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585-300-206
Comcode 108356080
Issue 5
May 1999
DEFINITY®AUDIX® System
Feature Descriptions
Copyright 1999, Lucent Technologies
All Rights Reserved, Printed in U.S.A.
Notice
Every effort was made to ensure that the information in this book was
complete and accurate at the time of printing. However, information is
subject to change.
Your Responsibility for Your System’s Security
Toll fraud is the unauthorized use of your telecommunications system
by an unauthorized party, for example, persons other than your com-
pany’s employees, agents, subcontractors, or persons working on your
company’s behalf. Note that there may be a risk of toll fraud associated
with your telecommunications system and, if toll fraud occurs, it can
result in substantial additional charges for your telecommunications
services.
You and your system manager are responsible for the security of your
system, such as programming and configuring your equipment to pre-
vent unauthorized use. The system manager is also responsible for
reading all installation, instruction, and system administration docu-
ments provided with this product in order to fully understand the fea-
tures that can introduce risk of toll fraud and the steps that can be taken
to reduce that risk. Lucent Technologies does not warrant that this
product is immune from or will prevent unauthorized use of com-
mon-carrier telecommunication services or facilities accessed through
or connected to it. Lucent Technologies will not be responsible for any
charges that result from such unauthorized use.
Lucent Technologies Fraud Intervention
If you suspect you are being victimized by toll fraud and you need
technical support or assistance, call the appropriate BCS National Cus-
tomer Care Center telephone number. Users of the MERLIN®, PART-
NER®, and System 25 products should call 1 800 628 2888. Users of
the System 75, System 85, DEFINITY® Generic 1, 2 and 3, and
DEFINITY® ECS products should call 1 800 643 2353. Customers
outside the continental United States should contact their local Lucent
representative, or call one of the above numbers in the following man-
ner:
Dial the International Access Code; for example, 011.
Dial the country code for the U.S., that is, 01.
Lastly, dial either of the telephone numbers provided above.
Lucent Technologies Web Page
The world wide web home page for Lucent Technologies is:
http://www.lucent.com
Federal Communications Commission Statement
Part 15: Class A Statement. This equipment has been tested and
found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant
to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide rea-
sonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is
operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates,
uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and
used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interfer-
ence to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a resi-
dential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the
user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
Industry Canada (IC) Interference Information
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio
noise emissions set out in the radio interference regulations of Industry
Canada.
Le Présent Appareil Nomérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques
dépassant les limites applicables aux appareils numériques de la class
A préscrites dans le reglement sur le brouillage radioélectrique édicté
par le Industrie Canada.
Trademarks
See the preface of this document.
Ordering Information
Call: Lucent Technologies BCS Publications Center
Voice 1 800 457-1235 International Voice 317 322-6791
Fax 1 800 457-1764 International Fax 317 322-6699
Write: Lucent Technologies BCS Publications Center
2855 N. Franklin Road
Indianapolis, IN 46219
Order: Document No. 585-300-206
Comcode 108356080
Issue 5, May 1999
For additional documents, refer to the section in “About This Docu-
ment” entitled “Related Resources.”
You can be placed on a standing order list for this and other documents
you may need. For more information on standing orders, or to be put on
a list to receive future issues of this document, contact the Lucent Tech-
nologies Publications Center.
Obtaining Products
To learn more about Lucent Technologies products and to order prod-
ucts, contact Lucent Direct, the direct-market organization of Lucent
Technologies Business Communications Systems. Access their web
site at www.lucentdirect.com. Or call the following numbers: custom-
ers 1 800 451 2100, account executives 1 888 778 1880 (voice) or 1
888 778 1881 (fax).
Warranty
Lucent Technologies provides a limited warranty on this product. Refer
to the “Limited Use Software License Agreement” card provided with
your package.
European Union Declaration of Conformity
The “CE” mark affixed to the equipment means that it conforms to the
following directives. Lucent Technologies Business Communications
Systems declares that DEFINITY AUDIX System equipment specified
in this document conforms to the referenced European Union (EU)
Directives and Harmonized Standards listed below:
EMC Directive 89/336/EEC
Low-Voltage Directive73/23/EEC
Acknowledgment
This document was prepared by OMD Technical Publications, Lucent
Technologies, Denver, CO. and Columbus, OH.
DEFINITY AUDIX System Release 4.0
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Contents
iii
Contents
Contents iii
About This Document xiii
Intended Audiences xiii
Prerequisite Skills and Knowledge xiii
How This Document Is Organized xiv
How to Use This Document xvii
Conventions Used in This Document xvii
Trademarks and Service Marks xviii
Related Documents xviii
How to Make Comments About This Document xviii
Activity Log 1
Applications 2
Requirements 2
Feature Operation 2
Interactions with Other Features 4
Address-by-Name 5
Applications 6
Requirements 6
Feature Operation 6
Interactions with Other Features 7
Administration and Data Acquisition Package 9
Applications 10
Requirements 12
Feature Operation 12
Interactions with Other Features 14
Alarm Origination 15
Applications 16
Requirements 16
Feature Operation 16
Interactions with Other Features 19
AMIS Analog Networking 21
Applications 22
Considerations 22
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Requirements 23
Feature Operation 23
Interactions with Other Features 30
Announcement Sets 33
Applications 34
Considerations 34
Requirements 35
Feature Operation 36
Interactions with Other Features 38
Automated Attendant 39
Applications 40
Using Rotary Phones with an Automated Attendant 44
Requirements 45
Feature Operation 45
Interactions with Other Features 46
Automated Backup 51
Applications 52
Requirements 52
Feature Operation 52
Interactions with Other Features 52
Automatic Message Scan 55
Applications 56
Requirements 56
Feature Operation 56
Interactions with Other Features 58
Broadcast Message 61
Applications 62
Considerations 62
Requirements 62
Feature Operation 63
Interactions with Other Features 69
Bulletin Board 73
Applications 74
Requirements 74
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Feature Operation 75
Interactions with Other Features 75
Call Answer 77
Applications 78
Requirements 78
Feature Operation 78
Interactions with Other Features 82
Call Screening (DS Mode Only) 87
Applications 88
Considerations 88
Requirements 88
Feature Operation 89
Interactions with Other Features 89
Class of Service 91
Applications 92
Requirements 92
Feature Operation 92
Interactions with Other Features 93
Delivery Scheduling 97
Applications 98
Requirements 98
Feature Operation 98
Interactions with Other Features 100
Dial Ahead/Through 103
Applications 104
Requirements 104
Feature Operation 104
Interactions with Other Features 105
Dial-by-Name 107
Applications 108
Requirements 108
Feature Operation 108
Interactions with Other Features 109
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Digital Networking 111
Applications 112
Requirements 112
Feature Operation 114
Feature Administration 115
Interactions with Other Features 115
Directory 119
Applications 120
Requirements 120
Feature Operation 120
Interactions with Other Features 120
Enhanced Disconnect Detection 123
Applications 124
Considerations 124
Requirements 125
Feature Operation 125
Interactions with Other Features 126
Escape to Attendant 127
Applications 128
Requirements 128
Feature Operation 128
Interactions with Other Features 128
Exit AUDIX 131
Applications 132
Requirements 132
Feature Operation 132
Interactions with Other Features 132
Full Mailbox Answer Mode 133
Applications 134
Requirements 134
Feature Operation 135
Interactions with Other Features 135
Guest Password 139
Applications 140
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Requirements 140
Feature Operation 140
Interactions with Other Features 142
INTUITY Message Manager 145
Applications 146
Requirements 146
Considerations 147
Feature Operation 148
Interactions with Other Features 148
Leave Word Calling (CL Mode Only) 151
Applications 152
Considerations 152
Requirements 153
Feature Operation 153
Interactions with Other Features 153
Login Announcement 157
Applications 158
Requirements 158
Feature Operation 158
Interactions with Other Features 163
Mailing List 165
Applications 166
Requirements 166
Feature Operation 167
Interactions with Other Features 175
Message Delivery 179
Applications 180
Requirements 180
Feature Operation 180
Interactions with Other Features 182
Message Sending Restrictions 185
Applications 186
Requirements 186
Feature Operation 186
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Interactions with Other Features 187
Message-Waiting Indicator 191
Applications 192
Considerations 192
Requirements 192
Feature Operation 193
Interactions with Other Features 193
Multilingual 195
Applications 196
Considerations 197
Requirements 197
Feature Operation 198
Interactions with Other Features 202
Multiple Personal Greetings 205
Applications 206
Requirements 207
Feature Operation 207
Interactions with Other Features 221
Name Record by Subscriber 223
Applications 224
Considerations 224
Requirements 224
Feature Operation 225
Interactions with Other Features 226
Online Help 229
Applications 230
Feature Operation 230
Interactions with Other Features 232
Outcalling 233
Applications 234
Considerations 234
Requirements 234
Feature Operation 235
Interactions with Other Features 240
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Personal Directory 243
Applications 244
Requirements 244
Feature Operation 244
Interactions with Other Features 248
Playback and Recording Control 249
Applications 250
Requirements 250
Feature Operation 250
Interactions with Other Features 251
Priority Message 253
Applications 254
Requirements 254
Feature Operation 254
Interactions with Other Features 257
Priority Outcalling 259
Applications 260
Requirements 260
Feature Operation 260
Interactions with Other Features 262
Private Message 263
Applications 264
Requirements 264
Feature Operation 264
Interactions with Other Features 264
Save Voice 267
Applications 268
Requirements 268
Feature Operation 268
Interactions with Other Features 279
Security Password 281
Applications 282
Requirements 282
Feature Operation 283
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Interactions with Other Features 284
Shared Extension 285
Applications 286
Requirements 286
Feature Operation 286
Interactions with Other Features 286
System Clock 287
Applications 288
Requirements 288
Feature Operation 288
Interactions with Other Features 289
TDD 291
Applications 292
Considerations 292
Requirements 295
Feature Operation 295
Interactions with Other Features 298
Traffic Reports 301
Applications 302
Requirements 302
Feature Operation 302
Interactions with Other Features 303
Transfer Into AUDIX (CL Mode Only) 305
Applications 306
Requirements 306
Feature Operation 306
Interactions with Other Features 307
Transfer Into Mailbox (DS Mode Only) 309
Applications 310
Requirements 310
Feature Operation 310
Interactions with Other Features 312
Transfer Out of AUDIX — Basic (DS Mode) 315
Applications 316
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Considerations 316
Requirements 316
Feature Operation 317
Interactions with Other Features 318
Transfer Out of AUDIX — Enhanced (CL Mode) 319
Applications 320
Considerations 320
Requirements 320
Feature Operation 321
Interactions with Other Features 322
TTY Automated Attendant 325
Applications 326
Considerations 326
Requirements 327
Feature Operation 328
Interactions with Other Features 328
Untouched Message 329
Applications 330
Requirements 330
Feature Operation 330
Interactions with Other Features 330
Voice Mail 333
Applications 334
Requirements 334
Feature Operation 334
Interactions with Other Features 343
Voice Mailbox 345
Applications 346
Requirements 346
Feature Operation 346
Interactions with Other Features 364
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Contents
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DEFINITY AUDIX Feature Summary 369
DEFINITY AUDIX Command Summary 377
DCS Networks 383
DEFINITY AUDIX Feature History 389
DEFINITY AUDIX R1.0 389
DEFINITY AUDIX R2.0 395
DEFINITY AUDIX R3.0 395
DEFINITY AUDIX R3.1 397
DEFINITY AUDIX R3.2 398
DEFINITY AUDIX R4.0 398
Abbreviations 399
Glossary 403
Index 413
About This Document
xiiiIntended Audiences
DEFINITY AUDIX System Release 4.0
Feature Descriptions
Issue 5
May 1999
About This Document
This document is intended to serve as a technical reference for the planning,
administration, and operation stages of the DEFINITY® AUDIX® system. It
provides a detailed, layered description of all the system features, and is
designed to be used for quick reference as questions arise.
