Interviewer_Manual_NPS_Y2__English_x Interviewer Manual NPS Y2 English

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N
ATIONAL
B
UREAU OF
S
TATISTICS
2010
-
2011
National Panel Survey (NPS 2010-2011)
[
U
N I T E D
R
E P U B L I C O F
T
A N Z A N I A
]
1
Table of Contents
Part I: Household Questionnaire................................................................................................3
General Instructions ..........................................................................................................................4
General Instructions for Completing the Household Questionnaire................................................... 11
Pre-Printed Roster Form..................................................................................................................16
Section A-1: Household Identification ..............................................................................................17
Section A-2: Survey Staff Details ......................................................................................................19
Section B: Household Member Roster..............................................................................................21
Section C: Education........................................................................................................................26
Section D: Health............................................................................................................................. 31
Section E: Labour.............................................................................................................................38
Section F: Food outside the Household ............................................................................................54
Section G: Subjective Welfare ..........................................................................................................56
Section H: Governance ....................................................................................................................57
Section I: Food Security ...................................................................................................................59
Section J: Housing, Water & Sanitation ............................................................................................61
Section K: Consumption of Food over Past One Week.......................................................................69
Section L: Non-Food Expenditure – Past one week and one month ................................................... 72
Section M: Non-Food Expenditure – Past twelve months..................................................................73
Section N: Household Assets............................................................................................................74
Section O: Assistance and Groups ....................................................................................................75
Section P: Credit.............................................................................................................................. 77
Section Q: Finance...........................................................................................................................79
Section R: Recent Shocks to Household Welfare...............................................................................82
Section S: Deaths in Household........................................................................................................ 83
Section V-1: Household Re-contact Information ...............................................................................85
Section V-2: Filter Questions............................................................................................................86
Gift to the Respondent .................................................................................................................... 87
Section U: Anthropometry...............................................................................................................88
Following the Interview...................................................................................................................91
Part II: Agricultural Questionnaire ...........................................................................................92
Introduction.................................................................................................................................... 93
Section A- 1: Household Identification .............................................................................................94
Section 1: Household Roster ............................................................................................................ 94
Section 2: Plot Roster ......................................................................................................................95
Overall Structure of Sections 2 – 7 ................................................................................................. 100
Network Roster............................................................................................................................. 104
Section 3: Plot Details.................................................................................................................... 107
Section 4. Crops by Plot ................................................................................................................ 123
Section 5. Crop Production and Sales ............................................................................................ 127
Section 6. Permanent Crops by Plot ............................................................................................... 131
Section 7. Permanent Crops by Crop .............................................................................................. 134
Section 8. Outgrower Schemes & Contract Farming ....................................................................... 137
Section 9. Processed Agricultural Products and Agricultural By-Products........................................ 139
Section 10A. Livestock ................................................................................................................... 141
Section 10B. Livestock By-Products ................................................................................................ 147
2
Section 11. Farm Implements & Machinery .................................................................................... 150
Section 12. Extension.................................................................................................................... 152
Part III: Fisheries Questionnaire.............................................................................................154
General Instructions ...................................................................................................................... 155
Module B: Fisheries Calendar......................................................................................................... 156
Module C: Household Labour (Last High Season) ............................................................................ 157
Module D: Fisheries Labour (Last High Season)............................................................................... 159
Module E: Fisheries Input (Last High Season).................................................................................. 163
Module F: Fisheries Output (Last High Season) ............................................................................... 167
Module G: Fisheries Gear Rented Out (Last High Season)................................................................ 171
Module H: Fish Trading (Last High Season) ..................................................................................... 172
Module I: Household Labour (Last Low Season).............................................................................. 174
Module J: Fisheries Labour (Last Low Season)................................................................................. 174
Module J: Fisheries Input (Last Low Season)................................................................................... 174
Module K: Fisheries Output (Last Low Season) ............................................................................... 174
Module L: Fisheries Gear Rented Out (Last Low Season) ................................................................. 174
Module M: Fish Trading (Last Low Season)..................................................................................... 174
Part IV: Community Questionnaire ........................................................................................175
General Instructions ...................................................................................................................... 176
Section CB: Access to Basic Services ............................................................................................... 176
Section CC: Investment Projects..................................................................................................... 176
Section CD: Land............................................................................................................................ 176
Section CE: Agriculture .................................................................................................................. 177
Section CF: Demography and Family Issues .................................................................................... 177
Section CG: Governance ................................................................................................................ 177
Section CH: Water and Sanitation .................................................................................................. 177
Section CI: Roster of Community Leaders ....................................................................................... 178
Section CJ: Market Prices............................................................................................................... 178
Part V: Tracking Forms ..........................................................................................................179
Tracking Protocol .......................................................................................................................... 180
Form T-0 Preprinted Household Roster .......................................................................................... 181
Form T-1 Household Tracking Form................................................................................................ 190
Form T-2 Individual Tracking Form................................................................................................. 194
Tracking Examples......................................................................................................................... 198
Part VI: GPS Measurements...................................................................................................202
GPS Directions............................................................................................................................... 203
Basic Operation............................................................................................................................. 206
Part VII: Appendices..............................................................................................................208
Random Number Table.................................................................................................................. 209
TASCO Occupation Codes............................................................................................................... 213
ISIC Codes ..................................................................................................................................... 217
Conversions .................................................................................................................................. 220
Photos of Toilet Facilities............................................................................................................... 222
Photos of Household Water Treatment.......................................................................................... 225
Photos of Erosion Control / Water Harvesting Facilities .................................................................. 226
Part I: Household Questionnaire
4
General Instructions
Introduction
For planning processes such as the design of social programs, investment in infrastructure, or the
evaluation of policy, data are needed. Household surveys are one way to obtain such data. Research on
income and expenditure at the household-level seeks to collect and analyze the flow of resources
acquired and expended by households. The results of this research help evaluate different policies for
addressing needs in the community.
Research Aims /Objectives
The main objectives of the present household research project in Tanzania and Zanzibar (2010/2011) is
to collect information at the household-level on: education, health, employment, children living outside
of the home, water and sanitary practices, food expenditure both in and outside the household, non-
food expenditures, household resources, grants, crime and conflicts, governance, recent shocks to
household wealth, deaths, women’s issues and anthropometric status.
This data will allow the following:
Evaluation and analysis of levels of poverty and quality of life at the household level
Analysis of primary indicators on economic productivity, employment, and social welfare
Preparation of a ‘weighting system’ for a Consumer Price Index
The generation of general economic (macroeconomic) indicators; e.g. estimates of national
income (Gross Domestic Product – GDP)
Analyzing household ownership of productive assets and their linkages with household income
activities
Panel Data
Most household data is collected by visiting different households in different years of the survey. This
data is called “cross-sectional.” The National Panel Survey data is different because it revisits the same
households as last time, meaning that we are recording information about not only the living conditions
of the population, but also how those conditions have changed since the last survey. This makes
fieldwork slightly more complicated it will take time to find the same households again and to track
5
members that have moved. But it also makes the analysis more informative as now we know how
shocks affect different types of households differently. It is important in this survey that you work hard
to find every household on your list, as it is not possible to select replacement households for this
survey.
Confidentiality
Data collected from household members is confidential, as directed by the legal act 1:{2002} and should
not be exposed to unauthorized persons unrelated to this research. Personal identifying details will not
be removed before the data is released to researchers. This information will only be used for planning
and future identification purposes. It is necessary to ensure respondents that the information they give
will remain confidential and be used for research purposes only.
Terminology
The following are explanations and clarifications of terminology used in this questionnaire and the
research as a whole:
HOUSEHOLD - The word ‘household’ refers to people who live together and share income and
also basic needs. In other words, residents of a household share the same centre of production
and consume from that centre.
HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD The head of household is the member of the given household who
holds the role of decision maker in that household; other residents normally recognize this
individual as their head. In most cases the household head should take part in the economy,
control, and the welfare of the household in general.
HOUSEHOLD HOUSING - This refers to the land/plot owned by one household regardless of
appearance. It can be a single room, a building occupied by tenants, or more than one building
occupied by household
HOUSEHOLD INCOME – Sources of household include:
(a) Wages, salaries, benefits earned by workers
(b) Profits from agricultural and non-agricultural activities
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(c) Interest earned on investments or savings
(d) Loans, aid or pension-payments received
(e) Income from the sale of property
(f) Other payments received from insurers, etc
HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURE - This includes the following:
(a) Resources used to buy items and services for daily living
(b) The price of items and services consumed by the household and the line item
expenditure for these good and services
(c) Tax contributions, insurance payments, lottery tickets, interests for loans
together with expenditure on items not used for consumption
Responsibilities
The following section identifies the responsibilities of enumerators conducting this household research.
Instructions given here relate to tools and procedures for work at the job-site. As in any other kind of
work, unforeseen obstacles may develop during implementation of the research. To address these
problems, it is important that the supervisor remain in clear and frequent communication with the head
office in Dar es Salaam.
Research Tools
Each interviewer should have the following on their person:
(i) Identity card
(ii) Letter of introduction
(iii) Instructional book (for interviewer and for questionnaire)
(iv) List of selected households in a given area
(v) Questionnaire
(vi) Pre-printed Roster Sheet
(vii) Pencil, rubber eraser, and sharpener
(viii) Writing board
(ix) Notebook
(x) Weighing sac
(xi) Spring balance
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(xii) Beam Balance
(xiii) Infant Measuring Mat
(ixx) Upper Arm Measuring Tape
(xx) Meter rule
(xxi) Rain boots and raincoat
Supervisors will be given some of the aforementioned items together with a list of the households in the
given area. Interviewers and supervisors should ensure that the tools are well kept because they cannot
be obtained easily and there won’t be excess tools issue for those that are destroyed.
HOW DO WE GET INTO THE RESPECTIVE HOUSEHOLD FOR THE FIRST TIME?
Before initiating an interview in any give enumeration area, make sure that the village executive office
(VEO) is aware of your presence. The interviewer should show his/her identity card and introductory
letter to the village leaders at this time. Your supervisor will show the village leaders the list of people
you are to interview, and then these leaders can introduce you to the households. The interviewer will
be responsible for explaining the purpose of his/her arrival to each household. The interviewer should
be neat, respectful, and dressed appropriately. Female interviewers should wear khanga to cover
themselves when sitting, due to the lack of chairs in certain households.
WHAT SHOULD BE DONE IF THE HOUSEHOLD IS UNAVAILABLE?
Because the National Panel Survey is returning to the same households that they interviewed two years
ago, it is possible that some households or individual members will no longer be living in the same
location. These households will be known as either “tracking” or “split off” households. More
information will be available later in this manual about how to deal with these households, and you
should tell your supervisor when one of these cases arises in the field.
WHAT SHOULD BE DONE IF A HOUSEHOLD REFUSES TO PARTICIPATE?
The interviewer should do their best to earn the maximum cooperation of the interviewed households.
Interviewers should inform respondents in advance that the research is for the benefit of the country.
The interviewer should also seek for help from village leaders if they encounter severe obstacles. If a
household continues to refuse to participate in the survey, the interviewer should report this to the
supervisor. The interviewer should fill in the household identification information as done in other
households.
8
HOW SHOULD WE CONDUCT AN INTERVIEW?
Fill in the household preliminary information in the part A-1: HOUSEHOLD INFORMATION. The
Identification Code for Regional, District, Ward and enumeration area (EA) will be given to you by your
supervisor, as well as the household Code, Name of the household head and the list of eight household
that will be interviewed. Remember, the household number is obtained from the list of households
(listing forms) in the village or from the Enumeration Area (EA).
The success of the 2010/2011 panel survey depends on the responsibility and commitment of
supervisors and interviewers. Make sure you collect the data correctly and that you build warm
relationships with the interviewed households in your area. Make sure you arrive promptly at each
household. Follow the pre-instructions and procedures, bearing in mind that you should return to the
household regularly.
Responsibilities of the Interviewer
As in many research projects, the interviewer is of fundamental importance. It is critical that the
interviewer collect the necessary data/information accurately, as the whole research project depends
on the way the interviewer fulfils his/her responsibilities:
(i) The interviewer must follow instructions step-by-step to successfully accomplish their tasks
(ii) The interviewer should generate warm relationships with their respondents, in order to
receive accurate responses. Have confidence, and familiarize yourself with the traditions and
customs of the given society you are working in.
(iii) The first-impression that the interviewer makes to the respondent, in terms of their manner
of speech and dress, has great importance for the accuracy of the results, so do your best to
look and act appropriately.
(iv) The interviewer should present him or herself with confidence and as someone who knows
what they are doing. Additionally, the interviewer should never mention the gift/reward offered
9
at the end of the survey before it is complete, as this may affect the accuracy of information
obtained from respondents.
(v) The interviewer must mention and emphasize the confidentiality of this research. The
interview should be conducted between the interviewer and the respondent only; no other
persons who do not pertain to the household should be present during the interview, unless
allowed by the head of the household and for an important reason.
(vi) The interviewer must remember that the interviewer’s role is to ask questions, whereas the
respondent’s role is to answer them. Therefore, the interviewer must not offer suggestions to
the respondent. Nor should the interviewer express annoyance or any other reaction in
response to the answers given by the respondent, as this may bias the data collected.
(vii) If the respondent does not readily respond to a question, the interviewer should remind
them of the objectives of the research, as well as the confidentiality of the information given.
But in no case should the interviewer force the respondent to answer.
(viiii) The survey includes a large number of questions but the interviewer must always follow
the correct sequence, and manage the process effectively. If the respondent digresses during
his/her Reponses, the interviewer should let the respondent do so and not seek to intervene in
their speech. But after listening to him/her to the end, the interviewer should try to politely
direct them back to the original question as in the questionnaire
(ix) You have to report to the supervisor immediately when you have the ‘call back’ so that the
supervisor can prepare the schedule for the next day.
(x) It is important that the interviewer establishes a pre-agreement with the respondent about
the time and place of the interview, and that they meet them promptly at the time and location
that they prefer.
If the interviewer encounters any problem, he/she should petition help from their supervisor. It is
important to remember that by collaborating in this way with the supervisor, the best data will be
obtained.
10
Questionnaire
The survey is made up of four questionnaires:
1: Household information questionnaire
2: Agricultural questionnaire
3: Fisheries questionnaire
4: Community Questionnaire (This will be conducted by the supervisor him/herself)
First category: Household information on demographics, education, health, labour/employment, ,
housing, water and sanitation, food consumption in the last week, food consumption outside the
household, non food consumption (for the past week and month), non food consumption (for 12 past
months), household assets, assistance and groups, credit, finance, recent shocks to household welfare,
deaths, and anthropometric measurements.
Second category: Agricultural information on each household. This part has some questions concerning
with agriculture such as the number of plots, crops grown on each plot, production and sales of
agricultural products, agricultural equipments, livestock, etc.
Third category: Fisheries questionnaire. This questionnaire asks households about their activities in
fishing, fish processing and fish trading, including questions on inputs, labour, sales and consumption. It
is divided into two parts, one that asks high season information and one that asks low season
information.
