesmann, Greifswald University, Greifswald – Germany
Giuseppe Masera, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy

In spite of World Health Organization’s recommendations, the biomedical approach to health is still
prevailing in most countries and health services. Physical and mental health are prominently evaluated
as absence of disease, rather than conditions of well-being. Patients are treated for their pathology,
disregarding how their social and family contexts, as well as their psychological features and
subjective experience can influence disease course and outcomes. At the same time, and somehow
paradoxically, the increasing prevalence of chronic and degenerative diseases poses new challenges to
health professionals and institutions. The increasing percentage of citizens of all ages living with
chronic diseases, matched with welfare systems’ resource limitations demand the attention of
policymakers and practitioners. In the last two decades, increasing efforts were devoted to the
identification of environmental and psychological mechanisms underlying health-related behaviours,
in order to promote the agency and responsibility of individuals in maximizing their own health, and
detect personal and social resources that can support well-being in chronic disease.
This symposium aims at providing an overview of the most recent advancements in this domain.
Presenters come from different research and professional backgrounds. The multiplicity of their
perspectives will shed light on the complex and multifaceted needs and assets of the four main
characters involved in the healthcare system: patients, physicians, caregivers, and educators.
Moreover, the issue of resource promotion in chronic conditions will be analysed in the life-span
perspective, through empirical evidence collected among children, adults and elderly people.

CHRONIC PATIENTS’ WELL-BEING AND PHYSICIANS’ INFORMATION SHARING
Evangelos C. Karademas
The Common Sense Self-regulation Model (CS-SRM) posits that chronic patients adapt better to
illness if they develop adequate illness representations. The information provided by health
professionals plays a crucial role in this process. Research findings clearly support the usefulness of
CS-SRM based training among patients and practitioners.

MENTAL HEALTH IN CHRONIC DISEASE
Ernst Bohlmeijer
Positive psychology offers an evidence-based (public) mental health model that is complementary to
the medical model. The primary focus is on enabling people with chronic diseases to live a pleasant,
engaged and meaningful life. Evidence will be presented that mental health and mental illness are
related but different continua, and related applications will be illustrated.
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HAPPINESS IN CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
Lotta Uusitalo-Malmivaara
A summary of studies and correlates of happiness in special education (SEN) children compared with
normally achieving children will be provided. The role of inclusive educational settings and social
affiliation in improving SEN children’s subjective well-being will be highlighted, and implications for
educational policy will be discussed.

A SALUTOGENIC ANALYSIS OF WELL-BEING IN OLD AGE
Ulrich Wiesmann
Resilience in the aging population is a growing concern for researchers and practitioners. Studies
conducted from a salutogenic perspective among cognitively intact nursing home residents suffering
from multiple chronic conditions showed that the sense of coherence mediates the resources-wellbeing relationship.

THE ILLNESS EXPERIENCE OF PATIENTS AND CAREGIVERS
Marta Bassi
Home-based health care in chronic conditions is increasingly encouraged in European countries.
Findings from studies investigating illness perceptions and daily experience among patients and
caregivers will be summarized. Their implications to design interventions promoting individual and
family resources and well-being will be discussed.

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IS005
MANAGING AND ASSESSING WORK RELATED STRESS IN
EUROPE: STATE OF ART OF NATIONAL STRATEGIES
D4. Work and organization - Wellbeing at work
Convenor
and
Health
Presenters
Hygiene and

Discussant
Spain

Sergio Iavicoli, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Hygiene
Epidemiology, INAIL, Monte Porzio Catone; European Academy of Occupational
Psychology (EAOHP) - Italy
Cristina Di Tecco , Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine,
Epidemiology, INAIL, Rome - Italy
José M. Peiró , University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain
Veronique Crutzen, , Service Public Fédéral Emploi, Travail et Concertation sociale,
Brussels – Belgium
Malgorzata Milczarek, European Agency for Safety and Health at Work, Bilbao -

The last decades have seen significant developments in the economic, political, technological and
social landscape, that have had an impact on the nature of work and the way people perform job
leading to the emergence of new risks for health and safety in the workplace, including work-related
stress and its consequences for workers’ health (ILO, 2010; Kompier, 2006). Stress represents the
second most frequently work-related health problem after musculoskeletal diseases. In Europe the
overall costs due to mental health disorders, including those that are not directly linked to work, are
estimated to be 240 billion Euros per year, less than the half of which are linked to direct costs, such
as medical treatment, while the loss of productivity for companies accounts for nearly 136 billion
euros, including sick day absences (EU-OSHA, 2014). Following the EU Framework Directive
89/391/EEC, the European Framework Agreement of 8 October 2004 prompted to the inclusion of
work-related stress and psychosocial risks in the agenda of the main international research institutes
and OSH bodies. Thus, several initiatives and approaches were over time developed to provide policy
makers, employers, trade unions, experts and employees with theoretical frameworks and practical
tools for assessing and managing work-related stress risk. As a clear signal of the growing interest in
Europe on work-related stress, the current EU-OSHA campaign focuses on managing stress and
psychosocial risks at work, running under the title “Healthy workplaces manage stress”. This
symposium aims to offer a portrait of the state of art on the management of work related stress risk in
Europe in order to identify needs and challenges to move towards the development of integrated
monitoring systems for health and safety at Europe level.

THE ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF WORK-RELATED STRESS RISK IN
ITALY: THE INAIL’S METHODOLOGY
Sergio Iavicoli & Stavroula Leka
The international debate on work-related stress risk has been rapidly expanding over the last decades.
This presentation offers an overview of experiences and research activities on psychosocial factors and
work-related stress risk in Europe.

TOWARDS EFFECTIVE AND SUSTAINABLE PREVENTION OF PSYCHOSOCIAL RISKS
IN BELGIAN ENTERPRISES
Veronique Crutzen & Alain Piette
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The missions of the DG Humanization of Work of the Belgian FPS Employment and Labour consist,
amongst others, in setting a legal framework to ensure the safety and the health of the workers and in
promoting well-being at work. This presentation will show how the FPS Employment tries to fulfil its
missions regarding the complex issue of psychosocial risks (PSR).
CHALLENGES IN THE PSYCHSOCIAL RISK ANALYSIS: SOME CONTRIBUTIONS
FROM SPANISH PREVENLAB PSYCHOSOCIAL METHODOLOGY.
Josè Maria Peirò
Psychosocial risk analysis confronts a number of challenges. Issues such as objectivity, accuracy,
determination of the severity of the risks the comprehensive coverage of the different facet of the
organizations and the triangulation of methods and informants require consideration when developing
instruments. In this presentation the Prevenlab-Psychsocial methodology will be presented and the
way it has dealt with some of these important issues.

THE ITALIAN RESEARCH EXPERIENCES ON THE ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT
OF WORK-RELATED STRESS RISK: THE INAIL’S METHODOLOGY
Di Tecco Cristina
This presentation will show the Inail’s methodology for assessing and managing work-related stress
developed according to the Italian framework for health and safety at work and tailored to the Italian
context.

‘‘HEALTHY WORKPLACES MANAGE STRESS” – EU-OSHA CAMPAIGN
Malgorzata Milczarek
In April 2014, EU-OSHA launched a 2-year campaign ‘Healthy Workplaces Manage Stress’ to raise
awareness of the growing problem of work-related stress. In 2015, brand-new data of the EU-OSHA
survey ESENER-2 focusing on managing psychosocial risks across Europe is to be published. Main
publications, activities and the first results will be presented.

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IS006
DEVELOPMENTAL AND BEHAVIOURAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE
CIRCULAR MODEL OF VALUES
C.6 Culture and society - Attitudes and Values
Convenors
Presenters

Discussant

Eldad Davidov, University of Zurich, Zurich - Swizerland
Jan Cieciuch , University of Zurich, Zurich - Swizerland
Daniel Seddig , University of Zurich, Zurich - Swizerland
Henrik Dobewall , Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona - Spain
Jan Cieciuch , University of Zurich, Zurich - Swizerland
Michele Vecchione , Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Sonia Roccas , The Open University of Israel, Raanana – Israel
Shalom H. Schwartz, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem - Israel

In previous decades, research on values within social, personality, developmental and cross-cultural
psychology has been greatly influenced by Schwartz’s (1992) value theory. Schwartz (1992; Schwartz
et al., 2012) defined values as transsituational goals of varying importance, which serve as guiding
principles in the life of a person or a group. Values differ from one another in terms of their
motivational meaning and form a circular structure. Values are considered as one of the most
important factors that influence our behavior. A fresh impetus for the value research has been
provided by the refined theory of values proposed by Schwartz and colleagues (2012).
In our symposium we will discuss the behavioral and developmental implications of the value theory.
Michele Vecchione with co-authors will present an 8-year longitudinal study on values and discuss
various aspects of value stability and change over time in early adulthood. Jan Cieciuch with coauthors will present a longitudinal study on values in childhood and propose a preliminary outline of
the model of value development, based on the Schwartz’s theory of values. Henrik Dobewall and
Toivo Aavik will present the 3-year longitudinal stability in self- and other-rated values and argue that
other-reports of values are not less stable across time than self-rated values or than other-ratings of
traits. Daniel Seddig will present a longitudinal study on hedonism and leisure activities as predictors
of perceived school problems among adolescents. The last presentation addresses the problem of
value-behavior relations. Sonia Roccas and Lilach Sagiv will present direct and indirect mechanisms
through which values affect behavior in various life-domains, and discuss personal attributes,
situational factors and cultural contexts as moderators of value-behavior links.

STABILITY AND CHANGE OF BASIC PERSONAL VALUES IN EARLY ADULTHOOD: A
8-YEAR LONGITUDINAL STUDY
Michele Vecchione, Guido Alessandri, Anna Doring, Shalom H. Schwartz
The present study focuses on stability and change of basic personal values through young adulthood,
from age20 to 28 years. A sample of 270 young adults (54% females) with a mean age of 20.46 years
(SD = .50) completed the Portrait Values Questionnaire at three time points, each separated by an
interval of 4 years. We analyzed patterns of change within and between persons. Results: A mediumto-high rank-order stability was observed for all ten values, comparable to that reported in the
literature for personality traits. The mean-level importance of conservation values (security, tradition,
conformity) and self-transcendence values (benevolence, universalism) increased over time and
remained stable for openness to change values (self-direction, stimulation, hedonism). Among selfenhancement values, the importance of power values decreased while the importance of achievement
showed a slight decrease. No gender differences were found in the rate of change of the ten values. A
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large percentage of respondents had a stable value hierarchy, indicating a considerable degree of
ipsative stability. When considered from different analytic perspectives, stability and change of values
appear to coexist with a prevailing pattern of substantial stability, particularly at increasing ages.
TOWARD A MODEL OF VALUE DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDHOOD
Jan Cieciuch, Eldad Davidov, Rene Algesheimer
The cross-cultural confirmation of the circular model of values (Schwartz, 1992, Schwartz at al.,
2012) raises the question how the structure of values develops in early age. We address this question
both empirically and theoretically. We conducted a longitudinal study with three measurement points
on a group of 801 children aged from 7 to 11 in Poland. Values were measured by using the Picture
Based Values Survey developed by Döring, Blauensteiner, Aryus, Drögekamp, and Bilsky (2010) to
measure values differentiated based on Schwartz’s model. It turned out that the circular structure of
values was present even at the first measurement occasion and did not change over time. The value
priorities changed in concordance with the circle of values of Schwartz: An increase in a particular
higher-order value was connected with a decrease in the opposing higher-order value. Especially,
conservation decreased in importance while openness to change increased in importance in childhood.
Regarding self-enhancement and self-transcendence, inverse curvilinear trends were observed.
By summarizing the empirical results and some theoretical considerations presented in the literature,
we propose a preliminary outline for the model of value development based on the Schwartz’s theory
of values. Development of values was in principle not discussed by Schwartz, however his theory
provides a convenient framework for such a model. We discuss developmental implications of main
claims of the theory: (1) the motivational meaning of values; (2) the differentiation between the
structure of values and value priorities; (3) the circular continuum of values, and (4) the interpretation
values as a core element of the latent culture. Based on the developmental interpretation of these
theoretical elements we propose a description of the value development as a trade-off between basic
motivations and the latent culture.

RANK-ORDER CONSISTENCY AND PROFILE STABILITY OF SELF- AND INFORMANTREPORTS OF PERSONAL VALUES IN COMPARISON TO PERSONALITY TRAITS
Henrik Dobewall, Toivo Aavik
This study compares the 3-year rank-order consistency of informant-reports (i.e., judgments of other
people – peers, spouses, siblings, parents, etc.) of values with stability estimates of self-rated values as
meta-analytically reviewed and within the same sample. Whether the hierarchy of values attributed to
an individual is as stable as in target's self-reports was assessed with profile correlations. Self- and
informant- reports of personality traits were available for direct comparison. Results indicated that
informant-reports of values were not less stable across time than self-rated values or than other-ratings
of traits. This was true for the relative position of a person within a sample as well as the relative
ordering of these measures within the same individuals. The observed longitudinal stability of
informant-reports of values implies that they can serve as a reliable source of information. Moreover,
the temporal stability of value/trait profiles (self- and other rated) was found to predict subjective wellbeing.

HEDONISM, LEISURE ACTIVITIES AND PERCEIVED SCHOOL PROBLEMS
Daniel Seddig
This study analyses the influence of hedonism on the perception of problems in school. As a value
orientation hedonism is conceptualized to be a latent dimension directed on self-centered satisfaction,
excitement and pleasant arousal. Accordingly, hedonism is considered to be a source of distraction
from conventional goals regarding educational attainment and demands. The hedonists extrinsic
motivation is expected to be related with an enhanced involvement in leisure activities, such as
hanging out with peers and going to parties, that are consistent with the goals of hedonism. Such
distractions from school requirements are assumed to be related with an increase in the perception of
problems at school. The study uses panel data for a sample of German adolescents aged 14-17 to
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analyse longitudinal structural equation models. First, a basic model is fitted to test the proposed
(causal) mechanisms. Results indicate, that hedonism is a moderate antecedent of perceived school
problems. A part of the influence is indirect, mediated by the involvement in extrinsic leisure
activities. Leisure activities moderately affect the perception of school problems. Second, a
multivariate latent growth curve model reveals that the developmental processes of hedonism, leisure
activities and perceived school problems are interrelated during adolescence.

VALUES AS PREDICTORS OF EVERYDAY BEHAVIOURS
Ewa Skimina, Tomasz Rowiński, Włodzimierz Strus, Jan Cieciuch
The Schwartz’s (Schwartz at al., 2012) refined theory of values was recently used to study the
relationship between values and behavior. In order to test this relation, researchers developed
measures for behavioural tendencies that correspond to values distinguished on the circle and they
presented the evidences that value preferences explain both self- and other-reported behaviour
(Schwartz, Butenko, 2014; Torres, Cieciuch, Schwartz, 2014). In our study we applied another
approach and verified whether values explain daily behaviours, that do not directly correspond to the
values differentiated in the model of values (Schwartz at al., 2012). These behaviours were selected
based on exploratory analysis of daily behaviour rather than theoretically recognized as motivated by
specific values from the model. Furthermore, we checked what explains daily behaviours better values or personality traits. The sample consists of 801 participants (56.7% female). They completed
Portrait Value Questionnaire to measure values, Big Five Questionnaire-2 to measure personality
traits and a pool of behavioural items from Goldberg’s Oregon Avocational Interest Scales. In
regression analyses, behaviours were predicted by demographic variables in the first block and values
(or personality traits) in the second block. Adding variables from the second block to the model, for
each behavioural factor, it caused a significant increase of the explained variance of behaviour.
Results were similar for both values and personality traits. Such findings indicate that values predict
common, everyday behaviour at the significant level that is comparable to the personality traits.

HOW DO VALUES AFFECT BEHAVIOUR? DIRECT AND INDIRECT PATHWAYS
Sonia Roccas, Lilach Sagiv
The relationships between values and behaviour evoked much interest in the last decade. There is a
growing body of research on the content of these relationships in a variety of life domains. Relatively
little is known about the mechanisms that link values to behavior. The current research aims to shed
light on the substantial, yet complicated, relationships between values and behaviour. we present some
of the paths through which values affect behaviour, discussing both direct and indirect mechanisms.
We point to personal attributes, situational factors and cultural contexts as moderators of the
relationships between value and behaviour.

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IS007
THE INHERENT PARADOX IN CASES OF CHILD ABUSE AND
NEGLECT: THE VICTIM, THE PERPETRATOR, AND THE SOCIETY
B13. Development and Education - Child Abuse and Neglect
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant
United

Rafael Art. Javier, St. John‘s University, New York - United States
Amal O. Madani, Psychologist, New York - United States
Rafael Art. Javier, St. John‘s University, New York - United States
Thomas A. Caffrey, Psychologist, New York - United States
Caroline "CC" Clauss-Ehlers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick States

This symposium seeks to discuss the factors involved in child abuse and neglect that make the
phenomenon difficult to understand, accept, and explain. A review of current statistics reveals that the
phenomenon is pervasive nationally and internationally. These alarming statistics continue to
challenge social and behavioral professionals to offer more comprehensive explanatory models and to
provide more effective ways to address the immediate and long term psychological impact on those
affected. In this symposium we will explore the social and legal factors, as well as individual and
family dynamics that have made the phenomenon so pervasive. It is our contention that child abuse
can only be understood in the context of the domestic violence syndrome and of the weakening
ofelements of our society that are expected to serve as the moral compass for the community. Thus,
abuses to children by those in a position of authority (such as parents, family members, teachers,
priests, law enforcers, etc.) constitute the most egregious violation. They poison the very atmosphere
that is supposed to provide a sense of comfort, confidence, and trust. We will discuss in this context
the manifestation of child abuse in child custody cases where the more acrimonious the conflict
between the couples is, the more likely that children will be used as pawn in the family conflict. It
leaves the child psychologically stunned and struggling with personal confusion, issue of trust,
anxiety, and depression. We will discuss the long term consequences of this phenomenon in the lives
of those affected even into adulthood.

UNDERSTANDING CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT WITHIN A CULTURAL AND
SOCIOECONOMIC CONTEXT.
Rafael Art. Javier
There is a ‘cultural, social, and economic context’in which child abuse and neglect takes place. This
context influences and is influenced by ‘laws and procedures’ enacted by the specific society to
dictate and guide the relationships of its members with one another, including the ‘view of male
privilege’ and the ‘role of patriarchal society principles’ that guide one’s behavior toward one another
in that society. It is in this context that we hear how perpetrators
of child abuse in some cultures feel justified to engage in behaviors which result in great physical and
psychological harm to children in the name of discipline, etc. This paper will examine relevant factors
involved in the phenomenon, with particular emphasis on an analysis of the basic psychological
characteristics in the perpetrator and the social context in which it takes place. Bullying and
cyberbullying will be discussed in this context as component of the general syndrome inherent in child
abuse. Finally, the paper will offer some intervention recommendations derived directly from the
contextual framework guiding the paper.

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CHILD ABUSE IN CHILD CUSTODY EVALUATIONS
Amal O. Madani
The area of child custody evaluations is an important arena where child abuse often comes to light.
The presenter will discuss the multiple ways in which this issue could surface, and the necessary
considerations and challenges involved in protecting children while retaining neutrality to serve the
child’s best interest in an adversarial arena.

IMPACT OF CHILD ABUSE IN CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR
Thomas A. Caffrey
Just as society as a whole facilitates child abuse, child abuse in turn facilitates attacks on society as a
whole. Like a soft-nosed bullet, abuse’s effects spread to impact multiple parts of society far beyond
the victims themselves. One such impact is victims’ eventual criminal behavior. In this segment of the
presentation, specific child abuse victims will be described in such a way that their abuse illuminates
their eventual criminal behavior

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IS008
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL DYNAMICS OF HISTORICAL
REPRESENTATIONS
C5. Culture and society - Group processes and intergroup relations
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Laurent Licata, Université libre de Bruxelles, Brussels - Belgium
Laurent Licata, Université libre de Bruxelles, Brussels - Belgium
Michal Bilewicz, University of Warsaw, Warsaw - Poland
Silvia Mari, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Tibor Pólya, Institute for Psychology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences,
Budapest - Hungary
Yechiel Klar, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv – Israel
Federica Durante, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy

Social representations of history are vital to form a group’s identity. They have a wide social and
political impact as they provide some of the cultural contents that accompany identity changes
following societal transformations. They are transmitted across generations through narratives that
contribute to define ethnic, religious, and national identities. These representations are often
fragmented between nations or ethnic groups. They elicit group-based emotions that influence
behaviours and may lead to intergroup conflicts or to reconciliation.
This symposium will gather five renowned social psychologists from Western and Eastern European
countries and Israel, all members of COST Action IS1205. It will address how historical
representations are related to present social psychological processes from different standpoints, and in
different settings. Silvia Mari will show how fascism is represented in contemporary Italy, and how
these representations serve social identity protection motives. Tibor Pólya will show how contents of
national history narratives vary as a function of the narrator’s level of national identification in
Hungary. Yechiel Klar will show that being exposed to the out-group’s historical narrative in the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict is cognitively costly, which partly accounts for people’s reluctance to take
the other’s perspective on history. Then Laurent Licata will present studies conducted among African
immigrants in Belgium, showing that minorities striving for recognition of their past victimization
may develop prejudice towards other minority groups uninvolved in their past victimization. Finally,
Michal Bilewicz will present Moral exemplars theory: being exposed to exceptional moral exemplars
– i.e. out-group members who acted in a moral way during a past conflict – improves intergroup
attitudes both among members of victim and perpetrator groups. Studies conducted in Turkey,
Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Poland will be presented.

ITALIANS AND FASCISM: HOW CAN WE EXPLAIN THE LACK OF RESPONSIBILITY
AND GUILT FOR INGROUP MISDEEDS?
Silvia Mari, Federica Durante, Luca Andrighetto, Alessandro Gabbiadini & Chiara Volpato
We explored the failure of taking charge of the fascist misdeeds by the Italian ingroup. Study 1
investigated which groups/individuals are considered victims, perpetrators and bystanders of such
crimes. Study 2 tested the hypothesis that some mechanisms of moral disengagement may inhibit the
assumption of ingroup responsibility and prevent guilt.

NARRATIVE CONSTRUCTION OF GROUP HISTORY NARRATIVES AND THE
NARRATORS’ SOCIAL IDENTIFICATION
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Tibor Pólya and Pál Kővágó
Recent research substantiates the view that the construction of group history narratives contributes to
the definition of the meaning of group identity. Our studies show that the construction of these
narratives is also related to the narrators’ identification with the group. Results will be interpreted in
terms of self-categorization theory.

ON THE DIFFICULTY TO CONTAIN THE HISTORICAL NARRATIVE OF THE OTHER
SIDE IN INTRACTABLE INTERGROUP CONFLICTS
Yechiel Klar and Hadas Baram
We explore the consequences of uninvited exposure to the outgroup's historical narrative (OHN). For
example, participants exposed to the OHN consumed more glucose and made more spelling mistakes.
Both behaviors were predicted by the perceived difficulty with the OHN. A new motivation for
narrative closure measure was devised and tested.

LACK OF RECOGNITION FOR PAST VICTIMIZATION FOSTERS COMPETITIVE
VICTIMHOOD AND SECONDARY ANTI-SEMITISM: THE CASE OF SUB-SAHARAN
AFRICANS LIVING IN BELGIUM
Laurent Licata and Laura De Guissmé
We study how a sense of collective victimhood can drive minority group members (i.e. African
migrants) prejudice toward groups uninvolved in past victimization (i.e. Jews). Survey results show
that competitive victimhood is exacerbated by a perceived lack of ingroup victimhood recognition by
host society, leading to more secondary anti-Semitism.

HISTORICAL MORAL EXEMPLARS AS A WAY OF IMPROVING CURRENT
INTERGROUP RELATIONS
Michal Bilewicz, Sabina Cehajic-Clancy, and Marta Witkowska
Moral exemplars theory proposes that mere knowledge about non-stereotypical historical characters
who acted in a moral way could repair current relations between conflicted groups because it leads to
acknowledgement of historical moral variability. Convergent evidence from Turkey, Armenia, Bosnia
and Herzegovina, and Poland is presented.

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IS009
SOCIAL AND EDUCATIONAL DYNAMICS IN VIRTUAL SPACES
F14. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Cyberspace and virtual realities
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

M. Beatrice Ligorio, University of Bari, Bari - Italy
Carlo Galimberti, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Lucia Baiocco, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna - Italy
M. Beatrice Ligorio, University of Bari, Bari - Italy
Paolo Ferri, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Stefano Cacciamani, University of Valle D’Aosta, Aosta – Italy
Ersilia Menesini, University of Florence, Florence - Italy

The contraposition between virtual spaces and face to face situations is definitively surpassed.
Researchers interested in the use of technology have definitively understood that online and offline
mutually influenced each other with the result that the space of interaction is expanded and enlarged
and new conceptual environments emerged, where specific and complex phenomena may occur.
This symposium aims at analyzing these phenomena using original and complex theoretical lenses. In
particular, both the social and educational perspectives are adopted. The social point of view is used to
understand how people interact online, offline and into the edges spaces; how the sense of community
is structured and how it evolves along the life span, distinguishing positive and problematic ways of
using technology. The educational point of view is applied considering specific contexts, such as
school and university. The intention is to answer to questions such as: What exactly means for
students to replace books with new technology? What does it mean to learn online by performing
collaborative activities? The double social and educational lens is indeed a crucial feature of this
symposium. Each contribution uses both lens: Social phenomena are analyzed by looking also at the
learning dynamics and educational situations are studied by considering the social dimension.
This symposium is a valuable occasion to analyze the interconnection between cyberspaces and offline
situations by taking in account complexity and, at the same time, preserving the ecological dimension.
Indeed, methodological issues concerning data collection and data analysis will be also discussed
during the symposium.
A great collection of researches composes the symposium. Original data and results will be presented.
Furthermore, interesting discussion is expected, able to provide new insights and to indicate possible
innovative paths for understanding the role technology is playing in our society.

STUDYING INTERACTIONS IN EDGE ENVIRONMENTS FROM A PSYCHOSOCIAL
POINT OF VIEW: EPISTEMOLOGICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL REFLECTIONS
Carlo Galimberti, Eleonora Brivio, Fabiana Gatti
Interactions nowadays take place simultaneously in face to face and in virtual environments. These
two contexts create an edge environment, a mix between a real and a virtual environment. This
contribution expounds on the epistemological and methodological changes needed in social research
to study interactions when dealing with edge environments.

ON-LINE AND OFF-LINE LIFE: FROM INVERSE INSTRUMENTALITY
FUNCTIONAL ORGANS
Martina Benvenuti, Elvis Mazzoni, Lucia Baiocco, Davide Cannata, Luca Zanazzi
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Starting from the concepts of functional organs (Kaptelinin, 1996) and inverse instrumentality (Ekbia
& Nardi, 2011), we present a study analyzing the use of social web during lifetime. In particular, the
study explores processes underling problematic uses of the social web compared to those developing
and improving human abilities.

THE SCALE OF SENSE OF COMMUNITY IN UNIVERSITY ONLINE COURSES: FACTOR
STRUCTURE
Stefano Cacciamani, Giulia Balboni, Vittore Perrucci
Aim of the study is to present the factor structure of the Scale of Sense of Community in University
online Courses, developed according to the model of McMillan and Chavis (1986). Participants were
785 students. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis allowed to extract three factors:
Membership, Fulfillment of needs, and Influence.

SCHOOL
WITHOUT
TEXT
BOOKS:
DIGITAL
NATIVES
VERSUS
DIGITAL IMMIGRANTS
Michelle Pieri, Paolo Ferri
This contribution presents the Cobipad project ongoing in an Italian high school. Started in the 2012,
the project will last three years. It involves high school where students use an Apple IPad instead of
text books. Several focus groups were carried out with teachers, digital immigrants, and students
considered digital natives. The main results will be presented.

POLYPHONIC COLLABORATIVE LEARNING: WEB-FORUMS AS DIALOGICAL SPACE
M. Beatrice Ligorio, F. Feldia Loperfido, Nadia Sansone, Giuseppe Ritella
The dialogical approach, in particular the concepts of “voices” and “polyphony”, has been extensively
used in education (Ligorio & Cesar, 2013). These concepts can uncover some fine dynamics of
collaborative learning. Qualitative analysis of web-forums, used by university students while
performing online collaborative tasks, will be presented.

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IS010
EVIDENCE BASED INTERVENTIONS AGAINST BULLYING AND
CYBERBULLYING: A COMPARISON ACROSS EUROPE
B08. Development and Education - Bullying and aggression
Convenor
Presenters

Ersilia Menesini, University of Florence, Florence - Italy
Benedetta Emanuela Palladino, University of Florence, Florence - Italy
Christina Salmivalli, University of Turku, Turku - Finland
Heidi Vandebosch, University of Antwerp, Antwerp - Germany
Maria Sapouna, University of the West of Scotland, Hamilton - United Kingdom
Peter K. Smith , University of London, London - United Kingdom

In recent years there has been a growing international interest for translational studies, for a richer
information of public policy and health management on the basis of the results of relevant and reliable
research. Specific attention has been devoted to rigorous experiments evaluating replicable programs
and practices. To this purpose, various scientific efforts have been made to define standards of
evidence that could be clearly structured and easily comprehensible for researchers and nonresearchers. Those standards, involving efficacy, effectiveness and dissemination, can assist
practitioners, policy makers, and administrators in deciding which interventions show better evidence
and can be more convenient to adopt.
The symposium tries to provide an answer to this need focusing on high-quality evaluations of
theoretically based interventions to prevent bullying and cyberbullying and presenting the most
important models in four European countries.
Recent literature has shown that aggressive behaviours acted by peers may be experienced in both
face-to-face and online interactions; for this reason adopting a specific focus both on bullying and
cyberbullying appears to be the most promising direction for intervention with young students.
The five presentations will provide an overview of different models focusing on bullying and
cyberbullying, based on face to face and virtual interventions. Specific attention will be devoted to an
evaluation of the level of efficacy in the case of Italian and Belgian models and to an evaluation of
effectiveness and dissemination for the Finnish and English models, the final presentation will present
a systematic review of a new generation of computer simulator games used to prevent bullying and
cyberbullying.

EVIDENCE-BASED INTERVENTION AGAINST BULLYING AND CYBERBULLYING:
EVALUATION
OF
EFFICACY
AND
MEDIATION PROCESSES
IN
THE
“NONCADIAMOINTRAPPOLA!” PROGRAM
Benedetta E. Palladino and Annalaura Nocentini
The presentation tries to provide an answer to the need of high-quality evaluations of theoretically
grounded antibullying-cyberbullying interventions. We evaluated Noncadiamointrappola! program 3rd
Ed. by adopting an evidence-based approach in analysing aspects related to the intervention’s efficacy
and the mediational mechanisms involved.

FRIENDLY ATTACK: THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN EVIDENCE-BASED GAME
AGAINST CYBER-BULLYING
Heidi Vandebosch
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This presentation focuses on the Friendly ATTAC project, which aims at the development of a serious
game against cyberbullying. Starting from the Intervention Mapping Protocol, we will discuss and
illustrate the following steps: problem analysis, formulation of behavioral and change objectives,
material development, and first evaluations.

KIVA ANTIBULLYING PROGRAM: SUSTAINABILITY AND LONG-TERM EFFECTS
Christina Salmivalli
Since the national roll-out of the KiVa antibullying program in Finland, data has been collected
annually from students as well as school staff in schools implementing the program.
In the presentation, findings regarding the implementation quality and effectiveness of the KiVa
antibullying program during the five years of implementation (2009-2014) will be presented and
discussed.

AN EVALUATION OF BEATBULLYING’S MENTORING SCHEME IN SIX EU
COUNTRIES
Fran Thompson, Peter K. Smith and John Jessel
As part of a DAPHNE III project, the UK charity BeatBullying is piloting an online mentoring scheme
in Italy, Spain, Portugal, Romania, Poland and the Czech Republic. We are evaluating the delivery of
the training and the impact of the mentoring scheme using online, self report questionnaires completed
by mentors, adult mentors, counsellors and schools.
REDUCING
BULLYING
AND
CYBERBULLYING
THROUGH
ARTIFICIAL
INTELLIGENCE EDUCATIONAL GAMES: THE FUTURE OR A FAD?
Maria Sapouna
This paper will review a new generation of computer simulator games used to prevent bullying and
cyberbullying such as FearNot! and SimBully. The paper will discuss the innovative ways in which
these simulator games can be used with children and adults to provide them an insight into why
bullying is happening and how it can be prevented.

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IS011
COGNITION, EMOTION AND PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR:
PERSPECTIVE OF GENDER
B05. Development and education - Moral development and prosocial behavior
Convenor
Presenters

Madrid Discussant

Vicenta Mestre, University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain
Ana Tur-Porcar, University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain
Concetta Pastorelli, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Gustavo Carlo, University of Missouri, Columbia - United States
María Cristina Richaud , CIIPME – CONICET, Buenos Aires - Argentina
María Victoria del Barrio, National University of Distance Education (UNED),
Spain
Paula Samper, University of Valencia, Valencia – Spain
Vicenta Mestre, University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain

There is a debate regarding the roles of sociomoral cognitions and emotions in understanding moral
development. The relation among perspective taking, sympathy, prosocial moral reasoning, selfefficacy, prosocial behaviors and aggression were examined to show that cognitive processes and
emotional processes are interrelated and predict both prosocial behaviors and aggression.
Positive emotions act as protective factors or psychological resources (Fredrickson & Joiner, 2002)
increasing the confidence in others and reducing impulsive and uncontrolled behaviors, and often they
have been hypothesized to increase the likelihood of prosocial behavior.
The gender differences and attitudes toward individuals according to gender (sexism) are the
important variables in adolescence. Sexism legitimizes and maintains the gender hierarchy through
two complementary attitudes, defined by Glick and Fiske (1996) in hostile and benevolent dimensions.
Discussion focuses on the relevance of both social cognitions and emotions in moral development in
different countries, and the symposium will analyze the association between prosocial behaviors and
family dynamics (parental support, autonomy, warmth) and gender differences.
To review some cognitive and emotional processes that regulate prosocial and aggressive behavior in
adolescence and young adulthood.
To study the development of morality in different cultures. Cultural values and socialization practices
might promote or emphasize moral motives deemed to be of particular significance in specific
cultures.
To compare gender differences profile in cognitive, emotions and behaviors. The symposium
approach the gender impact in positive and negative emotions, prosocial reasoning and prosocial
behavior and aggression, with special attention hostile sexism and benevolent sexism.
To analyze the family dynamics that may be important for promoting positive development in youths.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN POSITIVE EMOTIONS, PROSOCIAL AND AGGRESSIVE
BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL SELF-EFFICACY IN ADOLESCENTS.
Maria Cristina Richaud
The aim is to examine how positive emotions are related to prosocial and aggressive behavior and
these in turn to social self- efficacy. Specifically, to test a theoretical model that proposes that positive
emotions promote prosocial behavior and diminish the aggressive one, and these in turn enhance or
diminish social self- efficacy.
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TRAJECTORIES OF PROSOCIAL BEHAVIORS FROM ADOLESCENCE TO YOUNG
ADULTHOOD: THE PREDICTIVE ROLE OF FILIAL SELF-EFFICACY AND PARENTAL
SUPPORT
Bernadette P. Luengo Kanacri
The current study explored diverse trajectories of prosocial behaviors (i.e., voluntary behaviors such
as sharing, helping, consoling) and their association with family dynamics across four times of
assessment (from age 16–17 to age 22–23) during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood.

PROSOCIAL TENDENCIES: PROSOCIAL REASONING AND EMPATHY
Paula Samper
We present the results of an empirical study with the aim of establishing the differential profile
between male and female adolescents in prosocial behavior and its relationship to empathy and
prosocial reasoning. Participants belonging to public and private schools of the Valencian Community.
The results support the connections between prosocial behavior, empathy, and prosocial moral
reasoning.

SEXISM AND PROSOCIALITY IN ADOLESCENCE
Ana Tur-Porcar
Scientific studies of contemporary society have consistently highlighted the prevalence of problems
caused by sexist attitudes, both hostile and benevolent. We run a survey on 728 early adolescents.
Results show that sexist attitudes are indicative of adolescents’ levels of empathy and prosociality.

EMPATHY AND AGGRESSION, DEPRESSION AND PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR IN
CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS
Victoria Del Barrio
The emotions are one of the most important problems in the social adaptation of children and
adolescents. The aim of this paper is to study the relationship between empathy, aggression,
depression and adapt social behaviour in children and adolescents.

THE DIFFERENTIAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF A MULTIDIMENSIONAL
MEASURE OF PROSOCIAL TENDENCIES
Gustavo Carlo
The present study was designed to examine the structure and functions of a multidimensional measure
of prosocial behaviors. Results showed that the hypothesized six-factor structure of the PTM-R had
good fit, the best fit model as compared to alternative models, and that there were several unique
patterns of relations between specific forms of prosocial behaviors and empathic concern, perspective
taking, and the global measure of prosocial behavior.

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IS012
ENTERPRISING PERSONALITY IN YOUTH: MAIN DIMENSIONS
AND ASSESSMENT
A03. General issues and basic processes - Psychometrics
Convenor

Discussant

José Muñiz, University of Oviedo, Oviedo - Spain
Eduardo García-Cueto, University of Oviedo, Oviedo - Spain
Ignacio Pedrosa, University of Oviedo, Oviedo - Spain
Javier Suárez-Álvarez, University of Oviedo, Oviedo - Spain
José Muñiz, University of Oviedo, Oviedo – Spain
Luis Manuel Lozano, University of Granada, Granada - Spain

As pointed out by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), fostering
entrepreneurial spirit is fundamental to the development of market economies. The failure of an
entrepreneur involves a cost to society in terms of lost opportunities and resources, and is detrimental
to the individual, both economically and psychologically. Entrepreneurial behavior and attitudes of
individuals are determined by different variables, some of them related to the cognitive and
personality characteristics of the person, and others focused on contextual aspects. The aim of this
symposium is to present the state of the art of enterprising personality assessment in youth, and
propose a new measurement instrument for the assessment of eight enterprising personality
dimensions: Achievement Motivation, Risk-taking, Innovativeness, Autonomy, Locus of Control, SelfEfficacy, Optimism, and Stress Tolerance. The symposium is articulated into four presentations. In the
first presentation the theoretic framework and the state of the art of the enterprising personality field is
established, and a new battery for the assessment of eight enterprising personality dimensions is
presented. In the second presentation the relationships between the eight dimensions of enterprising
personality and the Big Five personality traits are analyzed, using canonical correlation analysis and
other multivariate techniques. In the third presentation the relationships between the enterprising
personality dimensions and three Emotional Intelligence traits are studied in detail. Finally, a
computerized Adaptive Test for the assessment of enterprising personality is developed. For the
empirical studies mentioned above a sample of 2,693 students (51% males) from different regions in
northern Spain was used. Mean age was 16.52 years (SD=1.38), with an age range of 16 to 23.

DIMENSIONS AND ASSESSMENT OF ENTERPRISING PERSONALITY IN YOUTH
José Muñiz
The aim is to present the state of the art of enterprising personality assessment in youth, and propose a
new measurement instrument for the assessment of eight enterprising personality dimensions:
Achievement Motivation, Risk-taking, Innovativeness, Autonomy, Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy,
Optimism, and Stress Tolerance.

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ENTERPRISING PERSONALITY DIMENSIONS AND
PERSONALITY TRAITS
Javier Suárez-Álvarez
The main goal of this presentation is to anlyze the relationship between the eight enterprising
personality dimensions and the Big Five personality traits. The percentage of associated variance
between enterprising personality dimensions and personality traits was 24%., with Emotional Stability
being the most correlated trait.
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OVERLAP
BETWEEN
ENTERPRISING
PERSONALITY
DIMENSIONS
AND
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
Eduardo García-Cueto
In this presentation the relationships between the eight enterprising personality traits and three
dimensions of perceived emotional intelligence (attention, clarity and repair) are analyzed. The results
show that common variance between both set of variables was 16%, and the way persons handle their
emotions plays an important in enterprising personality.

COMPUTERIZED ADAPTIVE TEST FOR ASSESSING ENTERPRISING PERSONALITY
Ignacio Pedrosa
Using a Computerized Adaptive Testing approach (CAT), based on Item Response Theory models,
offers important advantages in relation to classical psychometric models. In this presentation a
Computerized Adaptive Test to assess enterprising personality was developed. The CAT developed
requires an average of 10 items for assessing the construct.

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IS013
THE MEANING AND MEASUREMENT OF HUMAN CAPITAL
A03. General issues and basic processes - Psychometrics
A12. General issues and basic processes - Intelligence and cognitive functioning
D01. Work and organization - HR assessment and development
D14. Work and organization - Workplace learning and training
F01. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Capacities building and human development
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Kevin R. Murphy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins - United States
Angelo DeNisi, Tulane University, New Orleans - United States
Hennie Kriek, University of South Africa, Praetoria - South Africa
Peer Ederer, Zeppelin University, Friedrichshafen - Germany
Samuel Grieff, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg – Luxembourg
Kevin R. Murphy, Colorado State University, Fort Collins - United States

The concept of Human Capital can be traced back as far as Adam Smith’s (1776) Wealth of Nations.
This concept has been variously defined as: (a) the abilities and skills of any individual, especially
those acquired through investment in education and training, that enhance potential income earning,
(b) the collective skills, knowledge, or other intangible assets of individuals that can be used to create
economic value for the individuals, their employers, or their community, (c) a measure of the
economic value of an employee's skill set, the collective value of the organization's intellectual capital
(competencies, knowledge, and skills, any stock of knowledge or characteristics the worker has (either
innate or acquired) that contributes to his or her productivity, (d) intangible collective resources
possessed by individuals and groups within a given population, (e) the capacity to work in
organizations, obey orders, in short, adapt to life in a hierarchical/capitalist society, (f) the capacity to
adapt, (g) all the knowledge, talents, skills, abilities, experience, intelligence, training, judgment, and
wisdom possessed individually and collectively, the cumulative total of which represents a form of
wealth available to nations and organizations to accomplish their goals, and (h) a treasure that a
company or institution has available with respect to the qualifications of the personnel that works
there.
Human capital is broadly regarded as being a critically important determinant of the success of failure
of organizations. Yet, as the varying definitions laid out above suggest, there is considerable
ambiguity in the definition and meaning of human capital. In this symposium, the authors and
discussant argue that there an urgent need to develop a clearer understanding of what human capital is,
how it is measured and assessed and how it can be develop and put into action in organizations. The
topic of human capital is one that has strong roots in psychology, but that spans multiple disciplines.
This symposium will discuss the meaning and measurement of human capital from the perspectives of
a multinational panel of psychologists (Grieff, Murphy), economists (Ederer), business administration
(DeNisi) and talent management scholars (Kriek).
Explorations of the meaning and measurement of human capital are important for a number of
reasons. First, it is widely thought that human capital is critical to the success or failure of
organizations, but without a clear and concrete definition of human capital, it is not clear what this
statement really means. There are good reasons to believe that at least some of that the characteristics
of the workforce that are usually included under the label “human capital” are not important to the
success or failure of organizations, particularly organizations in which work is structured in ways that
fails to take advantage of human capital (e.g., traditional assembly organizations). If you consider the
relatively modest resources organizations are often willing to devote to hiring, paying, retaining, and
developing their workforce, it is clear that organizations often act as if human capital is not very
important. The empirical question how important human capital really is, and how to best take
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advantage of human capital is very difficult to settle with any precision, given the lack of consensus
about what actually counts are human capital.
Second, one widely cited rationale for investments in education (outside of the workforce) and training
(inside the workforce) is that it develops human capital, and therefore yields eventual payoffs to both
organizations and national economies. Again, this argument may mean less than it seems. Without a
clear understanding of what human capital comprises, the proposition that investments in education
and training yield payoffs that justify their costs is a very difficult one to evaluate. It is also difficult to
make evidence-based decisions about which training or education interventions are or are not worth
pursuing, given the sometimes vague definitions of this construct.
Finally, different conceptions of human capital rely to a greater or lesser extent on “innate
characteristics” of workers. For example, general cognitive ability is likely to be included in any welldefined version of “human capital”. Some attributes of individuals that are likely to be regarded as
human capital are more difficult to develop or change over relatively short time periods, and
definitions of human capital that place more emphasis on characteristics that are developed over long
time periods and are relatively resistant to change (e.g., mental abilities, broad personality traits) will
suggest different strategies for enhancing human capital than definitions that stress specific
knowledge, skills that can be acquired and developed over relatively short time periods.
This symposium presents both empirical research on core skills that are becoming increasingly
important in defining human capital (e.g., complex and collaborative decision making) and
perspectives from four different perspectives (psychology, economics, business administration and
talent management) on the meaning and the development of human capital. Panelists include: (1)
Angelo DeNisi, Albert Harry Cohen Chair of Business Administration, Tulane University, New
Orleans, LA, USA, (2) Peer Ederer, Honorarprofessor for Human Capital, Growth and Innovation at
Zeppelin University, Friedrichshafen, Germany, (3) Samuel Grieff, Institute of Cognitive Science and
Assessment (COSA), University of Luxembourg, Luxemborg, and (4) Hennie Kriek, CEO, Top Talent
Solutions and Professor Extraordinarius at the Department of Industrial and Organisational
Psychology at the University of South Africa, Praetoria, Republic of South Africa. The Chair of this
panel (Kevin R. Murphy, Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
USA) will also serve as discussant. In this role he will present an integrated model of human capital
that reflects input form all four presenters.

HUMAN CAPITAL, PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND FIRM PERFORMANCE:
WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THESE LINKS
Angelo DeNisi
According to the Random House Dictionary, the term “human capital” is defined as the “collective
skills, knowledge, or other tangible assets of individuals that can be used to create economic value for
individuals, their employers, or their community” (Dictionary.com, June 2014). The major focus of
research and practice in the areas of performance appraisal and performance management has been to
implement programs through which employees can improve their individual performance (and thus
rewards), as well as improve the performance of the work group or (ultimately) the firm. Thus, these
efforts can be seen as means of taking potential human capital and translating it into actual human
capital. That is, the collective skills and knowledge of the individual employees must be managed in
such a way that they produce improvements in individual and firm-level performance.
When viewed in this way, research on performance management can be seen quite differently. The
variables that deserve the most attention, the relative importance of interventions designed to produce
better measures, and the actual dependent variables in research all need to be re-considered and reevaluated. My presentation will begin with a brief review of the literature from this alternative
perspective. This review will conclude with a discussion of what we know about improving individual
performance and what we know about leveraging such improvements to produce improvements in
firm performance. The presentation will then move to a discussion of suggestions for research and
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practice that might better enable us to use performance management interventions as a means of
developing human capital potential, drawing upon some recent work in this area (DeNisi & Smith,
2014).
References
DeNisi, A.S., & Smith, C.E. (2014). Performance Appraisal, Performance
Management, and Firm-Level Performance: A Review, A Proposed Model, and New Directions for
Future Research. Academy of Management Annals, 8, 127-179.
Human capital. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved June 25, 2014, from Dictionary.com
website

THE TRANSVERASL SKILLS THAT UNDERLIE MODERN HUMAN CAPITAL
Samuel Grieff
Transversal skills such as complex and collaborative problem solving bear strong implications for
human capital in the 21st century. We present theoretical background, assessment instruments, and
empirical results on both skills as important marker of human capital of increasing importance in a
rapidly changing world full of complexity. Complex and collaborative problem solving capture the
potential of individuals to successfully interact and master new problem situations - either alone or in
a team. We discuss implications and propose an agenda for contemporary research on human capital.

WHY THE COMPONENTS OF HUMAN CAPITAL ARE CHANGING
Peer Ederer
Changes in the nature of work are changing the definition and value of human capital. At least two
trends in developed economies ensure us that problem solving skills as one component of human
capital will be playing an increasingly important role in future production. First, digital technologies
are complementary to tasks that require pattern-recognition, judgment, interpretation and decision.
Second, countries increase their economic complexity by innovation and imitation, both of which
processes demand problem solving skills. The consequence of these trends - a growing demand for
problem solving skills - may be contributing to shortages of such skills if their human capital supply is
inelastic. Such shortages would be reflected either in unusually high returns to problem solving skills,
or else be alleviated by adulthood learning, in other words by being elastic. Our contribution
illuminates empirical and conceptual evidence for the relevance and value of these skills.

HOW THE SEARCH FOR TALENT IF CHANGING IN MODERN ECONOMIES
Hennie Kriek
Psychologists have made substantial contributions to organizations by helping them identify, recruit
and retain top talent. This contribution is especially important because the value of human capital is
not constant from one employee to another, but rather varies both as a function of the demands of the
job and the contribution of that job to the organization’s success of failure (i.e., the ability to translate
potentially valued characteristics of individuals into organizationally-valued outcomes) and because
the characteristics that contribute to human capital differ across various parts of the organization. The
general finding that jobs that contribute substantial value to organizations (or that entail the possibility
of substantial losses) tend to attract and require individuals with high levels of intelligence, social
skills, problem-solving ability and relevant knowledge has enabled psychologists to develop systems
for talent acquisition and management that generalize across organizations. However, changes that are
occurring in the landscape of human capital pose fresh challenges to psychologists involved in
identifying and managing top talent

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IS014
MULTISENSORY INTERACTIONS: FROM MECHANISMS TO
CLINICAL INTERVENTIONS
A06. General issues and basic processes - Cognitive neurosciences and neuroimaging
E12. Health and clinical intervention - Cognitive disturbances and rehabilitation
Convenor
Presenters

Lausanne;

Micah M. Murray, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Lausanne;
Switzerland; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville - United States
Amir Amedi, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem - Israel
Durk Talsma, Ghent University, Ghent - Belgium
Mark T. Wallace , Vanderbilt University, Nashville - United States
"Micah M. Murray, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne,
Switzerland; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville
- United States"
Nienke van Atteveldt, Maastricht University, Maastricht – Netherlands

This symposium will provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding the neurobiological
bases by which information from the different senses is combined to enhance perception, attention,
and actions in humans. In parallel, the symposium will provide a discussion of current directions in the
application of multisensory research in clinical settings ranging from neuro-developmental disorders
to aging and sensory loss. These advances have in many respects been fostered by multisensory
research being at the forefront of innovations in signal analyses of brain mapping and brain imaging
techniques. The presentations in this symposium will highlight this aspect. Micah Murray will provide
a synopsis of evidence in favour of multisensory interactions occurring within primary cortices during
the initial stages of stimulus processing and affecting functions from simple detection to memory
encoding and retrieval. Durk Talsma will discuss the contributions of stimulus driven (bottom-up) vs.
cognitive (top-down) influences on multisensory processing and how these factors can contribute to
individual differences in multisensory processing capabilities. Nienke van Atteveldt will present an
overview of neuroimaging studies that demonstrate the adaptive nature of multisensory interactions
during reading acquisition. Amir Amedi will demonstrate using behavioural and imaging studies the
multisensory task-based function of regions in the visual cortex of individuals with various degrees of
visual experience using sensory substitution (encoding visual information in sound spectrograms) for
tasks such as reading, object recognition and body-posture recognition. Finally, Mark Wallace will
discuss how multisensory processes are affected in both normal aging and in autism, and how
multisensory-based remediation methods may hold promise as tools to improve cognitive and
perceptual function.

THE BEHAVIORAL RELEVANCE OF AND SINGLE-TRIAL LEARNING FROM
MULTISENSORY PROCESSES
Micah M. Murray
Behaviourally-relevant multisensory processes occur in (near)primary cortices, as revealed by EEG,
fMRI, and TMS. Multisensory processes based on single-trial learning predict and enhance later object
recognition. Together, these data underscore how multisensory research is changing long-held models
of functional brain organization and perception.

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INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN TOP-DOWN CONTROL OF MULTISENSORY
PROCESSING
Durk Talsma
Previously, we have shown that audiovisual processing can depend on several cognitive processes,
including attention and memory. Moreover, individual persons differ considerably with respect to they
multisensory processing capabilities. Here we discuss to whether these individual differences depend
on variations in perceptual vs. cognitive ability.

INTEGRATION OF SPEECH AND SCRIPT IS ADAPTIVE TO CULTURAL AND
INDIVIDUAL VARIATION
Nienke van Atteveldt
Neuroimaging research suggests that literacy acquisition interacts with evolutionary older brain
systems for audiovisual and speech processing. These interactions are highly adaptive, as they differ
across scripts and correlate with individual reading fluency. This underlines the flexible and
experience-dependent nature of multisensory interactions.

HOW ENCODING COLOR VISION AND SHAPES IN SOUND SPECTROGRAMS CAN
HELP US UNDERSTAND BRAIN ORGANIZATION AND RESTORE VISION IN BLIND
Amir Amedi
Recent behavioural and imaging studies suggest that brain regions usually considered "visual" are
actually task-based. This task-based organization is revealed by teaching blind participants to use
visual-to-auditory Sensory Substitution Devices for tasks such as reading & body-posture recognition
and exploring the neural correlates using fMRI.

CHANGES IN MULTISENSORY FUNCTION ACROSS LIFESPAN AND IN THE CLINIC
Mark T. Wallace
This talk describes how multisensory function changes from early development through old age, and
how multisensory dysfunctions play an underappreciated role in clinical conditions like autism. The
talk further highlights how multisensory-based training can be a powerful interventional tool to
improve sensory, perceptual and cognitive abilities.

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IS015
PARENTING AND CHILDREN ADJUSTMENT ORGANIZER
B10. Development and Education - Parenting
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Concetta Pastorelli, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Concetta Pastorelli, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Emma Baumgartner, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Jennifer Lansford, Duke University, Durham - United States
Maria Concetta Miranda, Second University of Naples, Naples - Italy
Roberto Baiocco, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Sevtap Gurdal , University West, Trollhättan – Sweden
Elena Marta, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy

In the present symposium we aim to understand how socialization processes, individual
characteristics, social contexts and culture may prompt, cultivate, or discourage children adjustment.
There is a wealth of evidence indicating that socialization processes are related to children adjustment
(Gershoff, 2002). However in the last twenty years longitudinal and cross-sectional research has
revealed more complex relations. In particular, the role of individual child and parents’ characteristics
as well socio-cultural factors have been considered. For example, on the one hand, parents’
characteristics (e.g., depression and irritability) may interfere with their ability to respond adequately
to the needs of their children and affect their psychological well-being. On the other, hand, living in
violent communities may influence the way parents exercise their parental behavior and,
consequently, how well they are able to contrast their children’s maladjustment. Furthermore, as
revealed by Lansford et al. (2005; 2010), culture-specific normativeness of a parental behavior may
moderate the association between parenting and child adjustment.
Finally, a recent promising line of research is investigating the degree to which children’s adjustment
might vary as a function of family type. Empirical evidence supports not significant differences in
parenting skills among groups of gay, lesbian, and heterosexual parents, nor in key child
developmental outcomes (Goldberg et al.,2011; Tasker, 2010).
The invited speakers of this symposium will cover a wide range of the aforementioned topics to
promote better integrated knowledge among professionals on the most consolidated and up-to-date
empirical studies in this field.

SWEDISH CHILDREN’S AGENCY: PARENTAL WARMTH, SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT,
AND ADJUSTMENT
Sevtap Gurdal, Jennifer E. Lansford, Emma Sorbring
Using three waves of data collected when children were ages 8, 9, and 10, this study found that
Swedish mothers’ and fathers’ warmth was related to their children’s agency, which was related to
internalizing, externalizing, and school achievement.

PARENTAL IRRITABILITY, HARSH PARENTING, AND CHILD MALADJUSTMENT
Concetta Pastorelli, Eriona Thartori, Valeria Castellani, Laura Di Giunta, Carolina Lunetti, Jennifer
E. Lansford
Using multiple waves of data collected with Italian family triads (Rome sample), this study examined
the relations between maternal/ paternal irritability, harsh parenting (physical discipline and
psychological aggression) and children’s externalizing and internalizing symptoms.
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A BI-CULTURAL EXAMINATION OF POTENTIAL EARLY CUES OF DEPRESSION IN
INFANTS OF INADEQUATELY RESPONSIVE MOTHER
Authors: Emma Baumgartner, Stefania Sette, Fiorenzo Laghi, Carol Lee, Summet Farwaha, & Yvonne
Boh.
The present study examined, in a sample of mother-child dyads from two different countries (Italy and
Canada), the relation between maternal response to infant’s distress and infant’s cues during a
teaching task. Relations between maternal sensitivity and stress, social support, and infant’ s age and
country of origins are also discussed.

EXPOSURE TO COMMUNITY VIOLENCE, PARENTAL MONITORING AND
ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOR: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY
Maria Concetta Miranda, Dario Bacchini, Gaetana Affuso
The present study examined, with cross-lagged analyses based on three waves over a 3-years period,
the reciprocal influence of exposure to community violence, parental monitoring and antisocial
behavior in adolescence.

FAMILY AND CULTURE LEVEL CONTRIBUTIONS TO CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT:
A LONGITUDINAL STUDY IN NINE COUNTRIES
Jennifer E. Lansford, Jennifer Godwin, Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado, Arnaldo Zelli, Suha M. AlHassan, Dario Bacchini, Anna Silvia Bombi, Marc H. Bornstein, Lei Chang, Kirby Deater-Deckard,
Laura Di Giunta, Kenneth A. Dodge, Patrick S. Malone, Paul Oburu, Concetta Pastorelli, Ann T.
Skinner, Emma Sorbring, Sombat Tapanya, Liane Peña Alampay
Using data reported by mothers, fathers, and children in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy,
Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and United States), we examined multiple levels of
influence in the prediction of child abuse and neglect.

FAMILIES OF LESBIAN AND GAY PARENTS AND FAMILIES OF HETEROSEXUAL
PARENTS: PERCEIVED PARENTING COMPETENCIES, COUPLE COMMITMENT, AND
CHILD WELL-BEING
Roberto Baiocco, Federica Santamaria, Fiorenzo Laghi, Emma Baumgartner
This study examined the attitudes toward LG parenting in a sample of lesbians and gay men with
children; in addition the group of homosexual parents were compared with a similar group of
heterosexual parents.

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IS016
HAPPINESS AND PRODUCTIVITY AT WORK: DOES AGE MATTER?
D13. Work and organization - Age and work
Convenor
Presenters

San
Discussant

José María Peiró, University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain
David E Guest, King's College, London - United Kingdom
Emanuela Ingusci, University of Salento, Lecce - Italy
José M. Peiró, University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain
Maria Felisa Latorre Navarro, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México, Tizapán
Angel – Mexico
Marco Depolo, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna - Italy

Psychology has made a major contribution to the development of human resource management
(HRM) and in particular to the burgeoning body of research linking HRM and organizational
performance. Notable contributions include research findings relating to best practice concerning
selection, training and learning, performance appraisal and motivation and rewards. However
developments have generally given priority to practices that enhance performance, using workers as a
means to this end. It is important to pay more attention to the needs and perspectives of the employees.
In the European Union, the number of young adults is decreasing significantly and in contrast, the
number of people aged 55 and over is growing rapidly (Schalk et al. 2010). In this context, companies
had to reconsider the human capital, increasing the knowledge, the skills and experience of older
workers on the hand, and the flexibility and the desire to learn of younger workers. The human
resource practices need to be more sensitive to the needs, expectations and demands of the different
age groups.
The contributors to this symposium will present result of recent research about the influence of Human
Resources Practices on employees’ performance and wellbeing, taking into account the moderating
role of age in those relations and their actions to improve them. Special attention will be paid to the
analysis of impact of the different HR practices on employees of different age groups. This issue is of
great relevance nowadays in Europe given the increase rate of aged people in the composition of the
labor force.

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND THE HAPPY PRODUCTIVE WORKER
David Guest
This paper argues the need of rebalancing the contribution of psychologists to give greater weight to
the extensive research on HR practices that positively affect worker outcomes, including worker wellbeing. To this end, research is reviewed and new research presented that explores the extent to which
it is possible to put in place policies and practices to ensure that workers are both happy and
productive.

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUMAN RESOURCES PRACTICES AND WELLBEING.
A LIFE-SPAN APPROACH
José M. Peiró, Nuria Tordera & Laura Lorente.
Age is an important variable to understand the employees’ motives, attitudes and behaviors at work
and their work valued outcomes. Human resources practices in organizations are important means
through which companies manage the relationships, expectations and promises of employer and
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employees. In this study we examine the relationship between human resources practices, age and
wellbeing in 3 different cohorts of Spanish workers. Results show significant differences in how
human resources practices are appraised and valued by workers of the age groups.

JOB CRAFTING AND CREATIVE PERFORMANCE: THE MODERATING ROLE OF AGE
Emanuela Ingusci, Isabel Rodríguez, Alessandro Gennaro, Amparo Caballer, Esther Garcia
When employees perform creatively, they suggest new procedures that enhance an organization’s
ability to respond to the opportunities coming from labor market. In job crafting, employees modify
aspects of their jobs to improve the fit between the characteristics of the job and their needs, abilities,
and preferences. We aim to explore this relationship in a sample of workers, in the different age
groups. Results and implications are discussed.

SO JUSTLY TREATED SO HAPPY AND SATISFIED”, OR NOT? MODERATING
EFFECTS OF AGE AND JOB CATEGORY
Maria Felisa Latorre Navarro
The present study analyses the relations between perception of justice in work organizations and
happiness and job satisfaction in a sample of Mexican employees. Literature suggests that these
relations are moderated by age and job category. However, the moderating role may be different for
different types of justice. The results show that the moderating role of age and job category is just
significant for the relation between distributive justice and happiness and satisfaction. These results
question previous research and highlight the differential importance of justice for wellbeing.

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IS017
THE QUALITY OF LIFE AND WELL-BEING AMONG CHILDREN
AND YOUTH IN EUROPE: WHAT DO WE KNOW AND HOW
SHOULD WE APPLY THIS KNOWLEDGE?
F01. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Capacities building and human development
Convenor
Presenters

Lea Pulkkinen, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä - Finland
Frosso Motti-Stefanidi, University of Athens, Athens - Greece
Lea Pulkkinen, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä - Finland
Michiel Matthes, Alliance for Childhood European Network Group, Brussels -

Belgium
Munich
Discussant

Sabine Walper, University of Munich, Munich; German Youth Institute Munich,
- Germany
Tuomo Tikkanen, Finnish Psychological Association, Helsinki - Finland

In the global and economic perspective, most European children have secure and prosperous lives.
However, there remain a number of children who face multiple adversities. The analysis of factors
affecting a person’s well-being involves a consideration of both proximal factors with a direct impact
on children and youth and more distal factors that affect children and youth indirectly. There are a
wide range of studies on child well-being and health and factors affecting them, but most studies are
cross-sectional. There is a need for a longitudinal research of the qualities of living conditions and
their associations with individuals’ life styles and physical and psychological well-being, because
problems in them tend to accumulate in certain individuals and sub-groups. They affect individuals’
work careers and parenthood, through which they are transformed into the life conditions of the next
generation. The objectives of the symposium are, first, to analyze children’s adaptive success and
resilience and their association with the type and level of risks and stressors that they experience in
their life course and the continuity of adaptive functioning over time. Second, the way developmental
tasks of an earlier stage are solved, sets the stage for the way developmental tasks of later stages will
be adapted to. Therefore, we analyze the cascading consequences of success or failure in dealing with
these tasks across multiple domains such as education, various capacities, and psychological wellbeing. Third, it is vital that policies are aimed at helping children to do well, as this lays the foundation
for their success later in life. In EU member states, policy making and policy implementation by
governmental and other agencies tend to take place in silos and in a compartmentalized way where
children are concerned. We analyze a need to develop an approach that encompasses the whole child
and the whole living environment of the child in which he/she grows up.

ADAPTATION AND WELL-BEING OF IMMIGRANT AND NONIMMIGRANT
ADOLESCENTS DURING THE GREEK ECONOMIC CRISIS
FrossoMotti-Stefanidi & Jens B. Asendorpf
We examined how immigrant and nonimmigrant adolescents’ adaptation and well-being changed
during the Greek economic crisis. The comparison of two cohorts (N=2000, 12 yrs, nested in 60
classrooms), one examined before and the other during the crisis, showed significant changes both in
context and students’ adaptation, some in a positive direction.

ECONOMIC PRESSURE AND COPARENTING IN SEPARATED FAMILIES
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Sabine Walper& Alexandra Langmeyer
Parental separation and subsequent family transitions put children’s wellbeing at risk, but effects are
not homogenous. This paper focuses on the mediating role of economic deprivation and coparenting in
children’s coping with parental separation. In two German studies cooperative coparenting was a
resource for children but a challenge for parents.

POLARIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN WELL-BEING
Lea Pulkkinen & Katja Kokko
Polarized individual differences in physical and psychological well-being were found in midlife in the
Jyväskylä Longitudinal Study of Personality and Social Development. Adversities had accumulated in
about 10 percent of the sample. Critical indicators of this process were investigated. Knowledge can
be applied to promoting positive development.

IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF CHILDHOOD IN EUROPE
MichielMatthes (Alliance forChildhood European Network Group, Brussels, Belgium)
There are many institutions that provide services for children in each state, but most of them work on
their own without connecting philosophy. There are also many NGOs working on the theme of
children, and each organisation has its own perception of the child. Horizontal and vertical
connections are needed to lobby for the quality of childhood.

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IS018
THE ROLE OF SELF-EFFICACY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF
DIFFERENT PROCESSES CHARACTERISTIC OF ADOLESCENCE
B09. Development and education - Adolescent adjustment
Convenor
Presenters

Madrid -

María Cristina Richaud, CIIPME – CONICET, Buenos Aires - Argentina
Belén Mesurado, CIIPME – CONICET, Buenos Aires - Argentina
Concetta Pastorelli , Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
María Cristina Richaud, CIIPME – CONICET, Buenos Aires - Argentina
María Victoria del Barrio, National University of Distance Education (UNED),
Spain
Silvia Viviana Pugliese, University of Aconcagua, Mendoza - Argentina
Vicenta Mestre, University of Valencia, Valencia – Spain

According to Bandura, self-efficacy is "the belief in one’s capabilities to organize and execute the
courses of action required to manage prospective situations." In other words, self-efficacy is a person’s
belief in his or her ability to succeed in a particular situation. Bandura described these beliefs as
determinants of how people think, behave, and feel (1994). Performing a task successfully strengthens
our sense of self-efficacy. However, failing to adequately deal with a task or challenge can undermine
and weaken self-efficacy. Witnessing other people successfully completing a task is another important
source of self-efficacy. Self-efficacy has been shown as one of the essentials determinants of child and
adolescent adjustment. It is related to self-esteem, autonomy, and security when facing with a
problem. The objective of this Symposium is to study the role of self-efficacy in the development of
different processes in the adolescence. It will be analyzed how self-efficacy promotes prosocial
behavior and defends from negative emotions. At the same time it will
be presented results about males and females adolescents trajectories of prosocial behaviors and their
association with regulatory and assertive self-efficacy believe. Moreover it will be studied the
relationship of self-efficacy with maladjustment: anger, depression and suicide risk. Finally it will be
analyzed the role of self-efficacy, eustress, and flow in academic achievement.

NEGATIVE EMOTIONS AND BEHAVIOR: THE ROLE OF SELF-EFFICACY
Vicenta Mestre, Paula Samper, Anna Llorca
This study aims to test that self-efficacy promote prosocial behavior and diminish the aggressive one,
and analyze the relationships between emotional self-efficacy, negative emotions (anxiety, depression,
irritability) and behavior. The sample included Spanish adolescents students (age: 16-18 years).

MALES AND FEMALES TRAJECTORIES OF PROSOCIAL BEHAVIORS FROM
ADOLESCENCE TO YOUNG ADULTHOOD:ASSOCIATIONS WITH REGULATORY AND
ASSERTIVE SELF-EFFICACY BELIEVES
Concetta Pastorelli, Bernadette P. Luengo Kanacri, Nancy Eisenberg, Rosalba Cervaolo, Eriona
Tarthori, Gian Vittorio Caprara
The study explored diverse males and females trajectories of prosocial behaviors and their association
with regulatory and assertive self-efficacy believes across eight times of assessment from
adolescence to young adulthood. The results highlighted the role of perceived efficacy believes on
adolescence.
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SELF-EFFICACY AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH ADJUSTMENT IN SPANISH
CHILDREN
María Victoria Del Barrio, Miguel Angel Carrasco
It will be considered the specific relationship between self-efficacy and two common child and youth
emotional disorders: depression and anger. The results indicated that self-efficacy appears as a shield
for depression and this becomes more apparent with age. Regarding anger it appears to inhibit selfefficacy in all fields except the sports efficiency.

ROLE OF SELF-EFFICACY WITH TEEN SUICIDE RISK
Silvia Viviana Pugliese
The objective was to compare the characteristics of personality and expectations of adolescents
admitted in the hospital for "suicide attempts” and adolescents non-patients. Results indicated that
adolescents with suicide attempts have labile personality structure, weakening of inhibitory
mechanisms which interfere both motivation and self-efficacy.

THE MEDIATED ROLE OF FLOW IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SELFEFFICACY, EUSTRESS AND ACADEMIC ENGAGEMENT
Belén mesurado, María Cristina Richaud
This study aims to test a theoretical model about self-efficacy and eustress promote both flow and
engagement in school, and that in turn the flow state could promote the engagement in undergraduate
students. Results show that self-efficacy has a positive effect on flow and engagement and that
eustress has a differential role in academic setting.

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IS019
SYMPOSIUM FISS ITALIAN FEDERATION SCIENTIFIC SEXOLOGY
- DISCUSSING SEXUAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING
E21- Health and clinical intervention -Sexual Health
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Roberta Rossi , FISS, Italian Federation of Scientific Sexology, Rome - Italy
Adele Fabrizi , ISC, Institute of Clinical Sexology, Rome - Italy
Antonio Prunas, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Davide Dèttore, University of Florence, Florence - Italy
Maria Teresa Molo, Carlo Molo Foundation Onlus, Turin – Italy
Chiara Simonelli, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome; EFS, European Federation of
Sexology, Rome - Italy

Improving sexual health and wellbeing requires a holistic approach that takes into account the
physical, mental, social and economic factors that all influence sexual behaviour. It is important that
individuals have the information, knowledge, skills and accessible services that allow them to make
healthy choices about the sexual lives. The Italian Federation of Scientific Sexology (FISS) promote
this symposium to discuss the role of the Sexology in Italy and in Europe, after the recent first
qualification exam for psycho-sexologists was held in Istanbul on January 28, 2014. The exam was
arranged under the auspices of the European Federation of Sexology and the European Society of
Sexual Medicine, addressed to psychologists of all nationalities, including countries outside the EU.
After this update on the “state of the art” of the Sexology in Europe, the Symposium will take into
account the relationships between personality organization, sexual dysfunctions and quality of sexual
life e they will also discuss some of the issues of the couple sexuality through the comparison between
heterosexual and homosexual couples in intimate relationship and the sexual life of the couple who
live with an acquired brain disability.Participation of the President of the European Federation of
Sexology as discussant will further analyze the various issues presented.

CLINICAL SEXOLOGY: “WHERE ARE WE GOING?”
Adele Fabrizi
During last years the promotion of education and training for sexologists became one of the most
important topic in this scientific field. Concerning clinical aspects will be discussed the DSM-5 and its
controversial issues about FSD and MSD. Finally we will discuss about what's new in sex therapy
particularly regarding the Integrated Approach.

PERSONALITY ORGANIZATION, SEXUAL DYSFUNCTIONS AND QUALITY OF
SEXUAL LIFE
Antonio Prunas
According to Otto Kernberg (2012), a specific relationship exists between the continuum of
personality organization and the spectrum of sexual pathology.
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Aim of the present study is to assess the relationship between the basic features of borderline
personality organization, sexual dysfunctions and the quality of sexual life in a sample of adults from
the community.
GAY AND LESBIAN COUPLES IN ITALY: COMPARISONS WITH HETEROSEXUAL
COUPLES
Davide Dèttore, Paolo Antonelli
The current study examined the psychometric properties of an Italian translation of the Marital
Satisfaction Inventory – Revised (MSI-R), to assess the intimate relationships of gay and lesbian
couples in Italy. The results were compared to data from heterosexual couples and to previously
published data for gay, lesbian, and unmarried heterosexual couples from the United States

A COUPLE AND AN ACQUIRED BRAIN DISABILITY
Maria Teresa Molo, Chiara Crespi
Whoever suffers from an acquired brain disability will never be the same as before. He/she needs the
help of his/her spouse, whose autonomy becomes limited. The couple is trapped in the
attachment/taking care system, instead of living an erotic sexualized relationship.They should find
new meanings in the intimacy of the care, a deep emotional intimacy full of love.

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IS020
PSYCHOLOGICAL UNDERPINNINGS OF ORDINARY PEOPLE’S
POLITICAL IDEOLOGY
C12 – Culture and society - Political preferences and behaviour
Convenor
Presenters

Maria Sandgren, Södertörn University, Huddinge - Sweden
Alain Van Hiel, Ghent University, Ghent - Belgium
Anabel Kuntz, University of Cologne, Cologne - Germany
Artur Nilsson, Lund University, Lund - Sweden
Eldad Davidov, University of Zurich, Zurich - Switzerland
Emma Onreat, Ghent University, Ghent - Belgium
Hulda Thorisdottir, University of Iceland, Reykjavik - Iceland
Jasper Van Assche, Ghent University, Ghent - Belgium
Maria Sandgren, Södertörn University, Huddinge – Sweden

In the field of psychology, there is a renewed interest for the concept of political ideology. Ideology
can be studied as a network of acquired attitudes, values and beliefs depending on political discourse
and history (top down processes) and as underlying psychological motives and needs that will affect
how individuals take on ideological positions (bottom up processes). The aim of the symposium is to
present how psychological aspects of political ideology may be universal or culture-specific.
Political ideology has by default been operationalized as a unidimensional construct (liberal/leftist
versus conservative/rightist) but can only to a certain extent illuminate the structure of political
attitudes. Individuals may navigate along the left-right continuum to comprehend politics but be
governed by psychological motives and needs which are more or less related to the right-left
continuum.
The most consistent differences in political attitudes concern, on the one hand, core beliefs concerning
resistance to change or obversely acceptance of change and, on the other hand, attitudes toward
equality versus inequality. The underlying psychological aspects regard epistemic motives to reduce
uncertainty as well as existential motives to manage threatening circumstances. Situational factors
such as threats (for example a financial crisis) may increase support for conservative opinions among
individuals.
From a cross-cultural perspective, there is a heterogenity in self-identification of political ideology as
individuals combine aspects of cultural (also labelled as social) and economic issues across the
unidimensional construct. In the present European political debate, a generalized ideology of
inequality has re-emerged where certain outgroups are considered to be unequal in value.
Relying on personality, values and motivational approaches, this symposium investigates basic
processes underlying political ideologies in European and US contexts.

THE LEFT-RIGHT DIMENSION IN THE MINDS OF ICELANDIC VOTERS
Hulda Thorisdottir
The talk reports a study of the left-right scale from 1987-2013 in a Western small-state democracy.
Results show usage of the scale being remarkably stable over time, with no sign of sorting or
polarization of the electorate having taken place. The contextual nature of the left-right in relation to
specific political attitudes is examined.

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PERSONALITY TRAITS, VALUES, ATTITUDES, AND MOTIVATIONS UNDERLYING
POLITICAL IDEOLOGY IN SWEDEN AND ITALY: A COMPARISON OF THREE
CONTEMPORARY MODELS
Gian Vittorio Caprara & Artur Nilsson
We tested three models of the underpinnings of political ideology, in Sweden and Italy, addressing: (1)
political values, with underlying core values and traits, (2) right-wing authoritarianism and social
dominance orientation, with underlying traits and worldviews, and (3) attitudes to change, equality,
and the system, with underlying motivations.

VALUE PRIORITIES AND GROUP-FOCUSED ENMITY
Constanze Beierlein, Anabel Kuntz, & Eldad Davidov
Prejudice against outgroups (e.g., foreigners, Muslims, Jews or gays/lesbians) are often considered as
an expression of group-focused enmity (GFE). Drawing on value research, we explore the
motivational underpinnings of GFE in a German sample. We find that prejudice against different
outgroups partly shares a similar motivational basis.

RIGHT-WING IDEOLOGY: THREAT AS A PSYCHOLOGICAL BASIS OF SOCIALCULTURAL AND ECONOMIC-HIERARCHICAL BELIEFS
Alain Van Hiel, Emma Onreat & Jasper Van Assche
Classic views suggest that threat underlies right-wing attitudes. In the present study a distinction is
made between internal and external threat. We also present cross-national findings with respect to
threat and right-wing attitudes.

GENERAL AND SPECIFIC DETERMINANTS OF POLITICAL IDEOLOGY IN AN OLD
(SWEDEN) AND A NEW DEMOCRACY (LATVIA)
Maria Sandgren, Girts Dimdins, & Henry Montgomery
Our findings support a two dimensional (acceptance vs. avoidance of uncertainty, high vs. low
toughmindedness) model of political ideology in Sweden and Latvia. A closer examination reveals
that cultural differences concern party structure, ethnic identification, social, and economic attitudes.

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IS021
PROVIDING PSYCHOLOGY SUPPORT IN AN ELITE SPORT
ENVIRONMENT
E10 - Health and clinical intervention - Sport and exercise
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Paul Wylleman, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels - Belgium
Alberto Cei, Tor Vergata University, Rome - Italy
Anne-Marie Elbe, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen - Denmark
Nadine Debois , Institut National du Sport, de l'Expertise et de la Performance, Paris France
Paul Wylleman, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels - Belgium
Ralf Brand, University of Potsdam, Potsdam – Germany
Anne-Marie Elbe, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen - Denmark

As the field of sport psychology is witnessing a growth in interest in professional practice in Europe, it
is also faced with the challenge of developing its professional status. This symposium aims therefore
at presenting not only research but also experiential knowledge regarding the development and
provision of professional applied sport psychology services at the elite and Olympic level. In
particular, attention will be focussed on the actual process of consulting with and support provision of
elite athletes as well as on aspects related to being an elite and Olympic athlete including coping with
anti-doping procedures and the dual career of elite athletes. This symposium, organised by the
European Federation of Sport Psychology (FEPSAC), brings in this way experts together from five
European countries.

CAN YOU HELP ME WITH THAT? AN INTEGRATED VIEW ON ELITE ATHLETES’
CONSULTATION ISSUES
Ralf Brand, Ole Benthien & Mascha Grote
Since 2011 the University of Potsdam’s Center of Practical Sport Psychology delivered psychological
support to around 350 adolescent and adult national team athletes. We will describe this center’s
service structure and paint an empirical picture about the most frequent consultation issues by contentanalyzing more than 1700 consultation protocols.

SHOOTING ATTENTIONAL TRAINING
Alberto Cei
Shooting is a sport very challenging the mind power, requesting to stay confident and focused also
during the more stressful moments of the competition. This presentation will describe the development
of an efficient attentional training to cope with performing at their best in all shots.

DUAL CAREER IN FRENCH ELITE SPORT
Nadine Debois & Aurélie Ledon
Dual career support in elite sport may be based on each athlete’s desired vocational future rather than
on a default choice for an educative program easily reconcilable with the sport career. We will present
results from recent studies on that topic as well as the French career assistance organization system
designed in that perspective.
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REDUCING THE NEGATIVE IMPACT OF ANTI-DOPING REGULATIONS ON
ATHLETES’ PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING: THE ROLE OF THE SPORT
PSYCHOLOGIST
Anne-Marie Elbe & Marie Overbye
Anti-doping regulations like urine doping testing and the obligation to report whereabouts can
negatively impact elite athletes’ psychological well-being. We will present the results of recent studies
investigating this impact and discuss how sport psychologists can support elite athletes to better deal
with these anti-doping measures.

THE ORGANISATION AND PROVISION OF PERFORMANCE BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT
TO DUTCH OLYMPIC ATHLETES
Paul Wylleman & Maurits Hendriks
This presentation will focus on specific aspects of the provision by the Dutch Olympic Committee
NOC*NSF of performance behaviour support to its elite and Olympic athletes and coaches including
support providers’ competency profiles, integration in interdisciplinary teams, continued professional
development, and quality of service delivery.

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IS022
ATTACHMENT AND EMOTION REGULATION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN: NEUROBIOLOGICAL, DEVELOPMENTAL AND CLINICAL
PERSPECTIVES
B04. Development and Education - Attachment and intimate relationships
Convenor
Presenters

United
Discussant

Marinus H. Van IJzendoorn, Leiden University, Leiden - Netherlands
Lieselotte Ahnert, University of Vienna, Vienna - Austria
Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, Leiden University, Leiden - Netherlands
Marinus H. van IJzendoorn, Leiden University, Leiden - Netherlands
Morten L. Kringelbach, Universities of Oxford, Oxford; Aahrus University, Aahrus Kingdom
Pier Francesco Ferrari, University of Parma, Parma - Italy
Lavinia Barone, University of Pavia, Pavia - Italy

Attachment is a concept used in a variety of disciplines such as biology, psychiatry, child and family
studies, social and clinical psychology. Attachment has been studied in various species and at all
levels of development, from the prenatal period to old age. In this invited symposium we want to
address some recent advances in neurobiological research on attachment and emotion regulation to see
how attachment supports human adaptation to various niches and social challenges. The role of two
hormones central to the study of attachment across the life-span will be discussed, namely oxytocin
and cortisol. Oxytocin would prepare for parenting and bonding, whereas cortisol has been related to
stress and emotion regulation. On the neural level new insights into the role of the orbitofrontal cortex
in parenting will be presented, as the OFC seems engaged in several phases of parent–infant
interactions, from early, privileged orienting to infant cues, to ongoing monitoring of interactions and
subsequent learning. Furthermore, evidence on the critical role of the mirror neuron system in
developing attachments will be discussed. Electroencephalografic findings in newborn macaques
showed that a mirror mechanism operates in the early stages of postnatal development and that early
adverse social experiences affect its developmental trajectory. The presentations aim to offer new
insights into the interactions between hormones, brain neural activity, and attachment.

IS OXYTOCIN AN ATTACHMENT HORMONE?
Marinus H. van IJzendoorn & Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg
Oxytocin is widely advertised as the ‘love hormone’ promoting attachment relationships between
adults and between parents and their children. The effects of oxytocin, however, seem dependent on
childhood attachment experiences, and may not always be positive. Its potential use in (therapeutic)
interventions will be discussed.

EXPLORING THE HUMAN PARENTAL BRAIN
Morten L. Kringelbach
The parent-infant relationship is fundamental to infant survival and development, and the bond
appears to form effortlessly and intuitively. I will examine emerging evidence that the orbitofrontal
cortex is engaged in several phases of parent–infant interactions, from early, privileged orienting to
infant cues, to ongoing monitoring of interactions and subsequent learning.
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FATHER-CHILD ATTACHMENT AS RELATED TO FRUSTRATION TOLERANCE AND
STRESS REACTIVITY IN PRETERM UND FULL TERM BABIES
Lieselotte Ahnert, Bernard Piskernik, Barbara Supper, Andrea Witting & Nina Hammer
Because fathers challenge children from early on, they might also influence child stress reactivity.
Thus, we collected data on saliva cortisol, frustration tolerance and attachments in pre und full term
babies. In preterms, stress reactivity and frustration tolerance appeared constricted, for which fatherchild attachment was the only predictor.

EARLY SOCIAL EXPERIENCES AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF MIRROR NEURONS IN
MONKEYS
Pier Francesco Ferrari
Mirror neurons have been proposed to play a central role in social relations. In a series of studies in
monkeys and humans we have investigated the issue of how mirror neurons (MN) emerge during
development and which social experiences could be critical for their formation. These studies provide
an original account of basic aspects of social cognition, and offer new insights on the interactions
between brain plasticity and early experience.

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IS023
USING TECHNOLOGY
BEHAVIOR

TO

ENCOURAGE

ENVIRONMENTAL

F11. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Environment and sustainability
Convenor
Presenters

Wesley Schultz, California State University, San Marcos - United States
Andreas Nilsson, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg - Sweden
Cees Midden , Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven - Netherlands
Ruth Rettie, Kingston Business School, Kingston Hill - United Kingdom
Stefano De Dominicis, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome – Italy

This invited symposium focuses on the ways in which technology can be used to promote
proenvironmental behavior. Especially in the area of electricity consumption, technology serves a
critical role in encouraging individuals to use less, and to use energy more efficiently. Recent
advances in hardware and software have provided new platforms with which to present persuasive
communications. This symposium brings together experts from four countries, with each presenting
new empirical research findings in which they use technology to change behavior. All four of the
presentations focus on electricity consumption, and leverage insights from psychological science to
promote reductions in consumption.

USING AMBIENT PERSUASIVE LIGHTING TO ENCOURAGE ENERGY SAVING
Cees Midden
ENERGY FEEDBACK IN THE HOME: DISSONANCE AND DENIAL
Ruth Rettie, Tim Harries and Kevin Burchell
This paper describes three experiments that used digital technology platforms to promote
proenvironmental behavior. The studies suggest that people are reluctant to apply a cognitive frame of
material economy to a space that, for many, is essentially social and emotional: the home.

MINDING THE GAP: NORMATIVE INFLUENCE ON ENERGY CONSERVATION
INTENTIONS
Magnus Bergquist and Andreas Nilsson
The study examine the gap between an induced norm and behavior (norm distance), applied to energy
behaviors. Results show that congruent descriptive and injunctive norms produce more conformity and
stronger motivation compared to incongruent descriptive and injunctive norms. In the congruent norm
condition more distal norms yield greater influence. The ambiguous unity (kWh) produce higher
motivation compared to the dis-ambiguous unity (SEK).

USING NORMATIVE FEEDBACK TO REDUCE ENERGY CONSUMPTION
Stefano De Dominicis
In a field study involving 431 households in San Diego County and aimed at reducing electricity
consumption, we provided residents with different real time feedbacks via ad-hoc designed in-home
displays. Results show that the impact of a motivational element such as social-norm is the most
effective to reduce households’ electricity consumption.
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IS024
ADVANCES IN SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY: HOW DO
PSYCHOLOGICAL VARIABLES INTERACT WITH OBJECTIVE
FEATURES OF PLACES, CITIES, AND REGIONS IN THE PROCESS
OF PSYCHOLOGICAL ADAPTATION?
A19. General issues and basic processes - Other
Convenors
Presenters

Martin Obschonka, Saarland University, Saarbruecken - Germany
Rainer K. Silbereisen, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Jena - Germany
Clemens Lechner, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Jena - Germany
Ingrid Schoon , University of London, London - United Kingdom
Peter Jason Rentfrow, University of Cambridge, Cambridge - United Kingdom
Ulrich Trautwein, University of Tübingen, Tübingen – Germany

Recent advances in socio-ecological psychology have spurred a debate whether psychological science
should retain its deeply intrapsychic and subjectivist focus. Socio-ecological psychology (Oishi,
2014), a relatively young field of investigation that however is based on classical theories that view
psychology as intimately intertwined with the context (e.g., Bronfenbrenner, 1979; Lewin, 1939),
attempts to bring the objective perspective to psychological science by investigating how objective
social and physical features of the broader environment (e.g., city or region) affect psychological
mechanisms at the individual and group level, and vice versa. Inspired by this objectivist-contextual
perspective, the proposed Invited Symposium deals with the question whether objective features of the
broader environment moderate psychological mechanisms at the individual level. The aim is to present
cutting-edge research from different sub-disciplines of psychology (e.g., personality psychology,
developmental psychology, social psychology, clinical psychology) that apply a socio-ecological
perspective in these fields. The presentations will investigate an individual-level psychological
independent variable referring to a general or concrete concern of the individual (e.g., perceptions of
social change, economic recessions or natural disasters; salient developmental tasks etc.), an
individual-level psychological dependent variable referring to psychosocial adaptation (e.g.,
psychological well-being), and objective features of the broader environment (e.g., neighborhoods,
cities, and regions) as a moderator variable. The symposium will contribute to the growing body of
evidence illustrating how psychological variables interact with the objective social ecology in the
process of psychological adaptation.

GEOGRAPHICALLY VARYING ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN PERSONALITY AND LIFE
SATISFACTION IN THE LONDON METROPOLITAN AREA
Markus Jokela, Peter J. Rentfrow, Wiebke Bleidorn, Michael E. Lamb, Samuel D. Gosling
We examined how life satisfaction and personality traits are geographically distributed within the U.K.
London metropolitan area (n=56,019), and how the strength of associations between personality traits
and life satisfaction vary by residential location (i.e., personality–neighborhood interactions).
Residential area was recorded at the level of postal districts. The strength of associations between
personality traits and life satisfaction were dependent on neighborhood characteristics. Higher
openness to experience was more positively associated with life satisfaction in postal districts with
higher average openness to experience, population density and ethnic diversity. Higher agreeableness
and conscientiousness were more strongly associated with life satisfaction in postal districts with
lower overall levels of life satisfaction. The associations of extraversion and emotional stability were
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not modified by neighborhood characteristics. These findings suggest that people’s life satisfaction
depends, at least in part, on the interaction between individual personality and particular features of
the places they live.

THE CLASSROOM CONTEXT: DIRECT AND MODERATION EFFECTS ON
EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING FOR VULNERABLE STUDENTS
Ulrich Trautwein & Richard Göllner, University of Tübingen
For the past 30 years, research has shown that emotional stability has a strong association to
psychosocial well-being and plays a key role in accounting for the severity and maintenance of
emotional problems. This applies to adults, children, and adolescents. Youths low in emotional
stability tend to encounter peer rejection and exhibit negative emotions, such as fear, sadness, anxiety,
or depression. In the present study, we tested the classroom context of students as a differential risk
factor for peer adversity among emotionally unstable students. Participants included 2.895 5th graders
from 130 classrooms in a large-scale longitudinal study (TRAIN, Tradition and Innovation) in
Germany as well as their parents and teachers. The results of multilevel-regression analysis supported
a Person × Environment model in which emotionally unstable students experienced more peer
adversity and reported a lower level of emotional well-being when their classrooms are high in
disruption and disorganization. The findings provide further insights about the influence of
extrafamilial environments on the social and emotional adjustment of students in general and, in
particular, of emotionally unstable students.

FAMILY SOCIO-ECONOMIC ADVERSITY AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S TRANSITION INTO
THE LABOUR MARKET. THE ROLE OF AREA DEPRIVATION AS POTENTIAL
MODERATOR Ingrid Schoon and Nicola Pensiero, Institute of Education, University of London, UK
The existing literature suggests that growing up in a family experiencing socio-economic adversity
and financial hardship can have adverse long-term effects regarding educational and occupational
attainment. Moreover, previous research suggests that where one lives matters in terms of life
opportunities. Living in a disadvantaged neighbourhood, especially in urban areas, has been associated
with lower levels of educational performance and problems in making the transition to paid
employment. In this paper we assess the role of area deprivation as a potential moderator, taking into
account multiple dimensions of parental socio-economic adversity, the level of educational
achievement orientation and associated experiences in the labour market transition. Our analytic
sample comprises 9,874 young people participating in the Longitudinal Study of Young People in
England (LSYPE), a cohort of young people born in 1989/90. Area deprivation is indicated by the
Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD); parental socio-economic adversity comprises measures of
parental education, employment, financial hardship, family structure and housing conditions;
education achievement orientation comprises indicators of educational aspirations and expectations;
and problems in employment transitions is measured through information in young people's activity
status between ages 16 to 20 years, in particular the total number of months not being in education,
employment or training (NEET). We also control for variation by gender and ethnic minority status.
The findings suggest that area characteristics affect the association between parental hardship and
labour market transitions of their offspring, pointing to a moderating role of local opportunities in
shaping employment transitions among disadvantaged young people.

WHO REAPS THE BENEFITS OF SOCIAL CHANGE? AGENTIC PERSONALITY AND ITS
SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL BOUNDARIES
Clemens Lechner, Martin Obschonka & Rainer K. Silbereisen, University of Jena, Germany
Modernity offers a host of new opportunities for personal growth and flourishing. Among the most
widely discussed trends are (1) individualization, entailing broadening lifestyle choice on the side of
the individual; and (2) the trend towards lifelong learning, offering new opportunities the acquisition
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of knowledge and competencies, often through new technologies. Not all individuals benefit from this
“positive side” of social change to the same extent, however. In the present study, we investigated the
role of agentic personality as a source of individual differences in the exposure to the benefits of
individualization and lifelong learning. We hypothesized, first, that people with a more agentic
personality actively seek out and embrace the new opportunities, resulting in a higher subjective
experience of broadening lifestyle choice and new learning opportunities. Second, we assumed that the
effect of agentic personality is bounded by the social ecology, with stronger associations between
agentic personality emerging in social ecologies that are facilitative of agentic exploration.
Specifically, we predicted that the agentic personality predicts experiences of broadening lifestyle
choice especially in regions with a higher divorce rate, and experiences of new learning opportunities
especially in regions with a high internet adoption rate. Analyses in two parallel samples from
Germany (N = 2,442) and Poland (N = 2,571) largely confirmed these predictions. Combining
subjective indicators changes in personal life circumstances with objective socio-ecological data, our
study thus demonstrates that agentic personality plays an important role in “reaping” the potential
benefits that social change holds – but that the effect of agentic personality is bounded by the
opportunities and constraints in the social ecology.

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IS025
EUROPEAN CITIZENSHIP TODAY: WHAT DOES IT MEAN?
C6 – Culture and society - Attitudes and values
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Bruna Zani, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna - Italy
Bruna Zani, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna - Italy
Dimitra Pachi, BPP University, London - United Kingdom
Elena Marta, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Zuzana Scott, Masaryk University, Brno - Czech Republic
Serdar M. Değirmencioğlu, Dogus University, Istanbul - Turkey

The aim of the symposium is to discuss the meaning of European citizenship today, focussing on a
series of questions around this theme, like the nexus between EU citizenship and identity, the
relationship between national and European citizenship, national and European identity, right and
duties of European citizens, the minorities non-citizens. Four papers will be presented by authors
coming from three different Eu states (UK, Italy and Czech Republic), discussing some psychological
and psychosocial variables in influencing the construction and development of EU citizenship among
young people, and in particular the role of ethnicity (Dimitra Pachi), the new forms of engagement
adopted by young people to have their voice heard (Bruna Zani, Cinzia Albanesi, Elvira Cicognani);
identification (sense of importance and pride) with Europe and country of origin, and the trust in
European and national institutions (Zuzana Scott, Jan Serek, & Petr Macek); the components of
European identity and representations (Elena Marta, Daniela Marzana, Sara Alfieri). The implications
of all these problems at the policy level will also be discussed.

PERCEPTIONS OF CITIZENSHIP AMONGST YOUTH IN LONDON; DOES ETHNICITY
MATTER?
Dimitra Pachi
This talk is going to be on: a. the meaning of citizenship for ethnic majority and minority young
people and b. young people’s perceptions of and attitudes towards, in particular, EU citizenship (how
much they know about it, whether they hold on to it and what role it plays for them). The results of the
PIDOP (Processes Influencing Democratic Ownership and Participation) project showed that ethnicity
plays an important role as it differentiates both perception of citizenship and levels of European
identification, with challenging implications at a policy level.

BECOMING EUROPEAN ACTIVE CITIZENS
Bruna Zani, Cinzia Albanes &, Elvira Cicognani,
The paper will discuss some preliminary data on the concept of active citizenships, in a sample of
Italian young people, with particular attention to the new forms of participation and engagement
youngsters adopt to have their voice heard at national and European levels. Findings from focus
groups will be presented, illustrating their perspective on Europe, their role in constructing a “new”
European vision, their requests to the policy makers.

PROUD TO BE EUROPEAN?
Zuzana Scott, Jan Serek, & Petr Macek
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For many young people, being European is more of an abstract category rather than expression of
strong sense of common identity. However, this does not mean that young people are unaware of their
belonging to Europe and their Europeanism. In this presentation we examine young people's
identification (sense of importance and pride) with Europe (EU) and country of origin, their trust in
European Union/national institutions, and participatory roles of young people, national government,
and European Union as perceived by youth from Czech Republic.

YOUNG ITALIANS AND THE EUROPEAN CITIZENSHIP: PERCEPTIONS,
REPRESENTATIONS, AND IDENTITY
Elena Marta, Daniela Marzana & Sara Alfieri
Within the Youth Report promoted by the Milan Toniolo Institute, attention is also brought onto the
subject of Europe and the European citizenship. A national sample of 1750 young people completed a
questionnaire aimed at investigating perceptions about Italian citizenship and European citizenship;
the components of the European identity; the representations of Europe; meaningful figures in the
definition of citizenship and of European identity.

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IS026
PRIMARY CARE PSYCHOLOGY - LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN
INTEGRATED CARE: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
E08. Health and clinical intervention - Community Psychological Care
Convenor
Presenters

Robyn Vines, University of Western Sydney, Bathurst - Australia
Bente Storm Mowatt Haugland, Uni Research, Bergen - Norway
Diana L. Prescott , Hampden Psychological Consultation, PLLC, Hampden - United

States

Discussant

James Bray , Baylor College of Medicine, Houston - United States
Jean Grenier , University of Ottawa, Ottawa - Canada
Marie Helene Chomienne, University of Ottawa, Ottawa - Canada
Robyn Vines, University of Western Sydney, Bathurst – Australia
Robyn Vines, University of Western Sydney, Bathurst - Australia

This symposium will provide an overview of current progress in integrated psychological service
delivery in the primary care setting in a number of western countries. Primary Care Psychology is a
growing area of practice and service delivery, at the core of which lies a collaborative model of mental
and general health care involving appropriately trained psychologists working with family physicians
in the general practice setting. Its key objective is to provide early intervention for common mental
health disorders (previously under-treated), chronic disease and its behavioural and mental health
sequellae. The model minimizes the stigma of help-seeking, facilitates more equitable access to care,
and requires different approaches to those traditionally used in the hospital, community health and
private practice sectors. Research indicates that many major health problems, such as diabetes, heart
disease and obesity, are due to psychosocial and lifestyle issues and are frequently sub-optimally
treated by the medical profession alone. Similarly, mental health care in many places still results in
high prevalence/common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety being treated by drug
therapy alone and/or generic counselling delivered by a number of different service providers. In
addition, low prevalence conditions such as schizophrenia are still largely referred to psychiatrists for
pharmacological treatment alone. Appropriately trained psychologists have much to contribute to the
optimal treatment of these disorders and are becoming increasingly involved in the earlier intervention
and prevention of these problems in a new integrated health care framework.
The symposium will provide an overview and comparison of integrated models of primary care
service delivery in six western countries: Norway, the USA, Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom
and France. In each of these, current research & service delivery trials, funding mechanisms and
training models will be explored, as well as current barriers to optimal roll-out of these psychological
services. The focus will be on best practice models and evidence-based interventions for treatment and
training, and will provide an up-date on current progress in different countries with a view to
establishing better networks to support this work internationally.

PRIMARY CARE PSYCHOLOGY IN THE UNITED STATES: COMMON BEHAVIORAL
HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE PROBLEMS
James Bray
This presentation will discuss the status of psychologists in the USA who work in primary care
settings and its relationship to the health care reforms that are occurring; practice opportunities in
primary care in private and public settings; and the use of technology and electronic health records in
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primary care practice.

WOW! WAY TO OPTIMAL WEIGHT: INTEGRATED CARE FOR CHILDREN AND
ADOLESCENTS IDENTIFIED WITH UNHEALTHY WEIGHT IN THE RURAL UNITED
STATES
Diana L. Prescott
WOW! is a pediatric obesity program offered to children and adolescents with a BMI greater than the
85th percentile. Staff involved in this integrated programme include a paediatrician, certified personal
trainer, nurse, registered dietician, clinical psychologist and students from each specialty. The program
allows integrated care for patients and their families and access to all team members each visit.

PRIMARY CARE PREVENTION OF ANXIETY PROBLEMS IN NORWEGIAN JUNIOR
HIGH SCHOOL ADOLESCENTS
Bente Storm Mowatt Haugland
Anxiety is a major mental health problem among adolescents, but the majority of anxious youth do not
receive effective help. By training and supervising school-health nurses in delivering cognitive
behavioural therapy (CBT), improved access to effective help within the primary health care system is
provided. The comparative effectiveness of this intervention will be discussed.