Intended Audiences
This document presents a thorough description of all DEFINITY AUDIX features.
It is designed for the following audiences:
AUDIX System Administrators
— This document provides details about
the DEFINITY AUDIX system’s features and references to other resources
that help an administrator customize the DEFINITY AUDIX system. Also,
basic procedures for using each feature are provided, allowing the
administrator to answer subscriber questions on feature use.
Lucent Technologies Account Executives, Project Managers, Software
Specialists, Software Assistants and Design Specialists
— These experts
need to understand all the features and functions of a DEFINITY AUDIX
system on a general and technical level, as presented in this document.
Telephone company customers or employees, including Local Exchange
Carrier (LEC) personnel
— All telephone companies, such as a Regional
Bell Operating Company (RBOC) might need this general overview of the
DEFINITY AUDIX system on hand.
Services support staff
— Remote personnel at the Technical Service
Center (TSC) and the Sales Design & Support Center (SDSC) also may
find this information useful.
Prerequisite Skills and Knowledge
This document assumes that the reader has a basic understanding of telephony
and telecommunications.
DEFINITY AUDIX System Release 4.0
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About This Document
xivHow This Document Is Organized
How This Document Is Organized
The features listed in this document are presented in alphabetical order by
feature name. Each feature section is divided into the following major headings:
Description
— Defines the feature and identifies the service it performs for
the user or the function it serves for the system.
Points to Remember
— Identifies factors to account for when the feature is
used.
Applications
— Identifies specific customer needs that this DEFINITY
AUDIX feature can address.
Considerations
— Expands on points to remember where necessary (only
present in some features).
Requirements
— Identifies hardware, software, and switch items that each
feature requires to function properly.
Feature Operation
— Lists the common step-by-step procedures needed
to use the feature.
Interactions with Other Features
— Lists and discusses the interaction
between this feature and both switch features and other DEFINITY AUDIX
features.
This document is not based on a specific definition of a feature. A subjective
estimate was made of the usefulness of each aspect of the DEFINITY AUDIX
system to the audiences of this book. Consequently, some feature descriptions
are conceptual discussions of broad functions (Voice Mail, Voice Mailbox), while
others point out smaller, unique features (Dial Ahead/Through, Priority Outcalling)
that might otherwise be overlooked. Some features are thus actually sub-features
of others. This inconsistency of scope is minor, well-documented where
appropriate, and subordinate to the utility of having all aspects of the system at
the fingertips of the reader.
NOTE:
The most important distinction to be made between features is whether
they are available in the control link (CL) or display set (DS) modes of
switch integration. The vast majority of the features are available in both
modes. Those that apply to only one mode are designated as such in the
title and header of each feature description.
The following features are available only in CL mode:
Leave Word Calling
Transfer Into AUDIX
Transfer Out of AUDIX — Enhanced
The following features are available only in DS mode:
Call Screening
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About This Document
xvHow This Document Is Organized
Transfer Into Mailbox
Transfer Out of AUDIX — Basic
The first page of each feature section provides summary information and
includes a table at the bottom of the page for quick reference information. For
each feature, this table identifies related features, administration forms used with
the feature, the feature’s primary function, and user groups most directly
concerned with it.
The following table defines the user groups of the features. These group names
serve as key words in the quick reference tables on the first page of each feature
description. See Appendix A for a summary of each feature and clarification of
the abbreviations used in this table.
Table 1. Primary User Groups for Features
Group Description Features
Subscriber Any user on the DEFINITY
AUDIX system Broadcast, Dial A/T, Dial Nam,
Dir, INTUITY Msg Mgr, Login,
MPG, Nam Rec, Pers Dir, Sec
PW
Caller Any internal or external
caller placing a call
through a switch that
contains a DEFINITY
AUDIX system
Call Ans, Escape, Exit, Full MB,
Guest, Trans Out. LWC
Sender A subscriber sending a
voice mail message Addr Nam, AMIS, Del Sched,
Mail List, Msg Del, Prior Msg,
Priv Msg, Vmail, LWC
Recipient A subscriber receiving a
call answer or voice mail
message
AMIS, Auto Scan, Call Scr,
MWI, Outcall, Prior Out,
Untouch, Vmail
All Subscribers and outside
callers Auto Att, Bull Brd, Help,
Multilingual, Play Rec, Share
Ex, TDD, TTY Auto Att, VM Box,
Trans In
Sys Adm One who sets up and
fine-tunes an entire
DEFINITY AUDIX system
or network on-site
Activity, ADAP, Alarm, Auto
Back, Announce, Broadcast,
COS, Enhanced Disconnect
Detect, Login, Msg Send Res,
Sys Clock, Traffic
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About This Document
xviHow This Document Is Organized
The following table defines the functional groupings of DEFINITY AUDIX features.
These group names also serve as key words in the quick reference tables on the
first page of each feature description. Again, see Appendix A for a summary of
each feature and clarification of the abbreviations.
Table 2. Functional Groups for Features
Function Description Features
Access Security aspects, getting in
and out Escape, Guest, Sec PW,
Trans In, Trans Out
Administration Setting up the DEFINITY
AUDIX system and options Announce, COS, Enh Dis
Detect
Directory Using a personal or system
database for calling or
routing messages
INTUITY Msg Mgr, Addr Nam,
Dial Nam, Dir, Pers Dir
Greetings Setting up personal
greetings INTUITY Msg Mgr, MPG, Nam
Rec, Multilingual
Information Providing or accessing
general or system
information
Broadcast, Bull Brd, Help,
Login
Maintenance System upkeep Activity, Alarm, Auto Back
Message Sending, receiving, or
manipulating messages INTUITY Msg Mgr, Msg Del,
Play Rec, Prior Msg, Priv
Msg, Untouch, LWC
Notification Notifying the subscriber of
new messages INTUITY Msg Mgr, MWI,
Outcall, Prior Out
Operation Basic system operation Dial Ahead/Through, TDD
Playback Listening and responding
to messages INTUITY Msg Mgr, Auto Scan,
Play Rec, VMBox
Recording Recording messages INTUITY Msg Mgr, Call Ans,
Call Scr, Play Rec, Vmail
Reports Accessing system data and
generating reports ADAP, Traffic
Routing Sending messages to
specific locations AMIS, Auto Att, Full MB,
INTUITY Msg Mgr, Mail List,
Msg Send Res, Priv Msg,
Share Ex, TTY Auto Att
Scheduling Sending messages at
specific times Del Sched INTUITY Msg Mgr,
Sys Clock
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About This Document
xviiHow to Use This Document
How to Use This Document
This document is a reference tool and should be used in conjunction with other
DEFINITY AUDIX documents which cover various aspects of DEFINITY AUDIX
service or use (see Appendix C for a list of documents).
Before using this document for the first time, do the following:
1. See Tab l e 1 and Ta b l e 2 in this preface and review Appendix A to become
familiar with the range of features and their functions.
2. Thumb through the document and, using the alphabetical organization,
examine the first pages of several feature descriptions. This will give you a
conceptual understanding of the quick reference information on each
introductory page.
3. Page through several feature descriptions to become familiar with the
document’s format, depth, and subject matter.
Once you have become familiar with the scope and organization of the
document, use the Table of Contents and the Index when you need to see a
specific topic.
Conventions Used in This Document
The following typographic conventions are used in this document:
Rounded boxes represent keyboard keys that you press. For example, an
instruction to press the enter, carriage return, or equivalent key is shown in
this document as:
Press .
The word
enter
means to type a value and press . For example, an
instruction to type y and press is shown in this document as:
Enter y to continue.
Two or three keys that you press at the same time (that is, you hold down
the first key while pressing the second key and, if appropriate, the third
key as well) are shown together in a rounded box and are separated by
hyphens. For example, an instruction to press and hold while
typing the letter d is shown in this document as:
Press .
Commands and text you type or enter appear in bold.
Information that is displayed on your terminal screen — including screen
displays, field names, prompts, and error messages — is shown in
typewriter-style constant-width type. Information that you enter from your
keyboard is shown in constant-width bold type. For example:
ENTER
ENTER
ENTER
CONTROL
CONTROL
D
DEFINITY AUDIX System Release 4.0
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About This Document
xviiiTrademarks and Service Marks
At the login: prompt, enter audix
Variables that the system supplies or that you must supply are shown in
italic type. For example, an error message that is displayed on the screen
with one of your specific filenames might be shown generically in this
document as:
The filesystem
filename
is out of space.
Trademarks and Service Marks
The following trademarked products are mentioned in this document:
AUDIX® is a registered trademark of Lucent.
dBASE III PLUS® is a registered trademark of Ashton-Tate.
DEFINITY® Communications System is a registered trademark of Lucent.
IBM® is a registered trademark of International Business Machines
Corporation.
INTUITY is a trademark of Lucent.
Motorola is a trademark of Motorola, Inc.
MS-DOS® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
UNIX® is a registered trademark of UNIX System Laboratories, Inc.