Fourth category: Community questionnaire. This part asks about the availability of community social
services, investment projects in the last year, land usage, agriculture in villages, village demographics,
available sanitation facilities, leadership, and price reports
11
General Instructions for Completing the
Household Questionnaire
General Instructions
The most important thing to remember when completing the household questionnaire is to write clearly
and accurately. Your information will have to be legible to the data entry operators for them to
correctly input your answers into the computer. If answers are not written clearly, and cannot be
correctly read by the data entry operator, they will trigger the consistency checks included in the data
entry program, and may stop the team from moving from the EA on a timely schedule.
All of the questions are written as they are to be read to the respondents. Enumerators should not ask
the questions according to their own criteria, except in situations where the respondent does not
understand the question. In such situations, you must explain the content without changing the sense
of the question. This is important to ensure that all respondents are answering the same questions.
Format of the Questionnaire
The household questionnaire modules are organized according to two basic formats.
Columns (vertical) : In this format, the text area, the response categories and the response to each
question are found organized sequentially in columns. An example of this is found in Module J: Housing,
Water and Sanitation where only one response is needed for information covering the entire household.
Columns and rows: This format is used when there is information from multiple respondents in a single
module. In this format, the questions are located in the columns and the responses are recorded in the
rows. An example of this format is found in Module D: Health, where the responses from all household
members are recorded on individual rows for the same set of questions.
The Flap
The household questionnaire has a fold-out flap to record the name,
age, and sex of each household member, translating into a “simplified”
12
3. 4.
Did [NAME]
ever go to
school?
At w hat
age did
[NAME]
start
school?
YES..1
NO...2
(29) AGE
1 7
3. 4.
Did [NAME]
ever go to
school?
At w hat
age did
[NAME]
start
school?
YES..1
NO...2
(29) AGE
2
8.
What year
did [NAME]
leave
school for
the last
time?
PUT "9999"
IF DON'T
KNOW
1994
22
household roster. The 12 rows of this table correspond to the 12 rows that appear in all modules in
which information on individual household members is collected. When you fold out this flap, its rows
align with the rows of the questionnaire modules. The agricultural module has three flaps, for sections
three, four and five. Be sure to always use your flaps when completing the questionnaire as they will
help assure that you put the information on the correct lines.
Skip Codes
Throughout the questionnaire, you will find ‘skip
codes.’ Skip codes tell you to proceed to a different
question than the one that immediately follows to
improve the flow of the interview. For example, if the
respondent tells you that they have never attended
school, you do not want to ask them at what age they
began school or what was the highest level that they
completed. Therefore you will find a skip code. This is
the first time of skip you will find in the questionnaire, and is called a “conditional skip” which means
that you skip based on the respondent’s answer to the question. In the first example, the respondent
did go to school, so the skip code does not apply and the interview continues with the next question in
the sequence. In the second example, the respondent did not go to school. Therefore the skip code to
question 29 applies. The following question is left blank and the next question that the respondent
should answer is question 29.
The other type of skip code that you will find in the questionnaire is an “unconditional
skip.” These codes are easy to find because they have a box around them. With
unconditional skips, no matter what the respondent answers, you should skip to the
question indicated in the box. In this example, you should always skip to question 22, no
matter what year the respondent indicates. All questions that are not answered because
of the skip pattern or general flow of the questionnaire should be left blank no
information should be recorded.
13
18.
Why w as [NAME] absent
from school?
12 - Visiting
Family in DSM
PUBLIC HOLIDAY....1
SCHOOL CLOSED
NOT IN BREAK...2
SCHOOL CLOSED IN
BREAK...........3
ABSENCE TEACHER...4
ILLNESS CHILD.....5
ILLNESS HH MEMBER.6
FUNERAL...........7
DISCIPLINARY
ACTION..........8
CANNOT MEET
COSTS...........9
CHILD REFUSED....10
CHILD HAD
TO WORK........11
OTHER, SPECIFY...12
CORRECT INCORRECT
15. 15. 15.
What w as the
total cost of
[NAME]'s stay(s)
at the traditional
healer or faith
healer?
INCLUDE
ESTIMATED
VALUE OF ANY
IN-KIND
PAYMENTS.
What w as the
total cost of
[NAME]'s
stay(s) at the
traditional
healer or faith
healer?
INCLUDE
ESTIMATED
VALUE OF ANY
IN-KIND
PAYMENTS.
What w as the
total cost of
[NAME]'s
stay(s) at the
traditional
healer or faith
healer?
INCLUDE
ESTIMATED
VALUE OF ANY
IN-KIND
PAYMENTS.
TSHS TSHS TSHS
0 --
Completion of Section C - F
Read each of these sections continuously for the same person before proceeding to the next
person. For example, in the household there are 3 household members: Julius, Mary and Alli.
You are interviewing Julius. After completing the Household Roster:
o Complete Section C for Julius
o Complete Section D for Julius
o Complete Section E for Julius
o Complete Section F for Julius
o Then if you can find and interview Mary:
o Complete Section C for Mary
o Complete Section D for Mary
o Complete Section E for Mary
o Complete Section F for Mary
DO NOT complete the first page of Section C (question 1-9) for Julius
then ask about Mary for the first page of Section C. Complete a section
in its entirely for one person before either moving to the next section
for that person, or asking that section for a different person. It is very
confusing for the respondent and for the enumerator!
Other responses. If the respondent says ‘other’ as his/her response, you
should record the response. You should write the code for others’ and then
write the specific response next to the number. In this example, the
respondent was absent from school to visit family in
Dar es Salaam. This is not an answer choice, so the
interviewer selects “12” and writes the reason in
words.
Zero response. Responses that require a monetary
figure have to be filled with ‘0’ if there is no any
amount used for the particular question. In the
following example, the respondent says that he was
14
1. 36.
IS THIS PERSON
ANSWERING
FOR HIMSELF/
HERSELF?
IS THE
RESPONDENT
A WOMAN
AGED 12 TO
49 YEARS?
YES..1
YES..1 NO...2
NO...2 (42)
Correct Incorrect
MONTH YEAR MONTH YEAR
7 2012 July 12
8.
Approximately w hen do
you expect to pay back
the money?
8.
Approximately w hen do
you expect to pay back
the money?
not charged for being taken to the spiritual services or when taken to the witchdoctor.
The correct method of recording is to put “00”, as in the first example. It is incorrect to
leave the box blank, as in the second example.
It is never permissible to leave a question blank that is not intended to be blank from the skip patterns.
If the respondent does not know, probe to get the necessary information. If after probing the
respondent still does not know, indicate ‘99’ on the questionnaire instead of leaving it blank. Note, ‘99’
answers cannot be used in the analysis, so every effort should be made to minimize the incidence of
these responses.
Reading questionnaire. The interviewer should not ask a sentence or
words written in CAPITAL LETTERS (other than the answer choices).
Such sentences or words are Instructions to the interviewer, or they are
answers to questions asked. Information written in capital letters is for
the interviewer only. In these two examples, do not read the following
to the respondent. Instead observe the roster list of household
members and write the correct answer for this question.
[EXTRA EXAMPLE HERE IN SWAHILI MANUAL]
Entering dates. When entering the month or year of an
event, follow these rules:
Calendar month: Always enter 1-2 digits. Do not write
the name of the month.
Calendar year: Always 4 digits
Last 7 days. For questions that ask for information from the “seven days ago’’, refer to the immediate
last 7 days. Example: If the interview is on Monday, “seven days ago’’ refers to the previous Monday
through Sunday (yesterday).
Decimals. If you need to report portions of a quantity less than 1, you should use decimals. Make sure
that you write the decimal point in the questionnaire very prominently, such as 3.5. Do not write
fractions. For example, do not write “3½”.
15
4.
How much did
you spend?
YES..1
NO...2
(NEXT) TSH
0101
1 3,400
0101
1 3400
0101
1 3,400 /=
0101
1 3,400 Tsh
Rice (paddy)
Rice (paddy)
Rice (paddy)
CORRECT
Rice (paddy)
I
T
E
M
C
O
D
E
INCORRECT
Within the past 7 days, did the
members of this household eat/drink
any [. . .] w ithin the household?
1.
Monetary amounts. When the response to be
recorded is a monetary amount or figure, write
the correct response in the corresponding cell.
Only record responses in Tanzania Shillings. For
example, if a respondent says $50 (US dollars),
use the approximate exchange rate to convert
that into Tshs. If you are not sure, check with
your supervisor. Record monetary amounts in
Tshilling with no decimal point. Do not include
cents. For any values less than 1 Tshilling, round
to the nearest Tshilling. For any amounts over
Tsh 1,000 include a comma.
Example:
Comments. You should write any relevant/important comments in the Comment Box on the second
page of the questionnaire. You can write small comments or notes to yourself on the other pages of the
questionnaire (in the margin) to help you when you edit the questionnaire later. But do not expect your
supervisor to read these comments. Any comments you want your supervisor to read should go on
page 2 in the Comment Box.
Pre-Printed Roster Form
The most important change from the last survey is the pre-printed roster form, which we will call T-
0. You will have this form for every household that was visited during the last survey, and it will
contain the information that you will need to re-locate the household, and the fill in the appropriate
forms for both household members that remained in the household or those that have left. The
“Tracking” section that appears later in this manual will give you all the details you need to complete
this form and the other forms as needed. What is important for the household questionnaire is that
you have the “hhid” number for the original household (which you must copy carefully and
accurately onto the cover of the household questionnaire) and the original roster numbers for the
respondents (which is needed to complete question 6 of section B.)
17
Section A-1: Household Identification
We start with name of the region and its code (the code of the region has only two figures, example,
Dodoma region is coded 01, Arusha 02 up to last region which is Kusini Pemba 55). Then follows the
names of the district, ward and villages with their codes. All the codes are listed on the National
Census and habitat of 2002.
Codes for villages/streets have three figures. Normally the village code starts with 0 followed by a
number. Household codes have four figures depending on the selected households for the interview.
On the right side of the introduction of the household there is box. Put x in the box and the number
of the form below the box. If you use more forms for one household make sure you do the same
thing.
FORM _____ OF _____ TOTAL
If you have used more forms, write x inside the small box on the right side of this page, and FORM 1
OF 4 TOTAL.
Question 8:
You will write the name of the current household head. If the household head is the same as the
head at the time of the last survey, this response will be the same as question 10. If the head has
changed, you should write the name of the new head here.
Question 9:
If this household is the original household in the same location as in the previous round of the
survey, code it 1. If it is the original household but in a new location, code it 2. If it is a split off
household from the original household, code it 3.
18
Question 10:
Write the name of the original head when the household was interviewed in 2010/2011 even if
this person is no longer the household head. This information will be available to you on the pre-
printed roster sheet, which you will bring to the household.
Question 11:
Copy the full 14-digit household identification number from the pre-printed roster sheet. This
number should be the same as the one printed on the sheet even if the household has moved to a
new location. It is extremely important that you copy this number accurately as it will be used to
link the data between the two years of the survey.
Question 12:
You will write the number of the house if this exists, if not, the location: like the name of the
neighboring household head, permanent address, telephone number and other important features
like school, church, mosque, police station, etc which can help a person to locate the household.
This information will be used to locate the household in subsequent rounds of the survey.
Section A-2: Survey Staff Details
Question 13:
Name of enumerator. Here the interviewer writes their full name.
Question 14:
Enumerator code. Every interviewer will have a code; this is always filled in for each and every
questionnaire he/she attends.
Question 15:
Time interview start. The interviewer should record the starting and finishing time of the interview.
The start time should be recorded in Swahili here, and the finishing time should be recorded in
Swahili in the box at the end of the questionnaire.
Question 16:
Date of the Interview. Write the date of the household with the household member. Start with day,
month and then year.
Question 17, 18, & 19
These questions are for the supervisor to fill out with his/her name, number and the date of
questionnaire inspection.
Question 20, 21, & 22
These questions are for data entry only. The data entry clerk should fill out with his/her name,
number and the date of entering the data.
Question 23, 24, & 25
These questions are for second data entry only. The second data entry clerk should fill out with
his/her name, number and the date of entering the data.
Observations on the Interview
On the right side of this page there is a big box where the interviewer should write their views on
how the interview was conducted, and any more important information, which may help the
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supervisor and the analysts of the questionnaire. Observations should be written at the end of the
interview.
Introduction to the household to be interviewed
The interviewer has to read the letter of introduction confidently, and then give time for the
respondent to ask questions. The interviewer should explain the content of the questionnaire:
Education, health, employment, etc. There are three different version of the introduction and you
will need to select the one that is appropriate to the household that you are interviewing. All
households should be read “Convey the Following to the Respondent” section. If the household is in
the newly selected clusters in Morogoro, Dar es Salaam or Pwani (which will be interviewed at the
very beginning of data collection), they should then be read “New Households in Morogoro, Dar es
Salaam and Pwani.” If the household is part of the main fieldwork and is not a split off household,
they should be read “NPS Households.” This section will be the most common. If the household is a
split off household, you should read the “Split-Off Household” section. All households should then
hear the “All” section before you begin the interview.
Section B: Household Member Roster
You should complete questions 1-6 for all household members before moving on the remaining
questions. You should also complete the household roster flap after question 6.
Question 1. List all household members, starting with the head, wife (if there is any), children,
relatives, and servants. You have to list those who share the meal in the household and contribute to
the household income. After listing, read out the names to the household head to make sure that all
household members are listed.
Question 2. Gender codes are 1 for men and 2 for women. This is an important question for all
household members. Do not determine the gender by names, because some names are used by
both genders for example, Tumain, Bahati and Happy can be both men and women. Even for
children, you have to make sure of the gender, because sometimes boys can look like girls, and girls
like boys. The interviewer should be careful, because wrong coding of the household members can
distort the whole data.
Question 3. When was (NAME) born?
Fill in the month and year when (name) was born. Write year first, then month. If the respondent
does not remember the month, you will write ‘99’ on the month Column.
It is possible that household members may not remember the year of his/her birth. Then the
interviewer should use the following events to help the respondent to remember the year.
Events Year
Starting of First World War 1914
End of First World War 1918
Starting of British rule in Tanganyika 1919
Starting of Second World War 1938
End of Second World War 1945
Birth of TANU 1954
Independence of Tanganyika 1961
Zanzibar revolution and Zanzibar-Tanganyika Union 1964
Arusha declaration 1967
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Birth of CCM 1977
Kagera war 1978
Retirement of Tanzania first president 1985
Question 4. Age of (NAME). Enter age of all household members in two digits. If the age is below one
year, write ‘00’ and if it is ‘98’ and above enter ‘98’. You should verify that this is consistent with the
year listed in the previous question. You should also compare this information with that on the pre-
printed tracking form. If there are differences, you should probe to find out the real information
from the respondent. Indicate the correct age on the new roster. You should also make a note on
the observations box that the pre-printed date was incorrect.
Question 5. Enter the code of the relationship with the household head. These are codes with only
one figure example (1…9) Servants to be included are those who share the meal and recognize the
household head as their boss. Use the codes as indicated on the questionnaire. Again, this
information should be compared with that on the pre-printed form and any discrepancies reconciled
on the new questionnaire.
Question 6. In this question the interview will indicate if this household member was present at the
last NPS survey in Year 1. If yes, then write a household ID number from the pre-printed tracking
form. Otherwise, fill in 99.
At this point in the questionnaire, you should pause to complete the household roster flap. You
should now ask the information to a single household member straight through to section G (on
page 25) before continuing with other household members.