PRIMARY CARE PSYCHOLOGY IN AUSTRALIA
Robyn Vines
Medicare funding was made available for psychological service delivery in Australia in 2006. Since
then, a number of models of care have operated. A best practice training model for psychologists to
work collaboratively with GPs in the provision of primary mental and general health care services has
been developed in Australia. The history and outcomes of this Integrated Care Model will be
presented.

OPENING ACCESS TO PSYCHOTHERAPY IN CANADA: AN UPDATE
Marie Helene Chomienne
In the wake of its primary care reform, Canada is now focusing on improving mental health care with
strategies such as “Every door is the right door” in Ontario. In Quebec a group is working to improve
access to psychotherapies. This presentation will provide an update on the status of primary mental
health care in Canada.

MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC INSOMNIA IN THE PRIMARY CARE SETTING
Jean Grenier
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the recommended treatment for management of chronic
insomnia (CI) in guidelines from Canada, USA, UK. CBT is also effective when CI co-exists with
anxiety, depression, and chronic physical diseases. This presentation will outline how to recognize and
treat CI in adults, in the primary care setting.

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IS027
TEMAS TEST AS ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT TECHNIQUES
FOR CULTURALLY DIVERSE CHILDREN
E03. Health and clinical intervention - Personality assessment
E05. Health and clinical intervention - Evidence-based psychotherapies
Convenor
Patrizia Bevilacqua, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Presenters
Dionne Joseph, Psychologist, Doha - Qatar
Erminia Costantino on behalf of Giuseppe Costantino, American Multicultural
Institute, New
York - United States
Filippo Aschieri, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Francesca Fantini, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Larry McReynolds, Lutheran Medical Center/Lutheran Family Health Centers, New
York United States
Leib Litman, Touro College & University System, New York - United States

TEMAS has been used as multicultural test and as an evidence-based Narrative therapy TEMAS
TNT). In The USA, TEMAS was standardized on 650 youngsters aged 5 to 13 and normed on four
culturally diverse groups: Black, Puerto Rican, Other Hispanic, and White. There are two parallel
versions: minority and nonminority and two forms: the long form has 23 cards, and the short form of 9
cards, the latter is used clinically. The test assesses cognitive, affective and personality functions and
is scored objectively. As an evidence-base therapy, TEMAS was first used with Hispanic children in
1994 and showed to be effective in reducing anxiety and aggressive behavior. It was also successfully
used as trauma treatment with Hispanic children in the 9/11 terrorist attacks multisite study. At the
present is being used in a large school-based trauma project.The objective of this symposium is to
show that the TEMAS is a valid multicultural assessment instrument and as an evidence-based trauma
therapy.

STANDARDIZATION OF THE ITALIAN TEMAS
Francesca Fantini, Filippo Aschieri and Patrizia Bevilicqua.
The Italian TEMAS Standardization was conducted on a group of 297 children (153 females and 144
males) aged between 6 and 10 years, with an average age of 8.33 years (SD = 1.35). The children were
divided into three ethnic groups: Italian (Italian-born children from families of Italian origin),
American-Hispanic (origin of Ecuadorian and Peruvian children born in their country or in Italy) and
Arabic (Egyptian and Moroccan children born in their country or in Italy).Evaluation of the concurrent
validity and interrater reliability showed that the TEMAS is a reliable and valid test to be used with
such cultural groups in Italy.

THE CHINESE VERSION OF THE TEMAS: A FIRST EXPLORATION WITH CHINESE
CHILDREN IN ITALY
Francesca Fantini, Filippo Aschieri and Maria Luisa Gennari
The Chinese TEMAS, whose pictures were designed to Chinese Characters and setting in China, was
tested on 45 Chinese children aged 8 to 12 children while parents completed measures of acculturation
strategies and they were interviewed on their parenting strategies. Analyses revealed that children’s
TEMAS stories were positively related to acculturation strategies as a moderator variable, and to the
parenting strategies reflected in the interviews.

CLINICAL UTILITY OF TEMAS WITH A SOUTH AFRICAN GIRL
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Dionne Joseph
The TEMAS was used in the assessment of an 8-year old girl of South African, Zulu origin, residing
with her father and stepmother in Doha, Qatar. This child had a history of eating disorder/obesity,
suspected sexual abuse and disordered family attachments in South Africa. The TEMAS successfully
‘pulled’ for these issues, some of which were corroborated by the child’s father, some of which were
only revealed during the assessment. The TEMAS was particularly useful given that the child was
very reluctant to engage in more direct methods of eliciting information about her history and internal
psychological processes.

TEMAS NARRATIVE THERAPY WITH HISPANIC CHILDREN AFFECTED BY
TRAUMATIC STRESS
Giuseppe Costantino, LeibLitman and Larry McReynolds
TEMAS Narrative Therapy is used in a large grant project to reduce traumatic stress among schoolbased children; 350 children received 14 sessions of TEMAS Therapy while 350 and 350 children
received 14 sessions of Cuento (Storytelling) Therapy. Preliminary results indicate that the TEMAS
Narrative Trauma Therapy seems to be an effective evidence based therapy with these minority
children.

THE LIFE AND WORK OF GIUSEPPE COSTANTINO/PRESENTAZIONE IN MEMORIA
DI GIUSEPPE COSTANTINO
Giuseppe Costantino, Ph.D. (1937-2015) was a trilingual child international psychologist, fluent in
English, Spanish and Italian. He was a writer, researcher, clinician, professor, mentor, friend, husband
and father. Throughout his career he made significant contributions to multicultural assessment; Dr.
Costantino was the author of the only validated story telling assessment/narrative multicultural test,
TEMAS (Tell-Me-A-Story), which has been translated into 9 languages, CuentoTherapy, and
TEMAS Narrative Therapy.
At the time of his death, he was the Director of Research, at Lutheran Family Health Center Network,
NYC; Professor at the Graduate School of Psychology, Touro College. His TEMAS has been the
topic of dissertations, globably. He presented and trained around the world. He had extensive
experience in providing clinical services, and conducting research programs with traumatized groups,
especially Latino children and families, in the United States and abroad. Colleagues, friends and
family will discuss his contributions to the world.

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IS028
INTERPERSONAL FACTORS RELATED TO BURNOUT: NEW
DEVELOPMENTS IN SERVICE PROFESSIONS
D04. Work and Organization - Well-being at work
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Laura Borgogni, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Chiara Consiglio, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Cristian Balducci, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna - Italy
Heather K. Spence Laschinger, University of Western Ontario, London - Canada
Michael P. Leiter, Acadia University, Wolfville – Canada
Christina Maslach, University of California, Berkeley - United States

Contemporary workers are exposed to increasing and demanding interactions with other people,
mainly due to the impressive growth of service-related jobs, and to the rising number of team-based
organizations in which people are supposed to work interdependently and collaborate with each other
to achieve common work goals. It is well-known that interpersonal stressors (such as conflicts and
requests by clients and colleagues) contribute to the most relevant chronic stress syndrome, namely
burnout, whereas its interpersonal repercussions are underexplored. The first aim of this symposium is
to present some contributions that focus on interpersonal factors that may have a role as antecedents as
well as consequences of burnout among different professions (health care providers, call centre
operators, civil servants) and countries (Canada and Italy). In doing so, a particular emphasis will be
given to new concepts and current phenomena (i.e., civility/incivility, interpersonal strain at work,
workplace bullying), sophisticated methodologies (i.e. longitudinal and diary studies) taking into
consideration self-reported and organizational data (i.e. customer satisfaction). Finally, the impact of
positive or negative individual characteristics (i.e. self-efficacy and negative affectivity) in the strain
process will be also examined.

PERSON AND DAILY LEVELS OF LINKS OF BURNOUT WITH WORKPLACE CIVILITY
Michael P. Leiter, Emily Peck, Vicki Magley, Jenna Shapiro, Howard Tennet,
A diary study of health care providers tested a model of relationships among exhaustion, cynicism,
and civility on a person level (between subjects) and a daily level (within subjects). A hierarchical
model confirmed that a model with exhaustion predicting cynicism and civility (with an additional
path from cynicism to civility) fits both levels.

THE PROTECTIVE ROLE OF OCCUPATIONAL SELF EFFICACY ON NURSES
EXPERIENCES OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY AND BURNOUT
Heather Laschinger, Roberta Fida
Exposure to workplace incivility results in burnout and in less job satisfaction and health and intention
to leave. Our results showed that nurses who believed they had the ability to cope with occupational
demands perceived lower incivility, experienced less burnout and were more satisfied with their job
and in general felt better.

INTERPERSONAL STRAIN AMONG SERVICE PROFESSIONALS: A NEW BURNOUT
FACET AND ITS ORGANIZATIONAL IMPACT
Chiara Consiglio, Laura Borgogni, Guido Alessandri
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Interpersonal strain represents the detach and disengaged reaction toward relationships at work
(clients, colleagues and supervisor) that has been recently related to burnout. This study, conducted in
the call centre setting, explored the mediating role of interpersonal strain in the relationship between
self-efficacy and customer satisfaction.

WORKPLACE BULLYING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS: A THREE-YEAR
FOLLOW-UP STUDY AMONG UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES.
Cristian Balducci, Franco Fraccaroli
We examined longitudinally the impact of workplace bullying on psychological distress among
employees of an Italian University undergoing a major organizational restructuring. We also examined
reversed and reciprocal causation between the two variables and controlled for negative affectivity, a
potential confounder of the examined relationships.

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IS029
EARLY ADVERSITIES, TRAUMA AND DEVELOPMENTAL
PSYCHOPATHOLOGY: RECENT CLINICAL DEVELOPMENTS AND
TREATMENT PERSPECTIVES
E05. Health and clinical intervention - Evidence-based psychotherapies
E14. Health and clinical intervention - Disaster and crisis psychology
A04. General issues and basic processes - Psychobiology
A05. General issues and basic processes - Genes-environment interplay and behaviour
Convenor
Discussant
Presenters
Presenters
Presenters

Ernesto Caffo, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia - Italy
Anthony P. Mannarino, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh - United States
Barbara Forresi, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia - Italy
Concetta Pastorelli, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Judith Cohen, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh - United States

Recent studies have revealed the long-term consequences of early adversities and childhood traumatic
events that increase vulnerability to mental health disorders in late adolescence and adulthood.
There is a wealth of evidence demonstrating not only the long term persistence of PTSD and other
psychological disorders following traumatic events, but also how early adversities may produce
structural and functional brain imaging changes, neuroendocrine and immune alterations. In the last
few years, moreover, studies highlighted the role of gene-environment (GxE) interaction in the
etiology of posttraumatic disorders and PTSD.
In this symposium we want to advance our understanding on the developmental course of early
adversities from childhood to adolescence and adulthood, and to examine how it is related to
psychological and biological risk factors. The invited speakers will therefore offer an update on child
trauma, from the standpoint of genetics, neurobiology, psychology, and psychotherapy according to a
developmental psychopathology approach.
A better knowledge of long term consequences of different types of child trauma (from child abuse to
natural disasters), as well as of the neurobiological and psychological basis for individual vulnerability
and resilience, can help improving primary prevention and pave the way towards individually-tailored
therapies.

PREVALENCE AND RISK FACTORS OF CHRONIC POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS
DISORDER IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS AFTER THE 2012 EARTHQUAKE
AFFECTING THE MODENA PROVINCE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF A CROSSSECTIONAL STUDY
Barbara Forresi, Ernesto Caffo, Francesco Soncini, Emanuele Bottosso, Elena Righi, Omar Daolio,
Ilenia Maini, Elena Di Pietro, Gabriella Aggazzotti
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of chronic PTSD in children and adolescents
after the 2012 Emilia Romagna Earthquake, and to identify PTSD potentially related individual and
social risks and protective factors to be addressed in future effective preventive interventions.

GRIN2B PREDICTS ATTENTION PROBLEMS AMONG DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN
Marco Battaglia
The interacting effect of GRIN2B variants with 4 measures of adversities [low socioeconomic status
(SES), preterm delivery, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and absence of breastfeeding] was
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investigated upon blindly assessed cognitive abilities (vocabulary, block design, digit spans of
Wechsler's Intelligence Scale, and Rey complex figure) and parents-rated behavioral problem.

EVIDENCE-BASED TREATMENTS HELP TRAUMATIZED CHILDREN: OUTCOMES OF
TRAUMA-FOCUSED COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY FOR CHILDREN
Judith Cohen
The Author will present recent studies on the outcomes of the TF-CBT for children and adolescents.

THE DEVELOPMENT OF PERCEIVED MATERNAL AND PATERNAL HOSTILE,
AGGRESSIVE CONFLICT FROM ADOLESCENCE TO EARLY ADULTHOOD AND
THEIR RELATIONS WITH POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER SYMPTOMS.
Valeria Castellani, Concetta Pastorelli, Eriona Thartori, Ernesto Caffo, Barbara Forresi, Maria
Gerbino
Using multiple waves of data from the Genzano (Rome) Longitudinal project, this study examined the
development of mother and father-adolescent hostile aggressive conflict from late adolescence to
young adulthood. The role of previous child' problems and family characteristics, as well as the
relation of level and change in mother and father-adolescent hostile aggressive conflict to adolescents'
post traumatic stress disorder symptoms will be investigated.

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IS030
THE DEMISE OF GUYS (DOGS): THE PROBLEM AND POSSIBLE
SOLUTIONS—COMING TO THE RESCUE OF YOUNG DOGS
C03. Culture and society - Sex and gender
F08. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Life skills in culture and society
Convenor
Presenters

Bernardo J. Carducci, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany - United States
Bernardo J. Carducci, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany - United States
Philip G. Zimbardo, Palo Alto University, Palo Alto - United States
Ronald E. Riggio, Claremont McKenna College, Claremont - United States
Shari Young Kuchenbecker, R.W. Research, Inc., Los Angeles - United States

The “Demise of Guys”—DoGs (Zimbardo & Duncan, 2012) describes a troubling pattern of
emotional and behavioral expression by young men characterized by diminished educational,
psychosocial, and career development. The first presentation focuses on two main symptoms of this
demise: excessive and socially isolated video game playing and Internet porn use and concludes by
offering practical suggestions for parents, teachers, and guys themselves about how they can balance
their lives and environment in order to thrive. To address the lack of social skills associated with the
DoGs, the second presentation reviews a 30-year program designed to promote basic social
communication skills and concludes with a description of a program and manual created to help
psychologists and trainers improve clients’ basic social skills. The third presentation describes the
implementation of an intervention strategy using “START Everyday Heroes” wristbands to increased
social engagement by young males and concludes with suggestions for incorporating these
inexpensive wristbands into multiple intervention pathways by parents, clinicians, and educators to
address the DoGs. To promote enhanced social connectedness, the fourth presentation describes a
five-step format for helping individuals develop conversational skills based on an understanding of the
basic elements within the structural anatomy of conversation and concludes with suggestions for
creating opportunities to practice conversational skills in a variety of day-to-day situations.

WHERE HAVE ALL THE GUYS GONE?: SAVING THE NEXT GENERATION FROM
ISOLATED EXISTENCES
Philip G. Zimbardo
To help account for the “Demise of Guys,” this presentation will focus on two main symptoms of this
demise: excessive and socially isolated video game playing and Internet porn use. This presentation
will also discuss some of the potential causes, including changing family dynamics, media influences,
environmentally generated physiological changes that decrease testosterone and increase estrogen, the
problematic stagnant economy, and the dramatic rise of gals in all domains.

A PROGRAMMATIC APPROACH TO ASSESSING AND DEVELOPING GUYS’ SOCIAL
SKILLS
Ronald E. Riggio
Drawing on a model for basic social communication skills, this presentation will discuss methods to
assess the possession of basic emotional/nonverbal and social/verbal competencies. Examples of the
training exercises will be given, and they will be applied specifically to developing “guys” social
skills.
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GETTING STARTED: PROMOTING EVERYDAY HEROES TO FOSTER EMPATHY AND
THE RE-RISE OF GUYS
Shari Young Kuchenbecker
This presentation describes the use of “START Everyday Heroes” wristbands in conjunction with
empathy training, mindfulness, and social-cognitive framing as a novel and inexpensive program for
promoting pro-social valuing and skills, specifically helping behavior, in young males.

A
“TALKING-CURE”
APPROACH
TO
PROMOTING
CONVERSATIONAL
INTELLIGENCE AND SOCIAL CONNECTEDNESS
Bernardo J. Carducci, Ph.D.
To address the lack of social skills as a contributing factor to the social isolation of young males, this
presentation will describe a five-step format for helping individuals to develop their conversational
skills and offers suggestions for creating opportunities to practice developing conversational skills in
day-to-day situations for the purpose of promoting social connectedness.

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The work of Dr. Giuseppe Costantino, presented posthumously

IS031
QUALITATIVE PERSPECTIVES TO OFFERING SUPPORT TO
INDIVIDUALS EXPERIENCING ANXIETY ASSOCIATED WITH PTSD
AND SHYNESS
F08. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Life skills in culture and society
E05. Health and clinical intervention - Evidence-based psychotherapies
Convenor
Presenters

Bernardo J. Carducci, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany - United States
Bernardo J. Carducci, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany - United States
Elsa B. Cardalda, Ponce Medical School and Health Sciences, Ponce - Puerto Rico
Erminia Costantino on behalf of Giuseppe Costantino, American Multicultural

Institute,
New York - United States
Nuria Sabate, Private practitioner, San Juan - Puerto Rico

This symposium will focus on helping individuals respond more effective to two rather different
expressions of anxiety—PTSD and shyness. Although these two expressions of emotion exist on
highly different points along the anxiety spectrum, they are linked together in this symposium by a
qualitative approach to research and practice that focuses on “listening to the stories” told by
individuals about how they experience and attempt to cope with their respective feelings. In this
symposium, the presenters will discuss how they use qualitative research techniques to develop
programs to help individuals deal more effectively with expressions of PTSD and shyness.
The first presentation will discuss the usage of the Tell Me A Story (TEMAS) as a qualitatively based
multicultural test and as an evidence-based Narrative Traumatic Therapy (TEMAS-TNT).It will also
include a discussion of the Narrative Traumatic Therapy as it is presently being used in a large schoolbased trauma projectin Brooklyn, NY involving 325 Latino children, ages 6-10. In response to recent
studies highlighting that Hispanics are at greater risk for PTSD than other groups, the second
presentation will discuss a program of qualitatively based research at the Medical School of Ponce,
Puerto Rico attempting to treat PTSD in Puerto Rican children, ages 6 to 10, utilizing the TEMAS
Narrative Trauma Therapy and will conclude with a discussion of the post-test assessment of this
treatment program. The third presentation will discuss the characteristic features of shyness and the
personal, social, and professional barriers shyness can create, along with a qualitative analysis
summarizingand evaluating the self-selected strategies shy individuals use to deal with their shyness.
The presentation will conclude with discussion offering guidelines for mental health professional to
create shyness workshopsto help both shy teens and adults deal more effectively with their shyness.

TEMAS IN THE ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF TRAUMA SYMPTOMS AMONG
LATINO CHILDREN
Ermina Costantino, Giuseppe Costantino, LeibLitman, Richard Waxman, and Air Maman
This presentation will discuss a treatment program utilizing the TEMAS Narrative Traumatic Therapy
to examined traumatic stress, anxiety, and depression among 325 Latino children, ages 6-10, from
three public schools in Brooklyn, NY.

TRAUMA EXPOSURE AND PTSD IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS IN PUERTO RICO
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Elsa B. Cardalda, Nuria Sabaté, and James Porte
This presentation will describe a program of research assessing neurological and cognitive variables
associated with PTSD and the use of TEMAS Narrative Trauma Therapy with Puerto Rican children
in Puerto Rico to assess treatment effectiveness.

DON’T BE SHY ABOUT HELPING SHY INDIVIDUALS DEAL WITH THEIR SHYNESS:
GUIDELINES FOR CREATING A SHYNESS WORKSHOP
Bernardo J. Carducci
This presentation describes strategies shy individuals use to deal with their shyness and offer
guidelines for professionals to create a shyness workshop to address the cognitive, affective, and
behavioral deficiencies exhibited by shy individuals.

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IS032
PSYCHOLOGICAL DYNAMICS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CAREERS:
SELF-CONCEPT AND SOCIAL-COGNITIVE PROCESSES IN STEM
EDUCATION AND CAREER CHOICE
B07. Development and education - Social cognition, identity and social interactions
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Daniel Cervone, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago - United States
Daniel Cervone, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago - United States
Elena Makarova, University of Bern, Bern - Switzerland
Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, University of California, Berkeley - United States
Ursula Kessels, Free University of Berlin, Berlin – Germany
Anne Maass, University of Padova, Padua - Italy

A major challenge for 21st-century psychological science it to identify factors that contribute to
individuals’ decisions to pursue and persist in science, technology, engineering, and mathematical
(STEM) fields. The need for psychological research is particular acute in light of the underrepresentation of women and persons of color in STEM fields in many industrialized nations. The aim
of this symposium is to present a range of European and U.S.-based research programs that share a
focus on the role self-concept (self-image, identity) and subjective beliefs about the relation between
oneself and the social world (interpersonal relationship, the fit between oneself and academic domains,
perceptions of supports in the educational environment) in STEM education and career choice.
Presenters will report empirical findings on gender identity, conceptions of academic domains, and
students’ preference regarding STEM careers; mentoring-based processes and their implications for
students’ personal identity as scientists, particularly among students of minority status; gender-based
conceptions of math and science fields and the implications of these conceptions for youths’ career
choices; and subjective beliefs about supports and barriers in a STEM-education environment and
their implications for self-efficacy beliefs and educational progress. The presentations and discussion
will seek to underscore ways in which basic research on the self, social-cognitive mechanisms, and
interpersonal dynamics can illuminate psychological factors that contribute to students’ desire to
participate in STEM fields and their eventual development of successful and fulfilling careers in
STEM.

SUBJECTIVE BELIEFS ABOUT THE SELF AND ENGINEERING EDUCATION: A
PERSON-CENTERED SOCIAL-COGNITIVE ANALYSIS
Daniel Cervone, Lara Mercurio, and Carmen Lilley (University of Illinois at Chicago)
We present research employing person-centered methods that address both inter-individual differences
and intra-individual variation in social-cognitive processes (self-concept; perceptions of educational
supports and barriers; perceptions of self-efficacy). Findings relate these variables to educational
progress among engineering students.

DOES SCIENCE SUIT ME? HOW ACADEMIC INTERESTS RELATE TO STUDENT’S
IDENTITY
Ursula Kessels
The presentation summarizes findings from both correlational and experimental studies showing the
importance of the perceived fit between an individual’s (gender) identity and (gendered) social
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meanings of academic domains (such as STEM subjects) for students’ liking, choosing, and aspiring a
career in the realm of STEM.

THE GENDER GAP IN STEM FIELDS: THE GENDER IMAGE OF MATH AND SCIENCE
AND YOUTHS’ CAREER ASPIRATIONS
Elena Makarova, Belinda Aeschlimann & Walter Herzog (Univ of Bern)
The study is part of the Swiss National Research Program on “Gender Equality” and is based on a
survey of 3,045 youth. It examines the occupational aspirations of female and male youth, the gender
image of three science subjects among youth, and the impact of the gender image of math and science
on young women’s career choice in STEM fields.

FOSTERING POSITIVE INTEGROUP MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS: IMPLICATIONS
FOR STEM FIELDS
Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton
Inclusion of Other in the Self (IOS), a process where people incorporate close others' attributes into
their self-concept, is evident in close relationships. We test whether close mentoring relationships also
trigger IOS processes, potentially leading mentees to adopt a scientific identity, with implications for
minority student retention.

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Sponsored by
ECPA (European Association of Community Psychology)

IS033
HAPPINESS AND GLOBALIZATION: “THE STRANGE
BEDFELLOWS “OF OUR COMPLEX WORLD
F01. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Capacities building and human development
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenor
Presenters

Italy
Discussant

Donata Francescato, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
José Ornelas , ISPA – University Institute, Lisbon - Portugal
Norma De Piccoli, University of Turin, Turin - Italy
Patrizia Meringolo, SIPCO – Italian Society of Community Psychology, Firenze –
Caterina Arcidiacono, University of Naples Federico II, Naples - Italy

Happiness as a theoretical construct is mainly used by economists, while psychologists have tried to
identify the major components of this construct: quality of life (Veenhoover,2012), individual (Keyes
2010)and social wellbeing (Prilleltensky, 2012). Community psychology underlines the positive
aspects of life within an ecological model constituted by individual, relational, organizational,
environmental and cultural dimensions (Prilleltensky, 2011). It differentiates itself from positive
psychology because community psychology focus also on collective experiences (and not only on
individual features or personality variables). Community psychology moreover, is centered principally
on second order changes,( Foster-Fishman, Nowell, &Yang, 2007; Watson, & Foster-Fishman, 2013)
which are relevant in approaching problems and opportunities implied in globalization processes.
Therefore in this symposium we aim to illustrate how the different components of happiness identified
by various branches of psychology have neglected the social and environmental components of
happiness. In a globalized world is increasingly urgent to take into account how social, economic, and
cultural changes impact personal and social happiness. The term globalization has consistently been
utilized to describe the dramatic changes the world is undergoing, as new technology and modern
economics have led to increasingly interconnected economies and cultures. Most psychologists have
stressed the manifold problems globalization processes have created especially in developed countries
such as Europe. Few have explored the opportunities globalization also offer. Since community
psychology underlines that we have to look for “meliors” and not only for “stressors” in our
environment, in this symposium we will focus primarily on the positive aspects of globalization, that
can foster relational wellbeing and happiness.

WHY A COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY APPROACH FOR HAPPINESS AND WELLBEING?
Patrizia Meringolo
Facing issues as happiness and well-being, Community Psychology focuses on collective experiences
(and not on individual features or personality variables). The presentation will illustrates also how
Community Psychology manages and negotiates the conflicts, avoiding “pacifying” arrangements, and
how it is oriented to second order systems changes.

SEIZING THE OPPORTUNITIES FOR INCREASING OUR HAPPINESS AND WELL
BEING IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD
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Donata Francescato
Globalization offers several opportunities in the economic, social, cultural and educational domains
which may help overcome many divides that characterize our conflictual society. By rebuilding trust,
and rekindling interpersonal and social ties the wealth of diversities that now foster conflicts, can
promote relational wellbeing and happiness.

THE SOCIAL RELEVANCE OF RESEARCH IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY: TOOLS
FOR THE PROMOTION FOR CAPABILITIES AND WELL-BEING
José Ornelas
Community Psychology employs evidence-based practices that privilege what enhances individuals,
groups or communities’s capabilities, and well-being, and focuses primarily on social movements and
policies Examples are described: a) capabilities for mental health; c) community leadership; c)
Housing First - innovation to end homelessness.

AN ECOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE TO PROMOTE HEALTH AND WELLBEING
Norma De Piccoli
In the modern Western world, health promotion is a central topic. This question is often developed in
terms of healthy lifestyle, focusing on the individual responsibility, safeguarding the status quo. The
presentation will highlight some theoretical and methodological tools consistent with a systemicecological analysis

HOW HAPPY YOU ARE? MEASURING INDIVIDUAL FEELINGS AND THOUGHTS
RELATED TO PLACES AND LIFE CIRCUMSTANCES
Caterina Arcidiacono
The Author presents first results of a research using a prototype app for smarthphone (created with
O.Gigliotta, S. De Martino e O.Miglino) measuring individual happiness in relation to life
circumstances, places, and social contexts. This tool, gives also respondents a feedback concerning
their moods in relation to specific circumstances.

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IS034
IN MEMORY OF PROFESSOR LAURA D’ODORICO - MUSIC AND
LANGUAGE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INFANT
COMMUNICATION
B01. Development and education - Language acquisition
Convenor
Presenters

Fabia Franco, Middlesex University, London - United Kingdom
Christine D. Tsang, Huron University College at Western, London - Canada
Fabia Franco, Middlesex University, London - United Kingdom
Manuela Filippa, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena; University of
Paris Ouest-Nanterre Paris (France) - Italy
Martine Van Puyvelde, Royal Military Academy, Brussels - Belgium
Simone Falk, University of Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France); LudwigMaximilian University of Munich, Munich – France

Darwin speculated “…the rhythms and cadences of oratory are derived from previously developed
musical power…. Musical sounds afforded one of the bases for the development of language” (1871,
p. 336). Yet, only in the last decade the study of the relationship between language and music has
received considerable attention in science. Language and music are the two main communication
systems in humans – both have everyday usages studied by psychologists and neuroscientists on the
one hand, and musicologists and linguists on the other; both have literacy forms associated with them,
begging educational considerations; both have evolved artistic forms through human history and
across different cultures; and both have brought art to the core of socially organized endeavors to
promote cross-domain benefits (e.g., El Sistema: Majno, 2012). Although research has been fastgrowing, how language and music interact in the ontogenesis of human communication from birth has
remained largely unexplored. This symposium brings together interdisciplinary cutting-edge research
aiming to uncover the missing link, that is, begging the fundamental question of how the relationship
between language and music evolves during the early stages of human development. By exploring
initial answers to such question/s, we aim to both contribute scientific objectives for a future agenda
and impact on educational programmes, health and rehabilitation intervention. The speakers and their
co-authors come from one North-American and five different European countries. They have
developed groundbreaking research lines exploring the boundaries between spoken and musical
interactions with infants, and they will report on their findings and ongoing studies. The discussion
will identify state-of-the-art themes and shared objectives, aiming to create a network able to
consolidate and further develop research on the interaction between language and music in the
European and international context.

INFANT-DIRECTED SPEECH AND SONG: COMPARISONS AND OPEN QUESTIONS
INFANT DIRECTED-SONG AND -SPEECH, COMPARISONS AND QUESTIONS
Simone Falk
Falk gives an overview over the main characteristics of infant-directed (ID- henceforth) speech and
song considering several languages and so identifying common aspects and differences. Infant
differential responses to song and speech are discussed in function of language acquisition as well as
in terms of infant and parental well-being.

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WHEN MUSIC AND SPEECH COLLIDE: INFANTS’ PERCEPTION OF MELODY IN THE
CONTEXT OF LYRICS
Christine D. Tsang and J. Bruce Morton
Tsang examines the impact of simultaneous speech and melody presentation on infants’ recognition of
melody and words. Infants' recognition of words remained unaffected but their perception of melody
deteriorated. The results suggest that 8-month-olds are highly sensitive to linguistic information to the
detriment of other perceptual processing.

INFANT-DIRECTED SINGING, ATTENTION AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN
INFANCY
Fabia Franco, Tatiana Sobolewska and Iryna Kozar
Franco explores the relationship between early exposure to ID-singing and language development in
two infant studies using preferential listening, parental reports and eye-tracking. The case is made for
ID-singing showing strong relationships with various aspects of the early stages of language
development.

EARLY ROOTS OF MUSIC AND LANGUAGE IN MOTHER-INFANT INTERACTION:
THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN TONAL SYNCHRONY, SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT AND
PHYSIOLOGICAL CO-REGULATION
Martine Vvan Puyvelde, Gerrit Loots and Nathalie Pattyn
Vvan Puyvelde shows that mothers and infants adapt their vocalizations to one another so that their
pitches become tonally related. Music that corresponds to the characteristics of tonal synchronized
vocal dialogues evokes physiological mother-infant co-regulation, which is essential for
psychophysiological maturation and thus supports language development.

LIVE MATERNAL SPEECH AND SONG TO PRETERM INFANTS: BENEFICIAL
EFFECTS, MATERNAL VOCAL MODULATION AND EMOTIONAL PROSODY
Manuela Filippa, Maya Gratier, Emmanuel Devouche, Didier Grandjean
Filippa reports an intervention study in which premature infants exposed to maternal vocal
intervention (MVI) showed significant decrease in critical events and increase in oxygen saturation,
both valid indicators of a better quality of life for preterm infants in the NICU. The musical
dimensions of maternal speech predicted outcomes.

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IS035
COMPLIANCE, RESISTANCE AND NEOLIBERAL VIOLENCE IN
THE 21ST CENTURY: INTERNATIONAL CRITICAL VOICES
F09. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - The psychological causes of economical crisis and its related costs for
individuals, families and society
Convenor

Presenters

Discussant

David Fryer, University of South Africa, Pretoria; University of Queensland
(Brisbane) Australia; Australian College of Applied Psychology, Brisbane (Australia)
South Africa
Carl Walker, University of Brighton, Brighton - United Kingdom
Cathy McCormack, Community activist, author and broadcaster, Glasgow - United
Kingdom
Darrin Hodgetts, Massey University, Auckland - New Zealand
David Fryer, University of South Africa, Pretoria; University of Queensland, Brisbane
(Australia); Australian College of Applied Psychology, Brisbane (Australia) - South
Africa
Saths Cooper , International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS); International
Social Science Council (ISSC); National ICSU Board at the National Research
Foundation of South Africa; University of Pretoria, Pretoria; University of
Limpopo, Sovenga - South Africa

This symposium will bring together international critical and community voices to uncover and
critique the violent subjection and re-subjectivation central to neoliberal violence around the world as
recommended by Foucault, who argued that: “the real political task in a society such as ours is to
criticize the workings of institutions that appear to be both neutral and independent, to criticize and
attack them in such a manner that the political violence that has always exercised itself obscurely
through them will be unmasked, so that one can fight against them. David Fryer (Australia) will set the
scene by arguing that ‘unemployment’ and ‘mental ill-health’ are not independent phenomena in a
cause-effect relationship but are, rather, two facets of socially constituted violence which functions to
maximize the working of the neoliberal labour market in the interests of employers and shareholders.
Darrin Hodgetts (New Zealand) will then draw upon his community research engagements with
members of the NZ precariat, including homeless people, to reveal structural violence as a feature of
everyday life. Carl Walker (England) will then draw both upon his work as convener of the European
Community Psychology Association Task Force on the consequences of fiscal austerity and also his
research on debt to describe neoliberal economies of affect and the UK debt collection industry as "a
kind of mental warfare". Cathy McCormack (Scotland), a community activist, will then describe three
decades of effective collaborative activist work with community and critical psychologists to uncover
and resist the neoliberal "war without bullets" being waged against working people and resulting in
misery, morbidity and mortality on a colossal scale. Saths Cooper (South Africa) will then respond as
Discussant to the panel’s presentations, take questions from, and consider statements by, members of
the audience about international neoliberal social violence and facilitate discussion.

DEPRIVATION, RESTRICTION AND CONSTITUTION: THE UNEMPLOYED SUBJECT
FROM A CRITICAL STANDPOINT
David Fryer
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A network of social elements, including discourses of unemployment and mental health,
simultaneously: ‘makes real’ ‘the unemployed’; visits diverse forms of social violence upon them; and
reconstitutes their subjectivity to (re)produce compliant human means of production required within
the contemporary version of the neoliberal labour market.

PSYCHOLOGY AS POLITICAL STRUGGLE: PRECARIAT CLASSES, HUMANITY,
COMPASSION AND HOPE
Darrin Hodgetts
Abstract: By ‘re-educating’ the criminalized poor to be compliant subjects for capital, individualistic
psychologies contribute to the harm many communities experience, due to structural inequalities and
social polarisation. I focus on how members of the precariat can be supported as they resist violent
subjugation by state institutions and elite interests.

A KIND OF MENTAL WARFARE’: NEOLIBERAL ECONOMIES OF AFFECT AND THE
UK DEBT COLLECTION INDUSTRY
Carl Walker
Abstract: Neoliberal social, political and economic transformations have enabled the development of
personal debt industries where degrading and violent affective relations are central to re-forming
neoliberal economic subjects, induce very particular forms of sustainable revolving debtor and
inscribe the desires of a financialised world into their psyches.

THE WAR WITHOUT BULLETS
Cathy McCormack
Abstract: Neoliberalism takes the form of a "war without bullets" waged against poor, precariously
and unemployed people and untold related misery, illness and death. I will describe over thirty years
of collaboration with community psychologists, health scientists, climate activists and others, devoted
to revealing and resisting neoliberal social violence.

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IS036
TOWARDS A BIO-PSYCHO-SOCIAL-CULTURAL MODEL OF
COMPETITION
A11. General issues and basic processes - Motivation and emotion
Convenor
Presenters
Presenters
Presenters
Presenters
Presenters
Discussant

Márta Fülöp, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest - Hungary
Alicia Salvador, University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain
Andrew J. Elliot, University of Rochester, New York - United States
Camilo Garcia, Veracruz University, Veracruz - México
Márta Fülöp, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest - Hungary
Mihály Berkics, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest – Hungary
Patricia Hawley, Texas Technical University, Lubbock - United States

It is increasingly difficult to accumulate research findings on competition into a coherent body of
knowledge. Researchers represent different disciplines from the biological sciences to social sciences,
and typically concentrate on the level of explanation that their scientific field represents. Researchers
of neurobiology do not have a systematic collaboration with cultural psychologists or educational
psychologists with personality or social psychologists. Therefore, scientific evidence is mainly
discipline-based and not integrated into a bio-psycho-social-cultural model of interpersonal
competition.
The proposed symposium brings together experts of competition with their research that represents
different aspects of competition from the biological to the cultural, from neurohormonal reactions to
the effects of social change. They study the individual e.g. the individual’s evaluative processes,
achievement goals, competitive attitudes, coping with winning and losing and personality and also
connect these to e.g. biological reactions and e.g. performance. They also investigate how culture may
shape these individual reactions. Some of the talks discuss the relationship of competition to
cooperation as well. The discussion will make an attempt to integrate these different perspectives,
levels and results into an evolving bio-psycho-social-cultural model of competition.

IMPORTANCE OF THE APPRAISAL FOR THE PSYCHOBIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO
HUMAN COMPETITION.
Alicia Salvador, Raqual Costa, Miguel Angel Serrano, Vanesa Hidalgo, Esperanza Gonzalez Bono
Psychobiological effects of competition are accepted as an example of the relationship between steroid
hormones and aggressive/dominant behavior in humans. An increasing number of studies point out the
importance of appraisal, evaluative processes and coping processes in understanding competitive
interactions in men and more recently also in women.

COMPETITION, COOPERATION, AND ACHIEVEMENT GOALS
Andrew Elliot
My talk will focus on the link between motivational dispositions toward competition and cooperation
on one hand, and the adoption of achievement goals on the other hand. Systematic links between the
two types of constructs will be overviewed, and their joint involvement in predicting achievementrelevant outcomes will be examined. Avenues for future research will be envisioned.

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PATTERNS OF COPING WITH WINNING AND LOSING
Márta Fülöp
In different studies three main patterns of coping with winning and losing emerge: the balanced, the
narcissistic-aggressive and the avoidant-giving up. However, these patterns also demonstrate cultural
and age differences. It will be discussed what may be considered universal and what culturally shaped
in coping patterns with winning and losing.

FROM COOPERATIVE TO COMPETITIVE BEHAVIOR: NEW TRENDS IN SOCIAL
INTERACTION AMONG MEXICAN CHILDREN AFTER FOUR DECADES.
Camilo García, Natanael Rivera
A series of experimental studies comparing the original 1970’s with current performance of children
of same age, with same tasks and, in same settings, showed a shift from cooperative to competitive
behaviors. The social motives choice cards, marble pull, and the cooperation board, showed higher
competition as predicted by Greenfield’s theory.

COMPETITIVE ATTITUDES AND PERSONALITY TRAITS OF SUCCESSFUL AND NONSUCCESSFUL STUDENTS IN ACADEMIC CONTESTS
Mihály Berkics, Márta Fülöp
Students taking part in academic contests and being successful or unsuccessful in them were compared
regarding their attitudes towards competition, winning, and losing, and a variety of personality traits
ranging from resilience to perfectionism. The relationship between personality traits and competitive
attitudes was also analysed.

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IS037
SKILL TRAINING WITH VIRTUAL REALITY AND VIDEO-GAME
PLATFORMS
A09. General issues and basic processes - Learning and memory
A06. General issues and basic processes - Cognitive neurosciences and neuroimaging
D14. Work and organization - Workplace learning and training
Convenor
Presenters
United

Discussant

Daniel Gopher, Technion – Institute of Technology, Haifa - Israel
Arthur Kramer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign States
Danny Dankner, ACE-Applied Cognitve Engineering, Hod Hasharon - Israel
Emauele Ruffaldi, ACE-Applied Cognitve Engineering, Hod Hasharon – Israel
Daniel Gopher, Technion – Institute of Technology, Haifa - Israel

Contemporary computer and sensor technology created new and exciting opportunities for the
development of simulators and skill trainers. In particular the application of videogame technologies
to the training of cognitive skills and multimodal virtual reality platforms for training of perceptual
motor skills. These new prospects raise challenges and dangers to the study of skill acquisition
training and transfer which are briefly summarized below. The three presentations of the symposium
will describe different aspects of the topic. They will be followed by a joint discussion.
Videogame training of cognitive skills: Development of training platforms for cognitive and
executive control skills of daily performed tasks has become a focal interest in contemporary basic
science and applied domains. It is nurtured on the one hand, by the progress in cognitive and brain
sciences and on the other hand, by the increased awareness for the role and importance of cognitive
skills in the performance of daily tasks across the life span. One appealing approach to the
development of cognitive training platforms, is by adopting and developing videogame environments.
Such games enable the development a more complex, dynamic and richer laboratory situations that are
closer to daily tasks and demands, and may thus serve as improved training and transfer environments.
Videogames and videogame like tasks may provide complex and dynamic tasks which impose high
demands and require long duration of training to master. These have not only the potential to better
simulate daily tasks and provide a controlled testing environment, but also constitute an enriched and
improved research paradigm to study and explicate aspects and dimensions of coping with task load,
attention management and executive control capabilities. For example, they are much richer and
diversified in their demands than most present laboratory tasks employed to the study cognitive
decline across the life span, or cognitive skills of different sports (basketball football, ice hockey etc.
Training platforms in multimodal virtual reality: Multimodal, immersive, virtual reality (VR)
techniques open new perspectives for perceptual-motor skill trainers. They also introduce new risks
and dangers. Training simulators for complex tasks are being used in increased frequency since the
end of the Second World War, which also marks the beginning of the technological age revolution.
With the growing complexity of systems and their operation environments, the required duration of
training and the increased costs of errors, on the job practice became difficult or impossible and
alternative training and simulation environments have been developed to enable skill acquisition and
learning. With the advance of computer technology simulators become more and more hybrid. System
dynamics, visual field of view and audition have been increasingly driven and generated by
computers. Contemporary developments in sensors and display capabilities and the exponential
increase in computation speed and storage capacity led the way to the development of multimodal
virtual environments. In these environments, the operator is immersed, experience multimodal
sensations and interacts with virtual objects including other humans (Riva 2006). Vision and audition
have been in the study and design of simulators from their inception. The new and important addition
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is the inclusion of haptics: the ability to feel and exercise force, touch, texture and kinematics. Haptic
technology is developing rapidly and haptic interfaces are now been incorporated in many virtual
worlds. It is hence a quite conservative expectation that the multimodal, virtual reality platforms will
dominate the next generation of training simulators. From the vantage points of training, motor and
cognitive sciences, this development carries with it some exciting prospects and serious challenges.

A TALE OF TWO TRAINING STRATEGIES
Arthur Kramer
Over couple of decades there has been an increasing interest in cognitive training, and in particular
training that engenders transfer effects beyond the trained tasks. Research has taken different forms
including the use of off-the-shelf video games, and commercially designed game versions of tasks. I
will discuss our approach to training, transfer and retention of new skills. It represents an integration
of Neuroscience, Cognitive Science, Human Factors, and Psychometrics in both understanding and
predicting learning and transfer of complex cognitive skills.

MULTIMODAL SYSTEMS FOR TRAINING IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS
Emanuele Ruffaldi
The technological advancements in computing and sensing capabilities is empowering researcher in
designing training systems capable of analyzing the performance level of trainee and providing
precisely timed augmented feedback. The feedback is the result of a combination of different
modalities ranging from the audio-visual to haptic feedback, depending on the training strategy. In this
talk we will present the design challenges for training system in virtual environment with an emphasis
on sport training highlighting a case study of a rowing training system.

COGNITIVE TRAINERS FOR SPORT - BASKETBALL AND ICE HOCKEY
Jacob Greenshpan Danny Dankner
The talk will describe the main aspects of developing a desktop cognitive trainers for basketball and
ice hockey. The trainers are a computer game like training platforms which capture the major
cognitive demands of the game and are practiced away from the game fields. The talk will discuss
principles, challenges and actual achievements of the developed applications.

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IS038
EXPLORING
NON-SUICIDAL
SELF-INJURY
(NSSI)
FROM
DIFFERENT
PERSPECTIVES:
INTERPERSONAL,
CLINICAL,
COGNITIVE AND BIOLOGICAL REFLECTIONS
B06. Development and education - Emotion and self
Convenor
Presenters

Penelope Hasking, Curtin University, Bentley - Australia
Glenn Melvin, Monash University, Clayton - Australia
Imke Baetens, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Lueven - Belgium
Paul Plener, University of Ulm, Ulm - Germany
Penelope Hasking, Curtin University, Bentley – Australia

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), the deliberate destruction or alteration of body tissue without
conscious suicidal intent, is a transdiagnostic behaviour that is used to cope with intense emotions and
psychological distress. Equally common among males and females, NSSI can include cutting, burning
or carving the skin and hitting or banging the self or hard objects. NSSI differs from suicidal
behaviour (including ideation and attempts) in being more prevalent, being engaged in more
frequently, typically involving non-lethal methods, and being driven by emotion regulation rather than
a desire to end life. As such the aetiology of NSSI is markedly distinct from suicidal behaviour,
necessitating a tailored approach to understanding and treating the behaviour.
This symposium will present new research findings from projects which attempt to better understand
the aetiology and treatment of NSSI from both intrapersonal and interpersonal perspectives. Data from
a longitudinal study of parent-adolescent dyads will shed light on how the family is impacted when a
young person self-injures and offer some insights for family therapy. NSSI is largely resistant to
treatment, but common among young people with depression. Predictors of NSSI outcomes among
depressed adolescents treated with either a psychosocial approach or antidepressant medication will be
presented with a view to identifying young people most at risk. Although impulsivity has been
implicated in the decision to self-injure, few have systematically explored the relationship between
different facets of impulsivity and self-injury. We will present a series of studies that explore the role
of impulsivity in NSSI, including how impulsivity might be exacerbated under stress, among young
adults who self-injure. Finally, neurobiological work in the field of NSSI is in its infancy. We will
conclude the symposium by presenting novel findings from fMRI studies in an effort to develop a
neurobiological model of NSSI.

INTERPERSONAL AND INTRAPERSONAL FACTORS SHAPING AND MAINTAINING
NSSI
Imke Baetens
NSSI is related to both child and caregiver factors which shape and maintain self-injury. In this
presentation, data from the first 3 wave longitudinal study (using both adolescent and parent data)
examining several interpersonal risk factors and consequences of NSSI will be presented. Helpful
elements for family therapy will be presented.

PREDICTORS OF NSSI AND SUICIDAL BEHAVIOUR FOLLOWING TREATMENT IN
DEPRESSED ADOLESCENTS
Glenn Melvin
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Suicidal ideation and NSSI are key markers of risk in depressed adolescents. This paper will present
the suicidal and NSSI outcomes of a sample of adolescents who received psychosocial and/or
antidepressant medication treatment for depression. Predictors of outcome will be presented in an
effort to identify those at greatest risk.

WHEN IS NSSI ASSOCIATED WITH IMPULSIVITY?
Penelope Hasking
Self-report measures implicate impulsivity in NSSI, but there is little data on how people who selfinjure cope under acute stressful situations and whether they are more impulsive when stressed. This
paper will present the results of a series of studies testing under which conditions impuslivity might be
related to NSSI.

NSSI AND THE BRAIN: TOWARDS A NEUROBIOLOGICAL UNDERSTANDING OF NSSI
Paul Plener
Although NSSI is prevalent among today’s youth, little is known about the underlying neurobiological
mechanisms. Based on our fMRI studies, we will present results about the interplay between stressors,
brain activation and pain. Different lines of research on NSSI will be combined to come up with a
neurobiological model of NSSI.

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IS039
THE IMPACT OF THE ITC GUIDELINES ON PSYCHOLOGICAL
ASSESSMENT
A03. General issues and basic processes - Psychometrics
Convenor
Presenters

United

Dragos Iliescu, University of Bucharest, Bucharest - Romania
Aletta Odendaal, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg - South Africa
Fanny Cheung, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong - Hong Kong
Ian Florance, The European Test Publisher Group (ETPG), Henley-on-Thames Kingdom
Jacques Grégoire, University of Louvain, Louvain - Belgium
Kurt Geisinger, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln - United States

This session will focus on the ITC Guidelines and their impact on various areas in the practice of
psychological assessment. The session wil begin with a review of the work of the ITC in developing
guidelines for tests and testing. It will look back at how these were developed in the past and describe
current procedures for development as well as describing those guidelines that are already developed
or currently under development. A number of existing Guidelines will then be discussed in more
detail: the Guidelines on Test Use, the Guidelines on Test Adaptation, and the Guidelines for Quality
Control. Finally, a survey among European test publishers will shed light on how test development
and publishing in Europe has been influenced by the ITC Guidelines.

THE ITC GUIDELINES ON TEST USE
Aletta Odendaal
The International Guidelines for Test Use were developed in the late 1990’s and formally launched in
2000 (Bartram, 2001). The presentation will attend to the reasons for international guidelines on test
use and a general description of the knowledge, skills, abilities and other professional characteristics
required by test users, specified in terms of assessable performance criteria. In addition, applications
of the guidelines will be discussed as general framework for test use standards and related
specifications for test user qualifications or certifications. In this regard, the ITC guidelines on test use
influenced the drafting of a clause on assessment in the Employment Equity Act in South Africa
(1998) and EFPA utilised the guidelines as a systematic framework to develop detailed standards
(Bartram, 2011), which were approved in 2007.

PRESENT AND FUTURE OF THE ITC GUIDELINES ON TEST ADAPTATION
Jacques Grégoire
A large number of psychological and educational tests are translated and adapted across languages and
cultures. Unfortunately, the quality of these adaptations is sometimes rather poor, with harmful
consequences for individuals evaluated with these tests. In order to improve the quality of adapted
tests, the International Test Commission developed guidelines on test adaptation. The guidelines fall
into four main categories: those concerned with the cultural context, those concerned with the
technicalities of instrument development and adaptation, those concerned with test administration, and
those concerned with documentation and interpretation. In this presentation, the rational underlying
the guidelines will be explained. Some limitations of the current guidelines and directions for the
development of a new version will be discussed.
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GUIDELINES FOR QUALITY CONTROL IN SCORING, TEST ANALYSIS, AND
REPORTING OF TEST SCORES
Kurt Geisinger
The ITC Quality Control Guidelines were developed to address the efficiency, and accuracy of the
scoring, analysis and reporting of test results. They can be used on their own or in conjunction with
the ITC International Guidelines for Test Use (2000). The nature of these guidelines will be discussed
throughout the presentation.

HOW THE ITC GUIDELINES AFFECT TEST DEVELOPMENT AND PUBLISHING IN
EUROPE
Ian Florance
Research carried out with the 26 key test publishing companies across Europe reports on how the ITC
guidelines have affected test development and delivery over the past few years and what developments
might affect these issues in the future and need to be reflected in guideline revisions.

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IS040
NARRATIVE MEASURES OF RELATIONAL COGNITION:
QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF TAT STORIES AND
AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL EXPRESSIVE WRITING
E02. Health and clinical intervention - Psychodiagnosis
E03. Health and clinical intervention - Personality assessment
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Sharon Rae Jenkins, University of North Texas, Denton - United States
Francesca Fantini, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Ivo Čermák, Academy of Sciences, Brno - Czech Republic
Sharon Rae Jenkins, University of North Texas, Denton - United States
Tereza Soukupová, Charles University Prague, Prague - Czech Republic
Tomáš Urbánek, Academy of Sciences, Brno - Czech Republic
Sharon Rae Jenkins, University of North Texas, Denton - United States

Carpendale and Lewis (2010) criticized current understanding of social cognitive development, saying
that too much emphasis is given to what is cognitive at the expense of what is relational. Relational
problems are a common topic of psychotherapy, and relational skills are important for maintaining
supportive social networks. Among clinical assessment instruments, the most efficient for
understanding the complexity of a person’s mental representations of relationships and other people is
the Thematic Apperception Test and similar storytelling techniques. Similarly, autobiographical
narratives such as Pennebaker’s expressive writing and stream of consciousness speech show how
people understand other people, themselves, and their relationships.
However, such stories and narratives give a wealth of data. This wealth requires a systematic approach
to organizing the data to find the most helpful information. The objective of this symposium is to
present three quantitative content analysis scoring systems that offer insight into specific kinds of
relational cognition. Presenters will discuss research data supporting the validity of their systems for
understanding their participants’ relational experience and behavior. Participants include priesthood
candidates, latency-age children, and college students who were instructed to write or talk freely about
a stressful experience: ending a romantic relationship. Methodological issues discussed include the
applicability to adults of a scoring system designed for children; a common scientific criticism of
TATs, that storytellers who wish to appear “good” (healthy) can influence the test’s results; and the
adaptation process for story scoring manuals applied to less coherent personal narratives. The
organizer will begin the session with a paper describing the scientific status and clinical usefulness of
these methods. As discussant, she will reflect on theory, clinical applications, and future research
needed on these systems.

THE SCIENTIFIC STATUS AND CLINICAL USEFULNESS OF THEMATIC
APPERCEPTIVE TECHNIQUES (TATS)
Sharon Rae Jenkins
Our psychometric theories are made for tests of ability and self-rating scales of symptoms, traits, or
behaviors that ask patients to make simple choices. TATs are not like that; instead of a clear, limited
response structure, they sample thoughts that the patient structures for clinicians to understand. How
do we join scientific and clinical views?
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EVALUATION OF SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL SKILLS OF PRIESTHOOD CANDIDATES
THROUGH THE TAT
Tereza Soukupová, Petr Goldmann
TAT (Teglasi’s Empathy system) and Rorschach were used to evaluate social and emotional skills of
50 men who applied to study theology in a Roman Catholic seminary. The goal was to evaluate
participants´ emotional resources, measure of autonomy, and capability of empathy. The results are
discussed with regard to the clinical usability of TAT.

EXPLORING CHILDREN’S DEFENSIVENESS TO THE TELL ME A STORY TEST
(TEMAS)
Francesca Fantini, Erica Dell’Acqua, Aglaia Banis, Filippo Aschieri
This study examined defensiveness in 40 Italian children aged 9-10 to the TEMAS. Children were
randomly assigned to fake-good and control conditions. The defensive attitude of the fake-good group
reduced verbalization of negative emotions, but most cognitive indicators and personality function
scores did not differentiate the two groups.

APPLYING INTERPERSONAL DECENTERING TAT SCORING TO EXPRESSIVE
WRITING AND STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS SPEECH
Sharon Rae Jenkins
Content analysis TAT scoring systems used in research on human motivation have been applied to
various other autobiographical materials. Can the same be done with clinical systems? This
presentation discusses the process of adapting the Interpersonal Decentering scoring manual designed
for stories to written expressive writing and stream of consciousness speech.

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IS041
THE BIG PICTURE OF TAT STORY ANALYSIS: FOUR
COMPREHENSIVE SYSTEMATIC APPROACHES
E02. Health and clinical intervention - Psychodiagnosis
E03. Health and clinical intervention - Personality assessment
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Sharon Rae Jenkins, University of North Texas, Denton - United States
Alessandro Antonio Scaduto, University of São Paulo, São Paulo - Brazil
Elisa Venturini, University of Paris Descartes Sorbonne, Paris - France
Leila Salomão de La Plata Cury Tardivo, University of São Paulo, São Paulo - Brazil
Sarah Vibert , University of Paris Descartes Sorbonne, Paris - France
Sharon Rae Jenkins, University of North Texas, Denton - United States
Sharon Rae Jenkins, University of North Texas, Denton - United States

Storytelling about pictures has long been an important clinical assessment technique because it yields
much rich information about many aspects of patients’ personalities and problems, especially aspects
that are unique to that patient. Interpreting this rich information to understand a patient well requires
years of training and often relies on complex theories. Systematic approaches to comprehensive
analysis of stories have been developed to make training more efficient and to help clinicians organize
and apply this information effectively. These approaches are based on comprehensive theories that
may apply to many kinds of data, especially Rorschach and TATs.
The objective of this symposium is to present four comprehensive theory-based approaches to
understanding a patient's problems by analyzing TAT stories. Each presenter will describe a different
comprehensive approach to story analysis and show how it applies to a specific population. Patient
populations included women with eating disorders, juvenile offenders, and women with gynecological
cancers; one paper studied randomly selected nonpatient Brazilians. The organizer will begin the
session by describing the challenges faced by those who create and use these methods and the benefits
to be gained by using them well. As discussant, she will reflect on clinical applications and future
research needed with these systems.

THE SEDUCTIVE THEORETICAL RICHNESS AND SCIENTIFIC CHALLENGES OF
THEMATIC APPERCEPTIVE TECHNIQUES (TATS)
Sharon Rae Jenkins
The history of TATs began with immersion in storytellers’ life-worlds, a fertile ground for theory.
Early clinical approaches were exhaustive efforts to classify everything interesting in stories. What
can be lost in this seduction is a sense of purpose, like a therapist who is so drawn into a patient’s
sessions that no therapeutic change occurs.

ASSESSING DEFENSIVE BEHAVIOR DIVERSITY AMONG ADOLESCENTS WITH
EATING DISORDERS: A QUANTITATIVE APPROACH USING TAT
Sarah Vibert, Caroline Hurvey
Shentoub and collaborators propose quantitative and qualitative interpretation of narratives in a
psychoanalytic view and theory of the “TAT process” in subjects’ manifest narratives. The discourse
analysis sheet reveals subjects’ defense mechanisms and psychic behavior in the construction of
narratives by 50 adolescent female inpatients.
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A PSYCHODYNAMIC INVESTIGATION OF THE PERSONALITY OF JUVENILE
OFFENDERS
Leila Salomão de La Plata Cury Tardivo, Maria Cecilia Vilhena, Junior Deconti
Deprivation, negligence and victimization are frequent among Brazilian juvenile offenders. In a
psychodynamic view, this study compared 30 juvenile offenders and a control group on quantitative
scores from Leopold Bellak’s Blank: their view of themselves and the world, self-image, object
relations, defense mechanisms, superego and ego integrity.

THE USING AND THE INTEREST OF TATS IN A FRENCH STUDY ABOUT SEXUALITY
OF PATIENTS AFFECTED BY GYNECOLOGIC CANCERS
Elisa Venturini, Marjorie Roques
The anatomical and physiological changes of treatment for gynecologic cancers may undermine
representations of the woman’s body, and induce her to question her femininity, ideas of motherhood,
and body aesthetic. Qualitative TAT test-retest during and after treatments of 15 women in France
showed the impact of the treatments on their sexuality.

THE THEMATIC APPERCEPTION TEST (TAT) IN ADULTS: BRAZILIAN NORMATIVE
DATA FOR THE MORVALIAN SYSTEM
A. Scaduto, V. Barbieri, M. A. Santos
This project developed norms for the TAT (Morvalian System) in adults from a non-clinical stratified
sample (gender, social-economical level, schooling and age) in the Brazilian state of São Paulo with N
= 96 randomly selected persons and 20 TAT cards. Results suggest indicators related to intrinsic card
properties and social-demographic variables.

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IS042
SELF-CONTROL SUCCESS AND FAILURE. IMPLICATIONS FOR
UNDERSTANDING AND CHANGING SELF-DEFEATING BEHAVIOR
A11. General issues and basic processes - Motivation and emotion
Convenors
Presenters
Medical

Catalina Kopetz, Wayne State University, Detroit - United States
Reinout Wiers, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam - Netherlands
Alexis Matusiewicz, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and University of Michigan
School, Ann Arbor - United States
Catalina Kopetz, Wayne State University, Detroit - United States
Edward Orehek, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh - United States
Reinout Wiers, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam - Netherlands
Wilhelm Hofmann, University of Cologne, Cologne – Germany

Self-control failure is often invoked to understand self-defeating behaviors such as extreme risk
taking, addiction, self-harm, etc. However, what may appear as a self-control failure may actually
represent peoples’ strategic goal pursuit. The current symposium examines these two sides of selfcontrol and explores the cognitive and motivational factors underlying self-control success and failure
and their implications for self-defeating behavior. Specifically, we will discuss 1) how situational and
social factors may result in self-control conflicts with uneven self-control succes; 2) engagement in
self-defeating behavior (self-harm and risk behavior) as goal-directed behavior rather than self-control
failure; 3) potential strategies and mechanisms of change in self-control.

SELF-CONTROL SUCCESSES AND FAILURES IN EVERYDAY LIFE
Wilhelm Hofmann
An experience sampling study was conducted to investigate self-control succes and failure.
Participants furnished reports of desire episodes and completed personality measures of BIS/BAS, trait
self-control, perfectionism, and psychological entitlement. Results suggest that desires are frequent,
strong, and often marked by conflict wich in turn elicits resistance with uneven success.

RISK TAKING AS MOTIVATED ACTION
Catalina Kopetz
Four studies tested the notion that risk taking represents a means to people’s current goals rather than a
self-regulatory/self-control failure. The results show that 1) risk taking increases when it is perceived
to be instrumental to individuals’ active goals; 2) the presence of cognitive resources augments this
effect; 3) the presence of alternative means relevant to current goal reduces this effect.

DISTRESS AND RISK BEHAVIOR IN BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER: A
SELF-REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE
Alexis Matusiewicz
Two studies investigated risk taking as strategic response to meet emotion regulation goals in
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) participants. Results from both studies revealed that women
with BPD showed increased risk behavior under distress as a function of 1) cognitive resources, 2)
intensity of emotion regulation goals and self-efficacy for emotion regulation.
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WILLINGNESS TO BECOME A MARTYR AS A GOAL DIRECTED BEHAVIOR
Edward Orehek
We explored willingness to become a martyr as a function of self-contrual. The results show that
interdependent self-construals, which reflect connection to others and the ability to extend oneself
through time and space, attenuate death anxiety and induce a greater willingness to become a martyr.
These results support martyrdom as a behavior enacted to fulfill individual’s needs for significance.

OVERCOMING
SELF-CONTROL
FAILURE
THROUGH
COGNITIVE
BIAS
MODIFICATION
Reinout Wiers
Self-control dilemmas and failure can be overcome through cognitive bias modification, which has
shown promising results in a clinical setting (attentional re-training Schoenmakers et al., 2010;
approach-bias re-training, Wiers et al., 2011; Eberl et al., 2013). I will here present new data on
internet-based cognitive bias modification for alcohol use, smoking, and overeating.

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IS043
TRAUMA-FOCUSED COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY (TFCBT): TREATMENT DEVELOPMENT AND INTERNATIONAL
DISSEMINATION
E05. Health and clinical intervention - Evidence-based psychotherapies
Convenor
States
Presenters

Discussant
States

Anthony P. Mannarino, Drexel University College of Medicine, Pittsburgh - United
Benjamin Saunders, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston - United States
Judith A. Cohen, Drexel University College of Medicine, Pittsburgh - United States
Laura Murray, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore - United States
Lutz Goldbeck, University of Ulm, Ulm – Germany
Anthony P. Mannarino, Drexel University College of Medicine, Pittsburgh - United

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) is an evidence-based treatment that has
been evaluated and refined during the past 25 years to help children and adolescents recover after
trauma. TF-CBT is a structured, short-term treatment model that effectively improves a range of
trauma-related outcomes in 8-25 sessions with the child/adolescent and caregiver. Although TF-CBT
is highly effective at improving youth posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and diagnosis.
TF-CBT also effectively addresses many other trauma impacts, including depressive and anxiety
symptoms, cognitive distortions about the trauma, and behavioral problems, as well as improving the
participating caregiver’s personal distress about the child’s traumatic experience, effective parenting
skills, and supportive interactions with the child. While TF-CBT was originally developed to address
the needs of children who experienced sexual abuse, over the past 15 years it has been used and
studied for many other populations of traumatized youth, including those exposed to traumatic loss,
domestic violence, and large scale disasters. Research now documents that TF-CBT is effective for
diverse, multiple and complex trauma experiences, for youth of different developmental levels, and
across different cultures.
The objectives of the symposium are to describe the development of TF-CBT for youth with complex
trauma presentations, international studies of its efficacy, and TF-CBT dissemination projects in the
U.S.A. and around the world.

TF-CBT FOR COMPLEX TRAUMA
Judith A. Cohen
This presentation describes practical strategies for implementing TF-CBT for youth with complex
trauma, including dedicating more time to stabilization skills, implementing the Safety component
early in treatment, titrating gradual exposure more slowly as needed by individual youth, and
incorporating unifying trauma themes throughout treatment.

WEB-BASED TF-CBT RESOURCES
Benjamin Saunders
Online TF-CBT learning resources and evaluation data will be presented. TF-CBTWeb is a 10-hour
course with 200,000 registered users. CTGWeb teaches how to apply TF-CBT to cases of child
traumatic grief. TF-CBTConsult is an online consultation resource. How best to use these resources in
training and implementation projects will be discussed.
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A RANDOMIZED CONTROL TRIAL OF TF-CBT IN ZAMBIA
Laura Murray
A randomized controlled trial of TF-CBT was conducted by lay counselors in five community settings
in Lusaka. There was a statistically significant decrease from baseline to post-assessment in trauma
and functional impairment scores in the TF-CBT group compared to the wait-list group. TF-CBT was
an effective treatment for youth in Zambia.

EFFECTIVENESS OF TRAUMA-FOCUSED COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY (TFCBT) IN GERMAN CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH CLINICS
Lutz Goldbeck
At eight German child mental health clinics, 150 patients with PTSD ages 7-16 years will be enrolled.
Half of them will be randomly assigned to TF-CBT and the other half to a wait-list. Therapists receive
intensive training and supervision. By May 2014,122 patients have been recruited. Preliminary
outcome data of the study will be discussed.

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IS044
THE ADAPTATION OF IMMIGRANT CHILDREN AND YOUTH
FROM DIFFERENT ETHNICITIES AND HOST COUNTRIES: WHO
SUCCEEDS AND WHY?
C07. Culture and society - Race and ethnicity
Convenor
Presenters

Frosso Motti-Stefanidi, University of Athens, Athens - Greece
Birgit Leyendecker, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum - Germany
Dagmar Strohmeier, University of Applied Sciences, Linz - Austria
Natasha Cabrera, University of Maryland, College Park - Austria
Peter F. Titzmann, University of Zurich, Zurich – Switzerland

Immigrant children and youth comprise a sizable and integral part of contemporary societies. Their
successful adaptation becomes a high-stakes issue for them and for society. However, they are faced
with developmental and acculturative challenges, as well as with contextual stresssors, such as poverty
and discrimination, that place strain on the adaptation process (García-Coll& Marks, 2012).In spite of
the challenges they face, most of them adapt well in their new countries. However, significant
variability has been observed in their adaptation depending on children’s age
andethnicity,developmental domain (Marks et al., 2014), and host country (e.g., Sam et al., 2008).To
help promote their positive adaptation it is crucial to understand who among immigrant children and
youth do well with respect to these challenges, concurrently and over time, and why. This symposium
includes presentations from 5 different countries and two continents (Europe and USA), focusing on 5
different ethnic groups, which address this issue. Their focus is on adaptation with respect to core
developmental and acculturative tasks (e.g. academic achievement, peer relations,self regulation),
and/or psychological well-being(self-esteem) and mental health (psychological symptoms).The main
objectives of the symposium are to examine whether and how, first, intergroup relations and
acculturative processes and, second, family functioning and individual attributes contribute to and/or
explain positive adaptation and psychological well-being among immigrant children and
youth.Together, these presentations suggest that to understand who among them succeeds and why,
one has to integrate the developmental, acculturative and social psychological perspectives to the
issue, taking into account that, like all youth, they are developing organisms, but that, unlike
nonimmigrants, they have to face some unique ecological circumstances, such as their immigrant
status and culture.

ETHNIC FRIENDSHIP HOMOPHILY AND ITS PREDICTORS
Peter F. Titzmann
Ethnic friendship homophily means that immigrants predominantly form intra-ethnic friendships. The
research presented shows that an acculturation, an intergroup, a developmental, and a context
perspective have to be combined to better understand inter-individual variation in this phenomenon
and to break ethnic friendship boundaries.

MULTI-ETHNIC
IDENTITY
AND
ACCULTURATION
ORIENTATIONS
AS
RESILIENCIES AGAINST THE ADVERSE EFFECTS OF DISCRIMINATION
EXPERIENCES FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH AMONG TURKISH IMMIGRANT
YOUTH
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Dagmar Strohmeier & Aysun Dogan, Ege
The link between discrimination and psychological health among immigrant youth (282 Turkish
immigrants) was examined, in connection with ethnic identity and acculturation orientations.
Discrimination experienced by teachers had the most adverse effects predicting a lowerintegration and
assimilation orientation and a higher separation orientation.

FAMILY AND INDIVIDUAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH TURKISH IMMIGRANT
AND GERMAN CHILDREN’S AND ADOLESCENTS’MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING
Birgit Leyendecker, Julia Jäkel, Alexandru Agache, & Uwe Wernekink
We examined family and individual factors associated with the socio-emotional well-being, strengths
and difficulties of Turkish immigrant children and adolescents in comparison with their German peers
(n= 480). Findings suggest that factors associated with mental health and well-being are both crossculturally comparable and culturally specific.

LATINO IMMIGRANT MOTHERS’ AND FATHERS’ GOALS AND VALUES:
SUPPORTING CHILDREN’S SELF-REGULATION AND SOCIAL COMPETENCE
Natasha Cabrera
Although Latinos are the largest immigrant ethnic group in the U.S., we know little about how
theysocialize their children. The key question I address is whether and how the quality of mother-child
and father-child relationship mediate the association between parents’ goals and values and children’s
social and regulatory behaviors?

RISKS AND RESOURCES FOR IMMIGRANT ADOLESCENTS' ADAPTATION DURING A
PERIOD OF ECONOMIC DOWNTURN
Frosso Motti-Stefanidi & Jens B. Asendorpf
The role of potential risks (social status, classroom context) and resources (parental school
involvement, self-efficacy beliefs) for the adaptation of two cohorts (in middle school before and
during the Greek economic crisis) of immigrant and nonimmigrant youth (N=2000) was examined.
Results confirm the ordinary magic of normative human resources.

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IS045
PROSOCIAL APPLIED RESEARCH: TRANSFERABILITY AND
SOCIAL INNOVATION
B05. Development and education - Moral development and prosocial behavior
D02. Work and organization - Leadership and entrepreneurship
D03. Work and organization - Teams performance
D04. Work and organization - Well-being at work
D05. Work and organization - Organizational behavior
D08. Work and organization - Innovation management
D09. Work and organization - Sustainable development and corporate social responsibility
D14. Work and organization - Workplace learning and training
Convenors
Presenters

Pilar Escotorin Soza, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona - Spain
Robert Roche Olivar, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona - Spain
Andrej Rajsky, University of Trnava, Trnava - Slovakia
Juan José Martí Noguera, University Antonio Nariño, Bogotá - Colombia
Maria Gerbino, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Mauro Cozzolino, University of Salerno, Salerno - Italy
Pilar Escotorin Soza, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona – Spain

The term "prosocial behavior" has gained a strong presence in the vocabulary and also in the scientific
field since the 70's. Throughout the time, the studies on prosocial behavior have gained a place not
only in the psychological area, but also in other disciplines. However, as highlighted by a recent study
conducted by the LIPA (i.e., Applied Prosocial Research Laboratory of the Faculty of Psychology,
Autonomous University of Barcelona) we have found a great interest of the scientific community for
deepening the research on prosocial behavior, whereas there is less involvement in applied research,
that is, on programs entirely designed to enhance prosocial behaviors across the life span and in
different contexts and cultures (Escotorin, 2013).
Indeed, as posited by Massey and Barreras (2013): “research has the potential to play a role in social
and political change or is useful as a tool for advocacy or activism”.
Throughout its history, LIPA has been part of eleven European transference programs for promoting
applied prosociality. From our experience in intervention programs related with the promotion of
prosocial behaviors, there are still very few links between the results of the research and public
policies. This Symposium proposes to create a dialogue between the research on prosocial behavior
and its applications in the social context, as well as on according ways to inform public policies and
generate social dialogue through our outreach activities and specific proposals for public action.
“Prosocial Applied Research: Transferability and social innovation” is a symposium which has
the following main objectives:
Show the uniqueness of programs aimed at the promotion of prosociality in very different cultural
and social environments.
Generate a dialogue between experts on the applicability of intervention programs on prosociality
(as well as social responsibility through prosociality) in different social environments.
Discuss findings about the social impact of these programs and their evaluation (i.e., impact
validity).
Discuss the benefits of social transferability in areas not only exclusively related with educational
formal settings but also with other organizational and social contexts.
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EUROPEAN PROJECT SPRING (ALFA): PROSOCIAL INTERVENTIONS TO GENERATE
EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATES IN LATIN AMERICA ACCESSING THE
LABOR MARKET
Pilar Escotorin Soza, Conrad Izquierdo, Marc Brundelius
The European project SPRING (Social responsibility through PRosociality based INterventions to
Generate equal opportunities) is being implemented in six universities in Latin America. The purpose
of SPRING is to provide equal access to opportunities on the labor market for poor or otherwise
socially excluded university graduates in Latin America. In SPRING, universities undertake a process
of modifying the syllabus of specific courses by incorporating methodologies which help individuals
to create empathetic, collaborative and inclusive interpersonal relations at university as well as at the
future work place. Second, SPRING promotes an inter- and intra-organizational dialogue, applying the
concept of prosocial responsibility and empowering universities as territorial social agents, generating
relations of trust with their stakeholders.
Prosocial relations between students coming from a socially disadvantaged background, university
lecturers as well as employers can produce positive changes regarding their respective thoughts,
feelings and actions, and regarding the patterns of interaction and organizational culture of universities
and employers.
The SPRING project bases its proposal on a study of the state of the art (Gamboa and Avendaño,
2013) and 18 Focus Group conducted in 6 countries. These results reaffirm why it is necessary to
make curricular innovation from the point of view of prosociality and why it is relevant to generate
programs of prosocial applied research at the workplace.
The intervention model is based on Participatory Action Research. Starting from an inductive-dialogue
oriented approach, the complex concept of prosocial responsibility is being elaborated on. In parallel,
the groups are equipped with instruments to collect information during the different stages of the
change process. The educational and organizational dimensions of the intervention are being analyzed
both quantitatively and qualitatively.
Given its innovative design and the intrinsic interest pursued by the project, the description of the six
generated models of participation is suggested. It is also discussed how each model responds to the
local conditions of its implementation, contributing a cross section view of how the issues dealt with
in SPRING can be tackled from a prosocial responsibility point of view.

PROSOCIAL EDUCATION PROJECT IMPLEMENTED IN THE SLOVAK EDUCATIONAL
SYSTEM
Andrej Rajsky – Ivan Podomanicky– Martin Brestovansky
During the reform of state educational system in Slovakia at the beginning of 90's the mode of
alternation between two compulsory optional subjects – religious education / ethical education – was
decided to be undertaken. The subject Ethical education was introduced to school praxis in 1993, with
content and didactics based on Roche Olivar's prosocial education concept. Five slovak universities
(Trnava, Bratislava, Nitra, Banská Bystrica, Prešov) offer academic programmes for ethical education
teacher trainings and focus on research in prosocial and moral education. During twenty years approx.
four thousand graduates were educated who actively perform Ethical education at 90% of all slovak
elementary and secondary schools. There are various investigations focused on reflection, evaluation,
and actualization of the programme from the date of subject introducing till now. Our paper discuss
some partial findings of the actual research at Trnava University aimed to validate and prove the
Ethical education effects on positive changes in pupil's prosocial reasoning and behavior.

UNIVERSITY SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR
Juan José Martí, Manuel Martí, and Gonzalo Almerich
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Social Responsibility at the University has been conceptually developed over the twentieth century
from different perspectives and driven in this current century. The aim of this research was to identify
the psychological variables that influence in prosocial behavior. Human values and empathy were
associated in the self-attribution of socially responsible behaviors. The research design was a
crosscutting survey, based on a non-probabilistic and accidental sampling. The sample consisted of
861 students of Latin American public and private universities in Spain, Chile, Colombia and Peru.
The study is pioneer in the evaluation of the three constructs as in the procedure, which was an online
platform used in order to collect the questionnaires responses. This is the first study conducted with
college students from different Latin American countries where the self-attribution of social
responsibility, empathy and values were evaluated. The results indicate that college students show a
high frequency of socially responsible behaviors but no more prosocial intentionality thereof. Also, the
results show the values and empathic variables that help to promote the development of socially
responsible behaviors in university students. Domains as Tradition, Conformity and Benevolence,
together with the cognitive empathy scale of "Perspective Taking", predict these high frequency social
responsibility behaviors and respect for shared spaces, coexistence and civic and academic
responsibility, among others. This research provides insights into the psychological variables that will
affect being socially responsible, enabling to address from the University the training impact of well
qualified professionals and highly regarded for his duty to society. The aim of this presentation is to
contribute to the discussion about contents and methods leading to the successful transfer of
prosociality into the practice at Universities.

POSITIVE EFFECTS OF A SCHOOL-BASED INTERVENTION FOR PROMOTING
PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR IN ITALIAN ADOLESCENTS: WHO BENEFITS MOST?
Maria Gerbino, Bernadette Paula Luengo Kanacri, Gian Vittorio Caprara, Concetta Pastorelli,
Antonio Zuffianò
Prosocial behaviors (i.e., voluntary actions intended to benefit others by helping, caring, sharing;
Eisenberg, Spinrad, & Knafo, 2014) are considered integral to intervention goals that seek to promote
successful youth development. In effect, as highlighted by a good amount of empirical research, the
benefits of helping others extend throughout development by bringing long-term positive outcomes
into adulthood (see Carlo, Crockett, Randall, & Roesch, 2007). Within the wider framework of the
Positive Youth Development (Lerner et al., 2005), the specific theoretical rationale underlying our
intervention stems from the integration of various research traditions related to personality and social
development, which address the personal roots of prosocial behaviors. The new school-based
intervention, called Promoting Prosocial and Emotional Skills to Counteract Externalizing Problems in
Adolescence (Italian acronym CEPIDEA), is unique in that it is entirely designed to promote prosocial
behaviors and includes the promotion of four main components as its main determinants: (a) prosocial
values; (b) emotion regulation skills; (c) perspective-taking skills; and (d) interpersonalcommunication skills. Whereas recent findings have attested the positive effects of the CEPIDEA
program in increasing adolescents’ prosocial behavior and academic achievement, and in
counteracting physical aggression among early adolescents (Caprara et al., 2014), the present study
aims to extend the assessment of CEPIDEA intervention, by examining whether adolescents’
personality profiles moderates the long-term (follow-up at 18 months) effects of CEPIDEA on
prosocial and aggressive behaviors.
The intervention took place at two middle schools located in Genzano, near Rome. The intervention
group included 151 students (72 females; Mage= 12.4) and the control group included 140 students (78
females; Mage= 12.6). Cluster analysis identified four adolescents’ personality profiles: resilients,
vulnerables, overcontrollers and undercontrollers. The analysis of covariance revealed a moderating
effect of personality profiles on interventions effects. In particular, students with undercontrolled
profiles benefited more from the intervention in terms of increase in prosocial behaviors and decrease
in aggressive behavior. Thus, the intervention appears to make promising contributions to promoting
prosocial behaviors and in counteracting aggressive behaviors especially in those adolescents who are
more at risk of maladjustment.
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THE CREATIVE BREAK-OUT METHODOLOGY TO PROMOTE PROSOCIAL
BEHAVIORS IN THE SCHOOL CONTEXT: THE MOST PROJECT EXPERIENCE (SCFF)
Mauro Cozzolino, Giovanna Celia, Margherita Baione
The Creative break out is a methodological approach and a practical tool that enhances good
communication and improve relationships within different types of relational contexts, increasing selfawareness and prosocial attitudes. The tool has been developed and implemented within the EUfunded project MOST (Motivation to study) born thanks to the collaboration among different
European organizations with the aim to contrast school-drop out increasing pupils’ motivation to
study. In particular, an innovative training model for teachers has been developed in order to improve
teachers’ competence and skills to strengthen pupils’ motivation to study, within an approach based on
the promotion of prosocial behaviors and attitudes within the school context.
The Creative break out technique is one of the methods that are part of the didactical kit for teachers
developed within MOST project, but it can be applied to different relational contexts with the aim to
help individuals learn how to use communication strategies and relational styles to increase their sense
of belonging to that contest and to promote effective communication, prosocial behaviors and good
relations.
The method, whose theoretical background can be identified in the constructivism and the social
cognitive psychology, is based on the assumptions that everyone perceives the reality through their
personal characteristics and experiences, and that there is a mutual influence between perceptions
(about ourselves, the others and the environment) and our typical relational style. Therefore, the one
and only “reality” does not exist. On the contrary, there are common mechanisms that come from
cognitive needs of our mind, such us functional fixedness, as well as typical relational styles that can
deeply affect interpersonal relationships creating conflicts and relational difficulties.
The intervention is focused on the development of self-awareness about typical characteristics of our
mind when we are in relationship with someone else, providing strategies that can enable to
overcome the typical traps of our mind-functions processes and to enhance social skills and
prosociality. Facilitating the awareness about how we think in regard to others, how we construct
judgments and stereotypes, or how we see emotionally other people, means to promote a change in
typical relational styles that will affect relationships improving prosociality and wellbeing.

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IS046
SCHOOL-BASED TREATMENT WITH CULTURALLY DIVERSE
CHILDREN
C02. Culture and society - Family systems and processes
C07. Culture and society - Race and ethnicity
C18. Culture and Society - School setting
Convenor
Presenters

Caroline "CC" Clauss-Ehlers, Rutgers University, New Brunswick - United States
Alina Camacho-Gingerich, St. John’s University, New York - United States
Caroline "CC" Clauss-Ehlers, Rutgers University, New Brunswick - United States
Elizabeth Jensen, The College of New Jersey, Ewing Township - United States
Rafael Art. Javier, St. John’s University, New York - United States

The purpose of this invited symposium is to present an overview of school-based treatment
approaches with culturally diverse children. While the perspective presented is largely U.S.-based,
international implications are also considered. Based in part on recent contributions to the Handbook
of Culturally Responsive School Mental Health: Advancing Research, Training, Practice, and Policy
(Clauss-Ehlers, Serpell, & Weist, 2013), and contributions to the book Community Planning to Foster
Resilience in Children (Clauss-Ehlers & Weist, 2004), symposium presentations reflect key themes in
the advancement of culturally responsive school mental health. Presentations aim to contribute to
current knowledge about school-based intervention programs that promote positive outcomes among
diverse youth. In addition, our focus on diverse youth challenges the assumption that child
development is a similar process for all children. Rather, panel presentations demonstrate the
wonderful variability in child development and underscore the impact of culture, race, gender,
ethnicity, ability, religion, language, customs, and other variables on resilience and developmental
trajectories. Participant learning is encouraged through the following objectives: 1) to better
understand aspects of ethnic and racial identity development among adolescents; 2) to better
understand the role of school personnel in the promotion of positive youth outcomes; 3) to better
understand resilience within a cross-cultural context; and 4) to better understand implications of
research, policy, and practice for the advancement of the field. Each objective includes practice
considerations.

THE RACIAL/ETHNIC IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT OF DIVERSE ADOLESCENTS:
IMPLICATIONS FOR SCHOOL-BASED INTERVENTIONS
Caroline S. Clauss-Ehlers
This presentation starts off the panel by providing an overview of key terms. Based on the chapter The
Racial/Ethnic Identity Development of Tomorrow’s Adolescents included in the Handbook of School
Mental Health, the salience of race and ethnicity for diverse adolescents is presented. Implications for
working with diverse youth in school settings are discussed.

TRANSFORMATIVE ROLES FOR SCHOOL PERSONNEL
Elizabeth Jensen
This presentation focuses on the evolving role of school personnel and efforts to promote positive
youth outcomes. Based on the chapter From Guidance to School Counseling: New Models in School
Mental Health included in the Handbook of School Mental Health, the many ways that school
personnel can effectively engage youth and their families is presented.
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ASSESSING RESILIENCE IN A MULTICULTURAL CONTEXT: A LOOK AT THE
IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE
Alina Camacho-Gingerich
This presentation will address the relevant issues related to the definition and assessment of resilience
and risk factors within the immigration experience of Latino immigrants. In this context we will
address the problem of defining the Latino individual, issues of resilience in general and specifically
with Latinos, protective factors in the Latino context, and general recommendations. The presentation
will include a discussion of how cultural influences interact with normal developmental pathways
within the context of the immigration experience to give rise to new self definition as an immigrant
Latino.

STATUS OF RESEARCH, PRACTICE, AND POLICY: NEXT STEPS AND FUTURE PLANS
Rafael Art. Javier
This concluding presentation builds on previous discussion. It focuses on exploring the status of
research and practice for school-based intervention and treatment with culturally diverse youth. The
presentation provides an overview of the state of the field from both a US domestic and international
perspective. Implications for research and practice moving forward are presented.
References
Clauss-Ehlers, C.S., Serpell, Z., & Weist, M.D. (2013). Handbook of culturally responsive school
mental health: Advancing research, training, practice, and policy. New York, NY: Springer.
Clauss-Ehlers, C.S., & Weist, M.D. (Eds., 2004). Community planning to foster resilience in children.
New York, NY: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

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IS047
CHILDREN’S PROSOCIAL
ALTRUISTIC PUNISHMENT

BEHAVIOR

AND

THE

ROLE

OF

B05. Development and education - Moral development and prosocial behaviour
Convenor
Presenters

Liqi Zhu, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing - China
Jing Li, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing - China
Márta Fülöp, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest - Hungary
Michaela Gummerum, University of Plymouth, Plymouth - United Kingdom
Pamela Maras, University of Greenwich, London - United Kingdom

Prosocial behavior, voluntary behavior intended to benefit another, is of obvious importance to the
quality of interactions between individuals and among groups. Cross-cultural research has indicated
that prosocial behaviors in early childhood predicts positive developmental outcomes for children..
Cooperation produces mutually beneficial outcomes yet is costly for an individual. Why would an
individual be willing to perform costly cooperative behavior that benefits another individual? One
alternative explanation for cooperation in human large groups is systems of rewards or punishments
(Oliver, 1980; Sigmund, Hauert, & Nowak, 2001).
Some of the most fundamental questions concerning prosocial behavior and altruistic punishment are
still needed to be investigated. This symposium is composed of four studies conducted in Hungary, the
UK and China, respectively. The common focus of these studies is on children’s prosocial behaviors
and the role of altruistic punishment. This symposium focuses on children’s prosocial behavior and
altruistic punishment to discuss the following issues: 1) Primary school children’s understanding of
cooperation; 2) the relationship in prosocial behavior, social identity and academic competence in
three countries; 3)the factors affecting children’s, adolescents’, and adults’ altruistic punishment; 4)
the effect of punishment on cooperation in children with high-functioning autism.

PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN’S UNDERSTANDING OF COOPERATION
Márta Fülöp, Nóra Sebestyén, Mónika Sándor
The present study aimed at studying 8-9 years old primary school children’s (n=58) comprehension of
cooperation with two different methods (free associations and drawings). The results show that
children mainly interpret cooperation as working together in a team, helping each other, being friends
and they attach positive emotions as joy and love to it.

SOCIAL IDENTITY, ADOLESCENTS ACADEMIC COMPETENCE AND PROSOCIAL
BEHAVIOUR IN CHINA, FRANCE AND THE UNITED KINGDOM
Pamela Maras, Amy Moon, Nicole Gridley, Taveeshi Gupta
Across the three countries students’ self-reported pro-social behaviour was shown to positively relate
to self-reported identity with school, peers and family, in addition to greater academic competence,
academic effort and academic importance. In comparison antisocial behaviour was shown to have a
negative relationship with these outcomes.

THE DEVELOPMENT OF ALTRUISTIC PUNISHMENT
Michaela Gummerum, Belen Lopez-Perez, Lotte van Dillen, Erik van Dijk
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People’s interpersonal behavior is regulated by social and moral norms, and violations of these norms
are often met with punishment. This project investigated the factors affecting children’s, adolescents’,
and adults’ punishment of violators who violated prosocial and fairness norms by combining research
in developmental psychology and experimental economics.

DOES PUNISHMENT PROMOTE COOPERATION IN CHILDREN WITH HIGHFUNCTIONING AUTISM
Jing Li, Liqi Zhu
This study examined whether punishment could promote cooperation in children with highfunctioning autism (HFA) and matched typically developing (TD) children. It was found that
punishment promoted cooperation in prisoner’s dilemma game in TD children but not HFA children,
and punishment was costly for both HFA and TD children.

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IS048
SELF-ENHANCEMENT/SELF-ESTEEM AND MODESTY ACROSS
CULTURES
C18. Culture and society - Other
Convenor
Presenters

Susumu Yamaguchi, University of Tokyo, Tokyo - Japan
Ai Fukuzawa, University of Tokyo, Tokyo - Japan
Chihiro Kobayashi, Kobe College, Hyogo-ken - Japan
Huajian Cai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing - China
Jenny Kurman, University of Haifa, Haifa - Israel
Susumu Yamaguchi, University of Tokyo, Tokyo – Japan

There have been controversies over East Asians’ self-enhancement motivation. Because norm of
modesty is prevalent in East Asian cultures, self-enhancement motivation among people in East Asia
may well be hidden in their modest appearances. To reveal real intention among East Asians (as
compared to Westerners), which is often hidden beneath their modest behaviors, the present
symposium presents neurological evidence as well as that obtained by traditional methods. Taken
together, as will be presented, the evidence points to the generality of self-enhancement motivation
among East Asians.

A NEURO-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE ON SELF-ENHANCEMENT
Jenny Kurman, Rotem Perlmuter, and Simone Shamay-Tsoory
The overarching goal of the presented studies is to understand the mechanisms by which culture
influences self-enhancement, using both behavioral methods and techniques from neuroscience. Study
1 (N=120; Korea, Japan, Israel) compares self-enhancement level using self-evaluation in narrow and
broad traits among three cultural groups and shows an interaction between culture and type of trait.
Study 2 (N = 30) uses a fMRI paradigm and demonstrate greater activation of the DLPFC (a region
whose activation is associated with norm compliance) and the dACC (a region associated with
inhibition) during the trait rating task for South Koreans compared to Israelis, supporting the notion
that cultural restrictions and inhibition are more active among Koreas than Israelis during a selfevaluation process.

PAN-CULTURAL SELF-POSITIVITY: AN ERP STUDY OF SELF-REFERENCE
JUDGMENTS
Huajian Cai, Lili Wu, Yuanyuan Shi, and Ruolei Gu
Whether persons across cultures are motivated to pursue a positive self has been hotly debated. All
studies, however, have only investigated behavioral indexes. In this study, we had participants from
China and Western nations to judge whether a series of positive or negative traits described
themselves or not and recorded the electroencephalogram (EEG) at the meantime. Behavioral data
showed that regardless of from China or from Western nations, participants responded faster to
positive traits describing self than those not describing self but slower to negative traits describing self
than those not describing self, and endorsed more positive traits describing self than those not
describing self but deny more negative traits describing self than those not describing self, suggesting
pan-cultural self-positivity. The neural data showed that this self-positivity manifested on both LPP
and P300 for Chinese but merely on LPP for Westerners, providing neural evidence for both
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similarities and dissimilarities of the manifestation of self-positivity. Together, both behavioral and
neural evidence suggest not only a pan-cultural self-positivity but also the subtlety and dynamics of
self-regulation in Chinese self-enhancement.

RELATIONSHIP OF SELF-ENHANCEMENT OF ACADEMIC AND INTERPERSONALRELATIONSHIP DOMAIN AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING IN JAPANESE HIGH
SCHOOL STUDENTS.
Chihiro Kobayashi
In the present research, we asked several measures of psychological well-being (DV) and (a)
evaluation of past results and (b) expectation of future results, in both academic and interpersonal
domain (IV), to 392 high-school students in Japan. Measures of psychological well-being included;
Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Satisfaction to Life Scale (Kadono,1994), and Psychological WellBeing Scale (Ryff, 1989). Evaluation of past results asked Ps, how satisfied they were about their past
results (in academic and interpersonal relationships, respectively), and expectation of future results
(e.g., “I imagine myself getting good results”) in academic and interpersonal relationships, were taken
from Norem (2001). Results revealed that (1) Ps showed strong modesty in self-evaluating their past
results in academic area, whereas they showed self-enhancement in evaluating their past results in
interpersonal area. Also, (2) the positivity of interpersonal self-evaluation had stronger influence
towards psychological well-being than that of academic self-evaluation. Implication of these results
will be discussed.

RELATIONS AMONG TWO TYPES OF PESSIMISM AND ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION
-A
CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY AMONG JAPANESE AND AMERICANS
Ai Fukuzawa
This study examined relations between pessimism and achievement motivation among Japanese and
American students. Specifically, the aim of this study was to find a way to maintain achievement
motivation without sacrificing psychological well-being among Japanese students (relative to
Americans). Results indicated that, among Japanese, external pessimism (i.e., pessimism about
external factors), not internal pessimism, was positively related to achievement motivation. In
addition, among Japanese, external pessimism did not damage their psychological well-being even
after negative academic events in daily life. These results suggest that pessimistic views for external
factors are useful for maintaining achievement motivation while keeping positive psychological wellbeing.

MOTIVATIONS UNDERLYING MODESTY AMONG JAPANESE
Susumu Yamaguchi, Hiroaki Morio, and Fumio Murakami
We hypothesized that Japanese are motivated to maintain positive evaluation by others even when
they show modesty, especially when it comes to important traits. To examine this hypothesis, Japanese
undergratudate students were asked to imagine that they were praised by their family
member/classmate and answer if and how they would show modesty as well as how they would feel
when they show modesty. The results revealed that the Japanese participant does not want their
counterpart to lower their evaluation about his/her competence. In all, the results point to the existence
of self-enhancement motivation even when Japanese show modesty.

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IS049
TRANS WELL-BEING: IDENTITY, HEALTH, SEXUALITY AND
RELATIONSHIP
C04. Culture and Society - LGBTQI studies
Convenor
Paolo Valerio, University of Naples Federico II, Naples - Italy
Presenters
Angelo Brandelli Costa, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre Brazil
Antonio Prunas, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Denise Medico, University of Geneva, Foundation Agnodice, Foundation Profa,
Lausanne - Switzerland
Paolo Valerio, University of Naples Federico II, Naples – Italy
Discussant
Vittorio Lingiardi, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy

The publication of the DSM-5 represented an important moment of redefinition of transgender issues.
The old psychiatric diagnosis Gender Identity Disorder (GID) has been subjected to many nosographic
changes, being recalled Gender Dysphoria. Despite these changes and political movements aimed at
depsychiatrizing such identities, psychiatric community decided to not remove the diagnosis from
DSM, carrying on its medicalization. In the field of scientific research focused on gender variances,
two different tendencies exist: the first one focused on clinical issues related to transgender identities,
the second one focused on the complex dimensions related to social and internalized stigma and its
effects on mental health. These tendencies are not opposed to each other. On the contrary, they are
intersected in specific core points which the current symposium aims at highlighting.

GENDER VARIANT PEOPLE BETWEEN PATHOLOGIZATION, SOCIAL STIGMA AND
RESILIENCE
Paolo Valerio, Cristiano Scandurra
This contribution will provide a general overview of the actual socio-political condition lived by
gender variant people, in particular embracing the psychological effects of gender prejudice and antitransgender violence on mental health and wellbeing and the resilience strategies they may use to cope
with.

TRANSGENDER SUBJECTIVITY, BECOMING AND METISSAGE AS METAPHORS
Denise Medico
In this presentation, basing on qualitative research and clinical experience, the author will share her
understanding of transgender subjectivity which contrast with dominant clinical models. Mixing
grounded theory and reflexivity, some reflections coming from 15 in-depth interviews addressed to
MtF transgender people will be presented.
AN APPLICATION OF THE IMPLICIT ASSOCIATION TEST (IAT) TO THE
ASSESSMENT OF GENDER IDENTITY IN TRANSSEXUALS
Antonio Prunas
This research project aims at testing the clinical utility of the Implicit Association Test-Gender
Identity (IAT-GI; Greenwald et al, 1998) in the assessment of gender identity, focusing primarily on
its convergence with explicit measure of gender identity, gender dysphoria and sex roles and its
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capacity to discriminate among different groups according to gender identification and regardless of
biological sex and sexual orientation

BEING TRANS IN BRAZIL: DISCRIMINATION AND HEALTHCARE
Angelo Brandelli Costa, Henrique Caetano Nardi, Silvia Koller
This presentation aims to discuss a survey that investigated the health vulnerability of Brazilian
transgender persons. Specifically, will be presented data regarding HIV infection in trans women
comparing samples of two states that have distinct epidemic profiles: São Paulo and Rio Grande do
Sul. Data on health vulnerability in trans men and gender non-conforming persons will also be
presented.

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IS050
PROACTIVE PSYCHOLOGY RELIES ON ITSELF. ENPAP PROJECT
FOR INVESTING IN THE PRACTICE OF PSYCHOLOGY
D16. Work and organization - Other
Convenor
Presenters

Felice Damiano Torricelli , ENPAP, Rome - Italy
Giovanna Melandri, Human Foundation, Rome - Italy
Lisa Barclay, Social Finance, London - United Kingdom
Lucia Martina , Fondazione Lang Italia, Milan - Italy
Massimo Santinello, University of Padova, Padua – Italy

For years, public policies, in Italy and in Europe, have been cutting funds to social prevention and
consequently a lot of professional services performed by Psychologists have been reduced or deleted.
These policies, while allowing a saving immediately, then oblige public administrations to spend a lot
more to intervene in situations that become, over time, emergencies and needs, sometimes dramatic.
Aware of the overall condition of the economy in the Italian and European context, ENPAP - the body
in charge of the social welfare and pensions of the Italian Psychologists - wants to give its contribution
to address this situation and to support both the income and the working continuity for Psychologists.
The idea is to invest a part of the collected savings in social prevention projects involving
Psychologists that entail social and economic benefits (for example, in terms of cost savings) for the
welfare state, ensuring, at the same time, the future of Psychologists pensions. Supporting the national
welfare system through projects involving Psychologists on the territory can reactivate the virtuous
cycle of prevention, put at the heart of prevention activities the professional competence of
Psychologists, improve the life quality of citizens and support the development of the country. We
have identified in the Social Impact Bond (SIB) developed in the UK, a highly interesting tool to
pursue this goal. We are therefore working to develop, also in Italy, a similar financial mechanism
able to draw social and economic impact investments thanks to the direct involvement of professional
Psychologists. During the Symposium we will focus on the evolution of the project, the evaluation
models of social and budgetary impacts that support it, the reflections and the experiences in progress
in Europe activated through the same principles.

ENPAP PROJECT FOR INVESTING IN PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
Felice Damiano Torricelli
The Professional Psychology cannot exist out of the market that requests its services and for too long
the market of social prevention public services has been suffering a setback. The project we propose
aims to boost welfare actions in Italy through the private funding of projects of prevention applied
Psychology that lead to a consistent saving in public funds.

SOCIAL IMPACT BONDS: A MODEL FOR FUNDING PREVENTION
Lisa Barclay
In the UK, we set up a Social Impact Bond to fund Multi-Systemic Therapy for adolescents at risk of
being taken into State care due to behavioural problems. Social investors have committed £3m to fund
the service delivery over a five year period. The local government will repay investors according to
the level of success achieved in preventing care entry.

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A ROADMAP TO SOCIAL IMPACT INVESTING
Lucia Martina
Effectiveness in achieving results and impact measurement are the key words at the base of Social
Impact Bonds. The intervention will highlight the developments taking place in philanthropy and
social investing to envision the available options to go beyond grants in order to create relevant
outcomes for the community in a more sustainable way.

EFFECTIVENESS AND CHALLENGES OF WORKING AS A PSYCHOLOGIST IN
PREVENTION PROGRAMS: CLOSING THE GAP BETWEEN RESEARCH AND
PRACTICE
Massimo Santinello
There is increasing evidence about the effectiveness of preventive programs and strategies in relation
to mental health problems (e.g., for depression, smoking, alcohol abuse, etc.). Moreover, empirical
data show the economic impact (e.g., in terms of cost-effectiveness analysis) of using a preventive
approach for some specific problems. Implications about the lack of these strategies in Italy are
discussed.