Voic e Power is a trademark of Lucent.
Related Documents
See Appendix C for a description of the DEFINITY AUDIX system documents,
which cover planning, installation, administration, and maintenance of a
DEFINITY AUDIX system.
How to Make Comments About This
Document
Reader comment cards appear behind the title page of this document. While we
have tried to make this document fit your needs, we are interested in your
suggestions for improving it and urge you to complete and return a reader
comment card.
If the reader comment cards have been removed from this document, please
send your comments to:
DEFINITY AUDIX System Release 4.0
Feature Descriptions
Issue 5
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About This Document
xixHow to Make Comments About This Document
Lucent Technologies
Product Documentation
Room 22-2X57
11900 North Pecos Street
Denver, CO 80234
Email: octeltechpubs@lucent.com
Fax: (303) 538-1741
DEFINITY AUDIX System Release 4.0
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xxHow to Make Comments About This Document
Activity Log
1
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Description Points to Remember
Administration Screens
The Activity Log feature is an administrative tool for investi-
gating subscriber-reported problems with message-waiting
indicators (MWIs) and the delivery of messages. It maintains
a history of subscriber activity in the DEFINITY AUDIX sys-
tem. Since administrators can use the log to track activity by
subscriber extension and by specific time, they can often
resolve reported problems before filing trouble reports with
Lucent.
Who has it
: Normally, only the DEFINITY
AUDIX system administrator uses
the activity log.
Who controls it
: The system administrator
accesses the activity log and
specifies data collection through
the DEFINITY AUDIX
administration terminal.
Who can access it
: Only the system administrator or
other authorized users can
access the activity log through the
administration terminal interface.
The activity log is administered and
accessible through any approved
DEFINITY AUDIX administration termi-
nal, Personal Computer (PC), or Work
Group Station (WGS).
Activity Log
Sys-Par Act, Disp Act
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Activity Log
2Applications
Applications
The Activity Log helps system administrators diagnose user-perceived problems
such as MWI delays and delayed deliveries due to full mailboxes.
Requirements
The only requirement for this feature is one of the certified administration
terminals or a standard PC or WGS running a standard terminal emulation
package (such as a 513 Terminal Emulation package). A 570 parallel, 572 serial,
or other 473-compatible printer is optional but recommended.
Feature Operation
It is recommended that you enable the Activity Log so you will have the required
information at the time problems are reported.
You will use two different screens when working with the Activity Log: the
System-Parameters Activity-Log screen and the Display Activity-Log screen.
Setting Up the Activity Log
Use the change/display system-parameters activity log command to:
Enable/disable the Activity Log. The default is n (the Activity Log is
disabled).
Instruct the Activity Log to record MWI updates. The default is n (the
Activity Log will
not
record MWI updates).
Set a maximum number of Activity Log entries. The maximum allowable
value is 99,999. The default is 10,000.
Clear all entries in the Activity Log. The default is n. If you enter y, all
entries in the Activity Log will be cleared immediately. However, this value
always reverts to n after you exit the screen.
NOTE:
If you instruct the Activity Log to record MWI updates, the number
of records generated will increase significantly and could degrade
system performance. It is recommended that this field not be
enabled on a regular basis, but only as necessary.
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Activity Log
3Feature Operation
Activity Log Operation
Once you have enabled the Activity Log, it records specific activities for each
subscriber’s mailbox, including:
Subscriber log-in/log-off — These entries include new, unopened, and old
message counts.
Receipt of a new message — This entry includes new, unopened, and old
message counts.
Scheduled delivery of a message
Canceled delivery of a scheduled message
Change in status of a message — The status of a message can change
from new to unopened, new to old, unopened to old, and from new,
unopened or old to deleted.
MWI updates (if enabled)
Resets — A reset entry is made whenever the system date and/or time is
changed, either manually or automatically, and includes the previous date
and time.
You will use the display activity-log command to designate subscriber, date, and
time. The Activity Log will then display activity information for the selected
subscriber, starting at the specified date and time. The events are listed in
chronological order (oldest first). Press (Next Page) to display the remaining
entries.
A
received
entry is made in the Activity Log each time a message is delivered
into a subscriber’s mailbox. Note that a message with multiple recipients will
generate a
received
entry for each recipient. The message may be one of the
following:
Voice mail (VM)
Priority voice mail
Call Answer (CA)
Broadcast voice mail message
Log-in announcement
AMIS analog networking message
Undeliverable message notification
F7
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Activity Log
4Interactions with Other Features
A
scheduled
entry is made in the Activity Log each time a message is scheduled
for delivery. A single scheduled entry will be made for a message regardless of
the number of recipients. The message may be one of the following:
Voice mail
Priority voice mail
Call Answer
Since CA messages are scheduled for immediate delivery at the time they
are created, the scheduled delivery time is not repeated on the display. In
addition:
If both the calling party and the called party are local subscribers,
the display will show that the calling party scheduled the message
for the called party.
If the calling party is not a local subscriber, the activity will not be
recorded for the calling party.
If the called party is not a local subscriber, the local DEFINITY
AUDIX system will have no knowledge of the call and the activity
will not be recorded.
Broadcast voice mail message
Log-in announcement
See
DEFINITY AUDIX System Screens Reference
, 585-300-213, for a
complete description of Activity Log screens.
Interactions with Other Features
This section identifies the interactions of the activity log with switch features and
other DEFINITY AUDIX features.
Interactions with Switch Features
The activity log has no direct interaction with switch features.
Interactions with Other DEFINITY AUDIX
Features
The Activity Log can collect data on most DEFINITY AUDIX call answer and voice
mail functions. See the previous section, Activity Log Operation, for details.
Address-by-Name
5
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Description Points to Remember
Administration Screens
The Address-by-Name feature allows callers to address a
message to any subscriber by dialing the subscribers name
instead of the subscriber’s extension number. Callers who
do not know a subscriber’s extension number may select
name addressing by pressing (for Alternate Address-
ing Mode) and entering the subscriber’s name. The DEFIN-
ITY AUDIX system will automatically address the message to
that subscriber.
Who has it:
The Address-by-Name feature is
available to all subscribers of the
DEFINITY AUDIX system.
Who controls it:
The system administrator assigns
each subscribers default
addressing format (either
extension number or name) on the
Class of Service or Subscriber
screens.
Callers also control this feature by
pressing to toggle between
extension number and name
addressing.
Who can access it:
All subscribers who enter the
DEFINITY AUDIX system, using a
touch-tone telephone, can access
the Address-by-Name feature.
*A
*A
When using the
Address-by-Name feature, note
that the letter
Q
is represented by
pressing and
Z
by pressing .
The system administrator should
inform subscribers which default
addressing format (extension
number or name) they have been
assigned.
Address-by-Name only works for
recipients who are administered
on the DEFINITY AUDIX system,
or recipients who are properly
linked to the sender via AMIS Ana-
log Networking.
Address-by-Name works with
AMIS messages only for adminis-
tered recipients on remote sys-
tems administered for one-step
addressing.
7 9
Address-by-Name
COS, Subscriber
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Address-by-Name
6Applications
Applications
Many subscribers simply prefer to address messages to people rather than
extension numbers. But this feature can be most convenient when the sender
doesn’t know (or can’t remember) the extension number of an intended message
recipient. It is particularly useful when used with the Personal Directory feature,
which allows the sender to use abbreviated names.
Requirements
The Address-by-Name feature has no administration requirements. At the
request of subscribers who prefer to address-by-name, the administrator can set
the default addressing mode to name addressing on page 2 of the Subscriber
screen.
Feature Operation
The Address-by-Name feature can be used any time you want to address a
message, create a mailing list, or set up a personal directory. The most common
use, addressing a message, is described in detail below. To use the feature with
the Mailing List or Personal Directory features (assuming your default addressing
mode is number addressing), enter when first prompted for an address,
then enter all addresses by name. You will stay in name addressing mode until
you press again or until you are finished with the task.
To address a message to a subscriber by name, do the following:
1. Log into the DEFINITY AUDIX system.
2. Record and approve a message normally (see the Voice Mail feature).
3. Press to switch to name addressing mode (this assumes your
default addressing mode is by extension number).
4. Enter the letters that spell the last name of the subscriber, then, if
necessary, enter all or part of the first name (do not enter any characters
between the first and last names). Press .
Note that in many cases it is not necessary to enter the entire name; a
unique match is all that is required.
*
A
*A
*A
#
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Address-by-Name
7Interactions with Other Features
5. One of the following will occur:
If the system finds a unique match for the letters you entered, the
subscriber’s name is voiced by the system.
If the system finds two or three subscriber names that match the
characters you have entered, you will be prompted to select the
appropriate name.
If the system requires more information to make a match, you will
be asked to enter more characters (continuing from where you
stopped).
For example, to name-address a message to a subscriber named Jill
Wilson, you might press the following sequence of keys:
Interactions with Other Features
This section identifies the interactions of the Address-by-Name feature with
switch features and other DEFINITY AUDIX features.
Interactions with Switch Features
The Address-by-Name feature does not interact with the switch.
Interactions with other DEFINITY AUDIX
Features
The Address-by-Name feature interacts with other DEFINITY AUDIX features as
follows:
Class of Service
: The Address-by-Name feature can be a parameter for
differentiating classes of service. The DEFINITY AUDIX system
administrator can assign a default addressing format (extension number
or name) for each subscriber using the Class of Service screen.
Dial-by-Name
: The Dial-by-Name feature is nearly identical to
address-by-name, but is used for transferring out of the DEFINITY AUDIX
system rather than for addressing messages. Though similar, the features
are
not
directly interrelated. For example, if you invoke name addressing
for sending a message, then begin a transfer to another extension, the
system expects you to enter an extension number unless you press
(for dialing-by-name) while transferring.
Directory
: The system directory stores linked name and extension number
information, and this database is searched when subscribers address by
either name or extension.
I
NTUITY
Message Manager
: Subscribers can use name addressing when
using INTUITY Message Manager.
*A W I L S O N J
#
*A
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Address-by-Name
8Interactions with Other Features
Mailing List
: Subscribers can use name addressing when creating or
modifying mailing lists. Name addressing mode stays on until the
creating/modifying task is complete or until the subscriber turns it off.
Online Help
: Voiced help is available at any time by pressing .
