BT1056 Btech Syll Biotech R2013 14

User Manual: BT1056

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B.TECH. (FULL-TIME) - BIOTECHNOLOGY
CURRICULUM & SYLLABUS
2013 – 2014
Volume – I
(all courses except open electives)
FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY
SRM UNIVERSITY
SRM NAGAR, KATTANKULATHUR – 603 203
1 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
STUDENT OUTCOMES
The curriculum and syllabus for B.Tech programs (2013) conform to outcome
based teaching learning process. In general, ELEVEN STUDENT OUTCOMES (a-k)
have been identified and the curriculum and syllabus have been structured in such
a way that each of the courses meets one or more of these outcomes. Student
outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the
time of graduation. These relate to the skills, knowledge, and behaviors that
students acquire as they progress through the program. Further each course in
the program spells out clear instructional objectives which are mapped to the
Student outcomes.
The Student outcomes are
(a) An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and
interpret data
(c) An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired
needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social,
political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(d) An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
(e) An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(g) An ability to communicate effectively
(h) The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering
solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal context
(i) A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) A knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice.
2 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
B.Tech. Bio-Technology
Curriculum – 2013
(Applicable for students admitted from the academic year
2013-14 onwards)
SEMESTER I
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
PD1001
G
SOFT SKILLS I
1
0
1
1
MA1011
B
MATRICES AND CALCULUS
3
2
0
4
PY1001
B
PHYSICS
3
0
0
3
PY1002
B
PHYSICS LAB
0
0
2
1
CY1001
B
CHEMISTRY
3
0
0
3
CY1002
B
CHEMISTRY LAB
0
0
2
1
LE1002
G
VALUE EDUCATION
1
0
0
1
CE1001
E
BASIC CIVIL ENGINEERING
2
0
0
2
Courses from Table I
Student shall register for minimum 20 credits in I semester and minimum 20
credits in II semester. However student shall have registered for all the courses
enlisted under Semester I and II as well the courses in Table I by the time the
registration process is complete in II semester.
Keeping this in mind student shall register for the courses in I and II semesters.
Legend:
L- Number of lecture hours per week
T - Number of tutorial hours per week
P - Number of practical hours per week
C - Number of credits for the course
Category of courses:
G - General
B- Basic Sciences
E- Engineering Sciences and Technical Arts
P- Professional Subjects
3 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
PD1002
G
SOFT SKILLS II
1
0
1
1
MA1012
B
MULTIPLE INTEGRALS AND
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3
2
0
4
PY1003
B
MATERIAL SCIENCE
2
0
2
3
CY1003
B
PRINCIPLES OF
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
2
0
0
2
BT1002
P
HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND
HEALTH
2
0
0
2
BT1003
P
CELL BIOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1004
P
BIOCHEMISTRY
3
0
0
3
BT1005
P
BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY
0
0
4
2
LE1001
G
ENGLISH
1
2
0
2
TABLE I
COURSES WHICH CAN BE REGISTERED FOR EITHER IN I OR II SEMESTER
SEMESTER I / II
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
CS1001
G
PROGRAMMING USING
MATLAB
0
1
2
2
ME1001
E
BASIC MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING
2
0
0
2
EE1001
E
BASIC ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING
2
0
0
2
EC1001
E
BASIC ELECTRONICS
ENGINEERING
2
0
0
2
ME1005
E
ENGINEERING GRAPHICS
0
1
4
3
ME1004
E
WORKSHOP PRACTICE
0
0
4
2
NC1001/NS1001/
SP1001/YG1001
G
*NCC/NSS/NSO/YOGA
0
0
1
1
4 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
*NCC-National Cadet Corps
NSS-National Service Scheme
NSO-National Sports Organization (India)
SEMESTER III
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
LE1003/
LE1004/
LE1005/
LE1006/
LE1007
G
GERMAN LANGUAGE PHASE II /
FRENCH LANGUAGE PHASE II/
JAPANESE LANGUAGE PHASE II /
KOREAN LANGUAGE PHASE II /
CHINESE LANGUAGE PHASE II
2
0
0
2
PD1003
G
APTITUDE I
1
0
1
1
CH1051
E
CHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL
PROCESS CALCULATION
3
0
0
3
BT1006
P
LAB SAFETY AND ANALYTICAL
TECHNIQUES
2
0
0
2
BT1008
P
MICROBIOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1010
P
IMMUNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1012
P
GENETICS AND CYTOGENETICS
3
0
0
3
BT1007
P
LAB SAFETY AND ANALYTICAL
TECHNIQUES LAB
0
0
2
1
BT1009
P
MICROBIOLOGY LAB
0
0
4
2
BT1011
P
IMMUNOLOGY LAB
0
0
4
2
BT1013
P
CELL BIOLOGY LAB
0
0
4
2
TOTAL
17
0
15
24
Total No. of Contact Hours
32
SEMESTER IV
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
LE1008/
LE1009/
LE1010/
LE1011/
LE1012
G
GERMAN LANGUAGE PHASE II /
FRENCH LANGUAGE PHASE II/
JAPANESE LANGUAGE PHASE II /
KOREAN LANGUAGE PHASE II /
CHINESE LANGUAGE PHASE II
2
0
0
2
PD1004
G
APTITUDE II
1
0
1
1
5 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
SEMESTER IV
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
MA1034
B
BIO-STATISTICS
4
0
0
4
CH1052
E
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
PRINCIPLES I – MECHANICAL
OPERATIONS AND MOMENTUM
TRANSFER
3
0
0
3
CH1054
E
CHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL
ENGINEERING
THERMODYNAMICS
3
0
0
3
BT1014
P
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1016
P
ENZYME ENGINEERING AND
TECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1017
P
BIOPROCESS PRINCIPLES
3
0
0
3
CH1053
E
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
PRINCIPLES LAB
0
0
2
1
BT1015
P
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
LABORATORY
0
0
4
2
BT1018
P
BIOPROCESS AND ENZYME
TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY
0
0
2
1
P
Dep. Elective –I
3
0
0
3
TOTAL
25
0
9
29
Total No. of Contact Hours
34
SEMESTER V
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
PD1005
G
APTITUDE III
1
0
1
1
CH1055
E
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
PRINCIPLES II -HEAT AND MASS
TRANSFER
3
0
0
3
CH1056
E
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
PRINCIPLES II -HEAT AND MASS
TRANSFER LAB
0
0
2
1
BT1019
P
VECTOR BIOLOGY AND GENE
3
0
0
3
6 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
SEMESTER V
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
MANIPULATION
BT1021
P
ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1022
P
PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1024
P
ENVIRONMENTAL
BIOTECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1020
P
VECTOR BIOLOGY AND GENE
MANIPULATION LABORATORY
0
0
4
2
BT1023
P
PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY
LABORATORY
0
0
4
2
BT1047
P
INDUSTRIAL TRAINING I (Training
to be undergone after IV semester)
0
0
1
1
P
Dep. Elective -II
3
0
0
3
Open Elective I
3
0
0
3
TOTAL
22
0
12
28
Total No. of Contact Hours
34
SEMESTER VI
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
PD1006
G
APTITUDE IV
1
0
1
1
BT1026
P
PHARMACEUTICAL
BIOTECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1027
P
BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING
3
0
0
3
BT1025
P
ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY LAB
0
0
4
2
BT1028
P
BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING
LABORATORY
0
0
2
1
BT1049
P
MINOR PROJECT
0
0
2
1
P
Dep. Elective III
3
0
0
3
Open Elective II
3
0
0
3
Open Elective III
3
0
0
3
TOTAL
16
0
9
20
Total No. of Contact Hours
25
7 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
SEMESTER VII
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
BT1029
P
PROTEIN ENGINEERING AND PROTEOMICS
3
0
0
3
BT1030
P
BIOSEPARATION TECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1032
P
ETHICAL ISSUES, RESEARCH
METHODOLOGY, AND INTELLECTUAL
PROPERTY RIGHTS
1
0
0
1
BT1031
P
BIOSEPARATION TECHNOLOGY LAB
0
0
2
1
BT1048
P
INDUSTRIAL TRAINING II (Training to be
undergone after VI semester)
0
0
1
1
P
Dep. Elective IV
3
0
0
3
P
Dep. Elective V
3
0
0
3
TOTAL
13
0
3
15
Total No. of Contact Hours
16
SEMESTER VIII
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
BT1050
P
MAJOR PROJECT / PRACTICE SCHOOL
0
0
24
12
TOTAL
0
0
24
12
Total No. of Contact Hours
24
8 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
DEPARTMENT ELECTIVES
Course
Code
Category
Course Name
L
T
P
C
BT1051
P
CANCER BIOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1052
P
STEM CELL BIOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1053
P
DRUG AND PHARMACEUTICAL
BIOTECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1054
P
COMPUTER SIMULATION AND
DRUG DESIGNING
3
0
0
3
BT1055
P
INDUSTRIAL FERMENTATION
TECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1056
P
BIOREACTOR DESIGN
3
0
0
3
BT1057
P
FOOD AND BEVERAGE
FERMENTATION TECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1058
P
BIOCHEMICAL REACTION
ENGINEERING
3
0
0
3
BT1059
P
BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1060
P
METAGENOMICS
3
0
0
3
BT1061
P
BIOENERGY
3
0
0
3
BT1062
P
ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1063
P
ANIMAL THERAPEUTICS
3
0
0
3
BT1064
P
TRANSGENIC ANIMALS
3
0
0
3
BT1065
P
VACCINE BIOTECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1066
P
MARINE BIOTECHNOLOGY
3
0
0
3
BT1067
P
PHYTOCHEMICAL TECHNIQUES
3
0
0
3
BT1068
P
PLANT HORMONES AND SIGNAL
TRANSDUCTION
3
0
0
3
BT1069
P
PATHOGENESIS-RELATED
PROTEINS IN PLANTS
3
0
0
3
BT1070
P
REGULATION OF GENE
EXPRESSION IN PLANTS
3
0
0
3
BT1071
P
BIOBUSINESS
3
0
0
3
9 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
SUMMARY OF CREDITS
SEMESTERS
Category
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
Total
%
G
(Excluding open
and
departmental
electives)
6
2
3
3
1
1
16
B
( Excluding open
and
departmental
electives)
12
9
-
4
25
13.89
E
( Excluding open
and
departmental
electives)
7
6
3
7
4
27
15.00
P
( Excluding open
and
departmental
electives)
10
18
12
17
10
09
12
88
48.89
Open Elective
3
6
9
5.00
Dept. Elective
3
3
3
6
15
8.33
Total
25
27
24
29
28
20
15
12
180
100
10 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
SEMESTER – I
PD1001
SOFT SKILLS-I
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 30
1
0
1
1
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To enhance holistic development of students and improve their employability
skills.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To develop inter personal skills and be an effective goal oriented team
player.
2.
To develop professionals with idealistic, practical and moral values.
3.
To develop communication and problem solving skills.
4.
To re-engineer attitude and understand its influence on behavior.
UNIT I - SELF ANALYSIS (4 hours)
SWOT Analysis, Who am I, Attributes, Importance of Self Confidence, Self Esteem
UNIT II - ATTITUDE (4 hours)
Factors influencing Attitude, Challenges and lessons from Attitude.
Change Management
Exploring Challenges, Risking Comfort Zone, Managing Change
UNIT III - MOTIVATION (6 hours)
Factors of motivation, Self talk, Intrinsic & Extrinsic Motivators.