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IS051
THE ART OF RESPONSIBLE CHANGE
CREATING AND USING A COMMUNITY PATTERN LANGUAGE
FOR SOCIETAL CHANGE
F01. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Capacities building and human development
C05. Culture and society - Group processes and intergroup relations
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Wolfgang Stark, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen - Germany
Caterina Arcidiacono, University of Naples Federico II, Naples - Italy
Jacqui Akhurst, Rhodes University, Grahamstown - South Africa
Serdar M. Değirmencioğlu, Dogus University, Istanbul - Turkey
Wolfgang Stark, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen – Germany
Bruna Zani, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna - Italy

Psychological, social and naturalscience all have brought many insights about current problems in
society (like climate change, social (in)justice, unfair distribution of resources and lack of community
building). But our knowledge does not seem to guide our action. We are used to follow strategic plans
to cope with market dynamic and to guide our action on a rational and scientific secure basis. At the
same time, we know about the pitfalls of rational and economy-based planning: based on our recent
experience of technological or financial crises, we realize that we have to adapt to a faster growing
complexity which exceeds our human capabilities. This is why here is an urgent need to cope with
uncertainties and ambiguities beyond control and helplessness – to move toward the ability to create
responsible change.
This symposium therefore will stress the challenge how our insights can be inspired not only by our
rational brain, but to use the knowledge which is based on experience and tacit knowing (Polanyi,
Gigerenzer) of the many and on mindfulness, community building, creativity and art: How can we
create awareness on systemic interdependencies we are living in based on thes ubconcious patterns of
every daywisdom? How can we use the wisdom of artistic processes in order to design societal change
based on cooperation and creativity instead of competition and greed.
The symposium will bring together researchers and practitioners from diverse disciplines in order to
create a transdisciplinary approach to societal challenges.

TACIT KNOWING AND THE COMMUNITY - A KEY FOR COMMUNITY CHANGE?
TOWARDS A PATTERN LANGUAGE FOR MODELS OF CHANGE IN COMMUNITY
PSYCHOLOGY
Kora Kristof , Wolfgang Stark
Psychology most often restricts itself to research interventions on the individual or meso‐ level. One
of the keys for change is to link individual, meso- and macro-levels in order to identify patterns and
models for change on all levels. Therefore, psychology needs to take into account political,
sociological and psychological sources, but also art-based sources of transformation dynamics in
communities and social systems and realize that in complex systems a multidisciplinary approach
always is needed.
Patterns of tacit knowing are frequently used to make things work in communities and organizations.
Experienced-based "implicit wisdom" (Dewey, Polanyi) or "deep smarts" (Leonard), although being
crucial for successful change, most often are not recognized in practice or are accepted for theory and
research.
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Based on the work of Christopher Alexander and own research we developed a system of "pattern
mining and generating" to identify implicit wisdom in communities and organizations. In order to
systematically develop a "pattern language and models for change" which can be used to introduce
succesful change processes, we use both qualitative and art-based research tools to identify strengths
and to evaluate change in communities and organizations. We will show how patterns of implicit
knowing can be discovered and identified in community psychology using art-based approaches; and
how they can be systematized within „pattern languages“ and „models of change“.

“I NOW SEE THE WORLD DIFFERENTLY…”
WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM PARTICIPATORY ARTS PROJECTS
Jacqui Akhurst (York St John University, UK), Carolyn Kagan (Manchester Metropolitan University,
UK)
The use of arts activities as a tool for engagement, community development and community
psychology praxis has been growing. We will reflect critically on some projects in which we have
been involved, and draw on participants’ experiences to show that involvement in arts activities
contributes to the development of new constructs around the self and the ‘other’; enhancement of selfconfidence; and motivation for action. We will draw on project case studies to illustrate some of the
different ways in which new meanings about life have been found, linked to the creative activities.
The mechanisms, through which personal and thereafter societal transformations take place, include
collaboration, cooperation, egalitarian relationships, the development of shared values and goals, and
fun. However, participants also importantly gain insight into themselves and their positions in the
world, and report the value of creating of communities of practice, involving those with different
perspectives. The implications of what we have learnt from these different projects for a community
pattern language will be highlighted.

PSYCHOLOGY AT THE BORDER BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL, RELATIONAL AND SOCIAL
FACTORS
Caterina Arcidiacono (University Federico II, Napoli, Italy), Fortuna Procentese (University
Federico II, Napoli, Italy)
Individual and social well being is influenced by social and relational circumstances as well as
individual aspects.A simplified interpretation of social issues will focus only on the effects of social
facts on wellbeing (i.e employment, inequality, environment, democracy); but a psychological
perspective will be able to understand the role played by representation, attribution, and cognitive as
well as unconscious and symbolic meanings. Therefore community psychology, as discipline strongly
rooted in an ecological background, has tool to discover and explain how all these different
dimensions interact. In this respect, psychology is the discipline that takes into consideration social
variables related to individual and social historical backgrounds, as well as social organization
considering power issues and social organization in the form they are perceived and assumed by
individuals and groups. This discipline, considers then all relational determinants affecting individual
live allowing to understand how people feel and represent what is happening in their life an in their
environment. So far as we use a psychological approach we can understand social interactions in all
their explicit and tacit dimensions. Psychologists are then professional able to drive and follow process
of social change. On these ground the psychological approach to social issues is able to understand
them in all their aspects and therefore psychologists are needed in social planning, urban development,
and social regeneration.

RESPONSIBLE CHANGE UNDER IRRESPONSIBLE REGIMES: FOCUS ON YOUNG
PEOPLE
Serdar M. Değirmencioğlu (Dogus University, Istanbul, Turkey)
It is hard to imagine how responsible change can be realized as fiscal austerity is imposed on millions
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as “a natural state of affairs”. It is certainly a huge challenge to achieve responsible change when
governments are becoming increasingly irresponsible. To put it bluntly, how can positive societal
change be achieved under neoliberal capitalism? It is important to begin with the notion of “public
interest” so as to emphasize the fact that so long as “private” dominates “public”, no responsible
change is possible. Secondly, it is necessary to identify power differentials and who is hit the hardest
by neoliberal policies. This exercise quickly reveals those who are excluded or pushed to the margins.
Thirdly, it is necessary to pinpoint the linkages between “public interest” and the necessity of
community building in daily life. Next, it is essential to revive the often implicit notion of community
power – how various individuals can contribute to community change. This is particularly important
when the public services are pushed to conform “market rules” and those who are excluded or
marginalized are blamed as “social parasites.” Finally, it is important to apply this model particularly
to young people, who are marginalized through schooling, adultism and conventional democracy. Two
cases are presented to illustrate how this approach can foster cooperation and creativity in daily life.

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IS052
IN MEMORY OF PROFESSOR GIUSEPPE COSTANTINO - TEMAS
TEST ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN/ADOLESCENTS IN
MULTICULTURAL SOCIETIES
E03. Health and clinical intervention - Personality assessment
Convenor
Presenters

Gian Marco Sardi, S.I.P.Si.Vi, Cuneo - Italy
Carolina Meucci, John Cabot University, Rome - Italy
Daniel Dupertuis, Universidad Abierta Interamericana, Buenos Aires - Argentina
Elsa Cardalda, Ponce Medical School and Health Sciences, Ponce - Puerto Rico
Erminia Costantino on behalf of Giuseppe Costantino, American Multicultural
Institute, New York - United States
Gian Marco Sardi, S.I.P.Si.Vi, Cuneo - Italy
Leib Litman, Touro College & University System, New York - United States
Vito Tummino, President of FISSP (Italian Federation of Societies of Psychology)

Reporting of the standardizations of the minority and nonminority versions of the TEMAS (tell-Me-AStory) Multicultural test in the U.S.A, the Jewish TEMAS, the Latin-American versions in Puerto
Rico and Argentina, and the Romanian TEMAS version. The TEMAS presents several different
variables, the use of chromatic pictures, bipolarities of the cards, contemporary settings and familiar
themes, the use of a problem-solving scoring system, and normative standardizations for several
international groups. The TEMAS was first published in the USA as the sole multicultural narrative
test, normed with Black, Puerto Rican, Other Hispanic, and White groups to address the emic and etic
validity in assessing minority and nonminority children/adolescents.Research indicates that the
TEMAS is a valid instrument for the assessment of culturally diverse children in the USA and other
countries.Objectives are to report on the development of the TEMAS for assessment of multicultural
children, international validation of its clinical utility, and TEMAS dissemination in the USA and in
other countries.

STANDARDIZATION OF TEMAS (TELL-ME-A-STORY) TEST IN THE U.S.A AND
OTHER COUNTRIES
Giuseppe Costantino,.Erminia Costantino, Carolina Meucci, Elsa Cardalda, Gian Marco Sardi
The development of TEMAS in the USA was to address the emic and etic validity in constructing a
psychometrically sound multicultural narrative test for children/ adolescents. The TEMAS was
standardized on 650 youngsters aged 5 to 13 and normed on: Black, Puerto Rican, Other Hispanic, and
White. There are two parallel versions: minority and nonminority and two forms, the short with 9
cards and: the long with 23 cards. The test assesses cognitive, personality and affective functions and
is scored objectively. Numerous studies have shown that the TEMAS test presents concurrent and
predictive validity in the assessment of culturally diverse children /adolescents.

COMPARISON OF THE TAT, CAT AND TEMAS TESTS IN ASSESSING HISPANIC
CHILDREN
Elsa Cardalda
This study assessed the differential validity of the Thematic Apperception Test, Child Apperception
Test and the TEMAS (Tell-Me-A-Story) Test in assessing personality of 122 school-age Puerto Rican
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children in Puerto Rico. The three tests individually administered. The study used qualitative analyses
in assessing the thematic content and quantitative analyses in assessing fluency of the stories. Findings
indicated that the TEMAS protocols were more complete and extensive, than those of the TAT and
CAT; thus supporting the clinical utility of TEMAS in assessing culturally diverse
youngsters.(597characters, spaces included, each)

VALIDATION OF THE JEWISH TEMAS TEST
Giuseppe Costantino LeibLitman, Richard Waxman, CheskieRosenzweig. YairMaman Dan Sharir, and
Elizabete Santos
In 2011 there were 6.588 million Jews in the USA, with 1.6 million living in New York City
increasing 9% in the last 10 years;with also a 20% poverty level growth. This poverty rate places
Jewish children at risk of mental health problems like other minority children. The Jewish TEMAS
was developed as a culturally oriented test and validated in two preliminary studies. The results of the
first study, using 60 undergraduate College Jewish students, showed that J-TEMAS cards were more
relevant to Jewish culture than the American cards. The results of the second study, using 110 Jewish
children showed that the card's relevance was associated with clinically meaningful stories where
English language transitioned to Hebrew. The results indicated that the theoretical framework and the
new pictures were valid for the Jewish population.

VALIDATION OF THE TEMAS TEST IN ARGENTINA
Daniel Dupertuis, Ernesto Pais, Guadalupe Forti
Argentina has 42 million people, of which 95% are White and 25% are under the age of14.
Additionally, it has a high utilization of psychological services and a high number of psychologists.
The TEMAS is standardized in order to provide a more valid assessment than the TAT and CAT tests.
A total of 320 boys and girls, ages 6 to 13 are used. Preliminary results indicated that several pictures
needed to be redesigned in order to be more culturally relevant. In addition, comparison of the tested
Argentenian children were more similar to the White normative children of the American version in
cognitive, affective and personality functions than the normative Hispanic children.

UTILITY OF TEMAS TEST IN ASSESSING ABUSED CHILDREN IN ROMANIA
Gabriela Marc
Romania has one of the highest numbers of children living in placement centers and foster care of all
nations in Eastern Europe. The literature indicates that these children suffer child abuse and child
neglect. This study used the TEMAS test to assess 80 children in placement centers and 40 children
living in intact homes. Results indicated that placement children showed poorer interpersonal
relations, higher anxiety/depression and aggression, and lower self-esteem and sexual identity than
children living in intact home, thus indicating a valid clinical utility of the TEMAS test

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IS053
PSYCHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF HUMAN ACHIEVEMENTS
B02. Development and education - School adjustment, academic achievement and learning disabilities
Convenor
Presenters

Eris

Discussant

Andrzej Sękowski, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin - Poland
Andrzej Sękowski, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin - Poland
Anna Hawrot, Educational Research Institute, Warsaw - Poland
Ewa Czerniawska, University of Warsaw, Warsaw - Poland
Maria Ledzińska, University of Warsaw, Warsaw - Poland
Roberta Renati, Phronesis Centre for Potential Development & Resilience Nurturing Foundation, Milan - Italy
Sławomir Postek, University of Warsaw, Warsaw - Poland
Steven Pfeiffer, Florida State University, Tallahassee - United States
Ewa Czerniawska , University of Warsaw, Warsaw - Poland

The symposium deals with the problems of human achievement. Achievements constitute one of the
most important motifs of human activity. They are connected with the intellectual as well as the
motivational-and-emotional spheres of human personality and are thus related, among others, to
human giftedness, motivation, the value system, and self-esteem. The area in which an individual
achieves and the level of achievement are conditioned both by personality traits as well as the
environment in which one grows up. During the symposium, results of research will be presented
concerning both gifted students as well as adults who have been successful in various areas of activity,
including managerial positions. A person's achievements are associated with the period of life he or
she is in. At school, achievement is often related to learning activity. Achievements of adults are often
associated with professional activity. Symposium speakers pay special attention to individuals with
outstanding achievements at school and work. The papers discuss research on personality-related
determinants of outstanding achievements. An analysis of outstanding achievements shows the
particular importance of achievement motivation, analytical, creative and practical intelligence, as
well as metacognitive abilities. The key issues of the symposium are connected with the psychology of
giftedness and the psychology of individual differences. An analysis of the determinants of
achievements of gifted persons shows a great variety of the ways in which they can become
successful. Factors which reduce the level of achievements of gifted persons will also be discussed.
The importance of the area of achievement will be highlighted. Academic and professional
achievements have different determinants. The symposium has an international character and it will
feature studies of gifted persons conducted in Europe and the USA.

HUMAN ACHIEVEMENT AS A SUBJECT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH
Andrzej Sekowski
The article presents results of research on psychological determinants of human achievement. A
conception of psychological determinants of outstanding human achievement, taking into account both
the intellectual and motivational spheres including life goals and the environment, is discussed against
the background of the presented research.

PATTERNS OF OUT-OF-SCHOOL SUPPORT IN LEARNING SCHOOL SUBJECTS
Anna Hawrot, Ewa Czerniawska
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The goal of the paper is to examine patterns of out-of-school support in learning school subjects and to
verify the relationship between these patterns and school achievement. Analyses included data for
over 5000 lower secondary school students from 291 classes and 150 schools collected over three
years of schooling.

TRAJECTORIES OF WELL-BEING IN GIFTED CHILDREN. A RISK AND PROTECTIVE
FACTORS PERSPECTIVE.
Roberta Renati, Steven Pfeiffer
Gifted children have unique traits and needs. If these essentials are not supported, children may
display social-emotional and behavioural problems that could affect their trajectories to positive wellbeing and achievement. The crucial role of emotional intelligence will be examined. Implications for
intervention will be addressed.

PSYCHOLOGICAL MECHANISM OF INFORMATION OVERLOAD IN HIGH RANKING
MANAGERS – THEORETICAL MUSINGS AND VERY PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS.
Sławomir Postek, Maria Ledzińska
The talk covers the subject of psychological profiles of high achieving managers in relation to their
main professional focus: processing information. A sample of 124 Polish high ranking managers was
tested – the resulting holistic model of mediators and moderators of information stress will be
presented and its practical implications discussed.

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IS054
DECISION MAKING IN A LIFE-SPAN PERSPECTIVE
B07. Development and education - Social cognition, identity and social interactions
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Antonella Marchetti, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Alan Sanfey, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen - Netherlands
Barbara Colombo, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Cristina Bicchieri, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia - United States
Ilaria Castelli, Catholic University of Milan, Milan – Italy
Simona Sacchi, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy

The ability to adapt oneself in an efficient and productive way to our daily social environment is an
important challenge for humans, and this challenge is successfully met due to several fundamental
processes that have developed throughout the evolution of our species. In this Symposium, we are
particularly interested in decision making, i.e. the ability to process multiple alternatives and choose
an optimal course of action to achieve the individuals’ goals in a given situation.
The theoretical perspective we adopt in this Symposium is a life-span one, in order to investigate the
changes of decision making across ages and its possible relationships with other abilities or aspects of
development.
The important psycho-social ability here considered in relation to decision making is Theory of Mind,
i.e. the capacity to interpret behaviors in terms of mental states, analyzed in children and in the elderly
(Presentations n. 1, 3, 4). The evidences obtained from behavioral experiments are discusses along
with the evidences regarding the neural basis of decision making implied in complex strategic
situations (Presentation n. 2).

“EASIER SAID THAN DONE”: THE SENSITIVITY TO A SOCIAL NORM OF FAIRNESS
IN SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN
Cristina Bicchieri
The sensitivity to fairness undergoes relevant changes in decision-making development. Bargaining
games with Primary school-aged children allow to discover if they are sensible to a social norm of
fairness and if they behave accordingly. Theory of Mind is also investigated, as it is involved in social
interactions.

DECISION NEUROSCIENCE - NEW PERSPECTIVES ON SOCIAL CHOICE
Alan Sanfey
Decision Neuroscience utilizes novel approaches to the study of both individual and interactive
decision-making by combining the methods of behavioral experiments, functional neuroimaging, and
formal economic models. Examining sophisticated high-level behavior at a neural level can provide
important clues to the mechanisms of decision-making.

DECISION MAKING AND THEORY OF MIND IN THE ELDERLY
Ilaria Castelli
The increase in life prospects and the on-going socio-economic level of our society changed our view
of the aging process. It is important to understand the changes not only of physical and cognitive
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skills, but also of the socio-cognitive skills which contribute to the ability to interact with others, such
as Theory of Mind and decision making.

DECISION-MAKING AND LIES
Barbara Colombo
In economic domain people are often required to make decisions by taking into account the perceived
intentions of the partners. The aim of this study was to test how the perception that the responder is
lying affects proposers’ offers in the Ultimatum Game. Results suggest that lie detection is crucial in
economic decisions involving the interaction with other people and that visual behaviors, as well as
other stylistic variables, play a mediating role.

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IS055
THE STRIVING TO HAVE AN INNER COMPASS AS A
FUNDAMENTAL ASPECT OF EMERGING ADULTS' NEED FOR
AUTONOMY: PARENTAL ANTECEDENTS AND EFFECTS ON
RELATIONSHIP WITH PARENTS AND VALUE INTERNALIZATION
B07. Development and education - Social cognition, identity and social interactions
B10. Development and education - Parenting
Convenor
Presenters

Discussants

Avi Assor, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva - Israel
Avi Assor, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva - Israel
Beiwen Chen , Ghent University, Ghent - Belgium
Maria Brambilla, University of Bergamo, Bergamo - Italy
Ohad Ezra, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva - Israel
Yu Shi, Purdue University, West Lafayette - United States
Avi Assor , Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva - Israel
Guy Roth, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva - Israel

According to Assor (2012), people's need for autonomy has two important components: (a) the
striving to feel that one is free from control and pressure, and (b) the striving to feel that one has
authentic, direction-giving, goals, values and interests. This latter component was termed by Assor
(2012) Inner Compass (and see also Ryan, Deci & Vansteenkiste, 2015 on this concept). Research
based on self determination theory (Ryan & Deci, 2000) has focused mainly on the first component ,
and only indirectly examined the internal compass component.
The present symposium includes three presentations exploring antecedents and consequences of
adolescents' and young adults' experience of inner compass. The first presentation examines Chinese
students' experience of their mother as: (1) validating their inner compass, and (2) providing optional
choice and being non-controlling, as two unique predictors of positive relationships with mother.
Results support the proposed two-component view of the need for autonomy. The second presentation
replicates the findings obtained with Chinese students with Jewish Israeli students, thus suggesting
that the proposed two-component view of the need for autonomy may be valid across very different
cultures. This presentation also explores the role identification with mother's values as a predictor of
the experience of having an inner compass. The last presentation focuses on the socializing practice of
Inherent Value Demonstration (IVD): demonstrating the socializing agent's values in behaviour and
showing that the agent feels content while engaged in the behaviour. It was found that IVD contributes
to adolescents' identification with parents' values; and thereby possibly contributing to the formation
of a firm inner compass and a concomitant sense of autonomy.
Discussion will examine the proposed two-component view of the need for autonomy and a number of
related issues. For example: Are there under-explored aspects of parenting behaviour that may support
the formation of an inner compass in adolescents and young adults? We will focus on three such
aspects: Inner value demonstration, Fostering Inner Valuing, Supporting value exploration, and
parent's intrinsic values.

MATERNAL VALIDATION OF CHINESE COLLEGE STUDENTS' INNER COMPASS AS A
PREDICTOR OF CHILDREN’S VITALITY: THE MEDIATING ROLE OF AUTONOMOUS
MOTIVATION TO SPEND TIME WITH MOM
Yu Shi, Beiwen Chen and Avi Assor
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According to Assor (2012), in order for people to feel that their need for autonomy is satisfied they
need to feel that: (a) they have an internal compass - authentic, direction-giving. values, goals and
interests, and (b) they have optional choice and are not pressured or controlled. When close others are
perceived to support both aspects of the need for autonomy one is likely to feel autonomously
motivated to spend time with them, which in turn is likely to enhance feelings of vitality when being
around these people. While the contribution of the optional choice aspect of need for autonomy was
demonstrated in many studies guided by self determination theory (Ryan and Deci, 2000), no research
to-date has examined the effects of the experience of having an inner compass. Regression analysis of
data collected among 72 Chinese college-age students supported this view. Thus, students’ perception
of maternal ICV predicted their vitality when being with mother, and this relationship was fully
mediated by e autonomous motivation to spend time with mom. Path analysis also showed both ICV
and the experience of mother as providing choice and not controlling uniquely predicted motivation to
be with mother. Moreover, ICV predicted motivation to be with mother even after controlling for the
choice-vs-control aspect of need autonomy satisfaction; thus supporting our conceptualization of IC as
a distinctive, independent component of the need for autonomy.

REPLICATIONS AND FURTHER EXPLORATIONS OF THE EXPERIENCE OF HAVING
AN INNER COMPASS: CONSEQUENCES AND ANTECEDENTS.
Ohad Ezra and Avi Assor
Two studies were conducted to replicate and extend findings concerning the experience of having an
inner compass. Study 1 attempted to replicate the results obtained by Yu Shi (first presentation) in a
rather different, less hierarchical and less collective cultural group: Jewish college students in Israel.
Results of regression analysis and path analysis conducted on a sample of 140 college students were
very similar to those obtained by Yu Shi with Chinese students although as can be expected, Israeli
students perceived their mothers as higher on both inner compass validation and provision of optional
choice and low control. Thus, despite expected mean differences, it appears that there is cross-cultural
support for the two component of need for autonomy.
Study 2 examined the contribution of students' adoption of maternal values to the formation of a sense
of having an inner compass; that is to the experience of having authentic, direction-giving, values and
goals. As expected students' who reported having values similar to those of their mother also reported
a strong sense of inner compass to the extent that they felt autonomously motivated to adopt their
mother's values. In addition, holding intrinsic rather than extrinsic aspirations (Ryan, Sheldon, Kasser
& Deci, 1996) also contributed to having a firm sense of inner compass.
Taken together these studies further contribute to our understanding of the experience of having an
inner compass, its antecedents and consequences.

YOUTHS’ RELIGIOUS INTERNALIZATION AS A RESULT OF ADULTS’ BEHAVIORS:
THE ROLE OF BASIC AUTONOMY SUPPORT AND INTRINSIC VALUE
DEMONSTRATION
Maria Brambilla
It is possible to distinguish between at least two types of internalization of religion, called
identification and introjection (Ryan, Rigby & King, 1993), which differ in the degree of sense of
autonomy associated with the endorsement of religious values and practices: introjection is associated
with pressures to conform or with sense of unease, conflict and pressure, whereas identification is
experienced as more autonomous. We hypothesized that youths’ religious internalization can be
predicted by different adults’ behaviours, in particular Basic Autonomy Support (BAS, e.g. allowing
children to choose between different options and taking the chil's perspective) and Intrinsic Value
Demonstration (IVD, e.g. adults' behavior demonstrating the value they endorse, that is accompanied
by a sense of satisfaction and growth, thus demonstrating the inherent value of the behaviour). A study
with Italian Catholic youths investigated the role of BAS and IVD in affecting youths’ religious
internalization, considering both the context of family and group relations. Results show that BAS and
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IVD provided by parents, religious leaders and peers both positively predict religious identification
and not introjection. The role of IVD and identification with adults' values in promoting adolescents''
sense of inner compass will be discussed.

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IS056
THE STUDY OF INTRA-INDIVIDUAL VARIABILITY: IMPORTANCE
AND RELEVANCE FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATION
A12. General issues and basic processes - Intelligence and cognitive functioning
B12. Development and education - Typical and atypical development
Convenor
Presenters

Anik de Ribaupierre, University of Geneva, Geneva - Switzerland
Andreas Ihle, University of Geneva, Geneva - Switzerland
Anik de Ribaupierre, University of Geneva, Geneva - Switzerland
Anna Maria Re, University of Padova, Padua - Italy
Cesare Cornoldi, University of Padova, Padua - Italy
Christian Chicherio, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva - Switzerland
Delphine Fagot, University of Geneva, Geneva - Switzerland
Douglas D. Garrett, Lifespan Neural Dynamics Group - Max Planck UCL Centre for
Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research; Max Planck Institute
for Human
Development, Berlin - Germany
Erika Borella, University of Padova, Padua - Italy
Florian Schmiedek, German Institute for International Educational Resarch (DIPF),
Frankfurt-am-Main; Max-Planck Institute for Human Development,
Berlin - Germany
Martin Lövdén, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm - Sweden
Matthias Kliegel, University of Geneva, Geneva - Switzerland
Nathalie Mella, University of Geneva, Geneva - Switzerland
Paolo Ghisletta, University of Geneva, Geneva - Switzerland
Robert S. Stawski , Oregon State University, Cervallis - United States
Roger Ratcliff, Ohio State University, Columbus - United States
Stuart W.S. MacDonald, University of Victoria, Victoria - United States
Ulman Lindenberger , Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin –
Germany

Most studies in developmental and in cognitive psychology have used the mean performance as an
indicator of the individuals’ functioning. This almost exclusive emphasis on the mean, despite
numerous warnings over the years that individual variability has to be considered a fundamental
phenomenon, has led to the belief that fluctuations in behavior and heterogeneity across tasks are a
marker of dysfunctioning. A number of studies, in particular in the field of healthy and of pathological
cognitive aging, have now demonstrated that intra-individual variability (defined as short-term withintask fluctuations, or across time or tasks) provides a complementary information to that provided by
the mean. It might even constitute a reliable indicator of later cognitive dysfunctioning. Yet, studies
are still scarce, and a number of questions remain open, among which: while developmental
differences in variability have been rather convincingly demonstrated as concerns response times in
experimental tasks, it seems more difficult to observe them in terms of precision or accuracy scores;
also, there is no agreement reached yet on the best way to measure and model variability; or how does
behavioral variability relate to brain or other types of physiological (e.g., cardiac) variability.
The present symposium will address some of those issues. MacDonald and coll. review the various
types of variability that have been operationalized so far and discuss their relevance in the context of
aging. Schmiedek and coll. illustrate the use of diffusion modeling to disentangle various processes
underlying the increase in response times and in their variability in older adulthood. Garrett focuses on
the intriguing finding that brain variability follows an inverse developmental curve relative to that of
behavior variability. Mella and coll. illustrate the very large interindividual differences in
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intraindividual change on the basis of findings from a longitudinal study. Kliegel and coll. present first
empirical evidence about variability in prospective memory, which might raise some particular
methodological difficulties while obviously relevant for everyday memory. Finally, Borella and coll.
address the relevance of the study of variability for our understanding of developmental disorders in
children such as ADHD or dyslexia. If time allows, a discussion will take place among the
contributors to this symposium.

‘VARIABILITY’
IN
DEFINITIONS
OF
INTRAINDIVIDUAL
VARIABILITY:
COMPARISONS AND IMPLICATIONS
Stuart W.S. MacDonald, & Robert S. Stawski
Numerous definitions of response time variability are employed, with few studies comparing
competing operationalizations. We employ data from measurement burst studies to compare common
variability definitions. Discussion will focus on the implications of competing variability
operationalizations for improving our understanding of cognitive aging.

DIFFUSION MODEL ANALYSES OF INDIVIDUAL AND AGE-RELATED DIFFERENCES
AND PRACTICE-RELATED CHANGES IN CHOICE REACTION TASKS
F. Schmiedek, Roger Ratcliff, Martin Lövdén, & U. Lindenberger
With data from 101 younger and 103 older adults who practiced three choice-reaction tasks in 100
sessions, the use of diffusion modeling to understand individual and age-related differences as well as
practice-related changes in different aspects of performance, like means and intraindividual standard
deviations of reaction time, is demonstrated.

WHEN “NOISE” BECOMES “SIGNAL” IN THE STUDY OF HUMAN AGING AND
COGNITION
Douglas D. Garrett
Healthy brains are highly dynamic across moments, and these dynamics often reduce with aging. Our
work suggests that, contrary to traditional theoretical expectations of adult-developmental increases in
"neural noise," brain aging could instead be re-conceived of as a generalized process of increasing
system rigidity and loss of dynamic range.

CHANGES IN INTRAINDIVIDUAL VARIABILITY WITH AGING
Nathalie Mella, Delphine Fagot, & Anik de Ribaupierre
Within-individual changes in older adults in both mean level of performance and intraindividual
variability were analyzed, using bootstrap analyses, in a longitudinal study over a period of 4-5 years.
Results showed little systematic change and large inter-individual differences in intraindividual
change and in intraindividual variability.

EXPLORING VARIABILITY IN EVERYDAY-RELEVANT MEMORY FUNCTIONS
ACROSS ADULTHOOD
Matthias Kliegel, Andreas Ihle, & Paolo Ghisletta
One of the most frequent everyday memory tasks is to remember to execute delayed intentions (e.g.,
taking medication in time). The processes underlying this goal-directed behavior have been termed
prospective memory. The present talk will present first systematic studies exploring variability in this
everyday-relevant memory function in young and older adults.

INTRAINDIVIDUAL VARIABILITY IN DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES.
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Erika Borella, Christian Chicherio, Anna Maria Re , & Cesare Cornoldi
The aim of this presentation is to illustrate and discuss the contribution of intraindividual variability
(IIV) in understanding developmental disabilities, with a special focus on Attention-Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder and dyslexia. IIV in cognitive measures and skills directly related with school
learning in such disabilities will be considered.

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IS057
AGGRESSION AND VIOLENCE ACROSS CONTEXTS AND
COUNTRIES
B05. Development and education - Moral development and prosocial behavior
Convenor
Presenters

John Tisak, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green - United States
Ersilia Menesini, University of Florence, Florence - Italy
Georges Steffgen, University of Luxembourg, Walferdange - Luxembourg
Guido Alessandri, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Marie S. Tisak, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green - United States

Aggression and violence has been a very important study in the lives of children and young adults
across different countries or cultures. There are numerous journals and international conferences
devoted to this theme. In this symposium, we chose to include top and respected researchers from
different countries who have contributed to the understanding of aggression and violence. Therefore,
the main presenters are from Italy, Luxembourg, and the United States. However, the research they
present extends beyond these countries. Furthermore, each focus on a different context with
aggression and violence. In the first presentation, Tisak et al., will focus on elements, which may
influence aggressive behaviors among youth offenders, including prior exposure as a victim, prior own
aggressive behavior (via personal reports and official arrest records) and parental factors. The second
presentation, by Alessandriet al., integrates aggression and prosocial behavior by examining short term
influences between bullies and those who are altruistic. In their longitudinal study they were able to
use the ATL statistical model to separate effects that are state like (variable) to those that are stable
(trait-like). The third presentation by Steffgen compares who students in two different countries,
Luxemburg and Germany cope with cyberbullying in different bystander roles, such as assistants,
reinforcers, defenders, and outsiders. Menesiniet al., in the 4th presentation will discuss findings of
comparing adolescents’ perceptions of the seriousness as well as their definitions of bullying (face-toface) and cyberbullying (online). The study consisted of a cross-cultural study across 5 countries
(Italy, Germany, Estonia, Turchia, and Spain). An integrated discussion will follow.

PREDICTORS OF MODERATE AND SEVERE AGGRESSION AMONG ADOLESCENT
OFFENDERS: THE INFLUENCE OF PRIOR EXPOSURE, PRIOR BEHAVIOR, AND
PARENTAL FACTORS
Marie S. Tisak, John Tisak, Erin R. Baker, & Allison Kiefner-Burmeister
Two hundred and fifty-four adolescent offenders responded to how often they were a victim and/or
instigator regarding aggression and violence. Views of how caring and how controlling their parent(s)
were to them were also assessed. Based on their official arrest records, we examined whether
childhood familial problems, facilitated a juvenile committing more crimes than juveniles with no past
court interventions.

BULLIES AND ALTRUISTS UNDER THE LENS: UNDERSTANDING THE SHORT TERM
RELATIONS BETWEEN AGGRESSION AND PROSOCIALITY
Guido Alessandri, CorradoFagnani, & Michele Vecchione
A sample of 180 secondary school children (55% females), were assessed five times during two years,
for disentangling the short term influences between aggression and prosociality. The ALT model
allowed us to decompose the effects due to the state components of the variables, and those
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attributable to their stable (i.e., like-trait") components, while considering their developmental
trajectories.

COPING WITH CYBERBULLYING: A COMPARISON BETWEEN STUDENTS FROM
LUXEMBURG AND GERMANY
Georges Steffgen
This study explored how participants in cyberbullying incidents in Luxembourg (N = 150) and
Germany (N =212) differ in coping behavior. Students completed a questionnaire on participant role
and coping. Coping behavior was classified into six strategies: productive other-focused strategies,
productive self-focused strategies, nonproductive avoidance, relationships improvement,
aggressive/assertive response, and technical response.

BULLYING AND CYBERBULLYING DEFINITION AND PERCEPTION OF
SERIOUSNESS: DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES ACROSS COUNTRIES
ErsiliaMenesini, Annalaura Nocentini, Benedetta Emanuela Palladino, PiretLuik, Karin Naruskov,
Rosario Ortego, Juan Calmaestra, Herbert Scheithauer, Markus Hess, Anja Schultze-Krumbholz,
Zehra Ucanok, & Aysun Dogan
The aim of this study is to compare different perception of seriousness and definition of bullying and
cyberbullying in face to face and online contexts. To this purpose a set of 32 scenarios were developed
and used in a cross-cultural study across 5 countries (Italy, Germany, Estonia, Turchia and Spain) with
adolescents between 12 and 15 years of age.

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IS058
POSITIVE ORIENTATION: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE AND
THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenors

Presenters

Promotion,

Guido Alessandri, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Piotr K. Oleś, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin - Poland
Tomasz Jankowski, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin - Poland
Beata Bajcar, Wrocław University of Technology, Wrocław - Poland
Carol Ryff, University of Wisconsin, Madison - United States
Corrado Fagnani, National Centre for Epidemiology, Surveillance and Health
Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome - Italy
Guido Alessandri, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Kinga Lachowicz-Tabaczek, University of Wrocław, Wrocław - Poland
Michele Vecchione, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Piotr K. Oleś, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin - Poland
Tomasz Jankowski, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin - Poland

The main issue we would like to discuss during the symposium is - as the title suggests - positive
orientation, which is understood as a stable disposition to evaluate oneself, one`s life and future in a
positive way. Recent studies published by Caprara and his coworkers have revealed that some
variables used widely in research on well-being – that is self-esteem, satisfaction with life and
optimism – can be explained in a large degree by the higher-order factor, called positive orientation.
Research show that the positive orientation, although in a large extent inherited, is a different construct
than on the one hand personality traits, like for example the Big Five, and on the other hand consists
on three mentioned above variables and significantly correlates with the others like generalized selfefficacy or positive affect. Thus we plan to organize symposium around the "positivity" factor to
present some ideas and results on it. We would like to refer to a broader scope of variables describing
positive or optimal functioning of the person. We are interested in research challenges as well as
possible limitation of the model of positive orientation. Possible area of interest refer to a wide range
of problems related to eudemonic and hedonic well-being, growth, happiness and others.

POSITIVE ORIENTATION: FROM EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE TO AN OUTLINE OF THE
THEORY
Piotr Oleś
The paper aims at introducing three problems: (1) the structure of positive orientation, as constituted
of meaning of life and self-esteem, optimism and life satisfaction; (2) correspondence between
positive orientation and other variables describing well-being like generalized self efficacy or love for
life; (3) possible interpretations of positive orientation: its, origins, adaptive functions, and specificity.

DYNAMIC RELATIONS AMONG PSYCHOLOGICAL EXHAUSTION, POSITIVE AFFECT
AND POSITIVITY
Guido Alessandri & Corrado Fagnani
The present prospective study examined the prediction of psychological exhaustion (ESA) from
Positivity (POS) and Positive affect (PA) using weekly diaries kept by 228 undergraduate Italian
psychology students. Results supported a model in which a psychological resource, Positivity,
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positively predicted a psycho-physiological state (i.e., psychological exhaustion) indirectly through
mediation by a component of mood (i.e., positive affect).

POSITIVE ORIENTATION AND ADAPTIVE SELF
Tomasz Jankowski
Presented study conducted with 200 participants verified hypotheses about significant relationship
between Positive Orientation and an adaptive ‘core self’ (high self-concept clarity, low self-esteem
contingency, low self-rumination). Results showed that PO is a strong predictor of the adaptive
features of the self-concept, and that the self-concept clarity and rumination (but not self-esteem
contingency) are significant mediators between positive orientation and hedonic balance.

POSITIVE ORIENTATION MAY BE A STATE: THE ROLE OF THINKING ABOUT
DISTANT FUTURE
Kinga Lachowicz-Tabaczek, Beata Bajcar
Positive orientation is defined as a set of stable dispositions related to self-esteem, optimism and life
satisfaction. In this paper we propose to broaden the concept of positive orientation by considering it
not only as a dispositional construct but also as a state. We will present the results of studies which
show that thinking about more distant future in comparison to thinking about closer future lead to an
increase of self-esteem as a state, an improvement of positive mood and a growth of optimism
concerning future self-appraisals. Additionally, these effects turn out to be significantly stronger
among individuals with dispositional low self-esteem than in high self-esteem individuals. These
results may suggest the existence of state positive orientation which could be developed even among
people whose dispositional positive orientation is low.

POSITIVITY AS A DEVELOPMENTAL PREDICTOR OF HAPPINESS
Michele Vecchione & Guido Alessandri
The present study examined whether positivity, conceptualized as a pervasive mode of appraising,
viewing, and perceiving life from a positive stance, predicts chronic positive affectivity across time or
vice versa. Participants (263 participants [47% females]), were followed for eight years (from 15.5
years to 23.5 years). Longitudinal findings corroborated the posited paths of relations, with positivity
significantly predicting positive affectivity across time rather than vice versa.

THE CRITICAL ROLE OF THE NEGATIVE IN UNDERSTANDING OPTIMAL HUMAN
FUNCTIONING
Carol Ryff
This presentation will argue that optimal human functioning requires an integration of positive and
negative psychological experience. The perspective will be illustrated with a model of psychological
well-being that explicates how qualities such as purpose in life, personal growth, and self-acceptance
frequently involve encounters with life challenges and adversity. Empirical examples from the
literature on human resilience will be offered as an alternative to an exclusively positive orientation.

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IS059
COUNSELING IN CLINICAL AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
E22. Health and clinical Intervention - Other
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Mario Fulcheri, "G. d'Annunzio" University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti - Italy
Carlo Cristini, University of Brescia, Brescia - Italy
Guido Serchielli, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna
- Italy
Irene Sborlini, University “G. d’Annunzio” of Chieti-Pescara - Italy
Maria Francesca Freda, University of Naples Federico II, Naples - Italy
Maria Grazia Strepparava , University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan – Italy
Nicolae Mitrofan, University of Bucharest, Bucharest - Romania

In this current era of evidence-based practice, the mental health disciplines of psychology, both on the
side of psychotherapy both on the perspective of professional counseling, have embraced the
competency movement and its culture of competency. Competence and competency are closely related
terms: whereas some authors use the words interchangeably, others differentiate them wherein
competence refers to the potential or capacity to perform and competency means the actual
performance or demonstration of that capacity. Competence involves a broad spectrum of personal
and professional capacities relative to a given external standard or requirement. Competence is also
described as the habitual and judicious use of communication, knowledge, technical skills, clinical
reasoning, emotions, values and reflection in daily practice for the benefit of the individual and the
community. On the other hand, competency is the capacity to integrate knowledge, skills and attitudes
reflected in the quality of clinical practice. An ongoing initiative of the American Psychological
Association (APA) has been to shift professional training in psychology from a core curriculum model
to a core competency model of learning. More specifically the National Council of Schools and
Programs of Professional Psychology has developed a set of seven competencies for the professional
practice of psychology: relationship, assessment, intervention, research and evaluation, consultation
and education, management and supervision, and diversity. The principal objective of the present
symposium is aimed both to delineate the structural professional characterization of counseling at
formative level, both to describe, in the context of Clinical and Health Psychology, the fundamental
role of this intervention on psychological well-being and quality of life (with focus on Learning
Disabilities, Active Ageing, Narrative Methodology, University and Occupational Counseling).

AMBIGUITY, COURAGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENRICHMENT IN THE ACTIVE
AGEING: THE ROLE OF COUNSELING
Cristini C., Peirone L., Carrozzino D., Cesa-Bianchi M.
The complex characterization of ageing process, due to the constitutive structural ambiguity of the
phenomenon, is related to paradigm of Enviromental Enrichment. The focus of counseling in the
ageing is sustained by encouraging process, as a specific tool for a discovery both of a right to the
anger, both of a new creative sense of life.

THE ROLE OF DIFFERENT NARRATIVE MODES AND MEDIA IN COUNSELING
GROUP INTERVENTION
Freda M. F., Esposito G., Martino M. L., Valerio P., Gonzales-Monteagudo J., Stanescu D. F.
The contribution discusses an intervention group counseling carried out within the INSTALL
European Project aimed to promote mentalization competence with underachieving students in late
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with studies. The intervention used a narrative methodology, the Narrative Mediation Path (NMP), as
a mediation tool for the promotion of mentalization functions.

LEARNING DISABILITIES & EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY WORLD: WORK IN
PROGRESS?
Sborlini I., Paoloni G., Sorgi K., Conti C., Orsucci F.
In the university field the psychological counseling to Specific Learning Difficulties is part of the
range of services offered in order to strengthen skills and abilities of student development, through the
activities of reception, guidance, mentoring and teaching mediation, promoting full inclusion and
protection of equal opportunities for study.

THE ROLE OF THE CLINICAL-PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELING ON THE HEALTH OF
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
Rezzonico G., Bani M., Strepparava M.G.
University counseling service can be seen as a front-line service to detect and manage at an early stage
mental health issues in young adults helping them in crucial turning points in lifespan development
and to detect early psychopathological. This paper presents the effectiveness data of a university
counseling service.

THE COUNSELING FUNCTION IN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
Sarchielli G., Di Fabio A., Sirigatti S.
The aim of the presentation is to examine counseling as a special professional function in the field of
Clinical, Health and Occupational Psychology. This function involves different multidimensional
competencies and professional activities and might become an important intervention area for scientist
and practitioners also in Italy.

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IS060
SUPPORTING TRANSITIONS TOWARDS SUSTAINABILITY
EUROPE: THE ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

IN

F11. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics – Environment and sustainability
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Ricardo García Mira, University of A Coruña, A Coruña - Spain
Adina Dumitru, University of A Coruña, A Coruña - Spain
Ellen Matthies, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg - Germany
Giuseppe Carrus, University of Roma Tre, Rome - Italy
Irina Macsinga, West University of Timisoara, Timisoara - Romania
Tony Craig, The James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen - United Kingdom
Marino Bonaiuto, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy

Despite cross-cutting multidisciplinary research and policy efforts in most European states it has not
been possible to achieve significant changes in consumption and production which would reverse or
slow down the devastating projections outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climatic Change
(IPCC) for the ecosystems. The role of Environmental Psychology in giving responses to some key
societal challenges is becoming more widely recognized within the broader field of Environmental
Sciences, providing both conceptual frameworks for the understanding of key aspects of global
problems and methodologies for exploring the human-environment interactions. Considerable research
funds have been dedicated to investigate the barriers to and drivers of transitions to sustainable
societies and to define the processes and tools that would promote multi-level changes towards
sustainability. It has long been recognized that for transitions to sustainable societies to be effective, it
is necessary to tackle both consumption and production, and to conceptualize lifestyles as situated
patterns of activities, in contexts such as workplaces, homes and communities.
The present symposium will explore the multiple research dimensions and determinants of
sustainability transitions, as well as the main obstacles to achieving considerable greenhouse gas
emissions reductions in areas such as energy consumption, waste generation and management or
mobility. It will explore the psychological and social factors influencing (un)sustainable behaviors,
and the utility of different tools for the definition and testing of pathways for the transformation of
workplaces and communities, such as participatory scenario development tools, modeling and
simulations. Within a multi-disciplinary framework, it will show how social science theory, modeling
tools and multi-method empirical research can describe the conditions under which sustainable
lifestyles can become the norm, rather than the exception.

A TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL APPROACH TO SUSTAINABLE LIFESTYLES
Adina Dumitru
Although embedded practices and lock-in systems account for part of the difficulty in tackling climate
change, individual behavior still plays a key role in sustainable transitions. We will discuss an
approach to lifestyles that considers the temporal and spatial dimensions of environmentally-relevant
behavior and show how it can inform both research and policy.

SOCIAL DOMINANCE ORIENTATION, MINDFULNESS AND PRO-ENVIRONMENTAL
BEHAVIOUR
Giuseppe Carrus, Fridanna Maricchiolo, Angelo Panno & Lucia Mannetti
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Previous studies showed that Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) on the one hand, and Mindfulness,
on the other hand, are related to environmentally relevant behaviors (ERB). In a correlational survey
we test a mediation path from SDO to ERB, through mindfulness. Findings show that lower SDO is
related to greater mindfulness, which in turn, is related to more ERB.

INTENT PLUS IMPACT IS NEEDED! IMPLICATIONS OF A TWOFOLD PERSPECTIVE
ON SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERVENTION
PROGRAMS
Ellen Matthies
Within the discourse of education for sustainable development a twofold definition of individual
sustainable consumptionis common, comprising intent and impact aspects of individual sustainable
behaviours. We take up this definition and show that it is in accordance with the psychological
knowledge about possible longterm and side effects of interventions in the domain of environmentally
significant behavior.

BUILDING MODELS OF A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE: FROM STATISTICAL MODELLING
TO SOCIAL SIMULATION OF ACTIVITY PATTERNS
Tony Craig
Basic and advanced statistical methods have, for a long time played akey role within the
psychologist’s toolbox. We report here on some successful collaborations between environmental
psychologists and computer scientists, and introduce some ideas from agent based modelling that can
help in developing understanding of sustainability transitions.

THE ROLE OF IMPLICIT ATTITUDES IN SUSTAINABLE LIFESTYLE'S
DEVELOPMENT
Irina Macsinga
People decision to develop a sustainable lifestyle is related to their goals, with beneficial effects for
society. However, sometimes, there is an inconsistency between goals and behavior which creates an
ambivalent attitude. Using indirect measures, the study aims to identify people implicit attitudes
towards environmental issues, and based on the results, particular interventions are discussed.

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IS061
EMOTIONAL EATING
F05. EXPO 2015 Hot topics – Eating disorders
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Tatjana van Strien, Free University Amsterdam and Radboud University Nijmegen,
Nijmegen - Netherlands
Aranka Dol, Hanzehogeschool Groningen, Groningen - Netherlands
Carmen Keller, ETH Zurich, Zurich - Switzerland
Hanna Konttinen, University of Helsinki, Helsinki - Finland
Laura Winkens, VU University, Amsterdam - Netherlands
Tatjana van Strien, Free University Amsterdam and Radboud University Nijmegen,
Nijmegen – Netherlands
Tatjana van Strien, Free University Amsterdam and Radboud University Nijmegen,
Nijmegen - Netherlands

Emotional eating is an evolutionary atypical stress response. Distress is normally associated with a
hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis (HPA-axis) with physiological reactions designed to
prepare the individual for a fight or flight response, thereby suppressing feelings of hunger. The
unnatural response of emotional is thought to be acquired as outcome of adverse rearing experiences
early in life. These may have lasting effects on the HPA-axis resulting in a hypoactive instead of
hyperactive HPA axis: increased food intake instead of the typical reduced food intake. There also
may be problems with attachment, autonomy-connectedness and emotion regulation skills, in
particular when perturped mother-infant relationships are involved. Emotional eating is characterized
by overeating in response to negative emotions with as outcome ‘Kummerspeck’: excess weight
gained from emotional overeating.
In this symposium we present new results from experiments and (longitudinal) questionnaire studies.
Carmen Keller (Zurich, Switzerland) presents new results of a large longitudinal Swiss study. Earlier
she showed that emotional eating was a strong predictor of increased BMI one year later and that
physical activity attenuated but not annulled this association. Hanna Konttinen (Helsinki, Finland)
presents longitudinal results on emotional eating and depressive feelings. Earlier she showed that
emotional eating was related to higher consumption of sweet foods and to lower physical activity selfefficacy. Laura Winkens (Amsterdam, the Netherlands) will present results on the question: Mindful
eating, emotional eating and depressive symptoms: how are they linked? Tatjana van Strien
(Nijmegen/Amsterdam, the Netherlands), explores eating in response to positive emotions in relation
to overweight. Aranka Doll (Groningen, The Netherlands) will demonstrate an app for eHaelth
emotional eating treatment.

DETERMINANTS AND CONSEQUENCES OF EMOTIONAL EATING: RESULTS OF A
FIVE-WAVE LONGITUDINAL STUDY
Carmen Keller, Christina Hartmann
We examine the influence of emotional eating on food choices and weight change in dependence of
personality traits (e. g. neuroticism), body image and life events. A population-based study in
Switzerland started in 2010 with yearly follow-up periods for five years (last wave in 2014, N=2880).
Results will be presented in the symposium.

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EMOTIONAL EATING AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AS PREDICTORS OF 7-YEAR
DIETARY AND BODY WEIGHT CHANGES
Hanna Konttinen, Satu Männistö & Ari Haukkala
The study aims to examine the interplay between emotional eating and depressive symptoms in
influencing long-term dietary and body weight changes in a Finnish population-based sample (the
DILGOM Study). Baseline took place in 2007 (N=5024) and follow-up is conducted in spring 2014.
The outcomes of the research will be presented in the symposium.

MINDFUL EATING, EMOTIONAL EATING AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
Laura Winkens, Tatjana van Strien, Liisa Lähteenmäki, Madeleine Broman Toft, Ingeborg Brouwer,
Brenda Penninx, & Marjolein Visser
Mindful eating, emotional eating and depressive symptoms: how are they linked? In this presentation I
will present first results from the European MooDFOOD project, namely those of a cross-sectional
study in a Danish and Spanish sample.

POSITIVE VS NEGATIVE EMOTIONS/EMOTIONAL EATING AND OVERWEIGHT. IS
‘KUMMERSPECK’ A MISNOMER?
Tatjana van Strien (with Machteld A.Ouwens & Marianne Donker).
Positive emotions are a ‘neglected trigger for food intake’. Is eating in response to positive emotions
also related to overweight? In other words, is ‘Kummerspeck’ a misnomer and must we also speak of
‘Jollyfat’? I address this question in two questionnaire studies and one experiment with actual food
intake.

A GUIDED SELF HELP INTERNET INTERVENTION ON EMOTION REGULATION FOR
OBESE EMOTIONAL EATERS
Aranka Dol
I will demonstrate a smartphone app developed to practise emotion regulation skills. This application
is part of a 6-weeks Internet-based guided self-help intervention for obese high emotional eaters in a
group setting. Development of the intervention is in co-creation with the targetgroup and based on an
agile methodology.

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IS062
THE FUNCTIONAL-COGNITIVE FRAMEWORK IN PSYCHOLOGY
A18. General issues and basic processes - Theoretical approaches
Convenor

Marco Perugini, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Baptist Liefooghe, Ghent University, Ghent - Belgium
Jan De Houwer, Ghent University, Ghent - Belgium
Klaus Fiedler, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg - Germany
Marco Perugini, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Sean Hughes, Ghent University, Ghent – Belgium

The aim of this symposium is to identify elements that functional psychology can offer to cognitive
psychology, both as a general framework and with regard to a variety of topics such as cognitive
control, evaluative learning, personality, and social psychology. The basic idea is that both approaches
are not in competition because they operate at different levels of explanation. In fact, they might be
mutually supportive, provided that there is a commonlanguage to communicate with each other. The
symposium will include general talks on the details and merits of a Functional-Cognitive framework
in Psychology as well as more specific talks that exemplify its practical application to relevant issues
and domains.

INTRODUCING THE FUNCTIONAL-COGNITIVE FRAMEWORK
Jan De Houwer
Whereas functional psychologists explain behavior in terms of elements in the environment, cognitive
psychologists explain the impact of environment on behavior in terms of mediating mental processes.
In this presentation, I first argue that the functional and cognitive approach in psychology are mutually
supportive. That is, functional psychologists can help cognitive psychologists to uncover mediating
mental processes whereas cognitive psychologists can help functional researchers to identify new
environment-behavior relations. In the second part of the presentation, I review a number of potential
arguments for why functional and cognitive psychologist should not interact. I argue that these
arguments are based on misunderstandings or can be circumvented.

A FUNCTIONAL TAXONOMY FOR RESEARCH ON COGNITIVE CONTROL
Baptist Liefooghe, Jan De Houwer
Cognitive control is an important mental ability that has led to the construction of a multitude of
cognitive control tasks (CCTs) that measure effects, which are considered as proxies of mental
processes. Although the use of CCTs is vital for increasing our understanding of cognitive control,
there are still important gaps in our conceptualization of the communalities and differences between
performances on many different CCTs. In the present talk, we aim to shed some light on the universe
of effects that are observed in CCTs by introducing a functional taxonomy of CCTs and the effects
they reveal. We argue that much can be gained by describing CCT effects functionally as instances of
stimulus control. We then highlight the basis of our taxonomy by illustrating how different CCT
effects involve different aspects of stimulus control.

EVALUATIVE LEARNING: PUTTING THE FUNCTIONAL-COGNITIVE FRAMEWORK
TO THE TEST
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Sean Hughes, Jan De Houwer, Marco Perugini
Although humans may be biologically prepared to prefer certain stimuli over others, many of our likes
and dislikes are learned through on-going interactions in and with the environment. Over the last thirty
years, researchers have identified a number of important pathways through which novel preferences
may be formed and existing ones altered. Most of these pathways involve changes in liking due to
regularities in the presence of a single stimulus (e.g., mere exposure), two or more stimuli (e.g.,
evaluative conditioning) or between behavior and its consequences (e.g., approach/avoidance
learning). In this talk we offer intersecting regularities as a fourth and previously undiscovered
pathway for establishing likes and dislikes. We consider several important properties of preferences
that emerge in this way, discuss their implications for functional and mental theories of evaluation and
highlight a number of open questions and future directions for researchers in this area. In short, the
empirical and conceptual work outlined here represents an example of the functional-cognitive
framework ‘in action’.

A FUNCTIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON PERSONALITY STRUCTURE
Marco Perugini, Giulio Costantini, Jan De Houwer, Sean Hughes
Most personality psychology theories aim to describe systematic patterns of stable individual
differences in behaviors, sometimes including thoughts, emotions, and motivations and usually
referred to as traits. This conceptualization can easily lead to theoretical circularities in which
explanans and explanandum are mixed together (e.g., John is extraverted because goes to party and
John goes to parties because is extraverted). The possibility of applying a functional approach to
personality structure will be explored based on two core ideas. First, personality can be conceived as
relatively stable individual differences in the way in which regularities in the environment impact on
behavior. Second, different dimensions of personality (e.g., traits) refer to moderating impact of the
individual on (a) different types of environment-behavior relations (b) the impact that other
moderators (e.g., type of environmental regularity) have on environment-behavior relations, or (c) the
selection of environments that is expected to facilitate certain classes of behaviors.

ON THE (UNEQUAL) RELATION BETWEEN FUNCTIONAL BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
AND COGNITIVE PROCESS RESEARCH
Klaus Fiedler
My first and foremost argument is that the relationship between functional and cognitive research is
asymmetric; the latter is existentially contingent on the former, but not vice versa. I will not refrain
from providing telling examples to explain why the bridges metaphor ought to be replaced a pyramid
that clearly conveys the fact that whatever cognitive-process research can accomplish in a few stellar
moments must be built on a firm fundament of functional research. I will also dare to express – taking
a long-ignored Skinnerian perspective – how modest the theoretical and empirical insights gained
from over 50 years of research on cognitive mechanisms have been. To outline my critical appraisal, I
will discuss the role of model fitting in general and mediation analysis as an instrument of process
diagnosis in particular, and the necessity to validate cognitive models in functional research. For
illustration, I will refer to recent developments in priming, to what I call a cognitive-environmental
approach to decision making, and to recent evidence on an attention-shift mechanism supposed to
underlie illusory correlations.

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For International Test Commission Track

IS063
COMBINED EMIC-ETIC APPROACH TO CULTURE-SENSITIVE
PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT
A03. General issues and basic processes - Psychometrics
A14. General issues and basic processes - Personality
Convenor
Fanny Cheung, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong - Hong Kong
Presenters
Fons J. R. van de Vijver, Tilburg University, Tilburg; North-West University,
Potchefstroom
(South Africa); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia) - Netherlands
Jianxin Zhang, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China
Qian Wang, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong - Hong Kong
Velichko H. Valchev, University of Pretoria, Pretoria - South Africa
Weiqiao Fan, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai - China

There is a growing need for psychological assessment across the world. Most psychological tests have
been developed in western countries, and are translated for local applications. There have been
criticisms on the shortcomings of this imposed etic approach, but the indigenization movement to
develop local measures also encountered major limitations. The universal (etic) versus the indigenous
(emic) debate is revisited in the internationalization stage of cross-cultural psychology. The combined
emic-etic approach to assessment is able to provide a culturally-sensitive perspective to meet local
needs while maintaining an international perspective for cross-cultural comparison. This approach
involves deriving culturally relevant constructs with bottom-up methods, followed by empirical
studies to develop and validate scales, and conducting cross-cultural studies to compare universality.
Two successful examples of the combined emic-etic approach to personality assessment are presented
in the symposium. Three papers will describe the incremental validity of indigenously derived emic
personality scales of the Chinese (Cross-cultural) Personality Inventory in predicting behavioral
outcomes beyond etic personality scales. Two papers will introduce the development of the South
African Personality Inventory for 11 ethnic and language groups in South Africa and the preliminary
findings on its etic and emic personality dimensions. These papers illustrate the principles and
methodology in developing and validating indigenously derived personality measures using the
combined emic-etic approach, and the promise of this approach in building culturally relevant
personality assessment measures.

RELATION OF WORK PERFORMANCE WITH IR FACTOR AND IR FACETS
Jianxin Zhang, Mingjie Zhou, Fen Ren
The Interpersonal Relatedness (IR) factor of personality traits has been consistently found in the
analyses of CPAI scales and items, and the factor is composed of such scales as Face (FAC), Renqing
(REN), and Harmony (HAR) which reflect the adherence to normative social relationships in
collectivistic cultures. It is believed that IR is much rooted in Chinese culture so that it can be used
more effectively and specifically to predict Chinese behaviors. Results of the recent studies in China
found that the IR trait of Chinese enterprise leaders is related to team performance in a reversed U
manner. Team performance scores lower if their leaders possess either higher or lower IR
characteristics. It coincides with the relationship between team performance and FAC facet scores of
team members. That is, members of a team would perform poorly if they either attach too much or too
little importance to face behaviors among themselves. In contrast, the HAR facet can predict team
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performance in a U manner: members of a team perform better if they either attach either more or less
importance to harmony among themselves. The implications of these results are discussed.

INCREMENTAL CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE EMIC PERSONALITY FACTOR BEYOND
ETIC
FACTORS
TO
UNDERSTAND
CHINESE
ADOLESCENTS'
CAREER
DEVELOPMENT
Weiqiao Fan
The study examined the contributions of Interpersonal Relatedness (IR) factor, as the emic factor in
the CPAI-A, beyond etic personality factors to career development among adolescents from different
China regions. 2193 Senior One students, aged 15-19 years (M=16.39, SD=.58), from Hong Kong
(613 students), urban Shanghai (804 students), and rural Zhejiang (776 students), were assessed for
their personality traits, vocational situation (i.e., vocational identity, information, and barriers), and
vocational exploration and commitment. The results indicated that, after controlling for etic
personality factors, the IR factor provided incremental contributions to adolescents’ career
development variables in general. However, some local cultural differences were found among the
samples. Specifically, IR showed significant contributions to vocational exploration and commitment
across the three Chinese samples. For vocational situation, the contributions of IR to vocational
identity and occupational information were significant only in the Shanghai and Zhejiang samples, but
non-signficant results were found in career barriers across three samples. The implications to career
guidance for high school students on different Chinese local cultural contexts were discussed.

FAMILY ORIENTATION AS AN EMIC PERSONALITY FACTOR: ITS ROLE IN THE
SOCIALIZATION PROCESS OF CAREER DEVELOPMENT AMONG CHINESE
ADOLESCENTS
Qian Wang, Fanny M. Cheung, Peter Chit Hei Mok, Weiqiao Fan
The current research examined how family orientation (an emic personality factor identified in
previous work on CPAI-A) may moderate the link from career-related parental support to Chinese
adolescents’ career decision making self-efficacy. Tenth graders (M age = 16.39 years, SD = .58) in
three regions in China (N = 583 in Hong Kong, N = 724 in urban Shanghai, and N = 700 in rural
Zhejiang) participated. In predicting career decision making self-efficacy, a significant interaction
between career-related parental support and family orientation was found, such that the greater
adolescents’ family orientation, the stronger the positive link from career-related parental support to
adolescents’ career decision making self-efficacy. This moderating role of family obligation was
evident in the three regions and among both males and females. A significant interaction between
career-related parental support, region and sex was also found, such that while the positive link from
career-related parental support to career decision making self-efficacy was of similar strength among
males and females in Hong Kong and urban Shanghai, this link was stronger among males (vs.
females) in rural Zhejiang. These findings illustrate how personality factors identified by the
combined emic-etic approach may be applied to understand the socialization process of career
development among Chinese adolescents, and also highlight the importance to pay attention to
similarities as well as differences across different regions within China and between the two sexes.

PERSONALITY STRUCTURE IN SOUTH AFRICA: AN EMIC—ETIC APPROACH
Fons J. R. van de Vijver, Deon Meiring, Velichko H. Valchev
The South African Personality Inventory (SAPI) project aims to develop a personality measure,
derived from the implicit personality conceptions in the different cultural groups in South Africa and
applicable to all 11 official languages of the country, combining emic and etic aspects of personality.
In the qualitative stage, a common personality model was developed from interviews with native
speakers of all languages. The model included 9 clusters: Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability,
Extraversion, Facilitating, Integrity, Intellect, Openness, Relationship Harmony, and Soft-Heartedness.
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In the quantitative stage, starting from the original personality descriptions, nearly 2,500 items were
devised and piloted separately per cluster (ns between 439 and 1,023). Hierarchical factor analysis was
performed to examine the underlying structure; psychometric and substantive criteria were employed
to select items. In consecutive steps, the item pool was reduced to 250 items. The questionnaire was
administered to 1,155 participants of all ethnic groups. The resulting structure had six factors, was
simpler than the qualitative model, with broader factors and strongly represented social-relational
aspects.

TRAITS AND DAILY BEHAVIOR IN DIFFERENT CULTURAL GROUPS IN SOUTH
AFRICA
Velichko H. Valchev, Deon Meiring, Fons J. R. van de Vijver,
There are systematic cross-cultural differences in the way people describe personality: People in
individualistic cultures use more abstract trait descriptions and perceive greater cross-situational
stability and predictability of behaviors (in short, perceive personality as more traited), whereas people
in collectivistic cultures—notably East Asia, but also Blacks in South Africa—use fewer traits and
perceive less stability and predictability. The extent to which these differences in perceptions are
associated with differences in actual consistency and predictability of behavior has been little
researched. The present study examined behavior prediction from trait ratings in Black and White
students in South Africa. Participants filled in locally developed personality inventories and measures
of hypothesized mediator variables (self-monitoring, lay beliefs, and communication norms), and kept
diaries listing personality-relevant behaviors for 21 days. The results are discussed with reference to
the integration of trait and cultural-psychology perspectives on personality and of indigenous and
cross-cultural psychology.

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IS064
INNOVATIVE SCIENTIFIC METHODS FOR APPROACHING
COMPLEXITY IN APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH
A02. General issues and basic processes - Research design and experimental methods
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Santo Di Nuovo, University of Catania, Catania - Italy
Andrea Gaggioli, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Barbara Colombo, Catholic University of Milan-Brescia, Brescia - Italy
Daniela Maria Pajardi, University of Urbino, Urbino - Italy
Letizia Caso, University of Bergamo, Bergamo - Italy
Alessandro Antonietti, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy

Complexity challenges the methods of scientific research, and the experimental approaches have
possible shortcomings, regarding uses and misuses of measurement instruments, variables, statistics.
Is it possible to approach complexity in psychological applied research?
To approach complexity we need appropriate methods, suitable to integrate the classical experimental
one, e.g. by monitoring directly the whole action object of study, allowing the ‘sense’ of the studied
event to emerge.
The symposium aims to show how innovative methods and instruments can be used for psychological
applications useful to fulfill social needs with full scientific validity.
After an introduction (by the proponent) regarding the methodological issues aimed at challenging
complexity, the contributions to the symposium will deal with different fields of psychological applied
research:
- Neurostimulation applied to rehabilitation and cognitive empowerment;
- Positive Technology applied to mental health and wellbeing interventions;
- Evaluation of deception in forensic evaluations
- Evaluation of suggestibility in Juvenile Courts.
The methodological advances and shortcomings in these different applied fields of psychology will be
compared and discussed.
References:
Botella, C. et al. (2012). The present and future of Positive Technology. Cyberpsychology, Behavior,
and Social Networking, 15 (2), 78-84.
Jacobson, L., et al. (2012). tDCS polarity effects in motor and cognitive domains: A meta-analytical
review. Experimental Brain Research, 216, 1–10.
Peterchev, A. V., et al. (2012). Fundamentals of transcranial electric and magnetic stimulation dose:
Definition, selection, and reporting practices. Brain Stimulation, 5, 435–453.
Ridley, A.M., et al. (2012). Suggestibility in legal contexts: Psychological research and forensic
implications. London: Blackwell-Wiley.
Rogers, R. (Ed.) (2008). Clinical assessment of malingering and deception (3rd ed.). New York:
Guilford Press.

NEUROSTIMULATION: A NEW APPROACH TO REHABILITATION AND COGNITIVE
EMPOWERMENT
Barbara Colombo
The applications of neurostimulation to enhance motor rehabilitation and to promote cognitive
empowerment in adults and aging people will be critically discussed. The use of brain stimulation in
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basic research and in clinical applications reflects its capabilities to modulate cerebral function in
ways not feasible with other techniques.

POSITIVE TECHNOLOGY: USING MOBILE PHONES, BIOSENSORS AND VIRTUAL
REALITY IN MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING INTERVENTIONS
Andrea Gaggioli
Studies regarding the possibility of using technologies (e.g. smartphones, wearable sensors and
virtual/augmented reality) to enhance mental and physical wellbeing. A new field called ‘Positive
Technology’ has been developed, combining the objectives of Positive Psychology with advances in
interaction design.

THE IMPACT OF DUAL TASK ON THE EVALUATION OF DECEPTION
Letizia Caso, Francesca Morganti and Patrizia Patrizi
Detecting liars in juridical contexts is very complex and difficult to manage with traditional
techniques. Since deceiving is cognitively demanding (involving executive brain center such as the
prefrontal cortex), a dual task can be tested asking to resolve a spatial test when telling the lie,
analyzing both verbal and not-verbal behaviors.

STUDIES ON EVALUATION OF SUGGESTIBILITY IN JUVENILE COURTS WITH
GUDJONSSON SCALE
Daniela Pajardi & Gisli Gudjonsson, M. Vagni, T. Maiorano
The evaluation of suggestibility is a very intriguing problem in forensic assessment. The Gudjonsson’s
GSS2 scale aims to evaluate both yield e shift suggestibility in cases of suspect child abuse. Recent
studies have addressed the relations with cognitive and emotional-social aspects relevant for the
juridical decision.

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IS065
APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY IN CHINESE CULTURE – MEDICINE,
RELIGION, AND PSYCHOLOGY
C13. Culture and society - Religion
C18. Culture and society - Other
Convenor
Presenters

Buxin Han, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing - China
Buxin Han, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Guoqiang Wang, Wuxi Center of Mental Health, Wuxi - China
Huan Zhu, China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medical Science, Beijing - China
Jianyou Guo, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing - China
Kai Zhang, Wuxi Center of Mental Health, Wuxi - China
Qiuli Yang, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing – China

This symposium will focus on the applied psychology in China, in relation to traditional Chinese
culture. Four speakers will present their studies on Five-pattern Personality Inventory (Qiuli YANG &
Huan ZHU ), effect of Chinese herb medicine on anxiety (Jianyou GUO), Taoist Cognitive therapy
(Guoqiang WANG & Kai ZHANG), and psychology of religion in China (Buxin HAN).
The Chinese Taoist Cognitive Psychotherapy (CTCP) combines the Chinese Taoist's way of keeping
healthy with modern cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). It enlightens people to look at the suffering
from a positive perspective, teaches a person to live harmoniously with nature, subject to nature in
order to practice non-being, and guides people to maintain psychological balance when we faced
several setbacks in our life. Guoqiang WANG & Kai ZHANG will present the detail.
Qiuli YANG and her colleagues developed Five-pattern Personality Inventory. It is the effective
application of the theory in the Inner Cannon of Huangdi , to fill the gaps in Chinese personality test,
promote the development of psychological test and the traditional Chinese medicine. The inventory
for the research and development of TCM psychology and personality psychology plays an important
role, and has a certain economic benefits, is worth promoting.
Jianyou GUO tested compound MaTiXiang(CMTX)capsule, composed of four Traditional Chinese
medicine(Valeriana Jatamansi Jones, Albizzia Julibrissin, Semen Ziziphi Spinosae and Medulla
Junci,is a safe and effective anti-anxiety Chinese Herbs Compound. The effect related to several
pathways such as neurotransmitter and inflammatory factors.
Given the thousands years of religious life for most Chinese and over a hundred years of adoption of
modern psychology in China, PR as a discipline is just start to develop from perspectives of scientific
communication, capacity building, translation of classics, training seminars, project of empirical
studies in the 21st Century. Buxin HAN report.

PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION IN CHINA
Buxin Han
Seven Sino-America Bilateral Conferences of PR were held annually with around 100 attendees in
each one. Classic text books were translating and publishing. Network of PR, consist with scholars
and graduate sutdents from over 20 institutions around China.
Keywords: Psychology of religion, delopment of discipline, training program, empirical studies

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THE INTRODUCTION OF THE CHINESE TAOIST COGNITIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY
(CTCP)
Guoqiang Wang & Kai Zhang
CTCP restrict selfish desires; learn to be content and let go; be in harmony with others and humble;
use softness to defeat hardness; live together with people harmoniously; overcome hardness with
softness; maintain tranquility and act less; follow the laws of nature.
Keywords: Cognitive psychotherapy, Taoist philosophy, maintaining tranquility

PHARMACODYNAMIC STUDY OF THE ANXIOLYTIC EFFECT OF COMPOUND
MATIXIANG CAPSULE
Jianyou Guo
Preliminary evaluation of pharmacodynamics about compound MaTiXiang(CMTX)and other tests
in rats, showed that in related to several pathways such as neurotransmitter and inflammatory factors,
CMTX is safe and effective for treating anxiety.
Keywords:compound MaTiXiang; anxiolytic; elevated plus-maze; light/dark box; open field

THE APPLICATION RESEARCH OF FIVE-PATTERN PERSONALITY INVENTORY
Qiuli Yang & Huan Zhu
Five-pattern Personality Inventory (set in 1987, revised in 2008) is a standardization of indiginous
personality test, results Included in "The Comprehensive Dictionary of Psychology, General
Psychology, The psychology of TCM" and so on.
Keywords: Five-pattern Personality Inventory, Chinese medicine psychology,

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IS066
TRAUMA AND MENTAL HEALTH
E05. Health and clinical intervention - Evidence-based psychotherapies
Convenor
Presenters
Alkmaar
Coruña -

Mark van der Gaag, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam - Netherlands
Anabel Gonzalez, Universitary Hospital of University A Coruña, A Coruña - Spain
Berber van der Vleugel, Community Mental Health Service Noord-Holland Noord,
- Netherlands
Dolores Mosquera, Institute for the Study of Trauma and Personality Disorders, A
Spain
Mark van der Gaag, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam – Netherlands

Many clinicians and scientists consider the treatment of trauma to be dangerous for the patients. They
anticipate symptom exacerbation and suicide attempts. In a survey 70% of Dutch practicing
psychotherapist stated that they would never use EMDR or Prolonged Exposure in patients with
comorbid psychotic disorder and 50% would not in dissociative disorder. Psychotic disorder has
almost always been an exclusion criterion in scientific research. There is only little evidence and only
pioneers have been treating trauma in these severe mental illness (SMI) patients. This symposium will
show that treatment is possible, efficacious and safe and that not-treating these patients, is actually the
more deleterious option.
Dolores Mosquera is involved in the treatment of personality disorders with severe traumatization. She
will give case examples and short video fragments of the ways on how EMDR can be used in the
treatment of trauma. Anabel Gonzalez will continue with case examples and demonstrations in
patients with schizophernia and bipolar disorder and clarify the progressive approach that Gonzalez
and Mosquera have developed. In the prestigious guidelines by the British National Institute of
Clinical Excellence, it is stated that all people suffering from PTSD should be offered EMDR or PE!
Yet only minimal evidence was available for patients with a psychotic disorder. This resulted in a
large randomised controlled trial in the Netherlands with positive results presented by Mark van der
Gaag. In an add-on study, including all subjects with daily auditory verbal hallucinations, a
PSYMATE was used for experience sampling. Experience sampling measurements are ecological
measurements and can be done by a PSYMATE. During six days it beeped at random times ten times
each day. Berber van de Vleugel will present pre and post data of everyday life events, thoughts,
emotions and behaviour and the changes that occur as a result of trauma treatment in psychotic
patients.

EMDR IN TRAUMATIZED PERSONALITY DISORDERS
Dolores Mosquera
The treatment of severe mental disorders can help us to evaluate the relative contribution of trauma on
severe mental illness. Several cases of refractory bipolar disorder or schizophrenia will be presented to
illustrate the relationship between traumatic antecedents and refractory symptoms.

REFRACTORY SEVERE MENTAL DISORDERS: THE TRAUMA PERSPECTIVE
Anabel Gonzalez
The treatment of severe mental disorders can help us to evaluate the relative contribution of trauma on
severe mental illness. Several cases of refractory bipolar disorder or schizophrenia will be presented to
illustrate the relationship between traumatic antecedents and refractory symptoms.
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THE RESULTS OF EMDR AND PE IN PSYCHOTIC PATIENTS WITH PTSD: A
RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Mark van der Gaag
155 patients with psychotic disorder and PTSD were randomised to EMDR, PE or Waiting List.
Therapy consisted of eight sessions of 90 minutes. Therapy was efficacious and safe. Results were
retained at 6- and 12-mont follow-up.

TREATING TRAUMA IN PSYCHOTIC PATIENTS: AN EXPERIENCE SAMPLING STUDY
Berber van der Vleugel
How is daily life affected by 8 sessions, targeting the worst memories? Reports of experiences
(moods, thoughts, feelings and behaviours) were collected at the moment of their occurrence, using
the Experience Sampling Method for 6 consecutive days before and after treatment.

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IS067
IMPACT OF TRAUMA ON MEDICAL ILLNESSES
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Luca Ostacoli, University of Turin, Turin - Italy
Chiara Piroddi, Niguarda Ca’ Granda Hospital, Milan - Italy
Gabriella Bertino, University of Turin, Turin - Italy
Liuva Capezzani, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome - Italy
Luca Ostacoli, University of Turin, Turin - Italy
Michael Haase, EMDR Institute Germany, Bad Bevensen - Germany
Luca Ostacoli, University of Turin, Turin - Italy

There is an evident relationship between diseases and pathogenic memories, both disease-related and
belonging to patient’s personal history. Life events may precipitate the onset of the disease and its
evolution; major adverse childhood experiences, such as abuse or domestic violence, increases the risk
to develop heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes and liver disease. The research findings suggest that
the impact of negative childhood experiences on adult health is strong and cumulative. Stressful and
traumatic memories linked to the disease involve the diagnosis communication, relapses with
reduction of physical functionality, side effects of therapies, diagnostic procedures, fear for the future,
and future controls. Attachment unresolved issues affect therapeutic alliance with medical teams and
doctor – patient communication, and reduce compliance to both diagnostic exams and therapies. As
Nietzsche said, still today many Medically Ills suffer more for the fantasies about the disease than for
the disease itself, and when we explore fantasies we find that most of them are based on pathogenic
unresolved memories, leading to past or future-oriented worries. Someway, by facing a severe disease
we meet the inner self, developed through the elaboration we made all along our history.
Psychotherapy through EMDR in Medical Illnesses is aimed at restoring emotional and relational
stability in a suffering person, by promoting human and surroundings resources and by helping to face
stressful events. Coping skills and processing of distressing memories go along together, as shown in
pilot EMDR studies in Oncology, Multiple Sclerosis, life- threatening Cardiac Events, Fybromialgia.
The aim of the symposium is to present the possibilities offered by EMDR interventions in different
settings of Medical Illnesses with high emotional charge.

OVERVIEW ON THE IMPACT OF TRAUMATIC STRESS ON MENTAL AND PHYSICAL
HEALTH
Michael Haase
Traumatic stress can be dealt with or be the cause of debilitating and chronic diseases. The WHO
acknowledges the importance of stress for mental health by introducing a new chapter in the ICD 11
titled 'Conditions that are specifically related to stress'. But also the body keeps the score. This lecture
will give an overview on the impact of traumatic stress on mental and physical health as well as on
evidence based therapy.

CANCER RELATED TRAUMA AND EMDR TREATMENT: STATE OF THE ART
Liuva Capezzani
The relationship between trauma and resilience to cancer disease can be explained by the Adaptive
Information Model wich can be considered a new version of the biopsychosocial model in psychooncology. Data from monocentric and multicentric researches on EMDR treatment for cancer patients
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illustrate this new reading and show EMDR more effective than CBT and supportive therapy for
patients with cancer and PTSD diagnosys, both during active medical treatment phase and follow-up
medical phase.

EMDR APPROACH IN SPINAL CORD INJURY
Chiara Piroddi
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic condition which results in motor, sensory, and autonomic
impairments, causing difficulties with functional independence, social integration and employment,
besides increased risk of addiction and depression. EMDR treatment is described as a usefull tool both
to process traumatic memories and to prevent the following adjustment difficulties.

SHORT-TERM EMDR TREATMENT FOR PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
AND PTSD
Luca Ostacoli – Gabriella Bertino
The presentation focus on the application of a short term EMDR treatment of 12 sessions for patients
with Multiple Sclerosis and PTSD. 50 patients were recruited and randomized to EMDR versus
relaxation therapy. Both therapies were effective on Anxiety and Depression, but as regards PTSD
EMDR proved to be more effective with 100% resolution.

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IS068
EATING DISORDERS AND EMDR
F05. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Eating Disorders
Convenor
Presenters

Simona Anselmetti, San Paolo Universitary Hospital, Milan - Italy
Maria Zaccagnino, University of Lugano, Lugano - Switzerland
Natalia Seijo, Centro de Psicoterapia y Trauma, A Coruña - Spain
Patrizia Todisco, Casa di Cura "Villa Margherita”, Arcugnano - Italy
Simona Anselmetti, San Paolo Universitary Hospital, Milan - Italy

During the last decades research on eating disorders has been increasing, particularly regarding the
role of emotion regulation and the link between these disorders and a history of traumatic life events
(Putnam, 2001). Trauma theory suggests that the association between traumatic events occurred
during infancy and Eating Disorders is better understood as emerging through a series of complicated
emotional reactions and coping strategies (Schwartz & Gay, 1996). In this perspective the
development of such disordered eating behaviors could be seen as an attempt to manage
overwhelming emotions, memories, and stressors experienced in the trauma. Cole and Putnam (1992),
in fact, stressed how these traumatic events could lead to deficits in the management of overwhelming
emotions and other internal experiences in these individuals.
Regarding the therapy of eating disorders there is a consensus among therapists, regarding the
possibility to integrate different strategies of intervention such as the cognitive-behavioral therapy, the
family therapy, the dialectic therapy and the psycho-educational support. Several clinicians has
suggested an integration with a method focused on the traumatic memories: the Eye Movement
Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). The eye movement desensitization and reprocessing is an
eight-phase psychotherapy designed to address past negative experiences, current triggers of the
symptoms developed from those experiences, and any future blocks to effective functioning (AIP;
Shapiro, 2001). The efficacy of EMDR for the treatment of trauma has been well demonstrated in
several meta-analyses (Seidler & Wagner, 2006) and numerous researches in the last decades
emphasized the efficacy of the EMDR technique in the treatment of Eating Disorders. In the light of
the consideration stressed in literature, the main goal of the present symposium is to evaluate the
efficacy of the EMDR method on the core symptoms of Eating Disorders compared to the standard
therapies. Our hypothesis is that the integration of the EMDR treatment in standard therapeutic
settings (out-patients, in-patients, community) could lead to better results than the standard therapy
alone.

THE PRESENCE OF TRAUMATIC EVENTS IN ATTACHMENT HISTORY OF EATING
DISORDER PATIENTS AND THE INTEGRATION OF EMDR IN STANDARD THERAPY
Simona Anselmetti
This presentation is focused to explore the presence of traumatic events in the history of eating
disorders patients with a study assessing the Adult Attachment Interview. Moreover we are presenting
a therapy protocol integrating a specific approach to the treatment of “adverse events” (EMDR) in a
sample of eating disorder patients.

TREATING EATING DISORDERS WITH EMDR APPROACH: PRELIMINARY DATA
FROM A RESEARCH PROJECT
Maria Zaccagnino
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Numerous studies, in recent years, has focused on the link between Eating Disorders and a history of
traumatic life events. The aim of the presentation is to outline first results from a research project for
the evaluation of efficacy of the EMDR approach in the treatment of Eating Disorders, in terms of
work on traumatic memories connected to them.

INTEGRATION OF EMDR INTERVENTION IN A PSYCHO-NUTRITIONAL
REHABILITATIVE MULTIDISCIPLINARY INPATIENT PROGRAM FOR EATING
DISORDERS (ED): PRELIMINARY DATA IN ED TRAUMATIZED PATIENTS.
Patrizia Todisco
We describe the experience of a Unit specialized in the psycho-nutritional rehabilitation of ED with a
multidisciplinary integrated cognitive-behavioural approach adapted to the patients’ traumatic
experiences. In the inpatient treatment traumas and the related symptoms are tackled specifically
through EMDR.

THE REJECTED SELF: EMDR AND IMAGE DISTORTION TREATMENT IN EATING
DISORDERS
Natalia Seijo
Everything we have heard we are, and the way we were told to be, is tied to our image. In people with
Eating Disorders it acquires a value that ends up becoming the centre of their lives. The goal of this
presentation is to explain how we can treat the body image distortion from the EMDR perspective in
order to work on the awareness of the real body and reach acceptance.

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IS069
POSITIVE AND ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
F11. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Environment and sustainability
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Victor Corral-Verdugo, University of Sonora, Sonora - Mexico
Giuseppe Carrus, University of Roma Tre, Rome - Italy
P. Wesley Schultz, California State University, San Marcos - United States
Susan Clayton, The College of Wooster, Wooster - United States
Victor Corral-Verdugo, University of Sonora, Sonora – Mexico
Marino Bonaiuto, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy

A growing number of social and behavioral researchers exhibit an interest in defining and exploring
intersections between positive psychology and environmental psychology. Since both approaches
share the goals of promoting conditions conducive to human wellbeing and environmental quality,
such intersection is promising and deserves consideration. Recent findings show that it is not only
possible to gain psychological positivity from exposure to positive environmental conditions, but also
that the conservation of the environment is promoted by psychological positivity. Thus, the
interdependence between environmental and psychological positivity seems to be a worthwhile subject
of study. This symposium is devoted to discuss and explore ways in which environmental psychology
and positive psychology may interact in studying human and environmental positivity. One aim of the
symposium is to address psychological positivity from the perspective of environmental psychology; a
series of studies demonstrating the benefits that people obtain from interacting with the natural
environment illustrate this point. One more aim of the symposium is to address the positive
psychological instigators of sustainable behaviors, and the psychological benefits that people
experience from engaging in environmentally-protective behaviors. Presenters in this symposium
introduce a definition of “positive environment,” which is conceived as a context that promotes
individual and collective benefits, also influencing human predispositions to conserve the sociophysical structures on which life depends. With these goals and topics in mind, the presentations take
into consideration the positive environmental, cognitive, behavioral and affective dimensions
interacting with each other in the emergence and maintenance of, both, quality of life for people and
environmental quality.

POSITIVE ENVIRONMENTS: THE SEARCH FOR HUMAN WELLBEING AND
ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
Victor Corral-Verdugo & Martha Frias-Armenta
This paper discusses the role that environments play in the emergence and maintenance of
psychological positivity. The traditional view of environmental positivity is contrasted against an
ecological vision of positive environments in which the conservation of environmental quality is as
important as the satisfaction of human needs. A study is reported.

NATURE AND HUMAN WELLBEING: ENVIRONMENTS AS SOCIAL CUES
Susan Clayton
A growing body of research attests to the potential positive impacts of natural environments on
individual responses such as mood, creativity, and stress reduction. This paper discusses more
socially-relevant impacts on self-concept and attitudes, also presenting new research as well as
reviewing previous studies.
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THE BENEFITS OF CONNECTING WITH NATURE
P. Wesley Schultz & Coral Bruni
Symmetrical relationships between attitudes, self-concept, and self-esteem were studied. Participants
completed both implicit and explicit measures of connectedness, attitudes, and self-esteem at two time
points: upon entering, and exiting a natural park. In short, connecting with nature promoted more
positive environmental attitudes and improves self-esteem.

THE POSITIVE CONSEQUENCES OF INTERACTING WITH NATURE IN
EDUCATIONAL SETTINGS
Giuseppe Carrus, Sabine Pirchio, Massimilano Scopelliti, Ylenia Passiatore & Francesca Federico
This paper presents findings of field studies assessing contact with nature among pre-school and
school children. Those findings show that the experience of contact with nature in educational settings
produces positive psychological outcomes, such as improved cognitive performance and positive
social interaction. Implications of results are discussed.

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IS070
CULTURE AND THE BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES: THE
MECHANISMS OF SHAPING DIFFERENCES IN HUMAN NATURE
C17. Culture and society - Psychological processes
Convenor
Presenters

Paweł Boski, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw - Poland
Deborah M. Roberson, University of Essex, Colchester - United Kingdom
Michael Boiger, University of Leuven, Leuven - Belgium
Paweł Boski, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw - Poland
Piotr Sorokowski, University of Wrocław, Wrocław - Poland
Valery Chirkov, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon - Canada

Cultural and cross-cultural psychology have been occupied with three major questions: 1. What are the
cultural differences (dimensions) characterizing and differentiating individuals as well as populations
across the globe? - Work on values is the most prominent example of this field; 2. To what extent is
the claim for psychology being a universal science legitimate, considering its data base largely
restricted to WEIRD people, and the challenges coming from traditional cultures?; and 3. Which
mechanisms are responsible for cultural determination of psychological processes?
This symposium will focus mainly on examining the second and third questions. We will be looking
primarily on how research findings demonstrating population variation in basic cognition (colour
perception), human body preferences, and emotions, can be explained by cultural factors. Language,
ecology, and values/norms will be considered as the key transmission belts in contributions presented
by Roberson, Sorokowski, and Boiger. The issue of personal autonomy is essential when we consider
individual psyche vis-à-vis culture. A person is not a mere reflection of culture, otherwise her/his
psychological make-up would be reduced to a status of an isomorphic epiphenomenon. Chirkov will
present relative degrees of personal autonomy allowed by various cultural systems, and their
consequences for human growth and well-being.
As a consequence of living in the global world, more and more humans become bi- or multilingual/cultural. Because of this trend, a model of psyche shaped by a single culture becomes not
adequate. Acculturation studies address the problems of culture acquisition/retention, but less often
answers are sought on how a bi-/multicultural mind functions in terms of basic psychological
processes. Boski will review the existing literature on alternating and hybrid forms of their
organization and, in the role of discussant, he will the opinions of the remaining panelists.

CAN ‘CATEGORICAL PERCEPTION’ REVEAL THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN
CULTURE, LANGUAGE AND COGNITION?
Deborah M. Roberson
In a number of domains, tests of ‘Categorical Perception’ (CP) are said to reveal either interdependence of cognition, language and culture or their complete independence. I will discuss recent
findings in the domains of color and facial expressions and consider whether they can tell us anything
meaningful about day-to-day cognition in the real world.

ARE THERE UNIVERSAL PHENOMENA AND LAWS IN HUMAN PHYSICAL
ATTRACTIVENESS? - EVIDENCE FROM SMALL SCALE SOCIETIES
Piotr Sorokowski
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Evolutionary psychology is responsible for the revival of research on physical attractiveness. WHR,
LBR, SDS, and other measures have been introduced in the literature, but the data come
predominantly from technologically advanced societies. This paper will focus on the findings
collected in small-scale societies, questioning the claim for universality of such preferences.

THE WAY WE MAKE ME FEEL: HOW CULTURAL PROCESSES SHAPE EMOTIONAL
EXPERIENCE
Michael Boiger
Emotional experiences vary across cultures in systematic ways. I will review two mechanisms at the
heart of cultural variation in emotion: The culturally shared systems of meaning and meaning making
(e.g., language and appraisals) as well as the affordances and dynamics of the social environment (e.g.,
social practices and interactions).

CULTURE AND PSYCHOLOGICAL AUTONOMY: A THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF
THEIR DIALECTICAL RELATIONS
Valery Chirkov
Dialectical relations between culture and human psychological autonomy will be discussed. Culture is
crucial for forming mental representations, sense of self and self-regulation that lay at the basis of
psychological autonomy; it supports or hinders the development of autonomous functioning.
Empowered by autonomy, people support, reject, or change their cultures.

PSYCHOLOGY OF BI-/MULTI-LINGUAL AND CULTURAL INDIVIDUALS
Pawel Boski
This contribution will address a question implicit in previous presentations: What happens to
psychological processes of individuals who participate in two or more languages/cultures? Literature
on alternating (frame switching) and hybrid (mixed) forms of biculturalism will be reviewed, and their
implications for psychology of the growing sector of humanity discussed.

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IS071
DOPING BEHAVIOR IN SPORTS
E10. Health and clinical intervention - Sport and exercise
Convenor
Presenters

Ralf Brand, University of Potsdam, Potsdam - Germany
Anne-Marie Elbe, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen - Denmark
Arnaldo Zelli, Foro Italico University of Rome, Rome - Rome
Ralf Brand, University of Potsdam, Potsdam - Germany
Vassilis Barkoukis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki – Greece

Doping in sport, defined as the presence of a prohibited substance or its metabolites or markers in an
athlete’s sample, or evidence of the attempted use or use of a prohibited method, appears to be
widespread. Empirical evidence on the psychosocial predictors of doping has significantly increased
over the last decade. Most important findings are summarized in a recent meta-analysis (Ntoumanis,
Ng, Barkoukis & Backhouse, 2014). For example, perceived social norms and positive attitudes
emerged as the strongest positive predictors of doping and doping intentions. Morality and selfefficacy to refrain from doping showed up to be most negatively associated with both. But then, there
is a paucity of studies that help to develop an integrative view of doping behavior and its psychosocial
predictors. In addition, there is limited evidence that findings from the diverse empirical studies
conducted so far hold cross-national validity. This symposium illustrates most recent developments
and study results from a European network of doping researchers that aim to address these two
research gaps. The participating groups from Greece (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki), Italy
(Universities “Foro Italico” and “Sapienza” Rome), Denmark (University of Copenhagen) and
Germany (University of Potsdam) have been selected for funding by the World Anti-Doping Agency
(WADA, Canada) in separately conducted as well as joint research projects and have qualified for
being listed in WADA’s social science researcher directory. Their presentations converge in the
approach to expand existing views on individual psychosocial predictors of adolescent athletes’
doping behavior by focusing team sport settings. For example, in line with evidence that adolescents’
intentions to use doping substances partly depends on self-efficacy beliefs to resist social pressure for
using doping substances, it is plausible to hypothesize that young team athletes may be less
susceptible to consider the use of doping substances in presence of strong beliefs that their teammates
have the capacity to refuse or to resist external pressures soliciting doping use as well. In other words,
it is plausible to hypothesize a mechanism of effects due to self-regulatory “collective” rather than to
“personal” efficacy beliefs. The audience of this symposium will learn (1) that young team sports
athletes’ intentions to use and actual use of performance-enhancing substances critically depends on
interrelated sets of social-cognitive determinants and appraisal processes, (2) that these determinants
and appraisal processes explain inter-individual differences occurring within as well as between
different sport teams, (3) and that several but not all of these psychosocial characteristics can be
generalized across different national contexts.

DOPING INTENTIONS IN ADOLESCENT TEAM ATHLETES: THE ROLE OF
ANTICIPATED REGRET
Vassilis Barkoukis & Lambros Lazuras
The presentation will focus on the role of affective beliefs in decision-making processes in relation to
doping use. The effect of anticipated regret in predicting young athletes’ doping intentions will be
discussed. In addition, the incremental predictive ability of anticipated regret in doping intentions over
and above the effect of planned behaviour theory’s variables will be presented.
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SOCIAL COGNITION AND SITUATIONAL APPRAISALS IN DOPING OF SPORT
TEAMS: A EUROPEAN CROSS-SECTIONAL ANALYSIS
Arnaldo Zelli, Fabio Lucidi, Luca Mallia, Ralf Brand & Vassilis Barkoukis
The presentation will discuss the results of a cross-national study (i.e. Italy, Germany and Greece)
focusing on belief systems (e.g., moral disengagement, regulative self efficacy) and on appraisals of
hypothetical interpersonal situations possibly regulating the phenomenon of doping among juvenile
sport team athletes.

PSYCHO-SOCIAL FACTORS AND DOPING ATTITUDES IN FOOTBALL PLAYERS: A
CROSS-CULTURAL INVESTIGATION
Anne-Marie Elbe, Maria Kavussanu & Antonis Hatzigeorgiadis
We will present the results of a study conducted with competitive football players in Denmark, Greece
and the UK investigating motivational climate and moral variables (e.g. moral disengagement,
anticipated guilt) in connection with the players’ doping attitudes. Cross-cultural differences and
implications for doping prevention will be discussed.

USING THE PROTOTYPE-WILLINGNESS MODEL TO UNDERSTAND DOPING
BEHAVIOR
Ralf Brand & Franz Baumgarten
The Prototype-Willingness Models (PWM) suggests that doping behavior can be explained by
interacting processes between one reasoned pathway determined by intentions and one social reactive
pathway determined by behavioral willingness. We present the fit of data gathered from an
international sample of adolescent athletes to the PWM’s central assumptions.

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IS072
BIDIRECTIONAL PATHWAYS BETWEEN CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS,
HEALTH AND WELL-BEING
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Dominik Schoebi, University of Fribourg, Fribourg - Switzerland
Ashley K. Randall, Arizona State University, Tempe - United States
Richard B. Slatcher, Wayne State University, Detroit - United States
Simone Munsch, University of Fribourg, Fribourg - Switzerland
Thomas Ledermann, University of Basel, Basel – Switzerland
Dominik Schoebi, University of Fribourg, Fribourg - Switzerland

The symposium brings together research on hotspots of the complex pathways linking experiences in
family- and similar intimate relationships with physical and mental health. Each of the presentations
spotlights the topic from a different angle, relying on different methodological approaches and data,
and focusing on various relationship contexts and health facets. Although the linkage between
different aspects of close and particularly intimate relationships and physical and mental health is well
established, the mechanisms behind these associations are not well understood. Moreover, both
theorizing and the available evidence points to the possibility that pathways are bidirectional, which
compromises the potential insight on mechanisms that can be gained from cross-sectional or even
long-term longitudinal studies. Studies relying on more intensive longitudinal designs are in a better
position to provide access to those mechanisms, and the current symposium highlights several variants
of such studies in real life contexts, including daily diaries, ecological momentary assessment, weekly
reports and ambulatory sampling of auditory recordings. Moreover, an additional challenge in the
study of such mechanisms lies the assessment of pathways in data from more than two individuals in
relationships, such as a family of two parents and one child. One contribution thus focuses on
methodological and modelling challenges of complex relationships with multiple members and
proposes solutions.
Taken together, the symposium offers insight into cutting edge research on the links between familyand other intimate relationships and health. This research moves its focus more and more into the
reality of complex experiences, tracing individuals from hour to hour, day to day and week to week, as
they navigate their daily lives together with their families, partners and friends.

INTERPERSONAL EMOTION DYNAMICS OF SAME-SEX COUPLES IN THE U.S.
EXPERIENCING STRESS
Ashley K. Randall & Casey J. Totenhagen
The study examines concurrent or lagged variations in daily negative emotional experiences of
partners in same sex couples, and how the experience of different types of stressors (e.g., minority
stress) moderates partners’ emotional connectedness. This contribution presents novel findings on
interpersonal emotional dynamics in same-sex couples.

NEUROENDOCRINE AND HEALTH EFFECTS OF FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS AMONG
YOUTH WITH ASTHMA
Richard B. Slatcher
This research examines daily family experiences and their stress responses in 50 youth with asthma.
The study used the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) to examine momentary auditory data on
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conflict and positive parental behaviors in families, and their impact on salivary cortisol as a health
relevant biological stress marker.

ASSESSING ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN MEMBERS AND SPECIFIC PATTERNS IN
SMALL GROUPS
Thomas Ledermann
This paper reviews statistical approaches to model interpersonal influence in groups of two and more
individuals, and presents modeling solutions to examine data from two or more individuals belonging
to different groups or roles. Examples are provided based on existing health relevant data from
individuals belonging to families.

PERCEIVED REJECTION, EMOTION DYSREGULATION AND BINGE EATING IN
DAILY LIFE
Simone Munsch & Dominik Schoebi
This paper presents multiple studies based on momentary assessments of perceived rejection and
acceptance from close others, and their link with psychological distress, as reflected by emotional
dysregulation, chronic pain and binge eating. This research presents novel findings on short term
dynamics between rejection experiences and maladaptive emotion regulation patterns.

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IS073
PARENTING AND CHILDREN WELLBEING
B10. Development and education - Parenting
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Anna Silvia Bombi , Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Angela Mazzone, University "G. d'Annunzio" of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti - Italy
Anna Di Norcia, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Luca Milani, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Sara Pezzica, University of Florence, Florence – Italy
Dario Bacchini, Second University of Naples, Naples - Italy

Parenting is a multifaceted construct, including a variety of preventive and remedial practices, as well
as a general climate involving the child and the adults. A large body of research has demonstrated the
detrimental of negative parenting, with special emphasis on harsh discipline and/or neglect. This
symposium focuses instead on the positive parental actions / overall family climate, which provide
insights on the role of parents in preventing the child’s difficulties or in effectively managing existing
problems. Different ages will be considered, since preschoolers to adolescents, as well as different
problems: physical integrity in the daily activities (Di Norcia, Bombi and Cannoni), cognitive and
emotional regulation in children with ADHD (Pezzica, Bigozzi and Pinto), monitoring of videogames
use (Di Blasio) and behavior with peers (Camodeca and Mazzone). The contribution of each paper
will be discussed in terms of possible interventions to promote children’s wellbeing, both outlining
effective ways of doing, and discovering critical issues.