Personal Directory
: The DEFINITY AUDIX system will first attempt to
match the name entered with the subscriber’s Personal Directory. If an
exact match is not found, the DEFINITY AUDIX system then searches the
list of all administered subscribers. Subscribers can use name addressing
when creating or modifying their personal directories. Name addressing
mode stays on until the creating/modifying task is complete or until the
subscriber turns it off.
Voice Mail
: The Address-by-Name feature can be used for any voice mail
addressing.
*H
Administration and Data Acquisition Package
9
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Description Points to Remember
Administration Screens
The AUDIX Administration and Data Acquisition Package
(ADAP) is an application installed on a personal computer
(PC) connected to a DEFINITY AUDIX system. ADAP pro-
vides a vehicle for downloading data from the DEFINITY
AUDIX database to the PC for further analysis and for modi-
fying DEFINITY AUDIX subscriber data directly in the DEFIN-
ITY AUDIX database without accessing the administrative
screens.
ADAP includes two unique user interfaces:
PC2AUDIX, a nontechnical menu-driven program that
downloads data from the DEFINITY AUDIX database to
the PC, organizes it in a dBASE III PLUS format, and
produces a set of preformatted standardized reports.
PC2AUDIX also can be used to back up DEFINITY
AUDIX data to a diskette.
A set of programmer-oriented DOS-level commands
that can modify subscriber data directly in the DEFINITY
AUDIX database and download selected data from the
DEFINITY AUDIX database to the PC. No reporting
capability is included; it is left to the customer to
develop reporting applications on the PC or to upload
the data to a host computer for further analysis.
ADAP will run on any Lucent Tech-
nologies 6300-compatible or
newer model PC. A Lucent Tech-
nologies 6286 or 6386 WGS (or
compatible) PC is recommended.
ADAP DOS-level commands
require customer-developed soft-
ware to produce reports. Cus-
tomer-developed software is
not
supported by Lucent services.
PC2AUDIX requires dBASE III
PLUS software.
PC2AUDIX provides a scheduling
option for retrieving data during
off-hours.
Administration and Data Acquisition Package
See the ADAP document
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Administration and Data Acquisition Package
10Applications
Applications
ADAP allows the DEFINITY AUDIX administrator to analyze system usage. The
administrator can define report criteria to help manage system resources and
determine when additional hardware or administrative changes are necessary.
Even though PC2AUDIX and ADAP DOS-level commands are components of the
same package and share some common functionality, they are in many ways
unique administrative tools for accessing and analyzing the DEFINITY AUDIX
database. ADAP also provides a billing package that allows you to bill customers
for DEFINITY AUDIX system use.
PC2AUDIX
PC2AUDIX is a menu-driven application for nonprogrammers that downloads
data from the DEFINITY AUDIX database to the PC and produces a set of
preformatted, standardized reports with the downloaded information. Reports
can be generated directly from the PC2AUDIX menu. PC2AUDIX is useful for
monitoring system resources (including port usage and disk space), analyzing
traffic patterns, generating billing reports, and archiving traffic data to diskette.
PC2AUDIX requires that the dBASE III PLUS database software program is also
installed on the PC. Data retrieved from the DEFINITY AUDIX database by
PC2AUDIX is automatically organized in a dBASE III PLUS format.
PC2AUDIX provides the following capabilities through its menu-driven interface:
Data retrieval — Hourly, daily, and monthly system traffic data can be
downloaded to disk files on the PC using PC2AUDIX menu options.
Traffic reports — Downloaded system traffic data can be formatted in
reports that detail average ports in use and peak ports in use by hour for a
specified period, file system usage by hour and by day for a specified
period, session usage and remote traffic per day for a specified period,
and system attendant traffic for a day or a month.
Customer billingDownloaded system traffic data can be formatted in
reports that provide DEFINITY AUDIX billing detail for individual
subscribers and departments (or other coded entities) based on
customer-supplied billing criteria.
Site-specific data — Downloaded system traffic data can be searched
and formatted in lists of subscribers with bills over a specified amount,
subscribers with usage over or under specified limits, and subscribers
with space threshold exceptions.
Scheduling — PC2AUDIX data retrieval, the process of downloading data
from the DEFINITY AUDIX database to the PC, can be queued to run
unattended during off-hours using PC2AUDIX menu options. For
DEFINITY AUDIX networks, data can be retrieved from remote machines
to a single ADAP PC using the scheduling feature.
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11Applications
Data searches — Downloaded system traffic data can be formatted in
reports that list all fields for all local subscribers, list all fields for all remote
subscribers, or display individual local or remote subscriber records.
Data management — Downloaded system traffic data can be selectively
backed up from the PC to a diskette, deleted from the fixed disk, or
restored to the PC from a backup diskette using PC2AUDIX menu options.
PC2AUDIX includes an online help program that can be invoked interactively at
any time during PC2AUDIX operation.
DOS-Level Commands
DOS-level commands are programmer-oriented, UNIX-like commands that can
modify subscriber data directly in the DEFINITY AUDIX database and download
selected data from the DEFINITY AUDIX database to the PC. Syntax for
DOS-level commands is cryptic and therefore use of these commands is not
recommended for nonprogrammers.
No reporting capability is included with the DOS-level commands. It is left to the
customer to manipulate the data using database manager software on the PC
(such as dBASE III PLUS) to create customized reports or to upload the data
from the PC to a host computer (such as a mainframe) for further analysis using
custom-developed software.
There are three methods for entering DOS-level commands:
Enter individual commands from the PC keyboard at the DOS prompt.
Results are written to standard output in a flat ASCII format on the PC.
Execute commands from a batch file. If dBASE III PLUS is included in the
batch file, retrieved data is automatically converted into a dBASE III PLUS
format; otherwise it is written in a flat ASCII format.
Write applications that use DOS-level commands and database manager
software to organize DEFINITY AUDIX database information in customized
reports. (PC2AUDIX is an example of an application that uses these
DOS-level commands and the dBASE III PLUS database manager
software to create reports.)
ADAP DOS-level commands provide the following capabilities:
Add or delete subscriber records or modify subscriber field values directly
in the DEFINITY AUDIX database.
Download selected COS screens data to the PC.
Download selected Attendant screens data to the PC.
Download selected Subscriber screens data to the PC (including the local
and remote data).
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12Requirements
Download selected Maintenance screens data to the PC (including alarms
and errors).
Download selected System-Parameters screens data to the PC.
Download selected Traffic screens data to the PC.
Download performance statistics data to the PC.
Requirements
The following hardware and software are required to run ADAP:
A Lucent Technologies 6286 WGS (recommended), Lucent Technologies
6386 WGS, or other compatible PC that can run the MS-DOS 3.1 (or later)
operating system. The PC or Work Group System (WGS) must have at
least 640 Kbytes of memory before loading ADAP and 357 Kbytes of RAM
available after ADAP is loaded. At least a 40-Mbyte hard disk is needed.
The PC or WGS can be cabled from either COM1 or COM2 directly to a
DEFINITY AUDIX administration port or through a modem or Modular
Processor Data Module (MPDM) to dial into the DEFINITY AUDIX system
at from 1200 to 9600 bps. See
AUDIX Administration and Data Acquisition
Package
, 585-302-502, for complete installation instructions and a list of
supported modems.
A 513 terminal emulation package. This is an optional package for ADAP,
used only to troubleshoot the connection to the DEFINITY AUDIX system.
However, it is required if the ADAP PC is to also serve as an administration
terminal capable of logging in to the DEFINITY AUDIX system with the
administrative login and displaying the administrative and maintenance
screens directly on the PC screen.
A 570 parallel, 572 serial, or other 473-compatible Lucent Technologies
printer. This is optional but recommended.
The dBASE III PLUS software package (version 1.1 or later) if PC2AUDIX
is used. ADAP is not yet compatible with dBASE IV software.
Feature Operation
The ADAP PC, which can serve as the DEFINITY AUDIX administration terminal,
can be connected via either the COM1 or COM2 port on the PC to an
administration port on the DEFINITY AUDIX system, using either a direct
connection or a dial-up modem connection. The ADAP PC also can be used as
the administration terminal for the DEFINITY AUDIX system; a terminal emulation
package installed on the PC allows the administrator to display the DEFINITY
AUDIX administration and maintenance screens on the PC screen.
If PC2AUDIX is used, the administrator simply invokes PC2AUDIX and selects
options from the root menu. PC2AUDIX automatically logs in to the DEFINITY
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13Feature Operation
AUDIX system as required during the session in response to menu options that
are selected.
There are several important details to remember about using PC2AUDIX:
Before PC2AUDIX reports can be generated, the report data must be
retrieved to the PC using PC2AUDIX menu options.
Data is not stored indefinitely in the DEFINITY AUDIX database, so it must
be retrieved to the PC on a regular basis.
Data retrieval can be a time-consuming process and should be done
during off-hours to free up the administration terminal during daytime
hours and to minimize the impact of ADAP operations on DEFINITY AUDIX
performance.
The PC2AUDIX scheduling option facilitates this process by allowing up to 100
jobs to be scheduled for off-hours execution. Individual jobs can be scheduled to
run at the same time each week, so that ADAP data retrieval is an automatic and
regular process.
To use the DOS-level commands, the administrator logs in to the DEFINITY
AUDIX system by invoking either the ADAP automatic login command or the
ADAP manual login command.
The
AUDIX Administration and Data Acquisition Package
, 585-302-502,
document describes how to install ADAP and how to use PC2AUDIX and the
ADAP DOS-level commands. ADAP software is shipped on 3.5-inch diskettes.
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14Interactions with Other Features
Interactions with Other Features
This section identifies the interactions of the ADAP feature with switch features
and other DEFINITY AUDIX features.
Interactions with Switch Features
ADAP has little direct relation to switch features. Some switch feature settings
may affect the traffic data that ADAP accesses, but have no effect on the
operation of ADAP itself.
Interactions with Other DEFINITY AUDIX
Features
Tr a ff i c Rep o r ts
: ADAP can be used to download data from all traffic screens.
Alarm Origination
15
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Description Points to Remember
Administration Screens
The Alarm Origination feature initiates a communication link
between the DEFINITY AUDIX system and Lucent Technolo-
gies’ Operations Support System (OSS) to inform the OSS
that an alarm has been activated. The system downloads
specific information about the alarm from the alarm log. It
provides an efficient means for getting alarms resolved
quickly and includes a variety of options that allow the sys-
tem administrator to customize the type of alarm notification
to suit any service agreements.
The call is initiated through a maintenance port on the sys-
tem and an internal or external modem. The port and modem
are also available for remote access by the OSS to resolve
alarms. When the alarms are resolved, the system optionally
initiates another call to the OSS to transmit an All Clear mes-
sage.