UNIT IV - GOAL SETTING (6 hours)
Wish List, SMART Goals, Blue print for success, Short Term, Long Term, Life
Time Goals.
Time Management
Value of time, Diagnosing Time Management, Weekly Planner To do list,
Prioritizing work.
UNIT V - CREATIVITY (10 hours)
Out of box thinking, Lateral Thinking
11 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
Presentation
ASSESSMENT
1. A practical and activity oriented course which has continuous assessment for
75 marks based on class room interaction, activities etc.
2. Presentation – 25 marks
TEXT BOOK
1. INSIGHT, 2012, Career Development Centre, SRM Publications.
REFERENCES
1. Covey Sean, Seven Habits of Highly Effective Teens, New York, Fireside
Publishers, 1998.
2. Carnegie Dale, How to win Friends and Influence People, New York: Simon
& Schuster, 1998.
3. homas A Harris, I am ok, You are ok” , New York-Harper and Row, 1972
4. Daniel Coleman, Emotional Intelligence, Bantam Book, 2006
PD1001 - SOFT SKILLS-I
Course Designed by
Career Development Centre
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1
2
3
4
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
12 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
MA1011
MATRICES AND CALCULUS
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours =75 Hours
3
2
0
4
(Common to BT, BI, BME, BP, GE, FPE)
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To impart analytical ability in solving mathematical problems as applied to the
respective branches of Engineering.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To apply advanced matrix knowledge to Engineering problems.
2.
To improve their ability in trigonometry.
3.
To equip themselves familiar with the concepts of Differential calculus
4.
To expose to the concept of integral calculus
5.
To familiarize with the applications of differential and integral calculus
UNIT I - MATRICES (12 hours)
Review types of matrices, properties. Inverse matrix Cramer’s rule for solving a
system of linear equations. Rank of Matrix Consistency and Inconsistency of
a system of m linear equations in ‘n’ unknowns –Cayley Hamilton theorem
Eigen values and Eigen vectors of a real matrix.
UNIT II - TRIGONOMETRY (12 hours)
Review of complex numbers. De Moiver’s theorem and its applications. Expansion
of
sin n , cos nθ θ
in terms of
sin θ
and
cos θ
.Expansion of
tan nθ
in
terms of
tan
.Expansion of
n
sin θ
and
n
cos θ
in terms of sines and
cosines of multiples of
. Hyperbolic functions and inverse hyperbolic functions.
UNIT III - DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS (12 hours)
Differentiation and Derivatives of simple functions Successive Differentiation
Various forms of Algebraic and Trigonometric functions – Problems.
UNIT IV - INTEGRAL CALCULUS (12 hours)
Methods of integration Definite integrals and its properties-Reduction formula
for
x
ax n n n n m
e x , sin , cos x, sin x cos x
(without proof)-Problems.
13 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT V - APPLICATIONS OF DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS & INTEGRAL
CALCULUS (12 hours)
Applications of differential calculus & integral calculus. Tangent & Normal-Radius
of curvature – Velocity and acceleration. Integral calculus – Length & Area.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Kreyszig.E, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, 10th edition, John Wiley &
Sons. Singapore, 2012.
2. Ganesan.K, Sundarammal Kesavan, Ganapathy Subramanian.K.S, &
Srinivasan.V, “Engineering Mathematics”, Gamma publications, Revised
Edition, 2013.
REFERENCES
1. Grewal.B.S, “Higher Engg Maths, Khanna Publications,42nd Edition, 2012.
2. Veerajan.T, “Engineering Mathematics I”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co.,
New Delhi, 5th edition, 2006.
3. Kandasamy.P, etal. “Engineering Mathematics”, Vol.I (4th revised edition),
S.Chand &Co., New Delhi, 2000.
4. Narayanan.S, Manicavachagom Pillay.T.K, Ramanaiah.G, Advanced
Mathematics for Engineering students”, Volume I (2nd edition),
S.Viswanathan Printers and Publishers, 1992.
5. Venkataraman.M.K, “Engineering Mathematics” First Year (2nd edition),
National Publishing Co., Chennai, 2000.
MA 1011 MATRICES AND CALCULUS
Course Designed by
Department of Mathematics
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
E
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1-5
1-5
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engg. Sci.&
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
14 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
PY1001
PHYSICS
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours-45
3
0
0
3
Prerequisite
Nil
1.
To understand the general scientific concepts required for technology
2.
To apply the Physics concepts in solving engineering problems
3.
To educate scientifically the new developments in engineering and
technology
4.
To emphasize the significance of Green technology through Physics
principles
UNIT I - MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLIDS AND ACOUSTICS (9 hours)
Mechanical properties of solids: Stress-strain relationship Hooke’s law
Torsional Pendulum Young’s modulus by cantilever Uniform and non-uniform
bending –– Stress-strain diagram for various engineering materials Ductile and
brittle materials Mechanical properties of Engineering materials (Tensile
strength, Hardness, Fatigue, Impact strength, Creep) Fracture Types of
fracture (Elementary ideas).
Acoustics: Intensity Loudness Absorption coefficient and its determination
Reverberation Reverberation time Factors affecting acoustics of buildings and
their remedies Sources and impacts of noise Sound level meter Strategies
on controlling noise pollution Ultrasonic waves and properties Methods of
Ultrasonic production (Magnetostriction and Piezoelectric) Applications of
Ultrasonics in Engineering and medicine.
UNIT II - ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES, CIRCUITS AND APPLICATIONS (9 hours)
Del operator grad, div, curl and their physical significances - displacement
current Maxwell’s equations (derivation) Wave equation for electromagnetic
waves Propagation in free space Poynting theorem Characteristic of
Transverse electric and magnetic waves Skin depth Rectangular and circular
waveguides High powered vacuum-based cavity magnetrons Applications
including radars, microwave oven and lighting systems.
15 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT III - LASERS AND FIBER OPTICS (9 hours)
Lasers: Characteristics of Lasers Einstein’s coefficients and their relations
Lasing action Working principle and components of CO2Laser, Nd-YAG Laser,
Semiconductor diode Laser, Excimer Laser and Free electron Laser Applications
in Remote sensing, holography and optical switching Mechanism of Laser
cooling and trapping.
Fiber Optics: Principle of Optical fiber – Acceptance angle and acceptance cone
Numerical aperture V-number Types of optical fibers (Material, Refractive
index and mode) Photonic crystal fibers Fiber optic communication Fiber
optic sensors.
UNIT IV - QUANTUM MECHANICS AND CRYSTAL PHYSICS (9 hours)
Quantum mechanics: Inadequacies of Classical Mechanics Duality nature of
electromagnetic radiation De Broglie hypothesis for matter waves
Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle –Schrödinger’s wave equation Particle
confinement in 1D box (Infinite Square well potential). Crystal Physics: Crystal
directions Planes and Miller indices Symmetry elements Quasi crystals
Diamond and HCP crystal structure Packing factor Reciprocal lattice
Diffraction of X-rays by crystal planes Laue method and powder method
Imperfections in crystals.
UNIT V - GREEN ENERGY PHYSICS (9 hours)
Introduction to Green energy Solar energy: Energy conversion by photovoltaic
principle Solar cells Wind energy: Basic components and principle of wind
energy conversion systems Ocean energy: Wave energy Wave energy
conversion devices Tidal energy single and double basin tidal power plants
Ocean Thermal Electric Conversion (OTEC) Geothermal energy: Geothermal
sources (hydrothermal, geo-pressurized hot dry rocks, magma) Biomass:
Biomass and bio-fuels bio-energies from wastages Fuel cells: H2O2
Futuristic Energy: Hydrogen Methane Hydrates Carbon capture and storage
(CCS).
* One problem sheet consisting of 10 to 15 problems is to be prepared for
each unit and discussed in the class.
* Few problems based on design considerations related to appropriate
branches of engineering can be incorporated in each problem sheet.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Thiruvadigal.J.D, Ponnusamy.S, Sudha.D. and Krishnamohan. M, Physics
for Technologists”, Vibrant Publication, Chennai, 2013
2. Dattu R.Joshi, Engineering Physics”, Tata McGraw- Hill, New Delhi, 2010.
16 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
REFERENCES
1. Wole Soboyejo, “Mechanical Properties of Engineered Materials”, Marcel
Dekker Inc., 2003.
2. Frank Fahy, Foundations of Engineering Acoustics”, Elsevier Academic
Press, 2005.
3. Alberto Sona, Lasers and their applications”, Gordon and Breach Science
Publishers Ltd., 1976.
4. David J. Griffiths, Introduction to electrodynamics”, 3rd ed., Prentice Hall,
1999.
5. Leonard. I. Schiff, “Quantum Mechanics”, Third Edition, Tata McGraw Hill,
2010.
6. Charles Kittel, "Introduction to Solid State Physics", Wiley India Pvt. Ltd, 7th
ed., 2007.
7. Godfrey Boyle, Renewable Energy: Power sustainable future”, 2nd edition,
Oxford University Press, UK, 2004.
PY1001 PHYSICS
Course Designed by
Department of Physics and Nanotechnology
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
G
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1
4
2
3
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
--
x
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
17 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
PY1002
PHYSICS LABORATORY
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours – 30
0
0
2
1
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
The purpose of this course is to develop scientific temper in experimental
techniques and to reinforce the physics concepts among the engineering students
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To gain knowledge in the scientific methods and learn the process of
measuring different Physical variables
2.
Develop the skills in arranging and handling different measuring instruments
3.
Get familiarized with experimental errors in various physical measurements
and to plan / suggest on how the contributions could be made of the same
order, so as to minimize the errors.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Determination of Young’s modulus of a given material Uniform / Non-
uniform bending methods.
2. Determination of Rigidity modulus of a given material – Torsion pendulum
3. Determination of dispersive power of a prism – Spectrometer
4. Determination of laser parameters divergence and wavelength for a given
laser source –laser grating/ Particle size determination using laser
5. Study of attenuation and propagation characteristics of optical fiber cable
6. Calibration of voltmeter / ammeter using potentiometer
7. Construction and study of IC regulation properties of a given power supply
8. Study of electrical characteristics of a solar cell
9. Mini Project – Concept based Demonstration
TEXT BOOKS
1. Thiruvadigal.J.D, Ponnusamy.S, Sudha.D. and Krishnamohan.M, Physics
for Technologists”, Vibrant Publication, Chennai, 2013
2. Shukla R.K. and Anchal Srivastava, Practical Physics”, 1st Edition, New Age
International (P) Ltd, New Delhi, 2006.
REFERENCES
1. Souires.G.L, Practical Physics:” 4th Edition, Cambridge University, UK,
2001.
2. Chattopadhyay.D, Rakshit P. C. and Saha.B, An Advanced Course in
Practical Physics”, 2nd ed., Books & Allied Ltd., Calcutta, 1990.
18 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
PY1002 PHYSICS LABORATORY
Course Designed by
Department of Physics and Nanotechnology
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
H
i
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1
3
2
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
--
x
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
CY1001
CHEMISTRY
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours – 45
3
0
0
3
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To enable the students to acquire knowledge in the principles of chemistry for
engineering applications
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
The quality of water and its treatment methods for domestic and industrial
applications.
2.
The classification of polymers, different types of polymerizations,
preparation, properties and applications of important polymers and FRPs.
3.
The phase rule and its application to one and two component systems.
4.
The principle, types and mechanism of corrosion and protective coatings.