RISK TAKING IN PRESCHOOLERS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN MOTHER’S AND
CHILDREN’S PERCEPTIONS
Anna Silvia Bombi, Anna Di Norcia, Eleonora Cannoni
In a structured interview, 131 preschoolers were asked to imagine themselves in potentially risky play
situations and to report the risk level (a) they preferred and (b) their mothers allowed. Mothers
reported their ideas about children’s choices in (a) and their own perspectives on (b). Answers about
(a) were similar, but children’s perception of (b) were too optimistic. Only children’s choices in (a)
predicted their injury behavior.

COGNITIVE, EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL DYSREGULATION IN CHILDREN
WITH ADHD: THE PROTECTIVE ROLE OF PARENTING SKILLS
Sara Pezzica, Lucia Bigozzi, Giuliana Pinto
The paper presents the effects of two types of Parent Training treatment for parents of children with
ADHD. Treatments focused on the development of specific parenting skills in order to create a
familiar environment able to cope with the dysregulation of the child and to build positive
relationships, thus preventing the worsening of the situation.

PARENTAL MONITORING AND USE OF VIOLENT VIDEOGAMES IN ADOLESCENCE
Luca Milani, Giacomo Davide Fumagalli, Paola Di Blasio
We used a cross sectional methodology to assess associations between use of violent videogames,
parental monitoring and level of aggression. 348 adolescents 13-17 years old, were administered: adhoc questionnaire of videogame use; Youth Self Report; Monitoring Scale. Almost half of the
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participants use videogames that are inappropriate for their age. Parental monitoring is negatively
associated with the amount of videogame use. The amount of violence in the videogame predicts
antisocial behavior.

THE RELATION BETWEEN FAMILY FUNCTIONING AND BULLYING, DEFENDING AND
PASSIVE BYSTANDING BEHAVIOURS: THE MEDIATING ROLE OF PROSOCIALITY
Marina Camodeca, Angela Mazzone
The relationship between family functioning and roles in bullying, and the mediating role of
prosociality were examined in 213 preadolescents (mean age = 12.3). Familial cohesion, flexibility,
and satisfaction positively affected defending behaviour through prosociality, whereas negative
associations were found for bullying and passive bystanding.

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IS074
READINESS FOR AGGRESSION IN EMERGING ADOLESCENTS SOCIOCULTURAL AND FAMILY SOCIALISATION FACTORS
B08. Development and education - Bullying and aggression
Convenor

Adam Fraczek, The Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education, Warsaw Poland
Presenters
Adam Fraczek, The Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education, Warsaw Poland
Hanna Liberska, The Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education, Warsaw Poland
Karolina Konopka, The Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education,
Warsaw - Poland
Magdalena Rowicka, The Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education,
Warsaw - Poland
Marta Rutkowska, The Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education, Warsaw
–
Poland
Discussant
Adam Fraczek, The Maria Grzegorzewska Academy of Special Education, Warsaw Poland

The objective of the symposium is to present insights and developments in the area of the
measurement of interpersonal readiness for aggression, its sociocultural, socialisation and
temperamental predictors, as well as ideological correlates among adolescents.
Readiness for aggression is defined as a set of psychological processes and structures that regulate
aggressive manifestations. In the theoretical model three classes of mechanisms underlying aggressive
behaviours were identified: Emotional-Impulsive Readiness (E-IR), Behavioural-Cognitive Readiness
(B-CR) and Personality-Imminent Readiness (P-IR) (Fraczek, 2008). The constructed instrument, the
Readiness for Interpersonal Aggression Inventory (RIAI; Fraczek, Konopka & Smulczyk, 2008) has
been empirically tested and confirmed the tridimentional model in Poland and Spain (emotionalimpulsive, habitual-cognitive, personality-immanent).
Cross-national empirical studies have shown a relationship between patterns of readiness for
aggression, intra-family socialisation (parenting style), cultural experiences in childhood, gender and
gender identity (feminine/masculine). Masculine compared to feminine individuals are predominantly
characterized by habitual-cognitive readiness for aggression, whereas emotional-impulsive readiness
is higher among females than males and habitual-cognitive readiness is higher among males than
females.
Analysis performed on data obtained from well-adjusted and maladjusted (prisoners) young adults
show that the adjustment moderates the level of readiness of aggression but parenting practices and
styles experienced in childhood may contribute to the intensity of interpersonal readiness for
aggression.
Further social (family emotional climate, social support) and temperamental characteristics are
expected to predict interpersonal readiness for aggression as well functioning in the role of a victim or
an aggressor.
Research show that personal patterns of readiness for aggression influence the approval for violence in
social life as well as the differences in attitudes towards particular ethnic group which can be expected
to be function of left-right belief, economic and political identification, which, in turn, can be related
to political party support.

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CONSTRUCT VALIDITY AND FACTORIAL INVARIANCE OF THE READINESS FOR
INTERPERSONAL AGGRESSION INVENTORY, TESTING METRIC EQUIVALENCE IN
SPANISH AND POLISH POPULATIONS.
Adam Frączek
The Readiness for Interpersonal Aggression Inventory (RIAI) is designed for assessing a set of
psychological processes and structures that underlay aggressive manifestations. RIAI was thought to
identify three main mechanisms: Emotional-Impulsive, Behavioural-Cognitive and PersonalityImminent Readiness; the tridimensional structure has been confirmed empirically in Poland and Spain.

TEMPERAMENTAL AND SOCIAL CONDITIONS OF THE TENDENCY FOR
AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR AND FUNCTIONING IN THE ROLE OF A VICTIM OR AN
AGGRESSOR IN EMERGING ADOLESCENTS: THE DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVE.
Hanna Liberska
The study aimed to define the temperamental and social conditions that may contribute to readiness
for aggression, acting like an aggressor or a victim. Family emotional climate, social support, sex and
temperament were taken into account to predict and compare the contribution of each of them to three
aggression-related aspects considered in this study.

GENDER IDENTITY AND READINESS FOR AGGRESSION AMONG MALES AND
FEMALES
Karolina Konopka
The study examined the role of gender and gender identity (masculinity and femininity) of young
adults in three forms of readiness for aggression (emotional-impulsive, habitual-cognitive, personalityimmanent); showing gender and gender identity differences, and providing unique models for each
type of readiness for aggression with respect to the examined characteristics.

INTRAFAMILY SOCIALIZATION FACTORS AS A PREDICTORS OF READINESS FOR
AGGRESSION AMONG PRISONERS.
Marta Rutkowska
This study was to identify socialization factors that contribute to readiness for aggression in prisoners
and well-adjusted young adults. Focusing on parenting practices and styles experienced in childhood,
the unique models of family predictors were established for prisoners and non-prisoners, as well as,
for each type of readiness for aggression.

READINESS FOR AGGRESSION AND LEFT-RIGHT WING ORIENTATION AMONG
YOUNG ADULTS.
Magdalena Rowicka
This study investigated the relationship between patterns of three types of readiness for interpersonal
aggression, autoidentification on the left-right wing scale related to the content of acceptable beliefs
related to their identification as well as economic domain, political autoidentification and declared
support for main political parties.

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IS075
INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE (IPV), WORKING THROUGH EMDR
WITH VICTIMS AND PERPETRATORS
B04. Development and education - Attachment and intimate relationships
B08. Development and education - Bullying and aggression
B13. Development and education - Child abuse and neglect
B10. Development and education - Parenting
C02. Culture and society - Family systems and processes
C03. Culture and society - Sex and gender
C06. Culture and society - Attitudes and values
E05. Health and clinical intervention - Evidence-based psychotherapies
E14. Health and clinical intervention - Disaster and crisis psychology
Convenor
Presenters
-

Teresa Bruno, Centro Artemisia, Florence - Italy
Carla Maria Xella, CIPM (Centro Italiano per la Promozione della Mediazione), Rome
Italy
Paolo De Pascalis, ASL Modena, Modena – Italy

Interpersonal violence, specially chronic victimization of woman and children, is a under estimate
health risk factor for population. Traumatic events, like violence, violate the autonomy of the person at
the level of basic bodily integrity. The body is invaded, injured, defiled. Traumatic events have
primary effects not only on the psychological structures of the self but also on the system of
attachment and meaning that link individual and the family. Through the practice of dissociation,
voluntary thought suppression, minimization, they learn to alter an unbearable reality. They develop a
doublethink: the ability to hold contradictory beliefs simultaneously (Herman 1992).
The purposes of this symposium is to give useful information about approaches of intervention for
both victims and perpetrators of domestic and sexual violence, and give some guidelines to prevent
emotional impact on clinicians when working with trauma and vicarious traumatization. During the
symposium presenters will describe the effects of ongoing trauma on personality organisation and the
effects of childhood trauma, abuse and neglect. They point out the traumatic impact of prolonged
victimization on development characteristic personality traits, including alterations in empathy and
identity. Some specific approaches to victims of domestic and sexual violence are explored included
the risk assessment for domestic violence. Authors will illustrate some specific intervention with sex
offenders and domestic violence perpetrators. In particular the use of EMDR on both victims and
perpetrators during the treatment phases. Specificity of approach and intervention with victims and
perpetrator will be described, with a focus on court-prescribed treatment and risk assessment. An
outline of treatment for sex offenders (classical relapse prevention model, Good Lives Model, CIPM
model) will be provided.
Some issues about vicarious trauma will be discussed in order to understand traumatic
countertransference and the importance of therapist’s support system.

TREATING TRAUMATIC IMPACT OF VICTIMIZATION IN SURVIVORS.
S. Teresa Bruno
The victimization process changes the victim internal world. It’s at the origin of pathogenic statements
and can operate like malignant hypnotic suggestions. Understand this process is crucial for recovery
treatment of complex psychobiological dysregulation in IPV survivors. The recovery stages process is
described with particular attention at EMDR use in the different stages
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TREATING SEXUAL OFFENDERS. A CLINICAL-CRIMINOLOGICAL APPROACH
Carla Maria Xella
Specificity of approach and intervention with perpetrators of sexual violence against both women and
children will be described, A model of intervention based on relapse prevention and Good Lives plans,
including the use of EMDR, will be provided

PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR MEN PERPETRATORS OF VIOLENT BEHAVIOUR
Paolo De Pascalis
Clinical Psychology Asl Modena provides individual and group psychotherapy for men perpetrators of
domestic violence. This is the first center in Italy working in this field of public service. The goal is to
make them responsible for their behaviors and to stop it, encouraging a more appropriate relationship
based on gender equality and respect for women and children’s autonomy.

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IS076
E-HEALTH, PSYCHOLOGY AND MEDICINE: THE FUTURE OF A
CLOSE COOPERATION
E11. Health and clinical intervention - Lifestyles and healthy self-regulation
Convenor
Presenters

Telmo Mourinho Baptista, University of Lisbon, Lisbon - Portugal
Artur Rocha, INESC TEC - INESC Technology & Science Campus da FEUP, Porto Portugal
Francisco Miranda Rodrigues, University of Lisbon, Lisbon - Portugal
Maged N. Kamel Boulos, University of the Highlands and Islands, Elgin - United

Kingdom
Discussant

Telmo Mourinho Baptista, University of Lisbon, Lisbon – Portugal
Telmo Mourinho Baptista, University of Lisbon, Lisbon - Portugal

E-Health is already a reality today and not some future dream. E-Health can infuse a new life into
the‘health for all’ goal. But how can we link e-Health to psychology and how can we use e-health in
developing psychology evaluation and intervention programmes? Psychological health problems are a
major public health concern. Behavioral health problems and unhealthy lifestyles are responsible for
lost-years-of-life and premature mortality, as well as for years of productive life that are lost due to
disabilities (DALY’s).Psychologists and their psychological knowledge and research evidence must be
called in to this key health area, to help in designing and developing the best e-health solutions and
applications for reinforcing positive behaviour and lifestyle modifications. Newer concepts such as
gamification can be used more effectively with evidence-based contributions from the field of
psychology. How can gamification – the utilization of game elements – be best used innon game
situations as an effective way for the promotion of health behavior change? Why has it failed so many
times in several applied areas, although it has been presented as a powerful tool? Health problems with
behavioral causes are a priority of the World Health Organization. Mobile communication
technologies and the Internet have been offering a privileged field for the discovery of answers to
some of these problems. Because of its perceived closeness to games, gamification is also a privileged
way to health behaviors promotion. These are the questions and problems we are trying to provide
some answers and solutions for: to make technology a true and effective way in promoting health and
wellbeing, positive health behavior changes and good habits.

NEW CHALLENGES DEMAND NEW STRATEGIES
Telmo Mourinho Baptista
The importance and urgency to develop strategies for the prevention and promotion of health is
closely related to the challenges facing health needs. New areas of confluence of different types of
knowledge (such as medicine, psychology, health informatics) need to be integrated to create new
instruments to help people in their health objectives.

GAMIFICATION AND E-HEALTH
Maged N. Kamel Boulos
We present the main ingredients for a successful implementation of game mechanics (gamification) in
e-health interventions intended for health-related behaviour and lifestyle modifications (e.g., in obesity
[diet and exercise] or for smoking cessation), drawing on the best current research evidence in this
domain, including mobile game apps.
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SELF-REGULATION AND GAMIFICATION
Francisco Miranda Rodrigues
Motivation and self-regulation skills are fundamental to health habits formation and change. Selfregulation depends on self-monitoring of health behaviours and social and cognitive conditions for
these behaviours to happen. Combined with new health informatics technologies, Gamification allows
a new implementation of self-regulation strategies.

ICT4D - PLATFORM FOR INTERNET-BASED DEPRESSION TREATMENT
Artur Rocha
ICT4D is an innovative platform for the treatment for depressionthatcombinesboth internet and mobile
technologies, and face-to-face interventions. First usedduring the ICT4Depression project,
thisplatoformwillnow be used to support Comparative EffectivenessResearch (TAU vs blended) in
5countriesperforming RCT in the scope of E-COMPARED.

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IS077
BIOLOGICALLY-BASED AND CULTURALLY-BASED VARIETIES OF
HUMAN PROSOCIALITY AND MORALITY: SOCIALIZATION AND
PERSONALITY MECHANISMS
B05. Development and education - Moral development and prosocial behaviour
Convenor
Presenters

Gustavo Carlo, University of Missouri, Columbia - United States
Darcia Narvaez, University of Notre Dame, South Bend - United States
Deborah Laible, Lehigh University, Bethlehem - United States
Laura Padilla-Walker, Brigham Young University, Provo - United States
Maria Mestre, University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain
María Rosario T. de Guzmán, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln - United

States

Whereas traditional models emphasized social cognitive influences (e.g., Kohlberg, 1969), more
comprehensive models have emerged that account for biological- and cultural-based aspects of moral
development. Drawing from evolutionary, temperament, personality, social cognitive, cultural, and
socialization models of development, scholars are currently examining the wide range of influences on
moral development. Furthermore, these new research efforts adopt paradigms that acknowledge the
interactive and dynamic mechanisms of development. The present symposium is designed to present
examples of these new research paradigms, and to summarize recent findings that advance our
understanding of moral development.
The symposium gathers researchers from a wide range of theoretical perspectives that use diverse
methods and study diverse samples. Biological perspectives are exemplified in the research on
temperament (Laible and colleagues) and attachment and the evolved developmental niche (Narvaez
and colleagues). Cultural and socialization processes are focus of the studies on community building
and shared cultural practices in Poland (de Guzman and colleagues), parental socialization practices
(Laible and coleagues) and parenting styles (Walker & Carlo). Finally, the work on sympathy,
empathy, and perspective taking (Walker & Carlo; Carlo and colleagues) represents social cognitive
perspectives. These influences are studied using multiple methods (e.g., multiple reporters,
observations, interviews) and in diverse populations (e.g., Poland, U.S., Turkey, Spain). The works
represent a wide range of moral outcomes and analytical approaches (e.g., latent growth curve
modeling, qualitative, structural equation modeling). Thus, the findings will significantly contribute to
richer conceptualizations of moral development and greater understanding of the complex, interplay
mechanisms that account for such development.

BAYANIHAN: COMMUNITY BUILDING AMONG FILIPINOS IN POLAND
Maria Rosario T. de Guzman, Carolyn P. Edwards, & Jill Brown
This phenomenological study examines the process of community building within a growing Filipino
population in Poland. Qualitative data from interviews and focus group discussions evoked themes
reflecting the roles of religion, helping, cooperation, shared cultural practices, and individual agency
in coping with challenges related to migration.

THE EVOLVED DEVELOPMENTAL NICHE AND ITS EFFECTS ON MORALITY IN
ADULTS
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Darcia Narvaez, Lijuan Wang, Ashley Lawrence, & Ying Cheng
Like other animals, humans evolved intense parenting to optimize offspring development. Studies
show evolved practices are related to moral development in young children. Here mediation models
based on adult retrospective reports of childhood experience show significant paths from attachment,
mental health, moral capacities to moral orientation

LATENT GROWTH CURVE ANALYSIS OF SYMPATHY AND PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR
DURING ADOLESCENCE
Laura Padilla-Walker & Gustavo Carlo
Prosocial development is influenced by a variety of dispositional and relational variables. However,
we know little about longitudinal change in prosocial behavior during adolescence. This paper will use
latent growth curve modeling to determine whether longitudinal change in sympathy and parental
warmth are associated with change in prosocial behavior.

THE LONGITUDINAL ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN TEMPERAMENT, PARENTING, AND
YOUNG CHILDREN’S COMFORTING, COOPERATION, HELPING, AND SHARING
Deborah Laible, Gustavo Carlo, Asiye Kumru, & Cara Streit
Mothers of 293 Turkish children completed measures of parenting, temperament and prosocial
behavior. Analyses showed induction (age 4) was related to approach (age 6), which predicted
prosocial behavior (age 7). Maternal warmth (at 4) was linked with less reactivity (at 6), which
predicted more helping, and had direct links with cooperation (at 7).

A CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY OF PARENTAL USE OF REWARDS, EMPATHYRELATED TRAITS AND PROSOCIAL BEHAVIORS
Gustavo Carlo, Maria Mestre, Ana Tur-Pocar, Paula Samper, & Natalie Johnson
Examined the relative effects of parents’ use of social versus material rewards on adolescents’
empathic tendencies and prosocial behaviors in adolescents from Spain and the USA. Discussion will
focus on the different roles of social and material rewards in predicting prosocial tendencies.

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IS078
EMDR: THEORY, PRACTICE AND RESEARCH APPLICATION IN A
MASS DISASTER
F07. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Psychological consequences of natural disasters for individuals,
families and communities
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Elisa Bergonzini, ASL Modena Carpi, Modena - Italy
Elisa Bergonzini, ASL Modena Carpi, Modena - Italy
Isabel Fernandez, Center of Psychotraumatology, Milan - Italy
Lucia Formenti, Center of Psychotraumatology, Milan – Italy
Elisa Bergonzini, ASL Modena Carpi, Modena - Italy

EMDR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating chronic PTSD and old trauma memories, yet early
EMDR intervention, specially in mass disasters could be of great interest for prevention and
intervention in the field of mental health. EMDR can be part of a comprehensive treatment and can
become an elective treatment for people who can be very exposed when a disaster hits a community.
The presentations will highlight clinical aspects of using EMDR following recent trauma of great
magnitude such as earthquakes or murders of children.
Objectives of the Symposium are numerous. First of all, the authors will show the outcomes of EMDR
interventions in different areas, focusing on both natural disasters and social tragical events. These
interventions were delivered to the affected population in the aftermath of such catastrophes in order
to study the structure and the effectiveness of treatments in the acute phase of trauma.
The authors will describe throughly the development of individual and group treatments and their
connections with the reductions of PTSD symptoms. They will present epidemiological data and
measured change in post-traumatic stress before and after EMDR. Moreover, the authors will highlight
the effectiveness of these interventions in different periods of life, specifically childhood and old age.
Findings of these studies suggest that EMDR treatment is a valid early trauma-focused intervention in
case of community disasters: it is not only effective in the process of recovery from trauma but it also
facilitates the traumatic episode narrative and the normal process of mourning, thus preventing the
development of future emotional deseases. As part of a comprehensive approach, intervening with
EMDR has proven to give a significant contribution.
At the end of the Symposium practical guidelines for implementation of EMDR in the acute and
chronic phase of trauma after a mass disaster will be provided.

OUTCOMES OF ACUTE PHASE TREATMENTS FOLLOWING THE EARTHQUAKE
THAT HIT EMILIA IN 2012
Elisa Bergonzini
On the 20th and 29th of May 2012, Emilia was hit by two major earthquakes of a magnitude 5.9 on
the Richter scale. This study shows the outcome of EMDR interventions provided within three months
after the events. At the end, considerable attention will be devoted to the results of these interventions
on older people (>65).

EMDR WITH CHILDREN INVOLVED IN MASS DISASTER
Isabel Fernandez
EMDR can be an early trauma-focused treatment with children involved in mass disasters. Individual
and group sessions can be used for school children seriously exposed to trauma and grief including:
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threat to life, loss of friends and siblings, etc. During the presentation the structure of an intervention
in the acute phase will be described.

EMDR: OUTCOMES OF GROUP TREATMENTS FOLLOWING COMMUNITY
DISASTERS
Lucia Formenti, Maslovaric G., Gilardi T., Mastronardi C., Perilli S., Sacchezin S., Fonticoli E., Luzzi
M., Paturzo C.
This study describes the application of EMDR in group as an early trauma-focused intervention with
children involved in three different community disasters. Results indicated that after EMDR group
treatment children had a lower percentage of post-traumatic symptoms and subjective psychological
distress.

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IS079
SOCIAL ASPECTS OF LEARNING AND REMEMBERING
A09. General issues and basic processes - Learning and memory
Convenor
Presenters

Peter Graf, University of British Columbia, Vancouver - Canada
Maria A. Brandimonte , Suor Orsola Benincasa University, Naples - Italy
Peter Graf, University of British Columbia, Vancouver - Canada
Wendy Jolliffe, University of Hull, Kingston upon Hull - United Kingdom
William Hirst , New School for Social Research, New York - United States

Learning and remembering often appear to have a social aspect which is underscored, for example,
when students must collaborate in figuring out how to build a web-site or when a married couple
attempts to recollect details from their long-ago wedding day.But social learning/remembering is not
universally recognized as a valid and distinct phenomenon, or as valuable pedagogic approach;
especially in higher education (e.g., college and university), the emphasis is still on solo learning
andsocial aspects are frequently regarded as interchangeable with other aids that could be provided to
facilitate learning and remembering (e.g., video aids, study guides, different viewpoints).In support of
the hypothesis that social, collaborative learning and remembering are more than augmented solo
learning/remembering, one contribution to this symposium reports new research on the costs and
benefits which can occur in collaborative retrospective remembering. Another contribution focuses on
social prospective remembering -- remembering to do something for others -- and shows that this form
of memory is affected by both the amount and type of reward associated with successful performance.
A third contribution concerns the mindset people engage for interpreting memory failures, and shows
that such failures are perceived as particularly serious if they are about the future (i.e., prospective
memory failures) andif they impact other people. The final contribution to this symposium focuses on
the conditions which are necessary for true collaborative learning, and it uses research to highlight
elements which are critical for designing effective teacher education programs and for implementing
cooperative learning more generally in higher education.

LONG-TERM SELECTIVE FORGETTING AFTER LISTENING TO SELECTIVE
REMEMBERING: A CONSEQUENCE OF COLLABORATIVE LEARNING
William Hirst, Martin Fagin & Robert Meksin
Listening to another’s recollection of events produces selective memory improvements and selective
forgetting. The most definitive study suggests that long-term retention is more likely when
interweaved selective remembering and re-exposure trials are distributed than massed. Our research
investigated this hypothesis with retention intervals up to a month, and our results highlight both the
costs and benefits of collaborative remembering.

EFFECTS OF MATERIAL AND NON-MATERIAL REWARDS ON REMEMBERINGTO DO
THINGS FOR OTHERS
Maria A. Brandimonte&Donatella Ferrante
Previous research shows that pro-social prospective memory -- remembering to do something for
others -- is impaired by small material rewards. We have recently found that the amount and type of
reward have different effects on pro-social prospective memory, on concurrently ongoing activities,
and on participants’ predictions about future pro-social actions. We hypothesize that reward effects are
modulated by conscious or unconscious motivational mechanisms.
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MEMORY FAILURES ARE MORE SERIOUS IF THEY ARE ABOUT OTHERS AND
ABOUT THE FUTURE
Peter Graf & Michelle Crease Lark
Memory failures are assumed to be interpreted differently if they concern the past (retrospective)
rather than the future (prospective). Our research shows differences between retro- and pro-spective
memory (e.g., the latter are regarded as being more serious), but only when interpreting failures that
occurred in a social context. We use the findings to speculate about the different schemas engaged for
interpreting retro- and pro-spective memory failures.

DEVELOPING COOPERATIVE LEARNING PEDAGOGY IN INITIAL TEACHER
EDUCATION
Wendy Jolliffe
Cooperative learning - a strategy in which students work in teams to improve their understanding of a
subject - presents a variety of challenges. Research shows that training teachers in cooperative
learning impacts their understanding, attitudes and classroom practice. I use research findings to
identify critical elements in designing effective teacher education programs and for implementing
cooperative learning more generally in higher education.

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PS080
THE PROFESSIONAL CAREER OF PSYCHOLOGISTS IN THE
CYBERSPACE
F14. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Cyberspace and virtual realities
Convenor
Naples Presenters
Naples -

Discussant

Stefano Manzo, Ordine Psicologi Regione Campania; Anima Research Institute,
Italy
Stefano Manzo, Ordine Psicologi Regione Campania; Anima Research Institute,
Italy
Anna Cannata, Anima Research Institute, Naples - Italy
Christiane Eichenberg, Sigmund Freud University, Vienna - Austria
Alessandro Calderoni, Psymind; Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Milan - Italy
Antonella Bozzaotra, Campania Region Psychologists Association, Naples - Italy

The wide diffusion of new communication technologies, empowered by the use of the web, is
changing the traditional modalities of working, of dealing with commercial exchanges, of offering
services, of socializing. Structures, institutions, services and performances are undergoing the
inescapable processes of deconstruction and digitizing, and are urged to the use of the cyberspace;
people search for information concerning psychological care, health and wellbeing; services and
professional performances are offered directly online. As a consequence, the professionals of the
psychological sectors are urged to adapt and supply their psychological interventions according to this
new dimension.
But, notwithstanding the advantages, those technologies entail some levels of criticality. Both clients
and professionals feel that, added to the fear for a subversion of our traditional relationships, it is the
confusion and uncertainty given by a chaotic and unregulated offer for both services and
performances, and involving the efficiency and dependability of the psychological interventions.
All this aspects have produced two opposite effects: either an uncritical acceptance of logics,
procedures, and instruments which do not belong to the psychological profession, or the total refuse of
the new technologies. In the meantime, there has not been occasion to reflect and analyse the
relationship among the conveniences offered by the new communication technologies and the
psychological processes they involve. On the contrary, we consider it is necessary to regain the
specificity of our profession, by reflecting on shape and content it could assume inside this new
context.
The present symposium is aimed at reinforcing and integrating those researches aimed at exploring the
state-of-the-art of the online psychological interventions. More in details, we will present the results of
our researches in: drawing an updated map of the online psychological services offered in Italy;
analysing the representations that psychologists have of the online psychological interventions;
conducting an inquiry on the expectations of the “clients” on the psychological services; studying the
effects of a psychological service offered to “native digit” generations.
Our researches start by drawing a conceptual map of the reality of the psychological interventions in
the cyberspace, reporting limits and potentialities of these new forms of intervention. It would then
focus on identifying general principles able to guarantee the high quality and competency of the
professionals of the psychological sector; drawing guidelines, clear and coherent with the ethics of the
profession, addressed to both the government decision-makers and our committee; identifying possible
perspectives for the future of our profession.

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THE PROFILE OF A PROFESSIONAL IN THE CYBERSPACE; A PRELIMINARY
INQUIRY AMONG PSYCHOLOGISTS OF THE CAMPANIA REGION
Stefano Manzo
He will present an inquiry conduced among psychologists of the Campania Region, collecting the
different opinions and expectations on the online psychological intervention: who is already working
online, who would like to, who would never do it.

THE PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES INTO THE CYBERSPACE; A FIRST CENSUS ON
THE SERVICES OFFERED IN ITALY
Anna Cannata
She will present the results of a survey censing the psychological services offered in the cyberspace
inside the Italian territory, aimed at identify their typologies, characteristics and peculiarities, main
strength and weak points.

THE INTERNET AS A MENTAL HEALTH ADVISOR IN GERMANY – RESULTS OF A
NATIONAL SURVEY
Christiane Eichenberg
The internet constitutes a popular source of health information. However, the use of the internet and
other modern media in the domain of mental health remains widely unclear. This study aimed at
exploring the readiness for seeking information online and making use of online counseling and
media-assisted psychotherapy.

ZHENG, THE FIRST ITALIAN FACEBOOK-BASED ON LINE HELP FOR TEENS:
PROJECT, MODEL, OUTCOME
Alessandro Calderoni
Zheng was born in 2010 as the first public and free Italian service for psychological help aimed at
teenagers on Facebook. In the first year of its history, Zheng scored almost 900 teen users, more than
500 chat, and 300 email. In 2014 it still works and it’s a model for other services.

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PS081
THE PSYCHOBIOLOGY OF STRESS
A04. General issues and basic processes - Psychobiology
Convenor
Presenters

Kingdom
Discussant

Michael Smith, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne - United Kingdom
Mark Wetherell, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne - United Kingdom
Angela Clow, University of Westminster, London - United Kingdom
Michael Smith, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne - United Kingdom
Sarita Robinson, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire - United
Angela Clow, University of Westminster, London - United Kingdom

This symposium will be presented by members of the British Psychological Society (BPS)
Psychobiology Section with expertise in the psychobiology of stress. Each speaker leads a research
programme, collectively investigating i) the basal functioning and reactivity of endocrine and
cardiovascular parameters relating to stress, ii) psychosocial factors which may impact upon
functioning of these endocrine and cardiovascular systems and iii) the role of these systems in
mediating such outcomes as health and cognitive performance. The first talk will consider the effect of
anticipation on the release of the stress hormone cortisol, and will suggest that this may be a
mechanism by which the individual prepares biologically for forthcoming demand. The following
talks will consider the role of individual differences in modifying the psychobiological response to
stress. The second talk will suggest that insecure anxious attachment style is associated with an
increased cortisol response to psychosocial stress. The third talk will demonstrate that Type D
(distressed) personality is associated with a blunted cardiovascular response to stress, and will
consider whether dysregulation of the HPA axis in this group of individuals may explain the increased
physical health symptoms associated with Type D personality. The final talk will discuss the impact of
facing life-threatening, stressful situations on cognitive performance. Taken together, the symposium
aims to consider the role of psychobiological stress reactivity, and basal functioning of
psychobiological stress systems on health, wellbeing and cognition, as well as inter-individual
differences which may be involved in dysregulating psychobiological stress pathways and stress
reactivity. From an applied perspective, it is important to identify the health and cognitive implications
of a dysregulated stress response so that targeted interventions can be developed. The symposium is
supported by the BPS Psychobiology Section.

ASSESSING THE PSYCHOBIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN THE
ANTICIPATION OF STRESS
Mark Wetherell
Cortisol is increased during stress. The anticipation of stress also leads to increased secretion and may
prepare the individual for forthcoming demand. We have assessed the impact of a range of
manipulated stressors on diurnal cortisol rhythm.

INSECURE ANXIOUS ATTACHMENT STYLE PREDICTS AN ENHANCED CORTISOL
RESPONSE TO GROUP STRESS
Angela Clow

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Anxious attachment style is associated with poor health but links with stress reactivity are not clear.
Using the TSST for groups we show increased HPA axis activation and sustained perceived stress
compared to secure and avoidant attachment style.

TYPE D (DISTRESSED) PERSONALITY AND PSYCHOBIOLOGICAL STRESS
REACTIVITY
Michael Smith
This talk will present a series of studies in which we have been investigating the relationship between
Type D (distressed) personality and i) cardiovascular responses to stress, and ii) basal secretion of the
stress hormone cortisol.
THE PSYCHOBIOLOGY OF FACING LIFE THREATING SITUATIONS – THE IMPACT
ON COGNITION
Sarita Robinson
This paper will outline a series of studies undertaken to examine the impact of acute stress on
cognition. The paper will also consider the effects of individual differences and nutritional
interventions on trauma resilience.

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PS082
UNDERLYING MECHANISMS OF EXTERNALIZING AND SOCIAL
BEHAVIOUR PROBLEMS IN ADOLESCENCE
B14. Development and education - Developmental disorders in health
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Kirsten Smeets, Karakter Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Nijmegen - Netherlands
Kirsten Smeets, Karakter Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Nijmegen - Netherlands
Mireille Bakker, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen Jennifer Richards, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen Anoek Oerlemans, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen Floor Scheepers, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, Utrecht - Netherlands

Developmental disorders are often characterized by externalizing and social behaviour problems.
Maladaptive aggression and antisocial behaviours are reported in attention-deficit/hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorders (ODD), and conduct disorders (CD). Lack of
empathy, poorer emotion recognition, and impaired prosocial behaviour is often reported in autism
spectrum disorders (ASD) and CD. There is a need for information on multiple aspects of the origins
in these affected behaviours. Examining causal mechanisms for externalizing and social behaviour
problems has been difficult, partly because of the large within-disorder and between-disorder
heterogeneity of these behaviours (e.g. one person with emotion recognition problems might develop
conduct problems, whereas the other person develops autistic problems or no problematic behaviour).
This symposium integrates novel insights into the underpinnings of social behaviour problems and
related traits (e.g. autistic spectrum traits, attention deficits and hyperactivity problems, oppositional
behaviour problems and delinquent or conduct problems) using a complementary array of research
designs and methodological approaches (gene-environment interactions and parenting effects,
psychobiological markers, and person-cantered research).

CAN PROACTIVE AND REACTIVE AGGRESSION BE DISTINGUISHED AS DIFFERENT
SUBTYPES OF AGGRESSION IN ADOLESCENTS? A VARIABLE- AND PERSON-BASED
APPROACH
Kirsten Smeets
Literature is inconsistent as to whether proactive and reactive aggression can be separated or not. The
aim of this study was to examine the possible distinction of proactive and reactive aggression and
determine the underlying behavioural profiles. Results show that proactive and reactive aggression can
be distinguished, however proactive aggression does not seem to occur in the absence of reactive
aggression. Furthermore, reactive aggression seems to encompass a form of internal frustration and
external provocation. Contrary to previous studies, aggression factors and classes were not
differentially associated with other mental health problems and mainly driven by overall severity
rather than subtype of aggression.

THE ROLE OF TESTOSTERONE, CORTISOL AND OXYTOCINE IN CHILDREN AND
ADOLESCENTS WITH DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR DISORDERS
Mireille Bakker
This research is focused on hormonal values within a sample of children and adolescents with
disruptive behaviour disorders (DBD). High values of testosterone are connected to a decrease in
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empathic skills, which in turn is connected to aggression or antisocial behaviour. In contrast, it is
proposed that cortisol has a modulating effect on this. In addition, since both empathy and oxytocine
are connected to social functioning there may be a role for oxytocine on empathic processes.
Outcomes are explored within different subtypes of aggression and level of callous unemotional traits.
ADOLESCENT BEHAVIOURAL AND NEURAL REWARD PROCESSING: A TEST OF
THE DIFFERENTIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY THEORY
Jennifer Richards
While extremes in reward sensitivity can lead to maladaptive behaviour, little is known about its
genetic and environmental background. To improve our understanding of individual differences in
reward sensitivity, we tested the differential susceptibility theory, which states that individuals
carrying plasticity gene variants will be more disadvantaged in negative, but more advantaged in
positive environments. Behavioural and neural responses to rewards were assessed during a monetary
incentive delay (MID) task in adolescents with and without Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
(ADHD). We found evidence for differential genetic susceptibility toward positive social
environments for both behavioural and striatal reward sensitivity. Evidence was also found in favor of
cumulative genetic plasticity toward negative environmental effects for general task performance.

LONGITUDINAL, RECIPROCAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AUTISM SPECTRUM
DISORDER TRAITS AND PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOUR IN ADOLESCENCE. THE TRAILS
STUDY
Anoek Oerlemans
Disorders on the autism spectrum (ASDs), or autistic traits, have been associated with deficits in
prosocial behaviour. The current study investigates the longitudinal relationships between autistic
traits and prosocial behaviour in early to late adolescence. Results show that ASD and prosocial traits
were fairly stable over time. In addition, small cross-lagged effects indicate that worse prosocial
behaviour predicts poorer ASD outcomes (i.e. more traits) at a subsequent time-point, and vice versa.

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PS083
ATTITUDES TOWARD SAME-SEX MARRIAGE AND GAY/LESBIAN
PARENTING ACROSS EUROPE
C04. Culture and society - LGBTQI studies
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Salvatore D'Amore, University of Liège, Liège - Belgium
Salvatore D'Amore, University of Liège, Liège - Belgium
Marta Evelia Aparicio-García, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid - Spain
Marta Dora, Jagiellonian University, Krakow - Poland
Klio Geroulanou, New York College, Athens - Greece
Roberto Baiocco, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy

The legality of same-sex marriage (SSM) and gay or lesbian parenting (GLP) has been an object of
controversy in many European countries. Besides these important civil and legal recognitions, how
attitudes toward SSM and GLP are changing is an important question not only for psychologists but
for the formation of public policy and for political decisions as well. Previous research has only shown
the correlated variables of positive and negative attitudes toward SSM. No European research has
studied correlates of positive and negative attitudes towards SSM and GLP. In the framework of this
symposium we will present results coming from a huge cross-national research comparing
heterosexual’s attitudes of 18000 students across 7 European countries (Belgium, France, Greece,
Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain).
The sample involved between 300 and 1000 participants for each participant country. Half of the
sample involved heterosexual females and the other half heterosexual males. All participants were
from 18 to 25 years old. Up to one-third of the students from each country were to be from the Social
Sciences, but at least two-thirds of all participants must come from others faculties. The survey
questions were administered anonymously online through the internet. and with encryption to ensure
complete security of the data gathered. This research is important in order to gauge what attitudes are
prevalent in the selected countries and also to understand the sources of resistance to the quest for
same-sex marriage and lesbian/gay parenting rights. After this first presentation, results from three
contrasted countries (Greece, Poland and Spain) in term of civil rights and socio-political situation
will be presented. The findings of these cross-national and national studies may be important not only
for scholars but also for the formation of public policy to enhance the well-being of lesbian and gay
populations across Europe.

ATTITUDES TOWARD GAY AND LESBIAN COUPLES AND PARENTS IN SPAIN
Marta Evelia Aparicio-García, Béatriz Fernández-Castilla
The results show that two variables are really important when predicting a greater support toward
homosexuals: political ideology and importance of religion. Having contact with homosexuals and
specially being satisfied with emerge as key factors in predicting support from same-sex marriage,
homosexual parenting and positive attitudes toward them

ATTITUDES TOWARDS SAME SEX MARRIAGE AND GAY AND LESBIAN PARENTING
AMONG GREEK STUDENTS
Klio Geroulanou
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This presentation will focus on the Greek sample’s results, particularities, and implications. Main
findings indicate that male gender, religiosity and political conservatism are most related to negative
attitudes towards homosexuality, same sex marriage and parenting. Other correlates to these variables
will also be discussed in detail

ATTITUDES TOWARDS SAME-SEX MARRIAGE AND PARENTING IN POLAND
Marta Dora, Magda Mijas
Despite ongoing social changes resulting in broadening the definition of family, same-sex marriage
and lesbian or gay parenting are objects of controversy in many European countries, with Poland
taking lead. The analysis of over 660 surveys has shown a great homogeneity of the sample with
gender and religiosity as main predictors of the attitudes.

ATTITUDES TOWARD GAY AND LESBIAN MARRIAGE AND PARENTING ACROSS
SEVEN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES
Salvatore D’Amore, Robert-Jay Green, Katie Katuzny, Thèrese Scali, Roberto Baiocco, Olivier Vecho,
Pedro Alexandre Nuno da Costa, Magdalena Mijas, Marta Evelia Aparicio, Klio Geroulanou
This study (N=13,373) shows that attitudes toward same-sex marriage and gay and lesbian parenting
across seven European countries are associated with participant’s country of residence, sex, number of
LGBT people in social network, religiosity, belief in traditional gender roles, and satisfaction in social
relationships with LGBT people.

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PS084
A PROACTIVE APPROACH TO ORGANIZATIONS: IMPACT OF
POSITIVE ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR ON WELL-BEING AT
WORK
D05. Work and organization - Organizational behaviour
Convenors
Presenters

Ranjeet Nambudiri, Indian Institute of Management Indore, Prabandh Shikhar - India
Papri Nath, Indian Institute of Management Trichy, Tiruchirappalli - India
Ranjeet Nambudiri, Indian Institute of Management Indore, Prabandh Shikhar - India
Papri Nath, Indian Institute of Management Trichy, Tiruchirappalli - India
Marshall Valencia, University of Nottingham, Selangor Darul Ehsan - Malaysia
Belén Mesurado, National Scientific and Technical Research Council, Buenos Aires Argentina
Abhishek Totawar, Indian Institute of Management Trichy, Tiruchirappalli - India

Since decades, OB scholars have focused on exploring negative behaviour at workplace, such as
burnout, depersonalization, and absenteeism. Recent evidences, however, lay emphasis on the effects
of positive (proactive) organizational behaviour like positive emotions, flow, hope, and optimism.
This new perspective of ‘positive organizational behaviour’ (Luthans, 2002) argues that it is very
unlikely that presence of same factor will lead to satisfaction and absence to dissatisfaction.
Therefore, it is essential to explore positive (proactive) organizational behaviour distinctly, instead of
considering it opposite to negative organizational behaviour. This may contribute as an alternative to
the traditional reactive approach of studying behaviour in an organizational context. Several POB
studies show that studying positive organizational behaviour gives a comprehensive understanding of
the variance in organizational outcomes (Bakker & Schaufeli, 2008).
The primary objective of this symposium is to integrate some recent work on positive organizational
behaviour from different contexts. The four studies presented in this symposium, carried out in three
different geographical locations, tested through experimental and survey designs, highlight the
significance of positive organizational behaviour. Holistically, they explain how employees can
become more proactive, energetic, dedicated, and absorbed by their work. The discussion triggered by
this symposium will aim at developing a holistic understanding of the place where we work and live
by focusing both on reactive and positive aspects of it.
The proposed symposium serves to achieve two objectives. First, we highlight the impact of positive
organizational behaviour at employee and organizational level. Second, we integrate the findings and
propose a framework for future research.

JOB CRAFTING PREDICTS WORK ENGAGEMENT: THE MODERATING ROLE OF
WELL-BEING AND EXTRAVERSION
Marshall Valencia
Findings from a Malaysian sample indicates that positive job crafting-engagement link is more
enhanced when negative affect is high; and when low flourishing combines with high extraversion.
Implications on how low well-being can be harnessed to stimulate employee engagement are
discussed.

DOES FEELING POSITIVE CONTRIBUTES TO WELL BEING AT WORK?
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Papri Nath
A study on 511 Indian school teachers shows that positive experiences at work predict greater well
being through building psychological resilience. Moreover, structural equations reveal that emotional
intelligence moderates the impact of positive emotions on psychological resilience. The study has
implications in designing human resource development programs.

THE RELATION BETWEEN PERSONALITY TRAITS AND PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL
WITH FLOW AND ENGAGEMENT IN ARGENTINEAN EMPLOYEES
Belén Mesurado
The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between the Big Five factors of personality
and Psychological Capital with flow and engagement in Argentinean employees.
The results of SEM showed that the theoretical model fit the data very well. The role of personality
and capital psychology in the prediction of flow and engagement in work setting is discussed.

MOOD AND SELF-EFFICACY: HEDONIC AND UTILITARIAN MOTIVATION AS
MODERATORS
Abhishek Totawar, Ranjeet Nambudiri
A four-quadrant framework is developed and tested to examine the causal influence of mood on selfefficacy with hedonic and utilitarian motivation moderating this relationship. A quasiexperimental
design is followed with three mood states experimentally induced across six groups. Results and
implications are discussed in the organizational context.

FRAMEWORK FOR FUTURE RESEARCH
Ranjeet Nambudiri
We conclude this symposium by synthesizing findings from the four studies. It is expected that such
synthesis and integration will provide useful guidelines for future research in the arena of POB.

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PS085
IMPROVING SOCIAL WELL-BEING AND SUSTAINABLE
DEVELOPMENT: THE UNITED NATION AGENDA BEYOND 2015
D09. Work and organization - Sustainable development and corporate social responsibility
Convenor
Presenters

Pamela Bernabei, Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations,
Rome - Italy
Pamela Bernabei, Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations,
Rome - Italy
Veronica Odintsova, Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg - Russian

Federation

Discussant

Gabriella Palumbo, Italian National Health Institute, Rome - Italy
Margherita Carotenuto, AEO, Unit of sustainable development and training, Milan Italy
Marina Capasso, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy

Looking beyond the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the United Nation (UN) sustainable
development agenda for the period after 2015 is addressing new challenges facing people and planet:
improving economic and social well-being while protecting the environment, and address issues
including growth, equality, peace and security, governance and human rights. It must constitute global
transformational change for people and planet, with common, shared responsibilities for all countries,
recognizing that countries have different capabilities. The goal is “simple but daunting - prosperity and
dignity for all in a world where humankind lives in harmony with nature”.
So, if responsibility and reciprocity are in synergy, can people and the planet live together happily?
And, when arguing about ‘sustainable human relations’, ‘social responsibility’, organizations and
sustainability are we discussing about theory or practice? The aim of the Symposium is to try to give
answers to this challenge. The speakers, all involved in various committees and working groups that
address global problems, will describe the activities and the realization for the implementation of the
MDGs in regional areas of Europe and Russian Federation: from poor and abandoned places to
sustainable ecobiological projects and centres of humanistic art and culture. In particular, the
responsibility of young university students, involved in the projects, to achieve goals 2 (i.e. achieving
universal primary education), 7 (i.e. ensuring environmental sustainability), 8 (i.e. global partnership
for development) will be highlighted. Thus, projects that place human being at the centre of
sustainable development: education, civilization, which then bear the result of economic prosperity
and psychological well-being. Finally the results concerning “Civilization in progress, through cultural
diversity and MDGs achievement” (under the high level segment of the Economic and Social Council
of UN) will be discussed.

CULTURAL DIVERSITY AS A DRIVING FORCE FOR ALL MANKIND
Pamela Bernabei
Cultural barrier has been the most difficult to manage. This is why the focus of the paper is on the
state of art on tools for training young people and entrepreneurship with its additional components of
corporate social responsibility (CSR).

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ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Veronika Odintsova
To promote environmental education and social responsibility, the faculty of psychology of St.
Petersburg University is running training courses on interaction between physical space and personfriendly environment. Results are discussed.

CIVILIZATIONS IN PROGRESS AND LOCAL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
Gabriella Palumbo
Results of programme “Civilization in progress, through cultural diversity and MDGs achievement”
(at Lizori, under the high level segment of ECOSOC of UN) and its restoration as an ecobiological
sustainable development pilot example is discussed.

THE REAL HUMAN CULTURE AS GUARANTEE OF CULTURAL DIVERSITIES AND
SUSTAINABILITY
Margherita Carotenuto
Beyond many differences between cultures, civilizations, forms of society, there is a common
foundation.
This “common denominator” can be identified and described to evolve healthy individuals and
sustainable coexistence forms.

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PS086
LESBIAN AND GAY PARENTS IN THE SOCIAL CONTEXT: “WHAT
THEY THINK WE ARE. WHAT WE ACTUALLY ARE”
C04. Culture and society - LGBTQI studies
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Nicola Nardelli, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Roberto Baiocco, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Paolo Roberto Pagone, University of Padova, Padua - Italy
Marina Miscioscia, University of Liège, Liège - Belgium
Victor Figueroa, University of London, London - United Kingdom
Vittorio Lingiardi, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy

Studies regarding parenting by lesbians and gay men belong to a branch of research started about 40
years ago. Several studies have investigated the parental capability of lesbians and gay men and the
consequent development of their children. Research has mostly focused on lesbian mothers that have
conceived during previous opposite-sex relationships. In addition, there are studies about biological
gay fathers, gay and lesbian couples with adoptive children, and children born via medically assisted
procreation (MAP; i.e., surrogacy or insemination by donor). There have been various foci of research,
but two macro-categories can be noticed: on the one hand, there are studies about differences and
similarities between the parental skills of opposite-sex parents and same-sex parents; on the other
hand, there are studies about the outcome of children raised by lesbian and gay parents referring to the
sexual, social, psychological, and cognitive development compared with peers from heterosexual
parents. Overall, results demonstrated how lesbians and gay men could be good parents in child
rearing, caregiving ability, division of labour, and parental skills. Simultaneously, researchers studied
the other side of the coin: the discriminatory social context in which lesbian and gay parents and their
children live (or even the desire of lesbians and gay men to become parents). The legal standards
concerning same-sex marriage and the opportunity for gay men and lesbians to raise children differ
within the European legal scenario. Nevertheless, lesbians and gay men have to face prejudices
perpetuated against them, not only as citizens but also as parents, regardless of the State they live in.
What are the attitudes towards lesbian and gay parents, and the wellbeing of their children? How can
we prevent the prejudices against them? What are the challenges addressed by them? The aim of this
symposium is to contribute to answering these important questions, presenting four studies that have
used qualitative and quantitative methods. Hereupon, we want to merge these two distinct themes to
provide a rounded overview of a concern that restricts specific people’s civil rights because of their
sexual orientation.

ATTITUDES TOWARD GAY AND LESBIAN COUPLES AND PARENTS IN ITALY
Roberto Baiocco, Salvatore D’Amore, Robert-Jay Green, S. Ioverno, S. Mazzoni, Vittorio Lingiardi
This study aims at examining the correlated variables of positive and negative attitudes toward samesex marriage and parenting in Italy where LGBT having different recognition levels about their civil
and parental rights.

REDUCING UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ ATTITUDES TOWARDS LESBIANS AND GAY
MEN AS PARENTS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN IMPLICIT AND EXPLICIT PREJUDICE
Paolo Roberto Pagone, Nicola Nardelli, Roberto Baiocco, S. Ioverno, A. Simonelli, Vittorio Lingiardi
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Aim of this study is to evaluate reduction of negative attitudes towards lesbian and gay parents among
university students through teaching. Both implicit and explicit prejudice are assessed.

COPARENTING ACROSS TRANSITION TO PARENTHOOD IN LESBIAN-HEADED
FAMILIES: TWO CASE STUDIES
Marina Miscioscia, A. Simonelli, J.M. Gauthier
In this presentation we observe coparenting across the transition to parenthood in two lesbian-headed
families. Coparenting will be assessed by using the Lausanne Trilogue Play approach at time 1 (during
pregnancy) and time 2 (3 months after birth).

THE IDENTITY LIFE COURSE OF CHILEAN LESBIAN WOMEN BECOMING MOTHERS
FROM HETEROSEXUAL RELATIONSHIPS
Victor Figueroa, F. Tasker
Lesbian mothers living in Latino countries encounter different challenges due to the traditional
expectations for parenting and family formation of their societies. This study explored the coming out
process of 13 lesbian mothers living in Chile.

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PS087
RESILIENCE ACROSS CULTURES: USE OF THE DEVEREUX EARLY
CHILDHOOD ASSESSMENT FOR PRESCHOOLERS AND DEVEREUX
STUDENT STRENGTHS ASSESSMENT IN PROMOTING RESILIENCE
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenor
Resilient
Presenters

Jack A. Naglieri, University of Virginia, Charlottesville; Devereux Center for
Children, Villanova - United States
Ignazio Ardizzone, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Francesca Santoro, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Sara Panunzi, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
Serena Galosi, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome - Italy
David-Jan Punt, Hogrefe Uitgevers, Amsterdam - Netherlands
Matteo Ciancaleoni, Hogrefe Editore, Florence - Italy

The evaluation of factors related to resilience has become a key component to the positive psychology
movement, sometimes referred to as Social Emotional Learning (SEL) in the United States. SEL skills
are substantially developed through social learning contexts and theoretically linked to the frontal
lobes. Measurement of SEL skills is essential if psychologists and educators are to ensure the
development of healthy social-emotional skills. This session will begin with a description of the
Devereux Early Childhood Assessment for Preschoolers (DECAP2) and the Devereux Student
strengths Assessment (DESSA) published in the U.S. This will include the theoretical rationale for the
scales, their psychometric qualities, and application of these rating scales for promoting resilience.
Next, the research on the two versions that have been developed in the Netherlands and Italy will be
described. Finally, application of these tools for the promotion of resilience in clinical practice will be
provided.

ADAPTATION OF DESSA QUESTIONNAIRE: A CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY
David-Jan Punt, Matteo Ciancaleoni
The DESSA is an USA questionnaire adapted in the Netherlands and Italy. The aim of the study was
to assess the cross-cultural differences of the test across these countries. It was administered to parents
and teachers to evaluate both versions.

PROMOTING RESILIENCE: DESSA AND DECA -P2 IN ACTION
Ignazio Ardizzone, Francesca Santoro, Sara Panunzi, Serena Galosi
The authors through clinical examples show the effectiveness of Devereux Early Childhood
Assessment for Preschoolers second Edition and the Devereux Student strengths Assessment-K-8th
Grade in Promoting resilience and preventing child and adolescent psychopathology. The authors also
stress the potential of the two tests in giving information on the normal and pathological development
of personality highlighting an additional and useful of DESSA and DECA in the study of precursors of
personality disorders.

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PS088
ENHANCING SPATIAL ABILITIES THROUGH MOTOR PRACTICE
A12. General Issues and basic processes - Intelligence and cognitive functioning
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Angelica Moè, University of Padova, Padua - Italy
Wenke Möhring, University of Fribourg, Fribourg - Switzerland
Petra Jansen, University of Regensburg, Regensburg - Germany
Francesca Pazzaglia, University of Padova, Padua - Italy
Jérôme Clerc, University of Lille 3, Villeneuve d'Ascq - France
Attilio Carraro, University of Padova, Padua - Italy

The ability to rotate 3-D objects in the space is fundamental when performing many everyday tasks
such as finding one’s way in a new environment, finding the shortest way to reach a place, as well as
succeeding in learning many academic subjects ranging from geometry to physics or chemistry to the
extent that it predicts the choice of STEM careers and professions (Wai, Lubinski, & Benbow, 2009).
Until now research has outlined that a) many biological, cultural, motivational, and experiential
factors influence the ability to rotate correctly and fast, b) men outperform women in mental rotation
(e.g., Halpern et al., 2007). There is also evidence that the ability to mentally rotate objects can be
improved in many ways ranging from playing action video-games, solving mental rotation items or
sketching 3-D objects, engaging in spatial tasks, being included in an academic program which
involves spatial manipulations or representation, reducing stereotype threats, attributing performance
to effort (e.g., Uttal et al., 2013).
This symposium will focus on a way of improving mental rotation abilities: motor practice.
The beneficial effects of motor experiences, manipulation of objects, sports practice, dance, and
physical activities on mental rotation ability will be presented through studies conducted in four
different European countries focusing on populations ranging from 6 months to adulthood.
These activities involving motor practice performed over the years would result in a sort of longlasting and continuous training of overall spatial abilities and mental rotation, in particular, which
could have beneficial effects on both cognitive performance (mainly the ability to represent and
manipulate objects) and health (overall beneficial effects of physical activity). Factors such as
expertise, involvement, characteristics of the motor experience provided will be considered.
The discussion will focus on the role of the mental representation of movement in the development of
mental rotation abilities in both genders, and on the motivational aspects which could favour the
engagement in activities which boost mental rotation and spatial thinking.

EARLY EFFECTS OF MOTOR EXPERIENCE ON INFANT’S MENTAL ROTATION
Wenke Möhring, Andrea Frick
The role of motor experience for infants’ mental rotation ability was investigated using the violationof-expectation paradigm. At 6 months of age, infant’s mental rotation performance was improved by
prior manual experience, at 8-10 months performance was correlated to motor experience.

THE IMPROVEMENT OF MENTAL ROTATION PERFORMANCE IN SECOND
GRADERS AFTER LONG-TERM AND SHORT-TERM CREATIVE DANCE TRAINING
Petra Jansen

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Two studies examined the beneficial effects of dance training. An increase in performance in mental
rotation was observed after five weeks of dance lessons and even after one lesson, but not after normal
physical education lessons.

EFFECTS OF EXPERTISE IN MENTAL ROTATION PERFORMANCE
Francesca Pazzaglia, Angelica Moè, Beatrice Benelli
Studies outlining the effects of expertise in adults practicing sports or physical activities at a regular
basis will be presented. Research showing that professionals perform better in mental rotation than
beginners, and that gender differences maintain but reduce with increasing practice will be discussed.

STRATEGIES WHICH ENABLES TRANSFER OF MOTOR PRACTICE INTO COGNITIVE
ABILITIES
Jérôme Clerc
I will resume my past research showing positive effects of motor practice on cognitive abilities,
including mental rotation and memory for order. I will stress the need of considering individual
strategies people make use of when transferring motor practice to non-motor cognitive tasks.

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PS089
PSYCHOLOGICAL TRIAGE IN MASS EMERGENCIES: GOALS,
CRITERIA, ENACTMENT METHODS
F07. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Psychological consequences of natural disasters for individuals,
families and communities
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Michele Cusano, SIPEM Società Scientifica (Italian Emergency Psychological
Society), Rome - Italy
Angelo Napoli, LUMSA University Rome; SIPEM Società Scientifica (Italian
Emergency Psychological Society), Rome - Italy
Isabella Cinquegrana, SIPEM Società Scientifica (Italian Emergency Psychological
Society), Rome - Italy
Anna Palumbo, SIPEM Società Scientifica (Italian Emergency Psychological
Society), Rome - Italy
Michele Cusano, SIPEM Società Scientifica (Italian Emergency Psychological
Society), Rome - Italy
Michele Cusano, SIPEM Società Scientifica (Italian Emergency Psychological
Society), Rome - Italy

In order to introduce the concept of psychological triage, it’s important to consider that it represents
the first instance of welcoming and evaluation of the patients on the basis of precise criteria that make
it possible to establish a priority of intervention. We can basically say that psychological triage is a
first-welcoming and first-evaluation intervention for the victims of the event, in which, through a
receptive-evaluative-decisional process based on pre-defined criteria, we welcome the person,
evaluate their need for psychological help, identify how postponable the treatment is and determine
the person’s access to psychological care assigning them to a specific priority class. The higher the
class, the more timely the treatment is going to be. Psychological triage - therefore - is an act, or more
specifically a receptive-evaluative-decisional process, enacted through pre-established criteria and
methods, articulated in sequential well defined phases:
a) reception
b) recognition of signs and symptoms
c) attribution of a priority code
On a practical and concrete level, we can say that psychological triage is the process through which
we can assess the urgency for a specific subject to receive and perceive psychological sustainment in
that precise moment.
It should be noted that the psychological triage should not be considered an act or a psychodiagnostic
process. The psychological triage tends to evaluate whether there is need for psychological support
and how urgent. The psychodiagnostic, instead, tends to describe traits and mechanism of psychic
functioning. The psychodiagnostic aims to establish a framework psychic, the psychological triage is
intended to protect the psychological status of person.

GOALS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL TRIAGE
Angelo Napoli
Psychological triage tends to evaluate the need for psychological care and the urgency of it, using
standardized criteria and procedures that are shared and uniform.
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Starting with psychological reactions to critical events and addressing issues related to the assessment
of psychological impact, the presentation will focus on goals, procedures and tools of psychological
triage.

THE NEED FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL TRIAGE INTERVENTION
Anna Palumbo
Studying, experimenting and enacting the process of psychological triage is the only way to
distinguish, in situations of mass emergency, between the victims who need immediate psychological
care and those for which treatment can be postponed.

CRITERIA FOR THE THE ENACTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL TRIAGE
Isabella Cinquegrana
Psychological triage is enacted through the use of criteria on the basis of which operators assigns
subjects to treatment classes. Such priority classes are: low priority (PSI 1), medium priority (PSI 2),
high priority (PSI 3).

ADMINISTERING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL TRIAGE FORM
Michele Cusano
The psychological triage form is to be considered a rapid and effective instrument for the retrieval of
all necessary information, the assessment of the subject’s need for psychological care and the
preservation and study of all collected information. Therefore, particular importance is due to the
properly filling the form and interpreting the elements that constitute it.

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PS090
ISSUES AND POSSIBILITIES OF MORAL ACTING RESEARCH
B05. Development and education - Moral development and prosocial behaviour
Convenor
Presenters

Prague -

Marek Preiss, University of New York, Prague - Czech Republic
Iva Stuchlíková, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice - Czech Republic
Marek Preiss, University of New York, Prague - Czech Republic
Tereza Příhodová, Prague Psychiatric Center; National Institute of Mental Health,
María Luisa Vecina, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid - Spain
Alena Nohavová, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice - Czech Republic

The moral acting is a various concept, which may be studied through many approaches. Authors of
the symposium try to point out, define and account for some of these approaches. The main objective
of the symposium is a broader interdisciplinary reflection on moral acting, focusing on psychological,
clinical and philosophical perspective. We present findings from the ethical perspectives using
different populations and settings, university students and healthy subjects. Our focus carries from
philosophy over to measuring honesty and cheating; moral emotions, moral reasoning and ethics of
university students; coping strategies for academic dishonesty; and measuring honesty.
Nonetheless, the assumption of a shared meaning of academic cheating is not usually verified and it
may introduce an extra measurement error, especially when items are decontextualized. The anchoring
vignettes methods may help to solve the problem by letting respondents evaluate both their situations,
as well as hypothetical situations happening to other people (anchoring vignette).
Like a moral vignette or dilemmas we could use for the research of morality an event that actually
happened. Consequently, we considered measuring morality through the responsibility for the plane
crash of Malaysian Boeing 777 on July 17th,2014. Using this approach we usually assess someone’s
morality by knowing just his behavior. Majority of psychological research about morality/ethical
dilemmas, uses information about behavior as the most common type of assessment. However, the
latest research also underlined the role of emotions in morality, apart from the cognitive area. In
conclusion, with this study we would like to start the reflection concerning the impact of different
types of information about others on our subjective image of their morality. Aside from events we may
show an interest in prevalent social problem. We may emphasize a family violence, the problem that
has been traditionally treated as a gender-related issue.
Many of these moral terms seem to be linked under the umbrella of the moral integrity notion. The
development and use of integrity testing has substantially risen in the recent years. This phenomenon
occurred thanks to the increased numbers of dishonest behaviors across academia, as well as across
variety of working environments, where employers more often reach out to these instruments to screen
their potential future employees.
Because the subject of research is morality, we often face the issue that is usually called the validity
problem. We found that involved subjects have a tendency to follow and interpret moral stories too
much unlikely. These differences then affect and set up subject to answer questionnaires in a random
and confused manner. In order to find out why this occurs, we need to examine morality in a more
fundamental way.

STUDENTS’ MORAL EMOTIONS AND THE EVALUATION OF ACADEMIC
CHEATING/DECEPTION SITUATIONS – THE ADVANTAGE OF ANCHORING
VIGNETTES
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Iva Stuchlíková, Jana Vrbová
The paper deals with the process of developing vignettes that help to place moral emotions into
appropriate context with in the academic environment. We started with a survey assessing particular
situations in which the students felt moral emotions.

PLANE CRASH OF MALAYSIAN BOEING 777 – ASSESSMENT OF OFFENDER’S
MORALITY
Marek Preiss, Mariola Paruzel-Czachura, MichałBrol, Tereza Příhodová, David Krámský, María
Luisa Vecina, Fei Cheng
The aim of our presentation is to introduce our research connected with the assessment of morality of
a person (group) responsible for the plane crash of Malaysian Boeing 777 on July 17th, 2014. In our
research we used the three aspects model in the sphere of morality: behavior, emotions and views.

INTRODUCTION OF AN ORIGINAL AND NEWLY DEVELOPED INTEGRITY MEASURE
Tereza Příhodová, Marek Preiss, David Krámský, Lenka Krámská
The presented pilot study and standardization study introduces an original measure of integrity. In this
work, there are two poles standing against each other, one being integrity, as a complex construct
encountering more than a traditional concept of honesty and on the other side counter productive work
behavior, as a behavior harming the employer.

SACREDNESS OF THE FIVE MORAL FOUNDATIONS IN MEN IN COURT-MANDATED
PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENT FOR ABUSING THEIR PARTNERS
María Luisa Vecina, Daniela Marzana, Mariola Paruzel-Czachura
Intimate partner violence constitutes a serious social problem that has traditionally been treated as a
gender-related issue or as one aspect of the larger issue of family violence. This characterization is
compatible with the assumption that a sacred moral world is threatened by reality, which may be
associated with violent defensive reactions.

VALIDITY PROBLEM OF MORAL REASONING TEST IN REGARDS TO THE THEORY
OF ONE/THIRD PERSPECTIVE
Alena Nohavová, David Krámský
As a major aspect of moral reasoning the paper finds the engagement and the involvement to interpret
the moral issues either from the one person perspective or the third person perspective, as well as the
theory of psychical distance. Consequently, the paper tries to account for these perspective issues in
line with the Kohlberg’s theory.

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PS091
NEW DIRECTION OF SELF-CONTROL (AS A JIKO-CONTROL) OF
DOHSA-HOU (JAPANESE ORIGINAL PSYCHOTHERAPY USING
BODY-MOVEMENT TECHNIQUE)
E11. Health and clinical intervention - Lifestyles and healthy self-regulation
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Yutaka Haramaki, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima - Japan
Osamu Imura, Osaka University, Osaka - Japan
Eiji Ozawa, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima - Japan
Airi Zamami, Nagasaki Junior College, Nagasaki - Japan
Yutaka Haramaki, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima - Japan
Susumu Harizuka, Nakamura Gakuen University, Fukuoka - Japan

A Japanese psycho-therapeutic method “Dohsa-Hou” has been developed for more than 45years in
Japan. Initially, the method has been developed for the people with cerebral palsy to improve their
bodily movements by Professor Gosaku Naruse and his colleagues. And then the method has been
applied to the people with developmental disorders. Now a day in Japan, the clinical psychologists use
Dohsa-Hou as a psychotherapeutic method for the various kind patients at the medical center, mental
hospital, the mental clinic and the institution for disabled people ( ex. psycho-somatic patients,
paediatric patients, schizophrenia, depressive disorder, autistic spectrum disorder, ADHD and LD
children).
“Dohsa” is a Japanese special word and it means a holistic process of motor action which consists of
the psychological process and bodily movement process. The psychologaical process of Dohsa
consists of «intention» and «striving». So, the aims of Dohsa-Hou as a psychotherapy is to support the
patients to control their mind and body (movement). In other words, Dohsa-Hou might help the
patients to integrate their mind and body by themselves. In this symposium, we would like to
introduce to Dohsa-Hou (Japanese psychotherapy) and to report the latest studies of Dohsa-Hou, and
to discuss the new viewpoints of psychotherapy which integrates mind and body with participants of
this symposium.

INTRODUCTION TO DOHSA-HOU
Osamu Imura
Dohsa-Hou is a unique body-oriented approach which has developed in Japan for children with
disabilities and patients with mental disorders. The history, theory and techniques will be introduced.

JIKO-CONTROL FOR PEOPLE WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS
Eiji Ozawa
People with developmental disorders often have self-control problems such as impulsivity or repetitive
behavior. Many studies indicate Dohsa-Hou improves self-awareness and social interaction. This
presentation introduces therapeutic techniques.

JIKO-CONTROL EXPERIENCE FOR STUDENT WITH OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE
Airi Zamami
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JIKO-control experience for Obsessive–compulsive is effective in regulation of anxiety and anger. To
compare with Yoga, Dohsa-Hou has therapist-confronting experience and therapeutic personal
relationship for client.

JIKO-CONTROL FOR CHRONIC PAIN PATIENTS
Yutaka Haramaki
Chronic pain patients keep suppressing and inhibition of their emotion and behavior because of their
pain. Dohsa-Hou makes the patients activate self-care to manage their conditions by intentional
exercise.

PS092
INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY BETWEEN NEW CHALLENGES,
GOOD PRACTICES AND INNOVATIVE ANALYSIS SYSTEMS
E15. Health and clinical intervention - Ageing and dementia
A04. General issues and basic processes - Psychometrics
A15. General issues and basic processes - Artificial intelligence and expert systems
F15. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Data mining
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Giampietro Nardo, ASL San Donà di Piave, San Donà di Piave - Italy
Luc Pieter De Vreese, ASL Modena, Modena - Italy
Giampietro Nardo, ASL San Donà di Piave, San Donà di Piave - Italy
Tiziano Gomiero, DAD ANFFAS TRENTINO Onlus, Trento; Catholic University of
Milan, Brescia; University of Padova, Padua - Italy
Serafino Corti, Fondazione Sospiro ONLUS, Cremona; Catholic University of Milan,
Brescia - Italy
Enzo Grossi, Bracco Foundation, Milan; Villa Santa Maria, Tavernerio - Italy
Luigi Croce, Consorzio SIR Milano, Milan; Centro Studi Psico-Medico-Pedagogici e
della Mediazione CSPDM, Eboli; Catholic University of Milan, Brescia - Italy

Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are now living longer with the majority of individuals
reaching middle and even “old age.” As a consequence of this extended longevity they are vulnerable
to the same age associated health problems as elderly adults in the general population without ID. This
includes dementia, a general term referring to a variety of diseases and conditions causing a
substantial loss of cognitive ability and functional declines; adults with Down syndrome are at
especially high risk.
A great deal of recent effort has focused on the very earliest detectable indicators of decline (and even
prodromal stages of dementia causing diseases). Therefore, it would be very useful to assess a possible
decrease in the level of personal efficiency in the course of time, through the determination of a
baseline that delineates the highest level of lifespan functioning reached by the person with ID.
In this way it could be easier to capture which cognitive deficits are to be considered a primary
outcome of aging dependent ID and which, instead, are signs of a further impairment secondary to an
(incipient) neurodegenerative dementia that is associated by definition with a slowly progressive loss
of previously possessed skills.
Pertinent to this context there is another complex and emerging challenge posed by issues related to
autism.
Both of these challenges demand new tools, new analysis capabilities and best practices that should be
implemented in the general health services.
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In this symposium we would like to propose two research that led to the psychometric validation of
new tools for the Italian context (DSQIID and AFAST), the development of rational good practice in
the management and assessment of aging in intellectual disability (Sospiro and ULSS 10) and an
exemplification of the use of some Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and new processo of data
mining to analyze data and introducing the potential of these innovative tools applied to a complex
field of inquiry like Autism and the functional assessment in people with ID and dementia.

DSQIID
Luigi Croce
A multicentre validation study in aging adults with Down syndrome (DS) and other forms of
Intellectual Disabilities of the Dementia Screening Questionnaire for Individuals with Intellectual
Disabilities This study confirms the cross-cultural value of DSQIID which is a valid and user-friendly
observer-rated scale for cognitive screening in persons with DS aged 40 years and over and in
individuals with ID non-DS with age of 50 years and older.

DEMENTIA SCREENING IN PEOPLE WITH ID
Giampiero Nardo
Case study: data concerning the one year follow-up of a baseline screening for dementia applied to a
population of more than 200 persons with the Dementia Questionnaire for Persons with ID (DMR) in
a population of eastern Veneto and proposed procedures for access and service activation in a national
Health Service (Local Health Unit 10).

THE ROLE OF ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS IN AUTISM RESEARCH
Enzo Grossi
The presentation will focus some potential applications of artificial neural networks in research
activities on autism ranging from the development of predictive models starting from pregnancy risk
factor to the disentangling of EEG chaotic signals to intelligent neuro-imaging

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PS093
IMPLICATIONS OF THE SUCCESSFUL ADVOCACY OF
PSYCHOLOGISTS AT THE UNITED NATIONS TO INFLUENCE THE
NEW SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS
F01. Expo 2015 Hot Topics - Capacities building and human development
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Janel Gauthier, Laval University, Quebec City - Canada
Judy Kuriansky, Columbia University Teachers College, New York - United States
Telmo Mourinho Baptista, Ordem dos Psicólogos Portugueses, Lisbon; Iberoamerican
Federation of Psychological Associations (FIAP); Portuguese Association for
Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies - Portugal
Wolfgang P. Beiglböeck, Beiglböck & Feselmayer Consultants, Vienna - Austria
Florence Denmark, Pace University, New York - United States
José M. Peiró, University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain

In a monumental paradigm shift at the United Nations, mental health and wellbeing is being included
in the global agenda. These Sustainable Development Goals list the 17 goals and 169 targets
governments will strive to achieve in the years 2015-2030. This is due to the dedicated advocacy of
psychologists with member states of the United Nations, and other stakeholders, during meetings of
governments determining the framework. Panelists involved n this process will present major impact
of this success on the practice and science of psychologists worldwide, and the steps psychologists
can- and need - to do to insure maximal positive impacts on their own work and on the betterment of
the planet and people. This advocacy has also impacted the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk
Reduction recently determined in Japan this March. With so many disasters worldwide, including
most recently in Vanuatu and in Nepal, the implications to psychologists of this inclusion of mental
health in the framework will be discussed.

HOW PSYCHOLOGISTS CAN DO SUCCESSFUL ADVOCACY FOR THEIR WORK
Judy Kuriansky
The steps of the advocacy campaign for inclusion of mental health and wellbeing in the new
Sustainable Development Goals will be outlined, including drafting statements and meeting with
governments and important stakeholders, to serve as a model for psychologists to advocate in their
country, to advance their programmes and research.

MAKING YOUR VOICE KNOWN FROM ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD
Telmo Baptista
This presentation describes how psychologists from all countries can influence the global agenda even
when not living in one of the major cities where the United Nations is located, given the presenter’s
personal experience of participating in advocacy efforts. How the global agenda impacts all
psychologists work worldwide is also presented.

WHAT PSYCHOLOGISTS CAN CONTRIBUTE AT THE UN, THE CASE IN VIENNA
Wolfgang P. Beiglböeck
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This presentation focuses on the practical work that an IAAP representative is able to do at a UN
office in Europe and how UN committees can be influenced effectively, using examples like global
drug abuse prevention. Lessons learned are presented, including networking and using existing NGO
structures at the UN.

HOW PSYCHOLOGISTS CAN IMPACT ISSUES ON THE GLOBAL LEVEL AT THE UN
Florence Denmark
The presentation describes how psychologists can have a major impact on many issues on the global
level, specifically with regard to issues like aging, the family and violence against women, given the
presenter’s major roles in committees and conferences about these issues at the United Nations.

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PS094
PSYCHOLOGY OF AGGRESSIVE AND HOSTILE BEHAVIOR
B08. Development and education - Bullying and aggression
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Pavel Ermakov, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don - Russian Federation
Pavel Ermakov, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don - Russian Federation
Olga Fedotova, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don - Russian Federation
Vladimir Kosonogov, University of Murcia, Murcia - Russian Federation
Yuliya Mendzerickaya, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main - Germany
Irina Abakumova, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don - Russian Federation
Elena Vorobyeva, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don - Russian Federation

At the symposium will be discussed the problem of hostility as forms of emotionally-charged
behavior. The problem of a ratio of the studied subjective reality and its objectively observed analogs
is the most important in psychology. The term hostility is used along with concepts aggression and
anger. Studying of psychological mechanisms of hostility can open new opportunities for prevention
of social aggression and prevention of serious somatic and mental diseases.
Next will be analyzed the features of reflection of aggression in educational books on psychology like
"graphic guide". Aggression as tool behavioral reaction of destructive character has the numerous
manifestations and theoretical treatments.
At the symposium will be analyzed the recognition of anger depending on temperamental traits. The
current study explored the link between temperamental traits and the recognition of anger. Participants
watched morph faces which consisted of 100 frames depicting a gradual transition from anger to
neutral face and vice versa. Structure of Temperament Questionnaire was used to measure
temperamental traits of participants.
The following will be considered display of Anger in Lecturer-Student Interactions at Russian and
German Universities. This study aimed to find out the association between cultural dimensions,
display rules and such aspects of interpersonal interaction as partner’s gender and degree of situation
publicity in the lecturer-student communication.
At the end will be considered the influence of antiterrorist websites on value attitudes of different
population groups. The analysis of the basic components of Internet-contents influencing sense-value
features of consumers has shown that the processual component defines the dynamics of influence of
the most sense-saturated components of the perceiving Internet-content and brings their sense-creating
potential up to the level of devitrifying senses of the very user.

HOSTILITY AS FORMS OF EMOTIONALLY-CHARGED BEHAVIOR: FEATURES OF
CONCEPT’S TREATMENT
Pavel Ermakov, Olga Fedotova
The problem of a ratio of the studied subjective reality and its objectively observed analogs is the most
important in psychology. The term hostility is used along with concepts aggression and anger.
Studying of psychological mechanisms of hostility can open new opportunities for prevention of social
aggression and prevention of serious somatic and mental diseases.

FEATURES OF REFLECTION OF AGGRESSION IN EDUCATIONAL BOOKS ON
PSYCHOLOGY LIKE “GRAPHIC GUIDE”
Olga Fedotova, Pavel Ermakov
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Aggression as tool behavioral reaction of destructive character has the numerous manifestations and
theoretical treatments. A projection of a visual image of aggressive behavior in the book Niegel C.
Benson "Psychology. A graphic guide to your mind and behavior" (Cambridge, 2007) allows the
person who is interested in psychology to get acquainted with manifestations of aggression.

RECOGNITION OF ANGER DEPENDING ON TEMPERAMENTAL TRAITS
Vladimir Kosonogov, Elena Vorobyeva, Alisa Titova
The current study explored the link between temperamental traits and the recognition of anger.
Participants (N = 69) watched morph faces which consisted of 100 frames (pictures) depicting a
gradual transition from anger to neutral face and vice versa. Structure of Temperament Questionnaire
was used to measure temperamental traits of participants.

DISPLAY OF ANGER IN LECTURER-STUDENT INTERACTIONS AT RUSSIAN AND
GERMAN UNIVERSITIES
Julia Mendzheritskaya, Miriam Hansen, Vera Labunskaya
This study aimed to find out the association between cultural dimensions, display rules and such
aspects of interpersonal interaction as partner’s gender and degree of situation publicity in the lecturerstudent communication. We conducted an online-study with lecturers at universities in Russia and
Germany.

THE INFLUENCE OF ANTITERRORIST WEBSITES ON VALUE ATTITUDES OF
DIFFERENT POPULATION GROUPS
Irina Abakumova, Pavel Ermakov
The analysis of the basic components of Internet-contents influencing sense-value features of
consumers has shown that the processual component defines the dynamics of influence of the most
sense-saturated components of the perceiving Internet-content and brings their sense-creating potential
up to the level of devitrifying senses of the very user.

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PS095
CYBERBULLYING AND YOUTH: FROM THEORY TO
INTERVENTIONS
B08. Development and education - Bullying and aggression
Convenor
Presenters

Francine Dehue, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands
Trijntje Völlink, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands
Nicole Gunther, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands
Niels Jacobs, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands
Katrien Van Cleemput, University of Antwerp, Antwerp - Belgium
Heidi Vandebosch, University of Antwerp, Antwerp - Belgium
Conor Mc Guckin, College Green, Dublin - Ireland

This symposium will provide a complete overview on the latest knowledge regarding cyberbullying,
and evidence based interventions to prevent and combat (cyberbullying). The presentations of the
symposium will be structured on the basis of Intervention Mapping (IM). IM is a protocol consisting
of six steps that can be used as an iterative process for theory and evidence-based development of
health promotion interventions. The symposium presentations will follow the first 5 steps:
Step 1 Needs assessment: What is the most adequate way to define cyberbullying? What do we know
about the prevalence of cyberbullying? What are the (mental-) health consequences of (cyber-)
bullying?
Step 2 Defining change objectives: What are the most important behaviors and determinants related to
(cyber-)bullying? To what extent are cyberbullying and bullying distinct or related? And which coping
strategies are effective in preventing and combatting (cyber-) bullying? What are the most important
change objectives to prevent and combat cyberbullying?
Step 3 Theory-based intervention methods and practical applications: Which theories and methods can
be used to prevent and combat cyberbullying? What practical strategies can be used in interventions
and which change objectives do they try to influence?
Step 4 Intervention programs: Which interventions are developed using Intervention Mapping? What
is known about their effects? What is needed for further improvement of these interventions?
Step 5 Developing the program while making sure that it matches the previous steps and preferences
of the target group.
Step 6 Evaluation: How adequate is the definition of cyberbullying?, do the interventions indeed
contribute to decrease (cyber-)bullying, recommendations for improvement of the interventions.
One of the unique advantages of this symposium is that it is based on the book ‘Cyberbullying and
Youth: from theory to interventions’ that will be published by Psychology Press in July 2015 as part of
the Current Issues in Social Psychology series.

NEEDS ASSESSMENT
Nicole Gunther
Early studies on cyberbullying developed a definition in a top-down approach starting from the
definition of traditional bullying. The adequacy of these definitions will be discussed. Moreover, a
systematic narrative review of the quantitative research to date on the negative outcomes of
cyberbullying compared to traditional bullying is provided.
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DEFINING CHANGE OBJECTIVES; BEHAVIORAL AND (INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL)
DETERMINANTS OF BULLYING AND CYBERBULLYING
Trijntje Völlink
This presentation will explore current findings to determine key similarities and differences between
behavior and determinants of traditional and cyber bullying. Practical implications will be discussed in
regard to the question whether interventions should specifically tackle cyberbullying, or address this
as just one component of traditional bullying behavior among peers.

THEORY-BASED INTERVENTION METHODS AND PRACTICAL
Niels Jacobs
The theoretical reasons as to why online interventions are considered useful tools to combat
cyberbullying, several theory-based methods and strategies that can be used, different elements that
should be taken into account for a successful intervention and the importance of including program
participants into the development will be discussed.

INTERVENTION PROGRAMS: CURRENT STATE OF THE ART
Katrien van Cleemput, Heidi VandeBosch
In this presentation four interventions will be introduced. Two newly developed ICT-based
interventions have a main focus on combatting cyberbullying (i.e. Friendly Attac and Online
Pestkoppenstoppen.nl) whereas two other existing ICT based interventions have a main focus on
traditional bullying (i.e. FearNot and Let’s not fall into the trap). The pros and cons of both
approaches will be discussed.

EVALUATION: COMPARING INTERVENTION PROGRAMS AND CONCLUSIONS
Conor Mc Guckin
This presentation integrates ‘know how’ of Part I and the practical applications of Part II. The main
questions that will be discussed are: Is the definition of cyberbullying adequate in selecting the
children who actually need help? To what extent do the ICT interventions of presentation 4 indeed
differ in the use of methods, practical applications and content? How effective are these interventions
to combat (cyber-) bullying? Recommendations to improve future intervention.

References
Bartholomew, L. K., Parcel, G. S., Kok, G., Gottlieb, N. H., & Fernández, M.E., (2011).
Planning health promotion programs; an Intervention Mapping approach, 3rd Ed. San Francisco, CA:
Jossey-Bass.
Flay B.R., Biglan A., Boruch, R.F., Castro, F.G., Gottfredson, D., Kellam, S., Moscicky,
E.K., Schinke, S., Valentine, J.C., Ji, P. (2005). Standards of evidence: Criteria for efficacy,
effectiveness and dissemination. Prevention Science, 6(3), 151-175.
Menesini, E., & Nocentini, A. (2009). Cyberbullying definition and measurement:
Some critical considerations. Journal of Psychology, 217, 230-232.
Menesini, E., Nocentini, A., Palladino, B.E., Friesen, A., Friesen, S., Ortega, R., Calmaestra, J., et al.
(2012). Cyberbullying definition among adolescents: A comparison across six European countries.
Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 15 (9), 455-463. doi:10.1089/cyber.2012.0040.
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Olweus, D. (1993). Bullying at schools: what we know wand what we can do. Cambridge, MA:
Blackwell.

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PS096
INTERNET, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL CHANGE: A SOCIAL
PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE
C09. Culture and society - Media and communication
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Sharon Coen, University of Salford, Manchester - United Kingdom
Olawale Oni, University of Salford, Manchester - United Kingdom
Caroline Jones, University of Salford, Manchester - United Kingdom
Augusta Isabella Alberici, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Patrizia Milesi, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Anna Kende, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest - Hungary
Abigail Locke, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield - United Kingdom

Echoing the long standing debate in political communication which sees (news) media as a force for
democratisation (the “virtuous cycl” perspective, championed by Pippa Norris, e.g. Norris, 2000), or
as the cause of disengagement and apathy (the ‘spiral of cynicism’ perspective, e.g. Capella and
Jamieson 1997), the diffusion of the internet and the progressive affirmation of social media (SM) as a
platform of communication have opened a debate concerning the potential of these new forms of
communication to foster civic – and political – engagement. On the one hand, internet skeptics (e.g.
Morozov, 2011) see the internet as the main avenue for “slaktivism” (i.e. low-effort actions which
substitute a more substantial engagement), on the other, enthusiasts (e.g. Shirky, 2008)view the online
world as a unique platform not only for deliberation, but also for organisation and coordination of
collective action. The proposed symposium,bringing together research conducted in four Nations
(Nigeria, UK, Italy and Hungary), will present a social psychological perspective on the role played by
online platforms in fostering deliberations concerning political and social issues in the community by
identifying the underlying processes involved in adoption, use and participation in online debates as
well as the link between online participation and offline activism.
It is hoped that this debate will provide insight on the important contribution that social psychological
research and evidence can give to understanding the role played by new technologies in public
deliberation, the development of an informed citizenry and civic engagement.

WHAT ROLE DO WE SEE YOU PLAY FROM HERE? OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY
ADOPTION FOR PARTICIPATORY PROGRAMMING IN RADIO BROADCASTING
Wale Oni
This paper explores the impact of technology adoption in journalism by reporting the results of a
series of studies looking at journalist’s own – and audience’s beliefs about - role conceptions in the
context of participatory radio programming in Nigeria.

ECHO CHAMBER? AN ANALYSIS OF THE PUBLIC’S REACTION TO LOCAL NEWS
REPORTS OF THE SALFORD RIOTS IN LOCAL NEWSPAPERS
Sharon Coen, Caroline Jones
We report a media framing analysis exploring the relationship between the coverage of the Salford
riots in local newspapers and the public reaction (in terms of comments posted online) to such reports.

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COLLECTIVE ACTION AND THE SOCIAL AFFIRMATION FUNCTION OF SOCIAL
MEDIA
Anna Kende, Adrienn Ujhelyi, Nóra Lantos, Martijn van Zomeren, Eötvös Loránd
Starting from the SIMCA model of collective action, we report three studies exploring whether social
(i.e. social affirmation, network building, interactive, and creative) uses of social media motivate
collective action intentions and activist endurance.
“THE RIGHT THING TO DO”: DISCUSSING ONLINE AND THE MORAL PATHWAY TO
COLLECTIVE MOBILIZATION
Augusta Isabella Alberici, Patrizia Milesi
Activists of two web-based political groups participated in two studies. We investigated whether
activists’ perceptions of some features of online deliberation moderated the link between moral
obligation beliefs and politicized identity.

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PS097
EMERGING ADULTHOOD TODAY
C02. Culture and society - Family systems and processes
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Lucia Leonilde Carli, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Elena Anzelmo, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Franca Tani, University of Florence, Florence - Italy
Marzana Daniela, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Margherita Lanz, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Emanuela Rabaglietti, Univesity of Turin, Turin - Italy
Heike Maria Buhl, University of Paderborn, Padeborn - Germany

Social changes during the last decades have contributed to prolong the path toward adulthood. The
juvenile phase is now extended in time and is undefined from a social, professional and affective
point of view, rather than constituting a temporary condition. Within psychological and psycho-social
literature this situation is indicated by the introduction of the distinction between emerging adulthood
and young adulthood.
The Symposium proposes an analysis and a discussion of the factors that may play a role in the path
toward adulthood and that can influence emerging adults’ wellness, as well as their future as potential
adults and parents-to be.
In particular, it will be discussed the role of attachment to peers (partners and friends) in connection to
Italian emerging adults’ current attachment to parents and life satisfaction; the emergence of new
attachment networks among Italian students and working emerging adults in connection to romantic
attachment and recalled parental bonding; the links between the juvenile Neet condition (Not in
Employment, Education or Training) in Italy and family factors of a relational and sociodemographical nature; the individual and family predictors of Italian emerging adults’ financial and
subjective well-being; the relationship between emotion-related textual content posted by Italian
young adults on their Facebook profiles and their emotional well-being.

PARENT AND PEER ATTACHMENT: WHICH INFLUENCE ON EMERGING ADULTS’
LIFE SATISFACTION?
Tani Franca, Guarnieri Silvia, Smorti Martina
Attachment relationships with parent and peer are a major indicator of life satisfaction and individual
well-being. Despite this, there has been insufficient empirical work focused on understanding the
interrelationships and links between attachment to specific social partners (mothers, fathers, friends
and romantic partners) and life satisfaction during emerging adulthood. The main focus of the present
study was to examine the influence of parental attachment on emerging adults’ life satisfaction. In
addition to considering direct associations between these variables, we investigated indirect pathways
through peer attachment in emerging adulthood. The sample comprised 385 emerging-adult
adolescents (36.1% females), aged from 18 to 25 years. The Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment
was administered to assess parent and peer attachment. The Experiences in Close Relationships was
employed to assess romantic attachment. Finally, the Satisfaction with Life Scale was employed to
assess life satisfaction. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to identify the direct and
indirect effects of parental attachment on life satisfaction. Results indicated that both parental
attachment and peer attachment were positively related to life satisfaction, with romantic attachment
being the stronger unique predictor. Further, the findings suggest that only romantic attachment
mediates the association between attachment to mother and life satisfaction. Romantic partners
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achieve a privileged position in an emerging adults’ affective world. Nevertheless, parents continue to
have a crucial influence on their children’s lives. Results appear to be consistent with the prototype
hypothesis, which claimed that early attachment experiences lay a foundation for future intimate
relationships.

ATTACHMENT NETWORK DURING EMERGING ADULTHOOD
Elena Anzelmo, Judith Feeney, Lucia Leonilde Carli
Several studies have shown the growing importance of partners and friends as targets of attachment
functions within adolescents’ and young adults’ attachment networks (Hazan, Zeifman 1994; Fraley,
Davis 1997; Trinke, Bartholomew 1997; Feeney 2004). These studies linked a transfer of
ʻ attachment functions’ from parents to partners, with relationship length and romantic attachment
security. However, studies connecting the transfer of attachment functions and recalled parental
bonding are lacking (Friedlmeier, Granqvist 2006).
The aim of the present study is to investigate emerging adults’ attachment networks and their links
with both socio-demographical variables, such as gender and worker/student status, and relational
variables, such as romantic relationship length, romantic attachment and recalled parental bonding.
The study is part of a broad project called ʻ Parenthood todayʼ financed by IReR (Regional Research
Institute of Lombardy). The aim of the project is to investigate, during different phases and conditions
of the life-cycle, critical factors for parenting choice and parental investment.
Participants were 257 Italian emerging adults (63.8% female) aged between 19 and 24 who were
student or workers. All participants were currently in romantic relationships.
Self-reports were used: 1) a self-report adaptation of WHO-TO interview (Hazan, Zeifam 1994) for
attachment netwoks; 2) the Parental Bonding Instrument (Parker et al. 1979) for recalled parental
bonding (Care and Overprotection); 3) the Experience in Close Relationship Revised (Fraley et al.
2000) for romantic attachment (Anxiety and Avoidance).
Results showed 5 attachment network configurations that varied significantly according to gender,
student/worker status and romantic relationship length. Some of these configurations were also
connected to Avoidance and to Maternal Care.

WHO ARE ITALIAN “NEETS”? YOUNG ITALIAN NEETS AND THEIR FAMILY
BACKGROUND
Daniela Marzana, Sara Alfieri, Elena Marta, Emiliano Sironi, Alessandro Rosina
The present work aims to investigate the relationship between several family variables (parents’
educational level, intrusiveness, support, and autonomy) and young Italians’ status as NEETs (Not in
Employment, Education, or Training). A representative sample of 9.087 young Italians filled out an
online questionnaire The results reveal that perceived degree of autonomy has a specific negative
impact for males Neets while intrusiveness presents a positive impact mainly for females Neets.

ITALIAN EMERGING ADULTS’ FINANCIAL AND SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING:
INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY PREDICTORS
Margherita Lanz, Semira Tagliabue, A. Sorgente
The prolonged transition to adulthood, characterizing the Mediterranean area and in particular Italy
(Tagliabue, Beyers, Lanz, 2014), challenges research in investigating the factors enhancing emerging
adults’ well-being . In particular the financial crisis of 2008 determined a difficult financial situation,
especially for emerging adults. Thus, research on emerging adults’ well-being should also consider
the financial dimension (Shim et al., 2009). The study aims to illustrate the different factors
explaining financial and subjective well-being in emerging adulthood. Individual factors (work
condition, living arrangement, financial independence, age, personal needs and expenses), family
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factors (family structure, parental [emotional] and financial support, perceived financial status) and
individual and financial well-being were collected from 285 Italian emerging adults (20-30 years old).
Preliminary findings underline that different predictors affect subjective well-being according to
emerging adults ‘ work condition. Moreover, family variables (emotional support and perceived
financial status) explain different percentages of financial well-being’s variance: students (54%),
student-workers (27,3%) and workers (16,7%). Multigroup analyses related to emerging adults
working condition will be performed. Findings will be discussed taking into account the European
context.

TEXTUAL INDICATORS OF EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING: A STUDY ON FACEBOOK
AMONG YOUNG-ADULTS
Davide Marengo, Michele Settanni, Emanuela Rabaglietti
The relationship between online behaviors on social network sites (SNS) and offline behaviors,
attitudes and personality is well documented. Concerning internalizing symptoms, findings suggest
that the analysis of user-generated content on Facebook profiles can provide relevant information for
the identification of users at risk for depression and anxiety. In most studies, rating of user content is
generally performed by manually browsing SNS user profiles. Automated text analysis could represent
a more cost-effective, time-efficient analytic approach. In a sample of 199 young-adults (Mean age:
28.4 years; 66% females), the main aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship
between emotion-related textual content posted by participants on their Facebook profiles and selfreport symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress. As a secondary aim, age differences were
investigated. Automated text analysis was performed with the LIWC software. The DASS-21 scale
was used to collect information about internalizing symptoms. Correlation analyses revealed the
Negative emotions and Sadness LIWC categories to be positively correlated with self-report
depression, anxiety and stress, while Anger correlated only with anxiety. Overall, the frequency of
emotion-related words was found to be higher for participants aged ≤ 25 years than for older
participants; correlations between the LIWC emotional categories and the DASS-21 scales were also
generally stronger for younger participants. Finally, results are compatible with findings on more
traditional text sources and support the use of automated text analysis for the extraction of meaningful
indicators of psychological distress from textual content posted on SNS, in particular for young users.
The study of Tani, Guarnieri and Smorti analyses the mediation role of attachment to peers (partners
and friends) in connection to emerging adults’ current attachment to parents and life satisfaction. This
study suggests the importance of partners in addition to parents for emerging adults’ well-being.
The study of Anzelmo, Feeney e Carli explores the emergence of new attachment networks within
distinct groups of students and emerging working adults by investigating their preferred target figures
for attachment functions. This study also connects emerging adults’ attachment networks to romantic
attachment and recalled parental bonding.
The contribution of Marzana and colleagues examines the Neet condition (Not in Employment,
Education or Training), namely a juvenile condition of individuals not committed to learning or
working activities during the last 6 months. This study links this status to family factors of a relational
and socio-demographical nature.
The study of Lanz, Tagliabue and Sorgente examines the individual factors (work condition, living
arrangement, financial independence, age, personal needs and expenses) and the family factors (family
structure, parental emotional and financial support, perceived financial status) explaining financial
and subjective well-being in Italian emerging adulthood.

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Lastly, the study of Settanni, Marengo e Rabaglietti examines the relationship between emotionrelated textual content posted by Italian young adults on their Facebook profiles and their and selfreport symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress.

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PS098
NEW DIRECTIONS IN RESEARCH ON THE EMOTION
REGULATORY FUNCTIONS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTANCE
E11. Health and clinical intervention - Lifestyles and healthy self-regulation
Convenor
Presenters

Ozlem Ayduk, University of California, Berkeley - United States
Ozlem Ayduk, University of California, Berkeley - United States
Ethan Kross, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor - United States
Louis A. Penner, Wayne State University, Detroit - United States
Rachel E. White, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia - United States

The concept of psychological distance -- the removal of events from direct experience of “me” in the
“here-and-now” has been central to social psychological theories of self-regulation for the last 50
years. Growing out of this work, recent research has focused how psychological distance from the self
specifically, impacts emotion regulation and well-being. Findings have shown that focusing on
negative emotions from a third person, self-distanced as opposed to a first person, self-immersed
perspective reduces emotional reactivity and enhances well-being by facilitating big picture appraisals
on distressing events. In this symposium, we will present novel extensions of this work, which begin
to shed light on the regulatory functions of different psychological distancing strategies using multiple
designs (experimental, individual differences, longitudinal), populations (college students, community
participants, adolescents) and levels of analyses (behavioral, developmental, neural).
Kross & Ayduk will review findings demonstrating that using non first person pronouns and one’s
own name (rather than “I”) during introspection enhances psychological distancing from the self. In
turn, these different types of “self-talk” consequentially impact self-regulation across multiple
contexts (i.e., making good first impressions and public speaking) leading people to experience less
distress, ruminate less, and perform better. He will also present neural data underscoring the utility of
this strategy for automatic and effortless down-regulation of negative affect.
White & Duckworth will address the question of whether adolescents spontaneously engage in selfdistancing (i.e., taking an observer perspective during visualization) and whether doing so is linked to
adaptive outcomes. Their findings show that spontaneous self-distancing while reflecting on angerrelated experiences predict better emotion regulation, and that this relationship strengthens with age.
These findings highlight the role that self-distancing plays in fostering adaptive self-reflection in
adolescence, and begin to elucidate the role that development plays in enhancing the benefits of
engaging in this process.
Penner, Gueverra & Albrecht will present data on parents of pediatric cancer patients -- a group
known to be vulnerable to psychosocial problem associated with their child’s disease. Findings show
that parents who were both high in trait anxiety and spontaneously self-distanced as they analyzed
their feelings surrounding a past medical procedure their child went through reported less distress in
response to subsequent medical procedures and greater well-being longitudinally. These findings
underscore the utility of harnessing self-distancing as a regulatory mechanism in at-risk populations.
Ayduk & Bruehlman-Senecal will present data on temporal distancing demonstrating that adopting a
distant-future perspective (e.g., how will I feel about this 10 years down the line) on stressors relative
to a near-future (e.g., how will I feel about this 1 week from now) perspective reduces emotional
distress regardless of event severity. Moreover, this effect is mediated by impermanence focus—that
is, the extent to which participants focused on the transitory aspects of their stressors. Temporal
distancing thus, seems to be a relatively easy to implement distancing strategy that buffers against
both minor and major stressors.
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SELF-TALK AS A REGULATORY MECHANISM: HOW YOU DO IT MATTERS
Ethan Kross, Ozlem Ayduk
We will review findings from a program of research demonstrating how third-person (vs. first person)
self-talk fosters effective self-regulation at the experiential, behavioral, and neural levels by fostering
challenge (vs. threat) appraisals.
SPONTANEOUS SELF-DISTANCING PREDICTS ADAPTIVE SELF-REFLECTION
ACROSS ADOLESCENCE
Rachel E. White, Angela L. Duckworth
In two studies, adolescents reflected upon anger-inducing or worrying personal experiences.
Spontaneously self-distanced (v. self-immersed) reflection on these events predicted more adaptive
insight and, in turn, less emotional reactivity.