Alarm origination options are administered for a variety of
functional system groups. The system information transmit-
ted in the alarm call is obtained from the alarm log. The log
provides information about the success of alarm reports and
a mechanism for testing the feature.
If the system fails to make the
connection because the alarm
port is busy, or for any other rea-
son, it will retry periodically.
Support personnel can tempo-
rarily override this feature by sup-
pressing alarms. Suppressed
alarms that are not resolved will
be sent when the suppressed
state is no longer in effect (unless
whoever suppressed the alarms
logs off).
Alarm notifications can be set for
up to six suggested functional
system groups.
Alarm Origination
Sys-Par Maint, Alarm
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Alarm Origination
16Applications
Applications
The primary application of this feature is to speed up the resolution of alarms,
which it is estimated to do by at least ten percent. The automatic downloading of
alarm logs as they are generated starts the resolution process almost at the
instant of failure.
Additionally, this feature provides more opportunity for customers to participate in
system maintenance. By defining the types of alarms that originate alarm calls,
customers can use in-house specialists to solve specific types of problems.
Customers cannot administer this feature directly, but can have it customized by
services personnel.
Requirements
Initialization and Administration Software (INADS) database entries must be set
up to handle alarms from each remote system.
Feature Operation
Little is required of the system administrator for this feature to operate properly.
The initial administration is done by services personnel. The basic feature
operation is described in the following section.
Initial Administration
The system is shipped with this feature turned off. When turned on, the feature
remains activated through system restarts. In order to activate alarm origination,
do the following:
1. Enter at the command line: change system-parameters maintenance.
This will bring up the System-Parameters Maintenance screen.
2. Enter a Product ID in the appropriate field.
3. Enter a dial string in the appropriate field (This contains the phone number
and modem commands for originating the alarm call). Unless you are
using an external modem, use the
atdt
prefix in the dial string.
For example, you could type: atdt9,13035551213
If you are using an external modem, see the modem manual for proper
administration.
4. Enter the remote access port to use for originating alarm calls.
5. Enter the baud rate.
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17Feature Operation
6. Enter y in the Alarm Origination Active field. If you wish calls to be placed
when all alarms have been resolved, enter a y in the All Alarms Resolved
Notification field.
NOTE:
The
all resolved
notification includes
only
those alarms which have
been administered to cause an alarm origination call. In other
words, active alarms may be outstanding when an All Clear call is
placed.
7. Enter the alarm action for each of the eight alarm categories, as well as
the failure modes.
8. Use the key to store the information entered.
Alarm Action
When an alarm is raised, the following happens:
The action for the group associated with this alarm and severity is
checked. If a call should be placed, a timer is set for 5 minutes (to allow
the system to resolve the alarm automatically).
After 5 minutes, if a call is still required, it will be placed.
If the result of the call is an acknowledgment from INADS, all groups with
alarms will be treated as acknowledged, and no further action is needed.
Any subsequent alarm(s) raised in any of the already acknowledged
categories (of the same or lower level) do not cause another call to be
placed.
If the call fails for any reason, it will be rescheduled and attempted at a
later time. Possible reasons for failure include:
INADS not prepared for call or having problems
Maintenance port already in use
Dial string incorrect
Modem problems
Three failures in a row cause the failure modes (from the screen) to be
examined and relays to be closed if so administered. Calls will still be
attempted as per the retry strategy.
All Clear
If administered, alarm origination will place a call informing INADS that all
previously acknowledged alarms have been resolved. No All Clear call will be
placed if there are active alarms outstanding in groups that are administered to
place calls. For example:
ENTER
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18Feature Operation
An alarm is raised for group 1, and a call is placed and acknowledged.
The Alarm is subsequently resolved. An
All Clear
call is scheduled. If a
new alarm is raised in group 1 before the All Clear call is placed, the All
Clear call will be canceled, and no new alarm call will be scheduled.
(Unless the new alarm is at a higher severity).
An alarm is raised for group 1, and a call is placed and acknowledged. An
alarm is raised for group 2, and the alarm call is not acknowledged. The
Alarm in group 1 is resolved. At this point, all acknowledged alarms have
been resolved, but no All Clear call will be placed, because of the active
group 2 alarm. If a resolution for the group 2 alarm is received (before or
after it is acknowledged) an All Clear call will be placed.
Alarm Suppression
Alarm Origination may be temporarily suppressed by entering the command
disable alarm-origination. During suppression, no calls (other than test calls)
will be attempted, nor will the relays be operated. Alarm origination would
typically be suppressed after logging in through the maintenance port so that no
outgoing calls are attempted while the port is busy. Alarm or All Clear calls will be
delayed until alarm origination is again enabled.
Since the possibility exists that whoever had suppressed alarm origination may
fail to re-enable it, it will be automatically re-enabled whenever the login that
originally suppressed it logs off.
Alarm Origination Not Active
Even if alarm origination is not active (the feature is turned off as opposed to
temporarily suppressed), the relays will still operate. When alarms are raised, the
action to take for the particular group (and severity) will be examined. If the
action is to close the relays, they will be closed. If the action to take is to call, the
failure mode will be examined. If the failure mode indicates the relays should be
closed, this will occur immediately. Therefore, turning off the feature will not stop
operations of the relays, unless administered otherwise. See
DEFINITY AUDIX
System — Maintenance
, 585-300-121, for more information.
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Alarm Origination
19Interactions with Other Features
Interactions with Other Features
This section identifies the interactions of the Alarm Origination feature with switch
features and other DEFINITY AUDIX features.
Interactions with Switch Features
Contact Relays
:
The Alarm Origination feature can be set up to work with switch
relays.
Interactions with Other DEFINITY AUDIX
Features
The Alarm Origination feature does not interact with other DEFINITY AUDIX
features.
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Alarm Origination
20Interactions with Other Features
AMIS Analog Networking
21
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Description Points to Remember
Administration Screens
Audio Messaging Interchange Specification (AMIS) Analog
Networking is an optional feature that permits subscribers to
exchange voice mail messages with voice mail systems any-
where in the world, provided those systems also have AMIS-
analog capabilities (AMIS is an industry-wide standard).
Messages also can be exchanged with users on remote sys-
tems with AMIS capabilities made by vendors other than
Lucent Technologies.
The administrator may administer a set of remote voice mes-
saging systems for two-step (
casual
) addressing (for
instance, an entire area code) without administering remote
systems individually. If the traffic between the local system
and a particular remote system is heavy, however, the
administrator may administer the remote system for one-step
(
pre-administered
) addressing.
To address a message via AMIS analog two-step address-
ing, the subscriber must specify both the telephone number
of the remote voice mail system and the mailbox ID of the
intended recipient. To address a message via AMIS analog
one-step addressing, the subscriber need only specify the
remote mailbox ID of the intended recipient. Users on remote
systems administered for one-step addressing can be
administered on the local system via the Subscriber screen,
and they may be included in subscribers’ mailing lists and
personal directories.
The local DEFINITY AUDIX system will transmit messages at
specific times set by the DEFINITY AUDIX administrator on
the Machine screen. The times specified on this screen
must
be a subset of the outcalling periods administered on the
System-Parameters Outcalling screen.
Each DEFINITY AUDIX system
using AMIS Analog Networking
can exchange messages with any
voice mail system with AMIS ana-
log capabilities.
Remote systems can be adminis-
tered for easy one-step address-
ing.
As defined by the AMIS analog
specification, messages will be
transmitted separately for each
remote recipient, even if recipients
reside on the same system.
Messages are
played
by the
sending system and
recorded
by
the receiving system.
Because messages are played
and transmitted via analog lines,
their quality may degrade.
AMIS Analog Networking
Sub, Mach, Sys-Par Out
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AMIS Analog Networking
22Applications
Applications
AMIS Analog Networking is primarily of interest to businesses that use voice
messaging systems that do not use Lucent Technologies’ proprietary AUDIX
software. AMIS Analog Networking allows remote or systems to“talk” to each
other using a dial-and-answer system like a telephone call.
Customers whose additional voice messaging systems use AUDIX software may
want to use Digital Networking. See the Digital Networking feature for more
information about Digital Networking.
Considerations
A primary consideration in AMIS Analog Networking, as with the Outcalling
feature, is how often the feature will be used. This type of networking uses voice
ports which is an important consideration when planning a system configuration.
The considerations for one-step and two-step addressing are discussed below.
AMIS Analog One-Step Addressing
If the traffic between the local system and a particular remote system is heavy,
the administrator may administer the remote system for pre-administered
addressing. In this case, the administrator must individually administer the
remote system rather than including it in a set of administered remote systems.
To address a message via AMIS analog one-step addressing, the subscriber
needs to specify only the remote mailbox ID (normally an extension) of the
intended recipient. Users on remote systems administered for one-step
addressing on the local system also can be administered on the local system via
the Remote Subscriber screen. These locally administered, remote users may be
included in subscribers’ mailing lists (see the Mailing List feature) and personal
directories (see the Personal Directory feature). Since they are listed in the
system directory, they also can be addressed by name (see the
Address-by-Name feature).
AMIS Analog Two-Step Addressing
The administrator may administer a set of remote voice mail systems for casual
addressing. A set of systems could, for example, be an entire area code or all
local numbers. In this case, individual remote voice mail systems do not need to
be administered separately.
To address a message via AMIS analog two-step addressing, the subscriber
must specify both the telephone number of the remote voice mail system and the
mailbox ID of the intended recipient on the remote system. Users on these
remote systems
cannot
be administered on the local system, nor can they be
included in subscriber-defined address lists or personal directories.
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AMIS Analog Networking
23Requirements
The AMIS Analog Networking feature is designed to be very similar to the
standard Voice Mail and Networking features. However, subscribers who receive
AMIS analog messages from remote systems administered for AMIS two-step
addressing will notice information included in the header that is not included in
standard voice mail messages. This includes a statement that the message is an
AMIS analog message and, generally, the complete telephone number of the
remote voice mail system (depending on address range) in addition to the
mailbox ID of the person who sent the message (the sender’s name will not be
voiced).
Requirements
The AMIS Analog Networking feature must be activated by Lucent Technologies’
remote maintenance personnel. Each remote system, which may be a Lucent
Technologies system or another vendor’s voice mail system, must have AMIS
analog capabilities activated.