5.
The classification and selection of lubricants and their applications.
6.
The basic principles, instrumentation and applications of analytical
techniques
UNIT I - WATER TREATMENT (9 hours)
Water quality parameters: Physical, Chemical & Biological significance -
Hardness of water - estimation of hardness (EDTA method) - Dissolved oxygen –
determination (Winkler’s method), Alkalinity - determination - disadvantages of
using hard water in boilers: Scale, sludge formation - disadvantages - prevention
- treatment: Internal conditioning - phosphate, carbon and carbonate conditioning
methods - External: Zeolite, ion exchange methods - desalination - reverse
osmosis and electrodialysis - domestic water treatment.
19 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT II - POLYMERS AND REINFORCED PLASTICS (9 hours)
Classification of polymers - types of polymerization reactions - mechanism of
addition polymerization: free radical, ionic and Ziegler - Natta - effect of structure
on the properties of polymers - strength, plastic deformation, elasticity and
crystallinity -Preparation and properties of important resins: Polyethylene, PVC,
PMMA, Polyester, Teflon, Bakelite and Epoxy resins - compounding of plastics -
moulding methods - injection, extrusion, compression and calendaring -
reinforced plastics - FRP – Carbon and Glass- applications.
UNIT III - PHASE EQUILIBRIA, LUBRICANTS AND ADHESIVES (9 hours)
Phase rule: Statement - explanation of the terms involved - one component
system (water system only). Condensed phase rule - thermal analysis - two
component systems: simple eutectic, Pb-Ag; compound formation, Zn-Mg.
Lubricants: Classification –solid, semi solid, liquid, emulsion- properties
selection of lubricants for different purposes, Adhesives: classification-natural,
synthetic, inorganic- Adhesive action - applications.
UNIT IV - CORROSION AND ITS CONTROL (9 hours)
Corrosion: Basic concepts - mechanism of chemical, electrochemical corrosion
- Pilling Bedworth rule Types of Electrochemical corrosion - galvanic corrosion
- differential aeration corrosion - pitting corrosion - stress corrosion
Measurement of corrosion (wt. loss method only) - factors influencing corrosion.
Corrosion control: Cathodic protection - sacrificial anodic method - corrosion
inhibitors. Protective coatings: surface preparation for metallic coatings - electro
plating (copper plating) and electroless plating (Nickel plating) - chemical
conversion coatings - anodizing, phosphating & chromate coating.
UNIT V - INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS (9 hours)
Basic principles, instrumentation and applications of potentiometry, UV - visible
spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy and flame
photometry.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Kamaraj.P & Arthanareeswari.M, Applied Chemistry”, 9th Edition,
Sudhandhira Publications, 2012.
2. Dara.S.S, “A Text book of Engineering Chemistry, 10th Edition, S.Chand &
Company Ltd., New Delhi, 2003
20 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
REFERENCES
1. Jain.P.C and Monika Jain, "Engineering Chemistry", Danpat Rai publishing
company (P) Ltd, New Delhi, 2010.
2. Helen P Kavitha, “Engineering Chemistry I, Scitech Publications, 2nd
edition, 2008.
CY1001 CHEMISTRY
Course Designed by
Department of Chemistry
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
H
i
j
k
x
x
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objective with student
outcome
1-6
1,5
3
2
4
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
--
x
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
CY1002
CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours – 30
0
0
2
1
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To apply the concepts of chemistry and develop analytical skills for applications in
engineering.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To enable the students to understand the basic concepts involved in the
analyses.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Preparation of standard solutions
2. Estimation of total, permanent and temporary hardness by EDTA method
3. Conductometric titration - determination of strength of an acid
4. Estimation of iron by potentiometry.
5. Determination of molecular weight of polymer by viscosity average method
6. Determination of dissolved oxygen in a water sample by Winkler’s method
21 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
7. Determination of Na / K in water sample by Flame photometry
(Demonstration)
8. Estimation of Copper in ore
9. Estimation of nickel in steel
10. Determination of total alkalinity and acidity of a water sample
11. Determination of rate of corrosion by weight loss method.
REFERENCES
1. Kamaraj & Arthanareeswari, Sudhandhira Publications Practical Chemistry
(work book), 2011.
2. Helen P. Kavitha “Chemistry Laboratory Manual”, Scitech Publications, 2008.
CY1002 CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
Course Designed by
Department of Chemistry
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objective with student
outcome
1
1
1
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts(E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
--
x
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
LE1002
VALUE EDUCATION
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours- 15
1
0
0
1
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To provide guiding principles and tools for the development of the whole person
recognizing that the individual is comprised of Physical, Intellectual, Emotional
and Spiritual dimensions.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To help individuals think about and reflect on different values.
2.
To deepen understanding, motivation and responsibility with regard to making
personal and social choices and the practical implications of expressing them
in relation to themselves, others, the community and the world at large.
3.
To inspire individuals to choose their own personal, social, moral and
spiritual values and be aware of practical methods for developing and
deepening.
22 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT I - INTRODUCTION (3 hours)
Definition, Relevance, Types of values, changing concepts of values
UNIT II - INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP BEHAVIOUR (3 hours)
Personal values Self Strengths (self-confidence, self-assessment, self-
reliance, self-discipline, determination, self-restraint, contentment, humility,
sympathy and compassion, gratitude, forgiveness) Weaknesses (Influences --
Peer pressure, familial and societal expectations, media)
UNIT III - SOCIETIES IN PROGRESS (3 hours)
Definition of society; Units of society; Communities ancient and modern
Agents of change – Sense of survival, security, desire for comfort and ease sense
of belonging, social consciousness and responsibility
UNIT IV - ENGINEERING ETHICS (3 hours)
Definition - Societies for engineers Code of Ethics Ethical Issues involved in
cross border research -- Ethical and Unethical practices case studies
situational decision making
UNIT V - SPIRITUAL VALUES (3 hours)
What is religion? -- Role of religion Misinterpretation of religion – moral policing
– Consequences -- Religion as spiritual quest – Aesthetics and religion
TEXT BOOK
1. Department of English and Foreign Languages SRM University, Rhythm of
Life”, SRM Publications, 2013.
REFERENCE
1. Values (Collection of Essays). Published by: Sri Ramakrishna Math,
Chennai-4. 1996.
LE1002 VALUE EDUCATION
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
F
g
h
i
J
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-3
1-3
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
23 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
CE1001
BASIC CIVIL ENGINEERING
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours=30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To get exposed to the glimpses of Civil Engineering topics that is essential for an
Engineer.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To know about different materials and their properties
2.
To know about engineering aspects related to buildings
3.
To know about importance of surveying and the transportation systems
4.
To get exposed to the rudiments of engineering related to dams, water
supply, and sewage disposal
UNIT I - BUILDING MATERILAS (6 hours)
Introduction – Civil Engineering – Materials: Bricks – composition – classifications
properties –uses. Stone classification of rocks quarrying dressing
properties –uses. Timber - properties uses –ply wood. Cement grades types
properties –uses. Steel types mild steel medium steel hard steel
properties uses market forms. Concrete grade designation properties
uses.
UNIT II - MATERIAL PROPERTIES (6 hours)
Stress – strain types Hook’s law three moduli of elasticity poisons ratio
relationship factor of safety. Centroid - center of gravity problems in
symmetrical sections only (I, T and channel sections). Moment of inertia, parallel,
perpendicular axis theorems and radius of gyration (definitions only).
UNIT III - BUILDING COMPONENTS (6 hours)
Building – selection of site – classification – components. Foundations –functions
classifications bearing capacity. Flooring requirements selection types
– cement concrete marble – terrazzo floorings. Roof – types and requirements.
UNIT IV - SURVEYING AND TRANSPORTATION (6 hours)
Surveying objectives classification principles of survey. Transportation
classification cross section and components of road classification of roads.
Railway cross section and components of permanent way –functions. Water
way – docks and harbor classifications – components. Bridge components of
bridge.
24 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT V - WATER SUPPLY AND SEWAGE DISPOSAL (6 hours)
Dams purpose selection of site types –gravity dam (cross section only).
Water supply objective quantity of water sources standards of drinking
water distribution system. Sewage classification technical terms septic
tank – components and functions.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Raju.K.V.B, Ravichandran.P.T, Basics of Civil Engineering”, Ayyappa
Publications, Chennai, 2012.
2. Rangwala,S.C, Engineering Materials”, Charotar Publishing House, Anand,
2012.
REFERENCES
1. Ramesh Babu, “Civil Engineering”, VRB Publishers, Chennai, 2000.
2. National Building Code of India, Part V, “Building Materials, 2005
3. Surendra Singh, Building Materials, Vikas Publishing Company, New Delhi,
1996.
CE1001 - BASIC CIVIL ENGINEERING
Course Designed by
Department of Civil Engineering
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-4
1-4
2-4
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd meeting of academic council , May 2013
25 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
SEMESTER – II
PD1002
SOFT SKILLS-II
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours – 30
1
0
1
1
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To enhance holistic development of students and improve their employability
skills.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To develop inter personal skills and be an effective goal oriented team player.
2.
To develop professionals with idealistic, practical and moral values.
3.
To develop communication and problem solving skills.
4.
To re-engineer attitude and understand its influence on behavior.
UNIT I - INTERPERSONAL SKILLS (6 hours)
Understanding the relationship between Leadership Networking & Team work,
Realizing Ones Skills in Leadership, Networking & Team Work, and Assessing
Interpersonal Skills Situation description of Interpersonal Skill.
Team Work
Necessity of Team Work Personally, Socially and Educationally
UNIT II - LEADERSHIP (4 hours)
Skills for a good Leader, Assessment of Leadership Skills
Change Management
Exploring Challenges, Risking Comfort Zone, Managing Change
UNIT III - STRESS MANAGEMENT (6 hours)
Causes of Stress and its impact, how to manage & distress, Understanding the
circle of control, Stress Busters.
Emotional Intelligence
What is Emotional Intelligence, emotional quotient why Emotional Intelligence
matters, Emotion Scales. Managing Emotions.
26 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT IV - CONFLICT RESOLUTION (4 hours)
Conflicts in Human Relations Reasons Case Studies, Approaches to conflict
resolution.
UNIT V - DECISION MAKING (10 hours)
Importance and necessity of Decision Making, process of Decision Making,
Practical way of Decision Making, Weighing Positives & Negatives.
Presentation
ASSESSMENT
1. A practical and activity oriented course which has a continuous assessment
for 75 marks based on class room interaction, activities etc.,
2. Presentation - 25 marks
TEXT BOOK
1. INSIGHT, 2009. Career Development Centre, SRM Publications.
REFERENCE
1. Covey Sean, Seven Habit of Highly Effective Teens, New York, Fireside
Publishers, 1998.
2. Carnegie Dale, How to win Friends and Influence People, New York: Simon
& Schuster, 1998.
3. Thomas A Harris, I am ok, You are ok”, New York-Harper and Row, 1972
4. Daniel Coleman, Emotional Intelligence, Bantam Book, 2006
PD1002 - SOFT SKILLS-II
Course Designed by
Career Development Centre
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1
2
3
4
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts(E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
27 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
MA 1012
MULTIPLE INTEGRALS AND DIFFERENTIAL
EQUATIONS
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours - 75
3
2
0
4
(Common to Bio group)
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To impart analytical ability in solving mathematical problems as applied to the
respective branches of Engineering.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To understand maxima and minima of two and three variables.
2.
