Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts UIM Guide

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Oracle® Communications
Unified Inventory Management
Concepts
Release 7.3
E56720-01
July 2015
Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts, Release 7.3
E56720-01
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Contents
Preface ................................................................................................................................................................. xi
Audience....................................................................................................................................................... xi
Related Documentation.............................................................................................................................. xi
Documentation Accessibility.................................................................................................................... xii
Document Revision History ..................................................................................................................... xii
1 About Unified Inventory Management
Introducing UIM ...................................................................................................................................... 1-1
UIM and Service Fulfillment ............................................................................................................ 1-2
UIM System Architecture ....................................................................................................................... 1-3
Core Platform...................................................................................................................................... 1-4
Functional Modules ........................................................................................................................... 1-5
About Entities and Entity Types .......................................................................................................... 1-6
About the UIM Information Model...................................................................................................... 1-6
Understanding Products and Services............................................................................................ 1-7
Understanding Resources................................................................................................................. 1-8
Understanding Common Business Entities.................................................................................... 1-9
Understanding Common Patterns................................................................................................... 1-9
Understanding UIM Definitions .................................................................................................. 1-10
About Specifications, Data Elements, and Characteristics ................................................ 1-10
About Rulesets ......................................................................................................................... 1-11
About Cartridges ................................................................................................................................... 1-11
2 UIM User Interface Overview
Opening the UIM User Interface........................................................................................................... 2-1
The UIM Main Window.......................................................................................................................... 2-1
Navigation Section............................................................................................................................. 2-2
Pages .................................................................................................................................................... 2-2
Working with Tables .................................................................................................................. 2-4
Menus................................................................................................................................................... 2-5
Using the UIM Help ................................................................................................................................ 2-5
3 Design Studio Overview
About Design Studio ............................................................................................................................... 3-1
About Projects and Cartridges............................................................................................................... 3-1
iv
Understanding the Design Studio Workbench.................................................................................. 3-2
About Views ....................................................................................................................................... 3-2
About Editors...................................................................................................................................... 3-4
Designing Entity Specifications............................................................................................................ 3-4
Understanding Specification Relationships ................................................................................... 3-4
Extending Specifications with Rulesets .......................................................................................... 3-9
Working with Characteristics ................................................................................................................ 3-9
Characteristic Labels....................................................................................................................... 3-10
Design Studio Specification Example............................................................................................... 3-10
Deploying Cartridges into UIM ......................................................................................................... 3-13
4 Life Cycles and Statuses
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses........................................................................................................ 4-1
Resource Inventory Statuses............................................................................................................. 4-1
Inventory Status for Resources in Business Interactions and Work Orders.............................. 4-3
Inventory Status for Pipes and Connectivities in Business Interactions and Work Orders.... 4-5
Resource Assignment Statuses......................................................................................................... 4-8
Service Life Cycles and Statuses ........................................................................................................ 4-10
Configuration Life Cycles and Statuses............................................................................................ 4-13
Status Examples..................................................................................................................................... 4-16
Telephone Number Life Cycle and Statuses ................................................................................... 4-17
Modified Life Cycle for Ported In and Ported Out Telephone Numbers ............................... 4-19
Business Interaction and Engineering Work Order Life Cycles and Statuses.......................... 4-19
Project and Activity Life Cycles and Statuses ................................................................................. 4-21
Activity Life Cycle and Status ....................................................................................................... 4-22
Activity Item Life Cycle and Statuses .......................................................................................... 4-24
Change Item Life Cycle and Statuses.................................................................................... 4-24
About Impact Items ................................................................................................................. 4-25
5 Core Functionality
Searching.................................................................................................................................................... 5-1
Searching by Using Web Services.................................................................................................... 5-3
Configurations .......................................................................................................................................... 5-3
Understanding Configuration Specifications ............................................................................... 5-4
Configuration Example ..................................................................................................................... 5-4
Maintaining Configurations in UIM ............................................................................................... 5-5
Capacity...................................................................................................................................................... 5-5
Defining and Measuring Capacity................................................................................................... 5-6
Configuring Measurement Type .............................................................................................. 5-6
Configuring Units of Measure ................................................................................................. 5-7
Configuring Capacity Type....................................................................................................... 5-8
Configuring Capacity ........................................................................................................................ 5-8
Configuring Capacity Provided................................................................................................ 5-8
Configuring Capacity Required ............................................................................................... 5-9
Consumption.......................................................................................................................................... 5-10
Assignment ...................................................................................................................................... 5-10
About Shared Consumption of Entities................................................................................ 5-11
v
Understanding Entity References................................................................................................. 5-13
Resource Reservations.................................................................................................................... 5-13
Conditions ........................................................................................................................................ 5-14
Involvements.......................................................................................................................................... 5-15
Creating Involvements in UIM ..................................................................................................... 5-16
Topology ................................................................................................................................................. 5-16
About Topology Nodes.................................................................................................................. 5-16
About Topology Edges................................................................................................................... 5-17
Topology Example .......................................................................................................................... 5-17
Aggregating and Expanding Topology Data.............................................................................. 5-20
Entity Identification.............................................................................................................................. 5-24
6 Planning
Business Interactions............................................................................................................................... 6-1
Business Interaction-Enabled Entities............................................................................................. 6-2
Understanding the Business Interaction Life Cycle...................................................................... 6-3
Understanding Business Interaction Contexts............................................................................... 6-5
Understanding Business Interactions with External Systems ..................................................... 6-6
Configuring Business Interaction Specifications........................................................................... 6-7
Working with Business Interactions in UIM.................................................................................. 6-8
Deleting Entities in Business Interactions ............................................................................... 6-8
Engineering Work Orders....................................................................................................................... 6-9
Projects .................................................................................................................................................... 6-11
Project Details Page Overview ...................................................................................................... 6-12
7 Resource Entity Management
Inventory Groups ..................................................................................................................................... 7-1
About Inventory Group Types and Resource Pools ..................................................................... 7-2
Creating Inventory Groups in UIM................................................................................................. 7-2
About Inventory Group Hierarchies............................................................................................... 7-3
Network Address Domains.................................................................................................................... 7-4
8 Services
About Services .......................................................................................................................................... 8-1
Creating a Service and a Service Configuration in UIM .................................................................. 8-1
Service Topology...................................................................................................................................... 8-2
About Network-Oriented Services ....................................................................................................... 8-3
High-Level Steps for Creating a Network-Oriented Service....................................................... 8-4
Automated Validations and Configurations During Network Service Creation..................... 8-5
About Products ......................................................................................................................................... 8-7
9 Geographic Location
Places........................................................................................................................................................... 9-1
Geographic Coordinates ................................................................................................................... 9-2
Understanding Location-Type Place Entities ............................................................................... 9-2
vi
Location Hierarchy ..................................................................................................................... 9-2
Understanding Address-Type Place Entities................................................................................. 9-3
Configuring Address Selections ............................................................................................... 9-4
Understanding Address Ranges ..................................................................................................... 9-5
Understanding Site-Type Place Entities ........................................................................................ 9-5
Place Configurations .................................................................................................................. 9-5
Associating Places with Other Entities .......................................................................................... 9-6
Property Locations.................................................................................................................................... 9-6
About Property Addresses ............................................................................................................... 9-7
About Validating Addresses ..................................................................................................... 9-7
About Geographic Coordinates in Property Locations................................................................ 9-8
About Service Locations.................................................................................................................... 9-8
About Network Locations ................................................................................................................ 9-9
About Network Entities .......................................................................................................... 9-10
10 Equipment and Devices
Understanding Equipment Modeling............................................................................................... 10-1
Understanding Logical Devices.......................................................................................................... 10-3
About Logical Device Hierarchies................................................................................................ 10-3
Understanding Device Interfaces and Sub-Interfaces .............................................................. 10-4
Associating Rate Codes to Device Interfaces ....................................................................... 10-5
About Interface-Bound Cross-Connects............................................................................... 10-6
Cloning and Duplicating Logical Devices............................................................................ 10-6
About Flow Interfaces ............................................................................................................. 10-7
Logical Device Configurations...................................................................................................... 10-7
Understanding Logical Device Accounts .................................................................................... 10-8
About Logical Device Account Configurations................................................................... 10-8
About Associating Logical Device Accounts with Logical Devices ................................. 10-8
Understanding Physical Resources.................................................................................................... 10-9
Configuring Equipment Specifications ....................................................................................... 10-9
Understanding the Visualization Tab................................................................................. 10-10
Configuring Equipment Holder Specifications ................................................................. 10-11
Configuring Card Specifications ......................................................................................... 10-11
Configuring a Shelf Specification ....................................................................................... 10-11
Configuring a Rack Specification ....................................................................................... 10-12
Adding Ports and Connectors .................................................................................................... 10-13
Configuring Physical Port Specifications ........................................................................... 10-14
Configuring Physical Connector Specifications ................................................................ 10-14
Manually Configuring Equipment in UIM ............................................................................... 10-14
Configuring Physical Device Specifications.............................................................................. 10-15
Associating Physical Devices to Logical Devices ......................................................................... 10-15
Associating Devices and Equipment with Network Locations.................................................. 10-16
Associating Logical Devices with Network Locations and Network Entity Locations...... 10-16
Associating Equipment and Physical Device Entities with Network Locations ................. 10-17
Understanding Network Location Code Propagation ............................................................ 10-18
vii
11 Networks
Understanding Networks .................................................................................................................... 11-1
About Network Technologies............................................................................................................. 11-2
About Network Types .......................................................................................................................... 11-2
About Packet Virtual Networks.................................................................................................... 11-2
About Service Networks ................................................................................................................ 11-3
About Network Topologies................................................................................................................. 11-4
SONET and SDH Network Attributes.............................................................................................. 11-4
Selecting the Ring Type.................................................................................................................. 11-5
Selecting the Protection Type ........................................................................................................ 11-5
Understanding Network Nodes ......................................................................................................... 11-6
Understanding Network Edges .......................................................................................................... 11-7
Limiting the Types of Entities Represented by a Network Edge............................................. 11-7
Building Networks in UIM ................................................................................................................. 11-8
Map View................................................................................................................................................ 11-9
12 Connectivity Overview
About Connectivity............................................................................................................................... 12-1
About Connectivity Locations ............................................................................................................ 12-3
About Connectivity Technologies ..................................................................................................... 12-3
About Rate Codes.................................................................................................................................. 12-4
About Rate Code Compatibility.................................................................................................... 12-5
About Connectivity Functions............................................................................................................ 12-5
About Connectivity Identifiers ......................................................................................................... 12-5
Location-Based Connectivity Identifiers ..................................................................................... 12-6
Service-Based Connectivity Identifiers ........................................................................................ 12-6
Custom Connectivity Identifiers................................................................................................... 12-7
About Termination ............................................................................................................................... 12-7
About Connectivity Enablement........................................................................................................ 12-9
Working with Connectivity Entities in UIM ................................................................................... 12-9
Designing Connectivity ..................................................................................................................... 12-10
About Connectivity Design Visualizations ............................................................................... 12-10
About Design Versions................................................................................................................. 12-11
About Connectivity Gaps............................................................................................................. 12-12
Assigning Transport ..................................................................................................................... 12-13
About Interconnections................................................................................................................ 12-15
About Cross-Connects........................................................................................................... 12-15
About Physical Jumpers........................................................................................................ 12-16
13 Channelized Connectivity
About Channelized Connectivity ...................................................................................................... 13-1
About Channel Identifiers .................................................................................................................. 13-2
E-Carrier, J-Carrier, and T-Carrier Channel Identifiers............................................................. 13-2
SONET Channel Identifiers ........................................................................................................... 13-2
SDH Channel Identifiers ................................................................................................................ 13-4
WDM Channel Identifiers.............................................................................................................. 13-4
viii
Terminating Channels.......................................................................................................................... 13-4
Device Interfaces and Channel Termination............................................................................... 13-5
About the UIM Signal Architecture ................................................................................................ 13-10
E-Carrier Signal Architecture ...................................................................................................... 13-11
SONET Signal Architecture ......................................................................................................... 13-12
Wavelength Division Multiplexing Signal Architecture......................................................... 13-13
Configuring Connectivity Capacity................................................................................................. 13-14
Terminating and Enabling a Channelized Connectivity............................................................. 13-15
About Virtual Connectivity............................................................................................................... 13-16
Virtual Termination ...................................................................................................................... 13-17
Maintaining Channelized Connectivity and Network Resources............................................. 13-18
About Change Items and Impact Items ..................................................................................... 13-19
About Connectivity Design Versions and Grooming and Rehoming................................... 13-20
About Grooming ........................................................................................................................... 13-20
Grooming Scenario: lnter-Facility........................................................................................ 13-21
Grooming Scenario: Intra-Facility Grooming for Ethernet Over SDH .......................... 13-22
Grooming Scenario: 2:2 Inter-Facility ................................................................................. 13-24
About the Grooming User Interface.................................................................................... 13-25
About Rehoming ........................................................................................................................... 13-28
About the Rehoming User Interface.................................................................................... 13-30
Inserting and Removing Nodes in Networks .......................................................................... 13-33
Node Insertion User Interface Overview ........................................................................... 13-35
Node Removal User Interface Overview ........................................................................... 13-37
14 Packet Connectivity
About Packet Connectivity.................................................................................................................. 14-1
About Flow Identifiers......................................................................................................................... 14-1
Q-in-Q Stacking ............................................................................................................................... 14-2
VLAN ID Translation ..................................................................................................................... 14-3
Performance Parameters....................................................................................................................... 14-3
Terminating and Enabling Packet Connectivity............................................................................. 14-4
UNI Connectivity Enabled by T-Carrier Channels .................................................................... 14-5
INNI Connectivity Enabled by SDH Channels .......................................................................... 14-7
SDH Network Infrastructure.................................................................................................. 14-7
Creating and Designing the INNI Connectivity.................................................................. 14-8
15 Service Connectivity
About Service Connectivity ................................................................................................................ 15-1
Service Connectivity in Multipoint Services................................................................................... 15-2
Service Connectivities in Point-to-Point Services .......................................................................... 15-3
16 Pipes
When to Use Pipes................................................................................................................................. 16-1
Understanding Pipes ............................................................................................................................ 16-2
Understanding Pipe Relationships............................................................................................... 16-3
Provides Relationships............................................................................................................ 16-3
ix
Enables Relationships.............................................................................................................. 16-3
Provides and Enables Relationships in Combination......................................................... 16-4
About Multiple Enablement................................................................................................... 16-5
Understanding Pipe Configurations ............................................................................................ 16-7
Understanding Pipe Directionality............................................................................................... 16-8
About Connectivity Gaps in Pipe Enablement........................................................................... 16-9
Understanding Capacity and Signal Structure................................................................................ 16-9
Understanding Packet Capacity ................................................................................................. 16-10
Understanding Signal Structures................................................................................................ 16-10
Simple and Complex Signal Structures .............................................................................. 16-11
Modeling Connectivity in Design Studio and UIM..................................................................... 16-15
Defining Pipe Specifications........................................................................................................ 16-15
Creating Pipe Entities in UIM ..................................................................................................... 16-16
Understanding Pipe Models........................................................................................................ 16-17
Cable/Pair Model .................................................................................................................. 16-17
Packet Facility Model ............................................................................................................ 16-17
TDM Facility Model............................................................................................................... 16-17
Designing and Implementing Pipe Configurations................................................................. 16-18
Defining Pipe Configuration Specifications....................................................................... 16-18
Implementing Pipe Configurations in UIM....................................................................... 16-19
Configuring and Implementing Pipe Termination .................................................................. 16-20
Configuring and Implementing Child Pipes for the Cable/Pair Model............................... 16-21
About Pipe Termination and Rate Codes........................................................................... 16-22
Configuring Pipe Capacity .......................................................................................................... 16-22
Configuring Capacity for Packet Facility Pipes................................................................. 16-22
Configuring Capacity with Signal Structures.................................................................... 16-23
Changing the Capacity of Existing Pipes ........................................................................... 16-26
Enabling Pipes ..................................................................................................................................... 16-27
Enabling Pipes Manually ............................................................................................................. 16-27
Enabling Pipes Automatically with Path Analysis .................................................................. 16-27
About Path Analysis Criteria ............................................................................................... 16-29
About Path Analysis Results................................................................................................ 16-30
Understanding Path Analysis Modes ................................................................................. 16-31
Viewing Enablement Information .............................................................................................. 16-31
Viewing a Pipe Enablement Visualization......................................................................... 16-31
17 IP Address Management
Understanding IP Address Management ......................................................................................... 17-1
About Partitioning IP Address Space .......................................................................................... 17-3
About Joining IP Subnets............................................................................................................... 17-4
About Managing IP Addresses ..................................................................................................... 17-4
About Creating IP Networks............................................................................................................... 17-5
Specifying a Network Name ......................................................................................................... 17-6
Specifying an IP Address ............................................................................................................... 17-6
Specifying an IP Domain................................................................................................................ 17-6
Specifying a Network Owner........................................................................................................ 17-6
About IPv6 Address Types............................................................................................................ 17-6
x
About Creating IP Addresses.............................................................................................................. 17-7
18 Roles
About Roles ............................................................................................................................................ 18-1
About Role Types............................................................................................................................ 18-2
Auto-Creating Roles in UIM.......................................................................................................... 18-2
About Role Specifications and Entity Types............................................................................... 18-2
Adding Characteristics to a Role Specification........................................................................... 18-2
About Network Targets ................................................................................................................. 18-3
19 Telephone Numbers
About Assigning Telephone Numbers to Services ........................................................................ 19-1
Managing Geographies and Specialized Numbers........................................................................ 19-1
About Telephone Number Formats................................................................................................... 19-2
Managing Telephone Number Blocks .............................................................................................. 19-3
Telephone Number Aging................................................................................................................... 19-4
Organizing Telephone Numbers ....................................................................................................... 19-4
Telephone Number Portability .......................................................................................................... 19-5
Reserving and Redeeming Telephone Numbers ............................................................................ 19-5
Telephone Number Reporting............................................................................................................ 19-6
20 Custom Resources
About Custom Network Addresses ................................................................................................... 20-1
Custom Objects...................................................................................................................................... 20-1
21 Parties
About Parties.......................................................................................................................................... 21-1
22 Media Streams
About Media Streams........................................................................................................................... 22-1
Glossary
xi
Preface
This guide explains how to use Oracle Communications Unified Inventory
Management (UIM) to manage your telecommunications inventory. Because you use
Design Studio to define the structure used to model your inventory, this guide
includes information about using inventory-related features in that application.