Feature Operation
The local system simply calls the remote system and, when the remote system is
ready, plays the message. The remote system records the message and puts it in
the recipient’s mailbox. Since the analog messages are actually played back to
the remote system and not transmitted digitally, the remote system will take one
minute to record a one minute message, for example. If a message is sent to
more than one subscriber on the same remote system, it is played to the remote
system multiple times. See
AMIS Analog Networking
, 585-300-512, for the
specific procedures required to administer the AMIS Analog Networking feature.
AMIS Two-Step Addressing Procedure
The procedure to send AMIS messages from the local machine to a remote
system administered for AMIS two-step addressing is summarized as follows:
1. A local subscriber either creates a voice mail message, forwards a Call
Answer or voice mail message, or retrieves a message saved in the
outgoing mailbox. Note that AMIS messages designated
private
are not
delivered. AMIS messages designated
priority
are delivered, but they
appear as regular messages to the remote system.
2. When prompted for the recipient’s extension, the subscriber enters the
AMIS prefix, if one is administered, followed by the full telephone number
of the remote voice mail system (area code or country code plus area
code may be necessary), followed by the key. For more information on
prefixes, see Remote Addresses later in this section.
#
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3. When the system recognizes the telephone number as being in the range
of AMIS two-step addresses, it prompts the subscriber for the mailbox ID
on the remote system. The subscriber enters the mailbox ID (normally an
extension) followed by the key.
4. Subscribers can specify a time when they would like the message
delivered, but the message may have to wait in the outcalling queue for
the next administered AMIS transmission period.
5. The system attempts to deliver the message during an outcalling period
specified on the Machine screen. The times specified on this screen
must
be a subset of the outcalling times administered on the
System-Parameters Outcalling screen. If the outcalling ports are all busy,
the system retries in one minute. If an outcalling port is available, but for
some reason the system cannot deliver the AMIS message, the system
uses the
retry intervals
specified on the System-Parameters Features
screen.
6. The DEFINITY AUDIX system makes three attempts to deliver the
message. If the message is delivered successfully, the system updates
the outgoing message status to
delivered
. If all three attempts fail, the
system sends a message to the senders, notifying them that the AMIS
message was undeliverable.
NOTE:
Name addressing does not work with the AMIS two-step addressing
procedure.
AMIS Two-Step Addressing Example
Two people who work for the same company, and who are subscribers on
different voice mail systems, might need to exchange voice mail messages. For
example, if subscriber L (a subscriber on the local DEFINITY AUDIX system)
needs to send a voice mail message to subscriber R (an employee of the same
company at a remote site across town from subscriber L), she could do so via
two-step AMIS Analog Networking.
Before subscriber L can send an AMIS analog message to subscriber R’s voice
mailbox, she needs to know the following information:
The prefix, if assigned on the Machine screen, identifying the range of
hunt group numbers for voice mail systems to which subscribers can send
two-step AMIS analog messages; assume this prefix has been
administered to be 7.
The hunt group number for subscriber R’s voice mail machine (this is the
number subscriber R dials to use his voice mail system); assume the hunt
group number is 222-5000.
Subscriber R’s mailbox ID (this would normally be subscriber R’s
extension); assume subscriber R’s extension is 1111.
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25Feature Operation
To send subscriber R a message, subscriber L should complete the following
steps:
1. Log on to the local DEFINITY AUDIX system and record a message for
subscriber R.
2. When the system prompts her for the extension to which she wants to
send the message, she should enter the prefix, followed by the hunt-group
number of subscriber R’s voice mail system, followed by the key.
In this example subscriber L would enter 72225000#.
3. When the local system prompts subscriber L for the mailbox ID to which
she wants to send the message, she should enter subscriber R’s
extension, followed by the key.
In this example subscriber L would enter 1111#.
4. Subscriber L’s DEFINITY AUDIX system dials the hunt group for
subscriber Rs voice mail system.
In this example the local system would dial 9-222-5000.
5. When the remote system answers the call from the local system, the local
system notifies the remote system that it has an AMIS analog message for
mailbox 1111.
6. Subscriber L’s system plays subscriber L’s message to subscriber R’s
system; meanwhile, subscriber R’s system records subscriber L’s
message.
7. Subscriber R’s voice mail system puts subscriber L’s message in
subscriber R’s mailbox and notifies him that he has a message.
8. Subscriber R can then retrieve subscriber L’s message as he would any
other voice mail message.
NOTE:
For subscriber L to be able to send a voice mail message to
subscriber R, the system administrator of the local DEFINITY AUDIX
system (on which subscriber L is a subscriber) must have
administered that system for two-step AMIS Analog Networking to
local numbers. In addition, the system administrator of the remote
system (on which subscriber R is a subscriber) must have
administered that voice mail system to accept incoming AMIS
Analog Messages.
#
#
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26Feature Operation
AMIS One-Step Addressing Procedure
The procedure to send AMIS messages from the local machine to a remote
machine administered for AMIS one-step addressing is summarized as follows:
1. A local subscriber either creates a voice mail message, forwards a Call
Answer or voice mail message, or retrieves a message saved in the
outgoing mailbox. Note that AMIS messages designated
private
are not
delivered. AMIS messages designated
priority
are delivered, but they are
treated as regular messages by the remote system.
2. When prompted for the recipient’s extension, the subscriber enters the
AMIS prefix, if one is administered, followed by the remote mailbox ID
(normally an extension). For more information on prefixes, see Remote
Addresses later in this section.
3. Subscribers can specify a time when they would like the message
delivered, but the message may have to wait in the outcalling queue for
the next administered AMIS transmission period.
4. The system attempts to deliver the message during one of the intervals
specified on the Machine screen. The times specified on this screen
must
be a subset of the outcalling times administered on the
System-Parameters Outcalling screen. If the outcalling ports are all busy,
the system retries in one minute. If an outcalling port is available, but for
some reason the system cannot deliver the AMIS message, the system
uses the
retry intervals
specified on the System-Parameters Features
screen.
5. The system makes three attempts to deliver the message. If the message
is delivered successfully, the DEFINITY AUDIX system updates the
outgoing message status to
delivered
. If all three attempts fail, the system
sends a message to the subscriber notifying her that the AMIS message
was undeliverable.
AMIS Analog One-Step Addressing Example
For one-step AMIS Analog Networking, again consider subscriber L (a
subscriber on the local DEFINITY AUDIX system) who needs to send a voice mail
message to subscriber R (an employee of the same company at a remote site
across town from subscriber L). If subscriber Rs system is
pre-administered
on
subscriber L’s system, instead of using the procedure covered previously, she
could use one-step addressing to send a message to subscriber R.
Before subscriber L can send an AMIS analog message to subscriber R’s voice
mailbox, she needs to know the following information:
The prefix that was assigned to identify subscriber R’s voice mail system
on the Machine screen; assume this prefix is administered to be 7.
Subscriber R’s mailbox ID (this would normally be subscriber R’s
extension); assume subscriber R’s extension is 1111.
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27Feature Operation
To send subscriber R a message, subscriber L should complete the following
steps:
1. Log on to the local DEFINITY AUDIX system and record a message for
subscriber R.
2. When the system prompts her for the extension to which she wants to
send the message, she should enter the prefix identifying subscriber Rs
voice mail system, followed by subscriber R’s mailbox ID, followed by the
key.
In this example subscriber L would enter 71111#.
3. Subscriber L’s DEFINITY AUDIX system calls subscriber R’s voice mail
system by dialing the digits in the Dial String field defined on the Machine
screen for subscriber R’s voice mail system.
4. When the remote system answers the call from the local system, the local
system notifies the remote system that it has an AMIS analog message for
mailbox 1111.
5. Subscriber L’s system plays subscriber L’s message to subscriber R’s
system; meanwhile, subscriber R’s system records subscriber L’s
message.
6. Subscriber R’s voice mail system puts subscriber L’s message in
subscriber R’s mailbox and notifies him that he has a message.
7. Subscriber R can then retrieve subscriber L’s message as he would any
other voice mail message.
NOTE:
For subscriber L to be able to send a voice mail message to
subscriber R, the system administrator of the local DEFINITY AUDIX
system (on which subscriber L is a subscriber) must have
administered subscriber R’s system for one-step AMIS Analog
Networking on the local system. In addition, the system
administrator of the remote system (on which subscriber R is a
subscriber) must have administered that voice mail system to
accept incoming AMIS Analog Messages.
Remote Addresses
Addresses for users on remote voice mail systems consist of an optional location
prefix and one of the following:
For AMIS two-step addressing — Remote voice mail system telephone
number (entered by subscribers when they are prompted for an extension
during addressing) plus remote mailbox ID
For AMIS one-step addressing — Remote mailbox ID
The prefix consists of 0 to 21 alphanumeric characters. Added to the extension,
up to 31 characters can be assigned to an address range.
#
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28Feature Operation
The prefix, if defined, is a set of digits that identifies a remote voice mail system.
The first digit(s) of the Address Range Prefix field defined on the Machine screen
must match the AMIS prefix defined on the System-Parameters Analog-Network
screen. In addition to the AMIS prefix, the address range prefix may contain, for
example, an area code or a country code plus area code. Prefixes are usually
numeric and mimic the digits a subscriber would normally have to dial to address
an AMIS message.
In some cases, a prefix may be
required
if remote extensions conflict with the
local numbering plan of the host switch.
Prefixes can be defined for remote systems administered for AMIS two-step
addressing and AMIS one-step addressing. In implementing the AMIS Analog
Networking feature, a number of prefix options could be used to help subscribers
distinguish between remote voice mail systems. For example, a prefix could be:
The same numbers as the country code and area code.
The same numbers as the area code (NPA) and office code.
The office code (NNX or NXX) if the remote system shares the same area
code.
An RNX code if the remote system is in a private network.
An alphanumeric code used as a mnemonic of a location or system.
All of the above options could be administered to be mapped into a single
range of remote AMIS addresses.
The Address-Ranges screen can list all address ranges that have been
administered.
NOTE:
In all of the above examples, the prefixes
must
be preceded by the AMIS
prefix, if one was defined, on the System-Parameters Analog-Network
screen. AMIS Analog Networking address ranges
cannot
overlap with any
other address ranges. That includes address ranges used for the
Message Delivery feature. In addition, each AMIS two-step and AMIS
one-step range must be unique.
AMIS Analog Networking User Groups
For the AMIS Analog Networking feature, users are divided into the following
groups:
Local subscribers — Those subscribers whose mailboxes reside on the
local DEFINITY AUDIX system.