To expose to the concepts of Differential equations
3.
To expose to the concepts of Multiple integrals.
4.
To expose to the concept of vector calculus
5.
To expose to the concept of three dimensional analytical geometry.
UNIT I - FUNCTIONS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES (12 hours)
Functions of two variables partial derivatives total differentiation Taylor’s
expansion maxima and minima of functions of two and three variables -
Jacobians.
UNIT II - DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (12 hours)
Differential equations of first order–Linear equations of second order with
constant coefficients and variable coefficients method of variation of
parameters.
UNIT III - MULTIPLE INTEGRALS (12 hours)
Double integration in Cartesian and polar coordinates Change of order of
integration –Triple integration in Cartesian coordinates.
UNIT IV - VECTOR CALCULUS (12 hours)
Review of Vector Algebra.Gradient, divergence and curl solenoidal, and
irrotational fields directional derivatives line integrals surface integrals
volume integrals, Integral theorems (without proof) and its applications-cubes
and parallelepipeds only
28 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT V - THREE DIMENSIONAL ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY (12 hours)
Direction cosines and direction ratios of a line angle between two lines.
Equation of a plane equation of straight line shortest distance between two
skew lines – coplanar lines.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Kreyszig.E, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, 10th edition, John Wiley
& Sons. Singapore, 2012.
2. Ganesan.K, Sundarammal Kesavan, Ganapathy Subramanian.K.S, &
Srinivasan.V, “Engineering Mathematics”, Gamma publications, Revised
Edition, 2013.
REFERENCES
1. Grewal B.S, Higher “Engineering Mathematics”, Khanna Publications, 42nd
Edition , 2012.
2. Veerajan.T, “Engineering Mathematics I”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co.,
New Delhi, 5th edition, 2006.
3. Kandasamy.P etal. Engineering Mathematics”, Vol.I (4th revised edition),
S.Chand &Co., New Delhi, 2000.
4. Narayanan.S, Manicavachagom Pillay.T.K, Ramanaiah.G, Advanced
Mathematics for Engineering students, Volume I (2nd edition),
S.Viswanathan Printers and Publishers, 1992.
5. Venkataraman.M.K, “Engineering Mathematics” First Year (2nd edition),
National Publishing Co., Chennai, 2000.
MA 1012 MULTIPLE INTEGRALS AND DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
Course Designed by
Department of Mathematics
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
D
E
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1-5
1-5
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engg. Sci.&
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
29 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
PY1003
MATERIALS SCIENCE
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 60
2
0
2
3
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
The course introduces several advanced concepts and topics in the rapidly
evolving field of material science. Students are expected to develop
comprehension of the subject and to gain scientific understanding regarding the
choice and manipulation of materials for desired engineering applications.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To acquire basic understanding of advanced materials, their functions and
properties for technological applications
2.
To emphasize the significance of materials selection in the design process
3.
To understand the principal classes of bio-materials and their functionalities
in modern medical science
4.
To get familiarize with the new concepts of Nano Science and Technology
5.
To educate the students in the basics of instrumentation, measurement, data
acquisition, interpretation and analysis
UNIT I - ELECTRONIC AND PHOTONIC MATERIALS (6 hours)
Electronic Materials: Fermi energy and Fermi–Dirac distribution function
Variation of Fermi level with temperature in intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors
– Hall effect – Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS) and their applications
Superconducting Materials: Normal and High temperature superconductivity
Applications.
Photonic Materials: LED LCD Photo conducting materials Photo detectors
Photonic crystals and applications Elementary ideas of Non-linear optical
materials and their applications.
UNIT II - MAGNETIC AND DIELECTRIC MATERIALS (6 hours)
Magnetic Materials: Classification of magnetic materials based on spin Hard
and soft magnetic materials Ferrites, garnets and magnetoplumbites Magnetic
bubbles and their applications Magnetic thin films Spintronics and devices
(Giant magneto resistance, Tunnel magneto resistance and Colossal magneto
resistance).
Dielectric Materials: Polarization mechanisms in dielectrics Frequency and
temperature dependence of polarization mechanism Dielectric loss Dielectric
waveguide and dielectric resonator antenna Piezoelectric, pyroelectric and
ferroelectric materials and their applications.
30 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT III - MODERN ENGINEERING AND BIOMATERIALS (6 hours)
Modern Engineering Materials: Smart materials Shape memory alloys
Chromic materials (Thermo, Photo and Electro) Rheological fluids Metallic
glasses – Advanced ceramics – Composites.
Bio-materials: Classification of bio-materials (based on tissue response)
Comparison of properties of some common biomaterials Metallic implant
materials (stainless steel, cobalt-based and titanium-based alloys) Polymeric
implant materials (Polyamides, polypropylene, Acrylic resins and Hydrogels)
Tissue replacement implants Soft and hard tissue replacements Skin implants
Tissue engineering Biomaterials for organ replacement (Bone substitutes)
Biosensor.
UNIT IV - INTRODUCTION TO NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY(6 hours)
Basic concepts of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Quantum wire Quantum
well Quantum dot fullerenes Graphene Carbon nanotubes Material
processing by chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition
Principle of SEM, TEM, AFM, Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM)
Scanning ion-conducting microscopy (SCIM) Potential uses of nanomaterials in
electronics, robotics, computers, sensors, sports equipment, mobile electronic
devices, vehicles and transportation – Medical applications of nanomaterials.
UNIT V - MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION (6 hours)
X-ray diffraction, Neutron diffraction and Electron diffraction– X-ray fluorescence
spectroscopy Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) Ultraviolet and
visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) Differential
Thermal Analysis (DTA) – Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC).
PRACTICAL EXPERIMENTS (30 hours)
1. Determination of resistivity and band gap for a semiconductor material – Four
probe method / Post-office box
2. Determination of Hall coefficient for a semiconducting material
3. To study V-I characteristics of a light dependent resistor (LDR)
4. Determination of energy loss in a magnetic material – B-H curve
5. Determination of paramagnetic susceptibility – Quincke’s method
6. Determination of dielectric constant for a given material
7. Calculation of lattice cell parameters – X-ray diffraction
8. Measurement of glucose concentration – Electrochemical sensor
9. Visit to Advanced Material Characterization Laboratory (Optional)
31 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
TEXT BOOKS
1. Thiruvadigal.J.D, Ponnusamy,S..Sudha.D and Krishnamohan.M, Materials
Sciences”, Vibrant Publication, Chennai, 2013
2. Rajendran.V, “Materials Science”, Tata McGraw- Hill,New Delhi,2011
REFERENCES
1. Rolf E. Hummel, “Electronic Properties of Materials”, 4th ed., Springer, New
York, 2011.
2. Dennis W. Prather, Photonic Crystals: Theory, Applications, and
Fabrication”, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2009.
3. James R. Janesick, Scientific Charge-Coupled Devices”, Published by SPIE
- The International Society for Optical Engineering, Bellingham, Washington,
2001.
4. David M. Pozar, “Microwave Engineering”, 3rd ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2005.
5. Silver.F. and Dillion.C, Biocompatibility: Interactions of Biological and
Implantable Materials”, VCH Publishers, New York, 1989.
6. Severial Dumitriu, Polymeric Biomaterials Marcel Dekker Inc, CRC Press,
Canada 2001.
7. Cao.G, Nanostructures and Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Properties and
Applications”, Imperial College Press, 2004.
8. Pradeep.T, A Text Book of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology”, Tata
McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2012.
9. Sam Zhang, “Materials Characterization Techniques”, CRC Press, 2008.
PY1003 MATERIALS SCIENCE
Course Designed by
Department of Physics and Nanotechnology
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
H
i
j
k
x
x
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1
5
4
2
3
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
--
x
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
32 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
CY1003
PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
The course provides a comprehensive knowledge in environmental science,
environmental issues and the management.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
To enable the students
1.
To gain knowledge on the importance of environmental education and
ecosystem.
2.
To acquire knowledge about environmental pollution- sources, effects and
control measures of environmental pollution.
3.
To understand the treatment of wastewater and solid waste management.
4.
To acquire knowledge with respect to biodiversity, its threats and its
conservation and appreciate the concept of interdependence.
5.
To be aware of the national and international concern for environment for
protecting the environment.
UNIT I - ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND ECOSYSTEMS (6 hours)
Environmental education: Definition and objective. Structure and function of an
ecosystem ecological succession –primary and secondary succession -
ecological pyramids pyramid of number, pyramid of energy and pyramid of
biomass.
UNIT II - ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION (6 hours)
Environmental segments – structure and composition of atmosphere - Pollution
Air, water, soil , thermal and radiation Effects acid rain, ozone layer depletion
and green house effect control measures determination of BOD, COD, TDS
and trace metals.
UNIT III- WASTE MANAGEMENT (6 hours)
Waste water treatment (general) primary, secondary and tertiary stages. Solid
waste management: sources and effects of municipal waste, bio medical waste -
process of waste management.
33 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT IV- BIODIVERSITY AND ITS CONSERVATION (6 hours)
Introduction: definition - genetic, species and ecosystem diversity bio diversity
hot spots - values of biodiversity: consumptive use, productive use, social,
ethical, aesthetic and option values - threats to biodiversity: habitat loss, poaching
of wildlife endangered and endemic species of India, Conservation of
biodiversity: in-situ and ex-situ conservations.
UNIT V- ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION (6 hours)
National concern for environment: Important environmental protection acts in
India water, air (prevention and control of pollution) act, wild life conservation
and forest act functions of central and state pollution control boards -
international effort key initiatives of Rio declaration, Vienna convention, Kyoto
protocol and Johannesburg summit.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Kamaraj.P & Arthanareeswari.M, Environmental Science Challenges and
Changes”, 4th Edition, Sudhandhira Publications, 2010.
2. Sharma.B.K. and Kaur, Environmental Chemistry”, Goel Publishing House,
Meerut, 1994.
REFERENCES
1. De.A.K, “Environmental Chemistry”, New Age International, New Delhi, 1996.
2. Helen P Kavitha, Principles of Environmental Science”, Sci tech
Publications, 2nd Edition, 2008.
CY1003 – PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Course Designed by
Department of Chemistry
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objective with student
outcome
5
2
4
1,3
3
2, 5
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
34 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
BT1002
HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND HEALTH
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours - 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To provide a basic understanding of human physiological systems for a better
comprehension of the problems faced by human.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To familiarize the students with the basic organization of organisms and
subsequent development to an organ system, and provide students with an
understanding of the function and regulation of the human body and
physiological integration of the organ systems to maintain homeostasis.
2.
The functional aspects of various organ systems will helpful for further
understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action in health
and disease.
UNIT I - PHYSIOLOGY OF CELLS AND MOLECULES (5 hours)
Functional organization of cell-Physiology of membranes- Signal transduction-
Regulation of gene expression- Action potential- Cellular physiology of skeletal,
cardiac and smooth muscle
UNIT II - CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM (5 hours)
Organization and physiology of neurons-Circuits of the central nervous system-
Autonomic nervous system-Neuronal microenvironment
UNIT III - CARDIOVASCULAR AND RESPIRATORY SYSTEMS (7 hours)
Organization of the cardiovascular system-Arteries and veins-Cardiac
electrophysiology-Heart as a pump-Organization of respiratory system-Mechanics
of respiration-Acid/base physiology-Gas exchange in lungs
UNIT IV - GASTROINTESTINAL AND RENAL SYSTEMS (7 hours)
Organization of the GI system-Gastric function-Pancreas and salivary glands-
Hepatobiliary function-Organization of the urinary system-Glomerular filtration and
Renal blood flow-Integration of salt and water balance
UNIT V - ENDOCRINE AND REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEMS (6 hours)
Organization of the endocrine control-Endorine glands-Regulation of endocrine
glands-Male and female reproductive system-Fertilization, pregnancy, and
lactation
35 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
TEXT BOOKS
1. Boron.W.F. and Boulpaep.E.L,“Medical physiology,”, Elsevier, 2005.
2. Khurana, “Essentials of Medical Physiology,” Elsevier India, 2008.
REFERENCE
1. Bruce M. Koeppen and Bruce A. Stanton, Berne & Levy Physiology,”6th
Updated Edition, Mosby, 2009.