This guide provides a conceptual understanding of UIM. For detailed steps on how to
perform specific tasks see the Design Studio Help and the UIM Help.
Audience
There are multiple audiences for this guide. Some users can be responsible for doing
tasks that involve using both the Design Studio and UIM applications. The audience
should be knowledgeable about their company’s business processes, the resources
they need to model, and any products or services they offer.
Equipment engineers: They are responsible for creating equipment specifications
and modeling equipment in UIM.
Network design engineers: They are responsible for creating capacity,
connections, and network specifications, and using those inventory specifications
to build out connections and networks.
Service designers: They are responsible for creating service specifications and
building out services.
Customer service representatives: They are responsible for entering or tracking
workflow.
Developers: They are responsible for extending the application.
Related Documentation
For more information, see the following documents in the Oracle Communications
Unified Inventory Management Release documentation set:
UIM Installation Guide: Describes the requirements for installing UIM, installation
procedures, and post-installation tasks.
UIM System Administrators Guide: Describes administrative tasks such as working
with cartridges and cartridge packs, maintaining security, managing the database,
configuring Oracle Map Viewer, and troubleshooting.
UIM Security Guide: Provides guidelines and recommendations for setting up UIM
in a secure configuration.
xii
UIM Developers Guide: Explains how to customize and extend many aspects of
UIM, including the data model, life-cycle management, topology, security, rulesets,
user interface, and localization.
UIM Web Services Developers Guide: Describes the UIM Service Fulfillment Web
Service operations and how to use them, and describes how to create custom Web
services.
UIM API Overview: Provides detailed information and code examples of numerous
APIs presented within the context of a generic service fulfillment scenario, and
within the context of a channelized connectivity enablement scenario.
UIM Information Model Reference: Describes the UIM information model entities
and data attributes, and explains patterns that are common across all entities.
Oracle Communications Information Model Reference: Describes the Oracle
Communications information model entities and data attributes, and explains
patterns that are common across all entities. The information described in this
reference is common across all Oracle Communications products.
UIM Cartridge Guide: Provides information about how you use cartridges and
cartridge packs with UIM. Describes the content of the base cartridges.
For step-by-step instructions for performing tasks, log in to each application to see the
following:
Design Studio Help: Provides step-by-step instructions for tasks you perform in
Design Studio.
UIM Help: Provides step-by-step instructions for tasks you perform in UIM.
Documentation Accessibility
For information about Oracle's commitment to accessibility, visit the Oracle
Accessibility Program website at
http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=docacc
.
Access to Oracle Support
Oracle customers that have purchased support have access to electronic support
through My Oracle Support. For information, visit
http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=info
or visit
http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=trs
if you are hearing
impaired.
Document Revision History
The following table lists the revision history for this book.
Version Date Description
E56720-01 July 2015 Initial release.
1
About Unified Inventory Management 1-1
1
About Unified Inventory Management
This chapter introduces Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management
(UIM) and provides an overview of its capabilities. The chapter also describes the UIM
system architecture and the information model.
Introducing UIM
UIM is a standards-based telecommunications inventory management application that
enables you to model and manage customers, services, and resources. UIM supports
complex business relationships and provides full life-cycle management of services
and resources.
UIM provides you with a real-time, unified view of customer, service, and resource
inventory, enabling you to develop and introduce new services more quickly and more
cost effectively.
UIM is modular and flexible, so it can replace existing inventory systems or work
cooperatively with them. UIM allows access to its service and network asset data
through cooperation with a carrier’s other systems.
Through integration with other Oracle Communications applications and third-party
systems, UIM plays a vital role in service fulfillment. See "UIM and Service
Fulfillment" for more information.
UIM’s inventory management capabilities include:
Managing physical and logical resources. You can model and manage hardware
resources such as racks, shelves, cards, ports, and connectors. UIM also enables
you to model and manage logical resources such as network addresses, media
streams, and telephone numbers.
Managing connectivity. Connectivity is the ability to transfer information to and
from devices and locations. In UIM, you model connectivity by representing
physical and logical resources, the connections between those resources, the
capacity of the resources, and the locations of the resources.
Managing networks and topology. You can use UIM to model networks logically
and to associate resources to network nodes. You can specify the capacity of
networks by associating them with your connectivity model. Topology features
enable you to design and manage networks graphically and by using maps.
Managing services. UIM provides support for services and service fulfillment.
You can configure services with resources and update those configurations over
time.
Introducing UIM
1-2 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Managing life cycles. UIM manages the life cycles of resources and services as
they are planned, placed in service, and retired. Different kinds of entities have
different life cycles corresponding to how they are used in the inventory.
Managing business processes. UIM supports your business processes by
providing features for planning and resource management. For example, you can
use business interactions to plan activities such as service fulfillment or equipment
buildouts.
UIM and Service Fulfillment
Service fulfillment is the process of provisioning services ordered by customers. UIM
plays a vital role in this process by defining the configuration of services and assigning
resources to them. UIM works cooperatively with other Oracle Communications
applications and with third-party systems.
Figure 1–1 shows the provisioning flow of a typical service order involving UIM and
other external applications.
Figure 1–1 Provisioning Flow for a Typical Service Order
1. A customer relationship management system, such as Siebel CRM, captures order
information and submits a sales order to an order management system, such as
Oracle Communications Order and Service Management (OSM).
UIM System Architecture
About Unified Inventory Management 1-3
2. The order management system creates an orchestration plan to determine how the
order is to be provisioned.
The orchestration plan determines which downstream systems, including
provisioning, inventory, and activation systems, are affected by the order. The
order management system sends the appropriate data to these systems.
Downstream systems receive only the sales order data that affects them. For
example, the order management system sends only the line items that require
provisioning to a provisioning system.
3. A provisioning system transforms product actions into service actions and sends
service fulfillment data to UIM by using Web services.
4. Using the input from the provisioning system, UIM creates a service and designs
the service configuration with the resource assignments and other information
necessary to activate the service. UIM returns the service configuration
information to the provisioning system.
5. The provisioning system uses the information returned from UIM to calculate and
execute a delivery plan, then interacts with an activation system to submit an
activation order.
6. As services are provisioned, the provisioning system sends status updates
upstream to the CRM system. The provisioning system also updates UIM via Web
services so that the life-cycle statuses of the appropriate business interactions,
work orders, services, service configurations, and resources can be updated.
UIM System Architecture
UIM is a modular application. You can purchase and install only the modules that you
need. For example, if you are providing a VoIP solution, you can install a different set
of modules than someone providing a VPN service.
UIM comprises two main groups of components:
Core Platform. The core platform provides basic capabilities such as APIs and data
storage. It also provides functionality used throughout the application, such as
life-cycle management and capacity management. The core platform is required
and is supplied with the purchase of any functional module.
Functional Modules. Functional modules provide the capability to manage
different kinds of inventory, such as devices or telephone numbers. You can
purchase only the modules required by your business.
Oracle Communications Design Studio is not part of UIM, but it plays a vital role in
designing content for the application. A Design Studio for UIM plug-in provides
application-specific capabilities. See "Design Studio Overview" for more information
about Design Studio.
Figure 1–2 illustrates these components and their contents. The components are
discussed in more detail in the sections that follow.
UIM is hosted by Oracle WebLogic Server. WebLogic Server supports several different
application configurations, including single server, clustered servers, and Oracle RAC
(Real Application Cluster). See UIM Installation Guide and UIM System Administrator’s
Guide for more information.
UIM System Architecture
1-4 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 1–2 UIM System Architecture
Core Platform
The core platform is the architectural framework of UIM. It is required and is supplied
with the purchase of any functional module. The core platform provides:
Data storage. The core platform manages the storage of both model data and
entity data in the Oracle DBMS. See UIM Installation Guide and UIM System
Administrators Guide for more information.
UIM System Architecture
About Unified Inventory Management 1-5
Web-based user interface. Users access the application through a Web-based
interface. The UIM interface can be extended with custom pages, fields, and code.
See "UIM User Interface Overview" and the UIM Help for information about using
UIM through the graphical interface. See UIM Developers Guide for information
about extending the interface.
Web services. External systems can interact with UIM by using Web services that
provide access to UIM APIs. For example, an order management system can pass
order data into UIM by using Web services. A selection of Web services is available
by default, but you can write custom code to create new ones. See UIM Web
Services Developers Guide for more information.
Common patterns that enable core functionality. See "Understanding Common
Patterns" for more information.
Common business entities. These entities enable you to manage resources and
services and to define relationships among them. See "Understanding Common
Business Entities" for more information.
Functional Modules
UIM functional modules manage the end-to-end life cycle of services, logical
resources, and physical resources. You can purchase only the modules that your
business requires.
Each module supplies content to address a specific need. For example, the Device
Management functional module includes support for creating and working with
devices and equipment in your inventory. Both physical and logical resources are
included.
Table 11 lists the functional modules and the entities that they support. See "About
Entities and Entity Types" for more information about entities.
Note: Common business entities, such as business interactions,
inventory groups, parties, roles, conditions, and reservations, are
supplied by the core platform rather than functional modules.
Table 1–1 UIM Functional Modules
Functional Module Entity Types
Service Configuration Management Service, Service Configuration, Product
Connectivity Management Connectivity, Pipe, Pipe Termination Point, Pipe Configuration
Device Management Physical Port, Physical Connector, Physical Device, Equipment,
Equipment Holder
Logical Device, Logical Device Configuration, Device Interface,
Topology Node, Topology Edge
Geographic Address Management Place (including Location, Site, Address, and Address Range), Place
Configuration
IP Address Management IP Networks, IP Subnets, IP Addresses
Media Stream Management Media Stream
Telephone Number Management Telephone Number
Universal Resource Management Custom Object, Custom Involvement
About Entities and Entity Types
1-6 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
About Entities and Entity Types
Understanding entities is fundamental to understanding how you use UIM. UIM
entities represent logical and physical items that are inventoried, such as networks,
logical devices, telephone numbers, and services. They also represent items that are
used for categorizing, grouping, or managing other entities. Examples of these kinds
of entities include reservations, business interactions, and inventory groups.
UIM includes a number of different entity types that correspond to the various
categories of items in your inventory and how you manage them. For example, there is
a Network entity type, a Logical Device entity type, a Service entity type, and so on.
An individual entity is an occurrence or instance of an entity type, such as a specific
network, logical device, or service.
Entities are usually based on specifications that define their basic structure. There are
different specification types corresponding to the entity types. See "About
Specifications, Data Elements, and Characteristics" for more information.
See "About the UIM Information Model" for more information about the different
kinds of entities available in UIM.
About the UIM Information Model
This section explains the fundamentals of the information model that UIM uses to
represent your inventory and business practices. The UIM information model is an
extension of the Oracle Communications Information Model. The Oracle
Communications Information Model is based on industry standards, such as the
Shared Information/Data (SID) model and OSS through Java (OSS/J) developed by
the Telemanagement Forum. Oracle is an active participant in the development and
evolution of these standards.
Adherence to industry standards makes it possible for UIM to model inventories and
business practices without regard to the specifics of the telecommunications
environment, its services, or its resources. The use of industry standards also promotes
more efficient software development, deployment, and integration.
For more information about the Telemanagement Forum and its standards, see their
Web site:
http://www.tmforum.org
For specific, technical details, about the Oracle Communications Information Model
and the UIM information model, see Oracle Communications Information Model Reference
and UIM Information Model Reference.
Logical Device Account Management Logical Device Account
Network Design and Modeling Network, Network Node, Network Edge, Network Configuration,
Custom Network Addresses
NSO Management Enables the lifecycle management of Network Services and Virtual
Network Functions (VNFs) running on a virtualized network
infrastructure. Includes the ability to allocate resources to those
Network Services and VNFs.
Table 1–1 (Cont.) UIM Functional Modules
Functional Module Entity Types
About the UIM Information Model
About Unified Inventory Management 1-7
Figure 1–3 provides a simplified view of the Information Model and what it contains.
Some elements are omitted for clarity. See the following sections for information about
each of the categories in the model.
Figure 1–3 UIM Information Model
Understanding Products and Services
Products are entities that represent the items that your business sells. For example, you
might sell wireless phones or online movies.
Because UIM is primarily concerned with inventory, it emphasizes services. Product
entities are included in UIM for backward compatibility with customized solutions
that require mapping services to corresponding products. The UIM navigation section
does not include a Product link unless the user is authorized to access the Product
Search page. Access is turned off by default. See UIM System Administrators Guide for
information about authorizing user access.
Service entities represent the ways that products are delivered to your customers. For
example, if you sell a wireless telephony product, the customer receives a wireless
service that you provision.
See "Services" for more information.
About the UIM Information Model
1-8 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Understanding Resources
Resources are entities that enable the delivery of services. Broadly speaking, they are
the entities that constitute your inventory. They can be physical objects, such as
network cards or fiber-optic cables. They can also be logical resources, such as service
trails or network addresses.
You often assign resources to service configurations to specify how a service is realized
in your network. For example, if you configure a VoIP service for a customer, you need
to assign resources such as an IP phone, a telephone number, an IP address, a voice
mail account, and a VoIP user account.
Table 12 lists the UIM resource entity types and provides links to the sections where
they are discussed in greater detail.
Table 1–2 UIM Resource Entities
Entity Type For More Information
Connectivity About Connectivity
Custom Network Address About Custom Network Addresses
Custom Object Custom Objects
Device Interface Understanding Device Interfaces and
Sub-Interfaces
Equipment Understanding Equipment Modeling
Equipment Holder Configuring Equipment Holder
Specifications
Flow Identifier About Flow Identifiers
IPv6
IPv4
IP Address Management
Logical Device and Logical Device
Configuration
Understanding Logical Devices
Logical Device Account Understanding Logical Device Accounts
Media Stream About Media Streams
Network and Network Configuration Understanding Networks
Network Edge Understanding Network Nodes
Network Node Understanding Network Edges
Physical Connector Adding Ports and Connectors
Physical Device Understanding Physical Resources
Physical Port Adding Ports and Connectors
Pipe and Pipe Configuration Understanding Pipes
Pipe Termination Point Configuring and Implementing Pipe
Termination
Signal Termination Point Understanding Signal Structures
Telephone Number Telephone Numbers
About the UIM Information Model
About Unified Inventory Management 1-9
Understanding Common Business Entities
Common business entities do not represent items in your inventory. Rather, they
represent relationships between or aspects of those items. They are, nevertheless,
entities that have specifications that you define in Design Studio.
Table 13 lists the UIM common business entities and provides links to the sections
where they are discussed in greater detail.
Understanding Common Patterns
Core functionality that applies throughout UIM is enabled by common patterns. In
some cases, entities are associated with these patterns. For example, there are several
entities that you use to define and manage capacity.
These are the UIM common patterns:
Capacity management. You can track bandwidth consumption and requirements
in your network. See "Capacity" for more information.
Consumption, including the ability to consume, assign, and refer to resources. You
can also reserve resources to ensure that they are available when needed and
apply conditions that limit access to them. See "Consumption" for more
information.
Topology. UIM manages the geographical and logical topology of your network.
The application provides graphical tools and maps for visualizing and managing
the topology. See "Topology" for more information.
Life-cycle management. UIM entities transition through life cycles that indicate
their status in the inventory. Some transitions are manual; others occur
automatically. See "Life Cycles and Statuses" for more information.
Configuration. Some entities can be associated with configurations, making it
possible to maintain versionable collections of information about how the entity is
designed and realized. See "Configurations" for more information.
Involvement. You can define custom involvements to associate entities that are not
associated in other ways. See "Involvements" for more information.
Table 1–3 UIM Common Business Entity Types
Entity Type For More Information
Business Interaction Business Interactions
Engineering Work Orders
Custom Object Custom Objects
Inventory Group Inventory Groups
Network Domain Network Address Domains
Party About Parties
Place, Place Configuration Places
Property Location Property Locations
Role About Roles
About the UIM Information Model
1-10 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Understanding UIM Definitions
In Design Studio, you define artifacts that you use to model and manage your
inventory. Design Studio artifacts include specifications, data elements, characteristics,
and rulesets, among others.
About Specifications, Data Elements, and Characteristics
A specification is a blueprint that determines the information that you store about a
particular group of entities within an entity type. For example, you can define Logical
Device specifications for Cisco 2811 routers and Juniper M7i routers.
Data elements in specifications define the items of information you store about
entities. All specifications for a particular entity type share a default set of data
elements, but each individual specification can include custom data elements
appropriate to that group of entities. These custom data elements are called
characteristics. For example, all Logical Device specifications include a default set of
data elements, but each particular Logical Device specification can include unique
characteristics.
Characteristics can be shared by any number of specifications. For example, if you
define a Postal Code characteristic, you can reuse it in any number of Address
specifications (or any other specifications where it might be appropriate).
Characteristics can even be shared with other Oracle Communications applications to
ensure data uniformity.
You define specifications and characteristics in Design Studio. After you have defined
specifications and characteristics in Design Studio, you deploy them into UIM, where
you use them to create entities. You can also view specifications and characteristics in
UIM in read-only mode.
In UIM, you create entities based on the specifications defined in Design Studio. For
example, if you have a Cisco 2811 specification, you can create an entity based on the
specification for each router of that model in your inventory. Each entity includes
unique information, such as name, ID, serial number, location, configuration details,
and so on.
Figure 1–4 shows a simple example of the relationship between the entity type,
specifications based on the type, and entities created from the specifications.
In this example, the entity type is Place. There are several subtypes of Place entities,
including Address, as in this case. Three different specifications have been defined for
three different countries. Each specification is somewhat different, reflecting different
postal conventions. But several characteristics (Address1, Address2, City, and so on)
are shared among all three. Multiple entities have been created from each specification
for places in the three countries.
Note: A default data element from one specification can be reused in
a specification that does not include it by default. In this case, the data
element is tagged as a characteristic and becomes visible in UIM.