Question 7. This question intends to know if (NAME) shared the meal in the household for the past
seven days. If yes, fill in 1, and if no, fill in 2
Question 8. For this question, ask how many days in the last month the household member was
present in the household. If the member was present for the entire month, indicate 30.
Question 9. For the past 12 month has (name) stayed in this household for three month or more? If
yes code it 1 and if no code it 2. Those with no’ mark them x and do not ask them the following
questions as they are not household members for the purposes of this analysis. Note that there are
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three very important exceptions to this rule. They are listed in the directions box on the left of the
first page of the roster. The exceptions are: infants less than 3 months old, new household
members, and boarding school students.
Question 10. Within the past 12 (Month/Year), how many months (NAME) stayed outside this
household. Record the number of month (NAME) stayed outside the household.
Question 11. What is the main occupation of (NAME) for the past 12 months? Refer to the codes of
household activities: Agriculture/Livestock 1… Fishing 2… Mining 3… Tourism 4… etc. Fill in the
activity the respondent depends on the most for income. Use code 17, “TOO YOUNG” only for
children that are less than 5 years old who are not in school. If the child is 6 years old and not in
school, use code 16 “no job”.
Question 12. Ask if the father of (NAME) stays in the household. If the answer is yes, record his
roster ID number and move to question 15. If he is outside the household record 97 and go to
question 14. If he is dead, code 98. If the respondent does not know, use code 99 and move to
question 14.
Question 13. Ask the respondent how old was (NAME) when the father died. Record the age of the
child when the father died, not the age of the father when the father died.
Question 14. This question intends to know the standard of education of the father of (NAME).
Record the highest grade attended. Use the codes listed on the questionnaire.
Question 15. Ask the respondent where the mother of (NAME) is. If she is a member of the
household, fill in the mother’s roster ID number and move to question 18. If she is outside the
household fill in 97 and go to question 17. If she is dead, code 98. If the respondent does not know,
use code 99 and move to question 17.
Question 16. How old was (NAME) when the mother died? Record the age of the child when the
mother died, not the age of the mother when the mother died..
Question 17. Fill in the level of education of the mother of (NAME). Record the highest grade
attended. Use the codes listed on the questionnaire.
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Question 18. This question should not be asked to the respondent. Interviewer, check the age
reported in question 4 to see if (name) is 12 years old or above. If yes then code it 1; if no code it 2. If
this is the last member on household roster move to question 25. Otherwise move to the next
section for this household member.
Question 19. State of marriage of (NAME): For monogamous married code 1, polygamous married
code 2, living together code 3; and then move to question 21. For separated code 4, divorced code 5,
never married code 6, widow(er) code 7; and then move to question 25.
Question 20. Type of marriage ceremony of (NAME). Enter the code of the type of marriage
ceremony as it is given in the questionnaire. In this research the word ‘Marriage’ means a man and
woman married with a ceremony by the government, religious, or traditional. It also includes those
who have decided to live together for a long time. Part time lovers are not included. If it is a
government marriage code it 1, religious marriage code it 2, traditional marriage code it 3.
Question 21. Is the spouse/partner of (NAME) living in this household? If the answer is yes code it 1.
If the answer is no code it 2 and move to question 23.
Question 22. This question is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. Here
you have to record the roster ID number of the husband/wife from the household roster. If the
husband has more than one wife, record their numbers. If the number of wives is more than 4,
record up to 4.
Question 23. Does (NAME) have a wife/husband outside this household? If the answer is yes then
code it 1. If the answer is no, then code it 2 and skip to question 25.
Question 24. How many spouses of (NAME) live outside the household? This question should be
asked to Men only! Record the number of wives living outside the household. If there are none,
record ‘0’. Do not leave any empty space.
Question 25. For how many years has (NAME) lived in this community? Record the number of years.
If it is from the time of birth record ‘99’ and move on to the next section for the same respondent.
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Question 26. (NAME) moved here from which District? This is a very important question, because it
captures how people are moving in and out of this community. Fill in the name of the country if
he/she moved in from another country, or the name of the district if from another district. For
district, fill in the district and region codes using the code list on the back of the questionnaire. If the
person has moved from another country, just enter the name of the country, and no code.
Question 27. Reason of (NAME) moved to this household. Use the codes listed on the questionnaire.
Question 28. In which district (NAME) was born? Ask the country; if it is another country record the
name of the country only, and no code. If another region or district, record the name of the district
and the code for the district and region using the codes on the back of the questionnaire.
Section C: Education
Question 1. This question is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. This
questions asks you to identify household members who are 5 years old and above. Check the ages
from Section B. If the household member is 5 years old and above code it 1, if no then code it 2.
Question 2. Can [NAME] read and write? You have to identify who can read and write in Kiswahili,
English, or any other language, without considering whether they have gone to school. All household
members over age 5 should be asked this question. Code 1 for Kiswahili only, 2 for English only, 3 for
Kiswahili and English, and 4 for any other language. Code 5 if the respondent cannot read or write in
any language, then go to question 3.
Question 3. Did (NAME) ever go to school? You have to identify who has education in the household,
without considering the grades. All household members should be asked this question. Code 1 for
yes, and code 2 for no. If the answer is no, move to question 29.
Question 4. At what age did (NAME) start school? Ask the age of starting school for the first time,
this is what will be recorded.
Question 5. Is (NAME) currently in school? You need to get current information on if the respondent
is going to school at the moment. If the answer is yes, then code 1 and move to question 9, if it is no
then code it 2 and continue with the following questions.
Question 6. Was (NAME) in school last year? You have to find out if the person in question was in
school last year. If the answer is yes, then code it 1 and move to question 10. If the answer is no,
then code it 2 and continue with the following questions.
Question 7. What is the highest grade completed by (NAME)? Record the highest grade that was
completed by the person in question. Check the codes for grades. Note that code “19” is “OSC,”
which stands for “Orientation Secondary Course.” This code applies only for those students studying
or those who have studied in Zanzibar or Pemba. Respondents educated on the mainland should
not use this code.
Codes for question 7, 9, & 10
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PP ............... 01 ADULT ..............02
PRIMARY SECONDARY
D1................ 11 F1 .................21
D2................ 12 F2 .................22
D3................ 13 F3 .................23
D4................ 14 F4 .................24
D5................ 15 'O'+ course ........25
D6................ 16 F5 .................31
D7................ 17 F6 .................32
D8................ 18 'A'+ COURSE ........33
OSC............... 19 DIPLOMA ............
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MS+ CCOURSE....... 20
UNIVERSITY
U1................ 41 U2 .................42
U3................ 43 U4 .................44
U5&+. ..............45
Question 8.What year did [NAME] leave school for the last time? Record the year in which the
person in question left school for the last time. If they left school for a short break in 1995 (for
example to work), then returned again in 1997, and then completed school in 2000, record the year
2000 as the year they left school for the last time. Then move on the question 22 for all respondents.
Question 9. Which grade is (NAME) currently attending? You have to ask the highest grade during
the interview. If it is standard seven, enter the standard seven code 17.
Question 10. What grade was (NAME) attending last year? If (NAME) was in school last year, find out
what grade he/she was in.
Question 11. This is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. Refer to the
response in Question 5 and indicate if (NAME) is currently attending school. They would be
considered currently attending school if they have answered yes in question 5. If the respondent is
not currently in school, skip to question 22.
Question 12. Who owns the school (NAME) attends? Use the codes indicated on the questionnaire.
Question 13. Is this school a boarding school? Ask whether the school is a boarding school. If yes,
code 1 and go to Question 16. If no, code 2 and continue with the next question.
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Question 14. How does [NAME] usually travel to school? Find out the typical means of
transportation, which the respondent uses to get to school. Use the codes indicated in the
questionnaire.
Question 15. How long does is take [NAME] to get to school by this means of transportation? Find
out the amount of time it takes to get to school ONE WAY using the means of transportation
indicated in Question 14. Give the answer in minutes.
Question 16. Does (NAME) get meals at the school (school feeding)? If (NAME) does not pay any
extra money for food, code it 1. If they do not receive meals at school, or they have to pay for these
meals, code it 2.
Question 17. Has [NAME] missed school in the last two schooling weeks? If the answer is yes, code it
1. If the answer is no code it 2 and move to question 19.
Question 18. Find out the reason the household member failed to attend the school. Use the codes
indicated in the questionnaire.
Question 19. What is the status of the textbooks [NAME] uses for school? Find out if the household
member uses textbooks, if they borrow the textbooks from school or own the textbooks themselves,
and if they borrow textbooks from school, whether they can take them home. Use the codes
indicated in the questionnaire.
Question 20. In the last week, approximately how many hours did [NAME] spend on homework or
studying? Find out how much time the household member spends doing schoolwork in the house or
outside of school. Indicate the total time in hours and minutes.
Question 21. Has [NAME] had any problems at school? Find out if the household member has any
issues at school or problems with the school environment. Indicate up to two (2) answers in order of
importance from the list of codes in the questionnaire.
Question 22. Did [NAME] take the Primary School Leaving Exam (PSLE)? Code 1 if yes and go to the
next question. Code 2 if no and go to question 24.
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Question 23. How did [NAME] score in the exam? Indicate whether the household member passed
or failed the PSLE, or does not know how they scored. Code 1 if pass, code 2 if fail, and code 3 if they
don’t know. The “don’t know” code is included mainly for those respondents who are answering for
another much older household member and should be used only very rarely.
Question 24. Did [NAME] take the Form 4 or Form 6 exam? Find out if the household member took
either the Form 4 or Form 6 exam. Code 1 if they took the Form 4 exam, code 2 if they took the form
6 exam, and code 3 if they did not take either exam and go to question 28.
Question 25. In what year did [NAME] take the exam? Indicate the year in which the household
member took the Form 4 or Form 6 exam as indicated in the previous question.
Question 26. Will you show me the exam certificate? Ask to see the exam certificate for the Form 4
or Form 6 exam. Record whether the household member shows you the certificate using the codes
in the questionnaire.
Question 27. How did [NAME] score in the exam? Ask this question to everyone who has taken the
Form 4 or From 6 exam and has their exam certificate. Record the answer using the codes in the
questionnaire.
Question 28. Question 28 asks about various expenses that (NAME) might have had to pay for their
education over the last 12 months. Estimate the value in TSH, including in-kind goods. If there was
no expenditure for a certain category, indicate 0. The last column should be totaled by the
interviewer by adding up the T-shilling amounts in all the columns preceding. Note that shoes
should be considered as part of the uniform.
Question 29. Has [NAME] ever attended an adult education class? Which one? Record whether the
household member has attended an adult education class, using the codes in the questionnaire. If
the household member did not attend any class, record 4 and move to the next section. MUKEJA is a
program for those who were unable to attend or complete primary school during their childhood.
KCM (Kisomo Cha Manufaa) is a more limited adult literacy program for those who would like to
learn to read or write. KCK (Kisomo Cha Kujiendeleza) is a program that offers accelerated version of
primary school for those respondents that wish to re-join the formal primary or secondary school
system.
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Question 30. How many months did [NAME] attend this adult education class? Record the answer in
months.
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Section D: Health
This section is about the health of the household members regardless their age. These questions
should be asked to all household members 12 years and older, and the household member should
respond for him or herself. Follow the directives and the proper codes.
Question 1. This is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. Fill in the code 1 if
the household member answers the question himself and code 2 if he/she is not answering
him/herself.
Question 2. This question is asked to all household members without considering who was sick and
who was not. Sometimes, some people go to the clinics to check their health even without being
sick. If the answer is yes, then code it 1 and continue with the next question. If the answer is no then
code it 2; if he/she did not go to hospital or anywhere to have health advice in the past four weeks,
skip to question 7.
Question 3. This question asks for the type of provided that the respondent visited. Up to two may
be listed using the codes in the questionnaire. If the respondent lists a type of health provider that
is not included on the list, use code 18 and write the provider in words.
Question 4. How was the treatment of (NAME) financed? Record two possible means of funding.
Use the codes listed on the questionnaire. If the source of funding is not on the list, use code 9 and
write the funding source in words.
Question 5. How much did [NAME] spend when you visited [PROVIDER]? Record the amount of
money spent on the visit to the provider listed in question 4. If the respondent listed two types of
providers, ask about the costs associated with each type separately, and record the amount spent
separately for each type of provider.
Question 6. Did [NAME] have any problems during the visit to the health provider? Find out if the
household member had any issues when they visited the health provider. Indicate up to two (2)
answers from the list of codes in the questionnaire.
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Questions7 -9 is about the cost of medication. You have to add up all costs, including in-kind for
all means of paying, whether through household finances or health insurance. Then record the
total cost in shillings.
Question 7. What was the cost to pay for the treatment of (NAME) for medical treatment related to
illness and injuries within the period of 4 weeks, including prescription medicine, tests, consultation,
and in-patient fees? Convert any in-kind payments into TSH. Be careful not to include any non
prescription medication in this question as it will be recorded in question 9. Include the value
reported in question 5.
Question 8. What was the cost to pay for the treatment of (NAME) for medical treatment not
related to illness and injuries within the period of 4 weeks, including preventative health care, pre-
natal visits, check-ups, etc? Convert any in-kind payments into TSH.
Question 9. What was the cost to pay for the treatment of (NAME) for non-prescription medication
within the period of 4 weeks, including Panadol, Fansidar, cough syrup, etc? Convert any in-kind
payments into TSH.
Question 10. For the last 4 weeks was [NAME] hospitalized or did [NAME] stay overnight in a
medical facility? Find out if the household member in question spent at least one night at a medical
facility. Indicate yes or no. If yes, code 1. If no, code 2 and go to question 14.
Question 11. How many stays and for how many nights was [NAME] hospitalized? If the respondent
answered yes to question 8, record how many stays nights they spent in the hospital or medical
facility. The number of new stays would be the number of times that the individual was taken to the
hospital and stayed at least one night, regardless of the total length of the stay. For example, if a
household member was admitted to the hospital during the first week of the month for three nights,
then during the third week of the month for one night, and finally in the last week of the month for
four nights, the total number of new stays would be three, and the total number of nights would be
eight.
Question 12. What type of illness or injury did [NAME] have that led to his/her hospitalization?
Record the name of the illness or injury, using the codes in the questionnaire. List up to 2. If the
illness is not included in the choices, use the “other” code and write the name in words.
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Question 13. What was the total cost of (NAME)’s hospitalization(s) or overnight stays in a medical
facility? Write down the total amount of money spent when (NAME) was admitted for the health
services within the period of the past 12 month. Convert any in-kind payments into TSH.
Question 14. During the last 12 months, did (NAME) stay overnight at a traditional faith healer’s or
faith healer’s dwelling? Identify if the household member stayed overnight at a spiritual centre or
the herbalist centre within the period of the past 12 months. If the answer is yes code it 1, if the
answer is no code it 2 and move to question 16. This will not include hospital and dispensary
services.
Question 15. What was the total cost of (NAME)’s stay at the traditional healer or traditional faith
healer? Record the total amount of money spent when (NAME) stayed at the spiritual centre or
herbalist centre within the period of the past 12 month. Convert any in-kind payments into TSH. If
more than one payment was made over the last 12 months, the individual payments should be
added and the total amount recorded here.