BT1002 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND HEALTH
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
G
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1
2
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Bio-
technology
Bioprocess Engineering
Chemical
Engineering
x
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
BT1003
CELL BIOLOGY
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours – 45
3
0
0
3
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To provide a basic understanding of human physiological systems for a better
comprehension of the problems faced by humans.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To study cell structure and functions of organelles and understand the
mechanism of cellular transport within and outside the cell membrane
2.
To focus on different receptors and model of signaling and introduce the
concept of cell signaling and their role in diseases
UNIT I - AN OVERVIEW OF CELLS AND CELL RESEARCH (9 hours)
Origin and evolution of cells, cells as experimental models, tools of cell biology
chemistry of cells molecular composition of cells, central role of enzymes,
metabolic energy, biosynthesis of cell constituents, cell membrane.
36 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT II - CELL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION – I (9 hours)
Nucleus, Endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and Lysosomes, Bioenergetics
and Metabolism – Mitochondria, Chloroplasts, Peroxisomes.
UNIT III - CELL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION – II (9 hours)
The cytoskeleton and cell movement, cell surface transport of small molecules,
Endocytosis, cell –cell interactions-Adhesion junctions-Tight junctions-Gap
junctions- Plasmodesmata
UNIT IV - CELL SIGNALING – CELL REGULATION (9 hours)
Signaling molecules and their receptors, functions, pathways of intracellular signal
transduction the Cell Cycle –Mitosis and Meiosis –Cell death and cell renewal-
Programmed cell death-Stem cells- Embryonic stem cells and therapeutic cloning.
UNIT X - DISEASES OF CELLS (9 hours)
Epithelial cells and Cancer – Neurobiology and Neurodegenerative diseases
TEXT BOOK
1. Geoffrey M. Cooper and Robert E. Hausman,“The Cell: A Molecular
Approach,” Fifth Edition, ASM Press and Sinauer Associates, 2009.
REFERENCES
1. Channarayappa,Cell biology,” Universities Press, 2010.
2. Rastogi.S.C, “Cell biology,” New Age International publishers, 2005.
3. Cecie Starr, Biology: Concepts and applications,” Sixth edition, Thomson,
2006.
BT1003 CELL BIOLOGY
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
G
h
I
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1
2
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Bio-
technology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical
Engineering
x
--
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
37 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
BT1004
BIOCHEMISTRY
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours – 45
3
0
0
3
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To provide an understanding of the functions of various biomolecules and their
metabolism.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To study structural and functional properties of carbohydrates, proteins,
lipids and nucleic acids
2.
To emphasize the role of biomolecules by providing basic information on
specific metabolic diseases and disorders
UNIT I - INTRODUCTION TO BIOCHEMISTRY (12 hours)
Introduction-Chemical bonds-pH-Buffers-Carbohydrates-Lipids-Proteins
UNIT II - METABOLISM OF CARBOHYDRATES (8 hours)
Introduction to Metabolism-Glycolysis-Citric acid cycle-Gluconeogenesis-
Glycogen metabolism-Glycogenesis-Glycogenolysis-Biochemical aspects of
Diabetes Mellitus
UNIT III - PROTEIN METABOLISM (9 hours)
Introduction-Metabolism of amino acids-Transamination-Deamination-Metabolism
of ammonia-Urea cycle-Biosynthesis of amino acids-Disorders of tyrosine
(phenylalanine) metabolism
UNIT IV - FATTY ACID METABOLISM AND NUCLEIC ACID METABOLISM
(8 hours)
Introduction-Fatty acid oxidation-Ketone bodies & Ketogenesis-Biosynthesis of
Fatty acids-Eicosanoids-Cholesterol Biosynthesis-Lipoproteins-Disorders of Lipid
metabolism-Nucleic acids: Biosynthesis of Purine and Pyrimidines-Degradation of
purine nucleotides and pyrimidine nucleotides-Disorders of Purine and pyrimidine
metabolism
UNIT V - OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION (8 hours)
Introduction-Bioenergetics, High energy compounds, Biological oxidation-Electron
transport chain, Oxidative phospholyration, Chemiosmotic theory-Shuttle pathway
– Glycerol phosphate Shuttle, Malate aspartate Shuttle –Shunt pathways
38 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
TEXT BOOKS
1. Jain, J L, Jain, Nitin, Sunjay Jain, Fundamentals of Biochemistry”, S. Chand
Group, ISBN: 8121924537.
2. Satyanarayana.U & U. Chakrapani, Biochemistry,Books and Allied (p) Ltd.,
ISBN: 8187134801.
REFERENCES
1. David L. Nelson, Albert Lester Lehninger, Michael M. Cox, Lehninger
Principles of Biochemistry”, Edition 5, illustrated, W. H. Freeman, 2008.
2. Jeremy M. Berg, John L. Tymoczko, Lubert Stryer, “Biochemistry”, Ed. 7, W.
H. Freeman, 2012.
BT1004 BIOCHEMISTRY
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
G
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1
2
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engg. Sci. & Tech.
Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Bio-
technology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical
Engineering
x
--
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
BT1005
BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours – 60
0
0
4
2
Prerequisite
BT 1004
PURPOSE
To establish the basics of practical biochemistry and to provide a platform for
understanding and analyzing the biomolecules
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To teach laboratory safety and standard operating procedures of common
laboratory equipment’s
2.
To impart skills in preparation of solutions and biological buffers
3.
To extend knowledge in analysis, estimation and comparison of biomolecules
in normal and diseased conditions
4.
To offer exposure on modern separation techniques for biomolecules
39 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Introduction to commonly used instruments (pH meter, Spectrophotometer,
Centrifuge, Microscopes etc..) and laboratory safety
2. pH measurements and preparation of buffers
3. Qualitative analysis of carbohydrates (Monosaccharide Hexo, Pentose,
Aldo, Keto sugars, Disaccharides Reducing and non-reducing sugars,
Polysaccharides)
4. Estimation of blood glucose and comparison of normal and diabetes mellitus
samples
5. Estimation of blood plasma proteins
6. Separation of amino acids on Thin layer chromatography
7. Quantification of cholesterol and triglycerides from blood
8. Biochemical estimation of nucleic acid using spectrophotometer
9. HPLC determination of caffeine in urine – Demo
10. Purification of biomolecules using FPLC - Demo
REFERENCE
1. Laboratory Manual
BT1005 BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
i
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objective with student
outcomes
1
1
4
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad area
Bio-
technology
Bioprocess
Engineering
ChemicalEngineering
x
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
40 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
LE1001
ENGLISH
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours-45
1
2
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To help students achieve proficiency in English and develop their professional
communication skills to meet the demand in the field of global communication to
enable them to acquire placement anywhere with ease and confidence.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To enable students improve their lexical, grammatical and communicative
competence.
2.
To enhance their communicative skills in real life situations.
3
To assist students understand the role of thinking in all forms of
communication.
4.
To equip students with oral and appropriate written communication skills.
5.
To assist students with employability and job search skills.
UNIT I - INVENTIONS (9 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary – Tense and Concord:
2. Listening and Speaking Common errors in Pronunciation (Individual
sounds); Process description (Describing the working of a machine, and the
manufacturing process)
3. Writing – Interpretation of data (Flow chart, Bar chart)
4. Reading -- (Reading Comprehension -- Answering questions)
UNIT II - ECOLOGY (9 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary Error Analysis Synonyms and Antonyms,
Parallelisms
2. Listening and Speaking - Conducting Meetings
3. Writing Notice, Agenda, Minutes , letters to the editor via email : Email
etiquette
4. D Reading Comprehension – Summarizing and Note-making
UNIT III - SPACE (9 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary – tense and concord; word formation
2. Listening and Speaking Distinction between native and Indian English
(Speeches by TED and Kalam) – accent, use of vocabulary and rendering;
3. Writing – Definitions and Essay writing
4. Reading Comprehension – Predicting the content
41 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT IV - CAREERS (9 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary –Homonyms and Homophones
2. Listening and Speaking – – Group Discussion
3. Writing .Applying for job, cover letter and resume
4. Reading, etymology (roots; idioms and phrases), Appreciation of creative
writing.
UNIT V - RESEARCH (9 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary – Using technical terms, Analogies
2. Listening and Speaking -- Presentation techniques (Speech by the learner)
3. Writing – Project Proposal
4. Reading Comprehension -- Referencing Skills for Academic Report Writing
(Research Methodology Various methods of collecting data) Writing a
report based on MLA Handbook
TEXTBOOK
1. Department of English and Foreign Languages. English for Engineers”, SRM
University Publications, 2013.
REFERENCES
1. Dhanavel.S.P, “English and Communication Skills for Students of Science
and Engineering,Orient Blackswan Ltd., 2009.
2. Meenakshi Raman and Sangeetha Sharma.Technical Communication-
Principles and Practice”, Oxford University Press, 2009.
3. Day.R.A, Scientific English: A Guide for Scientists and Other Professionals”,
2nd ed. Hyderabad: Universities Press, 2000.
LE1001 ENGLISH
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
G
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-5
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering Sciences
and Technical Arts
(E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
42 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
SEMESTER I/II
CS1001
PROGRAMMING USING MATLAB
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 45
0
1
2
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
This Lab Course will enable the students to understand the fundamentals and
programming knowledge in MATLAB.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To learn the MATLAB environment and its programming fundamentals
2.
Ability to write Programs using commands and functions
3.
Able to handle polynomials, and use 2D Graphic commands
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Practicing MATLAB environment with simple exercises to familiarize
Command Window, History, Workspace, Current Directory, Figure window,
Edit window, Shortcuts, Help files.
2. Data types, Constants and Variables, Character constants, operators,
Assignment statements.
3. Control Structures: For loops, While, If control structures, Switch, Break,
Continue statements.
4. Input-Output functions, Reading and Storing Data.
5. Vectors and Matrices, commands to operate on vectors and matrices, matrix
Manipulations.
6. Arithmetic operations on Matrices, Relational operations on Matrices, Logical
operations on Matrices.
7. Polynomial Evaluation, Roots of Polynomial, Arithmetic operations on
Polynomials.
8. Graphics: 2D plots, Printing labels, Grid & Axes box, Text in plot, Bar and Pie
chart.
TEXT BOOK
1. Bansal.R.K, Goel.A.K, Sharma.M.K, MATLAB and its Applications in
Engineering”, Pearson Education, 2012.
REFERENCES
1. Amos Gilat, “MATLAB-An Introduction with Applications”, Wiley India, 2009.
2. Stephen.J.Chapman, “Programming in MATLAB for Engineers”, Cengage
Learning, 2011.