SPONTANEOUS DISTANCING AMONG PARENTS OF PEDIATRIC CANCER PATIENTS
Louis A. Penner, Darwin Gueverra, Terrance Albrecht
Among parents of pediatric cancer patients, high trait anxious parents’ spontaneous use of selfdistancing (i.e., third-person perspective) while thinking about a past medical procedure for their child
prospectively predicted better parental functioning.

THIS TOO SHALL PASS: TEMPORAL DISTANCE AND THE REGULATION OF
EMOTIONAL DISTRESS
Ozlem Ayduk, Emma Bruehlman-Senecal
Findings indicate that focusing on how one would feel about a stressor in the distant future (i.e.,
temporally distanced perspective) fosters distress regulation and well-being by leading people to focus
on the impermanent aspects of their emotions.

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PS099
PSYCHOTHERAPY AND TECHNOLOGY: FROM THE “EMBODIED
MIND” TO “DOCTOR NOTES”. A NEW SUPPORT TO
PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT
F10. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Psychotechnologies and life-long learning
Convenor
Presenters

Antonio Acerra, Scuola Romana Psicoterapia Familiare, Avellino - Italy
Franco Baldoni, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna - Italy
Mattia Minghetti, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna - Italy
Giulia Landi, Alma Mater Studiorum - University of Bologna, Bologna - Italy
Vincenzo D’Innella Capano, Inventor and lead developer of Telpress Doctor Notes –

Italy

Research in psychotherapy imposes, among other things, a challenge with objectivity. In addition to
that, the research data are limited partially due to the scarcity of standardized and reliable tools. In
particular, until now, researchers have been lacking of an effective and shared monitoring tool able to
assess psychopathological disorders and their development in a given time-frame, for a given case and
considering the relational and non-verbal aspects of the therapeutic process.
Telpress Doctor Notes is a method that combines clinical interpretative models with the monitoring of
the interactions and transactions via a technology originally intended for audiovisual classification and
analysis. Introduced by Telpress International BV this technology, which is based on a software
architecture, has been newly applied in psychological assessment and in individual, couple and family
therapy.
With implications also for training, this technology helps clinicians in their supervision activities as
well as in clinical analysis. It provides support in analyzing, annotating, labeling and indexing local or
remote audiovisuals - also in real-time - and integrates a sharing mechanism, making results available
to the scientific community, revealing as a simple, user friendly and standardized tool. The system
also allows to extract annotated non verbal content as well as to produce textual documents with
embedded videoclips or snapshots where necessary.
The annotation consists in the integral or partial transcription of the verbal and non-verbal
communication and it provides an effective method to store and index large amounts of structured or
unstructured clinical data along with the audiovisual information and its metadata. With its integrated
searching tools, thousands of hours of audiovisual documents become available in an indexed form, so
that local and remote operators can extract only relevant sections according to their submitted search
criteria.
This methodology is useful in clinical assessment, for example in the analysis of Adult Attachment
Interview (AAI) and in the study of implicit mentalization, based on non-verbal and procedural
elements. Psychotherapists can compare data useful for research and clinical ends and, when
permitted, extract visual clues of data provided by other clinicians; keeping track of the evolution of
their own research and treatment becomes a possible and simple task. Educators can track and
supervise trainees and trainees can analyze sessions with precision and without the need to learn
sophisticated software tools nor the necessity to buy dedicated hardware appliances.
The user interface in itself represents an innovation and permits to run in all available web browsers
making its use potentially ubiquitous, its learning process very fast and cost effective. This contributes
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to make of Telpress Doctor Notes a strong allied for the research community in clinical assessment
and in psychotherapy, allowing operators to set common goals with mutually verifiable progresses.
In brief, Telpress Doctor Notes can help to reach these fundamental goals:
- live tagging of real-time sessions and events
- annotate on the basis of verbal and non-verbal communication
- indexing and quick data retrieval of audio visual elements
- remote and real-time supervision of psychotherapeutic sessions
- (selective) sharing of the information with the scientific community
for research, training and therapeutic ends.

FAMILY PSYCHOTHERAPY AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES
Antonio Acerra
Clinical research in family psychotherapy imposes, as a necessary assumption, to abandon the
necessity of objectivity, the inclusion of the observant and the observed and the rigidity of the method
used. We are proposing a method that combines the systemic-relational paradigm with the monitoring
of the interactions and transactions through a new technology.

IMPLICIT MENTALIZATION ASSESSED BY MENTALIZATION ASSESSMENT IN
PSYCHOTHERAPY (MAP)
Franco Baldoni
Examples of implicit mentalization in a psychotherapeutic session will be displayed following
Mentalization Assessment in Psychotherapy (MAP) criteria (Baldoni 2014) and using Telpress Doctor
Notes method for the analysis of non-verbal behavior.

NON-VERBAL BEHAVIOR IN ADULT ATTACHMENT INTERVIEW (AAI). AN
ANALYSIS USING TELPRESS DOCTOR NOTES METHODOLOGY
Mattia Minghetti, Giulia Landi
An example of a videotaped Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) will be displayed codified following
Dynamic-Maturational Model of attachment and adaptation criteria end using Telpress Doctor Notes
methodology to study non-verbal behaviour.

TELPRESS DOCTOR NOTES: A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TECHNOLOGY
Vincenzo D’Innella Capano
Telpress Doctor Notes is a new technology implementing a method that combines clinical
interpretative models with monitoring of the interactions and transactions via a web platform
originally intended for audiovisual classification and analysis.

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PS100
LONGITUDINAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO COGNITIVE AND
NON-COGNITIVE EDUCATIONALLY RELEVANT TRAITS AND
THEIR AETIOLOGY
B15. Development and education - Longitudinal analysis
Convenor
Presenters

Sergey Malykh, Russian Academy of Education, Moscow - Russian Federation
Maja Rodic, Tomsk State University, Tomsk - Russian Federation
Margherita Malanchini , Goldsmiths University of London, London - United

Kingdom

Discussant

Elaine White, Tomsk State University, Tomsk - Russian Federation
Maria Grazia Tosto, Tomsk State University, Tomsk - Russian Federation
Yulia Kovas, Goldsmiths University of London, London - United Kingdom

Longitudinal investigations into educationally relevant traits have provided insights into their
development and the nature of their interrelationships. The proposed symposium presents a collection
of investigations into individual differences in educationally relevant traits and their aetiologies using
longitudinal methodologies.
The first talk (Rodic) is a large-scale cross-cultural study of cognitive development. The talk explores
the longitudinal relationship between mathematics anxiety, mathematics achievement and
mathematically related cognitive traits in 6-9-year-old children from the United Kingdom and Russia.
The second talk (Malanchini) combines longitudinal and genetically sensitive methodologies to
investigate individual differences in mathematics motivation and its association with school
achievement in a large sample of twins. The talk discusses the stability of the aetiology of
mathematics motivation and achievement as well as the origins of their longitudinal (age 9 – 16)
relationships. The third talk (White) presents findings from a longitudinal, cross-cultural investigation
of 11-12 year-old children in Russia and the United Kingdom. The study explores the developmental
trajectories of school achievement, cognitive abilities, anxiety, self-efficacy and enjoyment in the
context of mathematics and geography classrooms. The fourth study (Tosto) applies multivariate
genetic analyses to investigate the aetiology and development of oral language and components of
reading fluency and reading comprehension between childhood and adolescence (ages 7 – 16).

MATHS ANXIETY, EARLY ARITHMETIC AND MATHS RELATED COGNITIVE SKILLS:
A LONGITUDINAL & CROSS-CULTURAL INVESTIGATION
Maja Rodic, Tatiana Tikhomireva, Sergey Malykh, Olga Bogdanova, Xinlin Zhou, Yulia Kovas
The longitudinal relationship between maths anxiety, maths achievement and mathematically related
cognitive traits was investigated in Russian and UK early primary school children. The emerged crosscultural similarities and differences are discussed.

MATHEMATICS MOTIVATION: STABILITY AND CHANGE IN ITS AETIOLOGY AND
ITS LONGITUDINAL ASSOCIATION WITH MATHEMATICS ACHIEVEMENT
Margherita Malanchini, Zhe Wang, Robert Plomin, Yulia Kovas

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We explored the origins of mathematics motivation and its development over time (age 9 to 16) in a
large sample of twins. The longitudinal relationship between mathematics motivation and
mathematical ability and achievement was also investigated.

A LONGITUDINAL CROSS-CULTURAL INVESTIGATION INTO POTENTIAL
RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN COGNITIVE AND NON-COGNITIVE FACTORS WITHIN
THE MATHS AND GEOGRAPHY CLASSROOM
Elaine White, Efrosini Setakis, Tatiana Kolienko, Yulia Kovas
This longitudinal study followed UK and Russian students aged 11-12 years on multiple occasions
across one academic year focusing on their maths and geography classrooms. Developmental
trajectories were explored in relation to non-cognitive factors and cognitive abilities.

ORAL LANGUAGE, READING FLUENCY, READING COMPREHENSION: THE
AETIOLOGICAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN 7, 12 & 16 YEARS. A UK TWIN-STUDY
Maria Grazia Tosto, Philip Dale, Robert Plomin, Emma Hayiou-Thomas
Genetic analyses on reading fluency, comprehension & language measured at 7, 12 & 16 in UK twins
revealed genetic factors as responsible for stability & covariation within & across domains. Fluency &
comprehension showed a partial different aetiology.

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PS101
BEING TOGETHER APART: USING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT
PEOPLE LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS
E11. Health and clinical intervention - Lifestyles and healthy self-regulation
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Karen Rodham, Staffordshire University, Staffordshire - United Kingdom
Jeff Gavin, University of Bath, Bath - United Kingdom
Neil Coulson, University of Nottingham, Nottingham - United Kingdom
Karen Rodham, Staffordshire University, Staffordshire - United Kingdom
Daryl O’Connor, University of Leeds, Leeds - United Kingdom

Health systems are struggling ‘‘to cope with the demands of acute care, let alone the needs of those
with long term health conditions,’’ (Barlow, Wright, Sheasby, et al., 2002), it is therefore essential that
those living with chronic conditions are able to self-manage. Successful self-management necessitates
the development of a range of skills including knowledge of the condition and its treatment,
maintenance of adequate psychological functioning and the ability to implement lifestyle changes
required when living with a chronic condition (e.g. Clark, Becker, Janz et al., 1991; Redman, 2011).
Technology has the potential to play an important role in facilitating the ability of people with chronic
conditions to self-manage. For example, a number of researchers have documented the utility of online
support groups. However, the provision and moderation of such sites can be an onerous task and can
bring with it the fear of litigation. There are a number of ways online support can be offered – via
support groups, mobile phone apps, wiki technology, Facebook and other social media platforms.
However, with increasingly sophisticated technology available to us, are we at risk of acting like the
Emperor and his new clothes? Are our heads turned by the sci-fi technology that is increasingly
moving from the realm of the imagined to that of reality? In order to explore these issues, this
symposium addresses 3 key issues related to providing remote support for people living with chronic
conditions:
· Building and nurturing a supportive online environment
· The role of moderators
· The experiences of forum members

BUILDING AND NURTURING A SUPPORTIVE ONLINE ENVIRONMENT
Jeff Gavin, Karen Rodham, Neil Coulson, Leon Watts
This talk will present the findings from an NIHR funded research study which set up an online forum
and observed how support grew and developed. Implications for the provision of online support are
explored.

THE ROLE OF GROUP MODERATORS WITHIN HEALTH-RELATED ONLINE
SUPPORT COMMUNITIES
Neil Coulson, Rachel Shaw, Richard Smedley
Two studies will be presented exploring a) views of 33 moderators and b) a thematic analysis of 790
moderator messages with regards the processes, challenges and benefits of their role. Implications for
successful community development are explored.

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MEMBERS’ EXPERIENCES OF HEALTH-RELATED ONLINE SUPPORT COMMUNITIES
Karen Rodham, Jeff Gavin, Neil Coulson, Leon Watts, Toni Karic, Hannah Heath
This talk will present the findings from a programme of studies exploring members’ experiences of
health-related online support communities. Lessons for health professionals, forum developers and
patients are explored.

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PS102
ART THERAPY
TRAINING

FOR

PSYCHOLOGICAL

AND

COMPLEXITY

E22. Health and clinical intervention - Other
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Tania Simona Re, Careggi Hospital, Florence; University of Florence, Florence;
University of Genoa, Genoa - Italy
Paolo Barcucci, Dean of the Health Section – Addiction Sector, Torino - Italy
Tania Simona Re, Careggi Hospital, Florence; University of Florence, Florence;
University of Genoa, Genoa - Italy
Katja Lemberg, Director of KASVAVA Project - Finland
Eija Tarkiainen, Responsible of Minuksi Project - Finland
Silvana Cagiada, Cultural and Research Association “Care of Human Beings”, Crema
- Italy
Luisa Merati, Euromediterranean Network for Humanities in Medicine - Italy
Flavia Barbagelata, Member of the Italian Association of Psychosomatic Medicine Italy
Bruna Dighera, Il Gabbiano Association - Italy
Tania Simona Re, Careggi Hospital, Florence; University of Florence, Florence;
University of Genoa, Genoa - Italy

The training of psychologists poses increasingly complex challenges, in parallel to the increasing
articulation of our societies and wider opportunities for intervention that will make it possible and
necessary for this professional.
For several years we have carried out experiments and projects, training area, then not only
fundamentally therapeutic or preventive, in which the use of expressive and performative methods
such as art therapy, are used to prepare professionals from various areas, including which
psychologists, the complexity of their role.
We could say that there is a possibility to include in the curricula a subject that could almost be
described as "the complexity in and of itself," and that training in this specific field are particularly
useful form of expression just as the fine arts, while representing a distinct area-technical language,
convey the right to citizenship in that capacity for suspension of disbelief that in an era increasingly
exclusive measurability "objective", and in which the recovery of the areas rather uncertain and
unspeakable, without of course for this to abdicate irrational, it is absolutely necessary.
The symposium will also describe some experiences run triple in the formation of groups in which a
psychologist expert in cultural anthropology, one expert on addictions therapist and a psychiatrist art
have addressed the issue of altered states of consciousness through shamanic techniques and exorcism
without nothing to give up the rationality and even the evocative power of these rituals.

THE UNESCO CHAIR IN GENOA: A POSSIBILITY FOR AN INTERDISCIPLINARY
APPROACH
Tania Simona Re, Paolo Barcucci
The UNESCO chair project stems from a cultural necessity to fill and a wealth of knowledge to
preserve. Health, environment and treatment strategies are considered to be strictly connected in
contemporary medicine. This new, integrated approach contradicts and overcomes the traditional
separation between humanities, scientific medicine and treatment. Health and approach to treatment
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strategies are not uniform around the worlds; the universal baseline is quality assurance of
investigation in science.

AUTOHYPNOSIS
Silvana Cagiada
Practice of self-hypnosis, so unscientific, are still used by primitive peoples or by some Eastern
religious with the same procedures used by the ancient seers Egyptians, Aztecs, Greeks and Romans,
to facilitate the self-induction of trance, they used techniques are not so different those who today have
a clinical use in auto and hetero induced hypnosis.
The best use of the principles of functioning of our brain, even in the light of new scientific knowledge
of psychobiology, we can have a vision of a broad spectrum of ways of which the mind uses to
communicate with the body in somatic, visceral, humoral also through 'integration between science
and practice "natural", since all that is archaic and primitive is always within us.

THE ARTISTIC EXPRESSION AS A MEDIUM OF COMMUNICATION MULTIMODAL
Luisa Merati, Flavia Barbagelata
We propose a project of holistic therapy for inner growth, structured as a formal organization that uses
musical modes of communication trans modal technique in which visual images and sound integrated,
but also olfactory and gestural come together to offer a similar experience the artistic expression of
self and hetero direct, according to the archaic language of the dream, to establish a direct bridge of
communication with the deep unconscious and enable scenarios such as to growth and deep natural
harmonic.

KASVAVA (GROWING)
Katja Lemberg, Eija Tarkiainen
Kasvava (growing) is a Finnish national project that lasts for almost ten years, sponsored by the
Association of Psychiatrists of South East Finland and funded by the Finnish Agency of the
monopolies. The project was built to meet the demand of the people to be able to find reports and tools
to stay in a single place with all their inner dimensions and every aspect of daily life. The working
tools were built on experiential knowledge and all operators have initially made their way inside the
structure.

THE PATH OF THE “THREE HELLS” AS A PROCESS OF SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION
Bruna Dighera
In the framework of the activities carried out by thirty years in the community of “Il Gabbiano”, the
meeting with the association CRAMS (Research Centre Art Music Entertainment) has produced a
fertile contamination that has allowed us to realize a large share in Lecco area of social transformation,
taking advantage of an ongoing collaboration with the students of vocational schools and art, involves
migrants, individuals at risk, groups affected by poverty and marginalization.
The social action conduct ended with an art installation, coprogettata by students and by the
population is under construction, emblematic title "The three Hells".

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PS103
INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE, MINDFULNESS, HYPNOSIS AND EMDR:
NEW FRONTIERS FOR TREATMENTS
F12. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Mindfulness
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Tania Simona Re, Careggi Hospital, Florence; University of Florence, Florence;
University of Genoa, Genoa - Italy
Davide Lazzari, SIPNEI President (Italian Society of
Psychoneuroendocrinoimmunology) - Italy
Laura Gianotti, Hospital Santa Croce, Cuneo - Italy
Piero Stanley Pirro, Hospital Santa Croce, Cuneo - Italy
Isabella Bonapace, Psy Mindfulness Trainer - Italy
Tania Simona Re, Careggi Hospital, Florence; University of Florence, Florence;
University of Genoa, Genoa - Italy
Luisa Merati, Italian Society of Psychosomatic Medicine SIMP, Euromediterranean
Network for Humanities in Medicine - Italy
Jorge Emanuel Martins, University of Lisbon, Lisbon - Portugal
Maura Franca Garombo, S.I.S.P.Se o.n.l.u.s Italian Society of Sexual
Psychopathology - Italy
A. Contarino, S.I.S.P.Se o.n.l.u.s Italian Society of Sexual Psychopathology - Italy
C. Rosso, S.I.S.P.Se o.n.l.u.s Italian Society of Sexual Psychopathology - Italy
Mario Simones, University of Lisbon, Lisbon - Portugal

Integrative Medicine is gaining attention worldwide both in terms of a complementary and an
alternative approach to the conventional therapies. Integrative Medicine has expanded in different
categories: alternative medical systems (e.g.,homeopathy, traditional Chinese medicine); biologically
based practices (e.g., herbs, vitamins, food); mind body medicine (e.g., meditation, autogenic therapy,
progressive muscle relaxation) and Mindfulness.
Indeed the last 5-10 years have witnessed huge steps and the vast mobilisation of multidisciplinary
competences “toward a Science of Consciousness”, as clearly illustrated in the recent international
conference on that topic held in Stockholm under the patronage of the Center for Consciousness
Studies of the University of Arizona and of the Perfjell Foundation. At the same time that Science, and
especially the Neuroscience and the Physics of consciousness progresses, tools and new understanding
have been developed that will allow for the transfer of much of that basic Science into clinical
practice. This transfer doesn’t only concern the clinical practice exclusively with mental disease but
also the regular clinical practice where a patient, using his, or her mind, can influence the progression
of disease, becoming what one could rightly call a therapeutic partner.
The need to establish connections between Medicine, especially in the therapeutic aspect (healing),
and all the information already obtained from the mind-matter phenomenology has led to much
experimentation and the orising in this border area.
The Mind Body medicine uses the power of thoughts and emotions to a positive impact on
maintaining health and in the healing process. The mind-body approaches, particularly those that use
the relaxation response and beliefs of the patient, have been found effective in different mental and
phisical disorders. This is an area where new developments are happening everyday and where there is
growing evidence that new techniques like mindfulness, EMDR, hypnosis can influence and alter
many physiological processes including the immune system. It stands to reason that further
experimentation in this area is therefore necessary

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“MOLECULES OF EMOTION”: THE EPISTEMOLOGICAL MODEL OF PNEI
Mirko Labella
We are complex beings. The Psiconeuroendocrinoimmunology is the science that studies and
integrated connects various disciplines from medicine to psychology, anthropology, economics,
biology to physics. The SIPNEI is the first multidisciplinary company that studies with scientific
method approaches of integrated medicine for a health care professional who is familiar with the
complexity of the human network.
INSIDE-OUT CONNECTEDNESS: HAPPINESS TRANCE COHERENCE IN A
MULTIMODAL NEUROFEEDBACK ENVIRONMENT
Jorge Emanuel Martins
Developed as a neurofeedback BMI to help creating a fully immersion experience of the subject, in
order to induce a Subjective Happiness State and Long-Term Well-Being, with Clinical Hypnosis, as a
self-taught Altered State of Consciousness. The main outcome of this project is to adapt the healthcare
environment to a more mindfulness meditative experience. The multimodal neurofeedback
environment is the informational experiential matrix where the subject will create the heart-brain-body
neuroplastical coherence to achieve the Inside-Out Connectedness.

MINDFULNESS AND MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
Isabella Bonapace, Maria Grazia Gaia
The objective of this study is to determine: 1) whether Mindfulness Meditation ameliorates the quality
of life in patients affected by Multiple Sclerosis; 2) what evaluation participants have of the
Mindfulness program and these will be investigated through semi-structured interviews; and 3) the
analysis of what occurred during the program's sessions.

MINDFULNESS BASED STRESS REDUCTION PROGRAM ON CHRONIC LOW BACK
PAIN: A PILOT STUDY
Laura Gianotti, Piero Stanley Pirro
The objective of this pilot study is to determine the impact of the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction
(MBSR) program on chronic low-back pain (CLBP) as well as on physical, endocrine (cortisol
hormone) and psychological functioning. Participants in this observational study were 28 adults,
average age = 47.77, sd = 12.36, median = 47.

EMDR TREATMENT IN SEXUAL OFFENDING
Maura Franca Garombo, A. Contarino, C. Rosso
An Instrumental Case Study This case describes the use of eye movement desensitization and
reprocessing (EMDR) to reduce reactivity in a sex offender. Contemporary sex offender treatment
theory considers the role of unresolved trauma in the etiology of sexual offending and relapse risk.

A COMPARISON OF EFFECTS OF MINDFULNESS-BASED STRESS REDUCTION
BETWEEN PATIENTS WITH ORGANIC DISEASE AND HEALTHY PEOPLE: AN
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
Luisa Merati, Alice Azzoni
Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is a stress-reduction program based on meditative
practices, it is composed of 8 sessions of two hours and a full-day session. This program has shown
consistent efficacy in a variety of populations. The aim of this study is to observe the difference in the
outcomes of MBSR in patients with organic disease and healthy people, focusing on psychological
and physical well-being, perceived stress and awareness.
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Participants (N=13, M(SD) Age= 46,62 (14,28), 70% Women) are divided in two groups: the first
group (N=3, M(SD) Age = 49,67 (9,07) , 66% Women ) formed by fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis
and polytrauma patients; the second group (N=10, M(SD) Age = 45,7 (15,8) , 70% Women) formed
by healthy people. The groups run the program separately.
Data are collected at the start of first, sixth session, at the end of the last session of the treatment and
after one month by the end of it; using the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12), the Psychological
General Well-Being Index (PGWBI), the Mesure du Stress Psychologique (MSP) and the Mindfulness
Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS).
Data are analysed with statistical procedures for compare MBSR’s outcomes between the two group
of participants and eventually find significant differences.

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PS104
RESTORATIVE APPROACH COMMUNITY: PROMOTE WELLBEING, PREVENT DISRUPTION AND DEVIANCE
C11. Culture and society - Forensic psychology and law
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Patrizia Patrizi, University of Sassari, Sassari - Italy
Pia Christensen, University of Leeds, Leeds - United Kingdom
Martha Frías-Armenta, University of Sonora, Sonora - Mexico
Patrizia Patrizi, University of Sassari, Sassari - Italy
Giancarlo Tamanza, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Elena Marta, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy

The symposium aims to stimulate a debate on developments of communities marked on a conflict
management based on relational, peaceful, responsible and solidarity approach.
In particular, we will set up a comparison between different situations where the relationship is the
main resource to build social ties, interactions and opportunities for prevention of distress and
deviance, generative connections of well-being: between people, between systems, between people
and systems.
The conflict/crime management promoted by the restorative model represents a cultural shift:
community who call themselves Restorative City, schools that adopt restorative approaches, urban
areas that use the community for the effective management and resolution of conflicts (Wright, 2010;
Patrizi, 2014). At the citizen is recognized an active role in conflict management and more generally
in the government of the community in which he/she lives, making him/her feel part of the system
(Wright, 2010). The community can/must therefore be promoting lifestyles and relationships oriented
to peace, well-being of the person and the community (Lent & Brown, 2008). The symposium will
focus on the presentation of a model of Restorative Justice (Restoratives practices), for the protection
and promotion of individuals and communities.
Our model of Restorative Community is immersed therefore in a complex international debate on
normative changes, the implementing measures and operational protocols to be adopted in judicial and
extrajudicial fields, with the main aim to promote individual and collective welfare, fight recidivism,
participate in the dissemination of a sense of social security. Its objectives traced back to the need to
revise the penal systems in the light of the scientific evidence and operational considerations and, at
the same time, the development of new forms of treatment to reduce the conflict within the social
dynamics.
In this regard the symposium will focus on the presentation and comparison of international
restorative practices experiences in judicial and extrajudicial fields.

A RESTORATIVE COMMUNITY MODEL APPROACH: PROCESSING THE PROCESS
Patrizia Patrizi, Gian Luigi Lepri, Anna Bussu, Ernesto Lodi
The paper will present the development of a theoretical research on governance, on indicators and
restorative justice that substantiate the proposed model of Restorative Community, the ReCo model.
Will be presented the structure of the action-research project that provides focus groups in order to
involve the representatives of institutional agencies.

VITAL CITY, VITAL CHILDHOOD:
RESTORATIVE PRACTICES

YOUNG
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Pia Christensen
This paper presents on-going UK research into urban gardening as a restorative practice. This paper
examines some commonly recognised inter- and intra-generational community tensions and conflicts
and discusses the potential for the engagement of children and young people in urban gardening
movement activities as a way to transform (or exacerbate) such relationships.

ATTITUDES OF JUDGES ABOUT ALTERNATIVE SYSTEMS OF JUVENILE JUSTICE
Martha Frías Armenta
The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of judges or lawyers of the courts in relation to
the acceptance of alternative measures in juvenile justice systems. The results show that attitudes had
a direct effect on the acceptance of the alternative measures, whereas the social norm affected
attitudes. The results show the importance of the psychological variables in the prediction of decisions
making of the judges and other law professionals of the courts.

VICTIM-OFFENDER MEDIATION AND JUVENILE JUSTICE. PROCESS AND OUTCOME
ANALYSIS
Giancarlo Tamanza, Marialuisa Gennari
In this paper we present and discuss a training program aimed to support the improvement of a
Juvenile Mediation Service. It runs over three years, and it was divided into three distinct steps: a
phase of evaluation research on the process and outcomes of undertaken activity; a supervising of the
meditative practice; a phase of training about the operation mode of the working group.

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PS105
CULTURAL-HISTORICAL APPROACH IN CONTEMPORARY
PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCHES
B07. Development and education - Social cognition, identity and social interactions
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Olena Vlasova, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv - Ukraine
Oleg Panchenko, P. L. Shupyk National Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education,
Kiev - Ukraine
Oksana Yaremchuk, I. I. Mechnikov National University of Odessa, Odessa - Ukraine
Regina Erchova, Moscow State Regional Institute of Social and Humanity Studies,
Kolomna - Russian Federation
Andrii Trofimov, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv - Ukraine
Svitlana Paschenko, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv - Ukraine
Svitlana Paschenko, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv - Ukraine

Ahead of time, L. Vygotsky proposed to study the mechanisms of mental development of human by
experimental genetic method the main task of which was the experimental reproduction of any higher
form of behavior as a process. Such process was taken in motion and going from the process to its
individual moments, that just fits into Post-non-classical paradigm of modern scientific rationality.
Continuity of the research subject is viewed in Vygotsky’s reasonable ideas about the social situation
of mental development, its actual and proximal zone of development, general laws of normal and
abnormal development: periodicity, new formations (metamorphosis) development, unevenness of
each period, the main lines of development and unity in the process of evolution and involution in the
development of psyche that are common for the different levels of psyche (human and animal). The
law of construction of higher mental functions, their indirection by cultural mediations, interpersonal
character of the human psyche development and the role of mediator in this process, and also the idea
of a child’s active interiorization of a cultural content as a mechanism of his/her social development
made available not only the study of higher mental functions of human consciousness, which is
subjective in its nature, but also study of psychological content of the human self-consciousness (its
meanings, values and narratives), the formation and development of which forms a modern
perspective ‘apical psychology’ of personality, which Vygotsky was dreaming about, and the object of
which is defined as the development of humanistic in person in the process of socialization. The
essence of socialization is the development of a man through the mediation of other people's cultural
content that becomes internally psychological content of the individual psyche. Social content
provides mediation of human mental activity by specific cultural tools (signs and meanings, symbols
and myths). As a result, there are opportunities for the personal self-organization and coherent
organization and coordination of the joint actions of people.

DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRAL PERSONALITY IN THE DYNAMICS OF SOCIAL
CHANGES
Olena Vlasova
On the basis of cultural-historical approach it was designed an innovative concept of the processes of
personality socialization in conditions of social changes. The model opens a possibility of creation
effective complex scientific-research projects (psychological, educational and cultural) and
scientifically reasonable practices in the present-day challenging situation in the global society.
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CULTURAL-HISTORICAL APPROACH IN RESEARCH OF HUMAN READINESS TO
ACTIVITY
Oleg Panchenko, Lyudmyla Panchenko, Mariya Garazha
It is well-grounded that one of the important directions of the contemporary researches within the
cultural-historical approach is the evaluation of a human readiness to activity, definition of its psychophysiological criteria, and the time necessary for the attitude change. Introduction of the research
results should occur in attaching obligatory dynamic control of the state of a human readiness to the
work in dangerous, extreme and stressful conditions.

PERSONALITY SELF-REALIZATION IN THE CONTEXT OF HISTORICAL
PSYCHOLOGY
Oksana Yaremchuk
Personal self-development is investigated as a creative process of self-realization in cooperation with
other people. It occurs through interiorization of the sign systems for interpretation of various cultural
texts and synthesizing personal meanings. Research method: psycho-historical reconstruction. The
social and psychological concept of ethno-cultural myth-creativity of personality and community not
only justifies the sign symbolic determination of consciousness but also makes it possible to interpret
the sign as a tool for self-expansion of consciousness in the cultural and historical perspective.
Overall, a person creates his/her own texts using the imposition of cultural matrices on the chain of
life situations. It creates a “canon” of favorite and experienced as real concepts, texts, stories,
characters, coping strategies, etc. On the basis of this canon we designed the self-construction of a
person for implementation of the new life projects.

DIGITAL SOCIETY AS A CULTURAL CONTEXT OF PSYCHIC DEVELOPMENT OF
STUDENTS
Regina Erchova
One of the negative consequences of child development in a digital society is a digital dementia
meaning a deterioration in cognitive (attention, memory) and emotional abilities. The main task of the
research focuses on investigation of the cultural context (digital society) and its influence to psychic
development of person. Data were collected with binocular synchronous pupillometry method, and the
sample consisted of 466 students.

SOCIALIZATION OF ORGANIZATION PERSONNEL IN THE PRESENT SOCIALCULTURAL SITUATION
Andrii Trofimov
Peer-to-peer strategy promotes personnel participation and interaction and stimulates creative ways of
thinking, team working and interpersonal communication and forms an environment for the joint study
and cooperation in organization. Research methodology includes Organizational Commitment
Questionnaire (Porter, 1979), Management Style in Organization (Zakharov, 1999), Interpersonal
Relations Test (Leary, 1954), Level of Organizational Culture (Ladanov, 1997), Emotional
Intelligence Test (Hall, 2002). The sample is 45 organization employees. The forming experiment has
been based on the technique ‘Peer Learning Circles’ which is a peer-mentoring scheme. It develops
personal objectives and motivation, time-management skills and personal activity strategies, critical
thinking, team building, leadership and effective communication, reflective psychological readiness to
share an experience with the beginners, keen motivation for personal development and life-long
learning demanded by the present social-cultural situation.

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COPING WITH PROFESSIONAL STRESS IN THE OPEN CULTURAL-EDUCATIONAL
ENVIRONMENT
Svitlana Paschenko
The objective of the research is defining the role of professional Self-concept in developing strategies
of coping with professional crises in university lecturers. Coping strategies could moderate
relationship between excessive professional demands and positive and negative effects of professional
activity including job satisfaction, somatic and affective symptoms, psychological distress and
burnout. The method is a standardized inventory for exposure of professional crisis and coping factors
in lecturers (Gerasimova&Chorosova, 2006). N=302. Lecturers with such coping strategies as
targeting new intentions for development, finding self-control and purposes can resist the negative
impact of crisis on the affective component of professional self-awareness. Those professors who have
a low level of ego-centered self-actualization, self-evaluation of leadership characteristics, orientation
to avoidance and ownership and high level of development of various aspects of value component of
professional self-awareness, socio-oriented self-actualization, pedagogical and psychological
knowledge, professional and globalization identity are the most successful in resisting to the negative
impact of professional crises and turn it into coping strategies.

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PS107
EXAMINING LEARNING AND TRANSFER IN CHILDREN BY USING
PROBLEM-SOLVING TASKS
A02. General issues and basic processes - Research design and experimental methods
B03. Development and education - Learning and instruction
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Marijn van Dijk, University of Groningen, Groningen - Netherlands
Tatiana Rojas-Ospina, Pontifical Xavierian University, Bogotà - Colombia
Marlenny Guevara-Guerrero , University of Groningen, Groningen - Netherlands
Oscar Ordoñez, University of Valle, Cali - Colombia
Marijn van Dijk, University of Groningen, Groningen - Netherlands

The study of transfer and scientific reasoning skills is a central matter of research for cognitive and
educational psychologists. There is a good agreement that children are able to reasoning scientifically
from youngest infancy onwards (Gopnik, 2012). However, learning is not only about acquisition of
information, but also about adapting what has been learned to novel situations (Bransford & Schwartz,
1999). This phenomenon is called transfer. A common aspect in the studies on transfer is the interest
in how learning can be generalized to other contexts.
The main aim of the present symposium is to provide analyses of transfer in children (between the
ages of 4 and 10- years) in problem solving situations with repeated measurement designs. In contrast
to the traditional single-measurement designs, this approach shows the variability as an important
aspect of learning.
The studies presented in this symposium examine whether transfer is displayed in children's behavior
during the solution of new problem-solving by using diverse viewpoints such as: near/far transfer,
individual/dyadic, group/case studies, instructional/non-instructional, multimedia/hands-on tasks. In
addition, the studies address different contents of transfer: naïve understanding about Arquimedes’s
principle (AQP), air pressure (AP) and the use of control variable strategies (CVS). The results of
these studies all demonstrate the advantages of using a microgenetic method to show the complex
relationship of learning and transfer.
Transfer is explored in the three presentations as follows: First, the study of Rojas (University of
Connecticut and Universidad Javeriana-Cali) examines far transfer in a group of 4-year olds by using a
multimedia task on AQP. Secondly, the presentation of Guevara-Guerrero (University of Groningen)
explores near transfer in four dyads of 5-year olds, using hands-on tasks about AP. Finally, the study
of Ordoñez (Universidad del Valle) looks at near transfer of CVS in a group of 10-year olds building
cars. Together these presentations offer new insights in transfer and provide suggestions about using
real-time analysis in future studies.

QUESTIONING TRANSFER AND EMPOWERING TRANSFORMATION OF LEARNING
Tatiana Rojas, Scott Brown
We examine four year-olds’ transfer performance when functional context and modality were different
in a Problem-Solving condition. We found better performance in the PS condition and evidence of the
transformative character of learning and transfer.

THERE IS SPONTANEOUS TRANSFER? CHILDREN SOLVING HANDS-ON TASKS
Marlenny Guevara-Guerrero, Marijn van Dijk, Paul van Geert
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By using a multiple case study, we examine the spontaneous transfer in dyads (M=5. 15 years) solving
three problem-solving tasks. We found that transfer emerged after adjusting solutions and did not
increase between tasks, but showed variable paths.

DISCOVERING AND TRANSFERRING STRATEGIES IN THE CONTEXT OF
EXPERIMENTATION
Oscar Ordoñez, Álvaro Iván Valencia
We examine the transfer of CVS in twenty-six children (M= 10.7 years) solving two analogous tasks.
Results showed that CVS used at the beginning of each task were highly variable, indicating that
children used various approaches to solve the problem.

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PS108
CROSS-CULTURAL INVESTIGATIONS OF COGNITIVE AND
SOCIO-EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
B02. Development and education - School adjustment, academic achievement and learning disabilities
B09. Development and education - Adolescent adjustment
B10. Development and education - Parenting
B11. Development and education - Temperament and individual differences
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Sergey Malykh, Russian Academy of Education, Moscow - Russian Federation
Victoria Ismatullina, Russian Academy of Education, Moscow - Russian Federation
Ivan Voronin, Russian Academy of Education, Moscow - Russian Federation
Tatiana Tikhomirova, Russian Academy of Education, Moscow - Russian Federation
Darya Gaysina, University of Sussex, Brighton - United Kingdom
Georgy Vasin, Russian Academy of Education, Moscow - Russian Federation
Darya Gaysina, University of Sussex, Brighton - United Kingdom

The aim of this symposium is to present results of and reflect on cross-cultural investigations of
cognitive and socio-emotional development from childhood through the transition to adulthood. The
symposium consists of five presentations that focus on different psychological traits that are central in
the second decade of life: general cognitive ability, school achievement, personality, and mental
health. The proposed papers use samples drawn from various countries that have been found to differ
in terms of their socio-economic status, as well as cultural values, social norms, beliefs, and traditions.
All five papers include samples from the Russian Federation and Kyrgyz Republic. In the first paper,
the authors present the results of cross-cultural examination of working memory in two samples of
Russian and Kyrgyz adolescents. In the second paper, the authors analyse the links between five
personality traits and general cognitive ability highlighting the effect of culture, in two samples of
Russian and Kyrgyz adolescents. In the third paper, mother-child interactions are examined as
predictors of children’s school achievement, paying attention to cultural similarities and differences of
these relationships in three countries: the UK, Russia, and Kyrgyzstan. In the fourth paper, the
associations between parenting practices and offspring emotional and behavioural problems are
investigated in samples of young adults from the UK, Greece, Russia, Kyrgyzstan, and Brunei.Finally,
in the fifth paper, a genetically-informative cross-cultural approach is undertaken to get insight into
aetiology of the relationship between temperament and behavioural problems in adolescents from two
countries – Russia and Kyrgyzstan. These five presentations will provide a basis for a general
discussion on the importance of interdisciplinary approaches to studying individual differences in
cognitive and socio-emotional development in different countries.

CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY OF WORKING MEMORY IN ADOLESCENTS
Victoria Ismatullina
Working memory (CANTAB) was assessed in a sample of 289 adolescents from Russia and
Kyrgyzstan. Findings of this research will be discussed focusing on cultural similarities and
differences in cognitive development.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN “BIG FIVE” PERSONALITY TRAITS AND GENERAL
COGNITIVE ABILITY IN RUSSIAN AND KYRGYZ ADOLESCENTS
Ivan Voronin
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Associations between “Big Five” personality traits and Raven’s Progressive Matrices gscore were
tested in Russian and Kyrgyz adolescents (N=206) and appeared to be weak or moderate. Association
between g and Conscientiousness differs in two countries.

MOTHER-CHILD INTERACTIONS AND CHILDREN’S SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT: UKRUSSIA-KYRGYZSTAN CROSS-CULTURAL INVESTIGATION
Tatiana Tikhomirova
The results of a cross-cultural study of interrelationship between mother-child interactions and child’s
school achievements in the three samples (N=1375) of 11-14 year-old schoolchildren in the UK,
Russia and Kyrgyzstan will be presented.

PARENTING PRACTICES AND INTERNALISING AND EXTERNALISING SYMPTOMS
IN YOUNG ADULTS FROM FIVE COUNTRIES
Darya Gaysina
Associations between parenting practices and offspring internalising and externalising symptoms were
tested in British, Greek, Russian, Kyrgyz, and Brunei young adults. There is evidence for both
country-specific and country-common effects of parenting.

IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEMPERAMENT AND BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS
INFLUENCED BY GENES OR ENVIRONMENT? EVIDENCE FROM A RUSSIANKYRGYZ TWIN STUDY
GeorgyVasin
Temperament traits and behavior problems are interrelated. What are the mechanisms underlying this
relationship? In our study we analyze the extent to which genetic and environmental factors influence
this relationship in two different cultures.

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PS109
MENTALIZATION AND PARENTING: SOME CONSIDERATIONS
ABOUT REFLECTIVE FUNCTION AND SUGGESTIONS FOR
FUTURE RESEARCHES
B10. Development and education - Parenting
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Lucia Leonilde Carli, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Anja Keitel-Korndörfer, University of Leipzig, Leipzig - Germany
Chiara Giovanelli, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Alex Desatnik, University College London, London - United Kingdom
Antonella Marchetti, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy

In the last 30 years many researchers have underlined the relevance of mentalization, especially in
mother-child relationship as it can be considered the capacity to treat the child as a psychological
agent and it fosters child development (Meins et al., 2002; Sharp & Fonagy, 2008).
Child development either relational or cognitive or emotional has been linked to this parental ability.
More specifically, mentalization has been suggested to have a specific role in intergenerational
attachment transmission as infantile experiences with caregiver can be considered a base for the child's
attachment security, physical and socio-cognitive development (Sharp & Fonagy, 2008; Rothschild et
al., 2010).
Several constructs aiming to explore parental mentalization have been proposed in diverse
backgrounds.
In particular in a psychoanalytic framework Fonagy and collaborators (Fonagy, Gergely, & Target,
2007; Fonagy, Steele, Steele, Moran, & Higgitt, 1991; Fonagy & Target, 1997) have proposed the
concept of reflective function (RF) which can be defined in mother-infant relationship as: the parent's
capacity to reflect upon her own and her child's internal mental experiences (Slade, 2005). More
generally RF has achieved a major role in several studies about personality formation and disorders,
adolescence and treatment (Bateman & Fonagy, 2004; Benbassat & Priel, 2012; Fonagy, Gergely,
Jurist, & Target, 2003; Fonagy & Target, 1998).
In the context of mother-child relationship, another operationalization which has been suggested to be
relevant is called maternal Mind-Mindedness (Meins, Fernyhough, Fradley, & Tuckey, 2001).
The symposium can be considered an occasion to deepen some infantile evolutive aspects related to
RF and to share critical knowledge and thoughts based on recent studies about mentalization, and
more specifically RF and its relationship with MM. Furthermore it aims to suggest reflections and
ideas for further studies either theoretical or empirical.

MENTALIZATION AND OVERWEIGHT - HOW FAR GOES THE INFLUENCE OF
MATERNAL REFLECTIVE FUNCTIONING?
Anja Keitel-Korndörfer, Verena Wendt, Annette M. Klein, Kai von Klitzing
In the first contribute, Keitel-Korndörfer will discuss the role of maternal Reflective Function
comparing a sample of overweight mothers with normal-weight ones and she will reflect on the
relationship between RF and child's weight.
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MATERNAL
MENTALIZATION:
ARE
REFLECTIVE
FUNCTION
AND
MINDMINDEDNESS RELEVANT CONSTRUCTS IN INVESTIGATING MOTHER-INFANT
RELATIONSHIP AND CHILD ATTACHMENT?
Chiara Giovanelli, Lucia Carli
In the second contribute, Giovanelli will present a study conducted to compare RF and MindMindedness in a normative sample and she will analyze its results. Moreover she will share some
thoughts about the concept of mentalization and the constructs of RF and MM.

PARENTING, MENTALIZATION AND EPISTEMIC TRUST - TOWARDS THE NEXT
LEAP IN EMPIRICAL RESEARCH
Alex Desatnik
In the third contribute, Desatnik will discuss the concept of mentalization and RF and he will
introduce the idea of epistemic trust as a part of a triadic model with RF and attachment.

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PS110
POLITICAL BEHAVIOUR AND CITIZENSHIP – ASIAN AND
EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVES
C12. Culture and society - Political preferences and behaviour
Convenor
Presenters

Kerry Kennedy, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong - Hong Kong
Beata Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn - Poland
Anna Maria Zalewska, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poznan -

Poland

Discussant

Olga Mitina, Belgorod State University, Moscow - Russian Federation
Nina Nizowskih, Vyatka State Humanitarian University, Kirov - Russian Federation
Joanna Li Lijua, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong - Hong Kong
Kerry Kennedy, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong - Hong Kong
Despina Karakatsani, University of the Peloponnese, Corinth - Greece

Citizenship is a common characteristic of modern states extending rights to members and guaranteeing
certain protection. In return citizens have obligations to the statefor these benefits. Yet the political
behaviour of citizens does not always reflect this ‘citizenship contract’. Individuals often feel the need
to protest in different ways to assert rights they believe are not being addressed. The reasons for doing
so are not always clear. Sometimes there are individual causes related to personality and a sense of
alienation while at other times there are social causes related to perceived injustice and
entitlements.This symposium will explore how the citizenship attitudes of young citizens in selected
Asian and European countries are shaped, how young people view their future political participation
and values and whether the traditional ‘citizenship contract’ is under threat.
Survey data was identified focussing on young people’s attitudes to citizenship including the
International Civics and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS), the World Values Survey and two
European Citizenship Research Projects. The focus was on identifying those variables within different
country contexts e.g. personality, attitudes to the nation, political trust, attitudes to equality, political
efficacy etc. that accounted for the way young people see their future political participation.
The results indicated that young people from European countries tended to endorse future political
behaviour that was more politically oriented that those from Asian countries, they were less influenced
by patriotism but were similarly committed to equality as their Asian peers. The comparisons across
cultures and political systems showed the importance of contexts that influence citizenship values and
the difficulty of generalizing across cultures.

HONG KONG STUDENTS’ ATTITUDES TO PROTEST
Kerry Kennedy
Successive international research shows that young Hong Kong students show little interest in political
engagement, more interest in social engagement and a rejection of illegal protest. Yet ten year later the
same students engage in illegal activities in order to advance the cause of democracy. This paper will
draw on quantitative and qualitative data to try and explain these changing political behaviors.

YOUNG EUROPEANS’ CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIORS ACCORDING TO THEIR AGE
Beata Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz
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Citizenship attitudes develop from early adolescence. Based on research with 3794 students aged 1114-18 from 11 European countries we found developmental regularities of citizenship activity: passive
and personal citizenship tends to increase with age; there is also general decline in participatory
behavior, although a willingness to protest.

PERSONALITY CONSTRUCTS AND CITIZENSHIP DIMENSIONS OF YOUNG POLES
Anna Maria Zalewska
In a study (Grant ESF/84/2006) we found that general citizenship behaviour and its five dimensions –
passive, semi-active, social, personal and change-oriented (excluding political activity) – was
predicted by various personality constructs from among Big Five traits and social-cognitive beliefs –
optimism, values, mental toughness, responsibility.

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT OF YOUTH IN RUSSIA
Olga Mitina, Nina Nizowskih
Russian Enlightenment thought accumulated ideas about the formation of citizenship and civic
activity, then in specific way they were adopted in SU. Today society doesn’t pays attention to this
part of education and socialization. The study identified the representations of Russian contemporary
youth on these issues

ASIAN STUDENTS’ CIVIC BEHAVIOURS AND ATTRIBUTES AND THEIR AFFECT ON
CIVIC KNOWLEDGE
Joanna Li Lijua
Civic action occurs as a result of the interaction of students’ citizenship attitudes and behaviours. This
paper identifies attitudinal and behavioural factors affecting Asian students’ civic knowledge at both
individual and school levels. Both direct and indirect effects are examined. Data is drawn from the
ICCS involving five Asian societies.

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PS111
CLINICAL SUPERVISION AROUND THE GLOBE: PRACTICES,
EFFICACY, AND REGULATION
E01. Health and clinical intervention - Assessing and accrediting quality of psychotherapy training
and practice
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Nadine Kaslow, Emory University, Atlanta - United States
Carol Falender, UCLA University of California, Los Angeles - United States
Anthony Pillay, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban - South Africa
Analise O’Donovan, Griffith University, Brisbane - Australia
Nadine Kaslow, Emory University, Atlanta - United States
Carol Falender, UCLA University of California, Los Angeles - United States

Clinical supervision has only recently been acknowledged as a distinct professional competency. This
symposium will address the various global challenges and advances in training, guidelines, and
practices of effective supervision. Although clinical supervision is the cornerstone of clinical training
and transmission of the profession and its practices to future generations, internationally, psychology
has relied upon the process of osmosis for supervision and has addressed neither the quality nor
criteria for successful supervision. Within the past decade multiple countries have begun to remedy
this situation by developing guidelines for clinical supervision and by developing regulatory and
training criteria. Presenters in this symposium will address state of the art of clinical supervision
through the lens of multiple countries, cultures and viewpoints: Australia, South Africa, and the
United States. Subjects will include the state of the art of supervision guidelines and standards,
regulatory perspectives, effective supervision practices, and the trajectory of supervision training.
Critical questions include a) assessment of competence of the supervisor; b) training procedures and
requirements to conduct clinical supervision; c) existence of guidelines, ethical standards, or
regulations that directly address clinical supervision; d) research on supervision in the various contexts
and how they address and inform the areas of practice; e) consideration of outcomes of supervisee
development and competence and client outcome.
Objectives:
1)Identify common factors across global settings in the practice and regulation of clinical supervision
2)Identify strengths, commonalities, and variants in guidelines, regulations, and training across global
settings
3)Describe consensual themes on effective clinical supervision

SUPERVISION GUIDELINES IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
Carol Falender
Supervision Guidelines were adopted in 2014 in the United States. Commonalities and cultural
variants, legal, ethical, and regulatory considerations will be discussed as well as the Western
influence on global supervision.

CHALLENGES AND PROCESS: SUPERVISION IN SOUTH AFRICA
Anthony Pillay
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Supervision issues and challenges in professional psychology training in South Africa. While
supervision in professional psychology training has many universal challenges, countries like South
Africa, in social and political transition, have some unique issues influencing the supervision process,
content and dynamics.

CLINICAL SUPERVISION AND MANDATORY TRAINING: A VIEW FROM AUSTRALIA
Analise O’Donovan
In 2010, the Australian Psychology Registration Board introduced mandatory supervisor training.
Workshop content, effective and ineffective supervisors, and supervisee feedback about supervision in
the Australian context will be described.

EFFECTIVE SUPERVISION, CULTURE, AND COMPETENCE
Nadine Kaslow
One of the most challenging aspects of effective supervision relates to supervising trainees with
problems of professional competence. The interface between competence problems and multicultural
factors will be explored.

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PS112
AGEING AND MIGRATION IN EUROPE
C18. Culture and society - Other
Convenors
Presenters

Discussant

Isabelle Albert, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg - Luxembourg
Dieter Ferring, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg - Luxembourg
Vanessa Burholt, Swansea University, Wales - United Kingdom
Stephanie Barros Coimbra, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg - Luxembourg
Tineke Fokkema, University of Groningen, Groningen - Netherlands
Anne Carolina Ramos, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg - Luxembourg
Dieter Ferring, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg - Luxembourg
Beate Schwarz, University of Zurich, Zurich - Switzerland

Ageing and migration have become key topics in Europe today, as a large number of first generation
immigrants of the 1970s are currently approaching retirement age in many European countries.
Although the idea of return migration might often be well present in the lives of ageing migrants, an
actual permanent return to the country of origin seems to be enacted more seldom by today’s
immigrants after retirement. This might be due to several reasons such as social aspects (e.g., family
and friends), economic issues or health. It is therefore of prime importance to learn more about the
particular needs and resources of older migrants and their families. Ageing migrants face undoubtedly
a special situation: The acculturation situation may result in an increased need for social support due
to fewer sociocultural resources in the host country; however, they may also have a smaller social
network due to difficulties in adapting to the host country. Within migrant families, an acculturation
gap between first and second generation might further lead to different expectations regarding
intergenerational solidarity and support, and this can have negative effects on well-being of the
different family members. Issues of assistance and care for aged migrants will thus be crucial both for
the receiving society which has to address issues of diversity, integration and social cohesion, as well
as for families which provide still the lion’s share of support for the aged. Policy makers and
practitioners are conscious of the increasing importance of these issues, but more research is needed in
order to improve the provisions of age-specific services and assistance for ageing migrants and their
families. The present symposium aims to put issues of migration and ageing on the agenda and to raise
the awareness of these hot topics in today’s society. It brings together leading researchers in the field
of ageing and migration from four different European countries which are characterized by a large
share of immigrants in their population, namely UK, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Switzerland.
Contributions will focus on different, country specific immigrant (and national) groups, examining
aspects of ethnic identity and multiculturalism, intergenerational relations, social networks, support
and care as well as different aspects of well-being in the context of acculturation. Both quantitative
and qualitative methodologies will be applied. The presented studies will be discussed with respect to
similarities and differences between immigrant groups and different acculturation contexts, and
implications for policies regarding ageing and migration in Europe will be considered. Further, lacks
in current knowledge will be addressed and suggestions for future research activities will be presented.

TRANSNATIONAL FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS AND CULTURAL IDENTITY: OLDER
MIGRANTS IN ENGLAND AND WALES
Vanessa Burholt, Christine Dobbs, Christina Victor

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Social identity theory illustrates older UK migrants’ belonging to an ethnic group, country of origin of
family, and the UK. We explore the influence of cultural heritage, social class, support network and
global citizenship on cultural identity.

MULTICULTURALISM OF PORTUGUESE OLDER MIGRANTS AND THEIR ADULT
CHILDREN IN LUXEMBOURG
Stephanie Barros Coimbra, Isabelle Albert, Elke Murdock, Dieter Ferring
Addressing the issue of an acculturation gap between generations of migrants, we focus on ethnic
identity, multicultural ideologies, acculturative stress and well-being of Portuguese older parents
compared to their adult children in Luxembourg.

LONELINESS AMONG MOROCCAN AND TURKISH OLDER MIGRANTS IN THE
NETHERLANDS
Tineke Fokkema, Theo van Tilburg
Migrants might have difficulties to adapt to their new society and integrate socially. The current study
explores feelings of loneliness in 475 people born in Turkey or Morocco, aged 55-64, who migrated
more than thirty years ago to the Netherlands.

LONG-TERM CARE PERSPECTIVES AMONG ELDERLY MIGRANTS: THE CASE OF
LUXEMBOURG
Ute Karl, Boris Kühn, Anne Carolina Ramos
Based on biographic and network interviews, this paper analyses the long-term care perspectives
among elderly migrants in Luxembourg. It shows their preference for paid care work and challenges
related to language, culture and social isolation.

“THIS IS NOT MY TOWN”: FEELINGS OF CLOSENESS AND SECURITY OF OLDER
MIGRANTS AND NATIONAL RESIDENTS
Dieter Ferring, Thomas Boll
The study demonstrates differences in ratings of closeness to one’s living area and of feeling secure
out of the perspective of older Portuguese migrants and national residents. Results are discussed
regarding processes underlying acculturation.

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PS113
SOCIAL ROBOTS AS OUTGROUP: SOCIAL AND COGNITIVE
PROCESSES IN RELATIONS TO SOCIAL ROBOTS
C05. Culture and society - Group processes and intergroup relations
Convenor
Kingdom
Presenters

Discussant
Kingdom

Roger Giner-Sorolla, University of Kent, Keynes College, Canterbury - United
Friederike Eyssel, New York University, Abu Dhabi - United Arab Emirates
Francesco Ferrari, University of Trento, Trento - Italy
Maria Paola Paladino, University of Trento, Trento - Italy
Ceylan Ӧzdam, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels - Belgium
Roger Giner-Sorolla, University of Kent, Keynes College, Canterbury - United

Worldwide, in the past decade, there has been a sharp increase in investment into the development of
sophisticated social robots. But this is not matched by and equivalent level of progress in the studies
that investigate the reactions of humans toward this novel social group of our own creation: the robots.
Our symposium will redress this neglect by showcasing recent advances in psychological research on
robots as “outgroup”. Focusing on robots that resemble human beings (humanoids and androids), we
will present research into the psychological processes relevant to their acceptance in social interaction.
Friederike Eyssel will present studies showing how and when the processes of dehumanization and
anthropomorphism occur in the context of human-robot interaction.
Francesco Ferrari will present a set of studies based in intergroup theory, demonstrating that people
fear highly human-like appearance in robots because they are perceived to pose a threat to human
beings’ distinctiveness.
Maria Paola Paladino will address the same issue but from a different angle. Using a well-developed
social cognitive theory, processes she will present studies investigating the role of Category Conflict
in negative emotional reaction toward highly anthropomorphic robots.
Ceylan Ӧzdem will discuss her research showing the interaction between two processes involved in
human-social robot interaction, namely attentional reorientation (cognitive) and attribution of agency
(social). In addition to behavioral responses this study also investigated neural correlates of interaction
with social robots.
The discussant, Roger Giner-Sorolla, an expert in social emotions and dehumanization, will underline
how, across different lines of research, psychological theories and research are fundamental to
developing more “human friendly” social robotics. At the same time he will also explain how this
research represents a challenging laboratory for basic social psychological theories.

FACTORS = HUMANITY?
Friederike Eyssel
We will present experimental evidence on two prominent social psychological phenomena:
anthropomorphism and dehumanization. The underlying mechanisms will be discussed using the 3Factor Model of Anthropomorphism (Epley et al., 2007).

FEAR OF SOCIAL ROBOTS: PHYSICAL ANTHROPOMORPHISM AS A THREAT TO
HUMAN DISTINCTIVENESS AND IDENTITY
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Francesco Ferrari
Social robots generally are feared for economic reasons as they replace workers. Referring to research
on group distinctiveness, we demonstrated that fear toward robots is more generally linked to the
threat to human specificity and identity.

IS IT A ROBOT OR IS NOT? THE ROLE OF CATEGORY CONFLICT IN THE UNCANNY
VALLEY
Maria Paola Paladino
According to the uncanny valley theory, very human-like robots can be threatening and cause fear in
interactions. The three studies presented here investigate the role of category conflict as a cognitive
process responsible for this phenomenon.

BELIEVING
ANDROIDS?
ATTENTIONAL
REORIENTATION
AND
BELIEF
MANIPULATION WITH AN ANTHROPOMORPHIC ROBOT
Ceylan Ӧzdam
The present study investigated the potential interaction between the processes of attentional
reorientation (cognitive) and attribution to agency (social) and explored its neural substrate by using a
picture of an anthropomorphic robot.

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PS115
IDENTIFICATION WITH GROUPS FROM FRONT TO COVER: ITS
STRUCTURE, MOTIVATIONAL BASIS AND DIFFERENTIAL
EFFECTS
C05. Culture and society - Group processes and intergroup relations
Convenor
Presenters

Andrey Elster, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem - Israel
Avihay Berlin , The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem - Israel
Andrey Elster, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem - Israel
Eyal Rechter, Columbia University, New York - United States
Sonia Roccas, The Open University of Israel, Raanana - Israel
Noga Sverdlik, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva - Israel

Social groups consider members' identification as an immeasurable asset and invest considerable
efforts in promoting members' affiliation and commitment. Identification provides various benefits,
both to the group (e.g., contribution, loyalty) and to its members (e.g., sense of belonging, selfesteem). The proposed symposium aims to deepen our understanding of the concept of identification,
by examining its structure, motivational basis, and contextual factors that mitigate its effect.
The first two presentations focus on motivational bases underlying identification. The first examines
individual differences in values as predictors of identification over time: Members' values and the
values they perceived as expected had a unique contribution. The second presentation studies the
opposing effects of locomotion vs. assessment orientations, beyond satisfaction with the leader.
Identification, however, is not a uniform construct. The third presentation differentiates between two
forms of identification and aims to uncover their motivational and perceptual underpinnings. The
fourth presentation shows that attachment and glorification forms of identification differ in their
impact on psychological discomfort following violations of personal beliefs by ingroup actions.
Finally, the last presentation points to contextual factors affecting outcomes of identification, and
shows the moderating role of one's close environment in the relation between identification and
membership satisfaction.
The presentations differ in the nature of studies (field and lab), methodology (correlational,
longitudinal, multilevel designs) and context (nation, organization, sports teams). Taken together, the
research included in this symposium furthers the comprehension of a fundamental concept in social
reality - identification with groups. Our joint contributions can be utilized by theoreticians and
practitioners to manage and maintain positive relations between individuals and social collectives.

PERSONAL
VALUES
AND
PERCEIVED
EXPECTED
VALUES PREDICT ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT AMONG VOLUNTEERS
Noga Sverdlik, Tali Rabin
In a longitudinal study among volunteers in a prosocial organization, we found that both personal
values and values perceived as expected by the coordinator and the protégé in time 1 predicted
organizational affective commitment in time 2.

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REGULATORY MODE AND AFFECTIVE
COMMITMENT
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Eyal Rechter
Participants were 205 female players of a community sport league. Locomotion (positively) and
assessment (negatively) predicted affective commitment to the team, over and above satisfaction with
the coach.

LOVE VERSUS LOVING CRITICISM: DISENTANGLING CONVENTIONAL AND
CONSTRUCTIVE PATRIOTISM
Sonia Roccas, Maciej Sekerdej
Three studies of Polish and Israeli students seek to disentangle conventional and constructive
patriotism by examining perceptional and motivational mechanisms that differentiate between them.

INGROUP IDENTIFICATION AND NEED FOR COGNITIVE CLOSURE INTENSIFY
INTRAGROUP DISSONANCE
Avihay Berlin
Identification in the form of attachment (but not glorification) and Need for Cognitive Closure both
had a unique contribution in predicting psychological discomfort following a violation of personal
beliefs by ingroup actions.

THE MODERATING EFFECT OF UNIT SUPPORT CLIMATE ON THE RELATIONSHIP
BETWEEN IDENTIFICATION AND JOB SATISFACTION
Andrey Elster. Lilach Sagiv
Two studies show that the relationship between identification and job satisfaction depends on the unitlevel climate: This relationship is significantly stronger in units with a weak support climate as
compared to units with a strong support climate.

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PS116
EXTENSION ACTIONS: EXTRAMURAL UNIVERSITY AND ITS
INTERVENTIONS
B16. Development and education - Other
Convenor
Presenters

Janeiro de
Discussant
de

Lucia Maria de Freitas Perez, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de
Janeiro - Brazil
Lucia Maria de Freitas Perez, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de
Janeiro - Brazil
Vera Regina Loureiro, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de
Brazil
Sandra Albernaz de Medeiros, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio
Janeiro - Brazil
Sandra Albernaz de Medeiros, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio
Janeiro - Brazil

The university extension has a key role in enabling students training to bring together the community
and academia. It opens up perspectives for the everyday reality and offers a field in which the
relationship between students and community become valued, allowing the development of a more
dynamic academic curriculum, more tuned with the social demands. It is observed that the passage
through this experience produces a transformative effect of both the existential and intellectual points
of view. In addition, it is clear that such actions contribute to reduce the imaginary inequalities and the
gap between the privileged academic world and reality. Being cooperative processes, such activities
provide a fruitful field for coordinating professors and scholarship students to develop new research
with issues of strong socio-political nature, that can be a source of resources and tools creation for
effective transformation of the groups involved. We intend to present actions of different extension
projects at the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Unirio-Brazil. In this symposium we
held a cutout, prioritizing actions concerning people with special needs, college students and young
graduates of our university. The methodologies applied are articulated through Research-Action,
valuing the involved subjects, whether they are the fellows who work with us or those served by the
various projects. At the work "Mazes and skills: the choices of Pedagogy students" our approach goes
through the career choices narratives. In "Interlacing knowledge: some practice impasses" we focus on
the crises faced by the students when confronted with the professional field. In "Social inclusion of
young people and adults with disabilities: changing attitudes" we discuss the work in an institution
that attends youth and adults with intellectual and multiple disabilities.

MAZES AND SKILLS: THE CHOICES OF PEDAGOGY STUDENTS
Lucia Maria de Freitas Perez
The "Mazes and Skills" project makes video records of student testimonials about their career choices.
They are presented to others, leading to processes of reflection and discussion on the reasons that lead
to such choices.

SOCIAL INCLUSION OF YOUNG PEOPLE AND ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES:
CHANGING ATTITUDES
Sandra Albernaz de Medeiros
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The title-paper discusses an extension project developed by the Institute of Clinical, Educational and
Professional Psychology and meets youth and adults with disabilities.

INTERLACING KNOWLEDGE: SOME PRACTICE IMPASSES
Vera Regina Loureiro
The project aims to build a network of sensitive listening and to weave ties with educators in order to
create multiple spaces of intersection and discussion, both in classroom and virtual, to address the
inherent difficulties of the educational act.

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PS117
LEADERSHIP AND EMPLOYEE RELATED OUTCOMES
D02. Work and organization - Leadership and entrepreneurship
D05. Work and organization - Organizational behaviour
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Shailendra Singh, Indian Institute of Management Lucknow, Lucknow - India
Bhumika , Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur - India
Shailendra Singh, Indian Institute of Management Lucknow, Lucknow - India
Arvind K. Sinha, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur - India
Kailash B. L. Srivastava, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur - India
Manjari Srivastava, NMIMS Deemed to be University, Mumbai, Maharashtra - India
Arvind K. Sinha, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur - India

Leadership and motivation are the two central topics of organizational behavior which attract both
academicians and practitioners alike. Motivation is essential for keeping the employees engaged and
leadership is essential to show the direction and taking the responsibility motivating self and others.
Leadership has been dealt by researchers in multiple ways due to their diverse backgrounds. The
symposium addresses the primary question: to what extent do the leadership styles matter in
determining employee related outcomes. The study of leadership becomes more important from
Indian perspective as India offers unique cultural context due to its collectivist nature and high power
distance. While examining the role of leadership in shaping various employee related outcomes, we
have used multiple perspectives on leadership including autocratic vs participative leadership,
transactional vs transformational leadership, equity perspective on leadership and empowering
leadership. Employee related outcomes may consists of job satisfaction, organizational commitment,
employee engagement, job involvement, task performance and contextual performance and job related
strain and intention to quit . The major hypotheses tested in the studies are: a. social inequity may be
perceived not only in terms of financial rewards, but anything that the person subjectively considers as
rewarding, the nature of which may be related to personal values. b. transformational leadership
would be positively related to work engagement and psychological wellbeing among managers. C.
leadership style would have greater influence on employee attrition than organizational performance.
The researchers have followed both experimental and survey method to examine their hypotheses
using appropriate samples and measurement tools. The studies included in symposium have followed
social exchange theory in general and equity theory in particular to integrate their findings. The
studies have concluded that the leaders play a strong role in shaping employee related outcomes.
Theoretical and practical implications of the studies have been discussed. Limitations and future
directions have also been suggested.

LEADERSHIP WITH PASSION: EQUITY MOTIVATIONAL FOUNDATION OF
LEADERSHIP
Arvind K. Sinha
Author and associates discovered that social inequity may be perceived not only in terms of financial
rewards, but anything that the person subjectively considers as rewarding, the nature of which may be
related to personal values. An intense or frequent reinforcement of over-reward occurrences may lead
to a strong inclination toward a self defining activity that one likes or loves, is part of professional
position such as leadership roles. Such an inclination has been termed in the literature as “passion”.
Using the variables of social inequity and competence, the contribution of “over-rewarding” inequity”
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on effective organizationally relevant behaviour (with passion nurturing outcomes as the reward) was
investigated. Sample consisted of 100 senior undergraduates and 100 pass outs alumni of a
technological university, and 80 professionals working in banks. Data analysis comprised of interview
data, exploratory factor analysis and regression analysis. Results suggested that an “advantageous
inequity” arising out of a basic psychological need of relatedness to some (or a larger) cause, and
feeling of competence to make significant contributions to the profession and the humankind at large,
may be related to passion, which might make a difference to the form and quality of leadership role
enactment. People getting a chance to nurture their passion with such perceived advantage are also
likely to be better contributors to the organizationally and possibly socially relevant outcomes.
THE IMPACT OF TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL
CULTURE ON EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL BEING
Kailash B. L. Srivastava
The major objective of this study was to examine the effect of transformational leadership on work
engagement and psychological well being among managers. The data were collected from 325
managers through structured interview schedule using the self report method on employee engagement
and psychological well being, psychological climate and perceived organizational support. The data
on transformational leadership was filled up by the supervisors of the respective managers. The
transformational leadership and organizational culture were treated as independent variable and
psychological climate and perceived climate was treated as mediator and mediator variable, and work
engagement and psychological well-being were considered as dependent measures. The results
showed the direct effect of transformational leadership on employee engagement engagement and
psychological wellbeing and also the indirect effect of psychological climate, showing its mediation
effect. . In addition, the research also indicates that transformational leaders are more effective if there
is support form the organization resulting in better engagement and enhanced psychological well
being. The findings have implications for managers that if leaders adopt the transformational style,
they can easily develop a sense of trust and meaningfulness, which helps employees to better engage
themselves, face challenges and develop themselves to create wellbeing. The theoretical and practical
implications of the study are also discussed.
Key words: Transformational leadership, employee engagement, psychological climate, perceived
organizational support, psychological well being.

FACTORS INFLUENCING EMPOWERING LEADERSHIP BEHAVIOR: A STUDY OF
TEAM
LEADERS’
LOCUS
OF
CONTROL,
TEAM
MEMBERS’
TASK
CHARACTERISTICS, TENURE UNDER LEADERSHIP AND POWER DISTANCE
Manjari Srivastava1, Ruta Vyas
The focus of the present research is to understand the factors influencing empowering leadership
behavior, a perspective both from leaders and their team members. With the objective that
organizations can focus on the right elements and invest in the appropriate areas during their
leadership development activities.
The research is exploratory field study. Sampling is purposive, employing triadic design i.e. a manager
and two of his/her subordinates are selected for data collection. The total no. of respondents is 240,
with 80 managers and 160 of their direct reports.
The sample is drawn from seven professionally run organization including those of Indian origin as
well as multi-national companies. This study proposes to explore the relationship between leaders’
locus of control and his or her empowering behavior towards the immediate team and further explore
the moderating impact of power distance on empowering behavior. Similarly the study also aims to
explore if nature of task team members’ perform has any association with the empowering behavior of
their leader and whether this relationship is moderated by power distance between them. Thirdly,
whether tenure under a leadership influences the nature of task subordinates perform?
Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis is done to establish the validity of the questionnaires.
Further analysis would employ other multivariate techniques of quantitative data analysis.
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The finding from this research may be utilized by professionals to guide organizations desiring rapid
and sustainable growth, to develop leaders who empower their teams such that they act as leaders
themselves and become stimulants for the growth of the organization.
Key words: empowering behavior, team leaders, team members, locus of control, task characteristics,
power distance, and team members’ tenure.

ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR SOCIETAL WELFARE: ORGANIZATIONAL
ENTRY, SOCIALIZATION AND SENSE MAKING
Bhumika, Arvind K. Sinha
The present work attempts to understand the role of organizational leadership in implementation of
social welfare through a perspective known as sense-making, which may be thought of as a process by
which individual develops the cognitive map of their environment. It is also a process that helps the
organizational role incumbents in making decision about their own career graph including their intent
to either remain with or quit the organization especially during the early socialization phase, typically
during the first eighteen months on the job. Based on qualitative enquiry from the new role
incumbents, who did not yet complete two years of continuous experience on the main job for which
they had been selected in their respective cadres. Data collected from primary respondents using semistructured interviews were analyzed through the grounded theory approach. Based on the insights
gathered from the interviews, an attempt is made to advance a framework for understanding the
process of sense making of the role of organizational leadership in societal welfare of the internal
customers and bringing about the roles of (a) their unrealistic expectations and unmet expectations in
prompting them for making a choice between intent to quit or to remain with the organization, and (b)
the organizational socialization practices. The results are discussed toward a desirable emphasis on
actual implementation rather than just identification and creation of policies, and for implications on
part of the organization in the direction of enhanced rate of retention of the recruited role incumbents
and their social-emotional welfare.

EFFECT OF LEADER BEHAVIOUR AND ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE ON
EMPLOYEE ATTRITION
Shailendra Singh
Employee attrition has invited a great deal of attention from both academicians as well as from
practitioners. A popular question often raised by managers- what causes employee attrition- the
company or the leader? To respond to this debate, the study examines the impact of leader behaviour
and organizational performance on employee stress and likely attrition. It was hypothesized that both
leadership and organizational performance will have a significant impact on employee outcomes.
However, leadership would likely have a greater impact on employee outcomes as it is the immediate
supervisor who influences the work life of employee on day- to -day basis. For junior level employees,
leader is the person who represents the organization. Eighty young managers responded to questions
regarding their motivation, creativity, stress level and likelihood of attrition under a simulated
environment in a 2X2X2 experimental design framework having two kinds of leadership, namely
autocratic and participative and two types of organizational performance, namely, loss making and
profit making, and two kinds of stimulus order : nature of leadership followed by organizational
performance and nature of organizational performance followed by nature of leadership . Results
strongly supported the hypothesis that leadership has a greater impact on employee related outcomes
including likely attrition than organizational performance. Organizational performance also had a
signifiant influence of likelihood of attrition but the magnitude of the influence was relatively smaller.
The results give credence to the maxim that employees more likely to leave the organization because
of their supervisors than because of their organization's performance or image. The implications for
the theory and practice have been discussed.
Key Words: Stress, Attrition, Employee Outcome, Leadership Style, Organizational Performance
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PS118
THE INTEGRATION OF NEUROSCIENTIFIC APPROACHES IN THE
STUDY OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOR: THE CONTRIBUTE OF
NEUROMARKETING
F13. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Neuroeconomics and neuropolitics
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Vincenzo Russo, IULM University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Carlos Flavian , University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza - Spain
Dominika Maison, University of Warsaw, Warsaw - Poland
Maurizio Mauri, IULM University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Daniela Zambarbieri, University of Pavia, Pavia - Italy
Egle Vaiciukynaite, Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas - Lithuania
Carlos Flavian , University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza - Spain

The aim of the symposium is to explore and discuss the application of neuroscientific approaches as
innovative contribution to study consumer reactions. In the last decades the possibilities to take
advantage of brain image techniques and the implementation of scientific knowledge about the brain
allowed to understand and explain different cognitive and emotional processes involved in consumer
phenomena (Plassmann et al., 2012) to such an extent that neuroscientists are able to directly study the
brain processes to an unprecedented degree. However the fields of marketing, communication and
consumer behavior studies, are still not aware about the neuroscientific advances and about their huge
potential. The application of neuroscientific methods, such as the electroencephalography recordings,
to market research, has caused controversial debate in the scientific community (Lee et al., 2007). The
development of technologies that enable to measure many behaviors of consumers, such as the
pointing of the gaze (eye-tracking), or the quantitative facial emotional expressions analyses, or the
application of psychophysiological techniques based on the monitoring of the activity of autonomous
nervous system (heart rate, respiration, electromyography, skin conductance) can provide important
information that can be integrated with traditional methods of market research. However, despite the
development of scientific disciplines such as Neuroeconomics (Rustichini, 2006), the rise of protocols
or specific techniques enabling market researchers and professionals to take advantage of modern
neuroscientific methods is still an open issue. The contributes presented during the symposium will
discuss some case studies and some scientific considerations to widen the scopes of neuromarketing,
beyond commercial brand and consumer behavior application, in order to share a broader vision on
this topic and with the aim to implement marketing as a science.

HOW TO BETTER UNDERSTAND ADVERTISING COMMUNICATION BY USING
BIOMETRIC MEASURES
Dominika Maison
Three experimental studies will be presented using implicit measures based on facial emotional
reactions. Results showed that using neuroscientific measures provide better understanding of reaction
toward advertising than only data based on declaration.

CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR IN VIDEO ADS: AROUSAL AS A RECALL TRIGGER
Carlos Flavian
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The consumers’ interest on advertising is reducing because they are overexposed to ads. This research
aims to understand the mechanism by which the introduction of arousing sequences in video
advertising affects brand recall (Br) and ad recall (Ar).

INTEGRATION OF TRADITIONAL AND INNOVATIVE METHODS IN STUDYING
ADVERTISEMENTS VIA PAPER, TABLET AND WEBSITE: A NEUROMARKETING
EXPERIMENT
Daniela Zambarbieri
Advertising flyers appearing on a single date on a national Italian newspaper are exposed to: 24
subjects via paper, 24 via tablet and 24 via website. The effects in terms of memorization, total eyefixation time and brain waves activity are presented.

EVALUATING 3 SOCIAL CAMPAIGNS: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY WITH
NEUROSCIENTIFIC APPROACH
Maurizio Mauri
We evaluated the effects of 3 social campaign. The 3 ads were exposed to 16 foreigners. During the
exposure, for each subjects neuro-psycho-physiological measures were recorded. Results show how
they can “detect” the optimal social campaign.

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR CONSUMERS’ SOCIABILITY RESEARCH IN THE VIRTUAL
ENVIRONMENT FROM THE NEUROMARKETING PERSPECTIVE. DOES THAT MEAN
"BUTTERFLY EFFECT"?
Egle Vaiciukynaite, Rimantas Gatautis
"A hot medium is one that extends one single sense in "high definition""
(McLuhan, Lapham, 1994, p. 22)
Consumers’ sociability refers to social interaction between consumers and includes the social presence
to which consumers feel connected to others. The proliferation of social technologies has offered new
opportunities for consumers to interact with others in the virtual environment. Recently, consumers
have been more empowered and active. However, many companies have faced the challenge to
manage consumers’ sociability effectively and to measure the performance of it in the virtual
environment. Neuromarketing provides better understanding of consumers’ sociability through
measuring consumers’ unconscious processes. The study aims to identify new directions for research
into consumers’ sociability. Furthermore, the emergence of wearable technology has offered new tools
which can be used for consumers’ sociability research. Consumer can wear the technology that
includes tracking information related to physiological data. Wearable technology allows researchers to
investigate the relationship between consumers’ sociability and environment and captures consumers’
sociability in real time. Thus, this technology will transform research in this area. Several insights for
future investigation are identified. Keywords: customers’ sociability, neuromarketing, social
technologies, wearable technology

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PS119
THE HYBRID APPROACH AND THE SMART ENVIRONMENTS IN
SCHOOL: EMPOWERING THE TRADITIONAL PSYCHOPEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES WITH ECOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGIES
B03. Development and education - Learning and instruction
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Orazio Miglino, University of Naples Federico II, Naples - Italy
Dario Bacchini, Second University of Naples, Caserta - Italy
Raffaele Di Fuccio, University of Naples Federico II, Naples - Italy
Maria Concetta Miranda, Second University of Naples, Naples - Italy
Henrick Lund, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby - Denmark

Global investment in Information Communication and Technologies (ICT) to improve teaching and
learning in schools have been initiated by many governments; nevertheless the ICT adoption and
integration in teaching and learning have been limited (Buabeng-Andoh C., 2012).
At the same time, in the schools are widely widespread well-established psycho-pedagogical
approaches (such as the Montessori and Munari experiences, the use of structured materials, etc.) that
focus on the active involvement of children and support particular learning materials (educational
toys). The ICT devices could easily reinforce these practices, and the materials are able to foster both
learning and teaching processes by stimulating the manipulation of concrete objects and peer group
cooperation. In addition, they could integrate the new potentialities of the technologies such as the
immediate feedbacks, the tracked sessions, and the use of technological daily-life devices in school
contexts.
Some technologies, e.g. RFID/NFC sensors, the leap motion and the handwriting recognition are
natural candidates to empower the traditional psyco-pedagogical practices. This hybrid approach
allows the children and teachers to conduct the activities as in the past, taking advantages of digital
technologies. An important aspect is the use of ecological technologies, i.e. not invasive, yet able to
extract information by simply observing and not conditioning the children's activity.
It will be detailed the experience in this field faced by a project named INF@NZIA DIGI.tales 3.6
funded by the Italian Ministry of Education. The project will be shown in a double analysis: from a
side will be described the project aims and the results achieved; from another side will be detailed the
results of a needs analysis, carrying out a series of focus group and questionnaires in order to
understand the belief, perceptions and attitudes of teachers and parents about ICT devices in school for
children between 3- to 6-year old.

INF@NZIA DIGI.TALES 3.6: AN EXPERIENCE OF THE HYBRID APPROACH IN THE
ITALIAN SCHOOL CONTEXT
Raffaele Di Fuccio
It will be described the INF@NZIA DIGI.tales 3.6 project. The aim is to promote the use of ICT
technologies (cloud, social media, open data, etc.) and the latest paradigms of human-computer
interaction (RFID/NFC sensors and handwriting) in order to define psycho-educational practices
which are able to enhance curricular activities.

TEACHERS’ AND PARENTS’ ATTITUDES AND BELIEFS ABOUT THE USE OF
LEARNING TECHNOLOGY IN PRESCHOOLERS
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Dario Bacchini
The literature identified several factors that influence the decision to adopt ICT into teaching (Chen,
2008, Clausen, 2007). but considering just the teacher’s perception. The presentation will focus on a
study propose to fill this gap exploring, in a Italian sample, perceptions, attitudes and beliefs about
ICT in order to understand whether parents and teachers are willing to integrate ew technologies into
their practices of teaching.

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PS120
BUILDING BRIDGES BETWEEN EUROPEAN UNIVERSITIES AND
PSI CHI, THE INTERNATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY IN
PSYCHOLOGY
F01. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Capacities building and human development
Convenor
Presenters

Mercedes A. McCormick, Pace University, New York City - United States
Bernardo J. Carducci , Indiana University Southeast, New Albany - United States
John M. Davis, Texas State University, San Marcos - United States
Mercedes A. McCormick, Pace University, New York City - United States
Randall Osborne, Texas State University, San Marcos - United States
Martha S. Zlokovich, Psi Chi, International Honor Society in Psychology,
Chattanooga United States
Discussant
Florence Denmark, Pace University, New York City - United States

This symposium’s main objective is to build bridges, or partnerships, between European Universities
(faculty and students) and the USA-based chapters of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in
Psychology. Such bridges will be used to promote capacity building and professional
growth/development in the field of psychology. Each speaker’s presentation is focused on providing
information and professional experience about promoting Psi Chi’s mission internationally. Psi Chi’s
mission is to produce a well-educated, ethical, and socially responsible member committed to
contributing to the science and profession of psychology and to society in general, including to
recognize and foster the contributions that diversity makes to the science and practice of psychology.
The value of international collaboration, student professional development, engagement, and internetbased technologies are significant threads woven through each presentation.
An important outcome of the Building Bridges Symposium is for faculty and students from European
universities to understand clearly the historical background of the organization and the important
benefits of bringing a chapter of Psi Chi to their campus. The speakers will describe the process for
doing so and how it the process has adapted with more international bridges built.A Psi Chi chapter
offers professional benefits to the university, psychology department, faculty, and students.
Professional benefits of opening a Psi Chi chapter include opportunities to submit for publication in
the Psi Chi Journal of Psychological Research, networking, international mentoring, competing for
research grants and/or travel grants to attend conferences and other professional meetings, and more.
Psi Chi also provides information about graduate school and professional opportunities through
technological resources.
Outcomes of the symposium are: 1) to demonstrate a cultural sensitivity model of cooperation
between European and US higher education institutions supporting the growth of academic
partnerships for faculty and students; 2) describe Psi Chi’s effectiveness at supporting faculty and
students’ professional growth; and 3) demonstrate how Psi Chi’s implementation of social media and
other technological tools can enhance international collaborations among students in particular.

PSI CHI BUILDING INTERNATIONAL BRIDGES: FROM EUROPE TO AMERICA TO
EUROPE
John Davis
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This presentation will briefly describe the origin of Psi Chi during the 9th International Congress of
Psychology held at Yale University in 1929, ongoing international connections, and recent
international initiatives.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF INTERNATIONALIZING PSI CHI?
Martha S. Zlokovich
After 80 years as a national honor society, Psi Chi became international in 2009. Presentation
considers what does internationalizing the society mean, why is it important to members, and what
benefits can it accrue to both US and non US members?
BUILDING BRIDGES BETWEEN PSI CHI AND EUROPEAN UNIVERSITIES
Mercedes A. McCormick
This presentation will describe the importance of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in
Psychology connecting with universities represented at ECP to build student engagement, academic
success, and leadership skills.

BUILDING BRIDGES AS DEVELOPMENT: INTERCULTURAL SENSITIVITY
Randall Osborne
This presentation will focus on how Psi Chi’s efforts to build bridges between European universities
and our Honor Society represent growth on the 6 stages of Bennett’s developmental model of
Intercultural Sensitivity.

CROSS-CULTURAL CHANCES AND CHALLENGES TO PROMOTING PSI CHI IN
ITALY: AN ITALIAN-AMERICAN’S PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE
Bernie Carducci
The nuts and bolts to establish an initial Psi Chi Chapter in Italy will be discussed. Networking
outcomes and the cross-cultural values associated with selectivity of college/university honor societies
will be emphasized.

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PS121
THE EDUCATIVE FUNCTION BETWEEN FAMILY AND SOCIAL
RESPONSIBILITY
C02. Culture and society - Family systems and processes
Convenor
status
Presenters
status

Discussant

Marisa Persiani, Juvenile Court of Rome, Rome; AIO - NGO in special consultative
with ECOSOC, Rome; AEO, Milan - Italy
Marisa Persiani, Juvenile Court of Rome, Rome; AIO - NGO in special consultative
with ECOSOC, Rome; AEO, Milan - Italy
Rossella Celmi, International Organization for Migration, Rome - Italy
Tatiana Vereitinova, SAO, Saint Petersburg - Russian Federation
Daniela Di Pietro, AIO, FOIL, Unit of Psychology and Society, Milan - Italy
Floriana De Angelis, University College London, London - United Kingdom

To this day, civilized societies have chosen to institutionalize the family as the “standard” ecocontainer. Today, however the family as an institution is suffering from increasing pressure: external
information easily overthrows the values taught at home, and this applies to all domains; from
sexuality to religion, from ownership to anarchy, from love to selfish indifference, etc. Furthermore,
there is a growing concern in the world as increasing numbers of children and adolescents are having
difficulty managing the challenges of development. According to recent sociological research, an
increasing number of youth suffer from apathy, sadness, low self-esteem, and seem to be lacking the
capacity to define long-term goals and life choices. At the same time, many adolescents struggle with
internalizing problems such as anxiety and depression. Interventions that promote positive
psychological well-being may equip young people with the necessary life skills, supports and
resources to fulfil their potential and overcome adversity. The aim of the symposium is to present a
reflection on the educative function with a focus on the state of the art at international level and the
question to which the presenters will try to give an answer is “Is it possible to create a professional
style for a new social responsibility between traditional culture and globalisation?” Finally, programs
aiming at promoting generic psychosocial competence instead of focusing on specific behavioural
problems will be highlighted. In particular, programs aimed to facilitate the process by which the
individual gains greater awareness, both to her/his advantage, and to that of the ecosystem in question
(system and society).

THE EDUCATIVE FUNCTION BETWEEN FAMILY AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Marisa Persiani
The paper aims to present a reflection on the educative function, passing through the main
psychological currents of thought up to recent well-being psychology, underlining the need for an
inter-disciplinary approach.

CRISIS OF IDENTITY, EXISTENTIAL PROBLEM AND SOCIAL CONSCIOUSNESS
Tatiana Vereitinova
Following research by University of Saint Petersburg the principles for a logistic of progress is
discussed: 1)increase life quality; 2) emphasis on environment historic values; 3) professional
qualifications converge with local environment; 4) international connection point.
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AN INNOVATIVE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMME FOR THE SOCIETY OF THE FUTURE
Rossella Celmi
Educational programmes of the third millennium, based on empowering young people in solving the
difficult balance between individual and society from one side, and evolving their inner positive social
vocation on the other, are discussed.

AUTHENTIC INDIVIDUAL AND FUNCTIONAL SOCIETY
Daniela Di Pietro
Society is not abstraction, but a system characterised by individuals. Therefore, to succeed in
establishing a "healthy" and functional society, it is suggested to improve physical, mental and
psychological wellbeing of individual.

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PS122
OBJECTIFYING MEDIA: TURNING PEOPLE INTO OBJECTS
C03. Culture and society - Sex and gender
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Anne Maass, University of Padova, Padua - Italy
Carlotta Cogoni, Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste - Italy
Silvia Galdi, University of Padova, Padua - Italy
Maria Giuseppina Pacilli, University of Perugia, Perugia - Italy
Jeroen Vaes, University of Trento, Rovereto - Italy
Cristina Zogmaister, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan - Italy
Mara Cadinu, University of Padova, Padua - Italy

Media (including TV, advertisement, video games) continue to exert a powerful influence on society,
shaping social norms and proposing gender-specific role models. In many countries women tend to be
objectified, that is portrayed as bodies rather than individuals. Such objectifying portrayals are
particularly prevalent in Italian media, where sexualized images are even extended to children. This
symposium addresses the influence of such objectifying portrayals of women and girls on both male
and female media consumers. It brings together researchers from 5 Italian universities who investigate
the effects of objectifying media mainly with experimental methods, combined with reliable and valid
measures (see contribution by Zogmaister et al.).
The symposium provides impressive evidence for the robust and pervasive influence of objectification
even after relatively short media exposure. Spectators exposed to such media content tend to perceive
women (including individual, non-objectified women encountered after the media exposure) as more
object-like. Under normal conditions, human beings and objects are processed in distinct brain
regions, yet, when objectified, women are processed much like objects (see contribution by Cogoni et
al.) and, as a consequence, are perceived as less human (see contribution by Vaes). This object-like
perception of women is likely to disrupt normal empathic responses, thereby discouraging bystanders
from intervening in help of the victim (see contribution by Galdi). Interestingly, exposure to
objectifying media also interferes with cognitive abilities, such as women’s capacity to resolve math
problems. Such cognitive impediment is found even in pre-adolescent children (see contribution by
Pacilli et al.). Together, this symposium testifies to the multiple effects of media objectification and
provides the empirical basis for a broader discussion on how objectifying media shapes society and on
how such effects may be prevented.

WHEN WOMEN BECOME OBJECTS
Carlotta Cogoni, Andrea Carnaghi, Giorgia Silani
We investigate the mechanisms of women objectification by using a task where participants had to
recognise images of objects and targets (objectified or personalized women, mannequins). Results
indicate that objectified women are processed more analytically than the personalized ones or
mannequins, comparable to the processing of objects.

TOWARD A RELIABLE AND VALID MEASURE OF AUTOMATIC OBJECTIFICATION
Cristina Zogmaister, Federica Durante, Silvia Mari, Chiara Volpato
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The ascription of less-than-human nature to objectified individuals is an important phenomenon and
research is needed that links it to its antecedents and consequences. To conduct such research it is
mandatory to possess psychometrically sound measures of objectification. Here we review a range of
such measures in terms of reliability and validity.

FROM
OGLING
TO
DEHUMANIZATION:
UNDERSTANDING
SEXUAL
OBJECTIFICATION
Jeroen Vaes
Objectification literally refers to perceiving someone as something. When sexually objectified, a
woman is treated as a body that is capable of representing her. I will explain the interplay between
body-focus and dehumanization, measuring both people’s eye-movements and their tendency to
dehumanize male and female targets independently.

EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO OBJECTIFYING TV ON OBSERVER’S INTERVENTION IN
A SEXUAL HARASSMENT SITUATION
Silvia Galdi
Previous studies have revealed unequivocal evidence of a link between objectifying media and sexual
harassment. The present investigation provides an important extension of previous research by
demonstrating that exposure to objectifying TV also influences observer’s actual intervention to
prevent the harassment incident from progressing.

THE IMPACT OF SEXUALIZED IMAGES ON CHILDREN’S COGNITIVE
PERFORMANCE
Maria Giuseppina Pacilli, Carlo Tomasetto, Elisa Fachechi, Chiara Morbidini
We asked primary school children to complete a math performance test after the exposure to
sexualized vs. non-sexualized media images of children of similar age. Findings showed that
sexualized images hampered participants’ performance. Moreover, a reduction in working memory
capacity mediated the effect of sexualized images on children’s math performance.

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PS123
SPORT CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: A WELFARE INSTRUMENT TO
PREVENT DISCOMFORT AND TO CREATE A NEW ENVIRONMENT
CULTURE
E10. Health and clinical intervention - Sport and exercise
Convenor

Presenters

Giovanni Lodetti, AIPPS’s (Association International Psychologie et Psychoanalize
du Sport) President, SIPCS’s (Società Internazionale Psicologi Clinici dello Sport)
President, Milan - Italy
Alessandra Cova, AIPPS (Association International Psychologie et Psychoanalize du
Sport), Milan - Italy
Giovanni Lodetti, AIPPS’s (Association International Psychologie et Psychoanalize
du Sport) President, SIPCS’s (Società Internazionale Psicologi Clinici dello Sport)
President, Milan - Italy
Gaia Oldani, Social Clinic psychologist, SIPCS (Società Internazionale Psicologi
Clinici dello Sport) member, Milan - Italy
Elena Pomesano, Clinical psychologist, SIPCS (Società Internazionale Psicologi
Clinici dello Sport) member, Milan - Italy

Over the past twentyfive years in Psychology department led by Marcello Cesa Bianchi have been
developed some clinical sport psychology studies thanks to the works of C. Ravasini - G. Lodetti .
These works have created a new area of interest for the applied clinical psychology, which is the
clinical Sport Psychology ©, focused on the athletes personality growth and on the prevention and
treatment of young age discomfort through sport practice.
The aim of this clinical research is to define and share an universal message of the sport value.
The methodology is clinical observation of defense mechanism and relational and communication
ways, read through Transactional Analysis observing defense mechanism used from person into the
sport activity, their play activity, their relationship to individuate problems and suggest them the right
remedial action. We came to a new sport formula, aimed to the prevention and care disconfort and also
to the well being development.These studies have been approved by EFPA European Federation of
Psychologist Association.Some workshops have taken place in Milan through the Scuola Regionale
dello Sport (CONI) and Ordine degli psicologi della Lombardia; a Master of Science has been
activated through the Ospedale Sant’ Anna in Como under the Patronage of Ordine Regionale degli
Psicologi e della Provincia di Milano Projects proposed by AIPPS (registered in Ministero delle
politiche giovanili e attività sportive) help children and people to develop correct management of
aggressiveness, ADHD, hypomotility, good relationships with peers, immigrants integration, disabled
integration.
Principal objective is the prevention of disadvantage using sport not in agonistic sense, but like an
approach oriented towards the harmonious growth and a god development of the personality. There is
also other specific objectives: develop research and build a new generation of educator, sport
instructor, parents, athletes, sport manager, volunteers to share a new approach towards welfare,
wellbeing, integration. This particular “way of work” permits to reduce welfare costs and is
recommended for young country with young people to teach wellbeing.

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YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW: THE TWENTY-YEARS PATH OF CLINICAL
SPORT PSYCHOLOGY AND ITS MANIFESTO
Giovanni Lodetti
Over the past twentyfive years (since 1989) in Psychology department have been developed some
clinical sport psychology studies thanks to the works of C. Ravasini - G. Lodetti, Università degli
Studi di Milano. These works have created a new area of interest for the applied clinical psychology,
which is the clinical Sport Psychology ©, focused on the athletes personality growth and on the
prevention and treatment of young age discomfort through sport practice.
Principal objective is the prevention of juvenile disadvantage using sport not in agonistic sense, but
like an approach oriented towards the harmonious growth and a god development of the personality.
The methodology is clinical observation of defense mechanism and relational and communication
ways, read through Transactional Analysis. Our studies observe defense mechanism used from person
into the sport activity, their play activity, their relationship to individuate problems and suggest them
the right remedial action .These studies have been approved by EFPA that confirmed their complete
scientific autonomy in Xth European Congress in 2007, where for the first time a new section called
clinical sport psychology has been created and directed by AIPPS (Association International
Psychologie et Psycanalyse du Sport).They also develop well being aimed strategies with weak social
categories such as children, elderly people and teenagers. AIPPS created the Format Modello Ecologia
della Mente e Sport 2012-15 © for EXPO 2015 Milan.

AN ALTERNATIVE TO DRUGS FOR TAKING CARE OF CHILDREN AND TEEN AGERS’
MINOR TO SERIOUS DISEASES THROUGH SPORT AS WELFARE INSTRUMENTS: THE
GAME ROOM AND THE INTERVENTION ON CHILDREN’S SERIOUS DISCOMFORT
Alessandra Cova, Elena Pomesano
In order to give a complete answer as an alternative to drugs, there have been created some sport
projects for children, aimed to act against young age discomfort like ADHD syndrome and bad
management of aggressiveness. The scope of these projects is also to limit the use and the costs of
drugs for these children’s families and social communities.Through the creation of sport game rooms
in schools and other private structures, it has been possible to define and develop some clinical
therapies aimed to limit the symptoms and the disorders through various sports practice. The
methodology used in these contexts is the observation of the defense mechanism used during the sport
practice and plays.The major results have been obtained from the individual fight sports like fencing.
This martial discipline has been used and for and brought good results also in case of conduct disorder
and reduced socialization in primary school contexts and in case of Prader Willy Syndrome (PWS)
with mental deficit as well.The clinical approach of these projects allowed to develop a real welfare
path through sport practice in schools and in other contexts. This represents a way to prevent more
serious disease and it also has a strong impact on the social community in terms of costs (drugs) and
wellbeing.

BULLISM: SPORT AS SUPPORT AND PREVENTION THERAPY
Gaia Oldani
Nowadays teenagers suffer for minor to major school and non school related diseases. The
intermediate level of seriousness is often expressed through transgressive group behaviours and
bullism. The lack of capacity to use their cognitive, affective and relational skills as best they can,
cause the above mentioned forms of disease. The vicious circle created between the ‘torturer’ (bully)
and the ‘victim’ could cause, forward, serious and invalidating diseases for both, like substances abuse
and deviance or abandon phenomena or serious depression.These kind of disease are unfortunately
growing at international level in primary and secondary schools, where one child on two is at risk of
invalidating diseases that could affect the personality development. Sport can act as ‘laboratory’ where
young people can test their and their peers’ limits in a protected context defined by rules and aimed to
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read the signals of discomfort. This context facilitates the intervention on this discomfort, allowing
young people to share and experience a wellbeing path where there are no victims or torturer. This
article is about some examples of intervention through sport practice.

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PS124
NON-ALTRUISTIC MOTIVATIONS FOR PRO-SOCIAL BEHAVIOR
AND VALUES
A11. General issues and basic processes - Motivation and emotion
Convenors
Presenters

Discussant

Liat Levontin, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa - Israel
Noga Sverdlik, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva - Israel
Stephan Dickert, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna - Austria
Tehila Kogut, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva - Israel
Liat Levontin, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa - Israel
Noga Sverdlik, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva - Israel
Daniel Västfjäll, Linköping University, Linköping - Sweden

Altruistic behavior and motivation are usually characterized by a focus on the welfare of others.
Specifically, prosocial behavior is often accompanied by a conflict between the costs to the helper on
the one hand and the wish to improve the welfare of others on the other hand. Hence, the promotion
of other's welfare may be on the expense of one's own interests. Although altruistic motives are often
the basis for prosociality, in many cases prosociality results from more egoistic mechanisms some of
which the decision maker may not be fully aware of. The current symposium presents four research
projects that highlight some of these egoistic mechanisms. Sverdlik and Nave use terror management
theory to suggest that mortality salience influences the importance people attribute to prosocial values
such that values that focus on the welfare of close others become more important, while values that
focus on the welfare of distant others may become less important, depending on political orientation.
Kogut and Harel show that experiencing partial relief from a recent need, such as eating something
after being hungry for a few hours, promotes helping similar others, who are experiencing a
corresponding need (hunger). However, this experience of partial relief does not promote helping in
general. Levontin and Peer argue that guilt may be a strong motivator for prosocial behavior abut also
that prosocial behavior serves as a guilt relief action that diminish other ethical behaviors such as
confessing to one's unethical behavior. Finally, Dickert demonstrates how repeated donation requests
are perceived by people as more costly and less beneficial. Taken together, the symposium gives a
glimpse to some of the most recent findings in the field of prosocial behavior and motivation. Our
Discussant, Daniel Västfjäll, will provide his integrative view of the presentations and facilitate
discussion among audience members and contributors.