Question 16. This is a question for the interviewer only to identify children under 5 years. If the
respondent is a child under 5 years of age, skip to question 31. The disability/difficulty questions are
only for adults and children above the age of 5.
Question 17-30 ask about the respondent’s disability status. Some people may not call themselves
disabled, but still are unable to perform certain functions. These questions are designed to reach a
broader definition of disability than what may be physically, mentally, or emotionally visible.
Note that the skip patterns might be a little hard to follow in this section. If the respondent
indicates that they have no difficulties in performing the function, code 1, and skip the next
question about age of onset. If the respondent indicates that they do have difficulty in performing
the function listed, probe as to the level of severity, and use the appropriate code listed in question
17. The next question, age of onset, question should only be asked for those respondents who
indicated 2, 3 or 4 in the earlier question.
Question 17 & 18. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have any difficulty seeing, even if
the respondent is wearing glasses. If the answer is no, code 1 and move to question 19. If the answer
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is yes, probe for severity and then move to question 18 and record how old the respondent was
when the difficulty began.
Question 19 & 20. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have any difficulty hearing, even
if you can see that they are wearing a hearing aid. If the answer is no, code 1 and move to question
21. If the answer is yes, probe for severity and then move to question 20 and record how old the
respondent was when the difficulty began.
Question 21 & 22. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have any difficulty walking or
climbing steps. If the answer is no, code 1 and move to question 23. If the answer is yes, probe for
severity and then move to question 22 and record how old the respondent was when the difficulty
began.
Question 23 & 24. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have any difficulty remembering
or concentrating. If the answer is no, code 1 and move to question 25. If the answer is yes, probe for
severity and then move to question 24 and record how old the respondent was when the difficulty
began.
Question 25 & 26. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have any difficulty with taking
care of him/herself, including difficulty washing, dressing, feeding, using the toiler. If the answer is
no, code 1 and move to question 27. If the answer is yes, probe for severity and then move to
question 26 and record how old the respondent was when the difficulty began.
Question 27 & 28. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have any difficulty
communicating in their first language, like if they have difficulty understanding or being understood.
If the answer is no, code 1 and move to question 29. If the answer is yes, probe for severity and then
move to question 28 and record how old the respondent was when the difficulty began.
Question 29. Does this difficulty reduce the amount of work (NAME) can do at home, at work, or at
school? Now look back at the answers to the previous questions (17-27). If the respondent
answered yes to any of the odd-numbered questions, such that you recorded a 2, 3, or 4 in the
answer box, then ask question 31. Find out whether the difficulty causes the respondent to reduce
the amount of work he/she does at home, at work, and at school, and how much the work is
reduced. If a category is not valid, for example if the respondent is not in school, use the code “not
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applicable” (code 4). If the respondent answered no to all of the previous questions (17-27), move
to question 31.
Question 30. During the past 12 months, what measures were taken to improve (NAME)’s
performance of activities? If the respondent answered question 29, then ask if the respondent has
taken any measures to improve their performance of activities. Record the measures taken using the
codes in the questionnaire.
Question 31. Did (NAME) sleep under a bednet yesterday? Ask the respondent if (NAME) used a
mosquito net as a prevention of malaria last night. Use the codes listed on the questionnaire to
indicate if they slept under a bednet, and probe to find out whether the bednet was treated. If they
did not use a mosquito net, code 4, or they do not know, code 5, and skip to question 34.
Question 32. How did the household obtain this bednet? This question intends to know how the
household obtained the mosquito net used by (NAME). Use the codes listed on the questionnaire. If
the mosquito net was free, code 1 and skip to question 34.
Question 33. How much did the household pay for the mosquito net? Make sure they tell you the
amount used to buy the mosquito net. If it was an exchange of something which is not money, then
convert the value into TSH. If a mosquito net is shared between members of the household (for
example, between father and mother), only record the cost of the net once.
Question 34. Does [NAME] possess their birth certificate? Find out whether the individual has a birth
certificate. If no, probe to find out if their birth was registered with the civil authority. Use the codes
in the questionnaire.
Question 35. In the last year, did [NAME] access a medical exemption at a public health facility?
Indicate yes, no, or don’t know using the codes in the questionnaire.
Question 36. This question is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. Verify
if (NAME) is a woman between 12-49 years old using the ages from the Roster. If the answer is yes,
code 1, and if the answer is no, code it 2 and skip to question 41.
Questions 37-41 should be asked to women between 12-49 only.
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Question 37. In the past 24 months, did (NAME) give birth to a child, even if born dead? If the
answer is yes code it 1, and if the answer is no code it 2 and move to question 44. Be sensitive when
asking this question as the information might be sensitive for the respondent.
Question 38. Did (NAME) regularly go to a health clinic when you were pregnant with your last child
born in the last 24 months? If it is yes code it 1 and if it is no code it 2.
Question 39. Where did (NAME) deliver (NAME)’s last child born in the last 24 months? Use the
codes listed on the questionnaire. If the respondent names a place that is not listed in the codes,
use code 4 and write the name in words.
Question 40. Who delivered this child? Find out who assisted during labor. Use the codes listed on
the questionnaire. If the respondent names a person that is not listed in the codes, use code 4 and
write the person in words.
Question 41. Was this birth registered? If yes, code 1 and if no, code 2.
Question 42. This is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent; verify if the
household member is a child of 60 months (5 years) or less using the Roster. If yes, you will write
code 1 and continue, and if no, write code 2 and move to next section.
Question 43-49 should be asked to household members who are 60 month old or less (below 5
years)
Question 43. Has (NAME) had diarrhea in the last two weeks? Ask the respondent if (NAME) had
diarrhea in the period of the past two weeks. Diarrhea is determined by the perception of the
mother or caretaker, or by three or more loose or watery stools per day, or by blood in stool. If yes
write code 1, if the answer is no, then write code 2 and move to the next section.
Question 44. Now I would like to know how much (NAME) was offered to drink during the diarrhea.
Was he/she offered less than usual to drink, about the same amount, or more than usual to drink? If
less, probe for more information as to how much less. Use the codes indicated on the
questionnaire.
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Question 45. When (NAME) had diarrhea, was he/she offered less than usual to eat, about the same
amount, more than usual, or nothing in to eat? If less, probe for more information as to how much
less. Use the codes indicated on the questionnaire.
Question 46 & 47. Ask if the sick child (diarrhea) was given ORS or health worker-recommended
homemade fluid. If yes write code 1 and if no write code 2.
Question 48. Did (NAME) seek advice or treatment for the diarrhea? If the answer is yes then write
code 1, if no, then write code 2 and move to the next section.
Question 49. Where did (NAME) seek advice or treatment? This question you will write up to three
services where the respondent went for consultation and treatment of diarrhea of the child. Probe
for more than one place treatment was sought. Use the codes listed in question 3 of this section,
and indicate up to three responses in order of importance.
Section E: Labour
This section is about the work activities which members of the household do in order to sustain their
life. These questions should be asked to all household members 5 years and older. When possible,
the household member should respond for him or herself. Follow the directives and the proper
codes.
Definitions
Work /activities: Work is any lawful activity which a person engages in, in order to sustain his life.
Last 7 days: This is an international measure on work remembrance; it has been used for many
years. In these questions, the past 7 days is used to mean the seven days prior to the date of the
interview. This period is very important for recording ongoing activities.
Last 12 months: In these questions, the past 12 months is used to mean the previous 12 months
starting from yesterday. Since it may be difficult to remember the precise activities one year ago
from today, this should include the general 12 months prior to the date of the interview.
Absence at a work place: Make sure that anybody absent from the work for some time is listed as
the worker during his absence.
Examples of absence at a work place:
Employers who are paid while on leave: These must be persons who are expecting to go
back to work. The period of being out can be counted up to four months (this includes
maternity leave)
Self employment in business and agriculture: A person of this caliber must be ready to go
back to his business and the business must be operating during his absence .This person is
given only one month of absence.
Labourers: These people should not be counted as not being on the place of work for some
time. They have no contracts.
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THESE QUESTIONS SHOULD BE ASKED FOR HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS WHO ARE FIVE YEARS OR
OLDER.
[EXTRA EXPLANATION PROVIDED HERE IN SWAHILI MANUAL]
Question 1. This question is for the interviewer and should not be read to the respondent. This
vertical line the in reviewer is supposed to verify all household members who are above 5 years. If
yes you will write code 1, and if no, write code 2 and move to next section.
Question 2. Here also the interviewer has to verify if the household member is going to answer the
questions. Fill in the code 1 if the household member answers the question himself and move to
question 4. Fill in code 2 if he/she is not answering him/herself. It is best if everyone person can
answer for himself or herself as they would have the best information about how they use their
time.
Question 3. This is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. Fill in the
household id code of the person answering on behalf of the household member.
Question 4. Did you do any work of any type for pay, profit, barter or home use during the last 7
days? This question intends to find out if the household member is engaged in production for the
household’s expenditure in the past seven days. If yes code it 1 and skip to question 6. If the answer
is no code it 2 and continue with the following questions.
Question 5. Although you did not do any work during the last 7 days, did you have a job or own farm
or enterprise at which you did not work during the last 7 days and to which you will definitely return
to work? This question is about farm/business work/activities which a person is ready to continue
even if he did not work for the past seven days. A good example of this would be a teacher who is on
leave because the school is in recess. If the answer is yes, use code 1. If the answer is no, use code 2
and move to question 9.
Question 6. This question should capture the activity on which the household member spends most
of his time. If the household member does a few different activities for work, record the one which
they spend the most time doing. Note that a housewife could be considered an unpaid family worker
(non-agric) or unpaid family worker (agric) depending on if she has done any work in the fields over
the last 7 days. Use the codes found in the questionnaire.
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Question 7. How often in a week do you work in your current job? Record the frequency that the
household member does the work mentioned in question 6 for an average week. If he does the work
every day, use code 1. If he works often but not every day code 2, if he works sometimes code 3, and
if he works seldom code 4. Then move to question 12.
Questions 8-11 is about unemployment for the past seven days.
Question 8. Were you available for work during the last 7 days? Available means ready and willing
to work, with nothing such as illness or other obligations preventing the respondent from being able
to work, even if they do not have a job. If the answer is yes code it 1 and move to question 11, and if
the answer is no, code it 2.
Question 9. Ask why (NAME) was not available to work for the past seven days. Use the codes listed
in the questionnaire. Following this question, skip to question 11.
Question 10. This question wants to know if (name) has made any efforts to look for work (job)
within the period of the past four weeks. Steps to look for work could include printing and
distributing CVs, asking in local businesses if positions are available, or going to local places where
employers search for day laborers. Write code 1 if the answer is yes and code 2 if the answer is no.
Question 11. Ask (NAME) when he worked for payment for the last time including casual labor.
Write the month in two figures and the year in four figures. If the household member never looked
for work, write 0 for the month and 0 for the year. If you answer this question skip to question 14.
Question 12-43 concerns household members who are employed.
Question 12. This question asks if the respondent did any wage work during the last 7 days. If the
answer is yes, code it 1 and move to question 14, if the answer is no, code it 2.
Question 13. This question asks if the respondent did any wage work during the last 12 months. If
the answer is yes code it 1. If the answer is no, code it 2 and move to question 44.
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Question 14. Ask the household member for the name of the company or organization that he/she
works for. Make sure you write the correct name for the answer, and verify the spelling with the
respondent. If he mentions two places, ask one which is more important and record that place in
this section. There will be space to discuss the other place in the “secondary employment” section.
Question 15. Is your employer for this work…? List the type of employer, using codes listed on the
questionnaire.
Question 16. What kind of work do you usually do in this job? This question asks about the
occupation of the respondent. The main employed occupation over the past 12 months is either an
individual’s only occupation OR the occupation that the respondent worked the most hours, if the
respondent worked at more than one job. For individuals with two occupations with the same
number of hours, the main employed occupation is the one that gives the largest income. If equal in
number of hours and income, the one that the respondent considers as his or her main occupation
should be noted. Occupation refers to the kind of work the person does or the kind of the work
he/she did, when he/she was working for the first time. This question is to enquire specifically about
the nature of the job he/she is doing most of the time in the last 12 months.
If the person uses vague answers such as Civil Servant, Businessman, or 'Labourer', ask him/her the
exact type of job he/she did most of the time, and then write the occupation in the space provided.
The occupation will best be described by such job titles as teacher, driver, cook etc. If a person
moved from job to job, you will only record that occupation he/she is engaged in during the
reference period or the last 12 months. If a person has two or more occupations enter the one in
which he/she spends most of his/her time.
Try to get comprehensive answers, for example, it is not enough for a respondent to inform you that
he/she is a teacher. Probe to find out if he/she is a primary or secondary school teacher etc.
Question 17. What type of trade or business is it connected with? This question is to determine the
economic sector in which the respondent works. Write a description of what the establishment
where the respondent worked does. Industry refers to the activity of the establishment in which an
individual works at his or her occupation. An industry is usually identified on the basis of the nature
of the goods and services produced. The following are a few guidelines to help you accurately
determine the sector or industry in which the respondent works.
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Do NOT write the exact name of the company or the institution, except for those individuals
who work for government ministries, or official/ public organizations.
Do NOT write a generic description such as “workshop”, “industry”, “factory”, etc since this
would not provide enough descriptive information.
If the place where the person works produces more than 1 item (such as a factory that produces two
different items) list the main/primary item produced. Example: A person may be an accounts clerk
and employed by a dairy farmer. His occupation is ‘Accounting Clerk’ but his industry is ‘dairy
farming’.
Further Examples:
Proper explanation Unsatisfactory Explanation
Secondary school teacher Teacher
Maize and horticultural farmer Farmer
House and industry pipe repair Repairer
Secretary who keeps secret files Secretary
Furniture making Carpenter
Question 18. This question intends to know the number of people who also work where the
respondent works. If the respondent answers vaguely, for example “only a few” or “very many,”
probe to get a more accurate estimate. Record the number.
Question 19. How long does it take the respondent to get to work from the house? Record the time
of going or coming back, one way only. It does not depend on the method that the respondent uses
to get to their job. 30 minutes walking, 30 minutes on a bicycle or 30 minutes in a dala dala should
all be coded as 30 minutes. If the respondent uses different methods on different days, use the one
that s/he takes the most often.
Question 20. Is the respondent paid, either in cash or in kind payments, by his employer? If the
answer is yes fill in code 1 and move to question 22, if the answer is no, the fill in code 2 and
continue with the following question.
Question 21. What is the main reason you receive no payment for this work? Use the codes listed in
the questionnaire. If the respondent gives a reason that is not listed in the questionnaire, code 3
and write the reason in words. Then move to question 25.
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Question 22. How much was your last payment? If the respondent has not yet been paid, then
indicate the amount that they expect to receive. Also indicate also the time unit for which the
payment covers using the codes in the questionnaire. For example, if the respondent received 5000
TSH an hour, code 5000 in the first vertical line and code 1 in the second. If the respondent received
2,000,000 shillings a month, code 2,000,000 in the first vertical row and code 5 in the second.
Question 23. This question wants to know if the respondent does any extra duty apart from his
normal work, for which he receives payment that is not part of his salary. If the answer is yes fill in
code 1 and if the answer is no fill in code 2 and move to question 25.