43 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
CS1001 PROGRAMMING USING MATLAB
Course Designed by
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objective with student
outcome
2,3
1-3
1
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
ME1001
BASIC MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To familiarize the students with the basics of Mechanical Engineering.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To familiarize with the basic machine elements
2.
To familiarize with the Sources of Energy and Power Generation
3.
To familiarize with the various manufacturing processes
UNIT I - MACHINE ELEMENTS– I (5 hours)
Springs: Helical and leaf springs Springs in series and parallel. Cams: Types of
cams and followers – Cam profile.
UNIT II - MACHINE ELEMENTS– II (5 hours)
Power Transmission: Gears (terminology, spur, helical and bevel gears, gear
trains). Belt drives (types). Chain drives. Simple Problems.
UNIT III - ENERGY (10 hours)
Sources: Renewable and non-renewable (various types, characteristics,
advantages/disadvantages). Power Generation: External and internal combustion
engines Hydro, thermal and nuclear power plants (layouts, element/component
description, advantages, disadvantages, applications). Simple Problems.
44 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT IV - MANUFACTURING PROCESSES - I (5 hours)
Sheet Metal Work: Introduction Equipments Tools and accessories Various
processes (applications, advantages / disadvantages). Welding: Types –
Equipments Tools and accessories Techniques employed -applications,
advantages / disadvantages – Gas cutting – Brazing and soldering.
UNIT V - MANUFACTURING PROCESSES– II (5 hours)
Lathe Practice: Types - Description of main components Cutting tools Work
holding devices Basic operations. Simple Problems. Drilling Practice:
Introduction – Types – Description – Tools. Simple Problems.
TEXT BOOKS
1. Kumar.T, Leenus Jesu Martin and Murali.G, “Basic Mechanical Engineering”,
Suma Publications, Chennai, 2007.
2. PrabhuT.J, Jai Ganesh.V and Jebaraj.S, “Basic Mechanical Engineering”,
Scitech Publications, Chennai, 2000.
REFERENCES
1. Hajra Choudhary.S.K and HajraChoudhary.A.K, Elements of Workshop
Technology”, Vols. I & II, Indian Book Distributing Company Calcutta, 2007.
2. Nag.P.K, “Power Plant Engineering”, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2008.
3. Rattan.S.S, “Theory of Machines, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2010.
ME1001 BASIC MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Course Designed by
Department of Mechanical Engineering
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1- 3
1- 3
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
sciences(B)
Engineering
sciences and
technical art (E)
Professional
subjects (P)
--
--
x
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of the Academic Council , May 2013
45 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
EE1001
BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
This course provides comprehensive idea about circuit analysis, working
principles of machines and common measuring instruments.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
Understand the basic concepts of magnetic circuits, AC & DC circuits.
2.
Explain the working principle, construction, applications of DC & AC
machines and measuring instruments.
3.
Gain knowledge about the fundamentals of wiring and earthling
UNIT I - FUNDAMENTALS OF DC CIRCUITS (6 hours)
Introduction to DC and AC circuits, Active and passive two terminal elements,
Ohms law, Voltage-Current relations for resistor, inductor, capacitor , Kirchhoff's
laws, Mesh analysis, Nodal analysis, Ideal sources –equivalent resistor, current
division, voltage division
UNIT II - MAGNETIC CIRCUITS (6 hours)
Introduction to magnetic circuits-Simple magnetic circuits-Faraday's laws,
induced emfs and inductances
UNIT III - AC CIRCUITS (6 hours)
Sinusoids, Generation of AC, Average and RMS values, Form and peak factors,
concept of phasor representation, J operator. Analysis of R-L, R-C, R-L-C
circuits. Introduction to three phase systems - types of connections, relationship
between line and phase values.
UNIT IV - ELECTRICAL MACHINES & MEASURING INSTRUMENTS (6 hours)
Working principle, construction and applications of DC machines and AC
machines (1 - phase transformers, single phase induction motors: split phase,
capacitor start and capacitor start & run motors). Basic principles and
classification of instruments -Moving coil and moving iron instruments.
46 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT V - ELECTRICAL SAFETY, WIRING &INTRODUCTION TO POWER SYSTEM
(6 hours)
Safety measures in electrical system- types of wiring- wiring accessories-
staircase, fluorescent lamps & corridor wiring- Basic principles of earthing-Types
of earthing- Simple layout of generation, transmission & distribution of power.
TEXT BOOK
1. Dash.S.S, Subramani.C, Vijayakumar.K, “Basic Electrical Engineering”, First
edition, Vijay Nicole Imprints Pvt.Ltd,2013
REFERENCES
1. Smarajt Ghosh, Fundamentals of Electrical & Electronics Engineering”,
Second edition, PHI Learning, 2007.
2. Metha V.K, Rohit Metha, Basic Electrical Engineering”, Fifth edition,
S.Chand & Co, 2012.
3. Kothari. D. P and Nagrath.IJ, Basic Electrical Engineering”, Second edition,
Tata McGraw - Hill, 2009
4. Bhattacharya.S.K, Basic Electrical and Electronics Engineering”, First
edition, Pearson Education, 2011
EE1001 - BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Course Designed by
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-3
1
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering Sciences
and Technical
Arts(E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
--
--
x
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
47 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
EC1001
BASIC ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours – 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
This course provides comprehensive idea about working principle, operation and
characteristics of electronic devices, transducers, Digital Electronics and
Communication Systems.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
At the end of the course students will be able to gain knowledge about the
1.
Fundamentals of electronic components, devices, transducers
2.
Principles of digital electronics
3.
Principles of various communication systems
UNIT I - ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS (4 hours)
Passive components resistors, capacitors & inductors (properties, common
types, I-V relationship and uses).
UNIT II - SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES (7 hours)
Semiconductor Devices - Overview of Semiconductors - basic principle,
operation and characteristics of PN diode, zener diode, BJT, JFET, optoelectronic
devices (LDR, photodiode, phototransistor, solar cell, optocouplers)
UNIT III - TRANSDUCERS (5 hours)
Transducers - Instrumentation general aspects, classification of transducers,
basic requirements of transducers, passive transducers - strain gauge, thermistor,
Hall-Effect transducer, LVDT, and active transducers piezoelectric and
thermocouple.
UNIT IV - DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (7 hours)
Number systems – binary codes - logic gates - Boolean algebra, laws & theorems
- simplification of Boolean expression - implementation of Boolean expressions
using logic gates - standard forms of Boolean expression.
UNIT V - COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS (7 hours)
Block diagram of a basic communication system frequency spectrum - need for
modulation - methods of modulation - principles of AM, FM, pulse analog and
pulse digital modulation AM / FM transmitters & receivers (block diagram
description only)
48 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
TEXT BOOKS
1. Thyagarajan.T, SendurChelvi.K.P, Rangaswamy.T.R, “Engineering Basics:
Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, New Age International,
Third Edition, 2007.
2. Somanathan Nair.B, Deepa.S.R, Basic Electronics”, I.K. International Pvt.
Ltd., 2009.
REFERENCES
1. Thomas L. Floyd, “Electronic Devices”, Pearson Education, 9th Edition, 2011.
2. Rajput.R.K, “Basic Electrical and Electronics Engineering”, Laxmi
Publications, First Edition, 2007.
EC1001 BASIC ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING
Course Designed by
Department of Electronics and Communication
Engineering
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
X
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1,2
,3
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences
(B)
Engineering
Sciences &
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
--
--
x
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
49 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
ME1005
ENGINEERING GRAPHICS
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 75
0
1
4
3
Prerequisite
Nil
First Angle Projection is to be followed - Practice
with Computer Aided Drafting tools
PURPOSE
1.
To draw and interpret various projections of 1D, 2D and 3D objects.
2.
To prepare and interpret the drawings of buildings.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To familiarize with the construction of geometrical figures
2.
To familiarize with the projection of 1D, 2D and 3D elements
3.
To familiarize with the sectioning of solids and development of
surfaces
4.
To familiarize with the Preparation and interpretation of building drawing
UNIT I - FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (2 hours)
Lettering – Two dimensional geometrical constructions – Conics – Representation
of three-dimensional objects Principles of projections Standard codes
Projection of points.
UNIT II - PROJECTION OF LINES AND SOLIDS (4 hours)
Projection of straight lines Projection of planes - Projection of solids Auxiliary
projections.
UNIT III - SECTIONS AND DEVELOPMENTS (3 hours)
Sections of solids and development of surfaces.
UNIT IV - PICTORIAL PROJECTIONS (4 hours)
Conversion of Projections: Orthographic projection Isometric projection of
regular solids and combination of solids.
UNIT V - BUILDING DRAWING (2 hours)
Plan, Elevation and section of single storied residential (or) office building with flat
RCC roof and brick masonry walls having not more than 3 rooms (planning /
designing is not expected in this course) with electrical wiring diagram.
PRACTICAL (60 hours)
50 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
TEXT BOOKS
1. Venugopal.K and Prabhu Raja.V, Engineering Graphics”, Eighth Edition
(Revised), New Age International Publishers, Chennai, 2007.
2. Natarajan.K.V, A Text Book of Engineering Graphics”, 21st Edition,
Dhanalakshmi Publishers, Chennai, 2012.
3. Jeyapoovan.T, Engineering Drawing and Graphics using AutoCAD”, Vikas
Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2010.
REFERENCES
1. Bethune.J.D, Engineering Graphics with AutoCAD 2013”, PHI Learning
Private Limited, Delhi, 2013.
2. Bhatt.N.D, Elementary Engineering Drawing (First Angle Projection)”,
Charotar Publishing Co., Anand, 1999.
3. Narayanan.K.L and Kannaiah.P, Engineering Graphics, Scitech
Publications, Chennai, 1999.
4. Shah.M.B and Rana.B.C, Engineering Drawing”, Pearson Education
(Singapore) Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 2005.
ME1005 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS
Course Designed by
Department of Mechanical Engineering
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-4
1-4
1-4
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
sciences(B)
Engineering
sciences and
technical art (E)
Professional
subjects (P)
--
--
x
--
4.
Approval
23rd meeting of the Academic Council , May 2013
51 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
ME1004
WORKSHOP PRACTICE
L
T
P
C
Total contact hours - 45
0
0
3
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To provide the students with hands on experience on different trades of
engineering like fitting, carpentry, smithy, welding and sheet metal.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To familiarize with the basics of tools and equipments used in fitting,
carpentry, sheet metal, welding and smithy
2.
To familiarize with the production of simple models in the above trades.
UNIT I - FITTING (9 hours)
Tools & Equipments – Practice in filing.
Making Vee Joints, Square, Dovetail joints and Key making - plumbing.
Mini project – Assembly of simple I.C. engines.
UNIT II - CARPENTRY (9 hours)
Tools and Equipments- Planning practice.
Making Half Lap, Dovetail, Mortise &Tenon joints.
Mini project - model of a single door window frame.
UNIT III - SHEET METAL (9 hours)
Tools and equipments– practice.
Making rectangular tray, hopper, scoop, etc.
Mini project - Fabrication of a small cabinet, dust bin, etc.
UNIT IV - WELDING (9 hours)
Tools and equipments -
Arc welding of butt joint, Lap joint, Tee fillet.
Demonstration of gas welding, TIG & MIG welding.
UNIT V - SMITHY (9 hours)
Tools and Equipments –
Making simple parts like hexagonal headed bolt, chisel.