Default data elements are visible only as part of specifications in UIM.
Note: You can create entities of some types without using
specifications. Using specifications is more common, however, and is
also a good business practice because it ensures uniformity among
entities.
About Cartridges
About Unified Inventory Management 1-11
Figure 1–4 Specifications and Entities
About Rulesets
You use rulesets to modify or extend UIM functionality dynamically. Rules e ts d ef i ne
one or more business rules that are executed at a particular point, such as when a page
opens or an action is taken. For example, you can use rulesets to validate that entities
have been configured correctly or to format data appropriately for your business. You
could also write a ruleset to automatically configure a service upon creation. You can
define rulesets that apply globally or that are unique to a particular specification. See
UIM Developers Guide for more information.
UIM includes default rulesets that you can modify, but you can also define your own.
You use Design Studio to define rulesets and to associate them with the extension
points that determine when they are executed. See "Design Studio Overview" and UIM
Developers Guide for more information about rulesets and Design Studio.
About Cartridges
You can extend UIM functionality dynamically without rebuilding the application.
You do so by deploying cartridges into the application. A cartridge is a collection of
entity specifications, characteristics, rulesets, and code that is defined in an Oracle
Communications Design Studio project. The Design Studio project is compiled into a
deployable JAR file known as a cartridge. Cartridges can be bundled together into
cartridge packs that can be deployed in a single operation.
About Cartridges
1-12 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
When you deploy a cartridge into UIM, the data it contains becomes available in the
application. For example, if you deploy a cartridge that includes several different types
of logical device specifications, those specifications become available for creating
logical device entities in UIM.
You can also create your own custom cartridges in Design Studio. For example, you
can create custom specifications and rulesets that are specific to your business and
technology, and then deploy them to UIM.
Oracle also supplies various kinds of cartridges that extend UIM:
Base cartridges: Base cartridges provide fundamental capabilities and features
required by other cartridges. For example, there is a base cartridge that defines
measurements such as bandwidth.
Required cartridges: Some cartridges are required to be open in the Design Studio
workplace when you develop content for UIM.
Samples: Oracle provides various kinds of sample cartridges and cartridge packs.
You use these samples as a starting point for your own development, testing, and
experimentation.
Some Oracle sample cartridge packs provide extensive support for particular
technology domains. For example, the Carrier Ethernet cartridge (OracleComms_
UIM_CarrierEthernet) provides specifications and rulesets that enable you to
model Carrier Ethernet services. Other samples address channelized connectivity,
DSL, GSM, and Cable TV.
The names of all Oracle-supplied cartridges begin with ora_uim or OracleComms.
Many cartridges, including those supplied by Oracle, have accompanying ZIP archive
files containing the Design Studio project data used to compile the cartridge. You can
import the ZIP files into Design Studio to open the corresponding project for review or
extension.
See UIM Cartridge Guide for information about obtaining and using sample cartridges
and cartridge packs.
2
UIM User Interface Overview 2-1
2
UIM User Interface Overview
This chapter provides an overview of the Oracle Communications Unified Inventory
Management (UIM) user interface. For complete information about the user interface
and the tasks you can complete with it, see the UIM Help.
Opening the UIM User Interface
To open the UIM user interface, you need to obtain the following from a system
administrator:
User ID
Password
The UIM URL, including the server and port
Your user ID will be associated with access permissions that determine which parts of
the application you can see and which actions you can take. All of the pages and
actions described in this guide may not be available to you.
To open UIM:
1. In a supported browser, go to the URL supplied by the system administrator. The
URL is similar to the following:
https://ServerName:Port/inventory
2. Enter your user ID and password.
The UIM main window appears.
The UIM Main Window
When you open UIM, you see the main window, which has a navigation section on the
left that you use for navigation and an area to the right that is populated with pages
when you click links in the navigation section. The main window also includes menus
and a toolbar.
Figure 2–1 shows the main window with a Logical Device Summary page displayed.
The UIM Main Window
2-2 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 2–1 UIM Main Window
Navigation Section
The left side of the main window is called the navigation section. It displays a list of
links that enable you to find entities and other information in UIM. These links are
divided into the following groups:
The Tasks group contains links to projects, engineering work orders, and business
interactions.
The Services group contains links to service entities.
The Inventory group is divided into sub-groups:
The Resources sub-group contains links that enable you to search for resource
entities, such as connectivities, logical devices, telephone numbers, IP
addresses, networks, and more.
The Infrastructure sub-group contains links to property locations, custom
objects, inventory groups, parties, and places.
The Administration group contains for administrative functions such as
rebuilding topology and executing rule sets. It also contains links that enable you
to search for rulesets, sequence specifications, characteristics, and entity
specifications.
To make more room in the main window, you can adjust the size of the navigation
section sliding its border with the main window.
Pages
When you click on a link in the navigation section, the right side of the main window
is displays a page. In most cases, the pages that you open directly from the navigation
The UIM Main Window
UIM User Interface Overview 2-3
section enable you to search for entities. In other cases, clicking a link opens a page for
completing a task, such as importing inventory.
Figure 2–2 shows the Logical Device page, which you open by clicking the Logical
Device link in the Resources group. You use this page to search for logical devices. You
enter search criteria in the Search section in the upper part of the page and see the
results in the Search Results section in the lower part. See the UIM Help for more
information about searching.
Figure 2–2 Logical Device Page
Other kinds of pages appear as you work with entities in UIM. For example, if you
search for a particular logical device and then open it, you see its Summary page.
Figure 2–3 shows a Logical Device Summary page.
The UIM Main Window
2-4 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 2–3 Logical Device Summary Page
Additional pages enable you to perform other tasks. For example, you use the Logical
Device Information page to edit the identifying information about logical devices.
Pages are often divided into sections that contain specific kinds of information. For
example, in the Logical Device Summary page shown in Figure 2–3, there are Logical
Device Information, Logical Device Hierarchy, and Parent Logical Device sections,
among others.
You can save space in a page by collapsing a section. Click the triangle icon in the
upper left corner of the section’s title bar to collapse it. Click the icon again to expand
the section.
Working with Tables
Much of the information shown in pages is displayed in tables. These tables all have
the same basic functionality, although not all features are available in all tables.
You can choose which columns are displayed and the order in which they appear. You
can also filter and sort table contents so that only the most relevant information is
displayed. When there are more rows of data than can be displayed in a section, you
can scroll the table to see the additional rows.
See the UIM Help for detailed instructions about working with tables.
Using the UIM Help
UIM User Interface Overview 2-5
Menus
The toolbar above the navigation section and pages includes several different menus
Recent Items. Lists the 10 most recently used pages.
Favorites. Displays pages that you have designated as favorites. See the UIM Help
for complete instructions.
Help. Select from three different commands:
Link to Page. Displays the URL of the current UIM page. You can copy the
URL.
Help Portal. Opens the UIM Help.
UIM includes a Help system that you can access while using the application.
See "Using the UIM Help" for more information.
– About. Displays the release number of the application and its copyright
statement.
Using the UIM Help
UIM includes a Help system that you use to get step-by-step instructions. You can find
the information you need by searching or by navigating through the table of contents.
This section includes information about opening the Help system and finding
information. See the Help system contents for detailed information about all of its
features.
To open Help:
From the Help menu, select Help Portal.
The Help Portal window appears.
To open Help for the current page:
Click the question-mark icon in the title bar of a page.
The Help Portal window appears, displaying a reference topic for the current
page.
To browse for information:
1. In the navigation area on the left of the Help Portal window, click Contents.
An expanding table of contents appears in the navigation area.
2. Do one of the following:
Click a heading in the table of contents to display the introductory topic about
the corresponding section in the reading area.
Click the triangle next to a heading to expand it to show subheadings and
topics.
To search for information:
1. In the navigation area on the left of the Help Portal window, click Search.
A search area appears in the navigation area.
2. Enter a word or phrase to search for.
3. Select search options:
Using the UIM Help
2-6 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
To search for an entire phrase, select All words.
To search for any of the words you entered, select Any words.
To include Boolean expressions such as AND or OR, select Boolean
expression.
To match the capitalization of your search terms, select Case Sensitive.
4. Click Search.
Results are displayed below the search area. The total number matches appears
above the list of matching topics, which are ordered by the number of matches
they contain.
3
Design Studio Overview 3-1
3
Design Studio Overview
This chapter provides introductory information about how Oracle Communications
Design Studio is used with Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management
(UIM).
Design Studio is a separately licensed product that you install independently of UIM.
For detailed information on how to install Design Studio, see Design Studio Installation
Guide.
About Design Studio
Design Studio is an Eclipse-based development environment that supports several
Oracle Communications applications in addition to UIM. For UIM development, you
must install the Design Studio Platform, Design Studio Domain Modeling, and Design
Studio for Inventory plug-ins.
You use Design Studio to define artifacts such as specifications and rulesets that you
later deploy into UIM. You can define the following kinds of artifacts in Design Studio:
Entity specifications
Data elements tagged as characteristics
Units of measure and measurement types
Capacity provided, capacity required, and capacity type specifications
Entity identification specifications
Rulesets
Extension points and enabled extension points
Ruleset extension points and global ruleset extension points
Sequence specifications
See the Design Studio Help for detailed information about how you work with each of
these types of artifacts.
About Projects and Cartridges
In Design Studio, you create projects to contain the artifacts that you define. Each
project corresponds to a collection of files and folders where data is stored. When a
project is complete, you use Design Studio to build a cartridge that you deploy into
UIM.
Understanding the Design Studio Workbench
3-2 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
See the Design Studio Help for information about deploying cartridges interactively
from Design Studio. See the Design Studio Developer's Guide for information about
automating cartridge deployment using the Design Studio Cartridge Management
Tool (CMT). See the UIM Cartridge Guide for more information about the Cartridge
Deployer Tool (CDT).
You can also use Design Studio to open, view, and deploy content supplied by Oracle.
For example, you can open the cartridges in an Oracle sample cartridge pack, add
cartridges required for your business, and then deploy the cartridges into UIM.
See UIM Cartridge Guide for information about upgrading and extending cartridges.
Understanding the Design Studio Workbench
The Design Studio Workbench is the environment you use to develop and maintain
specifications, rulesets, and other artifacts. The contents of the Workbench depend on
the perspective that is currently displayed.
Perspectives are arrangements of content optimized for particular purposes. Design
Studio includes several predefined perspectives. The two most commonly used
perspectives are:
The Studio Design perspective, which provides tools for designing and
maintaining specifications and other artifacts.
The Studio Environment perspective, which includes views for working with and
deploying cartridges.
When you start Design Studio the first time, the Workbench displays a default
perspective. After that, Design Studio starts up in the last perspective used.
About Views
The tools in the Workbench are smaller, window-like areas called views. Each
perspective has a different set of views and each view is designed for a particular
purpose.
For example, the Studio Design perspective includes the following views:
Projects: This view shows the project contents grouped alphabetically by
specification type.
Note: You must install two required projects in Design Studio before
you can create UIM projects and deploy them as cartridges. The
following two projects must be open in your workspace:
ora_uim_model is a read-only project that represents the UIM
model. It supports the ability to define specifications and
characteristics and is also used to validate which entity types can
be assigned or referenced by configuration items.
ora_uim_mds is a read-only project that represents the fields that
can be displayed in UIM entities. This project makes it possible to
define the layout of fields in entities.
See UIM Installation Guide and Design Studio Help for more
information about importing these projects.
Understanding the Design Studio Workbench
Design Studio Overview 3-3
Relation: This view shows parent and child relationships for the selected
specification.
Relation Graph: This view shows a graphical view of a specification’s
relationships.
Data Element: This view shows all the entities in the project that include data
elements.
Problems: This view displays information about problems in the cartridge, such as
build errors.
The Studio Design perspective also includes editors, windows in which you do the
actual work of designing and modifying specifications and other artifacts. When you
make a selection in the Studio Projects view or Dictionary view, an editor for the
selected artifact opens. See "About Editors" for more information about editors.
Figure 3–1 displays the Workbench with the Studio Design perspective. In this
window, the Studio Projects, Package Explorer, and Solution views are open with the
Studio Projects view activated. A Logical Device specification is selected in the Studio
Projects view, making the corresponding Logical Device Specification editor active.
Figure 3–1 Studio Design Perspective
Designing Entity Specifications
3-4 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
See “Workbench User Guide” in Eclipse Help for additional information about views
and editors.
About Editors
Editors are the tools you use to design specifications and other artifacts in Design
Studio. Each editor is tailored for a particular type of artifact. Editors are opened based
on selections you make in views. Although multiple editors can be open
simultaneously, only one is active at a time.
Editors are divided into tabs arranged across the bottom. Some tabs appear in most
editors, but others pertain only to a few.
The editors for the various types of entity specifications vary based on the nature of
the entity, but many contain the following tabs:
Specification Properties: Defines basic information about the specification, such
as whether the IDs of entities defined by the specification are generated
automatically or manually. See "Entity Identification" for more information about
IDs.
Characteristics: Defines characteristics associated with the specification. Using
characteristics enables you to store information in addition to the default data
elements for the entity. For example, you can add characteristics to store
vendor-specific information about Equipment entities. See "Characteristic Labels"
for more information.
Related Specifications: Enables you to define relationships between
specifications. See "Understanding Specification Relationships" for more
information about relating specifications.
Configuration Spec Usage: Enables you to indicate that an entity based on this
specification can be consumed or referenced in the configuration specifications
listed in the tab.
Rules: Associates entity specifications with rulesets that customize UIM behavior.
For detailed information and procedures about using extension points and
rulesets, see UIM Developers Guide.
Layouts: Defines how entities based on the specification appear in UIM.
Media: Defines media files (such as JPG or GIF files) that can be associated with a
specification for display in UIM.
There are additional tabs used with some specifications. In this guide, those tabs are
explained when they are used with a particular specification type.
Designing Entity Specifications
Much of the work you do in Design Studio will likely be designing entity
specifications. The entity specifications you design in Design Studio are blueprints for
the entities you create in UIM to model your inventory.
Understanding Specification Relationships
One of the most important parts of designing a specification is defining relationships
to other specifications. For example, if you design a Logical Device specification, you
can build in a relationship to a Device Interface specification that ensures that a
particular number of interfaces are created automatically when you create a logical
device in UIM.
Designing Entity Specifications
Design Studio Overview 3-5
Related specifications frequently result in provides and constrains relationships among
entities in UIM. For example, when you relate a Logical Device specification to a
Device Interface specification, you establish a provides relationship in UIM between
Logical Device entities based on the specification and Device Interface entities based
on the related specification. If you design a Logical Device specification for an ATM
switch and relate it to an OC-12 Device Interface specification, when you create an
ATM switch entity in UIM, OC-12 device interface entities are created automatically.
The number of device interfaces created depends on a minimum value that you set for
the relationship in the Logical Device specification. A maximum value for the
relationship limits the number of child entities that can be added.
You can customize UIM by using extension points and rulesets so that the
relationships not recognized by default in UIM are meaningful. For example, you can
add rulesets that automatically create child entities based on a related specification
when an entity is created based on a parent specification. See UIM Developers Guide for
more information.
A constrains relationship results from relating a Network Node specification to a
Logical Device specification. This relationship limits the types of entities that a
network node can represent in UIM. For example, if you design a Network Node
specification that includes a relationship to a DSLAM Logical Device specification, you
can associate network node entities based on the specification only to entities based on
the DSLAM specification.
You establish most relationships in Design Studio from a specification editor’s Related
Specs tab. Certain types of relationships are handled on different tabs, however. For
entities that can have configurations, for example, you define entity-to-configuration
relationships on the Configurations tab.
Table 31 shows the specification relationships in Design Studio that are supported by
default in UIM.
Note: Design Studio enables you to define relationships from any
specification to any other specification, but only a limited number of
these relationships are recognized by default in UIM. The nature and
results of recognized relationships vary depending on the
specifications involved. See Table 3–1 for more information.
Designing Entity Specifications
3-6 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Table 3–1 Specification Relationships
Specification
Related
Specifications Usage Minimum and Maximum
Device Interface Device
Interface
UIM creates the sub-interfaces
provided by a new device
interface entity based on these
relationships.
The minimum value on the
relationship determines the number of
device interface entities that UIM
creates and is the minimum number
that must be maintained on the device.
The maximum value constrains the
number of device interface entities that
can be subsequently created.
Equipment Equipment
Holder
Physical Port
Physical
Connector
UIM creates the equipment
holders, physical ports, and
physical connectors provided by
a new equipment entity based
on these relationships.
The minimum value determines the
number of equipment holder, physical
port, and physical connector entities
that UIM creates and it constrains the
user from deleting the physical ports
and physical connectors after the
equipment is created.
The maximum value is not used for
equipment holder because the number
of holders is set by the specification
and cannot be changed after an entity
has been created.
The maximum value is used for ports
and connectors and constrains the
number of ports and connectors
entities that can be subsequently
created.
Inventory Group Inventory
Group
UIM constrains the types of
inventory groups that can be
related as parent and child
inventory groups.
Not applicable.
Custom Network
Address
Custom Object
Equipment
Logical Device
Logical Device
Account
Party
Physical Device
Pipe
Pipe Termination
Point
Product
Service
Telephone
Number
Inventory
Group
UIM constrains the entity to
participate only in inventory
groups created from the related
inventory group specifications.
Not applicable.
Designing Entity Specifications
Design Studio Overview 3-7
Logical Device Device
Interface
UIM creates the device
interfaces provided by a new
logical device entity based on
these relationships.
The minimum value on the
relationship determines the number of
device interface entities that UIM
creates and is the minimum number
that must be maintained on the logical
device. The maximum value constrains
the number of device interfaces that
can be subsequently created.
Logical Device Logical Device
Configuration
UIM constrains the type of
logical device configuration that
can be created for a logical
device.
Not applicable.
Network Network Node
Network Edge
UIM constrains the types of
network nodes and network
edges that can be included in a
network.
Not applicable.
Network Network
Configurations
UIM constrains the type of
network configuration that can
be created for a network.
Not applicable.
Network Edge Pipe
Custom Object
UIM constrains the types of
pipes and custom objects that
can be represented by a network
edge.
Not applicable.