DIFFERENT EFFECTS OF MORTALITY SILENCE ON PROSOCIAL VALUES: CARING
MORE FOR CLOSE OTHERS BUT CARING LESS FOR HUMANITY
Noga Sverdlik, Yeal Nave
Reminding people of their own death makes them emphasize benevolence values that focus on the
welfare of close others. In contrast, it makes political right-wingers deemphasize universalism values
that focus on the welfare of humanity.

VISCERAL NEEDS AND DONATION DECISIONS: DO PEOPLE IDENTIFY WITH
SUFFERING OR WITH RELIEF?
Tehila Kogut, Inbal Harel

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When people experience an ongoing need, they are less responsive to others’ needs even when those
needs match their own state. However, experiencing a relief from a need, promotes the helping of
others who are experiencing a corresponding need.

THE “JUST ENOUGH RELIEF” EFFECT: DONATIONS OR CONFESSIONS AS MEANS
FOR SELF-EXONERATION FOLLOWING UNETHICAL BEHAVIOR
Liat Levontin, Eyal Peer
In a series of 4 studies we show that the motivation underlying both confessions and pro-social
behavior include relieving one’s guilt. Accordingly, one of these strategies (confessing or donating)
makes the other one redundant in a given situation.

ALTRUISTIC AND NON-ALTRUISTIC MOTIVATIONS IN REPEATED DONATION
DECISIONS
Stephan Dickert
We assessed participants’ donation behavior in a repeated donation task. Results showed that people
were less willing to donate to the second donation request and that repeated donations were perceived
as more costly and less beneficial.

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PS125
STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE, CHALLENGES, AND
OPPORTUNITIES OF PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN
EUROPE AND THE AMERICAS
F01. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Capacities building and human development
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Laura Galarza, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan - Puerto Rico
Laura Galarza, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan - Puerto Rico
Aida Jimenez, Vanderbilt University, Nashville - United States
Milagros Méndez, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan - Puerto Rico
José M. Peiró, University of Valencia, Valencia - Spain
Vincent Rogard, University of Paris Descartes Sorbonne, Paris - France
Marina Romero, University of Barcelona, Barcelona - Spain
Rodney Lowman, Alliant International University San Diego, San Diego - United
States

Graduate programs in Psychology face a period of increased challenges and opportunities to comply
with changing external and institutional standards of excellence. Some of the challenges include
periodic changes in the standards of voluntary accreditation agencies, licensing board exam content,
and psychology board regulations, student demographic changes, student mobility, and
internationalization initiatives. Our proposed symposium panel composed of academic experts from
Europe and the Americas will present and discuss the internal and external standards of excellence,
challenges, and opportunities faced by psychology graduate programs in both regions. Internal and
external factors impacting graduate psychology programs include From Europe, Professor Jose Peiró
from the University of Valencia will discuss aspects related to standards of excellence, accreditation,
quality assurance, and assessment of psychology graduate programs in Europe. Vincent Rogard from
the University of Paris Descartes and Marina Romeo from the University of Barcelona will add their
perspective from experiences in France and Spain. Laura Galarza and Milagros Méndez from the
University of Puerto Rico will present on the standards of excellence, accreditation guidelines, and
regulatory challenges of psychology programs in the Americas with an emphasis on Puerto Rico, Latin
America, and the Caribbean. The presentation by Aida Jimenez will focus on recent developments in
psychology accreditation standards for health service psychology doctoral programs in the United
States and will discuss general recommendations and implications for psychology graduate programs.
Dr. Rodney Lowman from Alliant University in the United States will serve as the symposium
discussant. The similarities and differences on standards, challenges, and opportunities between
Europe and the Americas will be contrasted.

STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE, CHALLENGES, AND OPPORTUNITIES OF
PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN EUROPE
José M. Peiró
This presentation will discuss aspects related to standards of excellence, accreditation, quality
assurance, and assessment of psychology graduate programs in Europe. The presentation will discuss
current issues facing European psychology programs.

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STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE, CHALLENGES, AND OPPORTUNITIES OF
PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN THE AMERICAS
Laura Galarza, Milagros Mendez
Presenters will provide an overview and comparison of similarities and differences among countries in
the Americas on standards of excellence, accreditation guidelines, regulatory challenges, and
assessment practices of psychology graduate programs.

PSYCHOLOGY ACCREDITATION STANDARDS AND PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCY
FOCUS FOR PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED STATES
Aida Jimenez
This presentation will focus on recent developments in psychology accreditation standards for health
service psychology doctoral programs in the United States and will discuss general recommendations
and implications for psychology graduate programs.

STRENGTHS AND CHALLENGES OF EUROPEAN PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE
EDUCATION: PERSPECTIVES FROM FRANCE
Vincent Rogard
The presentation discusses the standards, strengths, and challenges of psychology graduate programs
in France and in multi-country European psychology programs in contrast to the information presented
by fellow panelists on Europe and the Americas.

STANDARDS, STRENGTHS AND CHALLENGES OF EUROPEAN PSYCHOLOGY
GRADUATE EDUCATION: PERSPECTIVES FROM SPAIN
Marina Romero
The presentation will focus on the standards, strengths, and challenges of psychology graduate
programs in Spain and in multi-country European psychology programs in contrast to information
presented by fellow panelists on the Americas and Europe.

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PS126
YOUNG PEOPLE CITIZENSHIP PROFILES FROM INTERNATIONAL
PERSPECTIVE - PART I
F08. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Life skills in culture and society
Convenor
Poland
Presenters

Poland
Discussant

Anna Maria Zalewska, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poznan José Joaquim Costa, University of Coimbra, Coimbra - Portugal
Beata Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn - Poland
Despina Karakatsani, University of the Peloponnese, Corinth - Greece
Riitta Korhonen, University of Turku, Turku - Finland
Susana Goncalves, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Coimbra - Portugal
Anna Maria Zalewska, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poznan Joanna Li Lijuan, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong - Hong Kong

The majority of contemporary social problems among youth cannot be effectively solved through
political regulation only, but they require active civic skills and engagement. Active participation in
social life as citizen is one of the main indicators of the quality of life. Attitudes towards democracy
determining citizenship behaviors develop from early adolescence (Hess & Torney, 2005). During the
symposium we will discuss the results of a comparative study (supported by
CiCeA/ResearchGrant/2014) into young people's citizenship activity profiles. Six types of citizenship
activities have been identified based on the Kennedy’s concept (2006): passive, semi-active,
politically, socially, personally engaged and change-oriented. 3794 students aged 11-14-18, girls
(1955) and boys (1839) from cities (1735) and towns (2031), from 11 European countries where
examined with Citizenship Behavior Questionnaire (Zalewska & Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz, 2011).
Results show high level of passive, semi-active and personal type of citizenship, very limited
engagement in politics and action for legal protesting in all countries. Quick cluster analysis revealed
four profiles of young citizens: Activists (with high level of civic engagement in all forms and types of
activity, but the highest in politics), Conservatives (with average levels of civic engagement and low
level of political engagement), Individualists (with high level of passive and personal engagement and
very low political and social engagement) and Alienated (with low levels of all activity types).
Different proportion of the profiles were found in particular countries Activists (LV: 42%; ES:16%;
PL: 30%; GR:59%; PT: 20%; FI: 36%), Conservatives (LV: 36%; ES: 39%; PL: 37%; GR: 29%; PT:
51%; FI: 2%), Individualists (LV: 4%; ES: 4%; PL: 2%; GR: 5%; PT: 3%; FI: 53%) and Alienated
(LV:18%; ES: 41%;, PL: 11%; GR: 6%; PT: 26%; FI: 9%).
In the I Part of symposium we will introduce to the problem, research method and will discuss the
results from Baltic countries perspective – Estonia and Latvia.

CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIORS AS LIFE SKILLS IN CULTURE AND SOCIETY
Kerry Kennedy
Participation is a key requirement of citizens in democratic societies, both an obligation and a process
of engagement. Yet participation takes many forms that can be categorized as passive and active,
political and social, legal and illegal. This paper will introduce the broad theoretical framework that
has guided the studies reported below.
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YOUNG PEOPLE CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOURS – HOW WE MEASURE THEM
Beata Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz, Anna Maria Zalewska
In the research we used 34-questions Citizenship Behavior Questionnaire with Cronbach Alpha for
scales: passive (.80), semi-active (.67), social (.73), political (.72), personal (.63) and changed-oriented
(.80) citizenship.

YOUNG CITIZENS PROFILES IN BALTIC COUNTRIES – THE LATVIAN PERSPECTIVE
Mara Vidnere
Results show high level of readiness to protest and low passive and semi-active behaviors. Latvian
youth had reflects neutral attitude towards national identity and the desire for to social change.

YOUNG CITIZENS PROFILES IN BALTIC COUNTRIES – THE ESTONIAN
PERSPECTIVE
Kristi Kõiv
Estonian youth had focus on two aspects of active citizenships (political and social) rather than semiactive citizenship as voting and an interest in public life.

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PS127
YOUNG PEOPLE CITIZENSHIP PROFILES FROM INTERNATIONAL
PERSPECTIVE - PART II
F08. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Life skills in culture and society
Convenor
Presenters

Beata Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn - Poland
Kerry Kennedy, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong - Hong Kong
Anna Maria Zalewska, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poznan -

Poland
Beata Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn - Poland
Kristi Kõiv, University of Tartu, Tartu - Estonia
Mara Vidnere, Riga Teacher Training and Educational Management Academy, Riga Latvia
Discussant

Joanna Li Lijuan, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong - Hong Kong

The majority of contemporary social problems among youth cannot be effectively solved through
political regulation only, but they require active civic skills and engagement. Active participation in
social life as citizen is one of the main indicators of the quality of life. Attitudes towards democracy
determining citizenship behaviors develop from early adolescence (Hess & Torney, 2005). During the
symposium we will discuss the results of a comparative study (supported by
CiCeA/ResearchGrant/2014) into young people's citizenship activity profiles. Six types of citizenship
activities have been identified based on the Kennedy’s concept (2006): passive, semi-active,
politically, socially, personally engaged and change-oriented. 3794 students aged 11-14-18, girls
(1955) and boys (1839) from cities (1735) and towns (2031), from 11 European countries where
examined with Citizenship Behavior Questionnaire (Zalewska & Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz, 2011).
Results show high level of passive, semi-active and personal type of citizenship, very limited
engagement in politics and action for legal protesting in all countries. Quick cluster analysis revealed
four profiles of young citizens: Activists (with high level of civic engagement in all forms and types of
activity, but the highest in politics), Conservatives (with average levels of civic engagement and low
level of political engagement), Individualists (with high level of passive and personal engagement and
very low political and social engagement) and Alienated (with low levels of all activity types).
Different proportion of the profiles were found in particular countries Activists (LT: 60%; LV: 42%;
ES:16%; PL: 30%; GR:59%; PT: 20%; FI: 36%), Conservatives (LT: 27%; LV: 36%; ES: 39%; PL:
37%; GR: 29%; PT: 51%; FI: 2%), Individualists (LT: 5%; LV: 4%; ES: 4%; PL: 2%; GR: 5%; PT:
3%; FI: 53%) and Alienated (LT: 8%; LV:18%; ES: 41%;, PL: 11%; GR: 6%; PT: 26%; FI: 9%).
In the II part of symposium research results will be discussed from Central-East European (Poland,),
South European (Greece, Portugal) and Scandinavian (Finland) countries. Finally, citizenship
behaviors trends, their limitations and perspective for the future will be presented.

YOUNG CITIZENS PROFILES IN CENTRAL-EAST EUROPEAN COUNTRIES – THE
POLISH PERSPECTIVE
Beata Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz
Results show high level of social and low political behaviors. Young Poles are focused on personal
growth. They are reluctant to rebel and likely to be involved in the affairs of community rather than
the matters of the State.
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YOUNG CITIZENS PROFILES IN SOUTH EUROPEAN COUNTRIES – THE GREEK
PERSPECTIVE
Despina Karakatsani
The Greek youth are focused on passive and social citizenship, less on action for change and personal
growth. Results will be analyzed in relation to the historical and sociopolitical background, economic
recession and compared to the societal and educational consequences.
YOUNG CITIZENS PROFILES IN SOUTH EUROPEAN COUNTRIES – THE
PORTUGUESE PERSPECTIVE
Susana Goncalves, Jose Costa
Results show high level of social engagement and low of readiness for personal growth. Results will
be discussed in the light of the economic crisis in Portugal (salaries, unemployment) and the
abstention rate in political elections.

YOUNG CITIZENS PROFILES IN SCANDINAVIAN COUNTRIES – THE FINISH
PERSPECTIVE
Riitta Korhonen
Results show high level of personal growth activity and loyalty to the state but low social engagement
among young Finns.

YOUNG EUROPEAN CITIZENSHIP PROFILES – COMPARISONS, TRENDS, AND
LIMITATIONS
Anna Maria Zalewska
Comparisons of data from various countries demonstrate that young people from European nations,
that share a similar history and road to democracy, differ in their civic activity profiles. They cannot
be joined based on simple parameters such as the period of free market, membership in the former
Soviet block or geographic location.

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PS128
REHABILITATION OF (TRAUMATIZED) VIOLENT OFFENDERS CHALLENGES AND NEW DEVELOPMENTS
C11. Culture and society - Forensic psychology and law
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Tobias Hecker, University of Konstanz, Konstanz - Germany
Jérôme Endrass, University of Konstanz, Konstanz - Germany
Tobias Hecker, University of Konstanz, Konstanz - Germany
Anke Köbach, University of Konstanz, Konstanz - Germany
Anselm Crombach, University Lumière of Bujumbura, Bujumbura (Burundi);
University of Konstanz, Konstanz - Germany
Andreas Maercker, University of Zurich, Zurich - Switzerland

The rehabilitation of violent offenders remains a challenge in forensic and clinical settings. This
symposium will focus on new developments with a particular focus on traumatized offenders. We will
first present therapy outcomes of court-°©‐ ordered therapies for violent and sex offenders.
Recidivism rates will be presented for different offense categories and the effectiveness of treatment
will be discussed. Then we present with Narrative Exposure Therapy for Forensic Offender
Rehabilitation (FORNET) a new approach for treating violent offenders (Elbert, Hermenau, Hecker,
Weierstall, & Schauer, 2012). Violent offenders are at high risk of developing trauma-°©‐ related
disorders and appetitive aggression – a hedonic form of aggression (Elbert, Weierstall, & Schauer,
2010), which reduce successful integration into societies (Hermenau, Hecker, Maedl, Schauer, &
Elbert, 2013). FORNET aims at reducing both symptoms of traumatic stress as well as aggressive
behavior and readiness for aggression. It broadly follows the logic of the evidence-°©‐ based trauma°©‐ focused Narrative Exposure Therapy. The therapist guides the client by means of exposure
through his traumatic experiences linking the emotions to the past. In FORNET we encourage to
verbalize also positive emotions and experiences that were linked with violent and aggressive
behavior. In this way, the whole range of experiences becomes integrated into the autobiographical
memory. In FORNET we support the client to foster the role change from a violent offender to a
citizen, who lives a sociall adjusted life. The client develops visions and wishes for the future to
support a successful integration into society. Pilot studies with former soldiers and violent youths
proved the feasibility of FORNET and found first evidence of a positive outcome (Crombach &
Elbert, 2014; Hermenau, Hecker, Schaal, Maedl, & Elbert, 2013). Here, we present two recent clinical
trials providing further evidence for the efficacy of FORNET.

THERAPY OUTCOME IN TREATED VIOLENT AND SEX OFFENDERS
Jérôme Endrass, Astrid Rosseger
All male adult violent and sex offenders (N=200) treated by MHS between 1997 and 2009 were
compared to untreated offenders. Recidivism rates will be presented for different offense categories
and the effectiveness of treatment will be discussed.

TREATING VIOLENT OFFENDERS BY MEANS OF NARRATIVE EXPOSURE THERAPY
Tobias Hecker, Katharin Hermenau

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Using FORNET the therapist helps the client to anchor the whole range of sensory and bodily
information, cognitions, and emotions in the past. We highlight the importance of addressing the
whole range of experiences while treating violent offenders.

EFFECTIVENESS AND DISSEMINATION OF NARRATIVE EXPOSURE THERAPY FOR
FORENSIC OFFENDER REHABILITATION
Anke Köbach, Susanne Schaal, Tobias Hecker, Thomas Elbert
In a clinical trial (N=98) with demobilizing combatants in the eastern DR Congo, where civil war
prevailed for decades, we demonstrate that FORNET conducted by trained local counselors reduces
trauma-related disorders and fosters reintegration.

ADDRESSING EVERYDAY VIOLENCE IN MALE AND FEMALE EX-COMBATANTS BY
MEANS OF FORNET
Anselm Crombach, Corina Nandi, Manassé Bambonyé, Roland Weierstall, Thomas Elbert
Burundi has a history of civil war. Risk factors for violent behavior, e.g. childhood adversities and
trauma-related disorders, accumulate in ex-combatants. In a clinical trial FORNET aimed at reducing
their involvement in current everyday violence.

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PS129
EMOTIONS AND EMOTIONAL DISORDERS: TREATMENTS AND
RESEARCH
E05. Health and clinical intervention - Evidence-based psychotherapies
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Giovanni Maria Ruggiero, Psicoterapia Cognitiva e Ricerca, Milan - Italy
Giovanni Mansueto, Studi Cognitivi, Milan - Italy
Mercedes A. McCormick, Pace University, New York City - United States
Giovanni Maria Ruggiero, Psicoterapia Cognitiva e Ricerca, Milan - Italy
Carmela Sansone, Seeds of Unity Pre K, New York - United States
Florence Denmark, Pace University, New York City - United States

Emotions and emotional disorders are strictly interwoven in many clinical models. This symposium
explores this connection in some clinical and well-being models. Carmela Sansone examines the
developed syllabus which is taught to 4-5 year old children for a school year. There is a pre/post test
model utilizing the Social Rating Scale (Gresham & Elliott, 1990); the Clark & Clark Doll Test (1947)
and the Empathy Self Report Scale (Eisenberg, 1991). The variables measured have been found to be
good indicators of emotional competence and the embracement of diversity and to correlate positively
with future success and life satisfaction. Mercedes McCormick shows data testing the efficacy of a
stress reducing Mindfulness and Yoga Therapy aimed at building Resiliency in Young Adults dealing
with Stressful Cultural Events. Bernardo Carducci and the Studi Cognitivi research team (Francesca
Fiore, Giovanni Mansueto, Sara Palmieri, Naomi Aceto, and Roberta Cattani) will show data
analysing shyness as a failure to respond appropriately in social situations. Giovanni M. Ruggiero will
analyze how emotional disorders depend on negative appraisal of categories of events and relational
patterns learned within significant experiences and relationships, which are evaluated as intolerably
painful, and grievous; and on rigid and unidimensional management of life themes using inflexibly
avoidant, controlling, and/or compensative strategies. Diego Sarracino will speak about the revision,
from a neurobiological viewpoint, of the role of emotions in the ABC model as theoretical and
technical basis of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT).

COGNITIVE BELIEFS AND PROCESS INVOLVED IN SHYNESS
Giovanni Mansueto, Francesca Fiore, Sara Palmieri, Naomi Aceto, Roberta Cattani, Giovanni Maria
Ruggiero, Bernardo J. Carducci
Shyness is the failure to appropriately respond to social situations. This study evaluated which
irrational beliefs – belonging to rational emotive behaviour therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy and
metacognitive therapy models- composed shyness and explored the differences between shyness and
social anxiety in terms of beliefs and processes.

MINDFULNESS AND YOGA THERAPY: TOOLS TO BUILD RESILIENCY IN YOUNG
ADULTS DEALING WITH STRESSFUL CULTURAL EVENTS.
Mercedes A. McCormick
This presentation will discuss and demonstrate mindfulness and yoga therapy as powerful stressreducing tools to help adults build resiliency in dealing with serious cultural events. A stress-reducing
program using these tools will be provided.
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TEACHING EMOTIONAL COMPETENCE AND THE EMBRACEMENT OF DIVERSITY
TO PRESCHOOL CHILDREN IN BROOKLYN, NY.
Carmela Sansone
The developed syllabus is taught to 4-5 year old children for a school year. There is a pre/post test
model utilizing the Social Rating Scale, the Clark & Clark Doll Test and the Empathy Self Report
Scale. These variables have been found to be good indicators of emotional competence, embracement
of diversity, future success and life satisfaction.

LIFE THEMES AND PLANS IMPLICATIONS OF BIASED BELIEFS: ELICITATION AND
TREATMENT (LIBET)
Giovanni Maria Ruggiero, Gabriele Caselli, Sandra Sassaroli
The LIBET is a model for case conceptualization in which emotional disorders depend on negative
appraisal of events and relational patterns learned within significant interpersonal experiences and
evaluated as intolerably painful and on rigid management of these life themes using inflexibly
avoidant, controlling, and/or compensative strategies.

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PS130
IS IT TIME FOR CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY TO ABANDON
DIAGNOSIS? CRITIQUES AND ALTERNATIVES FROM THE UK
E02. Health and clinical intervention - Psychodiagnosis
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Anne Cooke, Canterbury Christ Church University, Tunbridge Wells - United
Kingdom
Anne Cooke, Canterbury Christ Church University, Tunbridge Wells - United
Kingdom
Peter Kinderman, University of Liverpool, Liverpool - United Kingdom
Richard Pemberton, British Psychological Society Division of Clinical Psychology,
Leicester - United Kingdom
Tony Wainwright, University of Exeter, Exeter - United Kingdom

Many clinical psychologists in the UK are arguing that the time has come to abandon psychiatric
diagnosis together with the idea of ‘mental illness’, and instead embrace a consistently psychosocial
approach to mental health and distress. It is possible that the next ten years will see a radical paradigm
shift in mental health care. The dominance of the medical model over the delivery of mental health
care - and therefore the working practices of psychologists - has been such that many psychologists
unquestioningly accept approaches to assessment, formulation and therapy based on a conceptual
framework that is in many ways incompatible both with psychological science and with the actual
practice of psychological therapists. However, until recently, viable alternative frameworks were
poorly articulated and not widely disseminated.
This symposium will provide an overview of the critiques and suggested alternatives. It will also
outline how we are disseminating these ideas in the UK, the role played by the British Psychological
Society Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP) and the widespread welcome which they are receiving.
The presenters will give examples from the UK of well-developed alternatives to traditional
psychiatric diagnosis (Kinderman), to the design and delivery of mental health services (Pemberton),
and to the understanding of problems usually regarded as the preserve of biomedical psychiatry
(Cooke). Together, these presentations will outline a coherent alternative to current psychiatric
paradigms, and will envison a genuinely – and genuinely practical – psychological perspective.

A PSYCHOLOGICAL MODEL OF MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING
Peter Kinderman
Psychological science offers robust models of mental health and well-being. These integrate biological
findings with the substantial evidence of the social determinants of health and well-being, mediated by
psychological processes. This presentation will outline how such approaches offer coherent
alternatives to conventional psychiatric paradigms.

THE END OF MENTAL ILLNESS THINKING?
Richard Pemberton
Richard will present the UK Division of Clinical Psychology’s recent groundbreaking Position
Statement on psychiatric diagnoses, which calls for a paradigm shift away from a “disease” model. He
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will draw out the implications for theory and practice, and outline a path towards personalized,
effective and compassionate psychological care services.
CHANGING SOCIETY’S WHOLE APPROACH TO PSYCHOSIS
Anne Cooke
Anne will present the DCP’s recent report: “Understanding psychosis and schizophrenia: why people
sometimes hear voices, believe things that others find strange, or appear out of touch with reality, and
what can help”. This widely acclaimed report takes a consistently psychological approach to what is
often seen as quintessential “mental illness”.

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PS131
SEARCHING FOR NEW APPROACHES TO ENGAGE INTERGROUP
TENSIONS IN CONTEMPORARY COMPLEX SOCIETIES: INSIGHTS
FROM RESEARCH IN ISRAEL AND POLAND
C05. Culture and society - Group processes and intergroup relations
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Helena Desivilya Syna, The Max Stern Yezreel Valley College, Emek Yizrael - Israel
Daniella Arieli, The Max Stern Yezreel Valley College, Emek Yizrael - Israel
Michał Bilewicz, University of Warsaw, Warsaw - Poland
Victor Friedman, The Max Stern Yezreel Valley College, Emek Yizrael - Israel
Michal Raz, The Max Stern Yezreel Valley College, Emek Yizrael - Israel
Michał Bilewicz, University of Warsaw, Warsaw - Poland

Mounting social divisions and growing diversities characterizing the contemporary societies call for
new approaches of engaging the emerging complex intergroup relations. Such novel perspectives and
methods need to deal with intergroup tensions in a constructive manner: allowing meaningful
existence for all the groups, both autonomously and in tandem while avoiding ostracism, exclusion
and promoting expression of genuine voices. Kristeva (1991) succinctly highlighted this challenge:
"The question is again before us today as we confront an economic and political integration on the
scale of the planet: shall we be, intimately and subjectively, able to live with the others, to live as
others, without ostracism but also without leveling?"(p.1).
The symposium aims to discuss lessons emerging from research in two complex societies: Israeli and
Polish both abound with conflict-ridden histories of intergroup relations. Drawing on social
psychology of intergroup relations, conflict engagement theories and dynamic complex systems, the
new approaches explored in the studies focus on identifying ways to circumvent the core division and
conflict issue while creating alternatives to maintain cooperative intergroup relations (e.g. alternative
attractors, superordinate goals, joint spaces and crossed categories). Such alternatives include
common geographic identity (community), common tasks for mixed work teams, common goals such
as professional education and partnerships pursuing new social or business venture. The Israeli
presentations focus on examination of such novel methods in the area of nursing education and mixed
nurses team in actual work setting and the Polish revolves around the well-know "contact hypothesis"
and its expansion to include historical elements. Notwithstanding differences in context and research
methodologies, the symposium will culminate with integrated insights and delineation of future
research directions.

INTERVENTION PROCESSES AT AN ARAB-JEWISH ENCOUNTER IN THE ACADEMIA
Daniella Arieli, Victor Friedman
The study aims to both understand as well as influence Jewish and Arab nursing students’ relations.
We suggest a novel theoretical-practical approach based on social constructivism, for coping with
tensions related to intercultural encounters. It encourages the participants to consciously and jointly
reflect on and construct their space of encounter.

MAPPING THE STRENGTHS AND CHALLENGES IN JOINT ENCOUNTERS OF NURSES
IN ETHNICALLY AND NATIONALLY DIVERSE WORK TEAMS
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Michal Raz, Helena Desivilya Syna
The study examines nurses’, members of mixed work teams, efficacy in developing cooperative
relations to accomplish joint tasks, utilizing the positive aspects of diversity while sidestepping
negative legacies of protracted national conflict.It also elucidates the fostering and inhibiting factors in
constructing cooperative relations.

HOW HISTORICAL CONTACT CAN AFFECT INTERGROUP RELATIONS?
Michał Bilewicz
In this talk I try to extend Allport’s contact hypothesis (1954) into historical dimension. I suggest that
knowledge about historical contacts of our ancestors, as well as about group members who
transgressed group borders by their moral behavior (moral exemplars) can improve intergroup
relations. Evidence from Polish-Ukrainian, Polish-German and Polish-Jewish context will be
provided.

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PS132
ENTREPRENEURSHIP: PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE AND
NEW FINDINGS
D02. Work and organization - Leadership and entrepreneurship
Convenor
Presenters

Portugal
Discussant

Mariola Laguna, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin - Poland
Garazi Azanza, University of Deusto, Bilbao - Spain
Artur Domurat, University of Warsaw, Warsaw - Poland
Susana Correia Santos, ISCTE-IUL Instituto Universitário de Lisboa, Lisbon Adam Żaliński, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Lublin - Poland
Lorraine Uhlaner, EDHEC Business School, Roubaix - France

Entrepreneurship leads to both economic growth and job creation, at the same time delivering
innovative solutions to social and environmental problems. Small and medium-sized enterprises not
only constitute more than 90 per cent of European businesses, but also provide the majority of private
employment in Europe. Most of the entrepreneurship literature is dominated by business
administration and economics, however psychologists make important contributions to the
understanding of entrepreneurial intentions, cognitive processes, of entrepreneurial activities and their
interplay with broader social environment. As the unique working environment, entrepreneurial firms
offer a chance to investigate psychological mechanisms of motivation, cognition, personality, and
performance of entrepreneurs and their employees. Therefore, the symposium proposes to investigate
entrepreneurship from a psychological perspective, including variables on individual and team levels.
Presentations included in the symposium explore the relationships between personal resources, risktaking propensity, motivation and entrepreneurial intentions, actions, or business success. They aim to
show connections between psychological research and entrepreneurship by presenting novel empirical
findings which examine psychological antecedents, outcomes and processes associated with
entrepreneurship, including social context into the analyses.

THE SOCIAL PERCEPTION OF THE ENTREPRENEUR AND ITS EFFECTS ON
ENTREPRENEURIAL ATTITUDES, INTENTION AND SUPPORT
Garazi Azanza, Leire Gartzia
Despite the importance of entrepreneurship for economic growth and development, research about the
social perception of the entrepreneur is still scarce. This study aims to further explore the social image
of the entrepreneur in key groups: young Spanish people and social agents involved in the business
creation process.

ENTREPRENEURS ARE NOT RISK PRONE, THEY ARE BRAVE
Artur Domurat
The aim of the studies is to test the common belief that risk-taking propensity is the distinguishing trait
of entrepreneurs. As it turns out, entrepreneurs do not consider themselves as prone to risk, but as
brave. Their choices in lottery tasks are not riskier than choices of wage earners. Differences emerge
when the settings are ambiguous.

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THE ENTREPRENEURIAL POTENTIAL AT THE TEAM LEVEL: A PROXY FOR A
LONGITUDINAL APPROACH
Susana Correia Santos, António Caetano, Sílvia Fernandes Costa
This study presents the entrepreneurial potential construct in entrepreneurial teams competing in a
venture competition. A total of 18 entrepreneurial teams participated in this study. The results showed
that entrepreneurial potential profile can be a useful tool to point out successful and highly potential
teams.

SELF-EFFICACY, POSITIVE AFFECT, AND ENTREPRENEURIAL SUCCESS:
LONGITUDINAL RELATIONS
Adam Żaliński, Wiktor Razmus, Mariola Laguna, Oleg Gorbaniuk
The research aims to reveal reciprocal relationships between positive psychological resources and
success in entrepreneurial activity, using longitudinal framework. It tests how work specific selfefficacy, positive affect represented by enthusiasm, and subjective entrepreneurial success reciprocally
influence one another in a three-wave study.

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EIS133
BECAUSE THE WAY TO THE HEART IS THROUGH THE STOMACH.
PSYCHOLOGICAL PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION OF EATING
DISORDERS
F05. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Eating disorders
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Christoph Steinebach, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Zurich - Swiss
Christoph Steinebach, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Zurich - Swiss
Anne-Christine Volkart, Institute Private practice, Orbe - Swiss
Karin Teepe, Centre de Soins Parcours d’Exil, Paris - France
Volker Schulte, Institute University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland
FHNW, Windisch - Swiss
Alberto Zucconi, IACP Institute Instituto Dell’Approccio Centro Sulla Persona, Roma
- Italy
Alberto Zucconi, IACP Institute Instituto Dell’Approccio Centro Sulla Persona, Roma
- Italy

Social conditions, cultural norms, and individual needs determine our eating habits. Eating disorders
lead to severe impairments that lead not only to individual but also social, and societal harm.
Prevention and therapeutic services are aimed at changing the individual behavior and to forge a
lasting Influence on problematic emotions, cognitions and social factors. It Is becoming increasingly
clear that a consideration of the basic needs of the individual, their strengths, and resources must
complement the traditionally on deficits oriented interventions. In this symposium we offer an analysis
of current eating disorders as a social as well as individual problem. We reflect on strategies of health
promotion and psychotherapy In different countries. To line out new perspectives for both, health
promotion and therapy we stress the perspective of basic needs and strengths. As the participants oft
he symposium are from practice as well as research both perspectives will be brought together to
highlight evidence based practice and practice based theory In this problem area.

BODY AND MIND: BUILDING RESILIENCE IN PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR CHILDREN
AND YOUTH
Christoph Steinebach
Current innovations In psychotherapy for children and youth strengthen the Importance of basic needs,
strengths, and resilience as object and purpose. Commonalities of theory based interventions to main
concepts of positive Psychology are outlined. Consequences for eating disorder therapies are
discussed.
FOOD AND NUTRITION BETWEEN BASIC NEEDS AND LACK OF SOCIAL
RELATIONSHIPS: THE SITUATION OF THE REFUGEES
Karin Teepe
Eating disorders concern most asylum seekers and come as silent symptoms within severe
psychological suffering,frequently chronicised by the length and the difficulties of the immigration
procedure. Social constraints urge the patient to consider foodmerely as achievement of a basic need.
Therapy Issues are discussed.

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EATING DISORDERS AND OBESITY. EXPERIENCES WITH PSYCHOLOGICAL
PSYCHOTHERAPY IN A PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTION
Anne-Christine Volkart
The changes of our relationship to food and nutrition over the last decades goes together with changes
In the care of people suffering from eating disorders and obesity. I want to discuss It on the
background of a 10 years experience In a psychiatric institution In switzerland, treating people
suffering from eating disorders and obesity.
HEALTHY BODY IMAGE POLICIES
Volker Schulte
Media and fashion Industry nowadays often provide Ideal Images of body appearance which do not
cover reality. Never was the pressure on young people as strong as today to appear "physically
perfect". Teens who can no longer perform their natural body undermine their self-esteem.
Switzerland launched a multi-factorial body Image campaign which fosters a healthy body Image
beyond fashion beauty standards.
EMPOWERMENT AND ADVOCACY. THE CASE OF EATING DISORDERS
Alberto Zucconi
Health promotion Is an empowerment approach to strengthen health resources which enable
individuals and groups to enjoy a lifestyle related to health and well-being. Especially In the case of
eating disorders health promotion and prevention require a clear orientation framework. Advocacy for
health means to set priorities, to coordinate health related initiatives and to clarify the division of tasks
between national and regional levels.

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EIS134
PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION ACROSS EUROPEAN
COUNTRIES
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenor
Presenters

Tony Wainwright, University of Exeter, Devon - United Kingdom
Tony Wainwright, University of Exeter, Devon - United Kingdom
Isabel Fernandez, Psychotraumatology Research Center, Milan - Italy
Rifkat J. Muhamedrahimov, Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg Russian Federation
Britt Randi Hjartnes Schjodt, Municipality of Bergen City, Bergen - Norway
Vita Poštuvan, University of Primorska, Koper - Slovenia

The Importance of prevention of Ill-health and promotion of wellbeing needs to be high on the agenda
of governments and health systems. Rechel (2014) make the point that a very low proportion of health
spending Is on prevention. Psychologists have a key role to play In this field and this symposium will
provide an overview of the work of the newly formed EFPA Board of prevention and intervention
(http://preventionintervention.efpa.eu/introduction/ ).
The symposium presents areas of work with children and young people: one of an intervention at an
institutional level In orphanages; another study on the use of EMDR and the framework of Adverse
childhood experiences (http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/) ; and on suicide prevention
among young people In Europe.
We will close the symposium with a presentation of the results of a survey across member associations
concerning the work that Is done In prevention.
Rechel, B. (2014). Facets of public health In Europe. Milton Keynes: Open univ. Press.

THE WORK OF THE EFPA BOARD OF PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION
Tony Wainwright
Over the past two years the EFPA Board of prevention and intervention has been working to develop a
framework for collaborative working to promote this area of psychological practice. The presentation
will outline the main focus of the group’s work, the goals It has set and the obstacles to their
achievement. It will also invite participants to join with the group’s work In developing a European
network of applied psychologists working In prevention.
PREVENTION OF THE SOCIAL ORPHANHOOD: ST. PETERSBURG BABY HOME
INTERVENTION PROJECT RESULTS AND NEW POLICY ON INSTITUTIONS FOR
CHILDREN LEFT WITHOUT PARENTAL CARE
Rifkat J. Muhamedrahimov
This presentation Is focused to describe the quasi-experimental institutional intervention project
designed to support caregiver-child interactions and relationships In three institutions for children
birth to 4 years, called Baby Homes, In St. Petersburg, RF. The results of the project Influenced the
new resolution of the RF Government concerning institutional care, ultimately requirements for
creating In institutions a family environment for orphan children.
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ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES AND THE ROLE OF EMDR THERAPY IN
PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION
Isabel Fernandez, Chiara Callerame
The attention of scientific research In recent years has been focused on the link between a history of
traumatic life events and the onset of psychological and medical disease In adulthood. The aim of the
presentation Is to explain the concept of Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and to explore Its
usefulness In planning prevention and the role of EMDR therapy as one of the intervention programs.
SUICIDE PREVENTION IN YOUNG PEOPLE
Vita Poštuvan
Suicide prevention Is as complex as the phenomenon of suicide. Targeting young people we aim to
Influence their developmental processes In order to Increase their well-being and prevent suicide not
only In this developmental phase, but also later In life. Interventions Include awareness programmes,
education of gatekeepers, screening, as well as changes of attitudes In society.
PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION IN EUROPEAN COUNTIES: RESULTS OF A
SURVEY
Britt Randi Hjartnes Schjodt
This presentation aims to give a brief overview of gathered information concerning member
associations and their Involvement with this branch of practice. The data comes from answers to an
Informal questionnaire: What are the main challenges when It comes to mental health and quality of
life Issues In some European countries, and what can be done to prevent and Intervene at different
levels. This presentation Is supplemented by data from World Health organisation and organisation for
economic Co-operation and Development overviews. It will be discussed In terms of what kind of
skills and competence psychologists need to build, In order to participate In evidence-based
prevention and intervention at a community level.

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EIS135
HUMAN RIGHTS, PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL
RESPONSIBILITIES OF PSYCHOLOGISTS, SYMPOSIUM A
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
C08. Culture and society - Prejudice and social exclusion
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Polli Hagenaars, EFPA Task Force on Human Rights - Netherlands
Artemis Giotsa, University of Ioannina, Ioannina - Greece
Peter Kinderman, University of Liverpool, Liverpool - United Kingdom
Kerstin Söderström, Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer - Norway
Polli Hagenaars, EFPA Task Force on Human Rights - Netherlands
Ulrich Wagner, Philipp University of Marburg, Marburg – Germany

EFPA wants to articulate more strongly the responsibilities of psychologists and to develop policies
for counteracting human rights violations. Therefore, a Task Force Human rights has been established.
Human rights are documented In the universal declaration of Human rights and the convention on the
rights of the child, ratified by national states. Responsibilities of psychologists for the promotion of
Human rights and counteracting violations of Human rights derive from their expertise and role In
society as reflected In their Codes of ethics. This symposium distinguishes responsibilities of
psychologists for their clients and for the society at large and scope for action by individual
psychologists as well by national and international associations of psychologists.
The Task Force Intends to develop a policy that will enable action to be taken based on the unique
expertise and competence of psychologists. This policy Is meant to raise awareness of Human rights
and (risks of) Human rights violations, to prevent Human rights violations, to promote Human rights,
and to alleviate the effects of Human rights violations.
The focus of the first part of this double symposium Is on the ethical and professional responsibilities
of psychologists for the protection and promotion of Human rights, especially In the light of the EFPA
Meta Code. The core question to be discussed Is: what can and what should professional psychologists
do as individuals, as well as what can and what should EFPA Member associations do about
promoting Human rights.
The second part of the symposium will underscore the need for education In Human rights. The
assumption Is that Human rights should be part of university education and professional training,
including continued professional Development. This symposium aims to contribute to the
development of curricula and ways to transfer knowledge and experience.

HUMAN RIGHTS IN EUROPE (GREECE)
Artemis Giotsa
This present paper describes the protection of Human rights In Greece. The country Is a signatory to
the European convention on Human rights, the Geneva convention relating to the Status of
Refugees and the united nations convention against Torture. Many problems arise In different fields In
Greece: the treatment of migrants, refugees and Roma families, conditions In prisons, along with
many other topics.

EMBEDDING HUMAN
PSYCHOLOGISTS
Peter Kinderman

RIGHTS

INTO

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Applied psychologists are confronted with human rights challenges, and are subject to several sets of
expectations; from professional bodies, regulators, legislators and external pressure groups. This
presentation will discuss the UK experience of embedding human rights responsibilities Into
psychologists’ statutory standards of proficiency.

HOW CAN PSYCHOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE AND FORMAL PROCEDURES
CONTRIBUTE TO STRENGTHEN CHILDREN’S RIGHTS?
Kerstin Söderström
The right of the child to have his or her best Interests taken as a primary consideration Is vague and
often put aside when In conflict with other Interests or principles. This presentation discusses how
children´s rights and best Interests can be strengthen by psychological knowledge and procedures of
best-Interest assessments and determinations.

HUMAN RIGHTS, AN IMPLICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR
PSYCHOLOGISTS
Polli Hagenaars
As Human rights are a responsibility of psychologists, this should have implications for their
education and training. This societal responsibility has to be ‘translated’ Into knowledge and practice
for psychologists. As Human rights have been formulated predominantly In judicial and political
terms, a societal perspective on Human rights needs to be further elaborated.

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EIS136
HUMAN RIGHTS, PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL
RESPONSIBILITIES OF PSYCHOLOGISTS
SYMPOSIUM B: PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR
PSYCHOLOGISTS
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
C08. Culture and society - Prejudice and social exclusion
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Polli Hagenaars, EFPA Task Force on Human Rights Ioannis N. Dimitrakopoulos, European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights,
Vienna - Austria
Janel Gauthier, Laval University, Quebec City - Canada
Nora Sveaas, University of Oslo, Oslo - Norway
Ava Thompson, College of The Bahamas, Nassau - Bahamas
Ulrich Wagner, Philipp University of Marburg, Marburg – Germany

EFPA wants to articulate more strongly the responsibilities of psychologists and to develop policies
for counteracting human rights violations. Therefore, a Task Force Human rights has been established.
Human rights are documented In the universal declaration of Human rights and the convention on the
rights of the child, ratified by national states. Responsibilities of psychologists for the promotion of
Human rights and counteracting violations of Human rights derive from their expertise and role In
society as reflected In their Codes of ethics. This symposium distinguishes responsibilities of
psychologists for their clients and for the society at large and scope for action by individual
psychologists as well by national and international associations of psychologists.
The Task Force Intends to develop a policy that will enable action to be taken based on the unique
expertise and competence of psychologists. This policy Is meant to raise awareness of Human rights
and (risks of) Human rights violations, to prevent Human rights violations, to promote Human rights,
and to alleviate the effects of Human rights violations.
The focus of the second part of the symposium underscores the need for education for psychologists In
Human rights. The assumption Is that Human rights should be part of university education and
professional training, including continued professional Development. This symposium aims to
contribute to the development of curricula and ways to transfer knowledge and experience.

THE CONTRIBUTION OF PSYCHOLOGISTS IN PROMOTING HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE
EUROPEAN UNION THROUGH THEIR WORK
Ioannis N. Dimitrakopoulos
Human rights treaties set out obligations for governments. Psychologists through counseling and
therapeutic practices contribute to the fulfillment of these rights, e.g. When providing care and therapy
to crime victims; when they facilitate dialogue between ethnic or religious communities. This session
will discuss how this work can be framed In a Human rights perspective.

THE EVOLUTION OF DOCUMENTS ASSERTING HUMAN RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS
FOR HUMAN RIGHTS PROMOTION AND EDUCATION
Janel Gauthier
There Is a movement In psychology to develop policies that articulate the ethical responsibilities of
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psychologists for promoting Human rights (HR) and counteracting HR violations. In this presentation,
I examine the historical development and the contemporary meaning of HR and I discuss the
implications of my findings for HR promotion and education In psychology.

PSYCHOLOGISTS, HUMAN RIGHTS AND ETHICS - SOCIETAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF
PSYCHOLOGISTS
Nora Sveaas
Ensuring that human rights are respected and that all individuals are protected from abuse or violations
represent Important challenges In all societies. Psychologists have responsibilities related to this.
Participation In monitoring bodies and contributions to reporting and implementation of
recommendations, as well as the need for human rights education for psychologists will be
highlighted.

CHILDREN’S RIGHTS AND PSYCHOLOGY EDUCATION AND TRAINING: ADVANCING
CHILDREN’S WELL-BEING IN THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY
Ava Thompson
The CRC has transformed child welfare legislation and policy development In the global community
but there Is limited evidence of Its integration Into psychology education and training (PET). In this
paper I present a bahamian model for teaching children’s rights as a social value system and discuss
the implications for advancing psychology’s engagement In promoting children’s rights and wellbeing.

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EIS137
‘ETHICAL ASPECTS OF PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT IN CRISIS AND
DISASTERS, LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE DIFFERENT
EUROPEAN COUNTRIES’
F07. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Psychological consequences of disasters for individuals, families and
communities
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

"Magda Rooze, National Association of Psychology the Netherlands, Diemen
- Netherlands"
Maria Filippova, Centre of Emergency Psychological Aid of EMERCOM of Russia,
Moscow - Russian Federation
Anders Korsgaard Christensen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen Denmark
Eva Muenker Kramer, Association of the Austrian Psychological Association; EMDR
Institute Austria, Krems/Donau - Austria
Magda Rooze, Arq Psychotrauma Expert Group, Diemen - Netherlands
Salli Saari, University of Helsinki, Helsinki - Finland
Magda Rooze, National Association of Psychology the Netherlands, Diemen –
Netherlands

Adequate psychosocial intervention following disasters can reduce Ill health and foster resilience If
handled appropriately. The standing committee on crisis and disaster Psychology of the European
federation of psychologists associations (EFPA) wants the citizens of Europe to have access to
comparable psychosocial services regardless of where they live. By a more systematic focus on
psychosocial support within each member State’s emergency planning, by proper training of
volunteers and professionals, and by describing a minimum level of care for those who experience
disasters.
The rapid development In the field of disaster, crisis and trauma psychology has continued. Disasters
such as bus accidents, airplane crashes, mining accidents, large entertainment event disasters, natural
disasters such as earthquakes and floods, terror events such as bombings and school shootings have
posed great challenges for disaster and crisis psychology. In conjunction with this state of affairs, the
development of guidelines for the delivery of psychosocial support, standards of training for disaster
and crisis psychologists and the organization of disaster ,trauma and crisis psychologists In each
country have gained momentum. To join forces the SC thinks It Is of great Importance that the
European countries learn from each others’ experiences and expertise. This sharing of lessons learned
and knowledge Is the heart of the work of the SC.
Crisis and disaster psychology Is slightly different from other psychological tasks In three aspects: the
work Is often carried out on the crisis/disaster scene, there Is often great media coverage and the
affected persons are In a special vulnerable situation, because they are shocked and threatened by what
has occurred to them.
The SC members reflected on how these special conditions may Influence ethical Issues and wants to
discuss this to develop specific guidelines on ethical aspects In the work of crisis and disaster
psychologists.

ETHICAL ASPECTS OF RENDERING AN EMERGENCY PSYCHOLOGICAL AID IN
EMERGENCIES TO REPRESENTATIVES OF DIFFERENT CULTURES
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Maria Filippova
The personal experience of the authors dealing with the victims In emergency situations In russia and
abroad shows both culture non-specific and culture-specific acute stress responses. The forms and
methods of responding demonstrated are of practically all cultures In the emergency situations are
attributed to culture non-specific responses.

DISASTER PSYCHOLOGY: ETHICS IN CLINICAL WORK AND RESEARCH
Anders Korsgaard Christensen
What ethical standards are Important to be aware of In the acute phase after disasters and major
accidents. Who needs the help the most and why? How can research results In the field of traumatic
stress be utilized In the best way to benefit the victims. Ethical aspects of research design In post
traumatic stress studies will also be discussed.

PROFESSIONAL DISCRETION IN DISASTER AND CRISIS PSYCHOLOGY AND ITS
NEED TO NETWORK – AN UNSOLVABLE DILEMMA OR A CHALLENGE
Eva Muenker Kramer
In many countries psychologists have a very strict law on professional discretion. In psychological
first aid and In mid term disaster and crisis psychology networking Is essential also and expecially In
the Interest of the concerned persons. In the presentation arguments, pro´s and con´s between law and
practical reality will be discussed.

TERRA THE ‘STAIRCASE TO TERRORISM’ - RADICALISATION IN EUROPE AND
HOW TO INTERVENE
Magda Rooze
The TERRA research provides information about psychosocial factors which play a role In the
radicalisation process. This can be used to positively Impact upon supporting prevention and the deradicalisation process, through people who come Into daily professional contact with vulnerable
individuals and groups. But on what grounds do we Intervene.

RESEACH RESULTS VERSUS CLINICAL EXPERIENCES – HOW ORGANIZE ETHICAL
PSYCHOLOGICAL CRISIS HELP
Salli Saari
In acute crisis work research results and clinical experiences lead to different conclusions. Research
results indicate that most people who have been exposed to a traumatic event recover without crisis
help, but Is It ethical to leave them alone with their difficult experience, when we are thinking of the
needs of the victims.

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EIS138
THE PSYCHOLOGIST IN SPORT AND EXERCISE
E10. Health and clinical intervention - Sport and exercise
Convenor
Presenters

Michel Nicolas, University of Burgundy, Dijone - France
Michel Nicolas, University of Burgundy, Dijone - France
Ross Hall, University of South Wales, Cardiff - United Kingdom
Zrinka Greblo, University of Zagreb, Zagreb - Croatia
Irina Simonenkova , Russian State University of Physical Education, Sport, Youth and
Tourism (SCOLIPE), Moscow - Russian Federation
Pedro Almedia, ISPA University Institute, Lisbon - Portugal
Claire-Marie Roberts, University of Worcester, Worcester - United Kingdom
Enrique Cantón, University of Valencia, Valencia; ISPA University Institute, Lisbon
(Portugal) – Spain

Professional practices and interventions of psychologists In sport and exercise have greatly Increased
the last decade. However, despite the Importance of psychological factors both In performance and
well being, psychologists’ interventions are still unknown. This symposium proposes practices and
interventions of psychologists In sport and exercise but also In constraining and extreme situations.

AFFECTIVE, SOCIAL AND COGNITIVE OUTCOMES DURING A ONE YEAR
WINTERING IN CONCORDIA
Michel NICOLAS
This study investigated time patterns and the relationships between perceived stress, recovery, control,
attention lapses and defense mechanisms during a 12-month wintering In concordia polar station with
an international crew. Preventive psychological countermeasures should be developed to Improve
adaptation to ICE (Isolated, confined, Extreme) situations such as polar stations or space missions.

ELITE RIFLE SHOOTERS AND EMOTIONAL CONTROL: PREPARATIONS FOR THE
2014 COMMONWEALTH GAMES
Ross HALL
Biofeedback Is a therapeutic technique used to promote health and Improve performance. This study
outlines an intervention with elite shooters In prepartion for the 2014 Commonwealth Games.
Individually preferred breathing frequency rates can lead to Increases In Heart Rate variability, which
Is suggested to be linked with greater emotional control. The Impact of such training upon shooting
performance Is discussed In line with research evidence.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND MENTAL HEALTH AMONG
HIGH-SCHOOL STUDENTS
Zrinka GREBLO, Maroje SORIĆ, Marjeta MIŠIGOJ-DURAKOVIĆ
Empirical findings suggest that physical activity has beneficial effects across several mental-health
outcomes. However, studies aimed to determine the relationship between physical activity and
psychological well-being among adolescents are still scarce. Thus, the aim of our study was to further
contribute to this specific area of knowledge.
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TEST OF PERFORMANCE STRATEGIES ADAPTATION FOR EVALUATION OF
PSYCHOLOGICAL SKILLS
Irina Simonenkova
The basic psychological skills are Imagery skills, psychic energy management skills, stress
management skills, attentional skills, and goal-setting skills. The TOPS (Test of Performance
strategies) was developed to provide a test of psychological skills used both In competitions and
practice. The purpose of this study Is adaptation TOPS questionnaire, developed by Murphy and
Hardly In 1999, Into russian language.

ENHANCING ADOLESCENT SPORTS PERFORMANCE THROUGH PARENTAL
EDUCATION INTERVENTIONS
Claire-Marie ROBERTS
Parents of adolescent athletes play a critical role In their sporting development. This support can be
the difference between the athletes' progression or dropout, yet parents are rarely Informed of how
their behaviour can bring about a positive Influence. This study Involved educating the parents of elite
adolescent athletes on how best to support the sporting development of their children. The Impact of
the intervention was examined through coach and athlete feedback.

THE INTERCONTINENTAL SPORT PSYCHOLOGY: EUROPE AND LATIN AMERICA IN
THE INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
Enrique CANTÓN, Pedro ALMEDIA
A professional specialty needs that his profile of competences and the formation to develop, they are
clear and differentiated of any other specialties. This subject Is defined by his area of action and the
concrete characteristics of the work. In this sense, It seems logical that therefore It Is common In any
part of the world, at least In very substantial aspects. In this work, we contribute some elements to
analyze the current situation, especially In Europe and america, and to aim at some challenges of
future In this aspect.

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EIS139
TEACHING ETHICS
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
Convenor
Presenters
Presenters
Presenters
Presenters

Pierre Nederlandt, Galerie Agora, Bruxelles - Belgium
Pierre Nederlandt, Galerie Agora, Bruxelles - Belgium
Kathryn Bullen, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth - United Kingdom
Artemis Giotsa, University of Ioannina, Ioannina - Greece
Alla Shaboltas, Universitetskaya, Saint Petersburg - Russian Federation

Teaching ethics for psychologists seems obvious but how should It happen? The first step Is to Inform
the students but afterwards It’s also very Important to give information to the working psychologists
and also to answer their questions concerning the ethical dilemmas In the practice. The panel presents
the questions concerning teaching ethics and gives some concrete examples of the situation In some
European countries.

TEACHING ETHICS: WHEN, HOW? THE GUIDELINES FROM EFPA
Pierre Nederlandt
There are a lot of questions concerning teaching ethics. The first Is “when ?”. During the studies of
course but also during the professional life. A second question Is “how?”. Is It obvious to organize a
special course during the studies or must the deontology be explained by a lot of teachers ? And what
are the topics to be presented : the national code, the Model code from EFPA, the specific codes for
some specialists? And who has to teach ethics? Psychologists, lawyers ? This presentation opens the
discussion.
DEVELOPING ETHICAL COMPETENCES IN PSYCHOLOGY TEACHING AND
PROFESSIONAL TRAINING IN THE UNITED KINGDOM
Kathryn Bullen
In the UK, teaching Psychology frequently starts at pre-tertiary level. Continued professional
development (CPD) Is a requirement for UK based psychologists. Regardless of the level of training
all individuals engaged In research In psychology are expected to be familiar and compliant with the
british psychological society Codes of Research ethics. Codes of professional practice also apply to
practitioners In all areas of applied psychology. To date the main emphasis at the pre-professional
level has been on the ethics of research. However, there Is an acknowledgement within UK
psychology that there Is a need to develop ethical awareness and sensitivity across all levels of
psychology teaching. The principles underpinning the guidance are outlined In this presentation
together with initial feedback from users of the guidance regarding Its utility and practical benefits In
the learning environment.
THE CODE OF ETHICS AND TEACHING ETHICS IN GREECE
Artemis Giotsa
This presentation Includes the history of the development of the code of ethics In Greece and how this
code Is presented to the students. It also develops the questions concerning the limits of an academic
presentation of ethics.
THE BARRIER FOR TEACHING ETHICS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS IN COUNTRIES
WHERE THIS KIND OF COURSES ARE RELATIVELY NEW
Alla Shaboltas
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The proposition Is to share the russian experience of teaching ethics and to discuss the barrier for
teaching ethics for psychologists In countries where this kind of courses are relatively new and where
an Important question Is to share challenges with others.

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EIS140
WHAT CAN PSYCHOLOGY CONTRIBUTE TO THE DEFENCE AND
PROMOTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS?
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Saths Cooper, International Union of Psychological Science and Pan-African
Psychology Union, Johannesburg - South Africa"
David Fryer, Australian College of Applied Psychology, Brisbane - Australia
Pamela Maras, University of Greenwich, Greenwich - United Kingdom"
Robert A. Roe, President of EFPA, Maastricht - Netherlands"
Nora Sveaas, University of Oslo, Oslo - Norway
Ava Thompson, College of The Bahamas, Nassau - Bahamas"
Yeşim Korkut, Acıbadem University, Istanbul – Turkey

Psychology has adapted fairly quickly to the knowledge explosion and the ready access to
information. There Is general acceptance of difference, cultural diversity, and variance In
socioeconomic status. Within the ethical domain, It would be odd for lack of tolerance, even
understanding, around Issues relating to race, gender, sex, pregnancy, marital status, ethnic or social
origin, colour, sexual orientation, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, language and
Birth.
Psychology’s utility as an applied profession after the Boulder Conference (August 20 - September
3, 1949) and the espousal of the scientist-practitioner Model has grown apace such that psychological
insights pervade almost every facet of human endeavour and activity. The widespread decolonisation
from the 1960s has seen many more distinct nations being founded. Particularly since the polish
revolution In 1889 and the demise of the USSR In 1991, there has been a clamour for democracy and
Its apparent corollary: human rights.
However, psychology has not been able to adapt to this global desire to effectively engage In human
rights discourse, reducing the efficacy of psychological insights and relevance. This symposium will
explore the role that psychology should play In contributing to the discourse on human rights.

HUMAN RIGHTS FROM A CRITICAL STANDPOINT
David Fryer
‘Human rights’, rather than essential, universal, apolitical and progressive, are a manifestation of
historically contingent, culturally particular, dominant enlightenment discourses, deployed
oppressively and key to the constitution of the individualised psychologised subject. “The good”, as
Foucault said, “Is Invented” and so can be reinvented.

CAN PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE BE ‘IMPARTIAL’ IN THE FACE OF RHETORIC AND
POLICY THAT UNDERMINES HUMAN RIGHTS?
Pam Maras
Growing anti-immigration nationalist rhetoric In some parts of Europe plays on and reinforces
individual/community ‘fears’. The wider human rights implications for the rest of the world’s nations
and regions taking such positions and ways that psychology might relate to this will be considered,
against the backdrop of ‘scientific impartiality’.

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WHAT CAN PSYCHOLOGISTS DO ABOUT HUMAN RIGHTS?
Robert Roe
Although necessary and Important, psychological activities to help victims of Human rights violations
do little to change their prevalence. This presentation will consider specific recommendations for,
Inter alia, psychology’s better understanding of violations, prevention, effective intervention at
national and international levels, and coordination.

PSYCHOLOGISTS AND SURVIVORS OF GROSS HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS:
ENSURING VICTIMS’ RIGHTS TO JUSTICE AND REPARATION
Nora Sveaass
Perhaps the most Important human right for psychologists to be aware of Is victims’ right to
reparation, including rehabilitation. Victim rights present challenges within all human rights systems,
and efforts should be made to ensure that these rights are respected and enjoyed by those who have
had their lives changed by violation and injustice.
HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION FOR A 21ST CENTURY GLOBAL PSYCHOLOGY
Ava Thompson
Ethics Is a core component In psychology curricula globally, but human rights education remains on
the periphery of psychology education and training (PET), despite Its relevance for a 21st century
global psychology. This presentation provides an example of curricular integration from the caribbean
and the majority World, identifies critical Issues, and offers PET recommendations to promote the
integration of a human rights framework Into the discourse on a global psychology.

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EIS141
FEAR OF TELLING! THE ETHICS OF SUPERVISEE DISCLOSURE
THROUGH AN INTERNATIONAL LENS
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenor
Presenters

Discussants

Carol Falender, Pepperdine University, Los Angeles
- United States"
Carol Falender, Pepperdine University, Los Angeles
- United States"
Mary Creaner, Trinity College, Dublin - Ireland
Analise O’Donovan, Griffith University, Queensland – Australia
Shirley Morrissey, Griffith University, Queensland – Australia
Stephen H. Behnke, American Psychological Association, Washington DC - United
States
Jean L. Pettifor, University of Calgary, Calgary
- Canada"
Carole Sinclair, Independent practice, Thornhill - Canada

The major way supervisors learn about the clinical content of supervisee sessions with clients, for
whom they hold primary responsibility, Is through supervisee disclosure: clinical data presented In the
supervision session. However, supervisees may not disclose the very topics that are essential to
supervisee development, competence enhancement, and monitoring, and protection of the client.
Supervisees have reported they do not disclose clinical errors, personal reactions to the client or
countertransference, or personal factors about themselves and their clinical work. They may fear a
negative evaluation or other consequences, or do not trust the supervisory alliance. Multiple
jurisdictions approach supervisee disclosure differently with differences In Informed consent,
consequences, and potential Impact on gatekeeping. In this symposium, supervisors from australia,
Ireland, and the united States will present vignettes regarding Issues of supervisee disclosure and
ethical and legal intersections that Increase the complexity of supervisee disclosure. Discussants from
Canada and the united States will provide additional ethical perspectives.
Objectives:
Describe an ethical or legal standard regarding supervisee disclosure In each jurisdiction
Describe one deterrent to supervisees disclosing client information In each setting

WHAT’S NOT BEING SAID AND WHY? SUPERVISEE NON-DISCLOSURE IN THE
REPUBLIC OF IRELAND
Mary Creaner
Supervisee non-disclosure presents ethical challenges regarding the monitoring of best practice.
Understanding these Issues helps supervisors fulfill their gatekeeping role, particularly In Ireland,
where psychological therapy Is not state regulated.
DISCLOSING IMPAIRMENT AND THEN WHAT? ETHICAL AND LEGAL ISSUES IN
AUSTRALIA
Shirley Morrissey, Analise O’Donovan

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The Psychology Board of australia requires health professionals to report impaired practitioners
including Interns. Issues Include judging extent of impairment, confidentiality, Informed consent and
protection of the public.
ENCOURAGE DISCLOSURE? AN ETHICAL IMPERATIVE WITH CONSEQUENCES
Carol Falender
In the united States, the APA ethics Code (APA, 2010, 7.04) Student disclosure of personal
information Includes Informed consent. Supervisors must carefully balance encouraging supervisee
disclosure with duty to protect the client and supervisee.

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EIS142
PSYCHOLOGY AND AGEING: FINDINGS AND TRENDS ACROSS
EUROPE
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Convenor
Presenters

Dieter Ferring, University of Luxembourg, Walferdange - Luxembourg
Maria Angeles Molina , Instituto De Estudios Sociales Avanzados, Córdoba - Spain
Marta Santacreu, Autónoma University de Madrid, Madrid - Spain
Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros, Autónoma University de Madrid, Madrid - Spain
Antonio Bustillos, National University of Distance Education (UNED), Madrid Spain
Gerald Gatterer, Geriatric Centre Vienna, Vienna - Austria
Jasminka Despot Lučanin, University of Zagreb, Zagreb - Croatia
Mithat Durak, Abant İzzet Baysal University, Gölköy Yerleşkesi - Turkey
Elena Soldatova, South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk - Russian Federation
Hana Stepankova, National Institute of Mental Health, Klecany - Czech Republic

Most European countries face demographic changes defined by an Increase of the older population especially the “old old” people above 80 years - while the proportion of persons within the active age
between 15 to 64 years decreases. This “ageing of society” will challenge European countries on
several Interrelated dimensions most notably with respect to work, employment, and prosperity, but
also concerning health provision and care. It Is a challenge for psychology and especially
geropsychology to provide sound research-based knowledge about the diverse psychological processes
underlying human ageing as well as expertise about training, education and interventions that will help
to promote quality of living and subjective well-being both at the individual as well as the social level.
The symposium prepared by the EFPA standing committee of Geropsychology gives an insight In
current research topics across Europe and It delineates at the same time trends In geropsychology that
will become crucial In the next decades. Among these, one finds the notion cross-cultural Images of
ageing that shape our behaviour and attitudes as addressed by Ballesteros et al. (spain), as well as the
perception and evaluation of older adults with dementia which Is elaborated by Gatterer and Penkner
(austria). Biological and psychosocial factors affecting survival In old age constitute another topic
addressed by Despot-lucanin and lucanin. (croatia). Migration and coping with migration – as another
current and pressing topic of the ageing society the presentation by Durak et al. (Turkey). Soldatova
and zavialova (russia) address psychological resources of wellbeing In old age and the challenges that
the ageing process represents for identity formation. Finally, Stepankova and colleagues (Czech
republic) will discuss the most Important Issues that need to be considered In the process of
establishing geropsychology as a functioning discipline before a European and a national background.

CROSS CULTURAL RESULTS ABOUT IMAGES ABOUT AGEING AND ACTIVE AGEING
Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros, University Of Universidad Autónoma De Madrid, Spain
Antonio Bustillos, Universidad Nacional De Educación A Distancia, Spain
Marta Santacreu, University Of Universidad Autónoma De Madrid, Spain
Maria Ángeles Molina, Instituto De Estudios Sociales Avanzados, Spain
The study investigates whether self-perception of ageing can be considered (a) a component of active
ageing, (b) to what extent perceived discrimination Is influencing active aging and, (c) whether those
links are present In regions of three different countries using data from three cross-sectional surveys
carried out In Germany, mexico, and spain.
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ARE THERE SPECIFIC NEEDS OF PATIENTS SUFFERING FROM DEMENTIA? –
NORMALITY OR PATHOLOGY OF BEHAVIOUR?
Gerald Gatterer, Geriatric Centre Vienna; Vienna, Austria
N. Penkner, Geriatric Centre Vienna; Vienna, Austria
The study investigates psychological and behavioural symptoms of dementia and hereby focusses on
the needs of older persons suffering from dementia out of the perspective of caregivers. Results
indicate that needs are differently perceived and evaluated as pathological or not depending on the
existence of a dementia diagnosis.

SURVIVAL AND ASSOCIATED BIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS IN
ELDERLY PERSONS LIVING IN INSTITUTIONS IN CROATIA
Jasminka Despot Lučanin, Centre For Croatian Studies, University Of Zagreb, Croatia
Damir Lucanin, University Of Applied Health Sciences, Zagreb, Croatia
The aim of the research was to investigate the associations among biological factors and psychosocial
factors In the prediction of survival In old institutionalized persons In a sample of retirement home
residents. Differential effects are observed and discussed for psychosocial variables and biological
status In explaining and predicting survival.

THE PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF AHISKA TURKISH ELDERLY WITH A
HISTORY OF FORCED MIGRATION WHO RESIDE IN THE US
Mithat DURAK, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Department Of Psychology, TURKEY
Dena Shenk, Gerontology Program, Anthropology, UNC Charlotte, USA
Ekin Emiral, Bahcesehir University, Department Of Psychology, TURKEY
Ahıska Turks had been forced to migrate three times In 60 years under very stressing conditions. In
this presentation, common features of Ahıska turkish elderly people living In the US and other
migrated communities will be discussed using In-depth interviews conducted with the Ahıska elderly
In the US.

PSYCHOLOGICAL RESOURCES OF WELLBEING OF ELDERLY
Elena Soldatova, South Ural State University, Russia
Irina Zavialova, South Ural State University, Russia
The research tested whether the normative crisis of transition to old age leads to constructive new
formations of identity. Study findings indicate that psychological well-being In old ages Is associated
with the achieved identity and results provide evidence for the specific needs of psychological support
to older adults.

ESTABLISHING A CULTURE OF GEROPSYCHOLOGY: NATIONAL CHALLENGES OF
CZECH GEROPSYCHOLOGY
Hana Stepankova, National Institute Of Mental Health, Klecany, Czech Republic
Dieter Ferring, University Of Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Eva Jarolimova, Czech Alzheimer’s Society, Czech Republic
Ondrej Bezdicek, Department Of Neurology And Centre Of Clinical Neuroscience, Charles University
In Prague, Czech Republic
Tomas Nikolai, Department Of Neurology And Centre Of Clinical Neuroscience, Charles University
In Prague, Czech Republic
The presentation will address some of the most Important Issues that need to be considered In the
process of establishing geropsychology as a functioning discipline. In doing so, the presentation will
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refer to general factors at the European level before focussing the situation of geropsychology In the
Czech republic.

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EIS143
EDUCATING SUPERVISORS AS A MEAN TO IMPROVE THE
QUALITY OF PSYCHOLOGISTS’ SERVICES IN EUROPE: A
SLOVENIAN – NORWEGIAN COLLABORATION
E16. Health and clinical intervention - Other
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Per A Straumsheim, Norwegian Psychological Association, Oslo - Norway
Vlasta Zabukovec, Professor and President of Slovenian Psychologists’ Association
President, Ljubljana - Slovenia
Eva Danielsen, Norwegian Psychological Association, Oslo - Norway
Anja Podlesek, University of Lubljana, Lubljana - Slovenia
Vita Poštuvan, University of Primorska, Koper - Slovenia
Tor Levin Hofgaard, President of the Norwegian Psychological Association, Oslo Norway
Ingrid Lunt, Chair European Awarding committee for EuroPsy; University of Oxford,
Oxford - United Kingdom

In December 2014, a project with the objective to develop and Implement an education for
supervisors/mentors In slovenia, was funded with over 300 000 Euro by EEA/norwegian Grants. The
slovenian and norwegian psychological associations initiated this project several years ago. Later the
university of Ljubljana has become the leading partner (applicant) In the project, and other slovenian
institutions are Included: the university of primorska and the institute for Developmental Projects In
psychological couselling. The ambition Is to build a supervision model and education that Integrates a
competency based supervision (europsy), with a supervision model that underline empowering and
development of the psychologist (e.g. Via reflection and support).
The first and the second presentations focuses on the different perspectives In slovenia and Norway on
supervision: The slovenian psychological association have run a pilot project on implementing the
europsy competence model, with a focus on educating mentors In this model. In Norway, supervision
had been a part of psychologist education for over 40 year, and the norwegian psychological
association have been offering a 2-year education for supervisors. The third presentation give
information about the history of the project, the application process and the model for educating
supervisors that now are In the phase of implementation In slovenia. In the fourth presentation, a
participant that are undergoing training as a supervisor reports about her experiences from the project.
The last presentation offers an overview of the need for Improved quality of psychological services In
many parts of Europe. Further, why supervision Is necessary to develop quality, and how a project like
this can contribute to meet the europsy standard for psychologist education, and thereby Improve the
quality of psychological services. Hopeful, experiences from this project might inspire and stimulate
to development of similar education programs.

A CHALLENGE FOR SLOVENIA: MEETING THE EUROPSY DEMANDS FOR
SUPERVISION
Vlasta Zabukovev
Tradition for supervision In slovenia. Challenges with regard to developing high quality psychological
services. The slovenian psychological association have run a pilot project on implementing the
europsy competence model, with a focus on educating mentors In this model.

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BUILDING A TRADITION FOR SUPERVISION OVER DECADES
Eva Danielsen
In Norway, supervision had been a part of psychologist education for over 40 year, and the norwegian
psychological association have been offering a 2-year education for supervisors.

A ROLLER COASTER: FIGHTING THE BUREAUCRACY AND DEVELOPING A
SUSTAINABLE EDUCATION FOR SUPERVISION IN NO TIME
Anja Podlesek
The third presentation give information about the history of the project, the application process and the
model for educating supervisors that now are In the phase of implementation In slovenia.

DEVELOPING AS A SUPERVISOR; CHALLENGES AND HIGHLIGHTS
Vita Poštuvan
In the fourth presentation, a participant that are undergoing training as a supervisor reports about her
experiences from the project.

WHY SUPERVISED PRACTICE IS A KEY TO BUILD HIGH QUALITY
PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES
Tor Levin Hofgaard
The last presentation offers an overview of the need for Improved quality of psychological services In
many parts of Europe. Further, why supervision Is necessary to develop quality, and how a project like
this can contribute to meet the europsy standard for psychologist education, and thereby Improve the
quality of psychological services. Hopeful, experiences from this project might inspire and stimulate
to development of similar education programs.

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EIS144
CONFIDENTIALITY: THREATS AND CHALLENGES
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
Convenor
Presenters

Henk Geertsema, Board of Ethics of the Dutch Institute of Psychologists (NIP),
GERION/VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam - Netherlands
Edward Van Rossen, Competent authority for psychologists in Belgium, Brussels Belgium
Miguel Ricou, University of Porto, Porto - Portugal
Fredi Lang, Headoffice of the Association of German Professional Psychologists
(BDP), Berlin - Germany
Alla Shaboltas, Saint Petersburg State University, Saint Petersburg - Russian
Federation
Anne Andronikof, University of Paris West, Nanterre – France

The purpose of this symposium is to discuss the threats and challenges related to the Idea of
confidentiality. Confidentiality Is at the core of many activities of psychologists. Nevertheless the
protection of one’s privacy Is not so much valued In some situations. Some examples:
(a) By using (social) media people’s attitude to privacy has changed;
(b) In many healthcare institutions care is delivered by a multidisciplinary team. They share
information about the client;
(c) The introduction of digital patient files asked for strict regulations. The reality Is that often too
many people have access to patient information;
(d) quality care institutions or healthcare cost insurance companies want information about the clients.
Do they really need It to control the professionals?
How should psychologists or the association of psychologists respond to these developments?
The objectives of this panel are: (a) to create awareness about the threats and challenges of the idea of
confidentiality; (b) to discuss these threats and challenges from different angles and from several
cultural and historical perspectives; (c) to inspire for new approaches.

THE LIMITS OF CONFIDENTIALITY SET BY THE LAW
Edward Van Rossen
Cases are presented where laws require psychologists to disclose Important and very confidential
information to the state (e.g., the police) without the patient’s consent. Such limits of confidentiality,
aimed at protecting other members of society, may discourage crucial help-seeking behaviour. Or
don’t they?

MULTIDISCIPLINARY WORKING AND CONFIDENCIALITY
Miguel Ricou
Psychology has a wide range of actuation. There are so many fields of intervention that
multidisciplinary work Is fundamental, seeking the client best Interest. In this way, disclosure Is
necessary, which can put In danger the psychologist-client private relation. Balancing these two
Important values Is mandatory.
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EHEALTH & CONFIDENTIALITY
Fredi Lang
The introduction of digital patient files asked for severe regulations. Routines may lead to access to
patient information by too many people. Digital structure will become safer but confidentiality of all
personal and health information may be lost at once. Professionals and clients should develop
preventive strategies.

CONFIDENTIALITY ISSUES IN RESEARCH AND PRACTICE: CHALLENGES FOR
PSYCHOLOGISTS AND OTHER HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS IN RUSSIA
Alla Shaboltas
The typical cases of breaking confidentiality In research and psychological practices In russia will be
presented. The potential ways of promoting high standards of confidentiality regulations including the
role of EFPA Board of ethics and Local ethical committees as an Instruments for managing violations
of confidentiality will be discussed.

ISSUES OF CONFIDENTIALITY FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS IN A CHANGING WORLD: HOW
TO RESPOND?
Anne Andronikof
The disparity of the professional statute of psychologists across countries, and the current blurring of
frontiers between private and public life require thorough examination of the confidentiality Issue by
professional associations, leading to a consensual set of ethical recommendations so that psychologists
can, anew, exercise their personal responsibility In matters of confidentiality.

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EIS145
CREATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Jacqui Akhurst, York St John University, York - United Kingdom
Laura Remaschi, LabCom, University of Florence, Florence - Italy
Patrizia Meringolo, University of Florence, Florence - Italy
Jacqui Lovell , York St John University, York - United Kingdom
Caterina Arcidiacono, INCORPADE Laboratory, University of Naples Federico II,
Naples - Italy
Jacqui Akhurst, York St John University, York - United Kingdom
Nicholas Carr, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen
- Norway"
Nicholas Carr, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen
- Norway"

Community psychologists focus upon the Impact of the broader social context on individual wellbeing. They are concerned to make evident the exercise of power and Its effects, including the
resulting oppression of and discrimination against certain groups. They value diversity and are
committed to action against inequalities. As such, traditional research methods are often not
participatory enough, and practitioners search for methods that will engage people as co-producers of
material.
The following brief and focused papers (around 15 minutes of presentation time), will highlight
creative use of research methods as applied to community psychology. These papers will Illustrate
innovative approaches at the intersection of action and research.

AN EXPERIENCE OF GOOD PRACTICE, CARRIED OUT WITH DETAINED MINORS,
THROUGH CREATIVE INSTRUMENTS
Laura Remaschi, Patrizia Meringolo
This experience Is part of a European Project “outinout” aimed to promote social inclusion of detained
minors, building a network among juvenile justice services and institutions. In this step creative
Instruments (photos, Images, semantic maps, drawings) have been used, working In group about
communication, emotions and conflictual relationships.
INCORPADE Laboratory (Department of humanities, federico II university of Naples)
THE CO-CREATION OF ‘I LOVE PORTA CAPUANA’
Caterina Arcidiacono And Co-Researchers
To go beyond psychology understood as a discipline merely Interested In the study and treatment of
individual disease, we need to explore how to use the knowledge of our discipline as an Instrument for
social change aimed at overcoming inequality and building a society that Is fairer and able to meet Its
citizens’ needs; considering individual, Inter-generational, organizational, political, cultural, and
legislative factors. We present the ‘I love Porta Capuana’ project, which Included 180 undergraduate
and 10 postgraduate students, taking psychology Into this district of Naples, and resulting In a
flashmob event. Audiovisual material describing our creative methodologies In participatory action
research will be presented.
ART, INNOVATION AND BEING TRUE TO OUR VOICES, A PARTICIPATORY ACTION
RESEARCH PROCESS TO EVALUATE A COMMUNITY ORGANISATION FROM THE
PERSPECTIVE OF ITS DIVERSE MEMBERS
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Jacqui Lovell and Jacqui Akhurst
A body mapping tool was utilised within a participatory video production process to evaluate the
Impact of a community organisation from the perspective of Its diverse members. We will describe the
development of an inclusive, bottom up, evaluation process that did not require participants to either
read or write. The use of “I poems” drawing from gilligan’s work and expanding these, which
effectively allowed all of the voices of the participants to be heard through the analysis process. The
process by which this participatory action research opened up our use of arts-based methods, Illustrate
innovative and potentially empowering elements In this evaluative process.
THE USE OF FILM DOCUMENTARIES IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY RESEARCH
AND PRACTICE
Nicholas Carr
Drawing from the experience within other disciplines such as social Anthropology, social science,
journalism and the Arts, community Psychology has rediscovered the film documentary as a tool for
various research approaches and communications. This presentation demonstrates the Increased use
of film as a useful approach to community Psychology research and practice referring to recent
European titles. The relevance of documentaries as a tool for evaluating and disseminating
participatory research has been argued by Freedman &Brandt(2012). The Internet provides unique
technical possibilities of storing and accessing film data. There Is a need to explore the ethical and
legal questions arising from the use of accessible film data from research projects by searching the
web.

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EIS146
PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, PEOPLES, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: HOW
ARE THEY CONNECTED?
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

"Janel Gauthier, International Association of Applied Psychology; Laval University,
Quebec City - Canada"
Stephen H. Behnke, American Psychological Association, Washington DC - United
States
Laura Hernández-Guzmán, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City
- Mexico
Saths Cooper, International Union of Psychological Science, Johannesburg - South
Africa
Waikaremoana Waitoki, University of Waikato, Hamilton - New Zealand
Jean L. Pettifor, University of Calgary, Calgary - Canada

Humans over the centuries have been concerned with what are good ways of thinking and acting
as opposed to evil ways. In modern times, we often organize information In smaller chunks
without recognizing how they fit together In our experience as human beings. The concept of
“peoples” Is a key concept In the universal declaration of ethical principles for psychologists, but
the connection between peoples, social justice and professional ethics has yet to be explored. In
this symposium, we ask how ethics, peoples and social justice are connected. The following
questions will be discussed by distinguished presenters from different regions of the world:
(1) What are the implications of adding "peoples" to codes that refer to persons as individuals?
(2) Does adding "peoples" bring the code of ethics closer to encompassing social justice and
broaden the scope of psychological functions?
(3) Does adding "peoples" make codes more multicultural and therefore more universal In Its
applications?
(4) How does adding “peoples” affect our ethical decision making?
(5) How do you define a scientific foundation for social justice Issues?

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES COMMENT ON THE APA ETHICS CODE: DE-STABILIZING
THE CONCEPT OF CULTURE
Stephen H. Behnke
This presentation discusses an initiative of the APA ethics committee to invite ethnic minority
psychological associations to comment on the APA ethics Code. The society of indian psychologists,
comprised of american indian and Alaska natives, has written a commentary offering a profound
critique of the APA Code: There Is no culture-free perspective In ethics discourse. The presentation
explores the far-reaching implications of this critique.

THE ROLE OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN ETHICS CODES IN PSYCHOLOGY
Laura Hernández-Guzmán
Codes of ethics based on human rights recognize human dignity and the need of any individual to
develop In harmony and at the same time the enhancement of human condition of peoples. They
balance basic freedom, equality and human dignity. Only individual ethics can Influence peoples’
rights and contribute to coexistence and social justice.
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RECONCILING THE IRRECONCILABLE?
Saths Cooper
In an ever-conflictual world, where recent geo-politics have indelibly changed how we engage as
scientists and practitioners, this presentation will explore If the seemingly contradictory concepts of
ethics, Peoples and social justice are connected at all and under what conditions they may be possibly
connected. If ethical conduct Is as highly contentious as It has become, with hardened positions being
adopted, the quest for an egalitarian understanding of what the terms Peoples and social justice
connote will be critically unpacked.

ETHICAL PRINCIPLES FOR WORK WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLE – THE EXPERIENCE
OF NEW ZEALAND MAORI
Waikaremoana Waitoki
The move towards using ‘peoples’ as a critical term within the universal declaration of ethical
principles for psychologists Infers community, collective experience, determination, history and
culture. As indigenous peoples living our lives In the presence of a dominant majority ethnic group,
maori In New Zealand, along with many other indigenous peoples around the world were often
referred to as ‘populations’, rather than peoples, robbing us of our right to existence, community,
voice and nationhood. The adoption of the term “peoples” Is an act of social justice, In and of Itself.
Psychologists seeking to understand and engage indigenous peoples, individually and communally,
need to understand these semantics If professional and social justice efforts are to be of benefit.

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EIS147
ALTERNATIVE METHODS FOR ETHICS COMMITTEES: A CLOSE
LOOK ON MEDIATION AND EDUCATIVE MEASURES
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
Convenor
Presenters

Discussants

Yeşim Korkut, Acıbadem University, Istanbul - Turkey
Pierre Nederlandt, Fédération Belge des Psychologues, Galerie Agora, Bruxelles Belgium
Nina Dalen, EFPA Board of Ethics; Board of the Norwegian Psychological
Association, Oslo - Norway
Henk Geertsema, Board of Ethics of the Dutch Institute of Psychologists (NIP),
GERION/VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam - Norway
Yeşim Korkut, Acıbadem University, Istanbul – Turkey
Edward Van Rossen, Competent authority for psychologists in Belgium, Brussels Belgium

When confronted with severe ethical dilemmas and ethical violation cases , ethical committees often
choose to follow the adjudication process. In some cases they do employ educative measures, or very
rarely mediation technique.
Mediation Is a voluntary, and more flexible process using a neutral third party to develop a
reciprocally accepted resolution of the conflict between the two sides. It can be a very useful method
to employ In certain cases. Educative methods can Include letters, extra training, or suggestion of
therapy.
Objectives of this symposium can be summarized as follows: (1) To raise awareness about educative
methods and especially about mediation technique as an alternative to adjudication In some cases (2)
To Introduce EFPA mediation guideline (3) To hear perspectives from various countries about these
various techniques , including mediation, namely from Norway and Netherlands (4) To bring together
all the information, comments shared on the presentations, and to ensure time for audience questions
and discussion, via the existence of a discussant.

EFPA’S GUIDELINES ON MEDIATION
Pierre Nederland,
In 2007 the General Assembly of EFPA approved a paper presented by the standing committee of
ethics headed « guidelines on mediation In the Context of complaints about unethical Conduct ».
These guidelines give guidance to the EFPA member associations on the use of mediation as a mean
for the complainant and the accused psychologist to come to a settlement by themselves, facilitated by
a third party. All colleagues Interested In mediation may find here useful recommendations.

THE FUNCTION AND SCOPE OF AUTHORITY OF ETHICS COMMITTEES. A
DISCUSSION OF DIFFERENT METHODS INCLUDING MEDIATION.
Nina Dalen
In many European countries, how the psychological associations should handle complaints against
members, are subject to an extensively debate. One argument Is, being able and willing to discipline
own members, give more credibility In the society. Other advocates the benefit of a more nonjudgmental process. Pro and cons relative to different methods will be discussed.
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MEDIATION : THE CLIENT’S PERSPECTIVE
Henk Geertsema
Mediation can be a useful way of dealing with a client’s complaint. In this presentation we will
discuss the added value of mediation In a field In which there are already several possibilities to deal
with complaints, like the complaints commissions of organization, the complaints boards of
psychological associations and several governmental bodies. Who will benefit from mediation?

DISCUSSION: FUTURE POSSIBILITIES FOR ETHICS COMMITEES
Yesim Korkut
All the information shared on the presentations, the stance of EFPA regarding mediation technique,
the experiences with other methods than adjudication will be brought together. Perspectives from
other EFPA countries will be shared. Future possibilities and needs will be discussed together with
the audience.

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EIS148
EUROPSY BASIC AND SPECIALIST CERTIFICATES: STATE OF ART
AND CHALLENGES
D01. Work and organization - HR assessment and development
E01. Health and clinical intervention - Assessing and accrediting quality of psychotherapy training
and practice
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Salvatore Zappalà, Alma Mater Studioru - University of Bologna, Cesena - Italy
Ingrid Lunt, University of Oxford, Oxford - United Kingdom"
Rosaleen McElvaney, Dublin City University, Dublin - Ireland
Lourdes Munduate, Hispalense University of Sevilla, Sevilla - Spain
Per A Straumsheim, Norwegian Psychological Association, Oslo - Norway
José M. Peiró, University of Valencia, Valencia – Spain

The europsy (or european certificate in psychology) represents a major step forward in promoting the
mobility of psychologists and the access of clients to psychological services of high quality across
europe. It presents a set of european standards for psychology that is serving as the basis for
evaluating the academic education and professional training of psychologists across the different
countries of the eu, and other countries within efpa.
Europsy (the european certificate in psychology) provides the standards required for independent
practice at basic level. Specialist certificates in psychotherapy, and in work and organisational
psychology, have been developed to demonstrate the achievement of a specialised or advanced level
of competence and expertise in these particular areas of practice.
Currently twenty countries are participating in europsy. Such countries established a national awarding
committee (nac), the body that awards, within a country, the european basic certificate. The
symposium will give an update of the europsy basic certificate project.
The minimum standards that european psychologists should meet in order to qualify for independent
practice in the field of psychotherapy and work and organizational psychology have also been
developed and tested, respectively, in 2010 and 2013. These two specialist certificates have been
launched european wide. This symposium aims to inform ecp participants and psychological
associations about the aims and conditions necessary to implement the project. It also aims to inform
the larger audience of psychologists attending the ecp about the educational and learning activities that
psychotherapists and w&o practitioners are expected to attend after graduation, as well as the
competences to develop during their career in order to be awarded the specialist certificate.

THE EUROPSY PROJECT: AIMS AND CHALLENGES OF THE BASIC AND SPECIALIST
CERTIFICATES
Ingrid Lunt
This contribution will present reasons to launch and establish the Europsy project. In addition, a state
of the art of the actual implementation of the basic Europsy In the 20 countries, that have a NAC, will
be described. Finally, the speaker, that started the project and Is chairing and leading the European
awarding committee, will discuss the long-term objectives of the project.

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE IN PSYCHOTHERAPY
Rosaleen McElvaney
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In this contribution, Rosaleen mcelvaney, chair of the specialist European awarding committee, will
present the results of the implementation of the specialist certificate In Psychotherapy. The training
Standards for psychologists specialising In Psychotherapy, developed for this certificate, as guidelines
for the future, will also be outlined. This proposal concerns the curriculum the training institutions and
other Important components of the training.

THE PILOT PROJECT AND THE STANDARDS FOR THE SPECIALIST CERTIFICATE IN
WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
Salvatore Zappalà
This contribution will present the standards that were developed for this certificate and will mention
the results of the pilot project, which was run In five European countries, In order to test the standards
developed for the specialist certificate In Work and organizational Psychology. Information to be
provided, In order to Implement this certificate In all European countries, will also be presented.

COMPETENCES
IN
THE
SPECIALIST
CERTIFICATE
IN
WORK
AND
ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
Lourdes Munduate
Competences are an innovative component of the Europsy project. Different set and amount of,
competences have been established for the basic and specialist certificates. The challenges Involved In
assessing, measuring and giving evidence of competences will be discussed.

EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES AND CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN
THE SPECIALIST CERTIFICATES IN WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
Per A Straumsheim
The specialist certificates set standards for training, and post degree educational and learning
activities. Such activities still take many different forms and duration across European countries, and
matching such activities with the standards may be not so easy and immediate. Building on the
experience of the pilot test of the specialist certificate In Work and organizational Psychology,
examples of such learning activities will be presented, and suggestions on how to count them will be
offered.

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EIS149
INTEGRATING PERSONAL VIRTUE AND CHARACTER INTO THE
TEACHING OF ETHICS AND ETHICAL DECISION MAKING:
SHOULD IT BE DONE? CAN IT BE DONE?
C01. Culture and Society - Ethics and deontology
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Carole Sinclair, Independent practice, Thornhill - Canada
Carole Sinclair , Independent practice, Thornhill - Canada
Yeşim Korkut, Acibadem University, Instanbul - Turkey
Terry Simpson , Edith Cowan University, Joondalup - Australia
Stephen H. Behnke , American Psychological Association - Ethics Office, Washington
DC - United States
Carol Falender , Pepperdine University, Los Angeles; UCLA University of California,
Los Angeles - United States

The majority of previous dialogue on the teaching of ethics has tended to emphasize the development
of skills In ethical decision making and the knowledge of ethical principles and rules, with the
assumption (and some evidence) that such skills and knowledge Increase the likelihood of ethical
behaviour. However, there seems to be increasing concern and belief (and, again, some evidence) that
the development of such skills and knowledge may not be enough – that there are personal factors and
vulnerabilities that can strongly Influence a psychologist’s ability or willingness to apply his or her
knowledge and skills to a particular situation or dilemma. The concepts of “virtue” and “character” are
often drawn upon to understand and explore these personal factors. In order for the profession of
psychology to meet Its responsibilities to society, It Is Important for us to explore the role of virtue
and character In ethical behaviour, including the need for their integration Into the ethics training of Its
members. The objectives of this symposium are: (a) to stimulate international dialogue regarding
whether personal virtue and character should and can be Integrated Into the teaching of ethics, and (b)
to explore existing and potential methods for doing so. In this symposium, one presenter will trace the
history of attention to virtue and character In professional ethics across time and across professions;
two presenters, each from a different part of our global community of psychologists (Turkey and
australia) will explore Ideas and methods for integrating such concepts Into the teaching of ethics; and
a fourth presenter will explore, In the context of codes, the complexities Involved In making a
distinction between professional and personal behaviour. A discussant will provide comments and
reflections on the presentations, and time will be available for audience questions and discussion.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ROLE OF VIRTUE AND CHARACTER IN PROFESSIONAL
TRAINING
Carole Sinclair
Attention to the role of virtue and character In professional training has varied from ancient times to
the present. The history of and reasons for these changes will be traced, and the implications for
current ethics training will be explored.

WORKING WITH DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AND MODELS IN TEACHING ETHICS
AND ETHICAL DECISION MAKING: MORE EMPHASIS ON VALUES CLARIFICATION
AND PERSONAL AWARENESS
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Yeşim Korkut
Ethics training usually Involves teaching rational problem solving. However, a lack of self-awareness
often seems to be a factor In cases coming before ethics boards. Teaching methods to Increase the
depth of problem solving will be discussed.

HELPING GRADUATES BECOME VIRTUOUS PSYCHOLOGISTS: AN AUSTRALIAN
PERSPECTIVE
Terry Simpson, Terry Simpson, Alfred Allan, Maria M. Allan, & Francesca A. Bell
Australian researchers believe psychologists must be virtuous. We consider what It means to be a
virtuous psychologist, what role training programs have to play In helping their graduates become
virtuous psychologists, and, how this may be done.

FINDING VIRTUE IN OUR CODES: CHALLENGING THE PROFESSIONAL/PERSONAL
DISTINCTION
Stephen Behnke
Ethics codes typically distinguish between professional and personal behavior. This distinction Is
more complex and nuanced than often understood. The presentation explores how virtue may emerge
from these liminal spaces In our ethics codes.

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EIS150
CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AS A REGULATED HEALTH
PROFESSION: LAND OF OPPORTUNITY OR PANDORA’S BOX?
E22. Health and clinical intervention - Other
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Koen Lowet, Belgian Federation of Psychologists, Brussels - Belgium
Pauline Adair, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow - United Kingdom
Anders Skuterud, Norwegian Psychological Association, Oslo - Norway
Anne-Christine Volkart, Swiss Federation of Psychologists, Bern - Switzerland
Koen Lowet, Belgian Federation of Psychologists, Brussels - Belgium
Claus Vögele, Université du Luxembourg, Walferdange - Luxembourg

Clinical psychologists are important actors in the broad domain of health. In most eu countries the
practice of clinical psychology is regulated by laws, which explicate the qualifications required for the
practice of psychological intervention, such as psychotherapy covered by the health care system. This
is a major achievement on the way to better quality assurance and standardisation of evidence-based
health care. Nevertheless, harmonization of these laws across eu member states is still in its infancy,
and there are significant differences in terms of the required qualifications for the practice of clinical
psychology/psychotherapy, study programmes and intervention approaches accepted into national
directives. This symposium aims to exemplify the current state-of-affairs of the practice of clinical
psychology with contributions from a number of eu member states and address questions concerning
the consequences of differences and commonalities.

THE PRACTICE OF CLINICAL AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY IN THE UK
Pauline Adair
Clinical psychologist and Health psychologist are two domains of practice In the UK. A register Is
held by the Health Care and professions council (HCPC) since 2009 when registration became
mandatory. Those registered with HCPC are permitted to use the titles practitioner psychologist or
registered psychologist as well as a domain specific title depending on registration. The process to
registration as well as the requirements for continuing this will be discussed.

THE PRACTICE OF CLINICAL AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY IN NORWAY
Norway has a long standing tradition In applying knowledge for psychological research Into various
health domains. The practice of clinical and health psychology has been regulated for quite some time
now. This gives us the advantage to look back and see what this regulation has ment for the
psychologists In the field.

THE PRACTICE OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY IN
SWITZERLAND
Anne – Christine Volkart
Recently, a new law was adopted In switzerland to protect the title of psychologist and regulate the
standards of basic and postgraduate training In psychological professions. The law Is interesting as It
Is one of the most recent In Europe and focusing not only on the protection of the title of psychology,
but also regulating the practice of psychological professions, like psychotherapy.
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THE CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST (FINALY) RECOGNISED AS A HEALTH
PROFESSIONAL IN BELGIUM: HISTORY, REALITY AND THE FUTURE.
Koen Lowet
This symposium aims to explain the history and the new law which regulates the profession of the
clinical psychologists as a health profession and regulates the practice of psychotherapy In belgium.
Over 20 years belgian psychologists have tried to get their profession recognised In a federal system
dominated by physicians. The new law grants the clinical psychologists automony In his/her work and
Is therefore considered to be a great victory In the evolution to a multidisciplinary health care system.
The purpose of this symposium Is to explain the proces, the making of this new law and Its possible
consequences (positive and negative) for clinical psychology In belgium. We hope to give a
contribution to other countries who are struggling for legal recognition and exchange/compare with
other European countries that have already Installed legislation for clinical psychologists.

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EIS151
CULTURE AND ETHNIC DIVERSITY – CURRENT ISSUES FOR THE
PSYCHOLOGISTS’ PROFESSION
C18. Culture and society - Other
Convenor
Presenters

Discussant

Ludek Kolman, Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague - Czech Republic
Alexander Thomas, Universität Regensburg, Cologne - Germany
Carla Moleiro, University Institute of Lisbon ISCTE-IUL, Lisbon - Portugal
Sylvie Graf , Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno - Czech Republic
Ulrike de Ponte, University of Applied Science Regensburg, Regensburg – Germany

The symposium focuses on subject matter closely connected to the current task of the Taskforce for
Culture and ethnic diversity. The most pressing undertaking the members of the Taskforce address
their efforts to concerns preparation of guidelines for the incorporation of knowledge on (the
implications of) Cultural and ethnic diversity In the education and professional work of psychologists
In various areas. Part of this effort Involves proposing ways of the development of curriculum
components on Cultural and ethnic diversity at the bachelor and master levels In the study of
psychology students. As It could be evidenced In the symposium program, all the presentations deal
with the topics connected or closely related to the stated purpose. Alexander Thomas’ presentation and
workshop deal with ways of achieving Intercultural competence. Carla moleiro adds concern for
ethical standards In the field and my own presentation tries to find a way to a less complex and
because of It less costly training In the same area. The presentation of Graf and zingora brings new
knowledge on a rather theoretical, but at the same time exceedingly practical task of benefits of ethnic
diversity.
It might be asserted without doubt that the Intercultural encounters are very frequent nowadays, as Is
the frequent mingling of diverse ethnicities. The same holds for claims on the necessity to understand
people who are different from us and finding ways how to establish mutual understanding and
cooperation. The Taskforce for Culture and ethnic diversity tries to establish ways and procedures by
which professional psychologists might be able to contribute substantially, ethically, and In really
professional ways just to these ends. This, of course, Involves care and Involvement In curricula of
psychology students and research efforts on cross-cultural matters.

INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE IS PSYCHOLOGY
Alexander Thomas
Intercultural Competence presupposes processes of development and learning of a special sort.
Psychology can offer systematic and theory-based training to enable experiential learning. This
presentation will show some contributions that psychology and psychological theories can offer to this
field of learning and experience, and to the development of Intercultural competence.

ETHICAL STANDARDS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS WORKING WITH CULTURALLY AND
ETHNICALLY DIVERSE POPULATIONS: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN ETHICAL
PRINCIPLES AND ETHICAL VIRTUES
Carla Moleiro
In an increasingly diverse European context psychologists need to be able to work with people who
are culturally different from themselves. The present presentation will explore the development of
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ethical standards for psychologists working with culturally and ethnically diverse populations. A set of
specific standards will be explored and discussed.

ETHNICAL AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY – WORKSHOP
Alexander Thomas
Intercultural competence can be understood as a key competence. As fundamental assumptIons It Is
claImed (I) that there exIst specIfIc methods to achIeve thIs competence; and (II) there are establIshed
methods that result In a lIfe-long learnIng processes concernIng thIs end. ThIs workshop wIll be
focused on developIng a currIculum of Intercultural competence for BA and MA programs of
psychology students.

BENEFITS OF ETHNIC DIVERSITY: SECONDARY TRANSFER EFFECT FROM
INTERGROUP CONTACT WITH VIETNAMESE TO PREJUDICE AGAINST ROMA
Sylvie Graf & Tibor Zingora
Prejudice solidifies existing boundaries between groups and segregation perpetuates distrust and
animosities between their members. One of the most effective ways to reduce prejudice Is by having
members of different groups engage In contact with each other. Intergroup contact does not only
reduce prejudice against the encountered outgroup, but also against other less frequently encountered
groups.

INTERCULTURAL SENSIBILITY TRAINING
Ludek Kolman
The paper deals with the development of Intercultural sensibility training for psychologists, and
demonstrates techniques which might be employed to accomplish the training objectives. The training
course discussed aims to help understanding and getting experience of the trainees concerning the
differences of individualist and collectivist cultures which seems to be rather Important In
communication.