Remote voice mail users — Those users whose mailboxes reside on a
remote voice mail system (any system other than the local system).
Remote users are further divided as follows:
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29Feature Operation
Administered remote voice mail users — Those remote users who
have been administered on the local DEFINITY AUDIX system via
the Remote Subscriber screen. These users can be addressed by
name and their names, if recorded, will be voiced back. Only AMIS
users whose mailboxes reside on systems administered for AMIS
one-step addressing can be administered on the local system.
Nonadministered remote voice mail users — Remote users who
have not been administered on the local DEFINITY AUDIX system.
All users of remote systems administered for AMIS two-step
addressing are nonadministered remote users. Remote users on
systems administered for AMIS one-step addressing may be
administered or nonadministered. The system administrator
indicates whether local subscribers can send messages to
nonadministered recipients of remote systems administered for
AMIS one-step addressing via the System-Parameters Features
screen. They cannot control this for remote systems administered
for AMIS two-step addressing, however. Nonadministered remote
voice mail users are still further divided as follows:
Nonverified nonadministered remote users — Those
nonadministered remote users whose locations have not yet
been verified. For example, a message has been addressed
to a remote AMIS address, but a successful delivery has not
yet occurred.
Verified nonadministered remote subscribers — Those
remote users whose location has been verified either
because an AMIS message was successfully delivered to
them or because they have sent an AMIS message to the
local system.
NOTE:
Only administered remote users can be included in
mailing lists or addressed by name.
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30Interactions with Other Features
Interactions with Other Features
This section identifies the interactions of the AMIS Analog Networking feature
with switch features and other DEFINITY AUDIX features.
Interactions with Switch Features
Since the AMIS Analog Networking feature uses analog lines to transmit
messages, there are only minor interactions with switch features.
Call Transfer
: To avert toll-fraud, the switch might be administered to restrict
voice ports for certain calls, which might slow or limit AMIS networking.
Interactions with Other DEFINITY AUDIX
Features
The AMIS Analog Networking feature interacts with other DEFINITY AUDIX
features as follows:
Address-by-Name
: You can use the Address-by-Name feature to address
AMIS messages to administered remote users on remote systems
administered for one-step addressing.
Automated Backup
: This feature automatically creates a backup copy of
the directories that have information necessary for the AMIS Analog
Networking feature.
Call Answer
: Call answer messages can be forwarded to remote voice
mail users on remote systems via the AMIS Analog Networking feature.
Delivery Scheduling
: Messages can be scheduled for delivery between
systems networked via AMIS Analog.
Dial-by-Name
: You cannot use the Dial-by-Name feature to transfer
across an AMIS network.
Directory
: If you are using the Directory feature in an AUDIX network, the
only remote AMIS users you will be able to look up will be administered
subscribers on systems administered for AMIS one-step addressing.
AMIS recipients on remote systems administered for AMIS two-step
addressing cannot be included in the Directory.
Enhanced Disconnect Detection
: Since AMIS outgoing or incoming
network calls are terminated within the protocol, the Enhanced Disconnect
Detection feature has no effect on AMIS calls.
I
NTUITY
Message Manager
: Subscribers can address an AMIS message
using INTUITY Message Manager.
Mailing List
: Unadministered and administered remote AMIS recipients on
remote systems administered for AMIS one-step addressing may be
included on mailing lists. AMIS recipients on remote systems administered
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31Interactions with Other Features
for AMIS two-step addressing cannot be included on mailing lists.
Messages addressed to remote recipients will be put in the outcalling
queue and delivered during one of the intervals specified on the Machine
screen.
Message Delivery
: This feature is an extension of the AMIS Analog
Networking feature. Rather than sending a message to a remote voice
mail system, this feature permits subscribers to send a message to any
touch-tone phone (including someone’s home).
Message Sending Restrictions
: The administrator can administer which
subscribers can send AMIS analog messages, and to which remote
systems these subscribers can send messages.
Multilingual
: If the Multilingual feature is active, AMIS network outcalls will
be made using the system announcement set.
Outcalling
: The maximum number of outcalling ports, administered via the
System-Parameters Outcalling screen, includes ports used for Outcalling,
Message Delivery, and AMIS Analog Networking. Also, the times
administered on the Machine screens for AMIS Analog and Message
Delivery messages to be delivered
must
be a subset of the outcalling
periods administered via the System-Parameters Outcalling screen or the
AMIS analog messages will not be transmitted.
Personal Directory
: In one-step addressing only, an alias may be created
and assigned to any remote AMIS recipient just as it can be for a local
subscriber. If the remote subscriber is nonadministered, however, the
alias must initially be assigned using the extension number mode.
Priority Message
: Priority messages will be delivered to remote AMIS
systems, but they will not be recognized as priority messages by remote
systems.
Private Message
: You cannot send private messages via the AMIS analog
feature. Subscribers who designate AMIS messages as private are
notified by the DEFINITY AUDIX system that their message was
undeliverable.
Security Password
: There is no security password for remote AMIS analog
systems.
NOTE:
The system administrator should ensure that all subscribers
carefully secure their mailboxes with a good password to prevent
unauthorized persons from accessing the system and sending
AMIS analog messages.
Traffic Reports
: The traffic reports that show the most useful statistics for
AMIS Analog Networking activities (combined with Message Delivery
activities) are generated using the Special Features Daily Traffic, Special
Features Hourly Traffic, Subscriber Daily Traffic, and Subscriber Monthly
Traffic screens.
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32Interactions with Other Features
Voic e Mailb ox
: Subscribers send AMIS analog messages by logging into
their DEFINITY AUDIX mailbox, recording a message and addressing it to
someone on a remote AMIS system. Subscribers who receive AMIS
messages retrieve these messages in the normal manner. The DEFINITY
AUDIX system also uses voice mailboxes to notify local subscribers who
attempt to send an AMIS message if their message was undeliverable.
Announcement Sets
33
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Description Points to Remember
Administration Screens
A number of announcement sets are available with the
DEFINITY AUDIX system, including the following:
The Multilingual feature allows multiple announcement sets
to be used with the DEFINITY AUDIX system. Subscribers
can choose a Login Announcement Set and callers to a sub-
scriber’s mailbox can have a choice between two announce-
ment sets. Up to 9 announcement sets may be installed on
the DEFINITY AUDIX system at one time as long as enough
disk space is available for both the announcement sets and
voice text storage. The DEFINITY AUDIX system allows sys-
tem administrators to customize announcements.
U.S. English Polish
U.S. English Numeric Castilian Spanish
U.S. English TDD Dutch
Arabic Female German
Arabic Male Portuguese
British English Greek
Cantonese Hungarian
Croatian Korean
Czech Mandarin-Chinese
Canadian French Mandarin-Taiwanese
French Russian
Italian Slovak
Japanese Thai
Latin Spanish Turkish
Malay
The DEFINITY AUDIX system can
accommodate multiple announce-
ment sets if the Multilingual fea-
ture is activated.
Announcement fragments should
be modified only if absolutely nec-
essary since standard messages
and prompts can be destroyed.
Usually, only the DEFINITY AUDIX
system administrator has
announcement-control permis-
sion which allows access to Activ-
ity 9 for recording subscribers
names and customizing
announcements.
Announcement Sets
COS, Sub, Ann
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Announcement Sets
34Applications
Applications
A variety of announcement sets are available with the DEFINITY AUDIX system
for use in various regions of the world. Each subscriber can have up to three
active announcement sets — call answer primary, call answer secondary, and
login — as long as the Multilingual feature is turned on for the system and the
announcement sets have been assigned to the subscriber on either the
Subscriber or the Class of Service screen.
Using multiple announcement sets with the Multilingual feature enables the
DEFINITY AUDIX system to be an effective voice messaging tool in areas of the
world where two or more languages predominate and in markets where there is a
need to offer teletypewriter (TTY) service for hearing-impaired users. The
Americans With Disabilities Act encourages employers to make reasonable
accommodations for employees with disabilities, including employees who are
hearing-impaired.
The system administrator can personalize and customize the DEFINITY AUDIX
system as needed. Activity 9 (System Administration) on the DEFINITY AUDIX
Activity Menu lets the system administrator perform the following tasks:
Listen to system announcements.
Record, change, or listen to announcement fragments (fragments are
short sections of DEFINITY AUDIX voice prompts).
Use a voice terminal to record and listen to subscribers’ names. Remote
machine names also may be recorded.
Considerations
!WARNING:
Incorrect use of the announcement customization capability could be
hazardous to the integrity of the DEFINITY AUDIX system announcements. If
you decide you must change announcements, you must be extremely
careful and precise. If you make a mistake, the resulting announcements
could be erroneous and rectifying mistakes could be frustrating and
time-consuming. It is strongly recommended that you do not attempt to
modify any announcements without the help of your Lucent Technologies
software specialist.
Before customizing any announcements, system administrators should become
familiar with the composition of each announcement by studying the appropriate
announcement customization guide if available. An announcement customization
guide is available for each announcement set.
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35Requirements
Requirements
There are several requirements for using announcement sets.
Before installing an additional announcement set, ensure that there is
enough disk space for both the announcement set and voice text storage.
See
DEFINITY AUDIX System System Description
, 585-300-214, for
estimates of the amount of storage space required by each
announcement set. See
Installation and Switch Administration for the
DEFINITY AUDIX System Release 4.0,
585-300-122, for instructions on
installing an additional announcement set.
The Multilingual feature must be activated to use multiple announcement
sets with the DEFINITY AUDIX system. See the Multilingual feature for
more information on using announcement sets in a multilingual
environment.
The DEFINITY AUDIX system administrator must assign
announcement-control permission to individual subscribers using the
COS or the Subscriber screens. This announcement-control permission
can be used to record subscribers’ names or customize announcements
and should be reserved for system administrators. The Announcement
screen enables system administrators to modify announcements.
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36Feature Operation
Feature Operation
Part of DEFINITY AUDIX system administration requires using a voice terminal to
record system announcements and subscribers’ names (or having the
subscribers record their own names using the Name Record By Subscriber
feature). The following list identifies the recording activities available:
The most common task is recording and changing subscribers’ names
that are voiced by the DEFINITY AUDIX system. Voice mailbox
administration requires recording new subscribers’ names in the names
data filesystem. This allows the DEFINITY AUDIX system to announce the
names of called subscribers for Call Answer greetings and the names of
subscribers who send or leave messages.