Network Node Custom
Network
Address
Custom Object
Device
Interface
Equipment
Logical Device
Network
Physical Device
Physical Port
UIM constrains the types of
entities that can be represented
by a network node. Party and
Place associations to Network
Node are not currently
constrained by specification
relationships.
Not applicable.
Physical Device Physical Port
Physical
Connector
UIM creates the physical ports
and connectors provided by a
new physical device entity based
on these relationships.
The minimum value on the
relationship determines the number of
port or connector entities that UIM
creates and is the minimum number
that must be maintained on the device.
The maximum value constrains the
number of port and connector entities
that can be subsequently created.
Table 3–1 (Cont.) Specification Relationships
Specification
Related
Specifications Usage Minimum and Maximum
Designing Entity Specifications
3-8 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Pipe Pipe
Pipe
Termination
Point
UIM creates child pipes (cable
pairs) or pipe termination points
provided by a new pipe entity
based on this relationship. See
UIM Information Model Reference
for more detailed information
about relating pipe
specifications to pipe
termination point specifications.
The minimum value on the
relationship determines the number of
child pipe entities that UIM
automatically creates and is the
minimum number that must be
maintained on the pipe. The maximum
value constrains the number of child
pipe entities that can be subsequently
created.
Two pipe termination points are
created for all pipe entities; however, if
a pipe termination point specification
is associated with a pipe, the pipe
creates a pipe termination point using
the related pipe termination point
specification.
Pipe Capacity
Provided
UIM creates a capacity provided
for the pipe based on this
relationship when there is not a
signal termination point
specification related to the pipe.
If a signal termination point
specification is associated with
the pipe specification, the
capacity provided is created
based on the capacity provided
specification on the signal
termination point specifications.
Not applicable.
Pipe Capacity
Required
UIM creates a capacity required
for the pipe based on this
relationship.
Not applicable.
Pipe Signal
Termination
Point
UIM creates a signal structure
for the pipe based on this
relationship.
Not applicable.
Pipe Pipe
Configurations
UIM constrains the type of pipe
configuration that can be created
for a pipe.
Not applicable.
Place Place
Configurations
UIM constrains the type of place
configuration that can be created
for a geographic site.
Not applicable.
Product Product
Service
UIM constrains the types of
products and services than can
be added to a product in the
product hierarchy.
UIM validates the minimum and
maximum values in the relationship
against the minimum and maximum
child products and services in the
product hierarchy.
Table 3–1 (Cont.) Specification Relationships
Specification
Related
Specifications Usage Minimum and Maximum
Working with Characteristics
Design Studio Overview 3-9
Extending Specifications with Rulesets
You can use rulesets, extension points, and ruleset extension points to customize how
UIM performs actions related to entities based on a specification.
An extension point defines when the customized behavior takes place, such as
immediately after an entity based on the specification takes place or when the
Validate command is selected from the Actions menu.
A ruleset defines what happens at the extension point. For example, you can write
code that automatically creates additional entities or that validates that the entity
is configured properly.
A ruleset extension point brings together a ruleset and an extension point into a
unit that you add to the Rules tab of an entity specification.
For detailed information and procedures about extending specifications, see UIM
Developers Guide.
Working with Characteristics
Characteristics provide a means of storing specific items of information about an entity
that are not present by default. For example, if you define a specification for a
particular type of equipment, you can add characteristics that describe vendor-specific
features of the equipment. When you create entities in UIM based on a specification
that includes characteristics, those characteristics appear automatically in the entities.
From the point of view of Design Studio, characteristics are data elements. You tag
these data elements as characteristics, which makes them available for use in entity
specifications. See the Design Studio Help for more information about data elements.
In Design Studio, characteristics are displayed on the Characteristics tab of
specification editors and are also included in the list of data elements visible in the
Data Schema editor.
In UIM, characteristics appear as fields in which users enter or select information.
Users can expand UIM search parameters to include characteristics in addition to
default data elements.
Service Service
Configurations
UIM constrains the type of
service configuration that can be
created for a service
Not applicable.
Signal Termination
Point
Capacity
Provided
UIM creates a capacity provided
for the signal structure based on
this relationship.
Not applicable.
Signal Termination
Point
Signal
Termination
Point
UIM creates child signal
termination points in a signal
structure based on this
relationship.
The minimum value dictates the
number of provided connection
termination points to be created when
the parent trail termination point or
connection termination point is
created.The maximum value is not
used.UIM does not support creating or
deleting connection termination points
after the signal structure has been
created.
Table 3–1 (Cont.) Specification Relationships
Specification
Related
Specifications Usage Minimum and Maximum
Design Studio Specification Example
3-10 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
There are four types of characteristics, each of which has specific options that define or
limit the information stored in the characteristic:
Text fields store alphanumeric characters. You can define what types of characters
can be stored, their format, default values, valid values, and other properties of the
field.
Check boxes determine whether a characteristic is true or false for the entity.
Calendar fields enable users to enter or select dates. The properties you specify for
the characteristic define a range of valid dates and a default date.
List fields display a range of values to select from. In Design Studio, you can
define and sort the possible values for the list in several different ways. See the
Design Studio Help for more information.
Characteristic Labels
Characteristics must have unique names, but they can share the labels displayed for
them in UIM.
For example, you might want all addresses to include a Postal Code field. Because of
differences among national standards for postal codes, however, you may need to
develop specifications for several different countries. A US postal code characteristic
might be numeric with a maximum of nine digits, and a Canadian postal code
characteristic might be alphanumeric with a maximum of six characters. You can
define a unique characteristic for each country’s postal code but have them both
display as Postal Code in UIM.
Design Studio Specification Example
This section outlines the definition of an entity specification. In this example, a Logical
Device specification is defined for an ATM switch that can provide OC-3 and OC-12
device interfaces. For step-by-step instructions for the tasks in the example, see the
Design Studio Help.
You begin by selecting the type of specification you want to define, in this case, a
Logical Device specification.
In the Logical Device specification editor that opens, you use the Specification
Properties tab to enter basic identifying information, including the display name and
validity dates. Figure 3–2 shows the Specification Properties tab. In this case, default
values are being used for most options.
Design Studio Specification Example
Design Studio Overview 3-11
Figure 3–2 Entering Basic Identifying Information
Logical Device specification editors include a tab in which you can enter a vendor,
model, or part number that pertains to the logical device you are modeling. Figure 3–3
shows the Properties tab for a Logical Device specification. Not all specification types
have a Properties tab, and property data elements vary by entity type.
Figure 3–3 Setting Logical Device Properties
You can add characteristics to an entity specification to store data not supplied by
default by the specification type. You can either select from already existing
characteristics or them in the process of adding them. Figure 3–4 shows two
characteristics added to the Characteristics tab of a Logical Device specification.
Design Studio Specification Example
3-12 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Information about the selected characteristic is displayed in the editor on the right of
the tab.
Figure 3–4 Adding Characteristics
Figure 3–5 illustrates relationships between the Logical Device specification and two
Device Interface specifications.
Figure 3–5 Relating Specifications
Deploying Cartridges into UIM
Design Studio Overview 3-13
In UIM, these relationships mean that when a logical device is created based on this
specification, device interfaces are created automatically based on the minimum values
defined in the specification. Users can add OC-3 and OC-12 device interfaces up to the
maximum values established in the specification.
Figure 3–6 shows the relationship properties of the OC-3 device interface. The
minimum value means that one OC-3 will be created automatically when a logical
device entity is created based on this specification. The maximum values means that
users can create an additional 127 interfaces for a total of 128.
Figure 3–6 Setting Relationship Properties
Deploying Cartridges into UIM
After you have created a UIM project that includes specifications, rulesets, and other
artifacts, you deploy it into UIM. You can deploy cartridges and cartridge packs into
UIM using the following methods:
From Design Studio. You can deploy cartridges and cartridge packs interactively
from Design Studio to test environments. Design Studio enables you to manage
cartridges in the test environment consistently, manage common test environment
connection parameters across the design team, and compare cartridge version and
build numbers in the development environment with those of the cartridges
deployed in the test environment. See the Design Studio Help for more
information.
By using the Design Studio Cartridge Management Tool (CMT). The CMT enables
you to automate cartridge deployment. You can use the CMT to deploy cartridges
into both test and production UIM environments. You can also use it to deploy
cartridges into cluster environments. See the Design Studio Developer's Guide for
more information about the CMT.
By using the UIM Cartridge Deployer Tool (CDT). The UIM CDT is a GUI-based
tool that enables you to deploy to UIM run-time environments. The Oracle
Universal Installer installs the CDT as part of the UIM installation process. You can
use the CDT to deploy cartridges into both test and production UIM
Deploying Cartridges into UIM
3-14 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
environments. You can also use it to deploy cartridges into cluster environments.
See the UIM Cartridge Guide for more information.
4
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-1
4
Life Cycles and Statuses
This chapter describes the life cycles and statuses associated with several types of
entities in Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management (UIM). The life
cycles and statuses listed in this chapter are the defaults. You can extend life cycles and
statuses and associate life cycles with other types of entities, based on your business
processes. For information on how to extend life cycles, see UIM Developers Guide.
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses
Resources are managed over their entire life cycle (past, present, and future). Just as
resource inventory is managed over time, the consumption of each resource is also
tracked over time.
Whether a resource is available depends on the time frame referenced. A resource is
available for assignment or reassignment when:
Its life cycle begins before the resource is consumed
Its life-cycle state in the inventory allows it to be consumed
No consumption entity exists during the time interval
Resource Inventory Statuses
The inventory status indicates the stage in the life cycle for the following types of
inventoried resources:
Connectivities
Custom network addresses
Custom objects
Device interfaces
Equipment
Equipment holders
IP subnets
IP addresses
Logical devices
Logical device accounts
Media streams
Networks
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses
4-2 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Network edges
Network nodes
Physical connectors
Physical devices
Physical ports
Pipes
Pipe termination points
Telephone numbers
Figure 4–1 shows the resource inventory life cycle when a business interaction or work
order is not used. See Figure 4–2, "Resource Inventory Life Cycle in a Business
Interaction or Work Order Context" for the resource inventory life cycle in the context
of a business interaction or work order.
Figure 4–1 Resource Inventory Life Cycle
Table 41 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–1 and the
resulting status changes.
Table 42 provides a definition and business context for each resource status.
Table 4–1 Resource Status Flow Outside a Business Interaction or Work Order Context
Label
Number Description Status
1 Create a resource. Installed
2 Deactivate a resource. Unavailable
3 Activate a resource. Installed
4 Delete an installed resource. N/A
5 Delete an unavailable resource. N/A
Table 4–2 Resource Status Definitions Outside a Business Interaction or Work Order
Context
Inventory Status Definition Business Context
Installed The resource is created. An installed resource is available
to support services and other
resources.
Unavailable The resource has been
deactivated.
The resource is deactivated and
unavailable to support services or
other resources.
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-3
Inventory Status for Resources in Business Interactions and Work Orders
Resources that are included in business interactions and work orders have a different
life cycle, illustrated in Figure 4–2. Pipes and connectivities have a somewhat different
life cycle from other resources. See "Inventory Status for Pipes and Connectivities in
Business Interactions and Work Orders".
Figure 4–2 Resource Inventory Life Cycle in a Business Interaction or Work Order Context
Table 43 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–2 and the
resulting status changes.
Disconnected (Connectivity and Pipe entities
only.) The resource has been
disconnected.
The resource has been
disconnected. All resources
assigned to the entity have been
released (unassigned).
Table 4–3 Resource Status Flow in a Business Interaction or Work Order Context
Label
Number Description Status
1 Create a resource in a business
interaction.
Pending Install (business interaction
context)
2 Complete business interaction to
create a resource.
Installed (Current)
3 Cancel business interaction to
create a resource.
Pending Install (business interaction
context)
Table 4–2 (Cont.) Resource Status Definitions Outside a Business Interaction or Work
Order Context
Inventory Status Definition Business Context
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses
4-4 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Table 44 provides a definition and business context for each resource status.
4 Deactivate a resource in a
business interaction.
Pending Unavailable (business interaction
context)
5 Complete business interaction to
deactivate a resource.
Unavailable (Current)
6 Activate a resource in a business
interaction.
Pending Available (business interaction
context)
7 Complete business interaction to
activate a resource.
Installed (Current)
8 Delete an installed resource in a
business interaction.
Pending Remove (business interaction
context)
9 Delete an unavailable resource in
a business interaction.
Pending Remove (business interaction
context)
10 Complete business interaction to
delete a resource.
End of Life (Current)
Table 4–4 Resource Status Definitions for Business Interaction and Engineering work
order Contexts
Inventory Status Definition Business Context
Pending Install The resource is created in a
business interaction or work
order that is not yet completed.
A resource created in a business
interaction or work order can be
acted on as an installed resource
while the user is working in that
context. The resource is not
visible outside that context until
the business interaction or work
order is completed.
Installed The resource is created in a
business interaction or work
order that has been completed.
An installed resource is available
to support services or other
resources.
Pending Unavailable The resource has been
deactivated in a business
interaction or work order that is
not completed.
The resource is installed and
available to support services or
other resources outside the
business interaction or work
order context. In that context,
however, the resource is
deactivated and not available.
When the business interaction or
work order is completed, the
resource becomes unavailable in
current inventory.
Unavailable The resource has been
deactivated in a business
interaction or work order that has
been completed.
The resource is deactivated and
unavailable to support services or
other resources.
Table 4–3 (Cont.) Resource Status Flow in a Business Interaction or Work Order Context
Label
Number Description Status
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-5
Inventory Status for Pipes and Connectivities in Business Interactions and Work Orders
Pipes and Connectivities that are included in business interactions and work orders
have a different life cycle from that of other resources, as illustrated in Figure 4–3.
Rather than Pending Remove and End of Life statuses, pipes and connectivities have
Pending Disconnect and Disconnected.
You can disconnect a pipe or connectivity in a Business Interaction context if it is in
Installed state or in Unavailable state.
Disconnection is not allowed when a pipe or connectivity:
Has riders
Is associated to a service
Has an in-progress design version
Pending Remove The resource has been deleted in
a business interaction or work
order that has not been
completed.
The resource maintains its status
in current inventory; however, in
the business interaction or work
order context, the resource is not
available. When the business
interaction or work order is
completed, the resource status
changes to End of Life and the
resource is not available.
End of Life The resource has been deleted in
a business interaction or work
order that has been completed.
This status also applies to a
resource that was created in a
business interaction or work
order that was canceled.
The resource is effectively deleted
and is no longer visible or
available.
Table 4–4 (Cont.) Resource Status Definitions for Business Interaction and Engineering
work order Contexts
Inventory Status Definition Business Context
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses
4-6 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 4–3 Pipe and Connectivity Inventory Life Cycle in a Business Interaction or Work Order Context
Table 45 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–3 and the
resulting status changes.
Table 4–5 Pipe Or Connectivity Status Flow in a Business Interaction or Work Order
Context
Label
Number Description Status
1 Create a pipe or connectivity in a
business interaction.
Pending Install (business interaction
context)
2 Complete business interaction to
create a pipe or connectivity.
Installed (Current)
3 Cancel business interaction to
create a pipe or connectivity.
Pending Install (business interaction
context)
4 Deactivate a pipe or connectivity
in a business interaction.
Pending Unavailable (business interaction
context)
5 Complete business interaction to
deactivate a pipe or connectivity.
Unavailable (Current)
6 Activate a pipe or connectivity in
a business interaction.
Pending Available (business interaction
context)
7 Complete business interaction to
activate a pipe or connectivity.
Installed (Current)
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-7
Table 46 provides a definition and business context for each pipe or connectivity
status.
8 Disconnect an installed pipe or
connectivity in a business
interaction.
Pending Disconnect (business interaction
context.
For connectivities and versioned pipes
with design versions in Completed status,
a new version is created by copying the
existing version and setting resource
assignments to Pending Unassign.
If the connectivity or versioned pipe
design version is in In Progress, status,
disconnection is not allowed.
9 Disconnect an unavailable pipe or
connectivity in a business
interaction.
Pending Disconnect (business interaction
context)
For connectivities and versioned pipes
with design versions in Completed status,
a new version is created by copying the
existing version and setting resource
assignments to Pending Unassign.
If the connectivity or versioned pipe
design version is in In Progress, status,
disconnection is not allowed.
10 Complete business interaction to
disconnect a pipe or connectivity.
Disconnected (Current)
Table 4–6 Pipe Or Connectivity Status Definitions for Business Interaction and
Engineering work order Contexts
Inventory Status Definition Business Context
Pending Install The pipe or connectivity is
created in a business interaction
or work order that is not yet
completed.
A pipe or connectivity created in
a business interaction or work
order can be acted on as an
installed pipe or connectivity
while the user is working in that
context. The pipe or connectivity
is not visible outside that context
until the business interaction or
work order is completed.
Installed The pipe or connectivity is
created in a business interaction
or work order that has been
completed.
An installed pipe or connectivity
is available to support services or
other resources.
Table 4–5 (Cont.) Pipe Or Connectivity Status Flow in a Business Interaction or Work
Order Context
Label
Number Description Status
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses
4-8 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Resource Assignment Statuses
The resource assignment status indicates the stage in the life cycle of a specific
assignment of a resource to another entity. You can set up resources to be assigned to
multiple entities or set up an entity to allow multiple assignments. The resource
assignment status shown in Figure 4–4, "Resource Assignment Life Cycle" shows the
status for each specific assignment. Summary pages in UIM display only one resource
assignment status even though there can be multiple assignments. If any one of the
resource assignments has the status of assigned, the Summary page will show the
resource as assigned.
The configuration can be any of the following: service, place (geographic site), logical
device, network, pipe, or pipe termination point. The life cycle depicts whether the
resource is consumed by a service, pending consumption by a service, reserved for a
service, pending disconnect, disconnected, and so on. Figure 4–4 shows the resource
assignment statuses that represent the resource assignment life cycle. The status in the
dashed box is not seen in the UIM application.
Pending Unavailable The pipe or connectivity has been
deactivated in a business
interaction or work order that is
not completed.