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EIS152
INTERNET AND SOCIAL MEDIA: ETHICAL CHALLENGES
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
Convenor
Presenters

Nina Dalen, Norwegian Psychological Association - Hospital Trust: Local medical
center, Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic - Private practice, Hovet - Norway
Vita Poštuvan, University of Primorska, Koper - Slovenia
Karin Kalteis, Klinische und Gesundheitspsychologin - Psychotherapeutin
(Existenzanalyse), Wien - Austria
Henk Geertsema, GERION/VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam - Netherlands
Miguel Ricou, University of Porto, Porto – Portugal

Occasionally we realize that the technological development Is a step ahead of us. The expanding role
of technology In the provision of psychological services present opportunities and challenges.
Nowadays children and adolescents make use of the Internet as an Integral part of everyday life.
Computers, Internet and social media In general, constitute a big source of information. The activities
are interactive, dialogical and participatory. There are special ethical challenges for psychologists
using technology In their practices, like long distance intervention, as well as for psychologists who
asked to provide advice and guidance on children's and adolescents Internet use. EFPA guidelines for
psychologists who contribute to the media as a framework, will be presented.
In this panel, presenters from EFPA Board of ethics (boe) , will portray us, various difficulties
regarding Internet, and social media usage and we will be able to discuss about the ethical dilemmas
arising.

ETHICAL COMPETENCES IN MEDIA REPORTING TO PREVENT (YOUTH) SUICIDES
VIta Poštuvan
Inadequate and inappropriate media reports of suicide and suicidal behaviour might be followed by
copycat behaviour. Competences of professionals Involved In the media reporting on suicide play a
vital role In prevention. Among them, the awareness that suicide reporting should not be misused for
commercial purposes and that the confidentiality should always be a priority. Ethical Issues will be
addressed.

THE EFPA MEDIA GUIDELINES: DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION
Henk Geertsema
In 2011 the EFPA Board of ethics presented the guidelines for psychologists who contribute to the
media. The reason for developing these guidelines and some of the highlights are presented. Some
questions from the discussion In the Netherlands as part of the implementation are discussed. I will
argue that we will need some sharper definitions at some points In order to give real support to
psychologists.

ETHICAL ISSUES FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS USING NEW MEDIA
Karin Kalteis
Modern technologies are offering new ethical challenges: online personal and professional activities,
extra-therapeutic contacts, testimonials and communication. Ethical Issues are confidentiality, privacy,
multiple relationships, self-disclosure and transparency.
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PSYCHOLOGY AND LONG DISTANCE INTERVENTION
Miguel Ricou
Abstract: ethics It’s the science of relation. In psychology, the relation It’s the main way to Improve
Its intervention’s goals. One of the main challenges today, It’s the introduction of the new
communication technologies, promoting new opportunities to work In a more distant way. We pretend
to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of It.

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EIS153
ABOUT UNDERSTANDING ROAD USERS
D10. Work and organization - Traffic and transportation
Convenor
Presenters

Ralf Risser, University of Vienna - FACTUM Chaloupka & Risser OG, Vienna Austria
Bettina Schützhofer, Sicher unterwegs – Verkehrspsychologische Untersuchungen
GmbH, Vienna - Austria
Andrew Kenneth Tolmie, University of London, London; EFPA Standing Committee
on Traffic Psychology, London - United Kindgom
Christine Chaloupka, FACTUM Chaloupka & Risser OG, Vienna - Austria
Ralf Risser, University of Vienna - FACTUM Chaloupka & Risser OG, Vienna –
Austria

This symposion deals with verbal data, I.e. With the information we get via the exchange of spoken
words In a more or less standardised way. The psychologist has to make sure that information received
In this way allows to receive valid, reliable and objective information. This Is a difficult task that can
only be fulfilled approximately, and by using psychological theory and empirical and heuristic
experience. In one presentation verbal information received from witnesses will be discussed and how
the quality of such information can be assured. Another presentation will deal with the marketing
theory and there especially with the part that Is called information policy; how to find out about the
problems, needs and Interests of target persons and target groups with the help of interviews and
questionnaires. One author will talk about traffic culture and how this Influences the behaviour of road
users In a stochastic sense. And finally one presentation focuses on professional drivers and their
special problems. In all these cases motives play an Important role, both concerning the will to say the
truth or not (I.e. When on wants to hide not wished for personality states, attitudes or behaviour), and
concerning the Issue of problems, needs and Interests; the latter could be complex, not reflected,
ambiguous, or hidden even to the individual Itself. Not least, verbal data can reflect compensation
potential for performance problems. The use of standardised quantitative methods will be of no help In
all of these cases. The motto Is "qualitative methods help to discover phenomena that are reflected by
verbal data, and quantitative methods serve to measure the distribution of such phenomena In any
chosen population". It Is clear, though, that except for marketing all discussed procedures usually deal
with single individuals and to develop methods for measuring (e.g. Personality questionnaires) will be
possible and useful only after very long periods of collecting experiences with single individuals, or
otherwise with the help of intensive qualitative analyses that have the goal to provide materials that
can be used In the frame of standardised procedures.

THE VALIDITY OF EYE-WITNESS MEMORY AND TESTIMONY AFTER A TRAFFIC
ACCIDENT
Bettina Schützhofer & Dr. Ralf Risser
Eye-witness testimony Is an Important knowledge source after a traffic accident and helps to
reconstruct It. Scientific evidence shows that there Is sometimes a lack of quality when It comes to
witness statements. This Is e.g. Due to awareness phenomena, trauma or non-optimal interrogation
styles.

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THE PSYCHOLOGICAL SCREENING OF OCCUPATIONAL DRIVERS AND
IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK REDUCTION: UK POLICY AND PRACTICE
Professor Andrew Kenneth Tolmie
A fifth of UK road injuries Involve someone driving for work, yet commercial drivers do not legally
have to be assessed on the psychological skills needed to perform competently. The Impact on
accidents and the benefits of testing will be considered.

HOW DOES SAFETY CULTURE BECOME VISIBLE IN A SOCIETY?
Christine Chaloupka
Safety culture management including problematic attitudes or behaviour has been discussed recently
Intensely In industries. Indicators of organisational safety culture shall help to Improve effective
culture-enhancing practices In traffic safety.

TRAFFIC SAFETY MARKETING: A STRUCTURED COMMUNICATION WITH TARGET
GROUPS BASED ON UNDERSTANDING THEM
Ralf Risser
Marketing theory postulates that products, concepts, or Ideas can be sold – or "sold" – to Intended
target groups only If the needs, Interests and problems of these target groups In the frame of their
demographic context Is known and considered. This requires motive research, I.e. Sophisticated
combination of qualitative and quantitative questioning procedures.

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EIS154
EMPIRICAL FIELD WORK
D10. Work and organization - Traffic and transportation
Convenor
Presenters

Ralf Risser, University of Vienna - FACTUM Chaloupka & Risser OG, Vienna Austria
Christine Chaloupka, FACTUM Chaloupka & Risser OG, Vienna - Austria
Mirna Benigni, NoiSicuri Project, Brescia - Italy
Jens Schade, EFPA Standing Committee on Traffic Psychology; University of
Dresden, Dresden - Germany
Matus Sucha, Palacky University, Olomouc - Czech Republic
Ralf Risser, University of Vienna - FACTUM Chaloupka & Risser OG, Vienna –
Austria

How well traffic works with respect to both safety but also other qualities – comfort, accessibility, etc.
– should be possible to assess empirically. For Instance, for safety assessment It Is not advisable to
rely only on accident data, which are actually reconstructions of events and not empirical procedures,
and which actually should be avoided Instead of serving as a statistical data basis. Empirical data have
the potential to provide information about how and why risky situations emerge that may lead to
accidents. By steering these processes In a different way It should theoretically be possible to avoid
accidents. Thereby It seems easier to relate operational behaviour (michon) to risks than higher level
behaviour, like strategic thinking or even the cultural background of persons. In this seminar, though,
we will also discuss higher level factors and how they could possibly be measured, and then proceed
to more tactical and operational aspects In the presentations that follow: Rule breaking and how this Is
anchored, and the communication between pedestrians and car drivers as a source for many dangerous
situations – mostly to the disadvantage of the pedestrians. Moreover methods to observe road user
behaviour and road user interactions will be presented. With the help of those methods It should be
possible to identify risks connected to this behaviour and to the interaction between road users. The
goal should be two-fold; to identify risky behaviour, interactions and situations In order to assess risks
without having to rely on "sufficient" amounts of accidents for sound statistical analyses; and to
identify countermeasures based on empirically founded knowledge of the reasons for dangerous
behaviour and interactions. This does not make national accident statistics superfluous but should pave
the way to the so-called vision Zero; I.e. To a future when safety on the road starts resembling flight
and rail safety, both transportation modes that are exponentially more safe than road traffic.

PSYCHOSOCIAL CORRELATES OF TRAFFIC AND SPEED TRANSGRESSIONS IN
ITALIAN TEENS: THE RESULTS OF NOISICURI PROJECT RESEARCH
Mirna Begnini, Manuela Bina, Valeria Basili
The study was aimed to investigate driving behaviours, risky driving and their psychosocial correlates
In more than 500 adolescents, aged 12-20, living In the italian municipalities taking part In noisicuri
Project (national project of road safety).

RULE ACCEPTANCE AND COMPLIANCE OF PEDESTRIAN' AND BICYCLISTS AT
SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS
Jens Schade & Lars Rössger
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Since walking and bicycling are being promoted for Its health and environmental benefits,
minimisation of Its associated risks Is of Interest. We investigate the determinants of red light running
using both subjective (self-reported) and objective (observational) data.

DRIVERS AND PEDESTRIANS INTERACTION AT UNSIGNALISED CROSSINGS IN
URBAN SETTINGS
Matus Sucha
The Author In this paper presents outcomes of a field study focused on interaction between
pedestrians and drivers when they meet at unsignalised crossings In urban areas. Mixed methods
design was used to collect and analyse data, counting 1584 observations.

IN-CAR BEHAVIOUR OBSERVATION AS A COMPLEMENT TO NATURAL DRIVING
STUDIES
Ralf Risser
A behaviour observation from inside the car of observed subjects Is presented, together with validity
and reliability data, the occasions of use In research and diagnostics, and the theoretical background
concerning, e.g., the problem of obtrusiveness. Variables and In which way they reflect safety and
other Issues are discussed extensively.

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EIS155
ETHICS ADJUDICATION: SUBSTANCE, PROCESS, AND SPECIAL
CHALLENGES
THE NORTH AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
Convenor
Presenters

Stephen H. Behnke, American Psychological Association, Washington DC - United
States
Stephen H. Behnke, American Psychological Association, Washington DC - United
States
Yeşim Korkut, Yudit Namer, Acibadem University, Istanbul; Turkish Psychological
Association, Ankara; Gediz University, Izmir - Turkey
Nina Dalen, Norwegian Psychological Association, Oslo - Hospital Trust: Local
medical center, Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic - Private practice, Hovet - Norway
Henk Geertsema, GERION/VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam - Netherlands
Miguel Ricou, University of Porto, Porto – Portugal

The purpose of these two Interrelated panels Is to provide a comprehensive overview of ethics
adjudication among North american and EFPA member psychological associations. The panels will
examine the process of creating and administering an ethics adjudication program, the types of cases
that come before ethics committees and appellate panels, and special challenges that arise for
associations such as when a psychologist accused of unethical conduct knows several members of the
ethics committee or when a prominent member of the association attempts to exert Influence over the
outcome of an ethics case. Finally, the panels will address the relationship between psychological
association ethics committee and government bodies such as licensing boards and colleges In the
adjudicatory process. The objectives of this panel are: (a) to provide a detailed description of how
psychological associations adjudicate ethics complaints; (b) to convey the Importance of upholding
the ethical standards of the profession of psychology and the value of an adjudication program to
achieve that goal; (c) to describe the kinds of cases that are brought before ethics committees; (d) to
explain how psychological associations may develop and administer an ethics adjudication program;
(e) to compare ethics adjudication programs In North america with programs In EFPA member
countries; and (f) to distinguish the role of psychological association adjudication programs from
government regulatory bodies.

ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS IN ETHICS ADJUDICATION: NOTICE AND DUE PROCESS
Stephen Behnke
The presentation will address the essential elements of notice and due process in apa’s adjudication
program. The presentation will explain why notice and due process are critical and the legal relevance
of ensuring that all psychologists accused of ethical wrongdoing receive them.

ARE LICENSING BOARDS, NATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS, OR GOVERNMENT ENTITIES
BEST EQUIPPED TO ADJUDICATE CASES? THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
Carole Sinclair
Psychologists often join more than one psychology organization. In Canada, this may Include a
licensing board, a national association, a provincial association, and a government-sponsored specialty
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body. The same ethics complaint sometimes Is filed with more than one of these organizations. This
presentation will outline canadian practices regarding this Issue and the rationale for these practices.

ETHICS CASES: NATURE AND FREQUENCY IN THE UNITED STATES
LIndsay ChIldress-Beatty
ThIs presentatIon offers a comparIson to the presentatIons In Panel I by descrIbIng the nature and
frequency of matters that come to the APA ethIcs program. The presentatIon wIll hIghlIght
sImIlarItIes and offer contrasts between the work of ethIcs commIttees In the US and EFPA member
countrIes.

REFLECTION ON THE NORTH AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: THE VALUE OF ETHICS
EDUCATION PRECEDING ETHICS ADJUDICATION
Yesim Korkut
APA and CPA have both not only a good tradition of adjudication but also they share an
understanding of education preceding ethics adjudication. APA from years of 2000 on has valued a
lot educating, consulting, and training psychologists. CPA has also the mission of assuring ethical
behaviour by guiding and teaching Its members. We will have a close look to their preventive
approaches.

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EIS156
ETHICS ADJUDICATION: SUBSTANCE, PROCESS, AND SPECIAL
CHALLENGES
THE EXPERIENCE OF EFPA MEMBER COUNTRIES
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
Convenor
Presenters

Stephen H. Behnke, American Psychological Association, Washington DC - United
States
Stephen H. Behnke, American Psychological Association, Washington DC - United
States
Carole Sinclair, Independent practice, Thornhill - Canada
Lindsay Childress-Beatty, American Psychological Association, Washington DC United States
Yeşim Korkut, Acibadem University, Instanbul – Turkey

The purpose of these two interrelated panels is to provide a comprehensive overview of ethics
adjudication among north american and efpa member psychological associations. The panels will
examine the process of creating and administering an ethics adjudication program, the types of cases
that come before ethics committees and appellate panels, and special challenges that arise for
associations such as when a psychologist accused of unethical conduct knows several members of the
ethics committee or when a prominent member of the association attempts to exert influence over the
outcome of an ethics case. Finally, the panels will address the relationship between psychological
association ethics committee and government bodies such as licensing boards and colleges in the
adjudicatory process. The objectives of this panel are: (a) to provide a detailed description of how
psychological associations adjudicate ethics complaints; (b) to convey the importance of upholding the
ethical standards of the profession of psychology and the value of an adjudication program to achieve
that goal; (c) to describe the kinds of cases that are brought before ethics committees; (d) to explain
how psychological associations may develop and administer an ethics adjudication program; (e) to
compare ethics adjudication programs in north america with programs in efpa member countries; and
(f) to distinguish the role of psychological association adjudication programs from government
regulatory bodies.

THE VALUE OF ETHICS ADJUDICATION
Stephen Behnke
This presentation will highlight the importance of ethics adjudication in upholding the standards of the
profession. The presentation will underscore the important relationship between adjudication and
education, and will emphasize that adjudication is more effective when it does not have a punitive tone
or intent.

DEVELOPING AN ETHICS ADJUDICATION PROGRAM IN TURKEY
Yeşim Korkut, Yudit Namer
Tpa has adjudication activities from 2004 on after the ethics codes were officially accepted. In this
presentation tpa administrative board ethics -responsible member and chair of ethics committee will
first together portray the steps after a complaint arrives, at tpa. Then we will discuss our mission at the
initial phase and the challenges we had through time.
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ETHICS CASES: NATURE AND FREQUENCY IN NORWAY
Nina Dalen
The norwegian psychological association organize 8000 members, 90 percent off authorized
psychologists. During 2013, the ethics committee received 67 written complaint, and the appeals
committee received 10 cases. 4 psychologist had their autorization withdrawn by the norwegian board
of health. Quality control in the light of ethics adjudication will be discussed.

SPECIAL CASES IN ETHICS ADJUDICATION
Henk Geertsema
In the process of adjudication several parties are involved: the client with a complaint, the
psychologist, the board which hears the complaint, and the psychological association. Each party has
unique possibilities and challenges. I will stress the critical importance of the principle of separation of
powers.

THE EXPERIENCE OF ETHICS ADJUDICATION IN PORTUGAL
Miguel Ricou
Ethics adjudication should have a pedagogical aspect to make it legitimate and fair. The number of
psychologists in portugal has risen dramatically, thus pedagogy in ethics is critical to our association. I
will present the first three years experience of adjudication in the portuguese association.

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INDEX

Ayduk Ozlem PS098
Azanza Garazi PS132
Bacchini Dario IS015, IS073, PS119
Baetens Imke, IS038
Baiocco Lucia IS009
Baiocco Roberto IS015, PS083, PS086
Baione Margherita IS045
Bajcar Beata IS058
Baker Erin R. IS057
Bakermans-Kranenburg Marian J. IS001,
IS022
Bakker Mireille PS082
Balboni Giulia IS009
Baldoni Franco PS099
Balducci Cristian IS028
Bambonyé Manassé PS128
Bani M. IS059
Banis Aglaia IS040
Baptista Telmo Mourinho IS076, PS093
Baram Hadas IS008
Barbagelata Flavia PS102
Barbieri V.
Barclay Lisa IS050
Barcucci Paolo PS102
Barkoukis Vassilis IS071
Barone Lavinia IS001, IS022
Barros Coimbra Stephanie PS112
Basili Valeria EIS154
Bassi Marta IS004
Battaglia Marco IS029
Baumgarten Franz IS071
Baumgartner Emma IS015
Begnini Mirna EIS154
Behnke Stephen H. EIS146, EIS149, EIS155,
EIS156
Beierlein Constanze IS020
Beiglböeck Wolfgang P. PS093
Benelli Beatrice PS088
Benigni Mirna EIS154
Benthien Ole IS021
Benvenuti Martina IS009
Bergonzini Elisa IS078
Bergquist Magnus IS023
Berkics Mihály IS036
Berlin Avihay PS115
Bernabei Pamela PS085
Bertino Gabriella IS067
Bertolotti Mauro IS002, IS003
Bevilacqua Patrizia IS027
Bezdicek Ondrej EIS142
Bhumika PS117
Bicchieri Cristina IS054
Bigozzi Lucia IS073

SYMPOSIA
INDEX
Aavik Toivo IS006
Abakumova Irina PS094
Abele-Brehm Andrea E. IS002
Acerra Antonio PS099
Aceto Naomi PS129
Adair Pauline EIS150
Aeschlimann Belinda IS032
Affuso Gaetana IS015
Agache Alexandru IS044
Aggazzotti Gabriella IS029
Ahnert Lieselotte IS022
Akhurst Jacqui IS051, EIS145
Al-Hassan Suha M. IS015
Alagna Cinzia IS001
Albanes Cinzia IS025
Alberici Augusta Isabella PS096
Albernaz de Medeiros Sandra PS116
Albert Isabelle PS112
Albrecht Terrance PS098
Alessandri Guidi IS028
Alessandri Guido IS006, IS057, IS058
Alfieri Sara IS025, PS097
Algesheimer Rene IS006
Almedia Pedro EIS138
Almerich Gonzalo IS045
Alvarez Miriam IS001
Amedi Amir
Amedi Amir IS014
Andrej Rajski IS045
Andrighetto Luca IS008
Andronikof Anne EIS144
Anselmetti Simona IS068
Antonelli Paolo IS019
Antonietti Alessandro IS064
Anzelmo Elena PS097
Aparicio-García Marta Evelia PS083
Arcidiacono Caterina IS033, IS051, EIS145
Arcidiacono Caterina and co-researchers
EIS145
Ardizzone Ignazio PS087
Arieli Daniella PS131
Aschieri Filippo
Aschieri Filippo IS027, IS040
Asendorpf Jens B. IS017, IS044
Assor Avi IS055
362

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INDEX

Camodeca Marina IS073
Cannata Anna PS080
Cannata Davide IS009
Cannoni Eleonora IS073
Cantón Enrique EIS138
Capasso Marina PS085
Capezzani Liuva IS067
Caprara Gian Vittorio IS018, IS045
Cardala Elsa IS031, IS052
Carducci Bernardo J. IS030, IS031, PS120,
PS129
Carli Lucia Leonilde PS097, PS109
Carlo Gustavo IS011, IS077
Carnaghi Andrea PS122
Carotenuto Margherita PS085
Carr Nicholas EIS145
Carraro Attilio PS088
Carrasco Miguel Angel IS018
Carrozzino D. IS059
Carrus Giuseppe IS060, IS069
Caselli Gabriele PS129
Caso Letizia IS064
Castellani Valeria IS015, IS029
Castelli Ilaria IS054
Catellani Patrizia IS002
Cattani Roberta PS129
Cees Midden IS023
Cehajic-Clancy Sabina IS008
Cei Alberto IS021
Celia Giovanna IS045
Celmi Rossella PS121
Čermák Ivo IS040
Cervaolo Rosalba IS018
Cervone Daniel IS032
Cesa-Bianchi M. IS059
Chaloupka Christine EIS153, EIS154
Chang Lei IS015
Chen Beiwen IS055
Cheng Fei PS090
Cheng Ying IS077
Cheung Fanny IS039, IS063
Chicherio Christian IS056
Childress-Beatty Lindsay EIS156
Chirkov Valery IS070
Chirumbolo Antonio IS016
Chit Hei Mok Peter IS063
Chomienne Marie Helene IS026
Christensen Anders Korsgaard EIS137
Christensen Pia PS104
Ciancaleoni Matteo PS087
Cicognani Elvira
Cieciuch Jan IS006
Cinquegrana Isabella PS089

Bilewicz Michal IS008, PS131
Bina Manuela EIS154
Bleidorn Wiebke IS024
Bogdanova Olga PS100
Boh Yvonne IS015
Bohlmeijer Ernst IS004
Boiger Michael IS070
Boll Thomas PS112
Bombi Anna Silvia IS015, IS073
Bonaiuto Marino IS060, IS069
Bonapace Isabella PS103
Borella Erika IS056
Borgogni Laura IS028
Bornstein Marc H. IS015
Boski Paweł IS070
Bottosso Emanuele IS029
Bozzaotra Antonella PS080
Brambilla Marco IS002, IS003
Brambilla Maria IS055
Brand Ralf IS021, IS071
Brandelli Costa Angelo IS049
Brandimonte Maria A. IS079
Bray James IS026
Brivio Eleonora IS009
Brol Michał PS090
Broman Toft Madeleine IS061
Brouwer Ingeborg IS061
Brown Jill IS077
Brown Scott PS107
Bruehlman-Senecal Emma PS098
Brundelius Marc IS045
Bruni Coral IS069
Bruno Teresa IS075
Buhl Heike Maria PS097
Bullen Kathryn EIS139
Burchell Kevin IS023
Burholt Vanessa PS112
Bussu Anna PS104
Bustillos Antonio EIS142
Byrne Sonia IS001
Caballer Amparo IS016
Cabrera Natasha IS044
Cacciamani Stefano IS009
Cadinu Mara PS122
Caetano António PS132
Caffo Ernesto IS029
Caffrey Thomas A. IS007
Cagiada Silvana PS102
Cai Huajian IS048
Calderoni Alessandro PS080
Callerame Chiara EIS134
Calmaestra Juan IS057
Camacho-Gingerich Alina IS046
363

SYMPOSIA

INDEX

de Guzmán María Rosario T. IS077
De Houwer Jan IS062
De Pascalis Paolo IS075
De Piccoli Norma IS033
de Ponte Ulrike EIS151
de Ribaupierre Anik IS056
Deater-Deckard Kirby IS015
Debois Nadine IS021
Deconti Junior IS041
Değirmencioğlu Sedar M. IS025, IS051
Dehue Francine PS095
del Barrio María Victoria IS011, IS018
Dell'Acqua Erica IS040
Dellagiulia Antonia IS001
Delle Fave Antonella IS004
DeNisi Angelo IS013
Denmark Florence PS093, PS12O, PS129
Depolo Marco IS016
Desatnik Alex PS109
Desivilya Syna Helena PS131
Despot Lučanin Jasminka EIS142
Dèttore Davide IS019
Devouche Emmanuel IS034
Di Blasio Paola IS073
Di Fabio A. IS059
Di Fuccio Raffaele PS119
Di Giunta Laura IS015
Di Norcia Anna IS073
Di Nuovo Santo IS064
Di Pietro Daniela PS121
Di Pietro Elena
Di Tecco Cristina IS005
Dickert Stephan PS124
Dighera Bruna PS102
Dimdins Girts IS020
Dimitrakopoulos Ioannis N. EIS136
Dobbs Christine PS112
Dobewall Henrik IS006
Dogan Aysun IS044, IS057
Dol Aranka IS061
Domurat Artur PS132
Donker Marianne IS061
Dora Marta PS083
Doring Anna IS006
Downing George IS001
Duckworth Angela L. PS098
Dumitru Adina IS060
Dupertuis Daniel IS052
Durak Mithat EIS142
Durante Federica IS008, PS122
Ederer Peer IS013
Edwards Carolyn P. IS077
Eichenberg Christiane PS080

Clauss-Ehlers Caroline "CC" IS007, IS046
Clayton Susan IS069
Clerc Jérôme PS088
Clow Angela PS081
Coen Sharon PS096
Cogoni Carlotta PS122
Cohen Judith IS029
Colombo Barbara IS054, IS064
Colombo Monica IS003
Colucci Francesco Paolo IS003
Consiglio Chiara IS028
Contarino A. PS103
Conti C. IS059
Cooke Anne PS130
Cooper Saths IS035, EIS146
Cornoldi Cesare IS056
Corral-Verdugo Victor IS069
Correia Santos Susana PS132
Costa José Joaquim PS127
Costa Raqual IS036
Costantini Giulio IS062
Costantino Erminia
Costantino Erminia on behalf of Giuseppe
Costantino IS027, IS031, IS052
Costantino Giuseppe IS027, IS031, IS052
Coulson Neil PS101
Cova Alessandra PS123
Cozzolino Mauro IS045
Craig Tony IS060
Creaner Mary EIS141
Crease Lark Michelle IS079
Crespi Chiara IS019
Cristini Carlo IS059
Croce Luigi PS092
Crombach Anselm PS128
Crutzen Veronique IS005
Cusano Michele PS089
Czerniawska Ewa IS053
D'Amore Salvatore PS083
D’Amore Salvatore PS086
D’Innella Capano Vincenzo PS099
Dale Philip PS100
Dalen Nina EIS147, EIS152, EIS155
Daniela Marzana PS097
Danielsen Eva EIS143
Dankner Danny IS037
Daolio Omar IS029
Davidov Eldad IS006, IS020
Davis John M. PS120
De Angelis Floriana PS121
De Dominicis Stefano IS023
de Freitas Perez Lucia Maria PS116
De Guissmé Laura IS008
364

SYMPOSIA

INDEX

Frías Armenta Martha IS069, PS104
Frick Andrea PS088
Friedman Victor PS131
Fryer David IS035, EIS140
Fukuzawa Ai IS048
Fulcheri Mario IS059
Fülöp Márta IS036, IS047
Fumagalli Giacomo Davide IS073
Gabbiadini Alessandro IS008
Gaggioli Andrea IS064
Gaia Maria Grazia PS103
Galarza Laura PS125
Galdi Silvia PS122
Galimberti Carlo IS009
Galosi Serena PS087
Garazha Mariya PS105
García Camilo IS036
Garcia Esther IS16
García Mira Ricardo IS060
García-Cueto Eduardo IS012
Garombo Maura Franca PS103
Garrett Douglas D. IS056
Gartzia Leire PS132
Gatautis Rimantas PS118
Gatterer Gerald EIS142
Gatti Fabiana IS009
Gauthier Janel PS086, PS093, EIS136, EIS146
Gavin Jeff PS101
Gaysina Darya PS108
Geertsema Henk EIS144, EIS147, EIS152,
EIS155
Geisinger Kurt IS039
Gennari Maria Luisa IS027
Gennari Marialuisa PS104
Gennaro Alessandro IS16
Gerbino Maria IS029, IS045
Geroulanou Klio PS083
Ghisletta Paolo IS056
Gianotti Laura PS103
Gilardi T. IS078
Giner-Sorolla Roger PS113
Giotsa Artemis EIS135, EIS139
Giovanelli Chiara PS109
Giovannini Dino IS003
Godwin Jennifer IS015
Goldbeck Lutz IS043
Goldmann Petr IS040
Göllner Richard IS024
Goncalves Susana PS127
Gonzales-Monteagudo J. IS059
Gonzalez Anabel IS066
Gonzalez Bono Esperanza IS036
Gopher Daniel IS037

Eisenberg Nancy IS018
Elbe Anne-Marie IS021, IS071
Elbert Thomas PS128
Elliot Andrew J. IS036
Elster Andrey PS115
Emiral Ekin EIS142
Endrass Jérôme PS128
Erchova Regina PS105
Ermakov Pavel PS094
Escotorin Soza Pilar IS045
Esposito G. IS059
Eyssel Friederike PS113
Ezra Ohad IS055
Fabrizi Adele IS019
Fachechi Elisa PS122
Fagin Martin IS079
Fagnani Corrado IS057, IS058
Fagot Delphine IS056
Falender Carol PS111, EIS141, EIS149
Falk Simone IS034
Fan Weiqiao IS063
Fantini Francesca IS027, IS040
Farwaha Summet IS015
Federico Francesca IS069
Fedotova Olga PS094
Feeney Judith PS097
Fernandes Costa Silvia PS132
Fernandez Isabel IS078, EIS134
Fernández-Ballesteros Rocío EIS142
Fernández-Castilla Béatriz PS083
Ferrante Donatella IS079
Ferrari Francesco PS113
Ferrari Pier Francesco IS022
Ferri Paolo IS009
Ferring Dieter PS112, EIS142
Fida Roberta IS028
Fiedler Klaus IS062
Figueroa Victor PS086
Filippa Manuela IS034
Filippova Maria EIS137
Fiore Francesca PS129
Flavian Carlos PS118
Florance Ian IS039
Fokkema Tineke PS112
Fonticoli E. IS078
Formenti Lucia IS078
Forresi Barbara IS029
Forti Guadalupe IS052
Fraccaroli Franco IS028
Fraczek Adam IS074
Francescato Donata IS033
Franco Fabia IS034
Freda Maria Francesca IS059
365

SYMPOSIA

INDEX

Hofgaard Tor Levin EIS143
Hofmann Wilhelm IS042
Hughes Sean IS062
Hurvey Caroline IS041
Iavicoli Sergio IS005
Ihle Andreas IS056
Iliescu Dragos IS039
Imura Osamu PS091
Ingusci Emanuela IS016
Ioverno S. PS086
Ismatullina Victoria PS108
Izquierdo Conrad IS045
Jacobs Niels PS095
Jäkel Julia IS044
Jankowski Tomasz IS058
Jansen Petra PS088
Jarolimova Eva EIS142
Javier Rafael Art. IS007, IS046
Jenkins Sharon Rae IS040, IS041
Jensen Elizabeth IS046
Jessel John IS010
Jimenez Aida PS125
Johnson Natalie IS077
Jokela Markus IS024
Jolliffe Wendy IS079
Jones Caroline PS096
Joseph Dionne IS027
Juffer Femmie IS001
Kagan Carolyn IS051
Kalteis Karin EIS152
Kamel Boulos Maged N. IS076
Karademas Evangelos C. IS004
Karakatsani Despina PS110, PS127
Karic Toni PS101
Karl Ute PS112
Kaslow Nadine PS111
Katuzny Katie PS083
Kavussanu Maria IS071
Keitel-Korndörfer Anja PS109
Keller Carmen IS061
Kende Anna PS096
Kennedy Kerry PS110, PS126
Kenneth A. Dodge IS015
Kessels Ursula IS032
Kiefner-Burmeister Allison IS057
Kinderman Peter PS130, EIS135
Klar Yechiel IS008
Klein Annette M. PS109
Kliegel Matthias IS056
Köbach Anke PS128
Kobayashi Chihiro IS048
Kogut Tehila PS124
Kõiv Kristi PS126

Graf Peter IS079
Graf Sylvie EIS151
Grandjean Didier IS034
Gratier Maya IS034
Greblo Zrinka EIS138
Green Robert-Jay PS083, PS086
Greenshpan Jacob IS037
Grégoire Jacques IS039
Grenier Jean IS026
Gridley Nicole IS047
Grieff Samuel IS013
Grossi Enzo PS092
Grote Masha IS021
Gu Ruolei IS048
Guarnieri Silvia PS097
Gudjonsson Gisli IS064
Guest David IS016
Guevara-Guerrero Marlenny PS107
Gueverra Darwin PS098
Gummerum Michaela IS047
Gunther Nicole PS095
Guo Jianyou IS065
Gupta Taveeshi IS047
Gurdal Sevtap IS015
Haase Michael IS067
Hagenaars Polli EIS135
Hall Ross EIS138
Hammer Nina IS022
Han Buxin IS065
Hansen Miriam PS094
Haramaki Yutaka PS091
Harel Inbal PS124
Harizuka Susumu PS091
Harries Tim IS023
Hartmann Christina IS061
Hasking Penelope IS038
Hatzigeorgiadis Antonis IS071
Haugland Bente Storm Mowatt IS026
Hauke Nicole IS002
Haukkala Ari IS061
Hawley Patricia IS036
Hawrot Anna IS053
Hayiou-Thomas Emma PS100
Heath Hannah PS101
Hecker Tobias PS128
Hendriks Maurits IS021
Hermenau Katharin PS128
Hernández-Guzmán Laura EIS146
Herzog Walter IS032
Hess Markus IS057
Hirst William IS079
Hjartnes Schjødt Britt Randi EIS134
Hodgetts Darrin IS035
366

SYMPOSIA

INDEX

Leiter Micheal P. IS028
Lemberg Katja PS102
Lepri Gian Luigi PS104
Levontin Liat PS124
Leyendecker Birgit IS044
Li Jing IS047
Li Lijuan Joanna PS110, PS126, PS127
Liberska Hanna IS074
Licata Laurent IS008
Liefooghe Baptist IS062
Ligorio M. Beatrice IS009
Lilley Carmen IS032
Lindenberger Ulman IS056
Lingiardi Vittorio IS049, PS086
Lionetti Francesca IS001
Litman Leib IS027, IS031, IS052
Llorca Anna IS018
Locke Abigail PS096
Lodetti Giovanni PS123
Lodi Ernesto PS104
Loots Gerrit IS034
Loperfido F. Feldia IS009
Lopez-Perez Belen IS047
Loránd Eötvös PS096
Lorente Laura IS016
Loureiro Vera Regina PS116
Lövdén Martin IS056
Lovell Jacqui EIS145
Lowet Koen EIS150
Lowman Rodney PS125
Lozano Luis Manuel IS012
Lucanin Damir EIS142
Lucidi Fabio IS071
Luengo Kanacri Bernadette Paula IS011,
IS018, IS045
Luik Piret IS057
Lund Henrick PS119
Lunetti Carolina IS015
Lunt Ingrid EIS143, EIS148
Luzzi M. IS078
Maass Anne IS032, PS122
MacDonald Stuart W.S. IS056
Macek Petr IS025
Macsinga Irina IS060
Madani Amal O. IS007
Maercker Andreas PS128
Magley Vicki IS028
Maini Ilenia IS029
Maiorano T. IS064
Maison Dominika PS118
Makarova Elena IS032
Malanchini Margherita PS100
Mallia Luca IS071

Kokko Katja IS017
Kolienko Tatiana PS100
Koller Silvia IS049
Kolman Ludek EIS151
Konopka Karolina IS074
Konttinen Hanna IS061
Kopetz Catalina IS042
Korhonen Riitta PS127
Korkut Yeşim EIS 140, EIS 147, EIS149,
EIS155, EIS156
Kosonogov Vladimir PS094
Kővágó Pál IS008
Kovas Yulia PS100
Kozar Iryna IS034
Kramer Arthur IS037
Krámská Lenka PS090
Krámský David PS090
Kriek Hennie IS013
Kringelbach Morten L. IS022
Kristof Kora IS051
Kross Ethan PS098
Krzywosz-Rynkiewicz Beata PS110, PS126,
PS127
Kuchenbecker Shari Young IS030
Kühn Boris PS112
Kumru Asiye IS077
Kuntz Anabel IS020
Kuriansky Judy PS093
Kurman Jenny IS048
Labella Mirko PS103
Labunskaya Vera PS094
Lachowicz-Tabaczek Kinga IS058
Laghi Fiorenzo IS015
Laguna Mariola PS132
Lähteenmäki Liisa IS061
Laible Deborah IS077
Lamb Michael E. IS024
Landi Giulia PS099
Lang Fredi EIS144
Langmeyer Alexandra IS017
Lansford Jennifer IS015
Lantos Nóra PS096
Lanz Margherita PS097
Laschinger Heather IS028
Latorre Navarro Maria Felisa IS016
Lawrence Ashley IS077
Lazuras Lambros IS071
Lazzari Davide PS103
Lechner Clemens IS024
Ledermann Thomas IS072
Ledon Aurélie IS021
Ledzińska Maria IS053
Lee Carol IS015
367

SYMPOSIA

INDEX

Mercurio Lara IS032
Meringolo Patrizia IS033, EIS145
Mestre Maria IS077
Mestre Vicenta IS11, IS018
Mesurado Belén IS018, PS084
Meucci Carolina IS052
Midden Cees IS023
Miglino Orazio PS119
Mijas Magdalena PS083
Milani Luca IS073
Milczarek Malgorzata IS005
Milesi Patrizia PS096
Minghetti Mattia PS099
Miranda Maria Concetta IS015, PS119
Miranda Rodrigues Francisco IS076
Miscioscia Marina PS086
Mišigoj-Duraković Marjeta EIS138
Mitina Olga PS110
Mitrofan Nicolae IS059
Moè Angelica PS088
Möhring Wenke PS088
Moleiro Carla EIS151
Molo Maria Teresa IS019
Montgomery Henry IS020
Moon Amy IS047
Morbidini Chiara PS122
Morganti Francesca IS064
Morio Hiroaki IS048
Morrissey Shirley EIS141
Morton J. Bruce IS034
Mosquera Dolores IS066
Motti-Stefanidi Frosso IS017, IS044
Mourinho Baptista Telmo PS093
Muhamedrahimov Rifkat J. EIS134
Munduate Lourdes EIS148
Muñiz José IS012
Münker-Kramer Eva EIS137
Munsch Simone IS072
Murakami Fumio IS048
Murdock Elke PS112
Murphy Kevin R. IS013
Murray Laura IS043
Murray Micah M. IS014
Naglieri Jack A. PS087
Nambudiri Ranjeet PS084
Namer Yudit EIS155
Nandi Corina PS128
Napoli Angelo PS089
Nardelli Nicola PS086
Nardi Henrique Caetano IS049
Nardo Giampietro PS092
Naruskov Karin IS057
Narvaez Darcia IS077

Malone Patrick S. IS015
Malykh Sergey PS100, PS108
Maman Yair IS031, IS052
Manfrinati Andrea IS003
Mannarino Anthony P. IS029, IS043
Mannetti Lucia IS060
Männistö Satu IS061
Mansueto Giovanni PS129
Manzo Stefano PS080
Maras Pam EIS140
Maras Pamela IS047, EIS140
Marc Gabriela IS052
Marchetti Antonella IS054, PS109
Marengo Davide PS097
Mari Silvia IS008, PS122
Maria Ángeles Molina EIS142
Maria Concetta Miranda IS015
Maricchiolo Fridanna IS060
Marta Elena IS015, IS025, PS097, PS104
Martí Manuel IS045
Martí Noguera Juan José IS045
Martin Brestovansky IS045
Martina Lucia IS050
Martino M. L. IS059
Martins Jorge Emanuel PS103
Marzana Daniela IS025, PS090, PS097
Masera Giuseppe IS004
Maslach Christina IS028
Maslovaric G. IS078
Mastronardi C. IS078
Matthes Michiel IS017
Matthies Ellen IS060
Matusiewicz Alexis IS042
Mauri Maurizio PS118
Mazzone Angela IS073
Mazzoni Elvis IS009
Mazzoni S. PS086
Mc Guckin Conor PS095
McCormack Cathy IS035
McCormick Mercedes A. PS120, PS129
McElvaney Rosaleen EIS148
McReynolds Larry IS027
Medico Denise IS049
Meiring Deon IS063
Meksin Robert IS079
Melandri Giovanna IS050
Mella Nathalie IS056
Melvin Glenn IS038
Méndez Milagros PS125
Mendoza-Denton Rodolfo IS032
Mendzerickaya Yuliya PS094
Menesini Ersilia IS009, IS010, IS057
Merati Luisa PS102, PS103
368

SYMPOSIA

INDEX

Patrizi Patrizia IS064, PS104
Pattyn Nathalie IS034
Paturzo C. IS078
Pazzaglia Francesca PS088
Peck Emily IS028
Pedrosa Ignacio IS012
Peer Eyal PS124
Peiró José M. IS005, IS016, PS093, PS125,
EIS148
Peirone L. IS059
Pemberton Richard PS130
Peña Alampay Liane IS015
Penner Louis A. PS098
Penninx Brenda IS061
Pensiero Nicola IS024
Perilli S. IS078
Perlmuter Rotem IS048
Perrucci Vittore IS009
Persiani Marisa PS121
Perugini Marco IS062
Pettifor Jean L. EIS146
Pezzica Sara IS073
Pfeiffer Steven IS053
Pieri Michelle IS009
Piette Alain IS005
Pillay Anthony PS111
Pinto Giuliana IS073
Pirchio Sabine IS069
Piroddi Chiara IS067
Pirro Piero Stanley PS103
Piskernik Bernard IS022
Plener Paul IS038
Plomin Robert PS100
Podlesek Anja EIS143
Podmanicky Ivan IS045
Pólya Tibor IS008
Pomesano Elena PS123
Porte James IS031
Postek Sławomir IS053
Poštuvan Vita EIS134, EIS143, EIS152
Preiss Marek PS090
Prescott Diana L. IS026
Příhodová Tereza PS090
Procentese Fortuna IS051
Prunas Antonio IS019, IS049
Pugliese Silvia Viviana IS018
Pulkkinen Lea IS017
Punt David-Jan PS087
Rabaglietti Emanuela PS097
Rabin Tali PS115
Rajsky Andrej IS045
Ramos Anne Carolina PS112
Randall Ashley K. IS072

Nath Papri PS084
Nave Yeal PS124
Nederland Pierre EIS139, EIS147
Nicolas Michel EIS138
Nikolai Tomas EIS142
Nilsson Andreas IS023
Nilsson Artur IS020
Nizowskih Nina PS110
Nocentini Annalaura IS010, IS057
Nohavová Alena PS090
Nuno da Costa Pedro Alexandre PS083
O’Connor Daryl PS101
O’Donovan Analise PS111, EIS141
Obschonka Martin IS024
Oburu Paul IS015
Odendaal Aletta IS039
Odintsova Veronica PS085
Oerlemans Anoek PS082
Oldani Gaia PS123
Oleś Piotr K. IS058
Oni Olawale PS096
Onreat Emma IS020
Ordoñez Oscar PS107
Orehek Edward IS042
Ornelas José IS033
Orsucci F. IS059
Ortego Rosario IS057
Osborne Randall PS120
Ostacoli Luca IS067
Ouwens Machteld A. IS061
Overbye Maria IS021
Ozawa Eiji PS091
Pachi Dimitra IS025
Pacilli Maria Giuseppina PS122
Padilla-Walker Laura IS077
Pagone Paolo Roberto PS086
Pais Ernesto IS052
Pajardi Daniela Maria IS064
Paladino Maria Paola PS113
Palladino Benedetta Emanuela IS010, IS057
Palmieri Sara PS129
Palumbo Anna PS089
Palumbo Gabriella PS085
Panchenko Lyudmyla PS105
Panchenko Oleg PS105
Panno Angelo IS060
Panunzi Sara PS087
Paoloni G. IS059
Paruzel-Czachura Mariola PS090
Paschenko Svitlana PS105
Passiatore Ylenia IS069
Pastorelli Concetta IS011, IS015, IS018,
IS029, IS045
369

SYMPOSIA

INDEX

Sabate Nuria IS031
Sacchezin S. IS078
Sacchi Simona IS003, IS054
Sagiv Lilach IS006, PS115
Salmivalli Christina IS010
Salomão de La Plata Cury Tardivo Leila
IS041
Salvador Alicia IS036
Samper Paula IS011, IS018, IS077
Sandgren Maria IS020
Sándor Mónika IS047
Sanfey Alan IS054
Sansone Carmela PS129
Sansone Nadia IS009
Santacreu Marta EIS142
Santamaria Federica IS015
Santinello Massimo IS050
Santoro Francesca PS087
Santos Elizabete IS052
Santos M. A. IS041
Sapouna Maria IS010
Sarchielli Guido IS059
Sardi Gian Marco IS052
Sassaroli Sandra PS129
Saunders Benjamin IS043
Sborlini Irene IS059
Scaduto Alessandro Antonio IS041
Scali Thèrese PS083
Scandurra Cristiano IS049
Schaal Susanne PS128
Schade Jens EIS154
Scheepers Floor PS082
Scheithauer Herbert IS057
Schmiedek Florian IS056
Schoebi Dominik IS024, IS072
Schulte Volker EIS133
Schultz P. Wesley IS023, IS069
Schultze-Krumbholz Anja IS057
Schützhofer Bettina EIS153
Schwartz Shalom H. IS006
Schwarz Beate PS112
Scopelliti Massimiliano IS069
Scott Zuzana IS025
Sebestyén Nóra IS047
Seddig Daniel IS006
Seijo Natalia IS068
Sekerdej Maciej PS115
Sękowski Andrzej IS053
Serchielli Guido IS059
Serek Jan IS025
Serrano Miguel Angel IS036
Setakis Efrosini PS100
Settanni Michele PS097

Ratcliff Roger IS056
Raz Michal PS131
Razmus Wiktor PS132
Re Anna Maria IS056
Re Tania Simona PS102, PS103
Rechter Eyal PS115
Remaschi Laura EIS145
Ren Fen IS063
Renati Roberta IS053
Rentfrow Peter Jason IS024
Rettie Ruth IS023
Rezzonico G. IS059
Ribaupierre Anik de IS056
Richards Jennifer PS082
Richaud María Cristina IS011, IS018
Ricou Miguel EIS144, EIS152, EIS155
Riggio Ronald E. IS030
Righi Elena IS029
Rigobello Laura IS001
Risser Ralf EIS153, EIS154
Ritella Giuseppe IS009
Rivera Natanael IS036
Roberson Deborah M. IS070
Roberts Claire-Marie EIS138
Robinson Sarita PS081
Roccas Sonia IS006, PS115
Rocha Artur IS076
Roche Olivar Robert IS045
Rodham Karen PS101
Rodic Maja PS100
Rodrigo Maria Jose IS001
Rodríguez Isabel IS016
Roe Robert EIS140
Rogard Vincent PS125
Rojas-Ospina Tatiana PS107
Romeo Marina PS125
Rooze Magda EIS137
Roques Marjorie IS041
Rosenzweig Cheskie IS052
Rosina Alessandro PS097
Rosseger Astrid PS128
Rössger Lars EIS154
Rossi Roberta IS19
Rosso C. PS103
Roth Guy IS055
Rowicka Magdalena IS074
Rowiński Tomasz IS006
Ruffaldi Emanuele IS037
Ruggiero Giovanni Maria PS129
Russo Vincenzo PS118
Rutkowska Marta IS074
Ryff Carol IS058
Saari Salli EIS137
370

SYMPOSIA

INDEX

Straumsheim Per A. EIS142, EIS148
Streit Cara IS077
Strepparava Maria Grazia IS059
Strohmeier Dagmar IS044
Stuchlíková Iva PS090
Suárez-Álvarez Javier IS012
Sucha Matus EIS154
Supper Barbara IS022
Sveaas Nora EIS136, EIS140
Sverdlik Noga PS115, PS124
Tagliabue Semira PS097
Talsma Durk IS014
Tamanza Giancarlo PS104
Tani Franca PS097
Tapanya Sombat IS015
Tarkiainen Eija PS102
Tasker F. PS086
Teepe Karin EIS133
Tennet Howard IS028
Thartori Eriona IS015, IS018, IS029
Thomas Alexander EIS151
Thompson Ava EIS136, EIS140
Thompson Fran IS010
Thorisdottir Hulda IS020
Tikhomireva Tatiana PS100
Tikhomirova Tatiana PS108
Tikkanen Tuomo IS017
Tisak John IS057
Tisak Marie S. IS057
Titova Alisa PS094
Tizmann Peter F. IS044
Todisco Patrizia IS068
Tolmie Andrew Kenneth EIS153
Tomasetto Carlo PS122
Tordera Núria IS016
Torricelli Felice Damiano IS050
Tosto Maria Grazia PS100
Totawar Abhishek PS084
Totenhagen Casey J. IS072
Trautwein Ulrich IS024
Trofimov Andrii PS105
Tsang Christine D. IS034
Tummino Vito IS052
Tur-Porcar Ana IS011, IS077
Ucanok Zehra IS057
Uhlaner Lorraine PS132
Ujhelyi Adrienn PS096
Urbánek Tomáš IS040
Uribe Tirado Liliana Maria IS015
Uusitalo-Malmivaara Lotta IS004
Vaiciukynaite Egle PS118
Vaes Jeroen PS122
Vagni M. IS064

Sette Stefania IS015
Shaboltas Alla EIS139, EIS144
Shamay-Tsoory Simone IS048
Shapiro Jenna IS028
Sharir Dan IS052
Sharvit Keren IS003
Shaw Rachel PS101
Shenk Dena EIS142
Shi Yu IS055
Shi Yuanyuan IS048
Silani Giorgia PS122
Silbereisen Rainer K. IS024
Silvia Bombi Anna IS073
Simonelli A. PS086
Simonelli Chiara IS019
Simonenkova Irina EIS138
Simones Mario PS103
Simpson Terry EIS149
Sinclair Carole EIS141, EIS149, EIS156
Singh Shailendra PS117
Sirigatti S. IS059
Sironi Emiliano PS097
Skey Michael IS003
Skimina Ewa IS006
Skinner Ann T. IS015
Skuterud Anders EIS150
Slatcher Richard B. IS072
Smedley Richard PS101
Smeets Kirsten PS082
Smith Michael PS081
Smith Peter K. IS010
Smorti Martina PS097
Sobolewska Tatiana IS034
Söderström Kerstin EIS135
Soldatova Elena EIS142
Soncini Francesco IS029
Sorbring Emma IS015
Sorgente Antonella PS097
Sorgi K. IS059
Sorić Zrinka EIS138
Sorokowski Piotr IS070
Soukupová Tereza IS040
Spence Laschinger Heather K. IS028
Srivastava Kailash B. L. PS117
Srivastava Manjari PS117
Stanescu D. F. IS059
Stark Wolfgang IS051
Stathi Sofia IS003
Stavroula Leka IS005
Stawski Robert S. IS056
Steffgen Georges IS057
Steinebach Christoph EIS133
Stepankova Hana EIS142
371

SYMPOSIA

INDEX

Wang Guoqiang IS065
Wang Lijuan IS077
Wang Qian IS063
Wang Zhe PS100
Watts Leon PS101
Waxman Richard IS031, IS052
Weierstall Roland PS128
Wendt Verena PS109
Wernekink Uwe IS044
Wetherell Mark PS081
White Elaine PS100
White Rachel
Wiers Reinout IS042
Wiesmann Ulrich IS004
Winkens Laura IS061
Witkowska Marta IS008
Witting Andrea IS022
Włodzimierz Strus IS006
Wojciszke Bogdan IS002
Wu Lili IS048
Wylleman Paul IS021
Xella Carla Maria IS075
Yamaguchi Susumu IS048
Yang Qiuli IS065
Yaremchuk Oksana PS105
Zabukovec Vlasta EIS143
Zaccagnino Maria IS068
Zalewska Anna Maria PS110, PS126, PS127
Żaliński Adam PS132
Zamami Airi PS091
Zambarbieri Daniela PS118
Zanazzi Luca IS009
Zani Bruna IS025, IS051
Zappalà Salvatore EIS148
Zavialova Irina EIS142
Zelli Arnaldo IS015, IS071
Zhang Jianxin IS063
Zhang Kai
Zhang Kai IS065
Zhou Mingjie IS063
Zhou Xinlin PS100
Zhu Huan IS065
Zhu Liqi IS047
Zimbardo Philip G. IS030
Zingora Tibor EIS151
Zlokovich Martha S. PS120
Zoëga Ramsøy Thomas PS118
Zogmaister Cristina PS122
Zucconi Alberto EIS133
Zuffianò Antonio IS045
Ӧzdam Ceylan PS113

Valchev Velichko H. IS063
Valencia Álvaro Iván PS107
Valencia Marshall PS084
Valerio Paolo IS049, IS059
Van Assche Jasper IS020
van Atteveldt Nienke IS014
Van Cleemput Katrien PS095
van de Vijver Fons J. R. IS063
van der Gaag Mark IS066
van Dijk Erik IS047
van Dijk Marijn PS107
van Dillen Lotte IS047
van Geert Paul PS107
Van Hiel Alain IS020
van Ijzendoorn Marinus H. IS001, IS022
Van Puyvelde Martine IS034
Van Rossen Edward EIS144, EIS147
van Strien Tatjana IS061
van Tilburg Theo PS112
van Zomeren Martijn PS096
Vandebosch Heidi IS010, PS095
Vasin Georgy PS108
Västfjäll Daniel PS124
Vecchione Michele IS006, IS057, IS058
Vecho Olivier PS083
Vecina María Luisa PS090
Venturini Elisa IS041
Vereitinova Tatiana PS121
Veronique Crutzen IS005
Vezzali Loris IS003
Vibert Sarah IS041
Victor Christina PS112
Vidnere Mara PS126
Vilhena Maria Cecilia IS041
Villajos Esther IS016
Vines Robyn IS026
Visser Marjolein IS061
Vlasova Olena PS105
Vögele Claus EIS150
Volkart Anne-Christine EIS133
Völlink Trijntje PS095
Volpato Chiara IS008, PS122
von Klitzing Kai PS109
Vorobyeva Elena PS094
Voronin Ivan PS108
Vrbová Jana PS090
Vyas Ruta PS117
Wagner Ulrich EIS135, EIS136
Wainwright Tony PS130, EIS134
Waitoki Waikaremoana EIS146
Walker Carl IS035
Wallace Mark T. IS014
Walper Sabine IS017
372

ABSTRACT BOOK

ORAL
PRESENTATIONS

373

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O15
CONSUMER EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN SPAIN: PRELIMINARY
RESULTS
F03. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Consumer behaviour
Esther Lopez-Zafra, University of Jaén, Jaén – Spain
Manuel Pulido-Martos, University of Jaén, Jaén – Spain
Carmen Sanchez Garcia, University of Jaén, Jaén – Spain
Anna Andryushchenko, University of Jaén, Jaén – Spain
Antonio José Carrillo Lopez, University of Jaén, Jaén – Spain

Emotional Intelligence (EI) refers to the abilities/competencies that an individual has about emotions.
Consumer behavior is still a new venue of research. Kidwell et al. (2008) propose Consumer Emotional
Intelligence Scale (CEIS) under the ability model with good results in USA and China. Our purpose was the
adaptation and validation of CEIS in Spain. For the linguistic and cultural adaptation we follow the
International Test Commission guidelines. Four American and 4 Spanish made the process finally discussed
by three researchers. This process revealed the existence of cultural differences in building sentences with
linguistic nuances interpreted positively or negatively by various judges. For the evaluation phase and
consensus, a pilot with forty participants indicated a good understanding and clarity of the items. For
validation we followed the same original scale procedure. We use two different samples (132 undergrads;
120 non-undergrads, n = 252) to determine construct validity. Preliminary analyses show that it is not
consistent with the original structure. Statistical indicators indicate a poor correlation between items, and the
test-retest points to a lack of reliability, even obtaining significant and negative correlations among many of
the items. Our results question the usefulness of CEIS in Spain. Thus, we propose to create a new tool that
overcomes the shortcomings of the CEIS and allow us to apply it to decision-making on the use of healthy
food products.

374

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O16
THE SOURCES OF ISLAMIC RADICALISM
C13. Culture and society – Religion
Ghorbanali Ganji Jamehshoorani, Islamic Azad University, Azadshahr - Iran

Islamic Radicalism has become a serious problem in central Asia and Caucasus as well as other regions of
the world having predominantly Muslim population. The causes of this radicalization are hotly debated. It is
the aim of this investigation to present an inclusive fact finding research with the hope of shedding some
light on various probable sources of Islamic Radicalism in the Central Asian nations. To this end, attention
has been given to both internal and external factors s of extremism as opposed to some researches that have
focused exclusively on either internal or external factors.In this paper, it is argued that internal factors such
as religious oppression during Soviet rule, economic backwardness, low level education, sociopolitical
unawareness, and the existence of historically famous religious cities which prior to communist regime
functioned as the centers of Islamic educational training and ideology fostered religious extremism. With
respect to external factors, it is argued that Saudi Arabia along with Emirate, Qatar and Pakistan, all
predominately belonging to Sunni sect of Islam, in their rivalry to contain the propagation of Shia sect by the
Islamic Republic of Iran in these newly independent nations of Central Asia, provided spiritual and financial
support to the mostly deprived, marginalized and agonized segments of the Sunni Muslim population to be
armed and trained mainly in Pakistan and Afghanistan to propagate and defend Sharia violently if necessary.
Secondly, the dawn fall of Taliban rule in Afghanistan after September 11 led to the fleeing of some AlQaida members to the neighboring nations as their safe heaven which resulted in making them the militant
defenders of Islamic codes of behavior within these nations. The third external factors perceived to be the
precipitant of Islamic extremism was the idea of preventing the conversion of young Moslems to Christianity
by any ways and means in post-Soviet identity crisis.

375

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O18
AMBITIONS AT WORK: A COMPARISON OF STUDENTS AND
EMPLOYEES IN MASCULINE AND FEMININE CONTEXTS
D16. Work and organization – Other
Esther Lopez-Zafra Lopez-Zafra, University of Jaén, Jaén - Spain
Alice H. Eagly, Northwestern University, Evanston - United States
This study analyzed whether female or male students are more ambitious than employed women or men in
relation to achieving a higher position in organizational contexts that are congruent versus incongruent with
their gender role. The participants were 670 (311 men and 359 women) from two categories (391 students
and 391 employees); 206 were studying or working in male-congruent settings and 464 in female-congruent
settings. Surveyors asked students and employees to voluntarily participate in this study. Participants
received a questionnaire in which they were asked to imagine how they would react to a promotion to a
leadership position in their organization (for the employees) or a future organization congruent with their
field of study (for students). Then they answered questions about their beliefs about the consequences of the
promotion, their core self-evaluations that would result from the promotion, positive and negative emotions
the promotion would cause, and their gender role ideology. Results showed that individuals in masculine
contexts were significantly more ambitious than individuals in feminine contexts, regardless of their sex or
status. However, students thought that consequences were more positive than the employed women and men
did. Furthermore, women (both students and employees) in congruent contexts had a more positive selfevaluation than women in incongruent contexts, but men had a higher self-concept than women, regardless
gender of context. Key Words. Ambition, gender ideology, men, gender role-congruency, students vs
employees, women.

376

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O19
THE EFFECT OF EDUCATION ON THE ATTITUDE OF MULTIETHNIC
POPULATION IN GOLESTAN PROVINCE, IRAN
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
Ghorbanali Ganji Jamehshoorani, Islamic Azad University, Azadshahr – Iran

Golestan Province on the coast of Caspian Sea in Iran holds a multiethnic population. So, one of the major
objectives in this research was to assess the effect of education on the held attitude of the members of each
ethnic group toward the members of other ethnics. To achieve this objective, the attitude of each ethnic
group on four dimensions of economic, politics, culture and social interaction with other ethnic groups was
obtained through a questionnaire. T-test technique was employed to compare the attitude of two independent
groups: Illiterate and literate, lower and higher educated groups. Inferential statistical data indicates that
education has an inverse effect on the favorable attitude held by the individual in each ethnic group toward
other ethnics. Firstly, illiterate individuals in each ethnic group has more favorable attitude than literate ones
in accepting and showing inclination to have interaction across ethnic lines. Secondly, lower educated people
in each ethnic group inclined more than higher level educated ones in accepting and having interaction with
other ethnic groups. The difference of attitude between illiterate and literate, and also between lower and
higher educated people in each ethnic groups towered other ethnic groups, are statistically significant at
p<.05. Hence,the general conclusion that could be drawn is that the increase in individual education leads to
an increase in his negative attitude toward other groups. The widely held accepted view that widespread
education is one of the major prerequisite for cultural pluralism seems no to be holding true, at least, in
multiethnic population of Golestan Province, Iran.

377

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O20
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RELIGIOUS ATTITUDES AND DEPRESSION
A16. General issues and basic processes - Other
Mohammad Mehdi Naderi, Islamic Azad University, Azadshahr – Iran

Religious attitudes have influences on mental health. The main aim of the present study is to investigate the
relationship between religious attitudes and depression. The statistical sample of the study is 129 students of
Islamic university of Azadshahr which are selected based on random sampling. subjects are asked to fill out
the Beck`s Depression Inventory (1978) and Religious Attitude Questionnaire (Serahzade, 1987). Pearson
Correlation Coefficient and Multiple Factor Regression are used to analyze the research hypothesis. The
findings of the study suggest that there exists significant relationship between depression and religious
attitudes. Furthermore, religious attitudes can explain the depression variance significantly.

378

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O23
WOMEN’S WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN THE
PHILIPPINES
D12. Work and organization - Safety culture and climate
Jinky Leilanie Lu, University of the Philippines, Manila - Philippines

This study examined the association between labour intensification due to work intensification and work
extensification and ill health in women in certain manufacturing work in the Philippines. Work
intensification is defined as more workload for each worker, and work extensification as less deadtime or
work rest and more overtime. The sample was 23 establishments and 630 respondents. Workplace
environment monitoring showed exposure to hazards such as noise, chemicals, poor ventilation, and poor
illumination. The most prevalent illnesses and health problems were headache and coughs and colds.
Results of focus group discussions showed adverse work conditions, hazard exposures among women
workers, fast pace of work, close supervision, and prevalent occupational illnesses. . The results indicate that
the health issues of women workers depend on many factors, such as management and supervisory style, job
autonomy, nature of task, and hazard exposures.

379

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O24
WOMEN SAFETY CULTURE IN MANUFACTURING WORK
D12. Work and organization - Safety culture and climate
Jinky Leilanie Lu, University of the Philippines, Manila - Philippines
In the light of global industrialization, much attention has been focused on occupational factors and their
influence on the health and welfare of workers. This was a cross sectional study using stratified sampling
technique based on industry sizes. The study sampled 24 industries, 6 were small scale industries and 9 each
for medium and large scale industries. Among the 500 respondents, majority were female (88.8%), single
(69.6%) and worked in the production or assembly-line station (87.4%). For females, the most prevalent
hazards were exertion involving back (76.2%), excessive work (69.3%), heat (66.9%), poor ventilation
(56.6%), and chemical exposure (52.4%). Sickness absenteeism was relative high among the workers in this
study accounting for almost 54% among females and 48% among males. Many of the workers also reported
of poor performance at work, boredom, tardiness and absenteeism. From the data generated, important issues
that must be dealt with in work organizations include the quality of work life, and health and safety issues.
Based on these findings, we can conclude that there are still issues on occupational health and safety (OHS)
in the target site of export processing zones in the Philippines. There must be an active campaign for OHS in
industries that are produce for the global market such as the target industries in this study. Keywords:
Occupational health and safety, manufacturing industries, export processing zones, organizational factors,
quality of worklife

380

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O25
MULTIPLE INTERACTIONS OF HAZARD EXPOSURES, SITUATIONAL
FACTORS AND PERSONAL FACTORS ON BURNOUT AMONG NURSES
D12. Work and organization - Safety culture and climate
Jinky Leilanie Lu, University of the Philippines, Manila – Philippines

This was a cross sectional study, which aimed to determine the interaction between situational, factors, role
stressors, hazard exposure and personal factors among 246 nurses consisting most of females (78.5%) from
the different wards and units in the Philippine General Hospital (PGH). The dominance of female sin the
profession reinforce the prevailing notion that the caring professions such as nursing are relegated to women.
This gives the study its gender perspective. Almost half (49.6%) of the respondents reported being ill due to
work in the past year, and 56.1% missed work because of an illness. Correlation statistics using the
Spearman’s rho showed organizational role stressors was most significant in burnout among nurses in the
Philippine’s largest tertiary hospital. Organizational role stressors consisted of ten dimensions, namely: 1)
Inter-role Distance (IRD); 2) Role Stagnation (RS); 3) Role Expectation Conflict (REC); 4) Role Erosion
(RE); 5) Role Overload (RO); 6) Role Isolation (RI); 7) Personal Inadequacy (PI); 8) Self-role Distance
(SRD); 9) Role Ambiguity; and 10) Resource Inadequacy (RIn). The contribution of the study is in
advancing new concepts in the already existing framework of burnout, and thus, can assist nurses and
hospital administration on how to control this problem. Keywords: Burnout, Organizational Role Stressors,
Hazard Exposures, Situational Factors, Nurses

381

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O29
THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TRAINING SOFTWARE “PROBLEM SOLVING
ASSISTANT” ON REINFORCEMENT OF PROBLEM SOLVING OF
STUDENTS WITH MATHEMATICS LEARNING DISORDER
B03. Development and education - Learning and instruction
Fereshteh Baezzat, University of Mazandran, Mazandran – Iran
Samaneh Alimohammadi Malayeri, University of Verona, Verona - Italy
Samaneh Alimohammadi Malayeri, University of Verona, Verona - Italy
Objective: The purpose of the present research was the effectiveness of training software “problem solving
assistant” on reinforcement of problem solving of students with mathematics learning disorder. Method:
Research method was quasi-experimental with pretest and posttest design with control group. In order to do
this research, after of administering of, Diagnostic tests (including wechslers intelligence scale for children ,
Iranian kimat test) thirty girl students with mathematics learning disorder were elected from community of
students the fourth and fifth grades of primary school in Qaemshahr city through cluster sampling .Then they
randomly divided into two experimental and control groups. the experimental group received training
software “problem solving assistant” for 8 sessions but the control group didn't receive any intervension.
Data was analyzed through repeated measures analysis of mixed variance. Results: results indicated that
between problem-solving scores mean of experimental group and control group have meaningful
differences. Conclusion: Based on Results, the training software program improved solving problems in
students with mathematics learning disorder. Also this procedures will cause the permanence of the
training after duration of three months. It can be recommended that psychologists and learning disorders
professionals administer this training software program for the reinforcement of problem solving of
students with with mathematics learning disorder. Key words: Problem solving assistant software , solving
problem, mathematics learning disorder, primary school student.

382

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O32
MINDFULNESSBASED TREATMENT METHODS FOR ADDICTIVE
DISORDERS - EVIDENCE-BASED OR FAITH-BASED
F22. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Sustainability and mindfulness
Wolfgang Beiglboeck, University of Vienna, Vienna – Austria

Mindfulness came in the focus of interest in Psychology about 25 years ago. Its origins lay in Buddhist
meditation techniques where mindfulness plays an important role as a way to the cessation of personal
suffering. Therefore it became of interest in the treatment of psychological disorders as a possibility to cope
with emotional distress and maladaptive behavior. Nevertheless only during the last few years specialized
mindfulness based therapy programs for substance abuse disorders (SUDs) have been developed. Only few
of these treatment approaches have a sound theoretical basis and even fewer are evidence-based. Only three
of them (Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Substance Abuse, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement
for Opioid Misuse - MORE and Mindfulness-based relapse prevention - MBRP) have been investigated by
more or less extensive research programs to clarify their therapeutic effectiveness. This presentation will
critically discuss if the recently published results of this research legitimates the use of mindfulness based
treatment programs as standard care for SUDs. One main restriction of the ongoing research is that all
subjects of these efficacy trials have been from English-speaking countries. Therefore the results of a pilot
efficacy trial of a German Version of the MBRP will be represented . 30 in-patients and out-patients of a
treatment centre for alcohol addicts participated in this 8-week program. Questionnaires comprising Craving,
mindfulness, self-management and internal vs. external control were administered in a pre-/post-design. To
some extent these measurements could be compared to a control group receiving treatment as usual (TAU).
First results show an encouraging increase not only in mindfulness, but also in other relevant therapy factors.
Nevertheless there are some restrictions to observe when using mindfulness based approaches in the
treatment of SUDs. E.g. there is no or not sufficient research on gender issues and who benefits most of these
programs.

383

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O38
SCHOLARLY CONSENSUS ON VIDEO GAME VIOLENCE EFFECTS
CONTINUES TO ELUDE: EXAMINING FACTORS RELATED TO
DIFFERING OPINIONS AMONG SCHOLARS ON WHETHER VIOLENT
VIDEO GAMES CAUSE SOCIETAL VIOLENCE
C09. Culture and society - Media and communication
Christopher Ferguson, Department of Psychology, Stetson University, DeLand - United States

Survey evidence has now made clear that no consensus exists among either clinicians or media scholars
regarding the impact of violent media on youth. Some evidence with the general public and with clinicians
suggests that divergent opinions can be explained as consistent with previous generational struggles over
new media such as with comic books and rock music. Namely age, female gender and negative attitudes
toward youth all tend to predict greater willingness to believe video game violence is harmful. However,
these questions have never been addressed among media scholars themselves. The current research
describes a survey study of media scholars examining for factors that influence opinions on video games
including age, gender, negative attitudes toward youth as well as two new concepts, sanctimony bias and
warning bias. Addressing the sociology of media effects research itself may help understand why some
segments of the scientific community continue to make claims about video game effects that are unsupported
by data.

384

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O41
GUESSING IN MCQ-BASED ASSESSMENTS
A03. General issues and basic processes – Psychometrics
John Barnard, EPEC Pty Ltd, University of Sydney, Sydney – Australia

This presentation will focus on the scoring of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) as widely used in
assessments with a focus on guessing. Classical Test Theory (CTT) is traditionally used to calculate a score
based on the number of questions answered correctly. Scores can be adjusted for possible guessing using a
form of correction which assumes that guessing is random. In Rasch measurement fit statistics are
calculated. Having item difficulty and test taker ability on a common scale, guessing is suspected if a test
taker responds correctly to a question of which the difficulty is significantly higher than the test taker’s
ability. The three-parameter Item Response Theory (IRT) model includes a pseudo-chance (guessing)
parameter which reportedly estimates the probability of a test taker to correctly guess an answer. Whereas
the correction for guessing formula in CTT is hard to defend, test takers seldom randomly guess and a
guessing parameter value should not be constant, it is argued in Option Probability Theory (OPT) that a
guessing parameter should be a person parameter as it is people who guess. In this theory a realism index is
calculated to indicate the amount of uncertainty in a test taker’s responses. The test taker assigns percentages
to any number of possible answers from which a score and a realism index is calculated.

385

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O46
TOWARD A THEORY OF MONETARY INTELLIGENCE
C01. Culture and society - Ethics and deontology
Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Jennings A. Jones College of Business, Middle Tennessee State University,
Murfreesboro - United States

A growing body of research has explored Monetary Intelligence (MI, money smart). MI examines the
relationships between the affective-behavioral-cognitive (ABC) components of money attitudes and
theoretically appropriate outcomes. Results of MI offer the following insights. On the dark side, affective
love of money motive (Factors Rich, Motivator, and Importance) predicts unethical intentions in multiple
panel studies and cheating behaviors in laboratory experiments. Further, money is Power in the context of
Materialism. Those who value money as Power and do not Budget their money carefully tend to fall into
temptation—worship materialism, impress others, and show off in the social context. On the bright side, in a
cross-cultural study involving individuals in 32 geopolitical entities across six continents, money smart
managers with negative love of money motive but positive stewardship behavior have high pay satisfaction
and life satisfaction. Further, money smart managers adapt the approach coping strategies and enjoy higher
intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction; whereas money smart students have lower importance in making
money, but higher importance in making ethical decisions, and better objective academic achievement (final
course grade) in college (predictive validity). Monetary Intelligence demonstrates individuals’ ability to
monitor their own emotions, behaviors, and cognitions and use the information to guide their thinking and
actions in their everyday lives.

386

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O57
SHORT- AND LONG-TERM COGNITIVE OUTCOMES OF CARDIAC
SURGERY
E12. Health and clinical intervention - Cognitive disturbances and rehabilitation
Daria Eremina, Department of psychology, Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russian
Federation
Recent researches have shown severe cognitive disorders accompanying cardiac surgery. However, mild
cognitive dysfunction, more amenable to prevention and correction, is less studied because of difficulties in
diagnosing. Moreover, the underlying mechanism leading to cognitive decline is still unclear.
For this reason, we aim at analysing the dynamics of cognitive functions, dependent on biomedical and
psychosocial factors, of patients undergoing cardiac surgery without clinically determined signs of dementia.
We also focus on comparing cognitive functioning of patients with the normative data.
Examination of 100 patients of average age 57.4 ± 5.2 years (using WAIS, TMT-test, Stroop test, TAS,
Benton test, etc.) was effected in three stages: before surgery, 12-14 days after surgery, and 3 months after it.
The results obtained demonstrate negative changes in both short- and long-term verbal memory, and also in
attention switching after surgery. Possible reasons for postoperative cognitive decline include conditions and
consequences of the surgery, normal ageing, and brain injury at the time of coronary surgery. At the same
time, positive dynamics in the visual and logical memory, as well as in spatial and verbal-logical thinking,
was observed. Upon rehabilitation, the indicators of psychomotor speed, attention switching, and cognitive
flexibility, which were reduced as compared to the normative data before surgery, have regained their
normal levels 3 months after.

387

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O66
STEREOTYPICAL ATTITUDES AMONGST STUDENTS AT A SOUTH
AFRICAN UNIVERSITY
C07. Culture and society - Race and ethnicity
Kathryn Nel, University of Limpopo, Pretoria - South Africa
Cebile Tebele-Mensele, University of South Africa, Pretoria - South Africa
Elizabeth Nel, University of South Africa, Pretoria - South Africa
Larisa Louw, University of South Africa, Pretoria - South Africa

This study investigated race stereotypical behaviour amongst students at a South African University.
Participants were African (95%), White (3%), Coloured (1%) and Indian/Asian (1%). Females constituted
62% of the sample and males 38%. The average age of respondents was between 17 – 24 years. Participants
completed a racial stereotypes survey which had high internal consistency (Cronbach Alpha .93). The
findings indicated that black students from a rural background found that city blacks lacked African culture
and were overly westernised. It was also noted that they look down on rural blacks. Rural blacks were
stereotypically described as being more respectful, poor and with a greater affinity for African culture.
English speaking whites were described as superior, friendly and dominating whilst Afrikaner whites were
stereotyped as racist, aggressive, violent and hardworking. Indians were perceived as unethical and deceitful
whilst coloureds were noted as being violent and aggressive by blacks and whites of both groups.It is clear
that stereotypical racist language or discourse is still widespread in South Africa and underpins students’
perceptions of others. Key words: Stereotypes, race relations, diversity management.

388

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O70
THE EFFECTS OF MESSAGE FRAMING AND TEMPORAL
PERSPECTIVE IN PROMOTING HEALTHY EATING HABITS:
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULTS
Mauro Bertolotti, Catholic University of Milan, Milan – Italy
Giorgia Chirchiglia, Catholic University of Milan, Milan – Italy
Patrizia Catellani, Catholic University of Milan, Milan – Italy

Research on health communication has been investigating message framing as a persuasive technique to
promote healthy behaviours, such as following a balanced diet. Past results, however, showed that
emphasizing the positive consequences of healthy eating or, conversely, the negative consequences of
unhealthy eating doesn’t directly improve the persuasiveness of health-promoting messages. Other factors
can influence the effectiveness of health-promoting messages, such as the focus on health or well-being
concerns, the temporal perspective, and recipients’ individual characteristics. In our studies, we investigated
the effects of message framing on young and elderly participants. Participants were presented with messages
describing the positive vs negative effects of eating habits on health vs wellbeing, in a long vs short term
perspective. Participants’ agreement with the messages and the intention to change their eating behaviour
was measured, as well as participants’ levels of self-efficacy, health regulatory focus, and the consideration
of future consequences. Results showed that the persuasiveness of positively and negatively framed
messages was moderated by the regulatory concern and the temporal perspective of the messages.
Participants’ individual characteristics, including age,also moderated these effects. Discussion will focus on
which characteristics of persuasive messages and their recipients should be considered when designing
effective health communication.

389

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O71
EFFECTIVENESS OF COMPUTER TRAINING PROGRAM IN
DEVELOPING THE INTEGRATE BRAIN FUNCATION
A12. General issues and basic processes - Intelligence and cognitive functioning
Fawzy Ezzat Aly Abd Alazem Daw Daw, Suez University, Suez - Egypt

The aim of the study was to verify the effectivness of a Computer training program in developing the
Integrate brain functions for preparatory school students. The selected sample were 40 students for the first
grade from El-Tal Eilkabir preparatory school in Asmailia governorate-Egypt, means age 12.77 S.D 0.68 the
sample were divided into two equal groups, control group 20 students and experimental group 20 students.
The Arabic modification of Torrance test of the style of learning and thinking (TTSLT) by Riad & Abd
Eilateef (1986) and re-validated by Ibrahim (2011) were pre- administered to the two groups. The
Experimental group underwent to a computer training program for 15 sessions through 5 weeks, 3 sessions a
week, the duration of every session 45 minutes. The program designed and standardized under the
researcher supervision and was reviewed by a committee of ten educational professors . It consisted of some
activates representatives the row and simultaneous Brain funcationes such as, row pictures, Form useful
sentence of arrangment words, Linguistic reasoning, Logical reasoning, Aware the relations between
simultaneous pictures, also between words, Face recognition, Numerical reasoning, Pictures completion,
Visual spatial perception. Post test of (TTSLT) were applied to the two groups, the data were analyzed used
t test method between the two groups revealed that there were significant differences in the post ( TTSLT )
tests in favor of the experimental group at P. 0.01 in the integrate Brain funcations. The researcher
suggested that this finding sported the effectiveness of the Computer training program, Fruther Resarches
needed to Confirm this Results.

390

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O77
SEEING THE UNSEEN: OPPORTUNITIES TO WORK WITH CHILDREN
WHO ARE TRAUMATIZED IN A CARE GIVING RELATIONSHIP
B04. Development and education - Attachment and intimate relationships
Doris D'Hooghe, Traumacentre Belgium, Sint Margriete – Belgium

By presenting a clinical case of a 8 years old boy suffering anxiety, I want to broaden the vision regarding
attachment trauma and illustrate a treatment model , based on this expanded view. I want to finger point
attachment trauma as adverse experiences, occurring in early childhood, which are repetitive, chronic and
between child and caregiver. This expanded vision might serve as a basis for a new classification which has
implications for recognition and assessment and enables us to incorporate this in clinical practice, early
intervention strategies and treatment. The model is AIP informed and based on neuroscientifically
attachment and trauma theory. The model integrates working with the caregiver. Special attention is given to
the child-therapist relationship. Research on the consequences of early traumatic events helps us to define
new criteria for attachment trauma and enables a more accurate treatment. And finally, a higher awareness
of these events enables us to create adequate prevention strategies. By raising awareness among both
caregivers and clinician about attachment trauma, prevention strategies and tailor-made treatment might
increase and create new therapeutic opportunities.

391

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O88
CYBERBULLYING AND ONLINE AGGRESSION AMONG
ADOLESCENTS: EXPRESSIONS, PSYCHOLOGICAL CORRELATES AND
EMOTIONAL BEHAVIORAL REACTIONS
B08. Development and education - Bullying and aggression
Dorit Olenik Shemesh, The Open University of Israel, Raanana - Israel

The current presentation is based on a series of studies conducted during 2009-2015, explored the nature of
cyberbullying among youth, its expressions, relationships with psychological variables and youth emotional
and behavioral reactions, focusing on cyber victimization. Cyberbullying refers to a deliberate aggressive
activity that takes place using electronic technology, aimed at hurting and harassing others through digital
communication means (Smith et al., 2008) and is constantly increasing during the last years (Patchin &
Hunjuda, 2014). Cyberbullying is characterized by unique features offered by the electronic technology
communication, such as: Anonymity, rapid communication, wide accessibility, online disinhibition effect
and
possibilities
to
change
and
locate
identify
(Law
et
al.,
2012
http://www.sciencedirect.com.elib.openu.ac.il/science/article/pii/ S074756320900185X - bib51). 1132 Israeli
adolescents, aged 12-16, completed questionnaires examining their involvement in cyberbullying, specific
psychological variables and their emotional and behavioral reactions to cyber victimization. 26% of the
participants reported being cyber victims (with a significant increase over the years). Significant correlations
were found between cyber victimization and high levels of depressive mood, social and emotional loneliness,
low levels of self-efficacy and subjective well-being. The most common emotional reactions were rage and
anxiety, while the least common were loss of appetite and sleeping difficulties. Common behavioral
reactions were assaulting back and sharing with close friends, but not with parents. Almost no one of the
cyber victims disconnect the network. Possibilities for intervention programs integrating psychology and
technology aspects will be discussed.

392

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O93
DEVELOPMENT OF EMPATHY SCALE FOR HUMAN CARING
BEHAVIOR: INVESTIGATION ON RELEVANCE BETWEEN RESILIENCE
AND HOSPITALITY
F19. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Life skills in culture and society
Kazuki Nishiura, Miyagi Gakuin Women's University, Sendai – Japan
Kazuhiro Ikeda, Shokei Gakuin University, Sendai – Japan
Jun Tayama, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki – Japan

The purpose of this research was to develop empathy scale for human caring behavior, and to provide
fundamental evidence of spontaneous recovery of mental strength, which enables it to endure work stress for
human caring. Concretely speaking, we conducted investigation of 624 undergraduate students(300 general
undergraduate students and 324 childcare students) with the resilience scale(RS-14), in addition to the
hospitality scale that was developed by Nishiura et al.(2008). As a result, we found that the childcare
students in the 4th grade had significantly-higher hospitality than the general students, and that the childcare
students in the 1st grade and the 4th grade have significantly-higher resilience than the general students.
Furthermore, we confirmed that the sample of all the subjects was divided into 3 groups with cluster
analysis. The major findings of the study suggested that higher resilience students would show higher
hospitality, but lower resilience students would tend to be self-centered, and could not change their empathy
into human caring behaviors in the hospitality. Keywords: Empathy, Hospitality, Resilience, Emotional
Labor, Human Caring

393

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O96
DESIGNING AND TESTING A MODEL OF SOME PERSONAL, JOB
RELATED, AND ORGANIZATIONAL VARIABLES AS ANTECEDENTS OF
THE ORGANIZATIONAL WELL-BEING
D04. Work and organization - Well-being at work
Nasrin Arshadi, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz - Iran
Shoja Araban, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz – Iran

The purpose of this study was designing and testing a model of some personal, job related, and
organizational variables as antecedents of the organizational well-being in employees of National Iranian
South Oil Company (NISOC). The statistical population of the present research included all the employees
of National Iranian South Oil Company (NISOC). 450 employees were selected by relative stage sampling
method. Instruments used in the present study were Personally Expressive Activities Questionnaire (PEAQ),
Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ), Servant Leadership Survey (SLS), Organizational Ethical
Climate Questionnaire (OECQ), Job Stress Questionnaire (JSQ), Basic Psychological Needs at Work Scale
(BPNWS), and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). Structural equation modeling (SEM) through AMOS-18
software package was used for data analysis. Results showed that the proposed model fit the data properly.
Moreover, direct positive relationships of the psychological capital, basic psychological needs, job
characteristics, servant leadership, organizational ethical climate, and the direct negative relationship of job
stress with organizational well-being were confirmed. Bootstrap procedure for testing indirect effect revealed
that organizational ethical climate mediated the relationship between servant leadership and organizational
well being.

394

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O98
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PORNOGRAPHY CONSUMPTION AND
SEXUAL SATISFACTION BASED ON THE THEORY OF PLANNED
BEHAVIOR
A01. General issues and basic processes - History of psychology
Esra Inciler, Middle East Technical University, Ankara – Turkey
With expansion of internet usage, pornography becomes a very hot and risky topic about last few decades.
Pornography consumption is so sensitive and personal behavior, for this reason individuals generally do not
want to talk about it or frequency of pornography watching or choices about pornography. Some people are
more tolerated about sexual content in the internet, some other more conservative. On the other hand, there
are so many videos or images about explicit content; and everyone can face them almost any time. The aim
of this study was to explain relationships between pornography consumption behavior and sexual satisfaction
and pornography usage’s main psychosocial factors based on Theory of Planned Behavior. 430 participants
were attended to the study and they filled Demographic Form, Theory of Planned Behavior Questionnaire
about Pornography Consumption, and Kece’s Sexual Satisfaction Scale. Intention, perceived partner
behavior control, and attitude significantly predict pornography consumption.

395

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O102
AN INVESTIGATION OF PSYCHIATRIC SYMPTOMATOLOGY AMONG
MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN TURKEY
E16. Health and clinical intervention - Other
Ezgi Soncu Buyukiscan, Istanbul University, Istanbul - Turkey
Murat Paker, Istanbul Bilgi University, Istanbul - Turkey

The vast majority of psychotherapy research focuses on problems and symptoms of those who seek
counseling and therapy. The psychological difficulties that mental health professionals might experience,
however, have largely been disregarded. This is especially the case in Turkey. This study therefore focused
on investigating psychiatric profiles of mental health professionals in Turkey. A sample of 245 professionals
including psychologists, psychiatrists, psychological counselors, social workers and other mental health
professionals participated in the study. The study was carried out in a survey format, which included
questions regarding demographic and professional information as well as psychological problems the
participants might be experiencing. Psychiatric symptom level was measured via Brief Symptom Inventory
(BSI; Derogatis & Spencer, 1982). Turkish version of BSI reveals five major symptom clusters: Anxiety,
Depression, Negative Self, Somatization, and Hostility. The public link of the survey, together with an
introductory statement about the content and purpose of the study, was sent to major email groups joined by
mental health professionals in Turkey. The survey was also converted into a Word format, printed and
distributed to major hospitals and counseling and psychotherapy clinics in Istanbul, the most populated city
of Turkey where the majority of mental health workers reside in. participation in the study was based on
voluntarism. Mean score of the sample for all five BSI subscale scores were significantly lower than
expected means, suggesting that psychiatric symptomatology of the sample is significantly lower than the
normal population. Further analyses revealed significant intercorrelations between BSI subscale scores and
certain personal and professional variables. These variables include gender, age, university degree (having a
B.A., M.A., or Ph.D. degree), clinical supervision, years of clinical experience, total amount of training
received in the field, and theoretical orientation. Despite its limitations, the results of this study are important
in terms of presenting an overall psychological profile of mental health workers. At the end of the
presentation, the findings and their implications will be discussed with respect to both clinicians and those
who receive their services.

396

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O105
AN EYE TRACKING EXPERIMENT INTO THE DIVISION OF
ATTENTION BETWEEN TEXTUAL INFORMATION AND CAUSAL
DIAGRAMS IN ACADEMIC TEXTS
B03. Development and education - Learning and instruction
Sara Verbrugge, University of Leuven, Leuven – Belgium
Bert Goossens, University of Leuven, Leuven - Belgium
Which contributions do diagrams, causal relations and prior knowledge make to scientific texts used for
students in academic environments? To answer this question, we set up an experiment with 24 students.
They took part in an eyetracking experiment in which they read a text that matched their prior knowledge or
did not. Causal diagrams, which summarized the relations in the text by means of bullets and arrows, were
added. Text and causal diagrams were presented simultaneously on a computer screen. The number of causal
relations was also varied (many-few). Results showed that the text containing more causal relations was
better retained by participants than the text containing fewer causal relations F(1, 20)=39.31, p<.0001,
irrespective of prior knowledge. However, a main effect of prior knowledge could also be observed F(1,
20)=12.60, p<.01, texts that matched participants’ prior knowledge were better retained. We also checked the
eyetracking patterns of participants. For the text containing many causal relations, no correlations could be
found between overall scores and division of attention between textual information and diagrams. However,
for the text containing fewer causal relations, the more students integrated between text and diagram, the
better their memory of the text (correlation 0.63). See Mason et al. (2013) for similar results. Our findings
hints towards the need to elucidate course material lacking in causality, with diagrams in order to boost
memory.

397

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O108
EYEWITNESS MEMORY FOR VERBAL AND VISUAL ACTIONS AND
DETAILS IN YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULTS
A09. General issues and basic processes - Learning and memory
Alaitz Aizpurua, University of the Basque Country, Donostia-San Sebastian – Spain
Elvira Garcia-Bajos, University of the Basque Country, Donostia-San Sebastian – Spain
Malen Migueles, University of the Basque Country, Donostia-San Sebastian – Spain

Life expectancy has increased and so the likelihood that elderly people is called to testify. Although there are
no notable differences between young and older adults in recalling generic knowledge or the sequence of the
actions of the event, older adults have difficulty remembering specific information that requires
attentional/cognitive resources. To examine whether different cognitive mechanisms are involved in
processing generic/conceptual or detailed/perceptual information, in this study we distinguished between
actions and details and between verbal and visual information of a bank robbery. Participants completed a
recall (closed-questions) or a recognition (true/false) task and rated their confidence in their answers.
Performance was better in recall than in recognition, for actions than details and for visual than verbal
information. Relative to younger adults, older adults had more errors and showed higher confidence in their
false memories; their confidence ratings were similar in all contents, whereas younger adults showed higher
confidence for actions than details and for visual than verbal information. Errors characterized verbal actions
and visual details. These findings suggest that in eyewitness situations, complementary cognitive
mechanisms are involved in processing conceptual and perceptual information of the event, and provide
guidelines for detecting errors and for improving eyewitness questioning, in particular when the one
testifying is an older adult.

398

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O114
A CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY: SYSTEMATIC ASSOCIATION BETWEEN
GENDER-RELATED OCCUPATIONAL DIFFERENCES AND NATIONAL
CULTURE DIMENSIONS
C10. Culture and society - Economic choices
Fatih Ozdemir, Middle East Technical University, Ankara - Turkey
Hilal Terzi, Middle East Technical University, Ankara – Turkey

The purpose of the study was to predict gender-related occupational differences with Hofstede's national
culture dimensions (including power distance, individualism, masculinity, uncertainty avoidance,
pragmatism and indulgence). According to 2012 International Labour Organization (ILO) report, projected
worldwide gender gap in labor force participation was 26%, and this gap reached to 50% in South Asia,
Middle East and North Africa regions. Women are underrepresented at occupational areas over the world,
and the level of underrepresentation may be related with culture. In present study, 2006-2013 ILO statistics
and World Bank data (including the ratio of man and woman in agriculture, industry, service, labor force,
national parliament, legislative positions and vulnerable employment) was tested with Hofstede's national
culture data which was collected from 73 different countries. Analyses were conducted in country level.
Canonical correlation analysis indicated a systematic association between gender-related occupational
differences and national culture dimensions. Moreover, when gross national income per capita of each
country was controlled, cultural values significantly predicted the position of man and women in different
occupational categories.

399

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O115
SACREDNESS OF THE FIVE MORAL FOUNDATIONS IN MEN IN
COURT-MANDATED PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENT FOR ABUSING
THEIR PARTNERS
B05. Development and education - Moral development and prosocial behaviour
María L. Vecina, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid - Spain
Daniela Marzana, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Mariola Paruzel-Czachura, University of Silesia, Katowice - Poland

Intimate partner violence (IPV) constitutes a serious and prevalent social problem (Garcia-Moreno, Jansen,
Ellsberg, Heise, & Watts, 2006) that has traditionally been treated as a gender-related issue or as one aspect
of the larger issue of family violence (Lawson, 2012). However, IPV has not been framed within the recent
advances of moral psychology. In this respect, it has been observed that feeling too moral give people
credentials to behave immorally (Merritt, Effron, & Monin, 2010). Furthermore, the more people sacralize a
moral foundation, the more they are willing to fight for it (Graham & Haidt, 2012). Because such results are
drawn from Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic samples of college students (Henrich,
Heine, & Norenzayan, 2010), it would be interesting to study whether men convicted of domestic violence,
who manifestly have perform behaviors judged as wrong in most social systems, may also be affected by
such moral paradoxes. From a comparative perspective, we present a characterization of men in a courtmandated treatment for violence against their partners as holding a sacred vision of the five moral
foundations (Graham, Nosek, Haidt, Iyer, Koleva, & Ditto, 2011) and of their moral self-conception
(Allison, Messick, & Goethals, 1989). This characterization is compatible with the assumption that a sacred
moral world is easily threatened by reality, which may be associated with violent defensive reactions, and
allow us to add new relevant variables to psychological treatments.

400

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O117
THE INFLUENCE OF RELATIONSHIP STATUS, PERPETRATOR-VICTIM
SEX AND SEXTING EXPERIENCE ON PERCEPTIONS OF “REVENGE
PORN”
C11. Culture and society - Forensic psychology and law
Jeff Gavin, University of Bath, Bath - United Kingdom
Adrian J Scott, Edith Cowan University, Perth - Australia

Revenge porn is the practice of disclosing intimate images of a former romantic partner without their
consent. It is typically predicated on the victim sexting these images to the perpetrator. Though prevalent for
both sexes, sexting is a gendered phenomenon, with the perceived risks and repercussions different for men
and women. Drawing on research on other forms of intimate aggression, this study used a 2 × 2 × 2
independent measures design to investigate the influence of relationship status, perpetrator-victim sex, and
sexting experience on perceptions of revenge porn among university students. Students (n=250) were
presented with a vignette and asked to respond to items concerning the situation described, as well as items
concerning the taking, sending and receiving of intimate images. Approximately 50% of participants
reported taking intimate images and sending them to romantic partners, and a further 17% reported sending
them to prospective partners. The victim was perceived to be more responsible for the situation if the
intimate images were taken in the context of a casual rather than a committed relationship. The situation was
perceived to be more serious when the perpetrator was a man and the victim was a woman, and participants
who did not have sexting experience were more likely to perceive the situation to be serious than participants
who had sexting experience. Implications for victim support and prevention advice are considered.

401

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O123
WHAT AFFECTS PSYCHOLOGICAL RESILIENCE IN EARTHQUAKE
SURVIVORS FROM VAN, TURKEY?
E14. Health and clinical intervention - Disaster and crisis psychology
Gözde Ikizer, Middle East Technical University, Ankara - Turkey
Karanci Ayse Nuray, Middle East Technical University, Ankara – Turkey
Canay Doğulu, Middle East Technical University, Ankara – Turkey

Natural disasters may result in considerable losses and disruptions, inevitably affecting many people.
Therefore, facilitating the ability of individuals to adapt after disasters is an important need. However, there
is limited knowledge regarding the resilience capacity of individuals confronted with disasters. The study
aimed to understand factors associated with psychological resilience in the aftermath of two destructive
earthquakes which struck Van, Turkey in 2011.360 survivors participated in the study. Quota sampling
procedures were utilized to reach participants having different levels of earthquake damage. Instruments
assessing socio-demography, personality, social capital, severity of exposure, disaster-related attributions,
and coping styles were delivered to participants along with the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. The
analysis revealed that among pre-disaster variables, education, mental health, extraversion, satisfaction with
life, and structural social capital were positively associated with psychological resilience. Furthermore,
severity of exposure and coping self-efficacy and problem-solving coping predicted psychological resilience
among the within- and post-disaster variables. The results provide empirical evidence for the importance of a
wide range of factors that facilitate psychological resilience in disaster context. The recognition of these
factors may help to plan, to develop, and to apply psychosocial interventions for disaster survivors.

402

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O128
HOW DO CLINICIANS MAKE SENSE OF CHANGE? AN
INTERPRETATIVE PHENOMENOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE
FAMILY THERAPY FOR ANOREXIA NERVOSA
E06. Health and clinical intervention - Family treatments
Zoé Gelin, University of Mons, Mons – Belgium

Multiple Family Therapy (MFT) is an outpatient therapy, bringing together several families affected by the
same pathology, which has gained an established position in the treatment of several mental conditions over
the past decades. Our research seeks to clarify the therapeutic process from the clinician’s perspectives, with
the aim to clarify change mechanisms involved in this therapeutic setting described as a “hybrid” between
family and group therapy. Our objective is to contribute to the development of a better-defined identity for
MFT through the examination of the subjective experience of clinicians. A qualitative and inductive method
was chosen in order to emphasise the effective components within therapy interventions. Six experienced
MFT clinicians were interviewed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Three master themes
were identified as potentialtherapeuticfactors: (1) predefined therapeutic model, (2) transmission process and
(3) focus on the group. In particular, the process of differentiation within the security of the affiliation to the
group « teaches » the family that individuation of family members enhances its identity rather than destroys
it.WhileMFT seems to be strongly influenced by integrative research focused on common factors, the
dialectical dynamic between affiliation and differentiation within the group, operating as a mirror for the
family may constitute a specific mechanism of change involved in MFT.

403

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O131
DO THE GROUPS WE BELONG TO PREDICT HOW WE ACT? THE
EFFECT OF SOCIAL IDENTITY ON HEALTH RELATED BEHAVIOR
E11. Health and clinical intervention - Lifestyles and healthy self-regulation
Natascha de Hoog, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen – Netherlands

Belonging to certain groups (supporters, smokers, elderly) can have positive or negative consequences for
health related behavior. How much influence group membership has depends on one’s social identity. Social
identity is the part of identity derived from the groups people belong to. Especially degree of identification
with a group can influence health related behavior. Even though research has shown social identity can
influence health related behavior, not much is known about the underlying mechanisms. In 3studies the
relationship between social identity and health related behavior and a number of moderators were
examined.Study 1 showed a positive effect of smoker identity on smoking behavior. Smoker identity was
also positively related to susceptibility and negatively related to self-efficacy. Study 2 revealed a positive
effect of active elderly identification on physical activity. Both factors were also positively related to selfesteem, well-being and negatively to loneliness. Study 3 showed a negative effect of subjective Social
Economic Status (SES)on a range of unhealthy behaviors, especially when people saw those behaviors as
typical for low SES.Results show the importance of social identification in health related behavior,
especially degree of identification and perceiving certain behaviors as part of the ingroup. Future research
should focus on how social identification can be incorporated into health interventions.

404

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O132
EFFECTS OF RELAXATION INTERVENTIONS ON DEPRESSION AND
ANXIETY AMONG OLDER ADULTS: A META-ANALYSIS
E05. Health and clinical intervention - Evidence based psychotherapies
Piyanee Klainin-Yobas, National University of Singapore, Singapore – Singapore
Win Nuang Oo, National University of Singapore, Singapore – Singapore
Pay Ying Suzanne Yew, National University of Singapore, Singapore – Singapore
Ying Lau, National University of Singapore, Singapore – Singapore

This meta-analysis examined empirical evidence of the effects of relaxation interventions on anxiety and
depression among older adults. A comprehensive literature search identified studies that satisfied the pre-set
inclusion and exclusion criteria. We focused on 19 published and non-published studies undertaken in the
past 20 years (1994–2014). Three reviewers selected studies, extracted data and appraised the
methodological quality. We then computed Cohen’s effect sizes and used these to represent the effects of
intervention. Our findings suggested that older adults who received relaxation interventions experienced a
greater reduction in depression and anxiety than controls in most studies. Progressive muscle relaxation
training (PMRT), music therapy, audio-based cognitive therapy (ABCT) and yoga had the strongest
intervention effects on depression. Music therapy, yoga, mind/body wellness and PMRT most effectively
reduced anxiety symptoms among older adults. Furthermore, the impact of some relaxation interventions
remained in effect for between 14 and 24 weeks after the intervention was delivered. This meta-analysis
supported the positive effects of relaxation interventions on depression and anxiety among older adults.
Healthcare providers may integrate relaxation interventions into standard care for older adults in community
and hospital settings, taking into consideration the participant’s preference and healthcare policy. Keywords:
Anxiety, Depression, Relaxation Intervention, Meta-analysis

405

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O133
THE SIGNIFICANCE OF INDIVIDUAL VALUES AND DESTINATION
PERSONALITY FOR TRAVEL BEHAVIOUR
C16. Culture and society – Other
Tamara Jovanovic, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad – Serbia
Nebojša Majstorović, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad - Serbia
Why tourists like and why they choose to visit certain types of destinations are some of the key questions for
the tourism industry. This study has examined the effects of tourists’ individual values and their perception
of destination “personality” on their destination preferences. Research was conducted on the heterogeneous
sample of Serbian tourists (N=766) visiting three holiday destinations: seaside, mountain and city.
Questionnaire consisted of socio-demographic variables (gender, age, education and marital status),
Schwartz Scale of Universal Human Values (Schwartz, 1992), Brand Personality Scale (Aaker, 1997),
preference measures for three types of destinations and holiday satisfaction measures. Results of structural
equation modelling indicated that individual values, destination personality traits and socio-demographic
variables significantly predict tourists’ destination preferences. Out of 11 universal values, hedonism,
universalism and power significantly influenced tourists’ holiday preferences. It was also found that
perceived sincerity and excitement, as two destination personality features, influence holiday preference
directly, as well as, indirectly through satisfaction with the holiday. It was concluded that destination
preferences of Serbian tourists are affected by their values and perception of the destination personality and,
even more, by limitations that come from their socio-demographic status.