The name recording should be done in a quiet area using a good voice
terminal (always listen to names after voicing them to ensure the recording
is clear and correctly pronounced). Names may be a maximum of 8
seconds long.
NOTE:
If a subscriber’s name is not recorded, only the extension number is
voiced.
If the Automated Attendant or Bulletin Board features are used, a
designated speaker (such as the system administrator or other
responsible party) must record the announcement or list of menu choices.
This activity is performed like recording a subscribers personal greeting
(for more information, see Recording a Personal Greeting in the
Multiple
Personal Greetings
feature description). If using the Multilingual feature
and the Call Answer Language Choice field is set to y (yes), a Dual
Language Personal Greeting is recorded instead of a Multiple Personal
Greeting.
Occasionally the system administrator may rerecord DEFINITY AUDIX
announcements or fragments. This activity should be performed only
when necessary.
This section defines the announcement directory and its operation. For
procedures on recording subscriber names and system announcements, see the
DEFINITY AUDIX System — Administration
, 585-300-507, document.
Announcement Directories
System announcements are stored in the announcements directory
(/audix/annc). Names recorded by the system administrator (or recorded by
subscribers) are stored in the names directory (/audix/nm).
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37Feature Operation
NOTE:
Two announcement versions of U.S. English are available: U.S. English
and U.S. English Terse. You can activate either U.S. English or U.S.
English Terse or create your own set of announcements by copying and
modifying the U.S. English or U.S. English Terse sets. Any of the other
purchasable announcement sets can be customized after being installed
on the DEFINITY AUDIX system.
Changing Announcement Fragments
Announcement fragments are numbered pieces of voice data that are combined
in the system to screen the prompts and announcements the system plays for
subscribers and callers who access the system. The fragment numbers must be
combined in the right order for an announcement to play correctly, and one
fragment may affect many announcements. Announcements are handled in the
DEFINITY AUDIX system as follows:
Announcements are composed of one or more fragments.
Fragments are individually recorded pieces of speech.
Subscriber and machine names are special announcement fragments.
System announcements are listed by fragment number and text in each of the
announcement customization guides listed under
Considerations
. If you need to
change an announcement or fragment, you must use the correct fragment
number. Before changing a fragment, you should estimate the impact the
change will have on other announcements in the system since one fragment can
be used in numerous announcements. Fragments should be recorded in a quiet
area using a good telephone set.
System administrators should consider the global implications of changing each
fragment:
If the announcement fragments you want to change are not used in other
announcements that you do not want to change, you simply can rerecord
them using your touch-tone telephone.
If the announcement fragments you want to change
are
used in other
announcements that you do not want to change, you can create new
fragments to associate with just the announcements you want to change.
You can add, save, change, remove, or copy announcement sets
or
specific
fragments using the Announcement screens. See the
DEFINITY AUDIX System
— Screens Reference
, 585-300-213, for more information.
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38Interactions with Other Features
Interactions with Other Features
This section identifies the interactions of the Announcement Sets feature with
switch features and other DEFINITY AUDIX features.
Interactions with Switch Features
The Announcement Sets feature has no direct interactions with any switch
features.
Interactions with Other DEFINITY AUDIX
Features
The Announcement Sets feature can, in effect, interact with each DEFINITY
AUDIX feature.
Multilingual
: The Multilingual feature allows each subscriber to use
different announcement sets for the Login Announcement Set, the Call
Answer Primary Announcement Set, and the Call Answer Secondary
Announcement Set
TDD
: TDD is one of the purchasable announcement sets available with
the DEFINITY AUDIX system.
Automated Attendant
39
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Description Points to Remember
Administration Screens
The Automated Attendant feature presents callers with a
voiced menu of options, then routes calls according to the
keys the caller presses. Calls may be routed to any tele-
phone in the dial plan or directly to a subscriber’s voice mail-
box, where the caller will hear the subscriber’s Call Answer
greeting (either personal or system) or a prompt to leave a
message for the subscriber. If the caller does not respond to
the attendant menu within a specified period of time, the call
may be routed to a default extension. This extension can be
a secretary or a DEFINITY AUDIX voice mailbox that prompts
the caller to leave a message.
The automated attendant also can be administered to route a
caller to the voice mailboxes of nonresident subscribers
(DEFINITY AUDIX subscribers who do not have an extension
on the switch, but do have a DEFINITY AUDIX voice mail-
box).This allows remote personnel (such as salespersons) to
receive messages from clients and to retrieve those mes-
sages from the main office without having an office and tele-
phone on site.
Callers also can be routed to a shared extension, or to the
voice mailbox of a specific individual on the shared exten-
sion. If three people share a telephone, for example, callers
can leave a message for a specificsharing user or whom-
ever retrieves messages for the shared extension.
Who controls it
: Automated attendants are usually
controlled by the DEFINITY AUDIX
system administrator.
Who can access it
: Anyone who dials the automated
attendant phone number will hear
the recorded attendant menu (list
of choices).
Callers who reach an automated
attendant must use a touch-tone
phone to make menu selections.
An automated attendant is admin-
istered as a special kind of
DEFINITY AUDIX subscriber.
Each automated attendant counts
toward the total number of sub-
scribers on the system.
More than one automated atten-
dant extension may be assigned
per system.
You can set up Multilingual auto-
mated attendants. See the Multi-
lingual feature for more
information.
You can set up special automated
attendants that correspond to holi-
days and special business hours.
You can set up a TTY Automated
Attendant. See the TTY Auto-
mated Attendant feature.
Nonresident subscribers do have
a message notification capability:
the Outcalling feature.
Automated Attendant
COS, Sub, List Att
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Automated Attendant
40Applications
Applications
This feature is particularly useful in diverse organizations that handle many
external calls. Its nearly unlimited routing capabilities have many applications,
especially in the service industries. Customers need only specify the nature of
their business to have their calls routed to the appropriate representative, voice
mailbox, or Bulletin Board. The following sections identify only a few of the
applications where an automated attendant can be used.
Freeing Personnel for Other Tasks
While an automated attendant is handling incoming calls, the personnel who
would otherwise be needed to answer these calls are available for other tasks.
For example, people who call a company’s main or directory-listed number hear,
instead of a receptionist, a greeting or menu telling them which touch-tone button
to press to be directed to the department of their choice. These callers could
reach an agent by selecting a menu option or by waiting for the system to
automatically transfer them.
In addition to menu choices, each automated attendant menu can be
administered to allow callers to transfer to an extension of their choice. This
allows the DEFINITY AUDIX system to provide Direct Inward Dialing (DID)
service for an entire company.
Businesses that Receive Many Calls
At businesses that typically receive many incoming calls, such as telemarketing
groups, many customers may wait for service for long periods of time. Using an
automated attendant in this case could increase customer satisfaction and
promote sales as follows:
The switch could be administered to route callers to an automated
attendant after waiting a certain length of time or when a certain number of
calls are in queue (requires vectoring).
The attendant menu could give callers the option of leaving a message for
a return call, or remaining on hold. If callers elect to leave a message, they
could be routed to a general DEFINITY AUDIX voice mailbox with Call
Answer permission. After hearing the message, the agent can be
prepared with the essential information when making the return call.
Nonresident Subscribers
The Automated Attendant feature can provide nonresident subscribers
(DEFINITY AUDIX subscribers who do not have an extension on the switch, but
do have a DEFINITY AUDIX voice mailbox — such as salespersons) with the
ability to receive messages from clients and to retrieve those messages from any
location without having an office and telephone on site.
DEFINITY AUDIX System Release 4.0
Feature Descriptions
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Automated Attendant
41Applications
The nonresident subscriber would need to provide the client with only the
telephone number of the automated attendant and the subscriber’s voice
mailbox number. The client could then dial the number for the automated
attendant, listen to the attendant menu, enter the voice mailbox number and hear
the greeting for that subscriber. Then the client could either leave a message or
transfer to a sales clerk.
Shared Extensions
The Automated Attendant feature can provide voice messaging capabilities for
several people who share a single telephone. For example, a university dormitory
room has three roommates (Jerry Jones, Don Parker, and Brent Deven) but only
one telephone number. By administering that extension as an automated
attendant and creating three voice mailbox numbers that do not exist in the
switch dial plan, each roommate can have a private mailbox without having a
separate telephone. See the Shared Extension feature for more information.
Automated Attendants with Multiple Personal
Greetings
An automated attendant that is used with the Multiple Personal Greetings feature
can be a very flexible tool. The automated attendant would need to be
administered only once on the Subscriber screen, while the Multiple Personal
Greetings feature could provide available options depending on the type of call.
For example, one automated attendant could voice any of the following greetings
depending on whether the call is an internal, external, or out-of-hours call:
For all internal calls:
To leave a message for a specific person, enter the extension number.
To reach personnel, press one. To reach benefits, press two.
For all external calls:
Welcome to Davis Corporation. To reach the personnel department, press
one on your touch-tone telephone. To reach the benefits department,
press two. To leave a message for a specific person, enter that person’s
four-digit extension number. For assistance, please wait.
For all out-of-hours calls:
Welcome to Davis Corporation. Our normal office hours are 8:00 A.M. to
5:00 P.M. mountain standard time. To leave a message for a specific
person, enter that person’s four-digit extension number using your
touch-tone telephone. If this is an emergency, please press nine.
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Automated Attendant
42Applications
Automated Attendants with the Multilingual
Feature
Multilingual automated attendants can be set up with two or more languages.
The first stage of an automated attendant in a multilingual environment might ask
the user to select a language, and subsequent stages could implement the
Auto-Attendant function in the language chosen.
If using only two languages with the Automated Attendant, the system
administrator could set the Call Answer Language Choice field to y (yes) on the
Automated Attendant Subscriber or COS screen. The administrator then can
record Dual Language Greetings rather than Multiple Personal Greetings. The
primary greeting would tell the caller, in the secondary language, to press
to switch to the secondary language.
If using the Multilingual feature with the Multiple Personal Greetings feature, the
system administrator would set the Call Answer Language Choice field to n (no)
on the Automated Attendant Subscriber or COS screen. Since the administrator
records the automated attendants, automated attendants are not limited to only
two languages. The automated attendant main menu could direct callers to
several languages. For example:
In English,
For English, press 1.
In Canadian French,
For French, press 2
.
In Spanish,
For Spanish, press 3
.
Then for each choice, the administrator would record a nested automated
attendant in the appropriate language.
Automated Attendants for Business and Holiday
Schedules
You can create up to four automated attendants for varying