Question 24. What is the value of those extra duty payments? Over what time interval? Is it for
hours...1, for days...2 for weeks...3, for 2 weeks...4, for month...5, for quarterly...6, for half a year...7,
for whole year...8? Fill in according to the answer. Record it in Tanzanian shillings with the code of
the time unit.
Question 25. How many hours did you work last week? Record also paid leave and sick leave. If he
worked for two days, ask him to specify in hours.
Question 26. During the last 12 months, for how many months did you work in this job? Record also
paid leave and sick leave. Write the total in months.
Question 27. During the last 12 months, how many weeks per month do you usually work in this
job? For the months when the respondent works in the job, write the average number of weeks of
work the respondent usually works.
Question 28. During the last 12 months, how many hours per week do you usually work in this job?
For the weeks when the respondent works in the job, write the average number of hours of work
the respondent usually works.
Questions 29-43 ask about secondary wage work, if the household member has had more than one
form of wage employment in the last 12 months.
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Question 29. Find out if the household member has worked another job for wages in the past 12
months, in addition to the one listed in the previous questions 13-28. If the household member used
to work in a different job at some point during the year but does not work there now, still list it here.
For yes, code 1. For no, code 2 and move to question 44.
Question 30. Is your employer in this secondary wage work…? List the type of employer, using codes
listed on the questionnaire.
Questions 31-43 repeat the same questions about the secondary job as were asked for the primary
job in questions 13-29. Refer to the above section of the manual for more information on these
questions.
Questions 44-50 ask about unpaid apprenticeships. Record information about any unpaid
apprentice work which the household member has done for someone who is not a part of the
household.
Question 44. Ask if the household member has spent any time in the past 12 months working as an
unpaid apprentice for someone who is not a member of the household. If yes, code 1. If no, code 2
and move to question 51.
Question 45. This item is concern with the economic activity which one spends most of his time,
after the job listed in questions 13-28. For more information on answering this question, see
question 16 in this section.
Question 46. What type of trade or business is it connected with? You will fill in the codes from ISIC
depending on the answer. For more information on answering this question, see question 17 in this
section.
Question 47. Is your employer in this secondary wage work…? List the type of employer, using codes
listed on the questionnaire.
Question 48. During the last 12 months, for how many months did you work in this job? Record also
paid leave and sick leave. Write the total in months.
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Question 49. During the last 12 months, how many weeks per month do you usually work in this
job? For the months when the respondent works in the job, write the average number of weeks of
work the respondent usually works.
Question 50. During the last 12 months, how many hours per week do you usually work in this job?
For the weeks when the respondent works in the job, write the average number of hours of work
the respondent usually works.
Questions 51-73 will concern household members who are self employed in non agricultural
business or enterprise.
Household business or enterprise is an organized commercial activity, a commercial establishment,
owned and managed by household members. It can be very informal and have no hired labour or
formal registration. For instance, non-agricultural one-man operations providing goods/services for
various different non-household members/groups, i.e. working independently on their own-account,
must be classified as household enterprises.
This module collects detailed information on the ownership and operation of any income–
generating enterprises by the survey household that were in operation over the past 12 months. The
main criterion for an enterprise to be listed in this module is that it operated at some point over the
past 12 months, including those that operated over the past 12 months but are closed temporarily
or permanently as of the interview date, and those that may not have operated full-time every
month over the past 12 months. In fact, the module is interested in capturing seasonality in business
activities, i.e. the fact that the nature of some businesses leads owners not to operate continuously
throughout the last 12 months.
Household non-agricultural income-generating enterprises include those that produce or trade
goods or services, including owning a shop or operated a trading business, no matter how small.
Enterprises might include, for example, making mats, bricks, or charcoal; working as a mason or
carpentry; firewood selling; metalwork; tailoring; repair work; food processing, fish marketing, petty
trading and so on. Examples of household enterprises to list in this section include:
Tailor who repairs clothing and shoes at her stall in the market
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Business woman who goes abroad to buy clothing, and then brings it to Dar es Salaam to sell
in the market
Trader who buys maize from remote villages and transports it to the regional capital to sell
Bricklayer who works for different stores/shops in town when they need repairs
Individual makes charcoal and then carries it to sell along the road
Individual owns his own car and uses it as a taxi
Architect who designs roads and consults with many different firms and the government
sometimes for different projects
Question 51. Ask the respondent if the past week s/he was engaged in non agricultural business in
the past 7 days, other than agriculture. Using the guidelines above, fill in code 1 if the answer is yes
and move to question 53. Fill in code 2 if the answer is no.
Question 52. This question wants to know if the respondent was engaged in personal business apart
from agriculture for the past 12 months. If the answer is yes code it 1 and if the answer is no, code it
2 and move to question 74.
Question 53. What type of business was (NAME) working in? Write the description in the blank, and
later use the ISIC codes. Do not ask the respondent for the ISIC code. For more information, see
question 17 in this section.
Question 54. Who owns this business in the household? Fill in the id number of the household
member from the Roster, not the name. Fill in up to 2 Roster ID numbers if the business is owned by
multiple people in the household.
Question 55. How many people who are not household members are participating in this business?
Write the total number. If there are no participants who are not household members write ‘0’.
Question 56. Do not ask this question to the respondent. For the first type of business in which
household members are engaged, write A on the appropriate line for members for which this was
their main occupation. For the second type of business, write B on the appropriate line for members
for which this was their main occupation. Continue until all businesses are accounted for. Each
household member should have only one letter on their line. If a single household member has
more than one business, use the lines on the bottom of the page to account for those enterprises.
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CORRECT INCORRECT
58. 58.
YEARS MONTHS YEARS MONTHS
3 2 2007 7
How long has this
business existed?
How long has this
business existed?
If the business is owned by more than one household member, then fill in questions 57-71 for only
one household member. That is to say that there should be one respondent for all questions
relating to the “A” business, one respondent for the “B” business, etc.
Example: The head of household owns a market stall, and his son (member number 3) works for him
in his business. The head’s spouse runs a business from home. In this case the head should respond
to the questions about his business, and the spouse to the questions about hers.
Question 57. Where does (NAME) run his business (place)? Use the codes listed on the
questionnaire to identify the location. If the business may have moved temporarily, inquire about
the usual place of business.
Question 58. How long has this business existed?
Record the number of years and the number of
months that the business has existed – not the
first year in which in the business opened. If the
enterprise stopped its operations briefly and
restarted, the date should refer to when the enterprise first started operating.
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Question 59. Ask (NAME) where he received the capital to start this business. Use the codes listed
on the questionnaire. If the respondent names a source of capital that is not on the list, use code 11
and write the source of capital in words. Up to three sources of capital can be listed in order of
importance. Note that a ‘loan’ needs to be formally repaid, while a ‘gift’ does not. ‘Sale of assets
owned’ means that the owner sold some item of value in order to obtain the money needed to
begin the household enterprise is engaged. If no start-up capital was required, record 99.
Question 60. To whom do you sell you products or services? Indicate up to two responses using the
codes listed in the questionnaire. A “final consumer” (code 1) would imply that the enterprise is
retail-oriented. This means that the person who is buying the product is going to use it, and will
typically not re-sell the product. “Institutions” would include schools, hospitals, prisons and the like.
“Manufacturers” would imply that the enterprise provides unfinished products or raw materials to
other enterprises, who use them as part of the process of creating a final product for the market.
For questions 61-63, be careful with the categories. Physical capital stock includes fixed goods
devoted to the production of other goods, the use of which does not prevent future use. Inputs or
supplies are also used for producing other goods, but they diminish with use. Finished merchandise
or goods for sale are goods that are ready to be sold.
Examples:
1. Tailor: His/her physical capital stock includes: tailoring machines, a pair of scissors,
needle (question 61). He/she may also have a current stock of inputs such as pieces of
cloth and thread (question 62) and current stock of finished merchandise such as
readymade clothes like gowns, shirts etc. (question 63).
2. Selling water: In this case the business may have no capital (question 61) or inputs
(question 62). However, he/she may have water in stock to sell (question 63).
3. Miller: The miller’s physical capital stock includes the mill itself (question 61). Inputs or
supplies include fuel to run the mill and any pre-milled maize the business may own
(question 62). Finished goods for sale include milled maize (question 63).
4. Stationary store: A stationary store’s physical capital includes computers, printers, and
copy machines, and smaller items that the stationary store uses like staplers (question
61). Inputs or supplies include paper used for printing and ink or toner used in the
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machines (question 62). Finished goods include notebooks, pens, folders, or other items
sold by the stationary store for customer use (question 63).
5. Selling eggs: Suppose the respondent says they sell eggs from their farm as a business.
THIS SHOULD NOT BE ENTERED HERE. This activity should be entered in the agriculture
questionnaire to avoid double counting.
Question 61. You need to be careful when asking this question. You have to add the total value of
his properties; even those in the store, in the farm, farm implements, buildings, land, cars etc. The
total amount has to be filled in this question. It may be useful to make notes in the margins of your
questionnaire to assist in calculation the total value.
Question 62. What is the value of your current stock of inputs or supplies? This includes all
materials that kept on hand for making or producing goods.
Question 63. Ask the respondent the value of the goods which is ready to be sold.
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For questions 64-69, be careful to make a distinction between GROSS income and NET income.
Gross income is before taking into account all business-related taxes and expenses. Net income is
the profit. Questions 67-69 expand on the various business expenses. When you are finished with
these sections, check that:
Q65 = Q64 – Q67 – Q68 – Q69.
Examples:
1. Tailor: To know total revenue (question 64), you need to ask the revenue for gowns (Tsh
15000) and how many were sold in the last month (8 sold); revenue for shirts (Tsh 10,000)
and how many sold in the last month (3 sold). Check that Q65 = Q64 Q67 – Q68 Q69. All
prices should be measured in the same units.
2. Selling water: In the case of traders such as this, include money spent on merchandise under
input costs (question 68).
3. Miller: Total revenue (question 64) is all money that comes in as payment for milling
services. Net income (question 65) in the profit left over after paying for fuel or the
electricity bill (question 69).
4. Stationary store: Gross income (question 64) includes all money that comes from sales from
goods or printing. Net income (question 65) subtracts from gross income the amount of
money spent on monthly wages (question 67) and buying paper or other supplies wholesale
(question 68).
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Question 64. What gross income/takings did you get from your business or businesses last
week/month? Find out what is the monthly income before paying taxes and the fixed costs. For
weekly income fill in code 1, and for monthly income fill in code 2 for the period, and fill in the T-
shilling amount.
Question 65. This question intends to know the weekly/monthly income after paying taxes and fixed
costs. For weekly income fill in code 1, and for monthly income fill in code 2 for the period, and fill in
the T-shilling amount. The value for this question should be less than question 64, because it is
taking into account the money spent for the business after earning income.
Question 66. Ask the respondent how many employees who are not household members
participated in the business in the past one month. Record the number.
Question 67. What is/was your expenditure on wages last month? Record how much the household
member is spending in a month in paying salaries? If the amount is zero, fill in ‘0’
Question 68. What was your total expenditure on raw materials last month? Record the amount
spent in buying raw materials and inputs for his business. Enter the amount in TSH.
Question 69. How much were your other operating expenses (for this business) such as fuel,
kerosene, electricity, etc. last month? Record the amount spent in a month in paying other services.
Enter the amount in TSH.
Question 70. Ask the respondent, how many months out of the past 12 months did you operate this
business? If it is the whole year, indicate 12 months.
Question 71. What is the average monthly profit of this business for the months in the last year?
Record the average profit for the months in which the business was functioning. This should be the
total amount of money taken in minus the fixed and variable costs of production.
Question 72. Ask the respondent if apart from this business he has engaged in another non-
agricultural activity for the past seven days. If, the answer is yes, then fill in code 1 and move to the
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lines on the bottom of the sheet, starting at question 53. If the answer is no, fill in code 2 and move
to question 74.
Question 73. Ask the respondent if apart from this business he has engaged in another non-
agricultural activity for the past 12 months. If, the answer is yes, then fill in code 1 and move to the
lines on the bottom of the sheet, starting at question 53. If the answer is no, fill in code 2.
General work for the last seven days: Questions 74-81 are very important for this research and
should be asked for all household members above the age of 5. It is important to know the time
(hours) spent in working, to help determine those who are working below 40 hours a week. These
can be categorized as people who are working, based on the international standard of working.
This is very important for economic growth; the government needs to know this fact in order to
prepare policy towards workers.
Question 74. Record whether the household member has spent any time in the past week helping
with a household-run business, even if the household member did not receive payment for that
activity. For yes use code 1, and for no use code 2 and then move to question 76.
Question 75. Record the total number of hours that the household member spent working in a
household-owned, non-agricultural business, whether or not they were paid for their work. If none,
you will fill in ‘0’. Then move to question 77.
Question 76. Record whether the household member has spent any time in the past 12 months
helping with a household-run business, even if the household member did not receive payment for
that activity. For yes use code 1, and for no use code 2.
Question 77. Record whether the household member has spent any time in the past week helping
with the household’s farm, including tending crops, feeding animals, etc., even if household member
did not receive payment for that activity. For yes use code 1, and for no use code 2 and then move
to question 79.
Question 78. You will fill in hours (NAME) spends in working in the household farm, plus livestock
and fishing - whether or not they were paid for their work. If none, then fill in ‘0’. Then move to
question 80.
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Question 79. Record whether the household member has spent any time in the past 12 months
helping with the household’s farm, including tending crops, feeding animals, etc., even if household
member did not receive payment for that activity. For yes use code 1, and for no use code 2.
Question 80. You will fill in time, in hours and minutes, (NAME) spends in collecting firewood or
other fuel materials. If none, fill in ‘0’.
Question 81. You will fill in time, in minutes and hours, that (NAME) spends in fetching water,
including the time of going, waiting, and coming back. If none, fill in ‘0’.
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Section F: Food outside the Household
Section F should include all food or drinks consumed outside the household. (Anything the
respondent ate or drank outside the household should fit in one of the questions in this section.)
However, avoid double counting. For example, if the respondent ate a full dinner that included
barbecue meat, list this EITHER in questions 2&3 or 4&5, NOT in BOTH places.
Do not include gifts given out. Record received and consumed gifts. Ask their market value.
Question 1. This question is for all household members, ask if any of the household members ate or
drank outside the household in the past seven days. If yes code 1 and if no code 2. Household
members with code 2, skip to the next section.
Question 2 & 3. For household members with code 1, ask if they had a full meal (Morning, noon and
evening) outside the household. If the answer is yes code 1, and write on Question 3 the cost of the
meal. If the answer is no then code 2 and move to question 4.
Question 4 & 5. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have eaten grilled meat, roasted
potatoes, roasted banana or other snacks outside the household for the past seven days. If the
answer is yes, then code 1, and record on question 5 the cost of these snacks. If the answer is no,
code 2 and move to question 6.
Question 6 & 7. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have taken local beer outside the
household for the past seven days. If the answer is yes, code 1 and then record the cost of the drinks
in Question 7. If the answer is no, code 2 and move to question 8.
Column 8 & 9. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have drunk wine, beer or hard drinks
outside the household for the past seven days. If the answer is yes code 1, and record the cost of the
drinks on Question 9. If the answer is no, code 2 and move to question 10.