The pipe or connectivity is
installed and available to support
services or other resources
outside the business interaction
or work order context. In that
context, however, the pipe or
connectivity is deactivated and
not available. When the business
interaction or work order is
completed, the pipe or
connectivity becomes unavailable
in current inventory.
Unavailable The pipe or connectivity has been
deactivated in a business
interaction or work order that has
been completed.
The pipe or connectivity is
deactivated and unavailable to
support services or other
resources.
Pending Disconnect The pipe or connectivity has been
disconnected in a business
interaction or work order that has
not been completed.
The pipe or connectivity
maintains its status in current
inventory; however, in the
business interaction or work
order context, the pipe or
connectivity is not available.
When the business interaction or
work order is completed, the pipe
or connectivity status changes to
Disconnected and the pipe or
connectivity is not available.
Disconnected The resource has been
disconnected in a business
interaction or work order that has
been completed. This status also
applies to a pipe or connectivity
that was created in a business
interaction or work order that
was canceled.
The pipe or connectivity is no
longer visible or available.
Table 4–6 (Cont.) Pipe Or Connectivity Status Definitions for Business Interaction and
Engineering work order Contexts
Inventory Status Definition Business Context
Resource Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-9
Figure 4–4 Resource Assignment Life Cycle
Table 47 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–4 and the
resulting status changes.
Table 48 provides a definition and business context for each resource assignment
status.
Table 4–7 Resource Assignment Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
1 Create resource Unassigned
2 Assign resource to configuration item. Pending Assign
3 Complete configuration to assign resource. Assigned
4 Unassign resource from a configuration
item.
This status shows as Assigned
when looking at the resource, but
shows Pending Unassign if the
resource is in the context of its
configuration
5 Complete configuration to unassign
resource.
Unassigned
6 Remove a pending assignment for a
resource on an in-progress, designed, or
issued configuration or cancel a
configuration with a pending assigned
resource.
Unassigned
7 Restore resource assignment to pending
unassign. This happens when you remove
the pending unassignment of the resource,
you cancel a pending disconnect
configuration, or you complete a pending
cancel configuration.
Assigned
Table 4–8 Resource Assignment Definitions
Resource
Assignment Status Definition Business Context
Unassigned Resource is not assigned to a
configuration and is available for
assignment.
The resource is installed but not
assigned to a configuration. When
a configuration is assigned, the
resource or entity assignment
status changes to Pending Assign.
Service Life Cycles and Statuses
4-10 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Service Life Cycles and Statuses
Service entities are life-cycle managed. As a service transitions through its life-cycle
stages, different service statuses are assigned to the service. The default life cycle and
service transition statuses are delivered with the application; however, you can modify
the wording and extend the life cycles. See UIM Developers Guide for more information
on extending service life cycles.
Figure 4–5 shows the default service life cycle and status assigned to a service at each
stage of its life cycle.
Pending Assign Resource is assigned to a
configuration, but the
configuration is not completed.
A resource is assigned to an
entity, but the configuration is not
completed.
When the configuration is
completed, the assignment status
is updated to Assigned. If the
request is canceled, the pending
assignment changes to
Unassigned.
Assigned Resource is assigned to a
configuration and the
configuration is completed.
The assignment status of the
resource that is assigned to a
working configuration. When the
configuration is requested to be
disconnected, the configuration’s
resources have a status of
Pending Unassign.
Pending Unassign Either the resource is assigned to
a service that is in a pending
disconnect status, or the resource
is unassigned from its
configuration and the
configuration is pending
completion.
A service is planned for
disconnection. As a result, all of
its resource assignments are
unassigned from the
configuration.
For telephone numbers, if an
aging period is required, the
status is updated to
Disconnected. If an aging period
is not required, the status is
changed back to Unassigned.
Table 4–8 (Cont.) Resource Assignment Definitions
Resource
Assignment Status Definition Business Context
Service Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-11
Figure 4–5 Service Life Cycle
Table 49 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–5 and the
resulting status changes.
Table 410 provides a definition and business context for each service status.
Table 4–9 Service Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
1 Create service. Pending
2 Complete the first configuration or
complete service with no configuration.
In Service
3 Disconnect service. Pending Disconnect
4 Complete configuration to disconnect
service.
Disconnected
5 Service is canceled after configuration is
issued.
Pending Cancel
6 Complete pending cancel. Canceled
7 Suspend service. Suspended
8 Resume suspended service. In Service
9 Disconnect suspended service. Pending Disconnect
10 Cancel the disconnect of the service when
the configuration has been issued.
Cancel Pending Disconnect
11 Cancel the pending disconnect when the
configuration has not yet been issued.
In Service
12 Complete the cancel pending disconnect. In Service
13 Service is canceled with no configuration
or with one configuration version that has
not yet been issued.
Canceled
14 Cancel a pending cancel service. Pending
15 Cancel the cancel pending disconnect. Pending Disconnect
Service Life Cycles and Statuses
4-12 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Table 4–10 Service Status Definitions
Service Status Definition Business Context
Pending The service has been requested
and the design for that service is
being developed.
After the design is completed and
the service is activated, the
service status changes to In
Service.
If service is canceled and there is
no configuration, or the
configuration has not yet been
issued, the status goes to
Canceled.
If service is canceled and
configuration is issued, service
goes to Pending Cancel.
In Service The service has been provisioned
and is in use.
When a request is made to
disconnect the service, the service
status changes to Pending
Disconnect.
If the service is suspended, the
service status is Suspended.
Pending Disconnect A request was made to disconnect
the service.
After the request to disconnect
the service is completed, the
status changes to Disconnected.
If the request to disconnect the
service is canceled and the
configuration has not been issued,
the service status changes to In
Service.
If the request to disconnect the
service is canceled and the
configuration has been issued, the
status changes to Cancel Pending
Disconnect.
Disconnected A service that was functional is
now disconnected.
When a service has this status, a
new service must be created to
re-establish the service.
Suspended A service has been suspended,
but all resource assignments are
still active.
A service that is temporarily
nonfunctional has a status of
Suspended. The resource
assignments are still maintained
with a resource assignment status
of Assigned.
The status will change to one of
these statuses depending on the
action taken:
Pending Disconnect: If the
service must be
disconnected.
In Service: If the suspension
was resolved.
Pending Cancel A request has been made to
cancel a service.
When the request to cancel the
service is completed, the status is
changed to Canceled and that
service cannot be revived without
a new service order.
Configuration Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-13
Table 411 shows valid combinations of statuses that occur for services and their
assigned resources.
Configuration Life Cycles and Statuses
Figure 4–6 shows the configuration statuses used for services, logical devices, logical
device accounts, pipes, places, and networks. Figure 4–6 also shows the design status
assigned to each configuration at each stage of its life cycle.
Canceled A request for a service is canceled
and there is no configuration or
the configuration has not yet been
issued.
When a request for a new service
is canceled, a new service must be
requested to re-establish the
service.
Cancel Pending
Disconnect
A disconnect of a service is
canceled and the configuration
has been issued.
When a cancel pending
disconnect request is completed,
the service goes to In Service.
When a cancel pending
disconnect request is canceled,
the service goes to Pending
Disconnect.
Table 4–11 Service and Resource Assignment Status Combinations
Service Status Resource Assignment Statuses
Pending Pending Assign
In Service Pending Assign
Assigned
Pending Unassign
Pending Disconnect Pending Unassign
Disconnected Disconnected
Unassigned
Suspended Assigned
Pending Unassign
Pending Assign
Canceled To p re v ious stat us
Pending Cancel Pending Assign
Cancel Pending Disconnect Pending Unassign
Note: Connectivity entities do not have configurations, but they
have design versions that follow the same life cycle.
Table 4–10 (Cont.) Service Status Definitions
Service Status Definition Business Context
Configuration Life Cycles and Statuses
4-14 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 4–6 Configuration Life Cycle
Table 412 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–6 and the
resulting status changes.
Table 413 presents a definition and business context for each configuration status.
Table 4–12 Configuration Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
1 Create configuration. In Progress
2 Approve configuration. Designed
3 Issue configuration. Issued
4 Complete configuration. Completed
5 Cancel issued configuration. Pending Cancel
6 Cancel designed configuration. Canceled
7 Cancel in progress configuration Canceled
8 Complete a pending cancel configuration. Canceled
9 Cancel a pending cancel configuration. Issued
Table 4–13 Configuration Status Definitions
Configuration
Status Definition Business Context
In Progress The configuration for the
requested service has been
started.
This is set automatically when the
configuration is created. The
configuration status changes to
Designed when the service
configuration has been fully
developed. The configuration
status is set to Canceled when an
order that initiated the
configuration is canceled.
Designed The configuration has been fully
developed and is complete.
Transitions from the In Progress
status when the design has been
approved for the configuration.
The configuration status changes
to Issued when sent to the field or
upon activation. The status
changes to Canceled when the
order that initiated the design is
canceled.
Configuration Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-15
Table 414 lists the combinations of statuses that are possible for services and their
associated service configurations.
Issued The configuration for the
requested service has been sent to
the field for the physical work
and the network element work to
be done.
After the configuration is sent to
the field and the work is
completed, the configuration
status changes to Completed.
If the issued configuration is
incorrect or the service is
canceled, the status changes to
Pending Canceled to allow for
reversal of field work.
Completed The configuration for the
requested service has been
implemented.
After the configuration has been
implemented, the configuration
status changes to Completed and
the service transitions from
Pending to In Service when the
first version is completed.
Completed is an ending state for
the service configuration status
life cycle.
Pending Cancel A request for the service is
canceled after the configuration is
issued or a request to cancel a
configuration is made after the
configuration has been issued.
If a Pending Cancel for a service
configuration is canceled, the
configuration status goes back to
Issued.
If a Pending Cancel for a service
configuration is completed, the
configuration status goes to
Canceled.
Canceled A request for the service or the
service configuration has been
canceled and any field work that
needed to be reversed is
completed.
After the configuration and field
work for a canceled configuration
has been completed, the service
configuration status for that
service changes to Canceled.
Canceled is an ending state for
the service configuration status
life cycle.
Table 4–14 Service and Configuration Status Combinations
Service Status Configuration Statuses
Pending In Progress
Designed
Issued
In Service In Progress
Designed
Issued
Completed
Pending Cancel
Canceled
Pending Cancel Pending Cancel
Table 4–13 (Cont.) Configuration Status Definitions
Configuration
Status Definition Business Context
Status Examples
4-16 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Status Examples
Figure 4–7 shows the resource assignment statuses as a service is created and goes
through its life cycle.
Figure 4–7 Creating Service and Resource Assignments
Pending Disconnect In Progress
Designed
Issued
Completed
Canceled
Disconnected Completed
Canceled
Suspended In Progress (change requests only that were
performed before suspend)
Designed (change requests only that were
performed before suspend)
Issued
Completed
Pending Cancel (change requests only that
were performed before suspend)
Canceled
Cancel Pending Disconnect Pending Cancel
Canceled
Completed
Canceled Canceled
Table 4–14 (Cont.) Service and Configuration Status Combinations
Service Status Configuration Statuses
Telephone Number Life Cycle and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-17
Figure 4–8 shows the resource assignment statuses as a resource is unassigned from a
service.
Figure 4–8 Unassigning a Resource
Telephone Number Life Cycle and Statuses
Telephone numbers have a default assignment life cycle that is similar to that of other
resources, with the addition of an aging process and two statuses. This life cycle,
including the aging process applies to telephone numbers that are not ported in or out.
UIM uses the TN Type characteristic to identify numbers as ported in or out.
Telephone numbers without a TN Type and those assigned the Owned or Toll Free TN
Type follow the default life cycle. Telephone numbers with the Ported In or Ported Out
TN Type follow the modified life cycle described in "Modified Life Cycle for Ported In
and Ported Out Telephone Numbers".
Figure 4–9 illustrates the default telephone number assignment life cycle.
Figure 4–9 Telephone Number Assignment Life Cycle
Telephone Number Life Cycle and Statuses
4-18 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Table 415 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–9 and the
resulting status changes.
Table 416 lists the telephone assignment statuses. Telephone numbers have the same
inventory status as other resources shown in Table 42.
Table 4–15 Telephone Number Assignment Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
1 Create telephone number Unassigned
2 Assign telephone number to configuration
item.
Pending Assign
3 Complete configuration to assign
telephone number.
Assigned
4 Unassign telephone number from a
configuration item.
This status shows as Assigned
when looking at the resource, but
shows Pending Unassign if the
resource is in the context of its
configuration
5 Complete configuration to unassign
telephone number.
Unassigned
6 Complete configuration to unassign
telephone number.
Disconnected
7 Pass intercept period for a telephone
number.
Transitional
8 Pass transition period for a telephone
number.
Unassigned
9 Remove a pending assignment for a
telephone number on an in-progress,
designed, or issued configuration or cancel
a configuration with a pending assigned
resource.
Unassigned
10 Restore telephone number assignment to
Pending Unassign. This happens when
you remove the pending unassignment of
the resource, you cancel a pending
disconnect configuration, or you complete
a pending cancel configuration.
Assigned
Table 4–16 Telephone Number Assignment Statuses
Assignment Status Definition Business Context
Unassigned The telephone number is
available.
TN recall processing,
readiness, and maintenance
Pending Assign The telephone number is
assigned to a configuration
that has not been completed.
TN assignment
Assigned The telephone number is
assigned to a completed
configuration.
Configuration version and
configuration
Pending Unassign The telephone number has
been unassigned from a
configuration that has not
been completed.
TN assignment
Business Interaction and Engineering Work Order Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-19
Modified Life Cycle for Ported In and Ported Out Telephone Numbers
The assignment life cycle is modified somewhat for telephone number that are ported
in or ported out. These numbers are identified by the Ported In or Ported Out TN
Type.
Ported out numbers have their assignment status set to Ported and their inventory
status set to Unavailable.
There are two ways a ported out telephone number can return to the control of the
original service provider:
A snapback occurs when the customer gives up the number and it returns via the
regulatory process defined for its geography.
A winback occurs when the customer and the telephone number return to the
original service provider.
The UIM life cycle is the same for both snapbacks and winbacks: UIM changes the TN
Type back to Owned, the assignment status to Unassigned and the inventory status to
Installed. Although the life cycles are the same, UIM includes an optional
characteristic that identifies numbers as winbacks. Some service providers prefer to
track winbacks separately.
For ported-in telephone numbers UIM sets the assignment status to Unassigned and
the inventory status to Unavailable.
Business Interaction and Engineering Work Order Life Cycles and
Statuses
Business interactions and engineering work orders allow you to plan resource changes
that you want to put in service at a later date.
Figure 4–10 shows the life cycle for business interactions and engineering work orders.
See Figure 4–2, "Resource Inventory Life Cycle in a Business Interaction or Work Order
Context" to view the resource life cycles in context of a business interaction.
Disconnected The telephone number has
been unassigned from a
configuration and is being
aged.
Configuration version and
configuration
Transitional The telephone number has
been disconnected and cannot
be reassigned for a period.
TN recall processing
Ported The telephone number has
been ported out to another
provider.
Not applicable
Note: The number portability features described in this section are
available only if the Base Phone Management cartridge is installed.
See "Telephone Number Portability" and UIM Cartridge Guide for more
information.
Table 4–16 (Cont.) Telephone Number Assignment Statuses
Assignment Status Definition Business Context
Business Interaction and Engineering Work Order Life Cycles and Statuses
4-20 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 4–10 Business Interaction Life Cycle
Table 417 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–10 and the
resulting changes.
Table 418 presents a definition and business context for each business interaction or
work order status.
Table 4–17 Business Interaction and Engineering Work order Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
1 Create business interaction or work order. Created
2 Add items. In Progress
3 Complete business interaction or work
order.
Completed
4 Cancel in progress business interaction or
work order.
Canceled
5 Complete the created business interaction
or work order.
Completed
6 Cancel the created business interaction or
work order.
Canceled
7 Transfer items from one business
interaction or work order to another
business interaction or work order.
In Progress
Table 4–18 Business Interaction and Engineering Work order Status Definitions
Business Interaction Status Definition Business Context
Created The business interaction or
work order is created for a
new project.
A business interaction or
work order is created, but no
work has been started. A
business interaction or work
order can be completed or
canceled from this status.
Project and Activity Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-21
Table 419 lists valid combinations of business interaction/work order and resource
inventory statuses.
Project and Activity Life Cycles and Statuses
Project entities and the activities that they include have life cycles different from other
UIM entities.
In Progress Work has begun on the
business interaction or work
order.
The business interaction or
work order transitions from
Created when the user adds
items or when a user transfers
items from another business
interaction or work order.
From this status, a user can
complete the business
interaction or work order or
choose to cancel it.
Canceled The user cancels the business
interaction or work order.
A business interaction or
work order can be canceled
when it is in Created or In
Progress status.
Completed Work on all items is complete
and the work can now be
viewed in current inventory.
After work on all the business
interaction or work order
items is finished, the resulting
changes become visible when
you complete the business
interaction or work order.
Table 4–19 Business Interaction Statuses and Resource Inventory Status Combinations
Business Interaction or Work Order Status Resource Inventory Statuses
Created Not applicable because adding items to the
business interaction or work order changes
the status to In Progress.
In Progress Pending Install
Pending Remove
Pending Unavailable
Completed End of Life
Installed
Unavailable
Canceled Installed
Unavailable
The resource assignments revert back to the
previous state when the business interaction
or work order is canceled.
Table 4–18 (Cont.) Business Interaction and Engineering Work order Status Definitions
Business Interaction Status Definition Business Context
Project and Activity Life Cycles and Statuses
4-22 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 4–11 Project Inventory Life Cycle
Table 420 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–11 and the
resulting changes.
Table 421 presents a definition and business context for each project status.
Activity Life Cycle and Status
Activities are groups of operations that you configure and manage as part of projects.
They have life cycles and statuses independent of the projects to which they belong.
Table 4–20 Project Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
1 Create project. Created
2 Add activities. In Progress
3 Manually complete project Completed
Table 4–21 Project Status Definitions
Project Status Definition Business Context
Created A new project has been
created.
A project has been created,
but no activities have been
submitted.
In Progress UIM has begun processing
activities in the project.
The projects transitions
automatically to In Progress
from Created the first time an
activity is submitted. The
project does not transition to
In Progress when an activity
is added to it. The project
remains in In Progress status
until it is completed.