406

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O136
CORRELATES OF PERSONAL VALUES IN A CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY
OF INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS
C06. Culture and society - Attitudes and values
Charles T. Hill, Whittier College, Whittier - United States
Maria Rivas Barros, Magdalena University, Magdalena – Colombia
Klaus Boehnke, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen – Germany
Diana Boer, Goethe University, Frankfurt – Germany
Claudia C. Brumbaugh, Queens College CUNY, New York - United States
José Enrique Canto y Rodriguez, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Mérida – Mexico
Artemis Giotsa, University of Ioannina, Ioannina – Greece
Rodrigo J. Carcedo González, University of Salamanca, Salamanca – Spain
Loredana Ivan, NSPAS, Bucharest – Romania
Mie Kito, Hokkaido University, Sapporo – Japan
Zsuzsa Lassu, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest – Hungary
Guillermo Macbeth, Unversidad del Salvador, Salvador – Argentina
Eugenia Razumiejczyk, Unversidad del Salvador, Salvador – Argentina
Silvia Mari, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan – Italy
Cláudio V. Torres, University of Brasília, Brasília – Brazil

Correlates of personal values were analyzed using data from a cross-cultural study of intimate relationships
that is online in multiple languages at http://web.whittier.edu/chill/ir. Participants were recruited in countries
in North America (United States, Canada, Mexico), South America (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia), and
Europe (Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Romania, Spain), plus others responded from additional
countries. Among the 4033 respondents in these analyses, 79% were women, and 66% described a current
relationship. Factor analysis of Schwartz PVQ-21 items revealed four high order values found in previous
research: Conservatism, Self-Enhancement, Openness to Change, and Self-Transcendence. For both sexes:
Conservatism was positively correlated with identification with mainstream culture, church attendance, and
belief in God; Self-Enhancement was positively correlated with making money as a goal in life, and trying to
impose one's way on the partner; and Openness to Change was positively correlated with having higher selfesteem and saying life is meaningful. Self-Transcendence was positively correlated with having emotionally
closer and more fulfilling relationships, but only for men. The lack of other correlations with relationship
measures suggests that the dynamics of intimate relationships vary little due to differences in personal
values.

407

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O137
SITUATIONAL AND DISPOSITIONAL PREDICTORS OF MAGICAL
SIGNIFICANCE ASCRIBED TO MATERIAL POSSESSIONS ASSOCIATED
WITH A PARTNER
B07. Development and education - Social cognition, identity and social interactions
Aleksandra Niemyjska, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, University, Sopot - Poland

According to the laws of sympathetic magic (Frazer, 1925; Rozin, Millman, & Nemeroff, 1986), material
objects that resemble a partner (the law of similarity) or were in contact with him/her (the law of contagion)
are perceived as if imbued with this person’s “essence”. Consequently, photographs, clothes or gifts from a
loved one are treated like the person that they symbolize. It has been proposed that a psychological function
of this process, called romantic magical thinking (RMT), is regulation of perceived closeness to a partner
(Niemyjska, 2014). Accordingly, I provide empirical evidence showing that separation from a partner, either
experimentally manipulated (Study 1) or observed in imprisoned women (Study 2) was related to increased
tendency to display RMT. Study 3 confirmed that anxious attachment, characterized by a strong need for
partner’s attention and closeness, predicted increased levels of RMT, whereas avoidant attachment, defined
by a strong need to distance oneself from a partner, predicted decreased RMT. Moreover, dispositional
tendency to employ RMT was related to ascribe greater value to idiographically defined material possessions
that were participants’ keepsakes and gifts from their partners, families and friends. Adaptive and
disadaptive consequences of RMT are being discussed.

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O148
EARLY ADOLESCENCE AS A SENSITIVE TIME WINDOW FOR SOCIAL
STRESS TO CAUSE LONG-TERM ALTERATIONS IN BEHAVIOR AND
BDNF EXPRESSION
A05. General issues and basic processes - Genes-environment interplay and behaviour
Weiwen Wang, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing - China
San-na Yuan, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing - China
Fan Zhang, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing - China
Wenjuan Lin, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing - China

Social stress in adolescence is correlated with emergence of psychopathologies during adulthood. However,
how social stress specifically impacts adolescent behavior and brain function and its relationship with adult
psychopathologies remain unclear. This study included two experiments. In Exp1, we investigate the shortand long-term (24h and 6w after stress) effects of social defeat stress (SDS) on exploratory behavior, social
interaction and cortically-mediated cognitive function in attentional set-shifting task in early adolescent
(PND 28-37, EA), late adolescent (PND 38-47, LA), and adult (PND70-79, ADULT) mice. Adults
experiencing SDS during EA, but not LA and ADULT exhibited behavioral deficits in both defeated-related
social memory and extra-dimensional set-shifting. In Exp2, we further examined adult alterations in behavior
and BDNF expression induced by EA SDS and the effects of antidepressant duloxetine treatment. Besides
behavioral consequences as shown in Exp1, EA SDS also differentially affected adult BDNF levels in
different regions, causing decreased BDNF in medial prefrontal cortex and increased BDNF in hippocampus.
Moreover, 14d duloxetine treatment reversed above behavioral and molecular alterations. These results
suggested EA might be a sensitive “time window” during which SDS persistently affected context-related
memory and cortically cognitive function, which might be involved in the increased risk for psychiatric
disorders during adulthood.

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O150
INFLUENCES OF GENDER, POLITICAL AND RELIGIOUS
ORIENTATION ON INTUITION BASED MORAL DECISION MAKING
PROCESS
C12. Culture and society - Political preferences and behavior
Beyza Tepe, Ahçeşehir University, Bahçeşehir University, Istanbul - Turkey
Zeynep Ecem Piyale, Ahçeşehir University, Bahçeşehir University, Istanbul - Turkey
Selçuk Şirin, New York University, New York - United States
Intuitive approach of Jonathan Haidt (2013) constitutes the main theoretical framework for the current study
which attempts to explore the influences of gender, political attitude and religious orientation on moral
decision making process. Unlike the traditional morality approach based on cognitive perspective by
Kohlbergand Piaget, Haidt highlights the influences of human’s intuitions on moral decision making
process. Specifically Haidt argues that intuition comes first and finding reason comes second in the form of
rationalization moıechanism. Furthermore he argues that moral decision making is strongly associated with
religious orientation and gender which in turn influence one’s political orientation. Haidt proposed six
foundations of morality all of which is related to political attitudes which again put the emphasis on the
importance of intuitions on decision making process. These moral foundations are, care-harm, libertyoppression, fairness-cheating, loyalty–betrayal, authority–subversion, sanctity–degradation. Each of these
foundations play a role in the moral decision making process which is associated with individual’s political
orientations. Haidt (2012) stated that Republicans and Democrats are differentiated between each other in
terms of their moral foundations. Liberal and Democrats had showed a tendency to care-harm, libertyoppression and fairness-cheating foundations on their evaluation and decision making process. However,
Republicans had leaned equally to each of these six moral foundations. According to that background
knowledge, the relationship between political orientations and moral decision making process will be a kind
of interesting study in Turkey. Haidt and his colleagues’ (2013) developed harmless taboo violation stories to
test cultural validity of his theory which trigger the participant’s intuitions that overcome the
irrationalization. The current study is a replication of Haidt’s original study in Turkey. Specifically, we
interviewed 167 individuals between the ages of 18 - 30 years old using the same procedures outlined by
Haidt. In addition to the taboo scenarios, we also used two self-report surveys to estimate the relation
between moral reasoning and political ideology and spiritual beliefs. Political ideology is assessed via the
Right-wing authoritarianism scale adopted to Turkey by Güldü (2011). Participant’s spiritual beliefs were
assess by the Spiritual Transcendence Scale developed by Seidlitzand his colleagues (2002) which is
translated and back translated by researchers. The study tests basically the following three hypotheses.
(1)Higher score in right-wing scale and religious attitudes is positively related with moralizing stance but
being more spiritual is expected to be positively related with permissive stance. (2) Having higher spiritual
tendency is positively related with bothering scores. (3) Higher score in rightwing authoritarian scale is
expected to be associated with the higher scores of punishment attitude in the stories and their rightwing
authoritarian score. Hypothesis 1 and 3 were confirmed however hypothesis 2 was rejected. One of the
interesting results of the current study was that our samples howed tendency towards the concepts of
divinity which was not found in the original study with American and Brazilian sample. No significant
relationship was found between gender and moral decision making as it was similar with the original study.
Participants who got higher scores from the rightwing authoritarian, spiritual and religious scales
demonstrated more retributive attitude and moralizing stance towards the actors of harmless taboo violation
scenarios. According to Pearson correlation results, religious orientation is significantly correlated with
aggressive rightwing authoritarianism (r = .33, p .000), conventional rightwing authoritarianism (r= .55, p
.000) and spiritual tendencies (r = .71, p .000). Another interesting finding was that even though our
participants identified themselves in leftwing and nonreligious they reacted conservatively. This finding was
interpreted as such due to the relationship between referents of ethic of divinity and conservatism as it is

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highlighted by the body of literature (Inbar, Pizarro&Bloom, 2008). Further results and more detailed
analysis will be discussed at the presentation. Keywords: intuition, moral decision making, rationalization,
moral dumbfounding, decision making process.

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O156
TEACHERS' WAYS OF HANDLING SCHOOL BULLYING: DIFFERENCES
BETWEEN TEACHERS WITH AND WITHOUT WORKPLACE
VICTIMIZATION EXPERIENCES
B08. Development and education - Bullying and aggression
Kristi Kõiv, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana Bucaramanga, Bucaramanga - Colombia

The aim of the present study was to examine differences of the ways of handling school bullying incidences
between teachers with and without workplace victimizations experiences, taking into consideration the
measurement of self-report frequency of workplace victimization in school context by using the Negative
Acts Questionnaire (Einarsen & Raknes, 1997). Teachers’ workplace victimization was reported by 16%
(n=44) and nonvictimization by 84% (n=230) from a multi-stage cluster sample according to the criteria
proposed by Mikkelsen and Einarsen (2001). A sample of 276 teachers (mean age=41.09 years; SD=8.14)
completed survey asking how often they use different strategies (class management strategies; discussions
with the bully and the victim; ignoring bullying; inclusion of other adults; punishing the bully) to respond
bullying incidents between pupils. Teachers with and without workplace victimization experiences differed
on three of the five scale scores: (1) teachers with workplace victimization experiences more often ignored
bullying incidences and used punishment of bullies, and (2) teachers without workplace bullying experiences
used more often constructive discussions with bullies and victims. Factors related with teachers’ ways of
handling school bullying incidents may by relate not only with their personal characteristics and school-level
variables, but also with teachers’ experiences of being victims or non-victims of workplace bullying.

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O159
COMPARISON BETWEEN THE ORIGINAL AND REVISED
REINFORCEMENT SENSITIVITY THEORY IN EXPLAINING
PROACTIVE AND REACTIVE AGGRESSION
B08. Development and education - Bullying and aggression
Marija Saric, University of Zagreb, Zagreb - Croatia

Reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST, Gray, 1970) proposes three neuropsychological systems accounting
for two fundamental types of behaviour: approach and avoidance. Approach behaviour is explained by the
behavioral activation system (BAS) which provides the neural substrate for impulsivity. Avoidance behavior
is clarified by two systems: the behavioral inhibitions system (BIS) which relates to avoidance of
conditioned aversive stimuli and provides the neural substrate for anxiety; and the fight-flight-freeze system
(FFFS) which relates to avoidance of unconditioned aversive stimuli and provides the neural substrate for
fear. RST has been revised into the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory (rRST) where a clearer
distinction is made between BIS and FFFS. Research suggests that the overactivity of these systems
underlies the ethiology of proactive and reactive aggression. Dominance in approach behaviour increases the
risk of proactive aggression, while dominance in avoidance behaviour increases the risk of reactive
aggression. While no study has examined rRST in explaining proactive and reactive aggression, the aim of
this study is to compare RST and rRST in authorizing those subtypes of aggression. Measures of aggression,
BAS, BIS, and FFFS were obtained on adolescents (N=81). Regressional and correlational analyses were
applied. Ethical principles were respected. The results show no differences between RST and rRST in
explaining proactive and reactive aggression.

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O161
AN INVESTIGATION ON ENTREPRENEURIAL KNOWLEDGE
STRUCTURES: THE ROLE OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS BACKGROUND
D02. Work and organization - Leadership and entrepreneurship
Michela Loi, University of Cagliari, Cagliari - Italy
Marco Cogoni, Centro di ricerca e sviluppo e studi superiori della Sardegna, Pula – Italy
Maria Chiara Di Guardo, University of Cagliari, Cagliari – Italy

This research investigates entrepreneurs' and students' knowledge structures with regard to the
entrepreneurship knowledge domain. The exploratory purposes, resting on the entrepreneurial cognition
perspective, are to elucidate the network characteristics defining each groups' representations and to
investigate whether and which differences emerge between students' and entrepreneurs' knowledge
structures. 18 concepts were extrapolated through a two-stage procedure, firstly based on a literature review
aiming to extrapolate the most frequent concepts associated to entrepreneurship and, finally, on a focusgroup with entrepreneurs and students to select the final list, which follows: Experience, Intuition, Planning,
Change events, Self-efficacy, Risk, Earn, Personal success, Passion, Autonomy, Power, Market, Innovation,
Funds, Failure, Friends entrepreneurs, Entrepreneur, Regional context. According to pairwise association
methods, participants were asked to indicate the level of correlation between each pair of concepts in a 5
point-scale (1= not connected; 5= strongly connected). The Pathfinder algorithm was used to simplify the
structure of individuals' representations and an ad-hoc Python software was developed to (1) visualize
individual representations; (2) to measures concepts centrality. Results rest on a sample of 29 entrepreneurs
and 165 university students and show that the network differences between entrepreneurs and students
increase depending on students' training background.

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O164
DISPOSITIONAL GRATITUDE IS POSITIVELY ASSOCIATED WITH
SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY
C06. Culture and society - Attitudes and values
Lilian Jans-Beken, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands
Johan Lataster, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands
Roeslan Leontjevas, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands
Nele Jacobs, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands

My contribution will present data on dispositional gratitude associated with measures of subjective wellbeing. Gratitude received some attention in the research literature but empirical studies on gratitude as an
attitude remain sparse compared to other constructs such as resilience and subjective well-being. In a
longitudinal research design, 440 adults (M = 46, SD = 14, Range = 18 - 80) completed Dutch versions of
the Short Gratitude, Resentment, and Appreciation Test (S-GRAT), the Gratitude Questionnaire (GQ-6), the
Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS).
Multiple regression analyses showed significant positive associations between gratitude, life satisfaction, and
positive affect. Significant negative associations were found between gratitude and negative affect. We can
conclude that gratitude as an attitude is significantly associated with subjective well-being. Cultivating a
grateful attitude may add to the subjective well-being of individuals with and without mental health
problems.

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O166
PARENTAL EMOTION SOCIALIZATION AND ITS RELATIONS WITH
EMOTION REGULATION, SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND LANGUAGE
DEVELOPMENT
B10. Development and education – Parenting
Bilgesu Hascuhadar, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu - Turkey
Hamit Coşkun, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu – Turkey
Aim: In this research, the relations among the parental emotion socialization, child’s social competence,
metaphor development and the mediational role of child’s emotion regulation in this relationship will be
investigated. Introduction: Emotion socialization is defined as the parent’s responses and communication
with their children when the children experience negative emotions. The parental emotion socialization have
some influences on child’s emotion regulation and social competence. Also, child-parent interaction has also
some impacts on language development. Method: The sample of study will include a total of 200 pre-school
children whose ages are 5-6 years old, their mothers, and teachers. The children’s emotion regulation skills
will be measured via the task of delaying gratification and metaphor development will be measured via the
task of creating metaphor. Emotion socialization and parenting behaviors and social competence will be
assessed by a means of scales. ExpectedResults:This planned study will demonstrate whether or not the
relationship between parental emotion socialization and child rearing behaviors will be present in terms of
different aspects of the child development and investigate whether or not child’s emotion regulation is a
mediator variable in this relationship. Conclusion: The plausible results from the findings will contribute to
the quality of parent-child relationship and intervention programs for child development.

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O168
USING AVOIDANCE MOTIVATION TO DECREASE PROCRASTINATION
BEHAVIOR AMONG STUDENTS
A11. General issues and basic processes - Motivation and emotion
Michal Milka Schodl, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem - Israel
Aharon Raz, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva – Israel

We tested the hypothesis that an increase in avoidance motivation reduces procrastination. Students
participated in a longitudinal study about online self-learning tools. The learning tools were used to
manipulate either an approach or avoidance motivation. After the manipulation, participants were offered a
benefit (i.e., bonus points). Behavioral procrastination was operationalized as the time it took students to
receive the benefit (by clicking a weblink), such that higher delay indicated greater procrastination. 96
students (73 females) completed a measure of chronic procrastination and then were randomly assigned to
either the approach or avoidance manipulation conditions. The manipulation was operated twice, each time
followed by two benefits. Thus, we measured behavioral procrastination four times during the semester and
conducted four regression analyses and simple slope analyses regressing behavioral procrastination on
chronic procrastination and approach/avoidance motivation. In three out of four measurements, our
hypothesis was supported as increase in avoidance motivation either reduced behavioral procrastination
(delay of action) or moderated the effect of chronic procrastination on behavioral procrastination.
Specifically, we found that designing learning tasks that focused on avoiding mistakes reduced the tendency
to delay small beneficial actions. Our findings suggest that avoidance motivation may protect against the
chronic tendency to procrastinate.

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O169
INVARIANT MEASUREMENT OF CANCER HEALTH LITERACY
BETWEEN PERSONS WITH AND WITHOUT CANCER DIAGNOSIS
E13. Health and clinical intervention - Psycho-oncology and psychological support in chronic diseases
Levent Dumenci, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond - United States
Robin Matsuyama, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond - United States
Laura Cartwright, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond - United States
Robert Perera, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond - United States
Laura A. Siminoff, Temple University, Philadelphia - United States

Purpose: The Cancer Health Literacy Test – 30 (CHLT-30) was originally developed to measure cancer
health literacy of persons with cancer. This study aims to test the measurement invariance of the CHLT-30
between persons with and without cancer and compare latent means between the two groups. Rationale:
Invariant measurement properties of an instrument should be empirically demonstrated in groups excluded
from the test development sample. Once the invariant measurement properties are established, this evidence
will provide empirical basis to use the instrument in a new group and to allow for testing mean differences
between the two groups. Results: The unidimensional measurement structure of the CHLT-30, originally
proposed for persons with cancer (N = 1,306), was strongly supported in a group of persons without cancer
diagnosis (N = 534). Results from test statistics supported the configural invariance and scalar invariance
properties of the CHLT-30 between persons with and without cancer diagnosis. The latent mean difference
test was significant (p < .001) and large (d = .50) indicating that the cancer health literacy score of persons
with cancer is higher than those without cancer. Conclusion: In addition to the demonstrated invariant
measurement properties of the CHLT-30 between gender and race/ethnic groups, this study provides
construct validity evidence that the instrument can be used to measure cancer health literacy among persons
without cancer diagnosis. A large latent mean difference between the two groups provides further construct
validity evidence for the CHLT-30. Implications: The study results provide empirical support to the
applicability of the CHLT beyond individuals with cancer. The evidence that persons with cancer score
higher than persons without cancer may indicate changes in cancer health literacy level once the cancer
diagnosis is made. Longitudinal studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

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O177
COME DINE WITH ME BATSWANA MEALS! EXPLORING
INTERGENERATIONAL RELATIONS THROUGH TRADITIONAL FOOD
KNOWLEDGE IN SOUTH AFRICA
F19. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Life skills in culture and society
Shingairai Chigeza, North-West University, Potchefstroom - South Africa

Traditional food knowledge (TFK) plays a key role in contributing to healthy and sustainable diets.Yet,
traditional knowledge transfer between generations and consequently the usage of traditional foods is
gradually decreasing.Participatory action research is applied which is embedded in community psychology,
appreciative inquiry and fuses the disciplines of psychology and nutrition. Focus groups, intergenerational
practises (IGPs), and world café method were conducted with 60 Batswana women in two rural communities
in South Africa. Activities of the IGPs consist of preparing, cooking, and evaluating traditional dishes,
inspired by the TV reality show ‘Come dine with me’ (ITV Studios, Shiver Productions).Findings of this ongoing research reveal the current knowledge and perceptions of traditional foods as well as the usage and
meaning of traditional foods within the socio-cultural environment. The dynamics between generations in the
context of the transfer of this knowledge are described. Based on perceived opportunities and challenges
during the IGPs, approaches developed by participants to continue the transmission of TFK and nurturing of
intergenerational relations in the communities are presented. TFK transfer can be one means of asserting
relationship between traditional culture and healthy communities.More creative research is needed to explore
on TFK in the context of intergenerational relations to enhance healthy diets, and relational wellbeing of
communities.

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O178
SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THERAPEUTIC
ALLIANCE RUPTURE SESSIONS AND PRE-DROPOUT SESSIONS
E01. Health and clinical intervention - Assessing and accrediting quality of psychotherapy training and
practice
I. Volkan Gulum, Hacettepe University, Ankara - Turkey
Gonca Soygüt Pekak, Hacettepe University, Ankara - Turkey

Psychotherapy research literature suggests that the therapeutic alliance is the most robust predictor of
psychotherapy outcome and it is a common factor for every psychotherapy approach (Horvath, Del Re,
Flückiger, & Symonds, 2011). One of the relevant factors, there is a significant relationship between
therapeutic alliance quality and dropout rates (Roos&Werbart, 2013). However, to the best of our knowledge
there is no systematic comparison between pre-dropout sessions and rupture sessions. The main purpose of
this study is to compare the therapeutic alliance ruptures sessions and pre-dropout sessions in terms of
rupture types, psychotherapists’ behaviors, attitudes and sessions’ contents. We examined Hacettepe
University Psychotherapy Research Laboratory data set including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and
Schema Therapy sessions conducted by psychotherapy trainees. We mainly used qualitative methods to
analyze16 different rupture sessions and 16 different pre-dropout sessions in micro levels. Additionally, we
run some basic quantitative methods to improve data quality and clarity of the results. Results revealed that
there are apparent differences and similarities between the rupture sessions and pre-dropout sessions in terms
of positive psychotherapist behaviors, content intensity and the types and amount of ruptures.

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O182
LIFE SATISFACTION AND MEANING IN LIFE AMONG WOMEN
WITH/WITHOUT CHILDREN AT THE BEGINNING OF FERTILITY
TREATMENTS
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Orit Taubman - Ben-Ari, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan - Israel
Shirley Ben Shlomo, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan – Israel
Mor Pascal, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan – Israel
Joseph Azuri, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv – Israel
Eran Horowitz, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv – Israel

The will to be a mother is a central component of many women’s identity, providing meaning to their lives
and contributing to their life satisfaction. Difficulties to conceive may lead to stressful reactions. The study
aimed to examine the contribution of stress, cognitive appraisal (threat, challenge, self-efficacy), and selfmastery to life satisfaction and meaning among women with/without children in the beginning of fertility
treatments. One hundred and forty-five women completed questionnaires tapping stress, cognitive appraisal,
self-mastery, life satisfaction, meaning in life and background information, during their first visit to fertility
clinics. No differences were found between women with/without children in meaning and life satisfaction.
Additionally, the associations between self-mastery and cognitive appraisals of threat and self-efficacy were
mediated by the perception of stress:Higher levels of self-mastery were associated with lower levels of stress
which, in turn, were associated with lower appraisal of threat;Higher levels of self-mastery were associated
with lower levels of stress and higher cognitive appraisal of self-efficacy; Higher levels of self-mastery and
lower levels of stress were associated with greater satisfaction and meaning in life. The findings suggest that
it is important for the interdisciplinary staff to address psychological aspects, such as women’s cognitive
appraisal of the treatments already at the first visit to the clinic.

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O185
EFFICIENCY OF MINDFULNESS BASED COGNITIVE TREATMENT IN
REDUCING ANHEDONIA IN MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER
F22. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Sustainability and mindfulness
Ursa Malesic, Maastricht University, Maastricht - Netherlands
Frenk Peeters, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht - Netherlands

Anhedonia is a symptom characteristic for major depressive disorder (MDD) and is a deficit in two types of
pleasure –anticipatory and consummatory.Anticipatory pleasure is experienced in relation to future activities
while consummatory pleasure is experienced in the moment. A novel treatment for MDD that could be
promising for lowering symptoms of anhedonia in depressed individuals is Mindfulness Based Cognitive
Treatment (MBCT) that promotes the focus on the present moment. The aim of this study was to investigate
the efficiency of MBCT in reducing anticipatory and consummatory anhedonia in participants with a history
and current residual symptoms of MDD.The study did not find any effect of treatment group on change in
anticipatory and consummatory pleasure over time. Furthermore, it was found that anticipatory pleasure is
already lower in participants with more than 3 than those with less than 3 previous episodes of depression at
baseline. However, consummatory pleasure increased as a consequence of MBCT treatment, but only in
individuals with less than 3 previous depressive episodes. Focusing ones attention on the present moment
can therefore promote awareness of pleasurability of current experience, which results in increased
consummatory pleasure. The study provides an insight in the differences between individuals with different
history of depression and highlights the importance of investigating consummatory and anticipatory
anhedonia as two different constructs.

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O186
IS POOR SOCIAL FUNCTIONING OF PSYCHOTIC PATIENTS A RESULT
OF INABILITY TO TRANSFER SOCIAL REWARD VALUE TO FUTURE
SITUATIONS?
E16. Health and clinical intervention - Other
Ursa Malesic, Maastricht University, Maastricht - Netherlands

Poor social functioning is one of the main features of psychosis. A possible reason for poor social
functioning in patients with psychosis is impaired reward sensitivity.The aim of this study was to investigate
the extent to which positive affect (PA) experienced in social company leads to social engagement in the
immediate future, and whether this pattern of consummatory experience informing social behavior differs
between patients and controls. Furthermore, a combination of a Social functioning scale(SFS) and
experience sampling method (ESM) used in this study allowed us to understand how reports on the
questionnaire translate to everyday life. It was found that patients with psychosis report poorer social
functioning than controls and spend more time alone. Also, SFS subscale ‘social withdrawal’ and reports of
being alone during the ESM week were found to be directly associated with each other. Patients experienced
higher levels of PA while in the company of others than controls. However, pleasantness of social company
and PA while in company were not predictive of future engagement in social company in neither of the two
groups.This study confirmed the results of previous studies that found poorer social functioning in patients
with psychosis but suggested that positive experience during social company does not predict being in
similar situations in the immediate future for either group. The study opens new questions and introduces
possibilities for future research.

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O188
MY TRAUMA RECOVERY: A SELF-HELP WEB-BASED PROGRAM FOR
PTSD IN A RURAL AND AN URBAN SAMPLE IN CHINA
E14. Health and clinical intervention - Disaster and crisis psychology
Andreas Maercker, University of Zurich, Zurich – Switzerland

Background: Guided self-help interventions for PTSD are a promising tool for dissemination of
contemporary psychological treatment, e.g. after crisis or disaster situations. After the 2008 Sichuan
earthquake we investigated the efficacy of the Chinese version of the My Trauma Recovery (CMTR)
website. Methods: In an urban context, 90 survivors of different trauma types were recruited via Internet
advertisements and allocated for a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a waiting list control condition. In
a rural context 93 earthquake survivors were face-to-face recruited for a parallel RCT in which the website
intervention was conducted in a counseling center and guided by volunteers. Assessment was completed
online at a professional Chinese survey website. Primary outcome measure was the Posttraumatic Diagnostic
Scale; secondary outcome measures were Symptom Checklist 90-Depression, Trauma Coping Self-Efficacy
Scale, and Posttraumatic Cognitive Changes and Social Functioning Impairment questionnaires adopted
from the My Trauma Recovery website. Results: For the urban sample, findings indicated a significant
group×time interaction in posttraumatic symptoms severity. CMTR reduced posttraumatic symptoms
significantly with high effect size after one-month treatment and the reduction was sustained over a 3-month
follow-up. In the rural sample, the group×time interaction was also significant in posttraumatic symptoms
severity. Posttraumatic symptoms decreased significantly after treatment and during the follow-up period.
Additional outcome measures (posttraumatic cognitive changes, depression) indicated a range of positive
effects, in particular in the urban sample, contributing to the positive evidence for self-help interventions.
Differences in the effects in the two RCTs are exploratory explained by sociodemographic, motivational and
setting feature differences between the two samples. Conclusions: These findings give support for the shortterm efficacy of CMTR in the two Chinese populations and contribute to the literature that self-help Webbased programs can be used to provide mental health help for traumatized persons.

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O191
PARENT SATISFACTION WITH TOURETTE SYNDROME TREATMENT
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
E19. Health and clinical intervention - Interventions
Başak İnce, Istanbul Arel University, Istanbul - Turkey
Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics. Although
effective treatments for TS have been found, no study has yet examined parent satisfaction with the
treatment as an indicator of service and treatment quality. This study aimed to investigate parent satisfaction
with TS treatment and the association between parent satisfaction and tic severity, tic frequency and general
psychopathology in their children prior to treatment. Hence, parent satisfaction was examined following the
attendance of their children at either habit reversal training or psychoeducation group treatments while they
attended a parallel information and support group. Results showed that parents found the treatment to be
very helpful. There was high satisfaction with the amount of information and the frequency of the sessions,
and low satisfaction with the timing of the sessions, the number of the sessions and the duration of the
sessions. The study could not find significant associations between parent satisfaction and any of patientrelated variables or significant difference between treatment groups. A further qualitative analysis on parent
experiences showed that obtaining information, social support and symptom reduction were the most
satisfactory aspects of the treatment. Findings revealed that changing the number and the length of treatment
sessions and the overall duration of the treatment might improve parent satisfaction with TS group
treatments.

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O192
APPLYING EVIDENCE-BASED PSYCHOTHERAPIES (EBPS) TO YOUNG
PEOPLE WITH LONG-TERM CONDITIONS (LTCS)
E05. Health and clinical intervention - Evidence based psychotherapies
Başak İnce, Istanbul Arel University, Istanbul - Turkey
A considerable number of young people suffer from long-term conditions (LTCs) (e.g., asthma, orthopaedic
illnesses and epilepsy) which are likely to lead to psychosocial burden. Research has shown that high
percentages of young people with LTCs, particularly neurological illnesses, develop mental health problems.
The co-occurrence of LTCs and psychological symptoms negatively impacts patients’ quality of life and
their treatments. Hence, the current evaluation aimed to investigate whether young people with comorbid
neurological and psychological conditions benefit from the administration of Evidence-Based
Psychotherapies (EBPs). For this purpose, effectiveness of the EBPs was tested for 5 young people by
calculating the added value score of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) as an outcome
measure for general psychopathology. Furthermore, clinical significance and reliable change indices were
calculated for the symptom specific measurements (e.g., depression and anxiety). Findings indicated that 4
patients showed better improvement than predicted based on the SDQ Added Value Score. Furthermore, all
patients showed clinically significant improvement after treatment, and only 2 patients showed both
clinically significant and reliable improvement. The current evaluation demonstrated that it is possible to
integrate EBPs into care for young people with comorbid neurological and psychological conditions and
obtain good treatment outcome.

426

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O197
DISPLACEMENT EFFECTS ON FAMILY STRUCTURE AND ETHNIC
IDENTITY: MUSLIM MESKHETIANS IN THE USA
C16. Culture and society – Other
Ekaterine Pirtskhalava, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State Univeristy, Tbilisi - Georgia
Elene Pirtskhalava, Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State Univeristy, Tbilisi – Georgia

This presentation is e a part of my research which examines the impact processes of displacement on the
family of the Muslim Meskhetians in the U.S. The Muslim Meskhetians, refer to a local population
historically having been living in Samtskhe-Javakheti region of Georgia. Participant of this study are one
part of the deported people from Meskhetia, (republic of Georgia) the Muslim Meskhetians, which since
2005 are living as a refugees in the U.S. In the Scholars articles this community are called differently as
Meskhetian Turks or Turks from Meskehtia, In this article they are mentioned as Muslim Meskhetian.
Combining face to face in-depth and groups interview with refugees, the study illustrates that Muslim
Meskhetian refugee are carefully negotiating traditional values of family structure and family relationships in
the U.S. according to new social environment. There is shown impact of marriage process in Muslim
Meskhetians family.

427

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O198
IS UNCONSCIOUS JUDGMENT CULTURE BOUND? A CROSSCULTURAL RESEARCH DUPLICATION
A13. General issues and basic processes - Thought, decision and action
Deborah, R. Vivo, ISPPREF, Istituto di Psicologia e Psicoterapia Relazionale e Familiare, Ospedale
Universitario San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi D’Aragona, Salerno - Italy

Conscious thought is rule-based and precise, but it has limited capacity. Unconscious thought, on the other
hand, is less strict, creative, and has high capacity. A series of studies by Dijksterhuis and his colleagues
support the idea that unconscious thought works better when complex decisions are at stake. Because of the
importance of the implications of these findings (e.g., that people should stop consciously deliberating
complex decisions), we decided to repeat one Dijksterhuis’ studies in order to examine whether the so-called
“deliberation-without-attention” effect would still hold if we emphasized the role of experience and context
in conscious decision-making.

428

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O199
DOES UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ SPIRITUAL AND RELIGIOUS
ORIENTATION LEAD TO A MORE POSITIVE SOCIAL SELF-ESTEEM? A
RESEARCH PROPOSAL
C13. Culture and society – Religion
Deborah, R. Vivo, Ospedale Universitario San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi D’Aragona, Salerno – Italy

This research proposal is aimed at exploring whether University students with a spiritual or religious
orientation have a more positive collective self-esteem (as defined by Luhtanen and Crocker, 1992) than
students who do not have a spiritual or religious orientation. The research would include a demographic
questionnaire, a spirituality/religiosity questionnaire and a measure of collective self-esteem (Luhtanen and
Crocker’s COLLECTIVE SELF-ESTEEM SCALE), in order to find out whether there is a positive
correlation between high scores in spirituality/religiosity and high scores in collective self-esteem. I would
expect that students who have a religious / spiritual orientation - whether or not they are active members of a
religious (in)group - develop a sounder self-concept which ultimately leads to a more positive social selfesteem.

429

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O200
NEGATIVE EMOTIONS AT WORK AS A SOURCE OF JOB BURNOUT:
THE MODERATING EFFECT OF TRAIT EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
D04. Work and organization - Well-being at work
Dorota Szczygiel, Warsaw School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Faculty in Sopot, Warsaw – Poland
Lukasz Baka, Jan Dlugosz University, Czestochowa – Poland
The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that trait emotional intelligence (EI) acts as a moderator in
the relationship between negative emotions experienced at work and emotional exhaustion (EE) which is
considered to be the core symptom of the burnout syndrome. Participants (nurses working in hospitals in
Poland, N=177) were presented with a list of adjectives describing emotions and asked to rate the extent to
which they experienced each emotion at work. A list of emotions contained: positive emotions (contentment,
pride, enthusiasm and joy), anger-related emotions (ARE, annoyance, antipathy, anger), and sadness-related
emotions (SRE, sadness, dissatisfaction, disappointment). Participants also completed measures of trait EI
and EE. Positive and negative affectivity, measured with PANAS, were also controlled. To test the
hypothesis, moderated hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed. Results showed that the
interaction of ARE and IE term was significant and accounted for a significant portion of the variance in EE.
ARE were positively related to EE among employees who were low in trait EI. In contrast, ARE and EE
were unrelated among employees who were high in trait. The interaction of SRE and IE term was not
significant and did not explain any additional variance in EE beyond the main effects. The results of the
study demonstrated that trait EI functions as a psychological resource that buffers the negative association
between ARE and burnout.

430

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O201
THE INFLUENCE OF PRISON EDUCATION TO BUILD CITIZENSHIP
AND RETURN TO THE COMMUNITY
B03. Development and education - Learning and instruction
Francisco Ramos de Farias, Federal University of the State of Rio de Jaineiro, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

This paper presents the preliminary results of an ongoing research that aims to produce a reflection on the
public education policies in prisons, evaluating its implementation, operation and outcomes in terms of
remission of penalty and the possibility of building alternatives in recovery of criminals to society. This aim
was done with tracking laws, decrees, resolutions and other official documents as well as a review of the
literary regard of this subject. During the process a laboratory of social practices and research on violence for
the production of a school theme collection in prisons was set up. An orientation space was also created for
prisoners who were in a semi-open system and on parole, who demonstrated an interest in school education.
Those who wished to be integrated into the job market were also assisted. A referral to public health
institutions for the psychosocial support of those who brought indelible marks of stay in prison was included
as well as those who intend to develop the condition as criminal. The networking with professionals from
various fields was a strategy for this purpose. The work done to date shows that the inclusion in the
education and preparation for the job market are actions that facilitate the construction of citizenship after
being released from prison, as an alternative identity position different from a criminal one.

431

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O202
THE TRANSITION OF EGRESS FROM THE PENITENTIARY SYSTEM TO
THE COMMUNITY AFTER SERVING A SENTENCE: POSITIVE ASPECTS,
CONTRADICTIONS AND IMPASSES
C11. Culture and society - Forensic psychology and law
Francisco Ramos de Farras, Federal University of the State of Rio de Jaineiro, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

This paper discusses the results of a survey regarding the transition of the penal system to life in society and
the development of devices for the psychosocial, educational and legal counsel, contributing to the
reconstruction of citizenship and the circulation in the context of relationships. These actions were
undertaken at the Laboratory of Social Practice and Research on Violence (LPSPV) of the Post-Graduate
Program in Social Memory at the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). The
cartographic method was adopted in this research, being centered on the construction of the memory of
egresses coming from the prison system of the State of Rio de Janeiro. The survey was built on three
methodological steps: survey of journal’s investigation; documentary survey; and conducting group
interviews. Data analysis was based on the life stories method. The results have highlighted that the process
of institutionalization affects the subject, so that the transference of values from prison culture can function
as a mnemonic device for submission’s maintenance, even after prison release. At the same time, transition
plans are imbued with their memories related to condition as prisoners. Finally, the identity construction
processes reflects, in a significant way, on difficulties of building life projects.

432

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O203
MANIFESTATION OF THE DISCRIMINATORY ATTITUDE AS A
EVALUATION OF FACIAL APPEARANCE OF REPRESENTATIVES
ETHNO-CULTURAL GROUPS
B07. Development and education - Social cognition, identity and social interactions
Vera Labunskaya, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don - Russian Federation

The research purpose is a definition of features of evaluation of various components of ethno-cultural types
of facial appearance. Research Methods: The technique “Estimated and intentional interpretation of facial
appearance and its correspondence to gender and age constructs”. In the questionnaire facial appearance
types: “Slavic facial appearance”, “Caucasian facial appearance”, “Asian facial appearance” are the objects
of evaluation. We have offered the participants of research to estimate the degree of correspondence of
judgments to a certain type of facial appearance according to the 10 scoring system. For the purpose of
definition of distinctions between estimations of “Slavic facial appearance”, “Caucasian facial
appearance”,“Asian facial appearance” we have used Wilcoxon’s nonparametric Z-criterion (SPSS 16.00
program). Research subjects: Russian students - 37 women, 15 men at the age from to 25 years. Results of
research: The discriminatory attitude to groups with a certain type of facial appearance is expressed in
various levels of estimations of components of facial appearance. Conclusion: The students consider that
both men and women having “Slavic type of facial appearance” are more beautiful, attractive, more
masculine or feminine, than the persons of “Caucasian or Asian type of facial appearance”. The
discriminatory attitude presented in different types of estimations was shown to people with “Asian type of
facial appearance” in a greater degree.

433

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O204
FORMING FAMILIES WITH SURROGATES: PSYCHOLOGICAL AND
LEGAL BEST PRACTICES
C02. Culture and society - Family systems and processes
Michelle Loris, World Wide Surrogacy LLC, Law Firm of Victoria Ferrara, Fairfield - United States
Victoria Ferrara, World Wide Surrogacy LLC, Law Firm of Victoria Ferrara, Fairfield - United States

This presentation will discuss the psychological and legal best practices for working with Intended Parents
who are forming families with Gestational Surrogates. Today more and more couples, both same sex and
heterosexual, are forming families by using surrogates; yet no uniform legal or psychological practices are in
place to help and work with these couples. These presenters have been working together for over ten years
helping couples form families with gestational surrogates and they have developed a protocol of best
psychological and legal practices to help couples through what is a very long, complicated process involving
medical, legal, psychological, and family issues. In this presentation, we will outline the protocol of legal
and psychological process, policies, practices we have developed. We will illustrate the complexities and
obstacles ---both psychological and legal—by using case examples, and we will discuss some of the issues
and problems that are emerging in international surrogacy.

434

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O209
WORKPLACE TRANSLATION OF THE DIABETES
PREVENTION PROGRAM: PHASE I AND II RESULTS
E11. Health and clinical intervention - Lifestyles and healthy self-regulation
David DeJoy, University of Georgia, Athens - United States
Mark Wilson, University of Georgia, Athens - United States
Heather Padilla, University of Georgia, Athens - United States
Heather Zuerche, University of Georgia, Athens - United States

The Diabetes Prevention Program (PPE) is a clinically effective, theory-based intervention focusing on
weight management and physical activity. This presentation summarizes phase I and II results from a
workplace translation of DPP. Finding an acceptable trade-off between intensity and effectiveness is a
primary challenge of translation and is particularly crucial for widespread workplace adoption. A primary
ingredient of the original DPP was frequent one-on-one interaction with a trained “lifestyle coach”. The
current trial compared three delivery modes: group coaching sessions, telephonic coaching, and self-study.
The primary outcome was weight loss with secondary outcomes of healthy eating and physical activity.
Incremental cost effectiveness was used to compare the three treatment conditions. Results from the first
two phases of this three phase study indicate that telephonic coaching was more effective than the other
delivery modes and associated with a mean weight loss of approximately 6 lbs. at the conclusion of the core
intervention (six months). The telephonic condition was about twice as expensive as the group condition,
which was about twice as costly as self-study. Process evaluation data suggest that telephonic treatment
costs could be reduced with little impact on effectiveness through modification of the calling protocol. These
results are discussed in terms of developing a version of DPP suitable for adoption in different types of work
settings.

435

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O213
ROLE OF SOCIAL SUPPORT IN WORK-FAMILY BALANCE BY
CONSIDERING THE MEDIATING ROLE OF CORE SELF-EVALUATION
D01. Work and organization - HR assessment and development
Monirsadat Zakerfard, University of Isfahan, Isfahan - Iran
Aboulghassem Nouri, University of Isfahan, Isfahan - Iran
Hooshang Talebi, University of Isfahan, Isfahan - Iran
Hossein Samavatyan, University of Isfahan, Isfahan - Iran

The present research was designed to examine the role of social support in work-family balance also the role
of individual differences in this relationship.The assumptions were analyzed using structural equation
method among employees in a governmental organization in Iran.Using stratified random sampling, a
number of 150 employees were selected from the study population. The research tools included
Questionnaire of Work-Family Balance (Carlson et al. 2009), Family and Colleague Support
Measure(O’Driscoll et al., 2004), Survey of Perceived supervisor support(Rhoades and Eisenberger, 2000)
and Core-Self Evaluation Scale( Judge et al, 2003). Results of structural equation showed that the direct
influence exerted by family support, colleague support and supervisor support on work-family balance was
not meaningful. However, considering its indirect influence, results revealed that core self-evaluation played
a completely mediatory role in the relationship between family support and colleague support, while its
influence on the relationship between supervisor support and work-family balance was not meaningful. The
present study was conducted on the basis of conservation of resources (COR) theory. Since little research has
been conducted on the role of social support in work-family balance considering cross-individual
differences, the present research may be regarded as new in this manner and it creates some opportunity for
developing more research on cross-individual and cross-cultural differences in work-family balance.

436

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O218
THE SELFISH SIDE OF SELF-CONTROL
A14. General issues and basic processes – Personality
Presenter: Liad Uziel, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan - Israel

Self-control is a powerful tool that promotes goal pursuit by helping individuals curb personal desires, follow
norms, and adopt rational thinking. In interdependent social contexts, the socially acceptable (i.e. normative)
and rational approach to secure long-term goals is prosocial behavior. Consistent with that, much research
associates self-control with prosociality. The present research demonstrates that when norm salience is
reduced (i.e. social relations are no longer interdependent), high self-control leads to more selfish behavior
when it is economically rational. In three studies, participants were asked to allocate an endowment between
themselves and another person (one-round, zero-sum version of the dictator game), facing a conflict between
a socially normative and an economically rational approach. Across the studies,norm salience was
manipulated [through manipulation of social context (private/public; Studies 1 and 2), measurement of social
desirability (Studies 1 and 3), and measurement (Study 2) and manipulation (Study 3) of social power] such
that some participants experienced low normative pressure. Findings showed that among individuals in a low
normative pressure context, self-control led to economically rational, yet selfish, behavior. The findings
highlight the role of self-control in regulating behavior so as to maximize situational adaptation.

437

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O220
A VIBROTACTILE DEVICE TO HELP OLDER PEDESTRIANS TO GET
AROUND SAFELY
D10. Work and organization - Traffic and transportation
Stéphanie Cœugnet, IFSTTAR, French Institute of Science and Technology for Transport, Development and
Networks, LEPSIS, Laboratory for Road Operations, Perception, Simulators and Simulations, Versailles France
Aurélie Dommes, IFSTTAR, French Institute of Science and Technology for Transport, Development and
Networks, LEPSIS, Laboratory for Road Operations, Perception, Simulators and Simulations, Versailles France
Fabrice Vienne, IFSTTAR, French Institute of Science and Technology for Transport, Development and
Networks, LEPSIS, Laboratory for Road Operations, Perception, Simulators and Simulations, Versailles France
Nguyen-Thong Dang, IFSTTAR, French Institute of Science and Technology for Transport, Development
and Networks, LEPSIS, Laboratory for Road Operations, Perception, Simulators and Simulations, Versailles
- FranceSabrina Panëels, CEA, LIST, Sensory and Ambient Interfaces Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette - France
Farah Arab, CEA, LIST, Sensory and Ambient Interfaces Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette - France
Aline Chevalier, University of Toulouse 2, University of Bordeaux 3, Toulouse - France
Margarita Anastassova, CEA, LIST, Sensory and Ambient Interfaces Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette - France

Old pedestrians are overrepresented in fatal accidents. Many studies have consistently shown slower decision
making, wrong time estimation, slower walking speed and navigation difficulties that lead to dangerous
pedestrian behaviors and/or travel reduction with aging. In this context, the present study aims at developing
and assessing the efficiency of a vibrotactile navigation assistance to support old pedestrians to cross the
street and get around safely. To this end, 40 old participants aged between 70 and 80 and 20 young adults
take part in two simulated pedestrian tasks. The first one is a street crossing task where participants actually
cross a two-way experimental road in a virtual environment. The second one is a navigation task where
participants have to go from point A to point B in a virtual city. Each task is performed with and without a
vibrotactile wristband delivering alert messages (street crossing) and directional messages (navigation). Data
are currently being collected. We hypothesize that both young and old pedestrians will benefit from the
vibrotactile aid system, with fewer dangerous street crossing decisions and more efficient navigation
patterns. We expect a stronger effect in the old participants’ group. If such a vibrotactile device offsets
difficulties related to cognitive and perceptual decline in old pedestrians, it can contribute to maintaining
their travel autonomy and reduce the risk of fatal accidents.

438

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O221
TO DO, TO HAVE, OR TO SAVE? WELL-BEING AND MATERIALISM AS
PREDICTORS OF FINANCIAL INVESTMENT – CROATIAN CASE
F03. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Consumer behaviour
Ljiljana Kaliterna Lipovcan, Ivo Pilar Institute of Social Sciences, Zagreb – Croatia
Zvjezdana Prizmic-Larsen, Washington University, St.Louis - United States
Andreja Brajsa-Zganec, Ivo Pilar Institute of Social Sciences, Zagreb – Croatia
Tihana Brkljacic, Ivo Pilar Institute of Social Sciences, Zagreb – Croatia

Research suggests that people are happier if they spend money on experiential purchases such as travel,
rather than on material purchases. This study examined the predictive values of wellbeing variables and
materialism for the persons’ financial investments into savings, experiential or material purchases. Subjects
were a representative sample of Croatian citizens (N=1000, 51% women). The reported their life satisfaction,
and completed Personal Wellbeing Index (which includes satisfaction with 7 life domains: material status,
health, achievement, relationships, safety, community and future security), and a materialism scale. Also,
they reported how they would spend their extra money either in experiential purchases, in material purchases
or putting into savings. While controlling for gender, age, and income, hierarchical regression analyses
showed that being younger, with higher income, satisfied with the life as a whole and satisfied with their
achievements were the strongest predictors of experiential purchases. People who would invest in material
purchases were younger and more materialistic than their counterparts. People who would rather save their
money were older, with lower income, and less materialistic than their counterparts. Economic and cultural
environments are discussed as possible contextual influences for how people choose to spend or save their
money.

439

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O223
PROTESTS AND SOCIAL DISCONTENT IN BRAZILIAN
CONTEMPORARY
C16. Culture and society - Other
Rafael Andres Patiño Orozco, Federal University of the State of Rio de Jaineiro, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
Francisco Ramos de Farias, Federal University of the State of Rio de Jaineiro, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

This paper aims to present the meaning of social protests which took place in Brazil on June 2013 in an
economic prosperity context. This research was based on social psychology as a framework that allows
critical analysis of processes of social changes and interdisciplinary dialogue. The study was guided by
qualitative methodology and it was adopted by a method of content analysis to address the testimony of
protesters, published in virtual media during these events. A Categorization process was prepared in a
hermeneutic unit in Atlas-ti 6.2 software. It was identified that these social movements can be considered as
an expression of contemporary discontent at the failure of the Modernity’s political-economic project.
Protests are also forms of manifestation of indignation related to events considered as morally unjust. They
can motivate the creation of alternatives with the purpose of social transformation, but may also arise in the
form of radical groups that advocate violence as a means of protest. At the same time, these movements
represent forms of resistance against legitimate loss of Government and traditional channels of political
participation. In this sense, these subsequente events represent new modes of subjectivation.

440

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O224
SUBJECTIVE CONFIGURATIONS OF RELATIVES OF VICTIMS OF
FORCED DISAPPEARANCE IN COLOMBIA
C16. Culture and society – Other
Rafael Andres Patiño Orozco, Federal University of the State of Rio de Jaineiro, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
Francisco Ramos de Farias, Federal University of the State of Rio de Jaineiro, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

Based on a historical-cultural perspective of Social Psychology, the aim of this study was to understand the
subjective configurations on relatives of forced disappearances in the context of the Colombian armed
conflict. The research grew out of a study design of multiple cases. Unstructured interviews were conducted,
with three focus groups and a phrase complementation tool. The information produced was integrated into a
hermeneutics unit in Atlas-ti 6.2. The data analysis was conducted using abductive reasoning for identifying
configurations of meaning. It was found that the relatives of forced disappearances remain in a state of
mourning: a fracture in memory caused by the uncertainty about what happened to their loved one,
accompanied by the inability to build a sense of loss and, therefore, to grieve. Despite the uncertainty, there
are some possible ways to progress the loss and overcome the mourning. It is possible to construct meaning
about the traumatic experience from farewell rituals and repair actions, such as fact-finding and conviction of
those responsible in court. Some individuals manage to overcome their mourning by building new meanings
to life through work, political or academic lessons. We conclude that the overcoming of grief involves
individual, historical and social elements. Therefore, the society and the state have a crucial role in ensuring
the implementation of a repair process accompanying the significance of the traumatic experience.

441

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O225
COGNITIVE ORIENTATION AS A TOOL FOR IDENTIFYING
PSYCHOLOGICAL RISK FACTORS FOR COLORECTAL CANCER
E13. Health and clinical intervention - Psycho-oncology and psychological support in chronic diseases
Shulamith Kreitler, Tel-Aviv University and Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv - Israel
Michal M. Kreitler, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv - Israel
Frida Barak, Barzilai Medical Center, Ashkelon - Israel

The purpose was to identify personality correlates of colon cancer patients by applying a new methodology
of studying beliefs, based on the cognitive orientation theory. In study A the personality questionnaire was
administered to 106 colon cancer patients and 99 matched healthy controls. The results showed that the main
psychological features of the patients, independent of demographic and medical factors, were self-restraint,
controlling themselves and others, pent-up anger, increased demands of themselves and perfectionism. The
findings were confirmed in study B with 230 colorectal cancer patients. Gender differences were found in
responses. In study C discriminant analysis showed that the questionnaire identified significantly cases of
three groups (165 healthy controls, 90 Crohn patients at risk for cancer, 230 colorectal cancer patients). The
personality correlates of colorectal cancer were tendencies for compulsiveness, control of oneself, anger, self
effacement, pleasing others, self assertion, distancing oneself from others, keeping regulations, and
performing obligations perfectly. The three major foci are perfect duty performance, and two contradictory
pairs: self effacement versus self assertion, and closeness to others versus distancing from others. The
clusters and the contrasts constitute sources of tension. It is suggested that the identified personality
correlates be considered as psychological risk factors for colorectal cancer.

442

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O227
MEANING-BASED ASSESSMENT OF CREATIVITY
A12. General issues and basic processes - Intelligence and cognitive functioning
Shulamith Kreitler, Tel-Aviv University and Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv - Israel
Kineret Weissler, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv - Israel

The purpose was to develop a procedure of assessing creativity by the Kreitler meaning system which is a
psychosemantically-grounded system of processes underlying cognitive acts. Three studies will be presented,
describing the meaning variables differentiating between more and less creative participants, in different
samples of children, and with different measures of creativity. In the first study 158 children (ages7;2-9;4)
were administered the meaning test, the Wechsler IQ test and the Torrance test of creativity. In the second
study 71 children (mean age 10;9) were administered the meaning test and their drawings were evaluated for
creativity by 3 independent experts. In the third study 238 Beduin children (mean age 13;7) were
administered the meaning test and the questionnaire “The Things Done on your Own” (Torrance). In each
study the meaning variables differentiating between the more and less creative were identified. The creative
children used more dynamic terms, considered the objective aspects of objects, emphasized the experiential
aspects of emotions and cognitions, used nonverbal forms of expression and focused both on external and
internal reality, on the general and the specific, on the personal-subjective and the interpersonally-shared, on
the present inputs and the distant ones. It is suggested that the meaning variables characterizing the more
creative children could be used as an assessment instrument for creativity and for developing creativity.

443

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O234
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE AND
ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT: MEDIATION OF
ORGANIZATIONAL IDENTIFICATION
D05. Work and organization - Organizational behaviour
Ulas Ozcan, Hasan Kalyoncu University, Istanbul - Turkey

This study was undertaken to explore the relationship organizational climate and organizational commitment
(normative and affective) as mediated by organizational identification. A total of 350 white-collar employees
completed organizational commitment (affective and normative parts), organizational climate (open,
supportive, management, responsibility, criteria, stress, team, innovation and manager dimensions). As
indicated in hypotheses, organizational climate predicted affective and normative commitment and these
relationships are mediated by employees’ organizational identification. In addition both organizational
climate and organizational identification predicts 76% of affective and normative commitment. The results
showed that organizations needs to increase their identification based programs in order to secure
organizational commitment. Further studies and limitations will be discussed.

444

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O236
MANAGERS WHO PROVIDE SECURE BASE: DO THEY INCREASE
PROMOTION FOCUS?
D02. Work and organization - Leadership and entrepreneurship
Michal Lehmann, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem – Israel
Avraham N. Kluger, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem - Israel

Both attachment theory and regulatory-focus theory (RFT) make similar predictions: Attachment theory
suggests that a relationship that provides a secure base increases exploration; RFT suggests that nurturance
needs activate promotion focus, which is also associated with exploration. These predictions may also be
relevant for relationships at work. Thus, we hypothesize that a manager who provides a secure base
increases promotion focus among employees, and consequently increases the likelihood that employees
perform promotion tasks (vs. prevention tasks). We ran four scenario experiments, priming either a secure or
an insecure base with a manager. In Study 1 & 2 (N = 53, N = 301, respectively), after the prime,
participants rated the likelihood that they would perform promotion and prevention tasks. In Study 3 & 4
(N = 101, N = 121, respectively), participants chose between promotion or prevention tasks. Across all
studies, a secure base increased promotion focus (d = 0.67, p < .02; d = 0.22, p < .06, d = 0.56, p < .01; d
= 0.49, p < .01, respectively). To our knowledge, this is the first study to link between attachment theory and
RFT. Moreover, this research suggests that fostering good subordinate-supervisor relationships is likely to
be rewarded with promotion-focused behaviors such as creativity and innovation.

445

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O238
HOW "TALENTS" ARE DIFFERENT FROM OTHER PEOPLE:
DIFFERENTIATING FACTORS
A14. General issues and basic processes – Personality
H. Ulas Ozcan, Hasan Kalyoncu University, Istanbul - Turkey

This study examined the profile of the employees who are called as “talents” in different organizations and
different sectors. Total 2830 white-collar employees participated to the study and 189 of them were called as
“talents” in their organizations. All participants completed reasoning test, needs scales (nAff, nAch, nPow,
nCog), time perspectives scales, change orientation scale, self-efficacy, uncertainty tolerance, ambiguity
tolerance, locus of control scales. The results showed that the employees who are called as “talent” showed
significant differences in all these dimensions. Specifically, talents showed significantly higher level of
reasoning, nAch, nPow, nCog, change orientation, self-efficacy, locus of control and ambiguity tolerance.
They also had significantly low level of uncertainty tolerance and nAff. In addition, talents also had a pattern
of time perspective. Specifically, they were highly future oriented and showed low level of past -orientation
and present orientation regarding with fatalism. This study showed that there is a need to investigate specific
profiles in employees.

446

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O240
WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT, FAMILY SATISFACTION AND EMPLOYEE
WELLBEING: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN AND INDIAN
SOCIAL WORKERS
D04. Work and organization - Well-being at work
Thomas Kalliath, Australian National University, Canberra – Australia
Parveen Kalliath, Australian Catholic University, Canberra – Australia
Christopher Chan, York University, Toronto – Canada

The purpose of the study was to investigate family satisfaction as a mediating mechanism through which
work-family conflict influences are transmitted on the wellbeing of social workers, who are exposed to high
stress work environments. To date, few studies have compared work-family conflict experiences of social
workers across national cultures. The present study addresses the gap in the literature by investigating this
mediating relationship in samples of Australian (n=439) and Indian (n=428) social workers. Survey of
professional social workers resulted in two large samples that had comparable demographic characteristics.
Confirmatory factor analyses using 3 work-family conflict variables (Time, Strain and Behaviour), family
satisfaction, and wellbeing showed good fitting models. We then proceeded to test the structural models
using AMOS, and found that family satisfaction mediated the relationship between work-family conflict
(Behaviour) and wellbeing in both Australian and Indian samples, and also mediated the relationships
between work-family conflict (Time and Strain) and wellbeing in the Indian sample. The findings of our
study contribute to the work-family conflict literature by uncovering interesting cultural similarities and
differences in the work-family conflict experiences of social workers in the Australian and Indian samples.
Practical implications for human resource management policies of social service agencies in both countries
are discussed.

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O241
INTERCULTURAL WILLINGNESS TO COMMUNICATE WITHIN
HEALTH SERVICES; INVESTIGATING ANXIETY, UNCERTAINTY,
ETHNOCENTRISM AND HELP SEEKING
C05. Culture and society - Group processes and intergroup relations
Shanna Logan, University of Sydney, Sydney - Australia
Zachary Steel, UNSW Australia, Sydney – Australia
Caroline Hunt, University of Sydney, Sydney – Australia

In order to better understand barriers to initial engagement with health services by ethnic minority patients,
the current study experimentally investigated the effect of low and high perceived predictability of an
intercultural health professional within a low or high anxiety provoking health interaction, on willingness to
interact. Additionally, the study aimed to assess the impact of state and trait anxiety, and the contribution of
ethnocentrism and attitudes towards seeking psychological help, on willingness to interact within a health
setting. Results indicate that both state anxiety and an anxiety provoking situation are significant predictors
of willingness to interact, with high anxiety leading to less willingness to interact, a finding enhanced when
predictability was also low. Also a heightened anxiety provoking situation was found to have a direct effect
on the perceived predictability of an intercultural health interaction partner. Despite previous research
indicating the importance of help seeking behaviour and cultural attitudes in negatively influencing
engagement with health services, the current study found that state anxiety was a more significant indicator
of willingness to interact in a cross-cultural health interaction than these other indicators.

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O242
ETHNICITY AND SERVICE USE: AN ANALYSIS OF SERVICE USE AND
TIME TO ACCESS TREATMENT BY ETHNICITY STATUS IN A LOCAL
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE
C07. Culture and society - Race and ethnicity
Shanna Logan, University of Sydney, Sydney - Australia
David Rouen, South Western Sydney Local Health District, Sydney – Australia
Renate Wagner, South Western Sydney Local Health District, Sydney – Australia
Zachary Steel, University of New South Wales, Sydney – Australia
Caroline Hunt, University of Sydney, Sydney – Australia

The current research aimed to assess the impact of ethnicity status on mental health service use in a
metropolitan area in Australia. Middle Eastern and South East Asian minority ethnicity status was compared
to native Australian majority ethnicity status, as these were the two largest cultural groups residing within
the local area. Clients who accessed the Clinic for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress in Western Sydney between
1996 and 2010 underwent a clinical assessment and research interview prior to receiving treatment to
determine both illness history and cultural background. Data was extracted from these files on demographic
information and health history. Relative to the local population, ethnic minority status was associated with
fewer patients accessing the service, with South East Asian patients reporting lowest service across all
cohorts studied. However, Middle Eastern patients’ service utilization increased with each successive cohort
over time. No significant differences between ethnicity status and duration of treatment delay were reported.
In order to further understand this discrepancy, post hoc analyses with language groups were conducted,
which revealed that those who spoke Arabic within the family home reported a shorter treatment delay
overall. Lower than expected use of the service was found in South East Asian and Middle Eastern ethnic
minority patients, commensurate with previous literature reporting lower service use by ethnic minorities.
Differences in treatment delay by ethnicity status or language highlight the importance of understanding
differences both within and between cultural groups, to further understand the impact of culture on service
use.

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O249
EFFECTS OF INTERGROUP COMPARISONS AND ANONYMITY ON
PERFORMANCE IN A TEAM GAME-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
B03. Development and education - Learning and instruction
Benjamin Le Hénaff, University of Rennes 2, Rennes - France
Nicolas Michinov, University of Rennes 2, Rennes – France
Olivier Le Bohec, University of Rennes 2, Rennes – France

The aim of this communication is to extend the SIDE Model (Social Identity model of Deindividuation
Effects) to a team game-based learning environment. This model is rooted into the social identity theoretical
framework. According to SIDE, people in an anonymous state while their social identity is rendered salient
by an intergroup comparison, identify more with their group, leading to a higher motivation to put their
group in a positive light. Nevertheless, few studies have examined how the variables involved in that model
affected performance in online learning environments. In order to study how this model may be applied to
such environments, an online system was developed to help students acquiring basic computing knowledge
from quizzes. The system offered the possibility to deliver intergroup comparison feedback in real-time to
increase the salience of group identity either in anonymity or individuation conditions. Results showed that
when group identity was salient, performance was higher for anonymous students rather than individuated
ones, but only for those who had low prior knowledge of computing skills. A similar benefit of anonymity
was observed when group identity was not salient among students with high prior knowledge. These findings
may have implications on the development of online learning environments where social gaming can be used
to boost learning motivation and performance with social and psychological theoretical models such as
SIDE.

450

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O250
CONCEPTUAL STRUCTURES AND PRODUCTIVITY OF COGNITIVE
FUNCTIONING
A12. General issues and basic processes - Intelligence and cognitive functioning
Elena Volkova, Institute of Psychology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow - Russian Federation
Marina Kholodnaya, Institute of Psychology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow - Russian Federation

Definition of intelligence in terms of its properties turned it into a catalog of cognitive functions which
greatly varies in different authors. Intelligence as a holistic mental reality disappeared. We offer to pass from
describing the properties of the intelligence to the issue of the nature of mental formations which "inside"
determines the properties of intelligence. In terms of a new approach conceptual structures are viewed as a
substratum of conceptual abilities. Conceptual (semantic, categorical, generative) abilities are central link to
the structure of intelligence which is described as a form of individual mental experiences. We name this
approach to the study of intelligence as ontological one. Our study aimed to reveal interrelations between the
conceptual structures and productivity of different types of cognitive functioning. A multiple design was
used in our research including assessment of conceptual structures (Kholodnaya, Volkova), conceptual
abilities (Kholodnaya, Savin), creativity (TTCT), intelligence (SPM, WAIS, WISC), field dependence/field
independence (EFT), impulsivity/reflectivity (MFFT). Participants of the experiment were 480 students aged
14-22 years. The data obtained convincingly demonstrates resource functions of conceptual abilities in
growth of creativity, verbal and nonverbal intelligence, competence; mobilization of involuntary control in
terms of perceptual structuring and scanning; activation of the process of generating mental narratives.

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O251
PEER COACHING FOR EFFECTIVE WORKPLACE LEARNING
D14. Work and organization - Workplace learning and training
Blanka Tacer, University of Primorska, Koper - Slovenia
Kristina Potocnik, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh - United Kingdom

Peer coaching (PC) refers to relational resources for professional growth. The literature has acknowledged a
lack of systematic approach to introducing PC in organizations. In responding to this gap we conducted a
quasi-field experiment involving a 5-day PC training programme. A total of 45 teachers participated in the
training in order to develop PC competencies.Participants voluntarily filled in the questionnaire before and
after the participation in the PC training. The questionnaire measured coaching competencies, establishing
coaching relationship, active listening skills, core self-evaluations (CSEs), and teacher self-efficacy. The
results showed a significant improvement of the target competencies after the completion of the training.
Supplementary results showed a significant interaction effect of CSEs and coaching competence on training
outcomes. We found that teachers with higher CSEs showed a significantly higher improvement of their
coaching competencies compared to teachers with lower CSEs. Coaching as a method of workplace learning
is a growing field of study. This is one of few empirical studies exploring the effectiveness of PC
programmes. In terms of theory development, our study implies that personality traits might have an
important role in developing coaching competencies. In terms of methodological implications, we have
showed that quasi-field experiments can be successfully used in studying the development of coaching
competencies.

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O252
THE SCREEN BETWEEN: ARE MOBILE PHONES USED IN WAYS THAT
DISTRACT FROM OR FACILITATE FRIENDSHIP INTERACTIONS?
A16. General issues and basic processes - Other
Presenter: Genavee Brown, Western Washington University, Bellingham - United States
Adriana Manago, Western Washington University, Bellingham - United States
Joseph Trimble, Western Washington University, Bellingham - United States
Nicolas Michinov, University of Rennes 2, Rennes - France

Today, mobile phones are ubiquitous, indispensable digital communication tools, but they may intrude upon
face-to-face (FtF) interactions, including those between pairs of friends. As a tool, the phone may be used in
at least four different ways during interactions: distraction, distraction multitasking, facilitation, and
facilitation multitasking. Distraction occurs when the participant is focused exclusively on the phone.
Distraction multitasking occurs when the participant divides their attention between friend and phone.
Facilitation occurs when information is shared via the phone. Facilitation multitasking occurs when shared
information is discussed. The aim of the current study was to observe which of these phone use behaviors
would occur and in what amounts. Pairs of friends were unobtrusively filmed during brief interaction in a
waiting room setting where the 4 types of mobile phone use behaviors were observed. Results showed that of
distraction and distraction multitasking were more common uses of the mobile phone than facilitation and
facilitation multitasking. The present results showed that when mobile phones are used in friendship
interactions they seem to be used in ways that distract from the FtF interactions that should be fulfilling our
relational needs.

453

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O253
PERSONALITY WITHOUT BORDERS: DO QUESTIONNAIRE
LANGUAGES AND SMART-PHONES BIAS RESULTS?
D01. Work and organization - HR assessment and development
Rob Bailey, OPP Ltd, Oxford - United Kingdom
Tatiana Gulko, OPP Ltd, Oxford - United Kingdom
Sofia Lundahl, Lund University, Lund – Sweden
Elin Wetterberg, Lund University, Lund – Sweden

Purpose: Linguistic, cultural and psychological issues may bias multi-lingual psychometric assessment of
personality. Bias may also arise from questionnaire completion via websites vs. mobile phones. This
presentation explores two studies which test these assumptions. The rationale for this work is that mobile vs.
web differences have not been widely studied. Additionally, 16PF is unusual in that it has idiosyncratic
items, which cause a challenge to translation and adaptation. Methodology: Data were collected from 4,900
people completing the 16PF in US English, UK English, Norwegian, Danish, German, French, Italian,
Spanish, Swedish, and Dutch. Data were collected for 500 people completing a short version of the 16PF on
the web and via a mobile app. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) was used to examine item level and scale
level data. T-tests were used to assess scale level differences. Results: Significant DIF was found in a high
number of items for each language. However, the effect size of the DIF (estimated in lordif in R), showed
very few items had DIF big enough to cause a practical effect at the scale level. For the web/phone data only
four items were flagged for significant DIF, but none showed practically DIF. There were five significant
trait differences; however, effect sizes are small. Conclusions/implications Mobile or web administration
does not seem to cause bias. Some bias occurs via different languages, but not enough to have a major
practical effect. The analysis was limited to an EU/US sample; however, preliminary analysis suggests other
versions (e.g. Traditional Chinese) show less variation than some of the European languages. The results
suggest recruitment with mixed assessment languages will be fair to candidates.

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O254
ACQUISITION OF ENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS AMONG YOUTHS: A
TOOL FOR INSECURITY REDUCTION IN NIGERIA
F01. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Capacities building and human development
Vera Nkiru Nwadinobi, Nwafor Orizu College of Education Nsugbe, Nsugbe-Onitsha – Nigeria
Celestine Arinze Okafor, Nwafor Orizu College of Education Nsugbe, Nsugbe-Onitsha – Nigeria
Daniel Chinedu Okafor, Nwafor Orizu College of Education Nsugbe, Nsugbe-Onitsha – Nigeria

Lack of entrepreneurial skills among the youths in Nigeria accounts for most youth unemployment which of
course makes them vulnerable to different social crimes leading to insecurity in Nigeria. Economic
insecurity has the potential of exposing the people to poverty starvation, restiveness, underdevelopment,
social vices and general state of insecurity. The persistence of such a situation exposes everyone directly or
indirectly, to avoidable dangers of social crisis and violence. It is believed that the challenges of
unemployment and joblessness can predispose a nation to economic insecurity. The introduction of
entrepreneurship education into the education system of Nigeria is a well conceived policy that empowers
the youths with functional skills and thereby reduces insecurity of all kinds among them and the nation in
general. This present work therefore set out to find out whether acquisition of entrepreneurial skills among
the youths will create employment for them and possibly reduce insecurity experienced in Nigeria today,
specifically the study sought to find out the causes of insecurity in Nigeria and skills necessary for
entrepreneurial occupation in Nigeria. The significance of the study is that all concerned about the youth and
development will see that acquisition of entrepreneurial skills assist youths not only to be gainfully
employed but also to employ themselves and thereby contribute to economic security and eventual reduction
of insecurity and development of the nation, that will increase the practical input in entrepreneurial education
being introduced in schools. It will also boost vocational guidance in schools.To guide the study, three
research questions were raised thus: (a) What are the causes of insecurity in Nigeria? (b) What requisite
skills are needed for entrepreneurship occupation? (c) What are the contributions of entrepreneurial skills
training in insecurity reduction? Also three null hypothesis were raised and tested at the probability of 0.05
level of significance thus: (a) There is no significance difference among workers in the three selected
Nigerian universities with respect to their views on the causes of insecurity in Nigeria. (b) There is no
significant difference among workers of two different faculties with respect to their views on requisite skills
needed for entrepreneurship occupation. (c) Acquisition of entrepreneurial skills is not significant in
insecurity reduction in Nigeria. Survey Research Method was adopted for the study and a questionnaire titled
‘Entrepreneurial Skills and Insecurity Reduction Questionnaire’ (ESINRQ) was employed for data
collection. The population of the study consisted of 300 academic and non-academic staff from three
Nigerian universities. Purposive sampling technique was used to compose the sample with 100 staff selected
from each university. The staff were also stratified into status and faculty. A test-retest method after an
interval of three weeks and the use of Pearson Product moment correlation statistics, were employed to
obtain reliability co-efficient of 0.75. Scoring was based on a Likert type scale of strongly agree, agree,
disagree and strongly disagree, while the score of 4,3,2,1 was applied respectively from strongly agree to
strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using frequency count, percentage, mean score and mean ranking
were used particularly to answer the research questions presented in tables 1-3, the hypotheses were tested
using the t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) where applicable. According to (Itassan, 1998 & Adana,
1996), the t-test statistical tool as a parametric test is often used to compare the means of two groups.
ANOVA statistics is appropriate for use when the researcher is dealing with more than two independent
groups. From the summary of the results of the study, the causes of insecurity in Nigeria include poor
parental upbringing, parents as negative role models, the get-rich quick syndrome in Nigeria, IN-fighting
among political rival, high level of poverty, inability to obtain gainful employment, drop out syndrome,
visiting internet sites which show youths doing violent exploits, desire to be recognized and respected by
peers among others. Findings also show the requisite skills needed for entrepreneurial occupation to be
communication skills, negotiating skills, leadership skills, integrity and reputation for honesty and sales

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skills. Results further revealed the contributions in Entrepreneurial skills training in insecurity reduction to
be: skilled entrepreneurs can go into mass production of anti bomb detector and information techniques to
help detect or even block communication among perpetrators of insecurity, by reducing unemployment since
it contributes to the spate of insecurity, economic empowerment of the youths and that it enhances
production of high quality goods and services. The null hypothesis one showed no significant difference
among workers in the three selected Nigerian universities with respect to their views on the causes of
insecurity in Nigeria. Again hypothesis revealed that acquisition of entrepreneurial skills training is
significant in creating employment for youths and reducing insecurity. Based on the findings, the researcher
thereby concludes that acquisition of entrepreneurial training skills is a solution to insecurity problem in
Nigeria. This is because for lives and property to be saved within the country youths should be gainfully
employed. Entrepreneurship is a solution to unemployment as has been revealed by the study. People will be
job creators rather than job seeker in the end. It is therefore recommended that government should deemphasize paper qualification and introduce more viable programmes that foster entrepreneurship. Again
most of the ailing industries especially the ones that have many indigenous skilled professionals should be
revitalized. This will not only solve the problem of joblessness in the country, it will drive crimes away from
the streets thereby making the country safe to live in. thus reducing both economic insecurity and social
insecurity. In addition school counsellors have big tasks at hand based on the findings of the study.
Counsellors in each states of the federation should organize regular workshops, meeting and events with
local authorities, youths, and community members for national peace enhancement.

456

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O255
INTERPERSONAL BENEFITS OF OPTIMISTIC EXPECTATIONS:
OVERRIDING NEGATIVE RESPONSES TO PARTNER WITHDRAWAL?
B04. Development and education - Attachment and intimate relationships
Miriam Parise, Catholic University of Milan, Milan - Italy
Silvia Donato, Catholic University of Milan, Milan – Italy
Ariela Francesca Pagani, Catholic University of Milan, Milan – Italy
Dominik Schoebi, University of Fribourg, Fribourg – Switzerland

Optimism can be seen as an enduring strength in marriage. It provides spouses with a broader and more
flexible range of behavioral options and helps them to successfully navigate stressful situations. Optimism is
characterized by a positive attitude toward the future and by positive expectations. While a positive attitude
toward the future may benefit adaptation, merely holding positive expectations may lead to disappointment
and inflexible responding to daily challenges. Using questionnaires and diaries from 103 couples, this study
examines how spouses respond to situations where the partner prefers being alone at the end of a workday.
We investigated whether and how optimism, and two components of positive expectations, the overall level
of and the flexibility, shape these responses. Findings showed that perceived partner withdrawal was
associated with less positive and more negative reported behaviors. Optimism buffered this effect above and
beyond the effect of positive expectations. Expectation levels indicated no buffering and even a tendency to
more negative and less positive reactions. Finally, and unexpectedly, expectation flexibility had no effect on
partners’ reported negative behaviors, and was even associated with less positive reported responses to the
partner’s withdrawal. Implications for the theoretical understanding of optimism and expectations, as well as
for intervention, will be discussed.

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O264
YOUTH PERSONAL ACTIVITY MANIFESTATION IN SOCIAL
NETWORKS AND REAL LIFE
F14. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Cyberspace and virtual realities
Tatiana Pilishvili, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow - Russian Federation

The study is devoted to the personal activity manifestation in cyberspace (evidence from social networks)
and real life. It was conducted on the basis of Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow. 218
Russian students, 17-23 years old were engaged. There were used the content analysis of social network
activity and the following Russian adapted techniques: “Life orientations”, Leontiev D.A.; “Selfdetermination”, Sheldon B.; “Psychological well-being scales”, Rieff K.; “Life satisfaction index”, Panina
N.V.; “Success and failure explanation style”, Gordeeva, T.S.; “Strategies of interior behavior in conflict
situations”, Fetiskin N.P.; “Diagnostics of personal interactive orientation”, Schurkova N.E.; “Satisfaction
with quality of life level”, Vodopyanova N.E.; “The type of behavioral activity”, Wasserman L., Gumenuk
N.V.; “The level of aspiration”, Gorbatchevski V.K.; “The inventory of activity in social networks”,
Ivaschenko A.V., Pilishvili T.S. Studying the relationship between students activity self-esteem in social
networks, the number of registered profiles as well as the amount of time spent online per day, we’ve
obtained results, according to which feeling of satisfaction with own activity can’t be the only quantitative
variable. The productivity depends rather on the user’s activity who produces something in social networks
to change his life in objective reality, so on concrete efforts in cyberspace and productive activity in
meatspace for actual well-being.

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O268
ACTION ANTICIPATION BASED ON DESIRES, BELIEFS AND FALSE
BELIEFS: DIFFERENCE BETWEEN IMPLICIT AND EXPLICIT
EXPRESSIONS
B07. Development and education - Social cognition, identity and social interactions
Evren Etel, University of Queensland, Brisbane - Australia
Virginia Slaughter, University of Queensland, Brisbane - Australia

Action anticipation is a critical ability to make social interaction functional. This ability is defined within
Theory of Mind (ToM). Recent studies have shown two expressions of action anticipation: Implicit and
explicit. However, whether the implicit expression of action anticipation indicates an understanding of
behaviour or understanding of mental states is a debate. Recent studies show evidence supporting the
proposal that there is an early-developing implicit ToM process that may or may not be continuous with
later-developing explicit ToM. However, only false belief understanding has been assessed with implicit
tasks. On the other hand, studies of explicit ToM have moved beyond assessing ToM with false belief
understanding, through the development of a ToM scale to examine a series of ToM acquisitions
comprehensively (Wellman & Liu, 2004). This study aimed to develop an iToM scale, modelled on Wellman
and Liu’s explicit ToM scale. These tasks were designed to measure implicit understanding of the first three
steps of Wellman and Liu’s developmental scale, including diverse desires, diverse beliefs, and false
belief.Three ToM tasks including implicit and explicit versions were administered to 30 three year-old
children. The preliminary results indicated that, although children did not show difference between implicit
and explicit ToM task performances, a gradual developmental pattern was found in implicit performances,
similar to explicit performances. Findings are discussed in the framework of theoretical debate on what these
implicit performances indicate.

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O271
SHIFTING IDENTITIES AND SPACES IN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS: A
DISCURSIVE EXPLORATION OF YOUNG WOMEN’S ACCOUNTS IN
SOUTH AFRICA
C03. Culture and society - Sex and gender
Christine Laidlaw, University of South Africa, Pretoria - South Africa
Puleng Segalo, University of South Africa, Pretoria - South Africa
Precious Sipuka, Council for Higher Education, Pretoria - South Africa
Lorraine Radtke, University of Calgary, Calgary – Canada

Despite the numerous studies and interventions that have been conducted in the effort to improve women’s
sexual health, little has been done to understand sexuality from a female-centred perspective.Feminist
critique of gender inequality highlights how the production of male power is prevalent within heterosexual
relationships.Dating and intimate relationships among young people has been an area sparsely explored in
South Africa.Therefore, there is a need to explore how young people, specifically in this case, young women
negotiate dating and intimate relationships. Understanding how young women negotiate dating and intimate
relationships may enable us to get an insight into some of the dynamics that shape such
relationships.Research on intimate relationships among young people in South Africa has mostly focused on
exploring aspects of gender relations, violence within intimate relationships, HIV/AIDS and related sexual
behaviours and risks. Using a critical feminist lens, the study aimed to explore how young South African
women navigate their space, position themselves in their intimate relationships, construct themselves as
sexual beings and negotiate dating and intimate relationships.Two conversation groups discussing young
women’s relationships with men were conducted, and discourse analysis was used to analyse how the
women construct relationships with men, the sexual identities they work up, and the cultural resources they
draw upon in so doing. The paper will provide the preliminary finding of the study.

460

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O283
SPESIS: A NEW SCALE FOR THE EXISTENTIAL DAMAGE ASSESSMENT
C11. Culture and society - Forensic psychology and law
Sara Pezzuolo, Court Consultant, Milano, Montepulciano - Italy
Marco Samory, Court Consultant, Padova – Italy
Daniele Berto, ASL Padova 16, Padova – Italy
Michela Veronese, ASL Padova 16, Padova - Italy

Existential damage is a new claim within Italian civil courts. However, the quantification is extremely
difficult because of the lack of indicators and tools. The “Existential Damage Scale- Scala di Valutazione per
il Pregiudizio Esistenziale” (SPEsis) has the aim to measure such damage allowing the judges to comply
with the “compensation”. SPEsis is a 79-items scale that analyses 5 areas and it permits to obtain a
differentiated profile depending on the damaged area. The SPEsis has also two scales to detect attempts of
fake or exaggeration of the damage. SPEsis was submitted to a wide sample (n=340) split into 3 groups
(Damaged, Faked and Control); reliability and validity result to fit. KR20 index is more than .90 in each
group. Item analysis confirms the internal consistency of the scales. A hierarchical confirmatory factor
analysis verifies the construct validity. The statistical indexes confirm the goodness of the model (CFI and
TLI>.90 and RMSEA<.05). Scoring and transformation of the raw scores into percentile ranks and T points
are very easy. The SPEsis can be used in civil and penal trials, even with a biological damage in trial and
non-trial stage. It gives an immediate and reliable image of the existential damage, pointing out fake or
doubtful profiles. SPEsis advantages are the shortness and the accessibility for a wide population (for ages
16-78). The SPEsis is the only one tool created for the assessment and the evaluation of the existential
damage component.

461

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O285
ROLE OF RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHERS AND SELF-EFFICACY ON ELEARNERS’ COMMITMENT
F10. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Psychotechnologies and life-long learning
Emilie Vayre, University Paris Ouest Nanterre la Défense, Paris - France
Anne-Marie Vonthron, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre la Défense, Paris – France

In the last decade in France, e-learning has progressively spread through universities structures. In spite of
this growth, high dropout and failure rates have been of concern to many higher education institutions (Park
& Choi, 2009). According to Oncu and Cakir (2011), to improve online learning effectiveness, research must
deepen the study of e-learners’ engagement. Empirical studies have shown that relationships with others and
self-efficacy are significant predictors of training commitment, in both face-to-face and online learning
programs (e.g. Fredricks & al., 2004; Paechter, & al., 2010;...). Subsequently, the purpose of this study is to
test a model of e-learners’ commitment integrating social support (form teachers, peers and family members)
and sense of community as direct and indirect factors; training self-efficacy playing a mediator role. Survey
results based on a questionnaire administered to 255 students enrolled in an online French university course,
confirm but only partially our hypothesized model. Path analysis revealed that teachers are the only source of
social support that significantly promotes e-learners’ commitment. Moreover, sense of community exerts a
positive but indirect influence on students’ commitment; self-efficacy functioning as a mediator. Finally, the
study findings shed light on how we can foster students’ commitment in online courses, which is a
meaningful factor affecting e-learners’ academic achievement and retention (Hu & Hui, 2012).

462

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O290
COMPREHENSIVE AND BRIEF MEASURES OF HOPE FOR RESEARCH
AND PRACTICE
E02. Health and clinical intervention – Psychodiagnosis
Anthony Scioli, Keene State College, Keene - United States

Background: Scioli and colleagues (Scioli, 2007; Scioli &Biller, 2009) have introduced an integrative theory
of hope, focusing on mastery, attachment, survival, and spirituality. In conjunction with this work, Scioli et
al. (2011) have derived comprehensive measures of state (40 items) and trait hope (56 items). In the present
research3briefer measures of state hope were derivedto serve the diverse needs of researchers and
practitioners (2 parallel 20-item forms, and a 10-item rapid screen). Methods and Results: To establish the
reliability, and freedom from distortion (social desirability, age, gender, SES) of 3 brief hope measures, 525
internet participants were used (125 males; 403 females), 16 to 85 yrs. (M = 38.39; SD = 14.53). Alpha
values ranged from .84 to .87. Freedom from distortion was evident for all 3 measures (all p and t values
were > .05):(Eysenck Lie Scale correlations ranged from.05 to .06; for age, r values were between .04 and
.06; there no gender differences; for SES, the r values fell between.01 and .02). For validation purposes,
clinical and nonclinical samples were used. In young adults, all 3 measures demonstrated adequate validity,
correlating positively with standard measures of meaning and spirituality as well as willingness to enter
psychotherapy, and inversely with loneliness, anxiety, and depression. In a clinical sample, all 3 measures
were inversely correlated with clinician ratings on the Hamilton Scale for Depression.

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O292
HOPE AND HEALTH: THE IMPACT OF HOPE ON HEALTH HABITS,
HEALTH-RELATED STAGES OF CHANGE, HIV, AND CANCER
SURVIVORSHIP
E13. Health and clinical intervention - Psycho-oncology and psychological support in chronic diseases
Anthony Scioli, Keene State College, Keene - United States

Background: A positive link between hope and physical health has long been suspected. However, there is
scant empirical research to support this claim. Drawing on an integrative theory of hope (Scioli, 2007; Scioli
& Biller, 2009), 4 studies were conducted to assess the impact of hope on physical health and healing.
Methods and Results: In studies 1-3, an integrative trait hope scale was used (Scioli et al., 2011). In study 1,
the integrative hope measure was linked to a broader array of health habits as compared to a standard goaloriented measure of hope (Snyder et al., 1991). In a step-wise regression, the integrative approach to hope
was retained and the goal-oriented measure was excluded as a predictor of a composite health habits index.
In study 2, greater trait hope was associated with depth of commitment (more advanced stages of change) to
a healthier diet and increased exercise. In study 3 higher scores on the integrative trait hope measure were
predictive of non-progression of HIV (higher CD4 blood levels) over a 4 year period. In study 4, a content
analysis of hope themes in public testimonies of long-term breast cancer survivors revealed a strong reliance
on attachment and spirituality, dimensions typically ignored in psychological studies of hope. A fuller
conception of hope provides a framework for further research on emotion and health as well as a foundation
for developing positive interventions to foster greater health and healing.

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O294
VIOLENT RESPONSE TO INSULT: EXPERIMENTAL EXAMINATION OF
THE CULTURE OF HONOR IN TURKEY
C06. Culture and society - Attitudes and values
Veysel Mehmet Elgin, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu - Turkey
Honor is a central value in the honor cultures that are generally seen in the Mediterranean, Latin America,
and the Southern United States. As a Mediterranean country, Turkey also possesses the culture of honor
(COH). Although COH is a significant cultural syndrome for understanding the psychological processes of
the members of the honor cultures, it is a relatively new area that has been studied by the social
psychologists after the initial studies conducted by the anthropologists and sociologists. Generally speaking,
honor refers the reputation of the person, which one does not hesitate to protect it all costs. In this regard,
people are hypersensitive to insults in COH, and accordingly, violent response to insult is a general
characteristic of COH. Current study is the first experimental study examining COH in Turkey. Eighty four
(n = 84) male university students from the two regions of Turkey (i.e., Eastern Turkey and Western Turkey)
participated in this study. While half of the participants were exposed to a subtle insult, the other half was
not exposed to the insult. Then as the measure of violent response to insult, their responses on a word
completion task were examined. The ANOVA results indicated that the endorsement of COH in Turkey is
prevalent. It is believed that the findings will shed light on the COH literature in general. All the findings of
the current study and the suggestions for the future studies will be discussed on the basis of the literature.

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O296
COGNITIVE ERRORS AND SYMPTOMS OF ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION
IN NEW ZEALAND YOUTH
E09. Health and clinical intervention - Positivity and well-being
Tatiana Tairi, Massey University, Wellington - New Zealand

Cognitive models of psychopathology suggest that negatively biased thinking styles are involved in the
development and maintenance of emotional disturbances. Even though there is evidence for the existence of
cognitive errors in youth in the United States and Greece, this has not been examined to date in Aotearoa
New Zealand. The present study investigated the extent to which cognitive errors were exhibited by New
Zealand youth and the interrelationships between cognitive errors, anxiety and depression. A community
sample of adolescents aged 16 to 18 years from secondary schools within the Wellington region completed
an online survey, consisting of the Children’s Negative Cognitive Error Questionnaire and self report
measures of anxiety and depression. Initial results of the first 118 cases indicated that cognitive errors were
significantly related to greater levels of symptoms of anxiety and depression. These findings suggest that
cognitive errors are a common and pervasive attribute of adolescents who reported anxious and/or depressive
symptoms and demonstrated the generalizability of the association between cognitive distortions and anxiety
and depression in New Zealand. Final results of this investigation are expected to increase understanding and
inform the design of treatment interventions, as well as, educational interventions for anxiety and depressive
disorders in New Zealand youth.

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O297
SUCCESSFUL AGING IN THE WORKPLACE AND ORGANIZATIONAL
CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIORS AMONG OLDER WORKERS IN HONG KONG
D13. Work and organization - Age and work
Yue Lok Cheung, Lingnan University, Hong Kong - Hong Kong
Dannii Y. L. Yeung, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong - Hong Kong
Anise M. S. Wu, University of Macau, Macau - Macau

Global workforce is experiencing demographic aging. Thus, understanding factors that support successful
aging and its impact on occupational well-being become an important research agenda. For instance, earlier
studies suggest that older workers who experience successful aging in the workplace have lower intention to
leave the organization. In this study, we aim to extend this line of research by exploring whether successful
aging at the workplace is related to organizational citizenship behaviors, an important form of contextual
performance in the workplace. This study is a self-administrated questionnaire survey. 350 currently
employed Chinese workers in Hong Kong who aged 45 years or over were recruited. Among them, 129 were
male and 220 were female (one participant did not declare the gender identity). The average age was 51.88
(SD = 5.15). Correlation showed that all successfully aging in workplace dimensions (i.e. adaptability and
health, occupational growth, positive relationship with coworkers, sense of personal security and continued
focus of work goal) were significantly related to the two dimensions of organizational citizenship behaviors,
namely organizational citizenship behavior-individual (OCBI, r ranged from .28 to .42, app p<.01) and
organizational citizenship behavior-organization (OCBO, r ranged from .26 to .39, all p<.01). Hierarchical
regression showed that occupational growth was a significant predictor of both OCBI and OCBO. Strategies
will be discussed to enhance successful aging in the workplace during the presentation.

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O301
PROCESS EVALUATION OF ONLINE PESTKOPPENSTOPPEN, AN
ONLINE TAILORED ADVICE FOR CYBERBULLYING VICTIMS
B08. Development and education - Bullying and aggression
Niels Jacobs, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands

Online Pestkoppenstoppen is an online tailored advice for cyberbullying victims that are starting to attend
secondary vocational education. The intervention is developed based on theory, scientific evidence, and
recommendations of the target group. These recommendations, as well as process information (i.e. focus
group interviews, questionnaires and website usage statistics) will be discussed in this presentation. More
specifically, the following questions will be answered: How many/which adolescents participated? Why do
participants or schools withdraw from participation? Which recommendations/experiences do participants
have? How do they judge the intervention (quantitative/qualitative)? Almost 6000 adolescents (44 schools)
were invited, 361 started with the research. The most important results were: (1) schools/participants see the
intervention as really positive and useful; (2) participants judged the questionnaires attached tothis study as
too long and time consuming; (3) success of including schools and participants depends on the timing and
process of recruiting (two methods); (4) success of the research depends on the instructions (at school/in
information letters); (5) the online enrollment was perceived as being complex; and (6) a combination of
questions and advices is preferred. The results of this study lead to several recommendations that need to be
taken into account when conducting online research with this research population.

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O303
EMOTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH EARTHQUAKES TWO YEARS LATER:
THE ROLE OF PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AND AGE FOR PRIMARY
SCHOOL CHILDREN
F18. EXPO 2015 Hot Topics - Psychosocial consequences of disasters and poverty
Daniela Raccanello, University of Verona, Verona - ItalyMaria Cappello, University of Verona, Verona –
Italy
Diletta Caprara, University of Verona, Verona - ItalyPaola Cavazza, University of Verona, Verona – Italy
Fabiana Mazzola, University of Verona, Verona - ItalyLorenzo Facco, TERR.A.IN. snc, Vicenza – Italy

While long-term disadvantageous consequences of experiencing natural disasters for mental health are well
documented, less is known on how emotional representations of such events are influenced, especially for
children. We explored the role of personal experience and age for primary school children’s emotions
associated with earthquakes, after two years. We hypothesized that emotional richness was higher for
children who experienced them and with age. We involved 127 second- and fifth-graders, who were living
next to the epicentre of the 2012 Emilia Romagna earthquake (experimental group) or about 80 kilometres
far (control group) when it happened. We proposed a semi-structured interview, focused on knowledge of
earthquakes and associated emotions, and a task on the intensity of 4 negative emotions. We also measured
emotional understanding and regulation abilities, not differing in the two groups. Analyses of variance
revealed that the number of emotional terms and variety of their antecedents (natural, biological, human
technological, human non-technological, affective, and cognitive) spontaneously reported was higher for the
experimental group for older children. Intensity of fear, anxiety, sadness, and anger was higher for the
experimental group at all ages. Notwithstanding limitations, we documented the role played by personal
experience of natural disasters in shaping children’s later emotional representations, with useful hints for
prevention at an applied level.

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O305
IMPACT OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA ON
THEIR LEVEL OF LONELINESS AND ANXIETY
B02. Development and education - School adjustment, academic achievement and learning disabilities
Latife Utaş Akhan, Bulent Ecevit University, Zonguldak - Turkey
Along with the many conveniences introduced into our lives by use of the computer and internet, there are
also many problems associated with the excessively frequent use of them. According to Rehm, the internet is
a means for individuals to redefine themselves both individually and socially in several aspects including
among others education, health, child development, dialogue, intercommunication, self-fulfillment, but can
also be the cause of reduced social communication as well as social deviations. The longer time the internet
is used, the less enter the users into relationship with people in social life; which may result in “social
isolation”. This research was carried out in the form of a descriptive study aimed to identify the impact of
university students’ use of social media on their level of loneliness and anxiety. The universe of research
consisted of 754 students of a state university, willing to participate in research. In the personal data sheet
developed for the purpose of data gathering, the researchers made use of the Beck Anxiety Inventory and
UCLA Loneliness Scale. The researchers obtained written permits form the state university’s ethics
committee as well as written and verbal consent forms from participating students. The results revealed that
65.1% of the participants had an own personal computer, 60.7% had a Facebook account, 14.5% a Twitter
account, 37.4% spent 1-2 hours on the computer, while 18.6% spent 3-4 hours; and that 31.6% used the
internet to get information, 11% to get socialized/establish friendships, 27.6% to get rid of boredom, and
32.2% to engage in conversation. The loneliness level of students making use of social media 8 hours a day
or more, the anxiety level of students making use of social media almost never/only once in a month or those
staying with their relatives, and the anxiety and loneliness level of those at an age of 31 and more have been
found to be high.

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O309
DISTINCTIVE GENDER CHARACTERISTICS OF SELF-EFFICACY OF
HEADS OF UKRAINIAN EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
D02. Work and organization - Leadership and entrepreneurship
Olena Bondarchuk, University of Educational Management, Kiev – Ukraine

Objectives. To find out distinctive gender characterisitcs of self-efficacy of heads of Ukrainian educational
organizations. Theoretical bases. The theory of self-efficacy (A.Bandura, J.E.Maddux, M.Sherer etc); Career
dynamics (E.Schein, D.E.Super, J.L.Holland etc); The social psychology of gender (S.Bem, S.M.Burn etc);
Psychology of management in education (L.M.Karamushka, N.L.Kolominsky etc. Results. The following
research instruments have been used: a) M.Sherer et J.E.Maddux’s General Self-Efficacy Scale (modified by
A.Boyarintseva); b) a projective instrument of a free description of a successful manager’s life
(O.Bondarchuk). The obtained data were analyzed using correlation analysis, ANOVA (SPSS-21.0). The
sample included 482 heads of educational organizations (51.7% - females and 48.3% - males) from different
regions of Ukraine. The highest self-efficacy was shown to be both in men- and women-heads of educational
organizations who were oriented towards self-realization in all spheres of life. However, men, unlike women,
were more oriented towards vertical careers thus having higher self-efficacy (p<0.05). It should be noted that
with age this trend became stronger. Conclusion. The investigation findings can be used in developing
Ukrainian educational organization heads’ self-efficacy by means of special training courses based on
trainees’ gender differences. This can be effectively done in the system of post-graduate pedagogical
training, in particular in refresher training.

471

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O312
RESEARCH OF PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF DOMINANT
TYPES OF UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AS PERCEIVED
BY STUDENTS
D12. Work and organization - Safety culture and climate
Olga Ishchuk, Zaporizhzhya National University, Zaporizhzhya – Ukraine

The effectiveness of university training depends on a number of factors among which universities’
organizational culture sometimes plays a leading role. Objective: to analyze the characteristics of students’
perceptions of the dominant types of organizational culture of their universities. Methods. The investigation
was done on a sample of 619 students of universities of different ownership forms in different regions of
Ukraine using the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) by K.Cameron and R.Quinn.
Results. The study found that 38.3% and 32.2% of the students from state-owned universities viewed the
clan and market types of organizational culture respectively to be dominant in their universities. However the
clan type of organizational culture was shown to be dominant in 70.3% of private universities. The students
from the state-owned universities in contrast to those from the private ones had inconsistent ideas about the
key elements of organizational culture that included management type, HR management, strategic
objectives, efficiency criteria, and key ties. Conclusion. The inconsistency of students’ ideas about the key
elements of organizational culture has negative effects on students’ understanding of their role in the
development of universities and on students’ organizational behaviors in general. The investigation findings
can be helpful in counseling university heads and students as well as in training courses on matters of
organizational culture.

472

ORAL PRESENTATIONS 0001 - 0500

O313
A COUNTERBALANCED COMPARISON STUDY OF A TIMECONTINGENT SMARTPHONE APPLICATION AND AN EVENTCONTINGENT ESTIMATED SNACK DIARY
E11. Health and clinical intervention - Lifestyles and healthy self-regulation
Nele Jacobs, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen - Netherlands
Saskia Wouters, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen – Netherlands
Viviane Thewissen, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen – Netherlands
Mira Duif, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen – Netherlands
Lilian Lechner, Open University of the Nethe