Question 10 & 11. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have drunk soda/soft drinks
outside the household for the past seven days. If the answer is yes, then code 1 and record the cost
of the drinks on Question 11. If the answer is no, code 2 and move to question 12.
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Question 12 & 13. Ask the respondent (household member) if they have eaten sweets, ice-cream
and other refreshments outside the household for the past seven days. If the answer is yes, then
code 1 and record the cost of these refreshments on Question 13. If the answer is no, code 2 and
move to question 14.
Question 14 & 15. Ask the respondent (household member) if they had taken tea, coffee, sambusa,
cakes and other bites outside the household for the past seven days. If the answer is yes then code 1
and record the cost on Question 15. If the answer is no, then code 2.
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Section G: Subjective Welfare
Question 1. This is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. Because the
subjective welfare questions ask about the respondent about their own opinions on their wellbeing,
they cannot be answered by another member of the household. Fill in the code 1 if the household
member answers the question himself. Code 2 if he/she is not answering him/herself and move to
the next section.
Question 2. This question is a filter question for the age of the respondent. The subjective welfare
questions should only be asked to respondents 15 and over.
Question 3. For this question, ask the respondent how satisfied he/she is with various aspects of
his/her life. Ask for each item A-H, and use the codes found in the questionnaire. If the item is not
applicable to the respondent, use code 8. For example, if the respondent is a full-time student and
not looking for work, then item D, your job, is not applicable.
Question 4-6. These questions ask the respondent how they would self-describe their financial
circumstances this year, and compared to where they were living 3 years ago and 10 years ago. If the
individual was living in a different household 3 or 10 years ago, they should answer for that
household’s situation 3 or 10 years ago, and not for their current household 3 or 10 years ago if they
were not living there. Use the codes in the questionnaire.
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Section H: Governance
At the beginning of this section, a reminder to the respondent concerning the objective of the
National Panel Survey may be necessary. The respondents may be thinking that giving certain
answers during an election year may enable them to receive a certain service/product as to have a
positive impact on their living standards. It should be clear to the respondent that that is not the
intent of these questions, and that NBS is a neutral body.
Question 1. This is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. Fill in the
household ID code of the household member who was selected to answer the questions. This
information will be available on the pre-printed roster form.
If the person listed on the pre-printed roster form is not available, you should use the same
randomized procedure used to select the respondent in 2008/2009, by using the random number
table. To use the random number table, write the household number in the first column. Then count
the number of ADULT members in the household (18 years or older) and look at the column with
that number. The number in the appropriate row (this household) and appropriate column (correct
number of adult members) is the member ID of the person you should interview.
For example: if youre interviewing household 0123 which has 5 adult members, in the example
below you would interview member number 3.
Question 2. This is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. Fill in whether the
selected household member was interviewed. If yes, code 1 and move to question 4. If no, code 2.
Question 3. This is for the interviewer and should not be asked to the respondent. Fill in the
household ID code of the household member who was selected as the replacement to answer the
questions.
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Question 4-6. Ask these questions by moving from left to right in each row. Ask questions 4-6 for
each official before moving on to the next official in the next row. Still ask questions 5 and 6 if the
respondent does not know the name of the official. It is possible that the respondent has talked to
their official even if they do not know the official’s name.
Question 7-8. Ask these questions by moving from left to right in each row. First ask if the
respondent has attended any of the type of meeting in the past year. If they have attended all, use
code 1 and move to the next type of meeting. If they have attended some or none of the type of
meeting, code 2 or 3, respectively, and move to question 9 to ask why they missed some meetings.
Even if a respondent says that he/she attends some meetings, find out why they have not attended
all of the meetings by asking question 8.
Question 9. Find out how often the respondent has done each of the listed activities in the previous
year. For each activity, use the codes in the questionnaire to record the frequency of each of the
activities.
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Section I: Food Security
This module should be asked of the individual(s) primarily responsible for the preparation of food.
At the beginning of this section, a reminder to the respondent concerning the objective of the
National Panel Survey may be necessary. The respondents may be thinking that exaggerating
answers may enable them to receive a certain service/product as to have a positive impact on their
living standards. It should be clear to the respondent that that is not the intent of these questions.
Question 1. This question seeks to find out if the household had any concerns as regards to the
amount of food over the past seven days.
Question 2. Whether the response to question 1 is “yes” or “no”, question 2, parts A-H should still
be asked.
It is possible that the person says there were no worries in the past 7 days about having
enough food (no in question 1) but the household still took action listed in question 2.
Question 3. This question asks whether a consistently consumes some meals every day. The
question further wishes to know whether under-five children eat the same number of meals
compared to those above 5 years. As such if all the members of the household consume the same
number of meals every day then both columns will have the same number while the opposite is true
if the household members have different number of meals a day.
Question 4. This question finds out what children under 5 ate for breakfast on the day before the
interview. Use the codes on the right to fill out the breakfast food. If there are no children under 5 in
the household, record “00.”
Question 5. This question finds out what children age 5-13 ate for breakfast on the day before the
interview. Use the codes on the right to fill out the breakfast food. If there are no children age 5-13
in the household, record “00.”
Question 6. Ask if all household members eat roughly the same diet. If one person in the household
does not like to eat plantains and eats rice instead, then that still counts as “roughly” the same diet,
and the answer to the question should be yes. If someone in the household has stomach problems
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so that she cannot eat fish and eats chicken instead, that still counts as “roughly” the same diet and
the answer should be yes. If yes, code 1 and move to question 8. If no, code 2 and move to the next
question.
Question 7. Record who in the household eats a greater variety of foods and a lesser variety of
foods. A larger variety would include more foods from different food groups, like starches, proteins,
vegetables, or sweets. Record whether men, women, and children (6-59 months) eat more or less
diverse diets.
Question 8. Ask whether the household has been faced with a situation when they did not have
enough food to feed the family in the last 12 months. If yes, code 1. If no, code 2 and move to the
next section.
Question 9. Here you should record in which months the household did nto have enough food to
feed the family. Only ask about the past 12 months, so if you are doing the interview in October
2010, start by asking about the circumstances in October 2009. If you are doing the interview in
March 2011, start by asking about the circumstances in March 2010.
Question 10. Describe the reason for the lack of food in the household in the previous months. Use
the codes on the bottom of the page. Select up to 3 reasons, in order of importance.
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Section J: Housing, Water & Sanitation
This section is about the facilities that the household has in their home. It should be answered by
the household member who is most knowledgeable on these subjects.
Question 1. This question is about the ownership of the building occupied by the household. The
building can be the property of the household, rented (the whole building or a part of it), rented by
employer etc. As it is shown in the questionnaire, fill in the code according to the answers from your
respondent. Remember, when the code is 2 or 4 you will skip to question 3, and if the answer is 3, 5,
or 6 you will skip to question 4.
Question 2. Ask the respondent to describe the title deed of the house. If the household is a tenant,
then ask about the contract and remember the code 9. If it is a type of contract that is not included
on the list, indicate “8” and write the type of contract in words.
Question 3. This question asks about the house rent, or how much the household pays a month for
all buildings occupied by the household. If the house rent is paid by the employer, record the
amount of money which the employer pays for house.
Question 4. Here what is needed is the number of the rooms occupied by the household. Remember
that the number of the rooms does not include stores, toilets, shower rooms, halls, and veranda.
Include only the rooms being occupied by the household; including sitting rooms, dining rooms and
the kitchen. If there is a main house and secondary houses, separate the total number of rooms as is
shown in the column number. If there are multiple secondary houses, sum the total number of
rooms in the secondary house.
Question 5. Materials for building a wall include trees, wood, soil, soil and trees, and brick layering,
as it is shown in the questionnaire. If the respondent indicates a material that is not on the list, code
it as “other” (code 7) and write the material in letters. In the last round, there were very many
“other” answers to this question that really should have been included in one of the existing
categories. This take a long time to review and re-code. Therefore the interviewer should make an
effort to use the existing codes, using other only if the response is truly not on the list.
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Question 6. This question asks building materials for the roof; these include; grass, bamboo, tiles as
coded in the questionnaire. Fill in the relevant code. If the respondent indicates a material that is
not on the list, code it as “other” (code 7) and write it in letters.
Question 7. Indicate the main building material for the floor of all houses occupied by the
household, including soil, concrete, cement etc. Look for the codes of the building materials as it is
shown in the questionnaire. If the respondent indicates a material that is not on the list, code it as
“other” (code 3) and write it in letters.
Question 8. Write the main source of income in the household. Use the codes listed on the right side
of the page. If the respondent indicates a source of income that is not on the list, code it as “other”
(code 10) and write it in letters.
Question 9. This is an environmental question. The aim is to know how they dispose their trash. If
the household uses a method that is not included on the list, indicate “6” and record the method in
words.
Question 10. This question asks about the type of the toilet used by the household. ‘No Toilet’ refers
to the use of bushes, grass/field and other open spaces as toilet facilities. ‘Flush toilet’ refers to the
type of toilet which is characterized by the draining of human excreta by rush of running water.
‘Pour flush’ is similar to a flush toilet, but the water must be manually poured. ‘VIP (Ventilated
Improved latrines)’ is a ventilated pit latrine which is defined as an onsite means of human excreta
disposal in a hygienic, low cost and more acceptable manner. The primary features of VIP latrines
consist of an enclosed structure (roof and walls) with a large diameter (110mm), PVC vertical
ventilation pipe running outside the structure from the pit of the latrine to vent above the roof. They
often will have concrete slabs containing the latrine hole. ‘Ecosan’ toilets separate human excreta
into solid and liquid components that can then be used for irrigation and fertilization. ‘Unimproved
pit latrine (slab not washable)’ is a pit latrine built without health or hygienic related specifications.
The floor of this latrine is made of soil or other material that cannot be readily cleaned. ‘Improved
pit latrine (slab washable) is a pit latrine that has a concrete (or similar material) floor. See the
photos in the Annex for more details on each of these types of toilet facilities.
Question 11. This question is about the disposal of sewage. Record where the toilet flushes to, using
the codes in the questionnaire. If the household is connected to a piped sewer system, code 1 and
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move to question 15. This question should only be asked if the household uses a pour toilet or a
flush toilet.
Question 12. This question is about the disposal of sewage. Record whether the household has paid
to have their septic tank or latrine emptied in the past 12 months. If yes, code 1. If no, code 2 and
skip to question 14. This question should be asked if the household uses a VIP, Washable or
Unwashable pit latrine, or a flush toilet or pour toilet without connection to a piped sewer system.
Question 13.Record the amount spent to have the latrine or septic tank emptied, in T-Shillings.
Question 14. This question is meant to find out why the household does not have a connection to
the piped sewer system. Ask this question even if the piped sewer system is not available in the
community. In that case, use code 3.
Question 15. Ask if the household shares its toilet facility with other households. Record 1 for yes,
and 2 for no.
Question 16. This question is about the main energy the household use to cook. Note that what is
needed here is not the utensil but the energy used. If the household uses a type of energy that is
not included on the list, indicate “8” and record the type of energy in words.
Question 17. This question is about the light in the household (during the night), what type of
energy is used to provide light. Use the codes listed in the questionnaire. If the household uses a
source for lighting that is not included on the list, indicate “9” and record the source in words.
Question 18. This question is about the main source of energy used in the household. Use the codes
listed in the questionnaire. If the household uses a source of electricity that is not included on the
list, indicate “7” and record the source in words.
Question 19. This question identifies the main source of drinking water in the household during the
rainy season. Use the codes found at the bottom of the page. If you put the code “14” make sure
you write the main source of drinking water in words. If there are more than two sources, mention
the one used most frequently by the household. If you use code “1”, move to question 22.
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Question 20. This question asks the time used by the household in the process of fetching water
from the source to the household during the rainy season (mentioned in the previous question).
Here, time includes three aspects: going to fetch water, waiting to fill the container at the source,
and time spent coming back. If for example the household spends 1 hour and 35 minutes, record 95
minutes in the ‘minutes’ box. Do not record it as 135 minutes!
Question 21. Read to the respondent the minutes mentioned in question 20, and ask him out of
these minutes, how many are spent waiting to fetch water. If the respondent gives you the answer
in hours, convert the answer to minutes.
Question 22. For the source of drinking water during the dry season, use the codes found at the
bottom of the page. If you put the code “14” make sure you write the main source of drinking water
in words. If there are more than two sources, mention the one used most frequently by the
household. If you use code “1”, move to question 25.
Question 23. The question intends to know the time spent by the household to fetch water for their
use from the source to the household during the dry season. This source should be the one
mentioned in the previous question. Here time means: time for going to the source, time for waiting
to fill in the containers, the time spent on the way coming back. For example if the household
spends about 1 hour and 35 minutes, record 95 minutes in the minute box.
Question 24. Read to him the minuets mentioned in question 23 and ask out of these minutes, how
many he spent waiting to fill water in his container. If it is hours convert the answer to minutes.
Compare time spent collecting water in section E and in section J (Sec E Q 81 and Sec J Q 20/23)
and probe if these look inconsistent.
Question 25. This question asks what type of treatment method the household usually uses to
ensure their drinking water is safe. If they take no steps to ensure the safety of their water, use code
‘7’. Record up to 2 answers for this question. Photos of different methods of water purification are
included in the Annex of this manual.
Question 26. Record the main source of water used for cooking during the rainy and the dry season.
Fill out one answer for each season. If there are more than two sources for either of the seasons,
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mention the one used most frequently by the household. Use the codes found at the bottom of the
page. If you put the code “14” make sure you write the main source of drinking water in words.
Question 27. Record the main source of water used for washing during the rainy and the dry season.
Fill out one answer for each season. If there are more than two sources for either of the seasons,
mention the one used most frequently by the household. Use the codes found at the bottom of the
page. If you put the code “14” make sure you write the main source of drinking water in words.
Question 28. Record the main source of water used for gardening during the rainy and the dry
season. Fill out one answer for each season. If there are more than two sources for either of the
seasons, mention the one used most frequently by the household. Use the codes found at the
bottom of the page. If you put the code “14” make sure you write the main source of drinking water
in words. If the household does not have a garden, write “00.”
For Questions 29-32, collect details on each water source. Record the type of container used to
collect water from that source, the average number of containers used and the frequency with
which they are collected, and the cost of water from that source.
Question 29. This question should not be asked out loud to the respondent. For each water source
mentioned in questions 19, 22, 26, 27, and 28, put an “X in column 29. Then proceed through
questions 30-32 for each source separately, reading from left to right, before moving on to the next
water source. Some questions do not apply to all the answer choices and therefore have been
blocked.
Question 30. Record the type of container which is typically used by the household to collect water
from the source. Use the codes at the right of the page.
Question 31. Record the average number of containers fetched for each of the water sources, and
the frequency with which they are filled. Use the codes on the right for time periods. For example, if
the household fills up 5 20L jerry cans per day, record the number as “5” and the frequency as “1.”
Question 32. Record the cost, in T-shillings, of filling a 20L jerry can of water from the source. If the
household does not use jerry cans to gather water from that particular source, calculate what the
price per 20L is.
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Question 33. Find out if the household gets water from the piped water utility. In the Dar es Salaam
area, the piped utility’s name is DAWASA, and in the Morogoro area the piped utility company is
called MORUWASA. Use the local company name for the piped utility company if you are in a
different area. If yes, code 1. If no, code 2 and move to question 39.