Completed All activities in the project are
completed or canceled and
the user has completed the
project.
The transition to Completed
status is a manual action that
is possible only when all
activities in the project are
completed or canceled.
Project and Activity Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-23
Figure 4–12 Activity Life Cycle
Table 422 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–12 and the
resulting changes.
Table 423 presents a definition and business context for each activity status.
Table 4–22 Activity Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
1 Add activity to project. Ready
2 Submit the activity for processing. In Progress
3 All items in the activity are submitted and
processed successfully.
Completed
4 An in-progress activity is canceled prior to
completion.
Aborted
5 A canceled activity is resubmitted. In Progress
6 One or more items in an activity fails
during processing.
Failed
7 A failed activity is resubmitted. In Progress
8 Rollback of items in a failed activity does
not succeed.
Error
9 The activity is completed. Completed
Table 4–23 Activity Status Definitions
Activity Status Definition Business Context
Ready A new activity has been
added to a project.
An activity has been added to
a project, but has not been
submitted for processing.
In Progress The activity has been
submitted to UIM for
processing.
The activity transitions
automatically to In Progress
status when you submit it for
processing.
Project and Activity Life Cycles and Statuses
4-24 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Activity Item Life Cycle and Statuses
Activity items are individual tasks that must be done to complete an activity. There are
two types of activity items:
Change items identify entities to be added, changed, or removed when the activity
is processed.
Impact items identify entities that are added, changed, or removed as a result of
completing change items. Impact items are the indirect results of activities.
Change Item Life Cycle and Statuses
Figure 4–13 illustrates the status flow of change items.
Figure 4–13 Change Item Status Flow
Table 424 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–13 and the
resulting changes.
Completed All items in the activity have
been processed successfully.
The activity transitions
automatically to Completed
status when all items have
been completed successfully.
Aborted The activity has been
canceled before completion.
Canceled activities can be
resubmitted as-is or after
modification.
Failed One or more items has failed
to complete successfully.
Failed activities can be
resubmitted as-is or after
modification.
Error One or more transactions
could not be rolled back
when the activity failed. This
can occur when entities are
changed after the activity is
configured but before it is
processed.
It may be necessary to
complete manual actions to
resolve issues caused by the
error.
Table 4–24 Change Item Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
1 The change item is added as part of
activity configuration.
Ready
Table 4–23 (Cont.) Activity Status Definitions
Activity Status Definition Business Context
Project and Activity Life Cycles and Statuses
Life Cycles and Statuses 4-25
Table 425 presents a definition and business context for each change item status.
About Impact Items
Impact items are created as an indirect result of change items. They have a separate life
cycle. Figure 4–14 illustrates the status flow of impact items.
2 UIM submits the change item for
processing.
In Progress
3 The change item has been processed
without any errors
Pending Complete
4 After all change items in the activity are
processed successfully, UIM completes
them.
Complete
5 The parent activity is canceled prior to
completion.
Ready
6 The change item fails during processing
(The parent activity fails as a result.)
Failed
7 The failed parent activity is resubmitted. In Progress
8 The parent activity fails before all change
items are completed.
Failed
Table 4–25 Change Item Status Definitions
Change Item Status Definition Business Context
Ready A new activity has been
added to a project.
An activity has been added to
a project, but has not been
submitted for processing.
In Progress The change item has been
submitted to UIM for
processing.
The change item transitions
automatically to In Progress
status when UIM begins to
process it.
Pending Complete The change item has been
processed but other change
items are still being
processed.
The change item transitions
to this status automatically
after processing.
Completed This change item and other
items in the activity have
been processed successfully.
The change item transitions
automatically to this status
when all items in the activity
have been processed
successfully.
Failed The change item has failed to
complete successfully.
Change items transition to
this status automatically
when they failed to be
processed successfully.
Table 4–24 (Cont.) Change Item Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
Project and Activity Life Cycles and Statuses
4-26 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 4–14 Impact Item Status Flow
Table 426 describes the actions associated with each number in Figure 4–14 and the
resulting changes.
Table 427 presents a definition and business context for each impact item status.
Table 4–26 Impact Item Status Flow
Label
Number Description Status
1 The impact item is created by UIM during
the processing of an activity.
Pending Process
2 The impact item has been processed
successfully, but other items in the activity
are still being processed.
Pending Complete
3 The impact item and other items in the
activity have been processed successfully.
Completed
Table 4–27 Impact Item Status Definitions
Impact Item Status Definition Business Context
Pending Process The impact item has been
created but not yet processed.
UIM creates impact items in
this status when required
during the processing of an
activity.
Pending Complete The impact item has been
processed successfully.
The impact item transitions
automatically to this status
after it has been processed.
Completed All activities in the project are
completed or canceled and
the user has completed the
project.
The impact item transitions
automatically to this status
when all items in the activity
have been processed
successfully.
5
Core Functionality 5-1
5
Core Functionality
This chapter describes Oracle Communications Design Studio and Oracle
Communications Unified Inventory Management (UIM) core functionality. This
functionality supplies the infrastructure that you use to manage your inventory.
Much of the core functionality is provided by the UIM common patterns and the
entities that enable them. Search functionality is provided by the application
framework. See "Core Platform" for more information.
This chapter includes information about the following functionality:
Searching
Configurations
Capacity
Consumption
Involvements
Topology
Entity Identification
Lifecycle management is also provided by the core platform, but is covered in a
separate chapter. See "Life Cycles and Statuses" for more information.
Searching
UIM provides a search framework that enables you to find entities based on a wide
variety of criteria that depend on the entity type. You can combine criteria for an even
more specific search. For example, you could search for all Equipment entities that are
based on a particular specification and are in the Pending Install inventory status.
By default, you can search for the data elements that are common to all entities of the
same type. You can also add additional search criteria corresponding to the
characteristics that have been defined in specifications of the same type. By adding
additional fields to the search criteria, you can also search for entities based on
characteristics that have been defined in specifications of a particular entity type.
For example, if one Place specification includes a characteristic called Elevation and
another includes a characteristic called Sales Area, you can include one or both of
those characteristics in a search for Place entities.
For some entity types, you can search by relationships. For example, you can search
for equipment based on relationships to physical devices, logical devices, and places.
You can search for pipes based on relationships to terminating points, networks, and
Searching
5-2 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
logical devices. You can also search for inventory groups based on relationships to
places.
Figure 5–1 shows the Search page for Equipment entities, which enables you to search
on standard equipment data elements.
Figure 5–1 Equipment Search Page
You can save search criteria that you use frequently. For example, if you often search
for Equipment entities of a particular model number and vendor, you can save those
criteria for reuse. You can designate a saved search as the default search for an entity
type. The default search criteria appear automatically when you open the Search page
for that entity type.
You can also expand the Search section to search for equipment based on associations
to a physical device, logical device, or place. Figure 5–2 shows the Physical Device
section expanded.
Figure 5–2 Expanded Entity Search
When the results of a search are displayed, you can select entities and perform actions
on them. The actions you can take depend on entity type. For an Equipment search, for
example, you can apply reservations and conditions from the Search Results section.
Figure 5–3 shows results from a search for Equipment entities.
Configurations
Core Functionality 5-3
Figure 5–3 Search Results Section
See the UIM Help for more information about searching for entities in the UIM Web
interface.
Searching by Using Web Services
You can include searches when you interact with UIM by using Web services. A
custom Web service operations can include calls to the search methods provided by
the Finder class. See UIM Web Services Developers Guide for information about creating
and deploying custom Web services.
Configurations
Some entity types can optionally be associated with configurations. A configuration is
a versionable collection of facts about an entity, such as the design details of a service
or the hardware resources associated with a logical device.
For entities that have configurations, basic information that is likely to stay the same
over time, such as the name and description, are stored as part of the entity itself.
Information that can change over time, such as the specific hardware that makes up a
logical device or the resources required to fulfill a service, are stored in the entity
configuration. For example, a customer might maintain a DSL service for a long
period, but the router used for that service could change over time, as could the phone
numbers and associated email accounts.
Configurations can be versioned, enabling you to maintain a history of how the entity
has evolved over time. You can access previous versions in read-only form.
The following entity types can have configurations:
Flow interfaces
Logical devices
Logical device accounts
Logical device accounts
Networks
Pipes
Places (sites)
Services
Connectivity entities do not have configurations, but they do have design versions,
which are similar. See "About Design Versions" for more information.
Configurations include configuration items, which you use the specify the details of
the configuration. For example, you use configuration items to specify the resources
that enable a service. You can associate resources to configuration items in two ways:
Configurations
5-4 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Assignment. When you assign a resource to a configuration item, that resource is
consumed. For example, in a consumer VoIP service, you can assign a handset to
the service configuration. In most cases, the resource can be consumed only once,
so allocation places it in Assigned state. See "Consumption" for more information
about consumption.
Reference. When you reference an entity from a configuration, you indicate that
the configuration has an interest or dependency in the entity but does not
consume it. For example, a cable subscription service requires a cable controller
but does not consume it. In this case, a configuration item would reference the
controller rather than allocating it. See "Understanding Entity References" for more
information about entity references.
Configuration items can also include characteristics that enable you to capture specific
details. To organize configuration items and put them in context, you can arrange
them in a hierarchy.
As the configuration of an entity changes, you create successive configuration versions
that describe its composition at various times. Only one version can be in service at a
time.
Understanding Configuration Specifications
Like other entities, configurations are defined by specifications. You define
configuration specifications and relate them to entity specifications in Design Studio.
Each configuration-enabled entity type has a corresponding configuration type. For
example, you can associate a Logical Device Configuration specification only to a
Logical Device specification.
You can associate a configuration specification with multiple entity specifications of
the same type. You can also associate a single entity specification with multiple
configuration specifications. For example, you can associate multiple Logical Device
specifications with a single Logical Device Configuration specification and you can
associate a single Logical Device specification with multiple Logical Device
Configuration specifications.
When you define a configuration specification, you define its configuration items. The
specification defines how configuration items are organized, whether they are
required, the minimum and maximum number of resources that can be assigned or
referenced in the item, and any characteristics associated with them. See the Design
Studio Help for more information about defining configuration items.
Configuration Example
Figure 5–4 illustrates the relationships among entity specifications, configuration
specifications, entities, and configuration versions. A Service specification for a
telephony service is associated to a Service Configuration specification. The service
itself stores only the subscriber name and the configuration stores the telephone
number, service location, carrier, and so on.
When an Service entity based on the entity specification is created in UIM, successive
configuration versions based on the configuration specification store the relevant
information as it changes over time.
Capacity
Core Functionality 5-5
Figure 5–4 Specifications, Entities, and Configurations
Maintaining Configurations in UIM
When an entity in UIM is associated with a configuration specification, you can create
configuration versions for that entity. The configuration versions are based on the
configuration specification associated with the entity specification. (If an entity
specification is associated with multiple configuration specifications, you select which
configuration specification to use.)
Configuration versions have a life cycle so that you can develop a new configuration
version while a previous one is still valid. See "Configuration Life Cycles and Statuses"
for more information. When you create a new configuration version, the values of the
old one are copied. You modify and add to these values as necessary. When you
complete a configuration version, it becomes active, replacing the previous one.
For example, if you are replacing the handset in a VoIP service, you create a new
configuration version that includes the new device. When the handset is activated, the
new configuration version is complete, replacing the previous version.
Capacity
In UIM, capacity refers to the amount and type of something that entities require or
provide. UIM provides a capacity framework that enables you to define, measure, and
track the usage of capacity.
UIM pipe and signal termination points entities use the capacity framework to manage
bandwidth. Bandwidth specifies the speed and amount of data that can be transferred
from one place to another. See "Pipes" for more information about bandwidth.
You use measurement types, units of measure, and capacity types to define capacity
and how it is measured. See "Defining and Measuring Capacity" for more information.
Capacity
5-6 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
You associate Capacity Provided and Capacity Required specifications with other
entity specifications to define how they use capacity. See "Configuring Capacity" for
more information.
Table 51 list the entities that work together to manage capacity in your network,
along with examples of how they are used for bandwidth.
An additional type of capacity-related entity, the signal termination point, is available
for use with pipes. Signal termination points enable you to define channelized signal
structures that help define capacity for TDM (time-duplex multiplexing) connectivity.
See "Configuring Pipe Capacity" for more information.
Defining and Measuring Capacity
You define capacity by designing measurement types, units of measure, and capacity
types in Design Studio. These artifacts reference each other to form a capacity
definition that you can use with other entities.
The Base Measurements cartridge includes predefined artifacts related to bandwidth.
The cartridge includes a bit rate measurement type, a set of related units of measure
including bps, kbps, Mbps, Gbps, and a bandwidth capacity type. Along with other
base cartridges, the Base Measurements cartridge is delivered in the core UIM
package. You can find it in the following location when UIM is installed:
UIM_Home/cartridges/base/
See UIM Cartridge Guide for more information.
Configuring Measurement Type
Measurement types classify related groups of units of measure. For example, the
measurement type bit rate classifies units of measure such as bits per second (bps),
kilobits per second (kbps), and so on. See the Design Studio Help for detailed
instructions about creating measurement types.
Table 5–1 Capacity Entities and Specification
Entity Definition Bandwidth Example
Measurement Type Classifies how capacity is
measured
Bit rate
Unit of Measure Quantifies how capacity is
measured
Bits per Second (bps), Kilobits per
Second (kbps), Megabits Per
Second (Mbps), Gigabits per
Second (Gbps)
Capacity Type Defines the kind of capacity that
an entity provides or consumes
Bandwidth
Capacity Provided Defines the capacity an entity
offers in terms of a total amount
and a consumable percentage.
The percentage must equal 100%
for channelized pipes but can be
less than or greater than 100% for
packet-switched pipes.
44.736 Mbps at 100%
44.736 Mbps at 200%
Capacity Required Defines the capacity an entity
consumes in terms of an amount
required and a unit of quantity of
the required amount
1.544 Mbps
Capacity
Core Functionality 5-7
Configuring Units of Measure
Units of measure define the units used to measure capacity in UIM. A unit of measure
is a quantity or increment by which something is divided, counted, or described. For
example, kbps is a unit that measures a bit rate. Related units of measure are grouped
into measurement types.
When you define a unit of measure in Design Studio, you configure the following data
elements:
Display Unit Value: The text that is displayed in menus and lists for this unit of
measure.
Type of Measurement: The measurement type to which this unit of measure
belongs. You specify this property by selecting or creating a measurement type.
Default: Determines whether this unit of measure appears as the default value for
its measurement type in menus and lists. Only one unit of measure can be the
default for each measurement type.
Conversion Factor: A multiplier used to convert this unit of measure to another
unit of measure. For example, for an Mbps unit of measure, you could enter
1000000 as the conversion factor to bps.
The conversion factor is used internally by the UIM capacity framework so that it can
determine how much capacity is available, required, and consumed, even when
different units of measure are involved. For example, different pipe entities could
express their capacity provided or required in kbps and Mbps. Using conversion
factors, the capacity framework can convert their capacities to a common unit of
measure (bps) to determine whether requirements can be met.
Table 52 shows some standard conversions for bit rates.
Figure 5–5 shows the Properties tab for the Mbps unit of measure with the conversion
factor.
Table 5–2 Sample Conversion
Unit Conversion Factor
bps 1
kbps 1000
Mbps 1,000,000
Capacity
5-8 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 5–5 Unit of Measure
Configuring Capacity Type
A capacity type defines a kind of capacity that an entity provides or consumes. The
bandwidth capacity type is provided in the Base Measurements cartridge. You
associate a measurement type to a capacity type to specify how the capacity is
measured.
See the Design Studio Help for detailed information about creating and configuring
capacity types.
Configuring Capacity
You define Capacity Provided and Capacity Required specifications to define the
capacity that entities offer and require. When you associate a Capacity Provided
specification with another entity specification, the capacity defined in the Capacity
Provided specification is offered by entities that you create in UIM based on that
specification. Similarly, when you associate a Capacity Required specification with an
entity specification, the capacity defined in the Capacity Required specification
becomes an enablement requirement for entities based on the specification.
Configuring Capacity Provided
Capacity Provided specifications define the capacity that entities offer. When you
configure a Capacity Provided specification, you use the following data elements:
Capacity Type: Determines the type of capacity offered.
Total Amount: The amount of the capacity type that an entity can provide.
Note: You cannot associate Capacity Provided specifications with
Pipe entities that are associated with signal structures. These pipes
derive their capacity provided from their signal structures. See
"Understanding Capacity and Signal Structure" for more information.
Capacity
Core Functionality 5-9
Unit of Measure: The units by which the total amount is measured, defined by a
unit of measure.
Consumable Percentage: The percentage of the total amount that can be
consumed. A consumable percentage over 100% indicates that the capacity can be
oversubscribed.
For example, bandwidth is a capacity type that is measured by bit rate. Bit rates are
measured in units such as bps or Mbps. Entities such as pipes provide and consume
bandwidth at a bit rate that you specify. An OC3 bandwidth pipe can provide 155.52
Mbps, for example, and packet pipes can consume varying rates of that capacity.
Figure 5–6 shows an example of how the entities are set up for packet type pipes that
are not channelized.
Figure 5–6 Packet Capacity Example
For example, you can define an OC3 Pipe using the Capacity Provided entity that
provides bandwidth of 155.52 Mbps, 100% of which can be consumed. Pipes that can
use that capacity are associated with capacity-required entities.
In UIM, when you create an entity based on a specification that includes a relation to a
Capacity Provided specification, the provided capacity is automatically associated to
the entity. An entity can offer multiple types of capacity, so it can have relationships to
multiple capacity-provided entities. An entity specification can be related to only one
Capacity Provided specification of a given capacity type, however.
For example, a Pipe specification can be related to only one Capacity Provided
specification for the Bandwidth capacity type. If you create another type of capacity
that applies to a pipe, the Pipe specification can also be related to one Capacity
Provided specification of the new capacity type.
Configuring Capacity Required
A Capacity Required specification defines the capacity that an entity requires. When
you configure capacity required, you use the following data elements:
Capacity Type: Determines the type of capacity required.
Required Amount: The amount of the capacity type that an entity requires.