52 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
TEXT BOOK
1. Gopal.T.V, Kumar.T and Murali.G, A first course on workshop practice
Theory, Practice and Work Book”, Suma Publications, Chennai, 2005.
REFERENCES
1. Kannaiah.P and Narayanan.K.C, Manual on Workshop Practice”, Scitech
Publications, Chennai, 1999.
2. Venkatachalapathy.V.S, First year Engineering Workshop Practice”,
Ramalinga Publications, Madurai, 1999.
3. Laboratory Manual.
ME1004 - WORKSHOP PRACTICE
Course Designed by
Department of Mechanical Engineering
1.
Student outcome
a
B
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
×
×
×
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1, 2
1, 2
1, 2
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Art(E)
Professional
Subjects
(P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd meeting of the Academic Council , May 2013
NC1001/
NS1001/
SP1001/
YG1001
NATIONAL CADET CORPS (NCC)/
NATIONAL SERVICE SCHEME (NSS)/
NATIONAL SPORTS ORGANIZATION (NSO) /
YOGA
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours – 15 (minimum, but may
vary depending on the course)
0
0
1
1
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To imbibe in the minds of students the concepts and benefits of
NCC/NSS/NSO/YOGA and make them practice the same
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To enable the students to gain knowledge about NCC/NSS/NSO/YOGA
and put the same into practice
53 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
NATIONAL CADET CORPS (NCC)
Any student enrolling as a member of National Cadet Core (NCC) will have to
attend sixteen parades out of twenty parades each of four periods over a span of
academic year.
Attending eight parades in first semester will qualify a student to earn the credits
specified in the curriculum. Grading shall be done based on punctuality, regularity
in attending the parades and the extent of active involvement.
NATIONAL SERVICE SCHEME (NSS)
A student enrolling as member of NSS will have to complete 60 hours of training /
social service to be eligible to earn the credits specified in the curriculum.
Grading shall be done by the faculty member handling the course based on
punctuality, regularity in attending the classes and the extent of active
involvement.
NATIONAL SPORTS ORGANIZATION (NSO)
Each student must select one of the following games/sports events and practice
for one hour per week. An attendance of 75% is compulsory to earn the credits
specified in the curriculum. Grading shall be done by the faculty member handling
the course based on punctuality, regularity in attending the classes and the extent
of active involvement.
List of games/sports:
Basket Ball, Football, Volley Ball, Ball Badminton, Cricket, Throw-ball, Track
events
Field events or any other game with the approval of faculty member.
YOGA
Benefits of Agnai Meditation -Meditation - Agnai, Asanas, Kiriyas, Bandas,
Muthras
Benefits of santhi Meditation - Meditation Santhi Physical Exercises (I & II)
Lecture & Practice - Kayakalpa Yoga Asanas, Kiriyas, Bandas, Muthras
Analysis of Thought - Meditation Santhi Physical Exercises III & IV
Benefits of Thuriyam - Meditation Thuriyam Kayakalpa Asanas, Kiriyas, Bandas,
Muthras
Attitude - Meditation Thuriyam Kayakalpa Asanas, Kiriyas, Bandas, Muthras
Importance of Arutkappy & Blessings - Meditation Thuriyam Kayakalpa Asanas,
Kiriyas, Bandas, Muthras
Benefits of Blessings - Meditation Santhi Kayakalpa Asanas, Kiriyas, Bandas,
Muthras
54 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
Assessment
An attendance of 75% is compulsory to earn the credits specified in the
curriculum. Grading shall be done by the faculty member handling the course
based on punctuality, regularity in attending the classes and the extent of active
involvement.
REFERENCES
1. Yogiraj Vethathiri Maharishi, "Yoga for Modern Age", Vethathiri Publishers,
1989
2. Vethathiri Maharishi.T, "Simplified Physical Exercises", Vethathiri Publishers,
1987.
NC1001/ NS1001/ SP1001/
YG1001
NATIONAL CADET CORPS (NCC)/
NATIONAL SERVICE SCHEME (NSS)/
NATIONAL SPORTS ORGANIZATION (NSO)/YOGA
Course Designed by
NCC/ NSS/ NSO/YOGA UNITS
1.
Student outcome
a
b
C
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
X
X
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences
(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
X
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
55 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
SEMESTER- III
LE1003
GERMAN LANGUAGE PHASE I
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours – 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
Germany offers infinite opportunities for students of engineering for higher
studies, research and employment in Germany. B.Tech Students are offered
German Language during their second year. Knowledge of the language will be
helpful for the students to adjust themselves when they go for higher studies.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To introduce the language, phonetics and the special characters in German
language
2.
To introduce German culture & traditions to the students.
3.
By the end of Phase I, the students will be able to introduce themselves
and initiate a conversation.
4.
We endeavor to develop the ability among the students to read and
understand small texts written in German
5.
To enable the students to elementary conversational skills.
UNIT I (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen: Phonetics Sich begrüßen - Sich und andere
vorstellen formell / informell - Zahlen von 1 bis 1 Milliarde - verstehen & sprechen
Grammatik: regelmäßige Verben im Präsens - “sein” und haben im Präsens -
Personalpronomen im Nominativ
UNIT II (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen Telefon Nummern verstehen und sprechen
Uhrzeiten verstehen und sagen Verneinung “nicht und kein” (formell und informell)
Grammatik : Wortstellung Aussagesatz W-Frage und Satzfrage (Ja/Nein
Frage) Nomen buchstabieren und notieren bestimmter und unbestimmter Artikel
und Negativartikel im Nom. & Akkusativ
UNIT III (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen Tageszeiten verstehen und über Termine sprechen
-Verabredungen verstehen - Aufgaben im Haushalt verstehen Grammatik
Personalpronomen im Akkusativ und Dativ - W-Fragen “wie, wer, wohin,wo, was
usw.- Genitiv bei Personennamen - Modalverben im Präsens “können, müssen,
möchten”
56 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT IV (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen Sich austauschen, was man kann, muss
Bezeichnungen Lebensmittel – Mengenangaben verstehen – Preise verstehen und
Einkaufzettel schreiben
Grammatik Wortstellung in Sätzen mit Modalverben Konnektor ”und “noch”-
kein-------mehr “wie viel, wie viele, wie alt, wie lange” –Possessivartikel im
Nominativ.
UNIT V (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen Freizeitanzeigen verstehen – Hobbys und Sportarten
Anzeigen für Freizeitpartner schreiben bzw. darauf antworten Vorlieben und
Abneigungen ausdrucken
Grammatik Verben mit Vokalwechsel im Präsens Modalverben im Präsens
dürfen, wollen und mögen- “haben und sein” im Präteritum regelmäßige Verben
im Perfekt – Konnektoren “denn, oder, aber
TEXT BOOK
1. Studio d A1. Deutsch als Fremdsprache with CD.(Kursbuch und Sprach
training).
REFERENCES
1. German for Dummies
2. Schulz Griesbach
LE1003 GERMAN LANGUAGE PHASE I
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-5
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
57 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
LE1004
FRENCH LANGUAGE PHASE I
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To enable the student learners acquire a basic knowledge of the French language
and concepts of general French for everyday interactions and technical French at
the beginner’s level and also to get to know the culture of France.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To enable students improve their grammatical competence.
2.
To enhance their listening skills.
3
To assist students in reading and speaking the language.
4.
To enhance their lexical and technical competence.
5.
To help the students introduce themselves and focus on their
communication skills.
UNIT I (6 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary: Usage of the French verb “se presenter”, a verb
of self- introduction and how to greet a person- “saluer”
2. Listening and Speaking – The authentic sounds of the letters of the French
alphabet and the accents that play a vital role in the pronunciation of the
words.
3. Writing – correct spellings of French scientific and technical vocabulary.
4. Reading -- Reading of the text and comprehension – answering questions.
UNIT II (6 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary Definite articles , “prepositions de lieu” subject
pron ouns
2. Listening and Speaking pronunciation of words like Isabelle, presentez and
la liaison vous etes, vous appelez and role play of introducing each other
group activity
3. Writing – particulars in filling an enrollment / registration form
4. Reading Comprehension – reading a text of a famous scientist and answering
questions.
58 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT III (6 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary verb of possession “avoir’ and 1st group verbs
“er”, possessive adjectives and pronouns of insistence- moi, lui..and
numbers from 0 to 20
2. Listening and Speaking –nasal sounds of the words like feminine, ceinture ,
parfum and how to ask simple questions on one’s name, age, nationality,
address mail id and telephone number.
3. Writing –conjugations of first group verbs and paragraph writing on self
introduction and introducing a third person.
4. Reading Comprehension reading a text that speaks of one’s profile and
answering questions
UNIT IV (6 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary –negative sentences, numbers from 20 to 69, verb
“aimer”and seasons of the year and leisure activities.
2. Listening and Speaking To express one’s likes and dislikes and to talk of
one’s pastime activities (sports activities), je fais du ping-pong and nasal
sounds of words – janvier, champagne
3. Writing- conjugations of the irregular verbs – faire and savoir and their usage.
Paragraph writing on one’s leisure activity- (passé temps favori).Conj
4. Reading- a text on seasons and leisure activities – answering questions.
UNIT V (6 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary les verbes de direction- to ask one’s way and to
give directions, verbes- pouvoir and vouloir and 2nd group verbs , a droite, la
premiere a gauche and vocabulary relating to accommodation.
2. Listening and Speaking to read and understand the metro map and hence
to give one directions – dialogue between two people.
3. Writing –paragraph writing describing the accommodation using the different
prepositions like en face de, derriere- to locate .
4. Reading Comprehension -- a text / a dialogue between two on location and
directions- ou est la poste/ la pharmacie, la bibliotheque?......
TEXT BOOK
1. Tech French
REFERENCES
1. French for Dummies.
2. French made easy-Goyal publishers
3. Panorama
59 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
LE1004 FRENCH LANGUAGE PHASE I
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-5
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
LE 1005
JAPANESE LANGUAGE PHASE I
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours- 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To enable students achieve a basic exposure on Japan, Japanese language and
culture. To acquire basic conversational skill in the language.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To help students learn the Japanese scripts viz. hiragana and a few basic
kanji.
2.
To make the students acquire basic conversational skill.
3.
To enable students to know about Japan and Japanese culture.
4.
To create an advantageous situation for the students to have better
opportunity for employability by companies who have association with
Japan.
UNIT I (8 hours)
1. Introduction to Japanese language. Hiragana Chart 1 - vowels and
consonants and related vocabulary.
2. Self introduction
3. Grammar – usage of particles wa, no, mo and ka and exercises
4. Numbers (1-100)
5. Kanji – introduction and basic kanjis – naka, ue, shita, kawa and yama
6. Greetings, seasons, days of the week and months of the year
7. Conversation – audio
8. Japan – Land and culture
60 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT II (8 hours)
1. Hiragana Chart 1 (contd.) and related vocabulary
2. Grammar – usage of kore, sore, are, kono, sono, ano, arimasu and imasu.
Particles – ni (location) and ga. Donata and dare.
3. Numbers (up to 99,999)
4. Kanji – numbers (1-10, 100, 1000, 10,000 and yen)
5. Family relationships and colours.
6. Conversation – audio
7. Festivals of Japan
UNIT III (5 hours)
1. Hiragana Charts 2&3, double consonants, vowel elongation and related
vocabulary
2. Lesson 3
3. Grammar - particles ni (time), kara, made and ne. Koko, soko, asoko and
doko.