Question 34. Ask to see the household’s monthly water bill. Record the result using the codes found
in the questionnaire. If you could not see the bill, move to question 36.
Question 35. This question should not be asked out loud to the respondent. Check the bill to see if
water and sewer are included together. One the left side of the bill, both the words “water” and
“sewer” should appear. (These are circled in on the above example.) If both appear, code “1”. If
only water appears, code “2”.
Question 36. This question should not be asked out loud to the respondent. Record information
from the bill, including the date of the bill and total amount billed for water and for sewage. The
information you need to record is circled on the example bill above. Note that you need to be
35.
RECORD INFORMATION FROM BILL
YES..1 SEWAGE
NO...2
1 1 13/6/2010 32 4,650 5 0
DATE
DOES
HOUSEHOLD
PAY FOR
SEWAGE AND
WATER
TOGETHER?
36.34.
TSH
WATER
Can you show me
your monthly bill?
WRITE '00' IF NO SEWAGE CHARGE APPEARS ON BILL.
DAYS TSH M3
YES,
SHOWN....1
NO, CAN'T
FIND OR
REFUSED..2
(37)
NO BILL
RECEIVED.3
(37)
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careful that you record the “Current Charges” (circles above) rather than the “amount due”. Current
charges are the amount of new charges for this month, while amount due includes any older unpaid
bills.
Question 37. Ask the respondent for their opinion on the quality of the water they receive from the
piped water source. Ask about taste, smell, color, etc, and record one answer for their overall
satisfaction, based on the codes in the questionnaire.
Question 38. Find out how many hours the piped water runs for on the days when it is running. The
water might run for different amounts of time on different days; if that is the case, calculate the
average. Record the answer in hours.
Question 39. Find out how many days per week the water runs. Even if water only runs for 1 hour in
a day, it runs for that day and should be counted. Then move to question 40.
Question 40. Find out why the household does not have a connection to the piped water system.
Use the codes at the bottom of the questionnaire.
Question 41. Find out how the household feels about the water service from the local water utility.
Ask this question of all households, even if they do not have a connection to the piped water system.
It is important to know what the household knows about the piped utility in the community or in the
country, and how they feel about it.
Question 42. This question can be difficult to answer. Probe respondents by giving examples of
prices and ask if they would be willing to pay that amount for improved piped water supply service.
Move the price up and down until the respondent agrees on the maximum price he/she is willing to
pay. When the respondent agrees on a price, repeat it to confirm. Then record the final answer.
For example, ask:
“If the water supply service is improved, would you be willing to pay TSh 100 for a 20L bucket?
If yes, would you be willing to pay TSh 200 for a 20L bucket?
o If yes, would you be willing to pay TSh 300 for a 20L bucket?
If no, would you be willing to pay TSh 150 for a 20L bucket?
o If no, would you be willing to pay TSh 50 for a 20L bucket?
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o If yes, would you be willing to pay TSh 75 for a 20L bucket?
o If no, would you be willing to pay TSh 25 for a 20L bucket?
Etc.
So, the most you would pay for a 20L bucket of water from an improved water supply is TSh
75. Is that correct? [RECORD TSH 75]
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Section K: Consumption of Food over Past
One Week
This section will examine household food expenditure; food crops (starch from roots), sugar, beans,
horticultural crops, fruits, meat, milk and milk products, oil, spices, tea, soft drinks, coffee. The
questions ask if the household consumed any foods in the past seven days. It is important that you
take your time on this section and ask the questions carefully. These measures will be used to
construct poverty estimates.
NOTE: This section measures CONSUMPTION, not EXPENDITURE. The questions focus on how much
was eaten, not on how much was purchased or produced. Suppose, for example, that a household
purchases a 50kg bag of rice every month for TSh. 35,000, and eats approximately 1.5 kilos per day.
In the 7 days prior to the interview, the household may have purchased no rice. However, they ate
7*1.5kg = 10.5kg of rice. We care about the 10.5 kg eaten. When asked about the amount spent,
you should calculate the cost of these 10.5 kg (TSh. 35,000/50kg = TSh 700/kg. So for 10.5kg, the
cost was TSh 13,500.)
NOTE ON LOCAL UNITS: Respondents may give answers in local units. If they are unable to convert
these into standard units (the options listed on the questionnaire), you should record the answer in
local units. You are then responsible to weigh or measure these local units before you leave the
village and convert all answers into standard units.
Also, be careful with option 5 in the units question (“pieces”). This should only be used with items
that have a fairly standard size which will not vary from village to village. For instance, eggs may be
counted in pieces. Bread should not be counted in pieces.
Column 1. Read out to your respondent all items of food listed. Code 1 if the item is consumed, and
code 2 if the item is not consumed. Remember to record the items consumed in the household and
not outside the household. Ask this question for all items of food listed 101-1108 before moving on
to Column 2.
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Column 2. This question is asked only for those items with have a “1” in Column 1. Record the total
amount the household consumed in the past seven days. This includes purchases, own production
and gifts. And make sure to carefully code the units. While a household might eat 300 grams of
sugar in a week, 300 kilos would make everyone sick.
Column 3. In this Column, you should only list the purchases made by the household in the past 7
days. Again be careful to check the units.
Column 4. Record the total amount of money spent for this item in the past seven days.
Column 5. In this Column, you should only list the own production of the household in the past 7
days. Again be careful to check the units.
Column 6. In this Column, you should only list the gifts and transfers received by the household in
the past 7 days. Again be careful to check the units.
At the end of the line, you should perform a quick check that the total from Column 2 is roughly
equal to the sum of columns 3, 5, and 6. If there is a large difference in the amounts, you should ask
the respondent to clarify.
If the respondent says “Yes” to question 1, be sure that you have fill in all the appropriate columns
for that food item. For instance, in the example below, the household said “Yes” they consumed
raw maize. Even though all the raw maize came from own production (question 5) make sure you
enter zeroes for questions 3 and 6. You do not need to enter units when entering zeroes. You do
not need to enter shilling values in question 4 if none of the food item was purchased. See the
example below.
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Question 7. Instructions on testing iodine.
Question 8. This question seeks to find out the number of days the food categories reported above
were actually consumed. If a household has eaten mangoes each and every day of the past 7 days,
then 7 will be recorded in line F Fruits. If a household ate rice for 3 days and maize on 3 days,
record 6 in row A – Cereals, Grains, and Cereal Products.
Question 9. Ask your respondent if any person who is not a member of their household was invited
for food in the past seven days, even if it is only for one meal. If the answer is yes, code it 1 and
move to question 10. If the answer is no, code it 2 and move to the next section.
Question 10. Ask the respondent to tell you the number of days they invited visitors for food.
Remember to record this separating the visitors according to their age as it is itemized in A, B, C and
D.
Question 11. Also ask the number of meals the household invited visitors. Record it the same way as
you did in question 10.
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Section L: Non-Food Expenditure – Past
one week and one month
ONE WEEK RECALL
Question 1 & 2. Read out to your respondent all items listed below with codes 101-103. Ask if out of
these, some or all were consumed in the household for the past seven days. If the answer is yes,
code it 1, and if the answer is no code it 2. Ask for each and every item. For yes, remember to record
the total amount of money used to buy the item in column 2.
ONE MONTH RECALL
Question 1 & 2. This is the same question as the previous one, the difference, is that here you ask
for one month and the codes are 201-224.
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Section M: Non-Food Expenditure Past
twelve months
Question 1 & 2. These questions are also the same as the previous two questions. The difference is
that here you ask about 12 months and the codes are 301-319.
NON FOOD ITEMS THAT MAY NOT HAVE BEEN PURCHASED
Question 1. Ask your respondent if the household collected, bought or received items listed below in
the past 12 month. For every item, if the answer is yes code it 1. If the answer is no, code it 2.
Question 2 & 3. Columns 2 & 3 will depend on the answer to the previous question. If the answer in
question 1 is yes, then in Column 2 you will record the estimated value of the item. Probe by asking
how much it could cost if the same item was sold at the market. In Column 3, record the actual price
that the household paid for the item. If the household did not pay for the item, write “0.”
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Section N: Household Assets
These questions ask about the ownership of the resources and other valuable permanent assets as it
is stipulated in the questionnaire. It is possible that your respondent could be hesitant to respond to
these questions because they are very sensitive; this is information which one would not like to
share with a stranger. Try to use polite language to convince him of the confidentiality of the
interview.
Question 1 (codes 401-452). Read out to your respondent the list of the assets; ask him what they
own and record the total number of the assets in the box. If there is none, record “0”. Be careful to
record the number and not the value of the item. Households, no matter how wealthy, are unlikely
to own 20,000,000 air conditioners.
(For row 408: give the number of single chairs – do not state the number of “seti”.)
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Section O: Assistance and Groups
In this section you should ask all the questions across Columns 1-5 for row A before moving on to
row B.
Question 1. This question intends to know if the respondent received (money or in-kind) from the
Government or NGOs (religious) as it is listed on the horizontal line A-F. Do not include groups like
SACCOS and UPATU (self-help groups). If the answer is yes, then code it 1 and record it on the
horizontal line. If the answer is yes then code it 2 and move to the next item.
Question 2. This question is the continuation of question 1. If the answer to question 1 is yes, ask
your respondent to tell the name of the group which provided the item.
Question 3. Here we need to know the amount of money received from the sources mentioned in
question 2 for the past 12 months.
Question 4. Here we need to know the value of the grant listed in question 2. Ask your respondent
to tell you the value (money) of this food or other assistance.
Question 5. This question intends to know if there are other things, apart from money and food,
which the household received from the source of the grant (question 2) in the past 12 months. For
other items, check the list given on Column 1 item F.
Question 6. Record the household id numbers of the household members who participated in the
program, listing up to three.
Question 7. Ask your respondent if there is any household member who is a member of a Credit
Union (SACCOS is a good example). If the answer is yes, code it 1 if the answer is no code 2 and skip
to the next section.
Ask your respondent to tell you the names of the household members who are in the Credit Union.
List the names in the first column on rows A-E. Then insert the Roster ID number of each household
member.
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In this section, ask questions 8 through 16 for each person listed before moving on to the next
person on the list.
Question 8. This question asks the respondent how much credit (money) the household member has
in the Credit Union. Be discreet about asking this question, particularly if there are others around.
Respondents may not want to talk about how much money they have if others are listening.
Question 9. This question intends to know how many times and for what period the household
member gives out his contribution to the Credit Union. You will record it as it is directed. If it is 2
times a month, you will write 2 on the Column of frequency and 3 on the Column of unit.
Question 10. Ask a member of the Credit Union how much money he contributes each time her
contributes. Record the amount in T-Shillings.
Question 11 & 12. Ask when he last took a loan from this Credit Union. Ask for the month and year.
Record the year in four digits. Enter the amount the household member withdrew in question 12. If
they have never taken a loan from the group, enter ‘0’ and skip to the next row.
Question 13. Ask the household member how much credit he had before asking for the loan from
the Credit Union.
Question 14. Ask the reason for taking out the last loan. Use the codes provided in the middle of this
page.
Question 15 & 16.
In this question ask him/her about the period of paying back the loan. Record the time period and
the amount in question 15. For example if is paying back 20,000 weekly, you will enter 20,000 on the
Column of TSH and 2 on the Column of period. For question 16, your respondent will tell you how
long it will take him/her to finish paying back the loan.
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Section P: Credit
This section is to be answered by the head of the household or any household member who is
responsible of the loans listed below, and includes only those loans that are not from the SACCOS.
Question 1. Ask your respondent if there are any household members who took loan (money),
goods or services outside the household in the past 12 months. If the answer is yes, code it 1 and if
the answer is no code it 2 and move to section Q. Remember to include all the loans, including
agricultural activities loans. Be particularly careful when valuing loans that are in the form of goods
or services.
Question 2. Ask your respondent to mention the names of the institutions outside the household
where the household members took each of the loans in the past 12 months. Make sure you finish
listing people or institutions before moving to the next question.
Question 3. This question should not be asked to the respondent. The interviewer needs to insert
codes for the source of loans. Use the codes provided on the bottom of this page.
Question 4. On this item, you will insert the roster number of the household member who took the
loan from the institutions you listed on Question 2.
Question 5. Ask your respondent if the loan was in cash (money) or goods on credit (things). If
money code 1, if goods code 2.
Question 6. You will fill in the amount of the loan in shillings (Remember, if the loan was in the form
of goods, give the value in money and fill it in here).
Question 7. Ask your respondent to tell you if the whole loan is paid back. If the answer is yes code it
1 and skip to question 9. If the answer is no, code it 2.
Question 8. Ask your respondent when he/she is expecting to finish paying back the loan. Enter the
year and month expected. Enter the year in four digits.
Question 9. Ask your respondent the total amount to be paid of the loan, with interest.
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Example: Eli took a bank loan amounting to 100,000 with 25% interest. The total pay of the loan
with interest for Eli, is 125,000.
Question 10. It is normal that when a person asks for a loan, there is an intended purpose for the
loan. Ask your respondent the intended purpose of asking for the loan. Choose among the given
codes. If the reason is not on the list, then code it “11” and write down the intended purpose in
words.
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Section Q: Finance
This section intends to find out about use of mobile banking services, remittances payments, and
bank accounts. Ask this section to the household head or any household member who knows very
well the finances of the household.
Question 1. Find out if anyone in the household has used a money transfer service in the past 12
months. Answer for M-PESA, Z-PESA, and ZAP separately. If yes, code 1. If no, code 2. If no for all
three types of money transfers, skip to question 5.
Question 2. Record how often the household uses the transfer services. If multiple people in the
household use the services, or if the household uses multiple services, record the total for all
household members and all 3 services. Use the codes found on the questionnaire.
Question 3. Record the purposes for which the household used the transfer service. For each
activity, A-H, code 1 if the household used the transfer for the given purpose, and code 2 if they did
not use it for the given purpose.
Question 4. Look at all of the activities which were coded “yes” (1) in question 3. Ask which of those
activities was the most important for using the transfer service. Write the letter of the activity in the
box.
Question 5. Ask if anyone in the household has received cash remittances from aboard in the last 12
months. Do not include non-cash remittances, or cash coming from inside the country. If yes code 1,
and if no code 2 and move to question 12.
Question 6. Record the name of the country from which the cash remittances came. Use the codes
found at the bottom of the sheet. If the country name is not found, code 11 and specify the name of
the country.
Question 7. Record the relationship between the household head and the person who sends the
remittances. Use the codes on the bottom of the page.
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Question 8. Find out for how long the sender has lived aboard. Record the number as well as the
units. For example, if the sender has lived abroad for 15 years, write 15 in the number column, and 2
in the unit column.
Question 9. Record how the household receives the remittances. This is the method by which the
sender sends money so that the household can receive it. Use the codes at the bottom of the page.
You can list up to three different methods of sending money.
Question 10. Record the total value of cash received in the previous 12 months. Use T-shillings, even
if the money came in a different currency.
Question 11. Record what the money was spent on in Tanzania. When households receive money,
they may use it for a variety of different purposes. Recode the uses using the codes at the bottom of
the page. Record up to three uses.