Unit of Measure: The units by which the total amount is measured, defined by
selecting a unit of measure.
Quantity: The number of units of the required amount value that an entity
requires for a given capacity type. For example, when defining capacity required
for a pipe that is enabled by a facility pipe that supports TDM technology at any
Note: Pipes and signal termination points are the only entities that
can offer capacity by default.
Consumption
5-10 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
point in its path, you must set the quantity equal to the number of channels
required. Specifying the quantity in this way enables you to use the path analysis
functionality provided by UIM to locate facility pipes for service trails. See
"Enabling Pipes Automatically with Path Analysis" for more information.
For non-TDM technologies, the quantity can be set to 1. Path analysis calculates
the total bandwidth required and finds available packet facilities in addition to
finding available TDM facilities to support the end-to-end enablement of the pipe.
You associate Capacity Required specifications to specifications of entities that require
capacity. For example, you can associate a DS1 Capacity Required specification to a
DS1 Pipe specification.
In UIM, when you create an entity based on a specification that is related to a Capacity
Required specification, the capacity required is automatically created and related to
the entity.
An entity can require multiple types of capacity, so its specification can have
relationships to multiple Capacity Required specifications; however, an entity
specification can be related to only one Capacity Required specification of a given
capacity type. For example, a Pipe specification can be related to only one Capacity
Required specification for the Bandwidth capacity type.
Consumption
Entities in your inventory are used by other entities in various ways. For example, a
handset can be assigned to a VoIP service or a telephone number can be reserved for
use by a customer starting next week.
In UIM, the consumption framework is the mechanism by which you manage how
entities use each other. There are several forms of consumption, including assignment,
reservation, and conditions. See "Resource Reservations" and "Conditions" for more
information. Entity reference is similar to assignment, but does not involve actual
consumption. See "Understanding Entity References" for more information.
Assignment
The most common way the entities consume each other is by assignment. When an
one entity is assigned to another, the first entity is consumed by the second. For
example, consumption occurs when:
A physical port is assigned to a pipe termination point
A device interface is assigned to a logical device
An equipment entity is assigned to a service
In many cases, assignment, and therefore consumption, takes place in entity
configurations. For example, an IP address in the form of a Custom Network Address
entity can be assigned as a configuration item in a logical device configuration.
Table 53 lists the entities that can consume entities and the entities that can be
consumed.
Consumption
Core Functionality 5-11
About Shared Consumption of Entities
Entities can be consumed by one entity or by more than one entity. For example, in a
normal POTS service, the service consumes a single telephone number. The service has
only one number and the number can be assigned to only one service. But in a
Table 5–3 Consumers and Consumable Entities
Consumer Entity Consumable Entity
Place
Note: Only Site-type Place entities
can have configurations.
Custom network address
Custom object
Device interface
Place (address, address range, location, site)
Logical device
Physical device
Service
Logical device Custom network address
Custom object
Device interface
Network Custom network address
Custom object
Logical device
Pipe Pipe
Pipe termination point Custom network address
Custom object
Device interface
Equipment
Logical device
Network
Physical connector or port
Physical device
Service Custom network address
Custom object
Device interface
Equipment
Equipment holder
Place (location or site)
Logical device
Logical device account
Media stream
Network
Physical connector or port
Physical device
Pipe
Service
Telephone number
Consumption
5-12 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
party-line telephone environment, the same number is shared between two or more
services. Each service has only one number, but the same number is shared among
several services.
You configure consumption rules in Design Studio when you define specifications.
You can designate that a consumable entity can be consumed by one or more
consuming entities. You can also designate that a consuming entity can consume one
or more consuming entities.
Figure 5–7 shows an example based on POTS service. A POTS service can consume a
telephone number and the telephone number can be consumed by only one POTS
service. In this case, the Telephone Number specification is configured so that it cannot
be assigned to multiple entities. The Service specification is configured so that it
cannot assign entities that allow multiple assignments. This ensures that the telephone
number cannot be assigned to multiple services and that the service cannot consume a
telephone number that can be assigned to multiple services.
Figure 5–7 POTS Example
Figure 5–8 shows a party line service. A party line service allows customers to share
one telephone number, preventing them from making calls at the same time. In this
case, the Telephone Number specification is configured to allow assignment to
multiple entities. The party line service is configured so that it can consume entities
that allow multiple assignments.
Figure 5–8 Party Line Service Example
Consumption
Core Functionality 5-13
Understanding Entity References
You use entity references to represent an interest or dependency between a
configuration and an entity. An entity reference is similar to an assignment, except that
the referenced entity is not consumed by the configuration.
For example, a mobile GSM service is provisioned on a Home Location Register (HLR)
device. The relationship between the GSM service and the HLR device provides
important information about how the service is realized on the network, but the device
is not consumed by the service. Similarly, a cable TV subscription service requires a
cable controller (modeled as a logical device in UIM), but the service does not
consume the device.
Because referenced entities are not actually consumed, they are not affected by the
Blocked condition. A resource that has a Blocked condition cannot be consumed
(assigned), but it can be referenced.
You define an entity reference in Design Studio when you define a configuration item.
Just as with defining a configuration item for assigning resources, you can limit the
valid options to particular specification types or to entities based particular
specifications. See the Design Studio Help and the UIM Help for more information.
Table 54 lists the configurations that can include entity references and the types of
entities that can be referenced. Pipe configurations are not included in the table
because they cannot include entity references.
Resource Reservations
In UIM, you can reserve resources to prevent them from being used by other entities or
processes. You can reserve resources if they are unassigned, not already reserved, and
do not have a condition code that prevents assignments.
Table 5–4 Configurations and Referenceable Entities
Configuration Referenceable Entity
Logical Device
Network
Place (site only)
Service
Business Interaction
Custom Network Address
Custom Object
Device Interface
Equipment
Inventory Group
Logical Device
Logical Device Account
Network
Party
Physical Connector
Physical Device
Place
Pipe
Physical Port
Product
Service
Telephone Number
Consumption
5-14 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
You can reserve resources for a particular project, user, or service specification.
Reservations can be designated as long-term (30 days by default) or short-term (10
minutes by default). If the reservation is not redeemed by the expiry date, the resource
is released back into inventory. See UIM Developers Guide for more information about
defining reservation periods.
In UIM, you redeem a reserved resource when you assign the resource to a
configuration item using a service, logical device, network, or site configuration. By
default, UIM does not validate the redemption to ensure that it matches the
reservation. You can optionally associate a ruleset to the reservation to ensure that
reservation validation occurs. See UIM Developers Guide for information about the
RESERVATION_CHECK_REDEEMER ruleset.
You can reserve resources from an entity’s Summary page, or you can use the
Reservation link in the UIM navigation section to reserve multiple resource items on
one reservation.
The following resources can be reserved:
Custom network addresses
Custom objects
Device interfaces
Equipment
Equipment holders
Logical devices
Logical device accounts
Media streams
Networks
Physical connectors
Physical devices
Physical ports
Services
Telephone numbers
See the UIM Help for more information about reserving and redeeming resources.
Conditions
Conditions are a way to limit the availability of an entity for a period. A condition
therefore behaves as a consumer of the entity, similar to an assignment. There are three
types of conditions, which are listed in Table 55.
Table 5–5 Condition Types
Condition Type Definition
Blocked This condition is used for resources that cannot be consumed
because of some administrative reason. This condition prevents
users from making assignments to this resource.
Blocked resources cannot be consumed, but they can be
referenced. See "Understanding Entity References" for more
information about references.
Involvements
Core Functionality 5-15
See the UIM Help for more information about applying conditions.
Involvements
Many entities in UIM are involved with each other because of the way the inventory is
modeled. For example, a service configuration can include configuration items for one
or more places or resources, and a logical device can provide one or more device
interfaces. These kinds of relationships are explicitly defined in the UIM model and
the application provides tools to manage them.
UIM also enables you to define custom involvements between entities that are not
otherwise associated. You can define Custom Involvement specifications in Design
Studio to define various kinds of associations in your inventory. For example, you
could define Custom Involvement specifications that define involvements between
physical connectors and the ports they support.
UIM provides a default specification for a special kind of custom involvement called a
preconfiguration. A preconfiguration enables you to set up an association among
entities that makes later operations more efficient by linking their consumption.
Preconfigured resources share the same life cycle: when one of the resources is
reserved or assigned, the other is automatically reserved or assigned with it.
For example, in a DSL scenario with telephone service, you can use an involvement to
preconfigure a telephone number, switch port, and cable pair. (In the
telecommunications industry, this preconfiguration is sometimes called a left-in.) The
preconfigured resources are not yet a service, but they facilitate the rapid creation of
the service.
The following types of entities can have custom and preconfigured involvements:
Custom object
Custom network address
Device interface
Equipment
Equipment holder
Logical device
Logical device account
Physical connector
Physical device
Physical port
Pipe
Telephone number
Informational This condition does not affect the availability of a resource, but
it provides additional information about the resource.
Warning This condition supplies additional information about a resource.
A warning condition does not affect the availability of a
resource but warns the user that there may be reasons not to use
it.
Table 5–5 (Cont.) Condition Types
Condition Type Definition
Topology
5-16 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Creating Involvements in UIM
In UIM, you can create custom involvements or preconfiguration involvements from a
entity’s Summary page. See the UIM Help for the instructions to create involvements.
Figure 5–9 shows the Create Custom Involvement dialog that you see when you
create an Involvement for an entity. In this example, the user has selected to associate a
DS1 port to an entity and create an involvement. The list displays any Custom
Involvement specifications defined in Design Studio and deployed into UIM, along
with the Preconfigure Spec that is provided as base data with UIM.
Figure 5–9 Adding Involvements in UIM
Topology
The spatial relationships and connectivity among your inventory entities form the
inventory topology. Topology and the features based on it enable you to answer
questions such as:
Is there connectivity between Texas and Germany?
Is there a DS3 path from Dallas to San Francisco?
Is there an OC3 path from Chicago to the United Kingdom?
The UIM topology represents the connectivity entities in your inventory as topology
nodes and topology edges. Topology nodes represent locations, network nodes, or
devices while edges represent pipes or network edges.
UIM provides a graphical representation of topology where you can see your
inventory and its relationships at the level of detail that meets your needs. See
"Aggregating and Expanding Topology Data" and the UIM Help for more information
about the topology visualization. UIM also uses topology during automated pipe
enablement (path analysis). See "Enabling Pipes Automatically with Path Analysis" for
topology more information.
About Topology Nodes
A topology node represents an entity into which information can be transported or
from which information can be transported. A topology node can represent a specific
resource, such as a router, or it can represent something more general or geographic,
such as a VPN site or a city.
The following UIM entities are automatically included as in the topology as nodes:
Place (location, site, or address)
Topology
Core Functionality 5-17
Equipment
Physical device
Logical device
Network
Network node
Because they cannot exist independently in the inventory, the following entity types
are not included in topology:
Equipment holder (slot)
Physical port
Device interface
The topology includes the parents of these entities. For example, a device interface is
not included in the topology, but the logical device that hosts it is included.
You can customize other entities so that they are included in topology. See UIM
Developers Guide for more information.
About Topology Edges
A topology edge represents a relationship between topology nodes. Two types of
relationships are represented as edges in the topology:
Connectivity. Two types of connectivity are represented as topology edges.
Pipes. For example, a T1 facility pipe that transports information between two
devices or locations is represented as an edge in the topology.
Connectivity entities, including channelized, packet, and service
connectivities, are represented in the topology as edges.
Containment. Topology edges represent two types of containment:
Provides relationships between entities. See "Provides Relationships" for more
information.
Containment among entities in a hierarchy. The hierarchy can represent:
*Physical containment, such as a card contained in a shelf.
*Logical containment, such as a virtual router contained in a PE (provider
edge) router.
*Geographic containment, such as a city contained within a state contained
within a country.
Topology Example
Figure 5–10 shows an example of business relationships and connectivity among
entities. A Physical Port entity and a Device Interface entity are linked by a pipe. Each
of the two entities is part of a hierarchy and has associations with other entities.
Topology
5-18 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 5–10 Business Relationships Example
In the UIM topology, pipes are translated into communication topology edges. The
topology nodes on which a communication topology edge terminates are determined
for each end by going up the hierarchy in the business model starting from the
resource the pipe terminates on and proceeding to the highest level physical device or
logical device. If the highest level physical device maps to a logical device, the
topology edge is terminated on the topology node that represents the logical device. If
no physical or logical device exists in the hierarchy, the topology edge terminates on
the topology node that represents the highest level equipment entity in the equipment
hierarchy.
Containment edges represent the hierarchies. Not all entity types are represented as
topology nodes, however. For example, slots (Equipment Holder entities) are not
represented as topology nodes. As a result, containment topology edges ignore these
entities and they do not appear in the topology. For example, in Figure 5–10, the pipe
terminates on a physical port on one end and on a device interface on the other end.
Neither of these entities is represented by a topology node, so they will not appear in
the topology model.
Figure 5–11 shows the topology model that is generated from the business model in
Figure 5–10. A containment edge connects a card and a shelf, ignoring the slot. A
Topology
Core Functionality 5-19
connectivity topology edge representing the pipe runs between topology nodes
representing the physical device (switch) on one end and the logical device (DSLAM)
on the opposite end. These are the highest level physical device and logical device in
the hierarchy from each end of the pipe.
Figure 5–11 Topology of Business Relationships
Figure 5–12 shows the topology represented in Figure 5–11 as it appears in the
Topology page in UIM. Containment edges are shown as actual containment.
Connectivity edges are shown as lines.
Topology
5-20 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 5–12 Topology Example in UIM
Connectivity is shown first at the level of the places to which connected entities are
associated. In this case, that is at the level of the Place entities that represent the
buildings in which the switch and DSLAM are housed. If the switch and DSLAM had
been associated with the City locations, connectivity would be shown at that level.
In the first view, a black line between Place entities for buildings represents general
connectivity without identifying it specifically. In the second view, the Place nodes are
expanded to show the switch and the DSLAM. A green double-line represents the pipe
that connects them.
Aggregating and Expanding Topology Data
The UIM topology automatically reflects the geographical hierarchy that you set up for
your inventory. In some cases, you may have a highly articulated hierarchy that
includes multiple levels such as regions, states or provinces, counties, and cities. In
other cases, you may have a flat hierarchy with all cities directly under countries. UIM
topology works across all kinds of geographical hierarchies.
UIM aggregates topology data automatically so that higher levels in a place hierarchy
reflect the connectivity of their children. For example, devices in Berlin and Buenos
Aires that are connected by pipes are reflected in topology visualizations at the
country level by connections between Germany and Argentina.
Topology
Core Functionality 5-21
Connectivity between places is based on the connectivity of devices and equipment
associated with them. The UIM topology model automatically determines the implied
interconnections between the different levels of the hierarchy based on associations.
The topology visualization reflects the aggregation of topology data. The top level of
the visualization shows only nodes that have no parent nodes. For example, the
visualization might display only the countries in which you operate. As you drill
down by expanding nodes in the visualization, child nodes become visible.
Continuing in this manner, you can expand and explore any node to the level of detail
you need.
For example, suppose your inventory includes logical devices in various locations
connected by pipes as shown in Figure 5–13.
Figure 5–13 Topology Example
If you view this arrangement in the topology visualization with only the top level
showing, you see connectivity between the USA and China and between the US and
Europe. No direct connectivity exists between China and Europe. At this level of
detail, all the connectivity created by underlying pipes, equipment, and devices has
been aggregated into a single edge between places. This uncluttered view enables you
to quickly see the overall relationships between the various communication elements
in the data.
Topology
5-22 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 5–14 High-Level Topology View
Expanding nodes in the topology reveals additional connectivity details. You do not
have to expand the entire topology. You can have one node expanded to the finest
level of detail while others remain at the coarsest level. For example, if you expand
Europe node and the Illinois and Texas nodes in the US, you can see that the
connectivity from the Europe to the US flows to and from Texas and Illinois. Traffic to
and from California and Europe is routed through one or both of the US states.
Similarly, the US connection to China is through California.
Figure 5–15 shows a topology visualization with nodes and edges expanded at
different levels.
Topology
Core Functionality 5-23
Figure 5–15 Partially Expanded Topology View
When you expand the topology fully, you can see the full details of the connectivity.
As a result, you can see exactly which paths exist between places and entities in your
inventory. Figure 5–16 shows a topology visualization with nodes and edges expanded
fully.
Entity Identification
5-24 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 5–16 Fully Expanded Topology View
The aggregation capabilities of UIM are used in areas other than topology
visualization. In path analysis, you can look for connectivity paths between place
nodes on one side and specific devices on the other. For example, you could search for
a connectivity path from Texas to a specific logical device in a city in Europe. You can
also specify that a connectivity path must flow through a particular device or location.
For example, you could require that traffic from Slough to Los Angeles flow through
Plano. See "Enabling Pipes Automatically with Path Analysis" for more information
about path analysis.
See the UIM Help for information about using topology visualization features.
Entity Identification
Most product, service, resource, and common business entities are identified in UIM
with IDs that are unique by entity type. For example, you can have an Equipment
entity and a Logical Device entity with the same ID, but you cannot have two
Equipment entities with the same ID.
Entity IDs are a useful way to distinguish between entities of the same type that are
not uniquely named. For example, you could have many different Equipment entities
for interface cards with similar or identical names, but their IDs make it possible to
identify them uniquely.
By default, entities that require a unique ID are set up to automatically generate IDs as
they are created in UIM. The following entity types are configured for automatic ID
generation by default.
Business interaction
Custom network address
Entity Identification
Core Functionality 5-25
Custom object
Device interface
Equipment holder
Equipment
Logical device
Logical device account
Media stream
Network
Party
Physical connector
Physical device
Physical port
Pipe
Place
Product
Service
In Design Studio, you can configure entity specifications with custom automatic ID
generation that specifies exactly what numbering scheme to use. For example, you
could define prefixes to designate various kinds of logical devices.You can also disable
automatic ID generation so that IDs must be entered manually when entities are
created in UIM. See the Design Studio Help for more information.
In addition, you can use extension points, rulesets, and Sequence specifications to
further customize entity IDs. See UIM Developers Guide for more information.