Question 12. Ask if anyone in the household has received in-kind remittances from aboard in the last
12 months. Include only non-cash remittances. If yes code 1, and if no code 2 and move to question
15.
Question 13. Record the total value of in-kind goods received in the previous 12 months. If the exact
value is not known, ask the respondent to estimate the value in T-shillings.
Question 14. Record the name of the country from which the in-kind remittances came. Use the
codes found at the bottom of the sheet. If the country name is not found, code 11 and specify the
name of the country.
Question 15. Write whether anyone in the household has a bank account at a commercial bank,
credit union, or other financial institution. If yes code 1. If no code 2 and move to question This
question asks about non-wage income received by the household for property they own, excluding
agricultural land. You should write down the amount, in shillings, that the household receives in one
year from property they own such as houses, apartments, commercial property and any land not
used for agriculture. Agricultural land must be excluded because we will record information about
this in the agricultural questionnaire. If the household owns more than one rental property, add the
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annual value from all properties in the margin of the questionnaire and write the total amount in the
box.
Question 16. This question asks the amount received by all household members from pensions,
either from the government or from private firms. If multiple members of the household receive
pensions, you should add the annual amounts in the margins and write the total in the box.
Question 17. This question asks for the total of payments received from other households living in
Tanzania. This could be cash or goods sent by a former household members, family friends or
members of the extended family. And the cash or goods could be for any purpose for
consumption, for children’s school fees, to buy a large item such as a home or a car. If the
household receives goods in-kind, estimate their value and include it in the total.
Question 18. 21.
Question 19. Write the names of the institutions at which household members hold savings
accounts. Use the full name of the institution.
Question 20. Record the year in which the household member first opened a bank account. Give the
year in 4 digits; do not write how many years the household has had the account for. Then move to
the next section.
Question 21. If no one in the household has a bank account, record the reason why not. List up to 3
reasons, using the codes on the right side of the page.
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Section R: Recent Shocks to Household
Welfare
Ask this section to the household head or any household member who knows very well the welfares
of the household.
Question 1. This question intends to know whether the household encountered any disasters or
events from those listed in the first column, at any point in the past five years. Read the entire list of
shocks (items 101 119) before moving on to Question 2. In the case of 119, specify the shock in
words.
Question 2. Before answering question 2, read out the list of shocks which the household indicated
that it experienced in the past five years. Ask the respondent which of these shocks had the most
significant impact on their wellbeing, and then put code 1 in Column 2 for that shock. Then ask the
household which shock had the second most significant impact, and code it 2 in Column 2. Similarly,
code 3 for the third most significant shock. If the household indicates having only experienced two
shocks in the past five years, you will not have a code 3 in this Column.
Questions 3, 4 & 5. These questions will only be asked for the three major disasters which were
listed in question 2. You will leave blank the lines which are not listed in Column 2. For question 3,
the respondent will answer if the disasters lowered the income of the household. In question 4, you
will ask how much these disasters affected the household. Record the answer using the codes given.
In question 5, ask your respondent when the shock took place. Record the month and the year.
Record the year in four digits.
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Section S: Deaths in Household
This question intends to know about any deaths that took place in the last two years in the
households.
Question 1. Ask your respondent if there were any household members, including children and
infants, who died within the period of the past two years. If the answer is yes code 1, and if the
answer is no, code 2 and move to next section.
Question 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6. In question 2 you will record the name of the deceased mentioned by your
respondent. In question 3, record the code of the relationship between the deceased and the head
of the household, using the codes at the bottom of the page. In question 4, you are asked to list the
roster code of the deceased if they were present in the 2010/9 household. This question is similar to
question 6 in section B. Use the code on the pre-printed roster, and code 99 if the member was not
present in 2010/9. In question 5, record the gender of the deceased. Question 6 asks the age of the
respondent in years. If the deceased was under 5, please give the age in months. If younger than 12
years, skip to Question 9. Question 7 asks if the death was registered in the death registration
system. You should code 1 if yes, and 2 if no.
Question 8. This question asks what was the deceased’s job during his/her lifetime. You will code it
according to the codes listed at the bottom of the questionnaire.
Question 9. This question asks for the cause of death. Code the response according to the codes
listed in the questionnaire. If the cause was old age, code 1 and move to question 14. If the cause
was an illness, code 2 and move to question 11. If the cause was other, code 3 and move to the next
question.
Question 10. For question 10, if the deceased died from a reason different from sickness, whatever
the answer, code it and move to question 14.
Question 11. Question 11 asks for the cause of death, using the codes on the bottom of the page. If
you use code 34, remember to write the reason. If the respondent mentions to you more than two
illnesses, choose the major two illnesses.
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Question 12. For how long was the deceased suffering from this illness before he/she died? On the
Column of units, you will fill in the units. If he/she was sick for several days use code 1, for weeks use
code 2, for months use code 3, and for years use code 4. For example, if the deceased was sick for 4
months before his death, you will code 4 in the time column and code 3 in the measurement
column.
Question 13. This question looks at the cause of death, and whether the death was diagnosed by
medical staff or by the perception of the respondent. Use the codes provided on the questionnaire.
Question 14 & 15. Did death cause the loss of land and property due to customs? If it is yes code it
1. If no, code it 2 and move to the next deceased person if your respondent mentioned more than
one. For question 15, fill in the monetary value of the lost land or other assets.
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Section V-1: Household Re-contact
Information
This section is important for writing information for re-visiting the household, particularly if the
household decides to move to another location. Before asking the telephone number, you need to
take the GPS measurement. For every interviewed household, the interviewer must measure the
location of the household from the corner of North and East.
Question 1. Record the telephone number of the household head. If he has no telephone number,
please fill in ‘98’
Question 2. Record the telephone numbers of other household members. Fill in up to 3 members.
Fill in their names together with their telephone numbers. If no one in the household owns a
telephone, try to find the telephone number of a friend, relative or community leader who can
contact the household. You should always have at least 1 contact number for the household.
Question 3: A CLOSE PERSON IN THE COMMUNITY. This section includes relatives and friends who
live in the town/village/street/sub village where the household head stays. You will fill in the name,
relationship with the head of the household, work, place where he lives, other identifying
information, and telephone number.
Question 4: CLOSE PERSON (OUT SIDE THE COMMUNITY OR FROM ANOTHER VILLAGE). This
section includes relatives and friends who live outside the town, or village. You will fill in the name,
relationship to the household member, work, location where he leaves, other identifying
information and telephone number.
ATTENTION: For question 3 and 4, make sure you write full name, proper relationship with the
household head, main work, the location where he stays, and proper telephone number. On the
extra explanation, write characteristics of identifying a person, like their position, name etc.
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Section V-2: Filter Questions
Question 1. The question intends to know if there is any household member who has cultivated any
plot or raised any crops. If the answer is yes, code 1. If the answer is no code 2.
Question 2. In this question ask your respondent if there is any household member who owns a farm
which they do not cultivate. They may rent it to others, or the land may be fallow. If the answer is
yes, code 1. If the answer is no, code 2.
Question 3. Ask your respondent if there is any household member who cultivated a plot or grew
any crops during the long rainy season of the year 2010. If the answer is yes, code 1. If the answer is
no, code 2.
Question 4. Ask if there is any household member who owned or farmed during the last completed
short rainy season. If the answer is yes, code 1. If the answer is no, code 2.
Question 5. Ask if there is any household member who owned any livestock for the past 12 months.
If the answer is yes, code 1. If the answer is no, code 2.
Question 6. This question should not be asked to the respondent. Indicate if the household is
eligible to participate in the agricultural module. If the respondent has said “yes” to any question
listed in 1-5, then they are eligible and you should code “1” here. All households that have a “1”
here should be asked the agricultural questionnaire. If all questions in 1-5 have a “noresponse,
then they are not eligible and you should code 2.
Question 7. Ask your respondent if there is any household member who is engaged in fishing or
having a fish farm in the past 12 month. If the answer is yes then code it 1 and if the answer is no,
then code it 2.
Question 8. This question should not be asked to the respondent. Indicate if the household is
eligible to participate in the fishery module. If the respondent said “yes” to question 7, then they
are eligible and you should code “1” here. All household with a “1” in this box should receive the
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fisheries questionnaire. If they gave a “no” response, then they are not eligible and you should code
2.
Gift to the Respondent
In this section you have to explain to the respondent that you would like to give gift to thank
him/her for good cooperation in the research. Remember these gifts depend on the area. If it is a
town, give out bednets and if it is a village, give out hoes.
Question 9. If the household receives a radio, code it 1, and if it receives a bednet, code it 2.
Question 10. On this section you are required to write the name of the person who receives the gift,
as well as the identification number which is provided on the list of the household members. Then
remember to ask him/her to sign.
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Section U: Anthropometry
Anthropometry is the study of human body measurements, especially on a comparative
basis. We carry out these measurements for all available respondents, including babies. In
the case of measuring babies or small children, the mother or guardian of the child SHOULD
assist throughout anthropometric measurements. When taking measurements, be sure
that the mother or guardian understands what will be done to the child. Explain to the
mother or guardian how the child will be weighed and height will be measured. Be sure to
politely and thoroughly answer any questions or other concerns that the mother or
guardian might have.
Question 1 & 2. These questions should not be asked to the respondent. Question 2 asks if the
household member was measured. Code 1 for yes, and code 2 for no. If no, you should indicate the
reason why they were not measured. If the reason is not on the list in the questionnaire, code 4 and
write the reason in words.
Question 3. The weight should be recorded in kilograms with a leading zero. For example, 3.2
kilograms should be recorded as “03.2”. Make sure that the scale is on a hard flat surface and
properly zeroed before you begin your measurements. If a child is too small to stand on the scale on
their own, you should record the weight of the mother and child together, then the mother alone,
and subtract to find the weight of the child. With all measurements, you should look at the results
to make sure they seem reasonable before writing them in the questionnaire. For example, if the
scale shows a weight of 100 kilos for a small child, it likely has not been properly zeroed before
beginning. Similarly, if after your subtraction, you have a weight of only 2 kilos for a child, it is likely
that a mistake has been made. The data entry program will have consistency checks to test for
unreasonable height/weight/age combinations. If the measurements are not accurately recorded, it
will necessitate a callback to the household.
Question 4. This should be recorded in centimeters with leading zeros. For example 97 centimeters
should be recorded as 097. Below are the steps for taking accurate height measurements for
children laying down and child/adults standing. Generally all children taller than 45 cm or older than
24 months should be measured standing up.
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Measuring the length of children laying down:
1. Place the measuring mat on a hard, flat section of the ground or floor.
2. The assistant should kneel with both knees behind the base of the board.
3. You should kneel on the right side of the child so that you can hold the foot piece with your
right hand.
4. With the mother’s help, lay the child on the
board by supporting the back of the child’s
head with one hand and the trunk of the
body with the other hand. Gradually lower
the child onto the board. Ask the mother or
guardian to kneel close on the opposite of
the board facing the measurer, as this will
help to keep the child calm.
5. The assistant should cup his or her hands
over the child’s ears. With arms comfortably
straight, the assistant should place the child’s
head against the base of the board so that
the child is looking straight up. The child’s
line of sight should be perpendicular to the
ground. The assistant’s head should be
straight over the child’s head, looking directly into the child’s eyes.
6. You should make sure the child is lying flat in the center of the board. Place your left hand
on the child’s shins (above the ankles) or on the knees. Press them firmly against the board.
With your right hand, place the foot piece firmly against the child’s heels.
7. When the child’s position is correct, read and write down the measurement at the foot piece
to the nearest 0.1 cm.
Measuring the height of adults or standing children
1. Place the measuring board on a hard flat surface against a wall, table, tree, etc. Make sure
the board is not moving.
2. Ask the mother/guardian to remove the child’s shoes and unbraid any hair that would
interfere with the height measurement. Ash her to walk the child to the board and to kneel
in front of the child in order to reassure the child.
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3. Place the child’s feet flat and together in the
center of and against the back and base of the
board/wall. The assistant should place his or
her right hand just above the childs ankles on
the chin. Gradually close your hand. Do not
cover the child’s mouth or ears. Make sure the
shoulders are level, the hands are at the child’s
side, and the head, shoulder blades, and
buttocks are against the board/wall. With your
right hand, lower the headpiece on top of the
child’s head. Make sure you push through the
child’s hair.
4. When the child’s position is correct, read and
write down the measurement at the headpiece
to the nearest 0.1 cm.
Question 5. All individuals taller than 45cm and able to stand should be measured standing. Babies
shorter than 45cm or those unable to stand (generally those under 24 months) should be measured
lying down. Indicate the position in which the respondent was measured. This should apply to all
individuals, not just children.
Question 6. This is a filter question for the measurement of upper arm circumference. Only children
younger than 60 months should answer question 7.
Question 7. This question asks you to use the upper arm measuring tapes to
measure the circumference of child’s arm. Wrap the measuring tape around
the arm above the elbow but below the shoulder. Record the measurement
down to the nearest 0.1 cm.
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Following the Interview
Please remember to record the time spent on the interview. Thank the respondent for taking the
time to complete the survey. Let them know again that all the information will be kept confidential.
Also, tell them that the survey is annual and that they may be contacted again, and so finding them
is important. Ask them to provide information to the VEO if they are planning on moving from the
community.
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Part II: Agricultural Questionnaire
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Introduction
Summary of the Interviewer’s Responsibilities on the Agricultural
Questionnaire
1. activities before the interviews begin. This includes provision of information to the
street/village chairman about the major objectives of this research and securing their
cooperation to facilitate in the smooth completion of our tasks. This information should be
provided early before commencement of the research.
2. You are responsible to identify and visit sampled households as well as to measure all of the
household’s plots with GPS.
3. You must talk to the head of the household or another household member who is above 18
years for every sampled household explaining the objectives of your work and then make an
appointment for interview.
4. Arrange a reasonable time for interviewing residents of the households selected.
5. After completing the interview, thoroughly check the questionnaire to ensure you have not
made any mistakes/errors before leaving the interviewed household. For GPS plot
measurements, make sure that all the plots are measured and fill in the GPS measurement
questions in Section 2. All plots must be measured that are within one hour’s travel of the
household (either on foot, bicycle, motorbike, etc.) If you think a plot is too far to measure,
you must receive permission from your supervisor not to measure it.
6. You must maintain frequent communication with your supervisor for assistance as well as
for inspection of your work.
7. Where necessary you will be required to answer somequeries raised by your supervisor/staff
from NBS headquarters. This is meant to ensure the efficiency of your work.
8. You must submit questionnaires to your supervisor immediately when you have completed
them.
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Section A- 1: Household Identification
You will get ID codes for Regions, Districts, Wards, Villages/Enumeration Areas from your supervisor.
Write the Household ID code as written on the household questionnaire, make sure that the
household ID codes are identical to that of the agricultural questionnaire. You should also fill in
your name, enumerator ID number, date and time of the interview just as you have done in the
household questionnaire. On page 2 there is also a place for you to note any notes or special
information about the interview.
Section 1: Household Roster
Copy all information from household questionnaire. It is IMPORTANT to make sure that every
household ID’s are identical in both questionnaires. In question 4, you should place an ‘x’ in the line
for the respondent to this questionnaire. If there are more than one respondent answering
together, mark multiple respondents in this section.