Entity Identification
5-26 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
6
Planning 6-1
6
Planning
This chapter describes the planning features included in Oracle Communications
Unified Inventory Management (UIM). You can use any combination of the following
features:
Business Interactions
Engineering Work Orders
Projects
Business Interactions
Business interactions make it possible for you to plan UIM actions and then execute
those actions at a time of your choosing. Each business interaction can include a
variety of actions such as fulfilling services, adding entities, changing entity
hierarchies, and so on. The changes resulting from these actions are called business
interaction items.
A business interaction can represent an arrangement such as service fulfillment, a
capital project, a maintenance request, or any other activity that you want to plan in
advance. When you complete a business interaction, all of its items are executed and
the results become available throughout the application.
When you make changes to your inventory while using a business interaction, you are
working in a business interaction context. (Working outside of a business interaction
context is called working in current inventory.) After you enter a business interaction
context, all additions, changes, or deletions you make are visible only in that context
until the business interaction is complete. You cannot see or work with the results of
an incomplete business interaction while working in current inventory.
For example, if the business interaction included the addition of a new entity, that
entity becomes visible in current inventory only when you complete the business
interaction. See "Understanding Business Interaction Contexts", "Understanding the
Business Interaction Life Cycle", and the UIM Help for more information.
Business interactions can include child business interactions. For example, a service
fulfillment business interaction could be organized into multiple separate child
interactions so that changes can be implemented in the right order and at the right
Note: You do not have to use business interactions to make changes
to the inventory. You can also make changes in current inventory. Such
changes are immediately effective and visible.
Business Interactions
6-2 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
times. You define child business interactions in the hierarchy of the parent business
interaction.
Child business interactions must be complete before parent interactions can be
completed. You can choose to complete business interactions individually or to
complete an entire business interaction hierarchy, starting from the lowest level.
Business interactions are UIM entities and you work with them in much the same way
as you work with other entity types. You define specifications for them in Design
Studio and create entities based on those specifications in UIM. See "Configuring
Business Interaction Specifications", "Working with Business Interactions in UIM", and
the UIM Help for more information.
Business interactions can be created and managed by using Web services. See
"Understanding Business Interactions with External Systems" for more information.
Business Interaction-Enabled Entities
The following entity types are business-interaction enabled, meaning that actions
taken on them can be included as items in business interactions:
Connectivity (including design versions)
Custom network address
Custom object
Device interface*
Equipment
Equipment holder*
Logical device (including logical device configurations)
Logical device account (including logical device account configurations)
Media stream
Network (including network configurations)
Network node*
Network edge*
Physical connector*
Physical device
Physical port*
Pipe (including pipe configurations)
Pipe termination point*
Telephone number
The entities marked with asterisks in the preceding list are not displayed as items in
the Business Interaction Summary page in the UIM user interface. These entities
cannot stand alone; they are always part of another entity. As a result, the Business
Interaction Summary page displays their parent entities.
Entity configurations (and design versions in the case of Connectivity entities) can be
included in business interactions. If you set the business interaction context while
working in the parent entity, any new configurations you create and any changes you
make to existing configurations, are included in the business interaction. You can also
Business Interactions
Planning 6-3
set the business interaction context individually from a configuration page (or Design
Version tab for channelized connectivity.)
Service configurations can also be included in business interactions, but only when the
Service Fulfillment Web services create the business interactions. See "Understanding
Business Interactions with External Systems" for more information.
Understanding the Business Interaction Life Cycle
Business interactions have a life cycle that begins with their creation and ends with
their cancellation or completion. Changing the life cycle status of a business interaction
can affect the inventory status of an entity contained in a business interaction item. For
example, the status of a logical device added through a business interaction changes
from Pending Install to Installed when the business interaction is completed.
The life cycles of resources included in business interactions are different from those of
resources outside a business interaction context. See "Inventory Status for Resources in
Business Interactions and Work Orders" and "Inventory Status for Pipes and
Connectivities in Business Interactions and Work Orders" for more information.
The business interaction statuses are:
Created
In Progress
Canceled
Completed
See "Business Interaction and Engineering Work Order Life Cycles and Statuses" for
definitions of these status.
You change business interaction statuses with menu commands in the Business
Interaction Summary page or with Web service operations. See "Understanding
Business Interactions with External Systems" for more information. The one exception
is the transition from Created to In Progress status, which occurs automatically when
you add, change, or delete items in the context of a newly created business interaction.
Table 61 lists the business interaction status transition changes you can make:
Business Interactions
6-4 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Table 6–1 Business Interaction Life Cycle Transitions
Transition
Affect on Business Interaction
Status
Affect on Status of Entities Business Interaction
Items
Approve
Configurations
No change. This action changes service configurations from In
Progress to Designed. Service configurations already
in Designed status are not affected.
The operation fails if any service configuration in the
business interaction is in Issued, Complete, Pending
Cancel, or Canceled status.
Cancel Changes the status from Created or
In Progress to Canceled.
The transition fails if any child
business interactions are in Created
or In Progress status or if the
business interaction has any
completed children.
This action affects service configurations and their
parent services, but the exact result depends on the
combination of statuses of the services and service
configurations. The effect of a business interaction
cancellation is the same as the direct cancellation of
the service configuration. See "Service Life Cycles and
Statuses" for more information.
By default, the operation fails if any service
configuration in the business interaction is in
Completed status. You can configure UIM to allow
cancellation in this situation. See UIM System
Administrators Guide for more information.
Cancel Hierarchy Changes the status of the parent
business interaction and all of its
children from Created or In Progress
to Canceled. Children in Completed
or Canceled status are unaffected.
This action affects service configurations and their
parent services, but the exact result depends on the
combination of statuses of the services and service
configurations. The effect of a business interaction
cancellation is the same as the direct cancellation of
the service configuration. See "Service Life Cycles and
Statuses" for more information.
By default, the operation fails if any service
configuration in the business interaction is in
Completed status. You can configure UIM to allow
cancellation in this situation. See UIM System
Administrators Guide for more information.
Business Interactions
Planning 6-5
Understanding Business Interaction Contexts
The content of a business interaction is the set of items that represent actions, such as
creating or deleting an entity, that you take while you are in the context of that
business interaction. You can work in only one context at a time.
Changes you make while in a business interaction context are not visible in current
inventory until the business interaction is completed. Similarly, changes you make in
one business interaction are not visible in another business interaction context, even if
the other business interaction is a child of the first.
The inventory status of an entity can be different in different business interaction
contexts. For example, you can deactivate an entity in a business interaction while it
Complete Changes the status from In Progress
to Completed.
The transition fails if any child
business interaction is in Created or
In Progress status.
This action changes the statuses of entities to reflect
the actions defined in the business interaction items.
This action changes the status of service
configurations and their parent services. The general
result is to change service configurations from Issued
to Completed status, which causes the parent services
to change to In Service status.
The exact result depends on the combination of
statuses of the services and service configurations.
The effect of a business interaction completion is the
same as the direct completion of the service
configuration. See "Service Life Cycles and Statuses"
for more information.
The transition fails if any service configuration in the
business interaction is in In Progress or Designed
status.
Complete
Hierarchy
Changes the status of the parent
business interaction and all of its
children from In Progress to
Completed.
This action changes the statuses of entities to reflect
the actions defined in the items in all business
interactions in the hierarchy.
This action changes the status of service
configurations and their parent services. The general
result is to change service configurations from Issued
to Completed status, which causes the parent services
to change to In Service status.
The exact result depends on the combination of
statuses of the services and service configurations.
The effect of a business interaction completion is the
same as the direct completion of the service
configuration. See "Service Life Cycles and Statuses"
for more information.
The transition fails if any service configuration in the
business interaction hierarchy is in In Progress or
Designed status.
Issue
Configurations
No change. This action changes the status of service
configurations from Designed to Issued. Service
configurations already in Issued status are not
affected.
The operation fails if any service configuration in the
business interaction is in In Progress status. Service
configurations in Completed, Pending Cancel, or
Canceled status are skipped.
Table 6–1 (Cont.) Business Interaction Life Cycle Transitions
Transition
Affect on Business Interaction
Status
Affect on Status of Entities Business Interaction
Items
Business Interactions
6-6 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
remains active in current inventory. The current inventory status is updated to reflect
the business interaction when you complete the interaction.
It is important to be aware of whether you are working in current inventory or in a
business interaction context. In the UIM user interface, the context is displayed in the
about the entity type label in entity pages. If you are working outside of a business
interaction context, the context is shown as Current. If you are working in a business
interaction context, the context indicator displays the name and ID of the current
business interaction. You can switch contexts by selecting from the context indicator.
If you navigate to a Business Interaction Summary page, you are automatically
switched to the context of that business interaction. When you navigate to a Summary
page for an entity that is not business interaction enabled, you automatically exit your
business interaction context and work in current inventory. You switch back to your
previous context when you navigate to a business-interaction-enabled entity.
You cannot create entity configurations while working in a business interaction
context. This restriction applies to the three business-interaction-enabled entity types
that can have configurations: logical device, pipe, and network.
Figure 6–1 shows a Logical Device Account Search page. The context indicator
displays the name and ID of the current business interaction, 125-Disconnect Mobile
Service. See the UIM Help for more information about how to set and change the
business interaction context.
Figure 6–1 Business Interaction Context Indicator
Understanding Business Interactions with External Systems
External systems can cooperate with UIM to complete tasks such as engineering work
orders or service orders. These external systems use Web services to communicate
with UIM. For example, Oracle Communication Order and Service Management
(OSM) can use the Service Fulfillment Web services to send service orders to UIM for
fulfillment. See UIM Web Services Developer’s Guide for more information about Web
services in general and the Service Fulfilment Web services in particular.
In UIM, requests from external systems are modeled as business interactions.
Depending on the nature of a request, it could result in the creation of parent and child
Business Interactions
Planning 6-7
business interactions that represent various aspects of the request. Subsequent requests
can modify the original business interaction.
For example, a service order from OSM requires the creation of one or more service
entities in UIM. UIM responds to the service order request by creating a business
interaction that includes items for the initial service configuration or configurations.
(The service configuration versions are included as items in the business interaction,
but the parent services are not.) Depending on the structure of the service order,
additional child business interactions may be required for additional services involved
in the order.
When all the tasks required for service fulfillment in UIM are complete and approved,
the service order business interaction is completed, which results in the status of the
related service entities being set to In Service.
A subsequent service order could be received from OSM to change or disconnect the
service. This request results in a new service order business interaction that includes
the service configuration version that includes the work required to change or
disconnect the service. This business interaction is separate from the original business
interaction under which the service was created.
Business interactions that are created as the result of requests by Web services are
somewhat different from business interactions created in the UIM user interface:
Requests from external systems are sent in the form of XML documents. UIM uses
the content of the XML documents to create or update business interactions. The
documents are stored as attachments to the relevant business interactions for
future reference. You can view the XML documents associated with a business
interaction in the Transactions Log area of the Business Interaction Summary
page. See the UIM Help for more information.
Business interactions managed by Web services can include service configurations
as items. This capability is not available in business interactions created in the user
interface. After a business interaction has been created by Web services, however,
you can use the user interface to work with the service configurations it includes.
The parent service of a service configuration in a business interaction does not
appear as a business interaction item. The parent service is visible in current
inventory. Business interaction status transitions do cause status transitions in
parent services, however. See Table 6–1, " Business Interaction Life Cycle
Transitions" for more information about these transitions.
Configuring Business Interaction Specifications
Every business interaction entity in UIM must be based on a Business Interaction
specification, including those created by Web services. In Design Studio, you can
define separate specifications for business interactions that represent different types of
activities, such as service orders, infrastructure projects, and so on.
As with other entity specifications, you can add characteristics to describe the business
interaction or provide additional details. For example, you could add an Order Type
characteristic as a list with appropriate values. See the Design Studio Help and the
UIM Help for more information about defining Business Interaction specifications.
A Service Order specification is included in the base cartridges for use as the basis for
service fulfillment activities managed by Web services. The specification includes an
extension point so that you can write a ruleset to automate the actions that are
required to create a service order in UIM. See UIM Cartridge Guide for more
information about this specification.
Business Interactions
6-8 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Working with Business Interactions in UIM
You can create business interactions in the UIM user interface or by using Web
services. In either case, you can work with them in the user interface using the same
techniques you use with other entities. You can search for business interactions based
on various criteria. You work with business interactions in Business Interaction
Summary pages.
There are three major tasks that you perform in Business Interaction Summary pages:
You define the contents of the business interaction by creating or modifying
entities in a Business Interaction Summary page. These changes are included in the
business interaction without your having to set the context explicitly.
You can also define the contents of a business interaction by setting the business
interaction context while working elsewhere in UIM. The changes you make while
in a business interaction context are included in the corresponding business
interaction.
You create child business interactions in the Business Interaction Hierarchy area.
You change the life cycle status of the business interaction and its items.
Figure 6–2 shows a Business Interaction Summary page for a service fulfillment order.
The business interaction contains items for adding a new telephone number and a new
logical device (a SIM card).
Figure 6–2 Business Interaction with New Items
See the UIM Help for detailed information about working with business interactions
in the UIM user interface.
Deleting Entities in Business Interactions
Some special rules apply to entities that you delete from business interactions:
If the entity was created in the context of that business interaction, the entity is
deleted entirely when you delete it from the Business Interaction Items section.
Engineering Work Orders
Planning 6-9
If an entity was created in current inventory updated in a business interaction, it is
listed as Updated in the Business Interact Items section. Deleting it will remove it
from the business interaction, but not from inventory.
If you delete an entity from the Items section in a Business Interaction Summary page,
entities associated with the deleted entity may also be deleted in. To avoid deleting
associated entities, you can:
Search for the entity while in the business interaction context and delete it from
the Search Results section.
Manually remove the associations before deleting the entity from the Business
Interaction Summary page.
Engineering Work Orders
Engineering work orders enable you to plan resource infrastructure changes and have
all your changes take effect at the same time.
For example, you could use an engineering work order to create a GSM Base Station
Subsystem (BSS) network. The BSS network could include:
Network locations to represent Node B cell sites and the RNC (Radio Network
Controller).
Logical devices to represent RNC and Node B hardware.
Connectivity entities to represent the ABis connections between the RNC and
Node B locations.
A network entity, network nodes, and network edges that you use to represent the
BSS network and its elements.
Engineering work orders are closely related to business interactions and share almost
identical functionality. (Engineering work order entities are created using a specially
configured Business Interaction specification.) Unless otherwise noted in the UIM
documentation or Help, you should follow the same procedures when working with
engineering work orders that you do when working with business interactions. See
"Business Interactions" and the UIM Help for more information about business
interactions.
Like business interactions, engineering work orders can be included in Web services,
such as the Service Fulfillment Web service. See UIM Web Services Developer's Guide for
information about implementing Web services.
As with business interactions, entities you add or change while working in an
engineering work order context remain in Pending Install status until you complete
the engineering work order. At that time, the statuses of the entities change to Installed
and the entities become available in live inventory. For example, you could create all
the BSS entities mentioned previously in an engineering work order context and make
them all available at a prearranged time.
Engineering work orders use the same context indicator as business interactions. The
context indicator appears at the top of entity Summary and Configuration Summary
pages. The phrase “Engineering Work Order” appears in the context indicator to
distinguish engineering work orders from business interactions.
Engineering work orders include a number of fields that do not appear in business
interactions. The information stored in these fields enables you to manage and
organize the activities associated with the engineering work order. Figure 6–3 shows
an Engineering Work Order Summary page.
Engineering Work Orders
6-10 Oracle Communications Unified Inventory Management Concepts
Figure 6–3 Engineering Work Order Summary Page
You use the Work Order Type field to categorize engineering work orders. You can
search for engineering work orders by type to monitor progress and assess resource
needs. By default, the following types are available:
Commissioning
Decommissioning
Field Work
Network Reconfiguration
Installation
Upgrade
Replacement
You can extend the Engineering Work Order specification in Design Studio to add
additional work order types, such as Routine, Preventative, or Emergency. See Design
Studio Help for information about extending specifications.
Engineering Work Order Summary pages also include fields where you can enter
URLs for related documents, such as drawings, schedules, and procedures. There are
three such fields: Work Order Document, Standard Operating Procedure, and
Engineering Drawing.
Projects
Planning 6-11
Engineering work orders are assigned to individuals who perform the tasks required
to complete them. The assigned person is shown in the Assigned To field in an
Engineering Work Order Summary page. You can search for engineering work orders
based on the Assigned To field to produce a simple work list for yourself or another
user.
The Assigned To field is populated with a list of users who are authorized in
WebLogic to access UIM. See UIM System Administrators Guide for more information
about WebLogic security.
See UIM Help for more information about the fields in the Engineering Work Order
Summary page.
To enable the use of engineering work orders in UIM, you must install the ora_uim_
workorder base cartridge. This cartridge includes a business interaction specification
that defines engineering work orders. While only a single Engineering Work Order
specification can be used in UIM, it can extended in Design Studio. See UIM
Installation Guide for more information about installing base cartridges. See Design
Studio Help for more information about extending specifications.
Projects
In UIM, you use projects to plan and organize network and channelized connectivity
maintenance activities, such as grooming and rehoming. For example, you could
create a project that includes all the activities related to a particular network
infrastructure change during a specified time period.
Each project can include any number of activities. An activity is a group of actions that
accomplish a goal of a particular type. For example, an activity might be the deletion
of a particular network node. To accomplish this task, the node itself and the logical
device it represents must be removed and connectivities must be groomed to reflect
the change.
When you create a project, it does not include any activities. You add activities
individually, specifying one of four types:
Groom
Rehome
Insert Node
Remove Node
See "Maintaining Channelized Connectivity and Network Resources" and the UIM
Help for information about each activity type.
Unlike most other entities, all Project entities are based on the same specification. You
can open the Managed Project specification in Design Studio and modify by adding
entity-level characteristics. After you deploy the ora_uim_basespecifications base
cartridge that contains these changes, all Project entities you create in UIM will include
the additional characteristics.
See the Design Studio Help for information about entity-level characteristics.
Note: To avoid confusion, the specification is called Managed Project
in Design Studio. Project entities are not the same thing as Design
Studio projects.