4. Time expressions (today, tomorrow, yesterday, day before, day after)
5. Kanji – person, man, woman, child, tree and book
6. Directions – north, south, east and west
UNIT IV (5 hours)
1. Grammar - directions,-kochira, sochira, achira and dochira. Associated
vocabulary (mae, ushiro, ue, shita, tonari, soba, etc.)
2. Conversation – audio
3. Japanese art and culture like ikebana, origami, etc.
UNIT V (4 hours)
1. Kanji – hidari, migi, kuchi
2. Japanese sports and martial arts
TEXT BOOK
1. First lessons in Japanese, ALC Japan
REFERENCES
1. Japanese for dummies. Wiley publishing co. Inc., USA.
2. Kana workbook, Japan foundation
61 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
LE1005 JAPANESE LANGUAGE PHASE I
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
G
h
i
j
k
X
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1- 4
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences
(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
LE1006
KOREAN LANGUAGE PHASE I
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours-30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To enable students achieve a basic exposure on Korea, Korean language and
culture. To acquire basic conversational skill in the language.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To help students learn the scripts.
2.
To make the students acquire basic conversational skill.
3
To enable students to know about Korean culture.
4.
To create an advantageous situation for the students to have better
opportunity for employability by companies who have association with
Korea.
UNIT I (6 hours)
Lesson 1 < Introduction to Korean Language >, Lesson2 < Consonants and
Vowels >, <Basic Conversation, Vocabularies and Listening >
UNIT II (10 hours)
Lesson 3 < Usage of “To be >, Lesson 4 < Informal form of “to be” >,
Lesson 5 <Informal interrogative form of “to be >, Lesson 6 < To be, to have,
to stay >, < Basic Conversation, Vocabularies and Listening >
62 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT III (10 hours)
Lesson 7 < Interrogative practice and Negation >, < Basic Conversation,
Vocabularies and Listening >
UNIT IV (4 hours)
Lesson 8 < Korean Culture and Business Etiquette >, < Basic Conversation,
Vocabularies and Listening
TEXT BOOK
1. Korean through English 1 (Basic Korean Grammar and Conversation).
REFERENCES
1. Bharati Korean (Intermediate Korean Grammar).
2. Hand-outs.
3. Various visual mediums such Movie CD, Audio CD.
4. Collection of vocabularies for engineering field.
LE1006 KOREAN LANGUAGE PHASE I
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of
instructional
objectives with
student outcome
1-4
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences
(B)
Engineering Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
LE1007
CHINESE LANGUAGE PHASE I
L
T
P
C
Total contact hours- 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To enable students achieve a basic exposure on China, Chinese language and
culture. To acquire basic conversational skill in the language.
63 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To help students learn the Chinese scripts.
2.
To make the students acquire basic conversational skill.
3
To enable students to know about China and Chinese culture.
4.
To create an advantageous situation for the students to have better
opportunity for employability by companies who have association with
china.
UNIT I
Introduction of Chinese Language
UNIT II
Phonetics and Notes on pronunciation
a) 21 Initials:
b p m f d t n l g k h j q x z c s zh ch sh r
b) 37 Finals:
a o e i u ü
ai ou ei ia ua üe
an ong en ian uai üan
ang eng iang uan ün
ao er iao uang
ie uei(ui)
in uen(un)
ing ueng
iong uo
iou(iu)
c) The combination of Initials and Finals - Pinyin
UNIT III
Introduction of Syllables and tones
a) syllable=initial+final+tone
b) There are four tones in Chinese: the high-and-level tone, the rising tone,
the falling-and-rising tone, and the falling tone. And the markers of the
different tones.
UNIT IV
a) Tones practice
b) The Strokes of Characters
1. Introduction of Chinese Characters
2. The eight basic strokes of characters
64 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT V
1. Learn to read and write the Characters:
(eight) (not) (horse) (rice) (wood ).
2. classes are organized according to several Mini-dialogues.
TEXT BOOK
1. A New Chinese Course 1- Beijing Language and Culture University Press.
REFERENCES
1. New Practical Chinese Reader Textbook (1) Beijing Language and Culture
University Press.
2. 40 Lessons For Basic Chinese Course I – Shanghai Translation Press.
3. My Chinese Classroom - East China Normal University Press.
LE1007 CHINESE LANGUAGE PHASE I
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1 -
4
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences
(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
PD1003
APTITUDE-I
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 30
1
0
1
1
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To enhance holistic development of students and improve their employability
skills.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To improve aptitude, problem solving skills and reasoning ability of the
student.
2.
To collectively solve problems in teams & group.
65 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT I - NUMBERS (6 hours)
Types and Properties of Numbers, LCM, GCD, Fractions and decimals, Surds
UNIT II - ARITHMETIC – I (6 hours)
Percentages, Profit & Loss, Simple Interest & Compound Interest, , Clocks &
calendars
UNIT III - ALGEBRA – I (6 hours)
Logarithms, Problems on ages
UNIT IV - MODERN MATHEMATICS - I (6 hours)
Permutations, Combinations, Probability
UNIT V - REASONING (6 hours)
Logical Reasoning, Analytical Reasoning
ASSESSMENT
1. Objective type – Paper based / Online – Time based test
REFERENCE
1. Agarwal.R.S, “Quantitative Aptitude for Competitive Examinations”, S.Chand
Limited 2011
2. Abhijit Guha, “Quantitative Aptitude for Competitive Examinations”, Tata
McGraw Hill, 3rd Edition,2011
3. Edgar Thrope, “Test Of Reasoning for Competitive Examinations”, Tata
McGraw Hill, 4th Edition, 2012
4. “Other material related to quantitative aptitude
PD1003 – APTITUDE-I
Course Designed by
Career Development centre
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with Student
outcome
1
2
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts(E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
66 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
CH1051
CHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS
CALCULATION
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours - 45
3
0
0
3
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
This course prepares the students to formulate and solve material and energy
balances on chemical and biochemical process systems.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
To familiarize
1.
Basic principles of process calculations
2.
Material and Energy balance calculations
3.
Biochemical calculations
UNIT I - INTRODUCTION (9 hours)
Units and dimensions: the mole unit- mole fraction (or percent) and mass
fraction (or percent)- analyses of a mixture- concentrations- Basis of
calculations: predicting P-V-T properties of gases using the following equations
of state: ideal gas law- Van der Waals equation- Redlich-Kwong equation-
calculation of density.
UNIT II - CHEMICAL EQUATION AND MATERIAL BALANCES (9 hours)
Basics of chemical equation and stoichiometry: limiting reactant- excess
reactant- conversion- selectivity- yield. Basic concepts involved in material
balance calculations: material balance problems without chemical reactions:
membrane separation- mixing- drying- crystallization. Basic concepts of recycle-
bypass and purge streams.
UNIT III - COMBUSTION, PARTIAL SATURATION AND HUMIDITY (9 hours)
Introduction to combustion: flue gas- Orsat analysis- theoretical air- excess air-
determination of products of combustion of solid- liquid and gaseous fuels-
calculation of excess air. Humidity calculations: Saturated gas- partial saturation-
dew point- molal humidity- humidity- saturation molal humidity- saturation
humidity- percentage humidity- relative humidity. Material balances involved in the
following processes: dehydration- humidification- condensation
67 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT IV - ENERGY BALANCES (9 hours)
Thermodynamics: Heat capacity of gases- empirical equations for heat
capacities- mean heat capacities of gases- Kopp's rule- latent heats- calculation
of enthalpy from thermophysical properties.-Thermochemistry: Standard heat of
reaction- heat of formation- law of Hess- standard heat of combustion- heats of
formation calculated from heats of combustion- calculation of the standard heat
of reaction from heats of formation or combustion- effect of temperature on heat
of reaction- enthalpy changes in reactions with different temperatures- calculation
of theoretical flame temperature.
UNIT V - MATERIAL & ELEMENTAL BALANCES FOR BIOCHEMICAL
PROCESSES (9 hours)
Growth of stoichiometry and elemental balances: Energy balance for continuous
ethanol fermentation- Mass balance for production of penicillin -Conservation of
mass principle: Acetic acid fermentation process -Xanthan gum production-
Stoichiometric coefficient for cell growth -Embden–Meyerhoff–Parnas pathway.
TEXT BOOKS
1. David M. Himmelblau, "Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical
Engineering", 6th Edn., Prentice-Hall of India, New Delhi, 1998.
2. Hougen.O.A, Watsen.K.M and Ragartz. R.A, "Chemical Process Principles",
Part-I, John Wiley and Asia Publishing Co., 1976.
REFERENCES
1. Najafpour.G.D, Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology”, Elsevier,
2007.
2. Richard M. Felder, Ronald W. Rousseau, "Elementary Principles of Chemical
Processes", 3rd Edition by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Singapore, 2000.
3. Bhatt.B.I and Vora.S.M, "Stoichiometry", 3rd Edn., Tata McGraw-Hill
Publishing Company, New Delhi, 1996.
CH1051 CHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PROCESS CALCULATION
Course Designed by
Department of Chemical Engineering
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1
3
2
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
68 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
BT1006
LAB SAFETY AND ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours – 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of fundamental
concepts and underlying principles in the instruments used in biotechnology. In
addition, the course is expected to develop the analytical skill to enable them to
interpret the experimental data.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To provide the basic knowledge in the safety aspects and ethics
2.
To impart sufficient scientific understanding of the basic concepts in
instrumentation used in Biotechnology.
3.
To provide experience in various bioanalytical techniques.
4.
To apply the concepts in the interpretation of the data.
UNIT I - LABORATORY SAFETY (3 hours)
General rules - personal precautions lab safety- good laboratory practices-lab
maintenance. Apparatus, Materials and reagents, test systems, test and
REFERENCE substances and standard operating procedures.
UNIT II - BIOSAFETY AND ETHICS IN THE LABORATORY (5 hours)
Biosafety levels-containment levels-risk assessment guidelines - Regulations
specific o the biotechnology labs- Hazardous materials used in biotechnology-
disposal of chemical and hazardous chemicals- controlling the exposure of
hazardous chemicals-biological agents –handling and disposal-ethical issues.
UNIT III - BASIC INSTRUMENTS (5 hours)
Theory, instrumentation and applications of pH meter, colorimetry and
calorimetry.Electrophoresis- General principles- electrophoresis, PCR Machines-
handling and maintenance.
UNIT IV - MICROSCOPY & SPECTROSCOPY (9 hours)
Principle, working and applications of Microscopy- Dark-field, Phase contrast,
Fluorescence, Confocal, Polarization microscopy; Electron microscopy: TEM &
SEM.
69 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
Spectroscopy techniques-Measurement of transmittance and absorbance Beer
and Lambert’s law spectrophotometer analysis qualitative and quantitative
absorption measurements - General Principles, instrumentation, applications of
spectrometers – UV – visible, fluorescence, Infrared Spectroscopy- Atomic
absorption and Mass spectrometry.
UNIT V - CHROMATOGRAPHY (8 hours)
Chromatographic methods- General principles, instrumentation, applications,
classification of chromatographic techniques - Ion exchange, Gel filtration,
Affinity, Gas chromatography techniques and High Performance Liquid
Chromatography (HPLC).
TEXT BOOKS
1. Weinberg.S, “Good Laboratory Practice Regulation Drugs and Pharm. Sci.
Series,Vol. 124, 2nd Ed., Maracel Dekker Inc., N.Y.
2. Willard.H.H, Merrit.L.L, Dean.J.A, Settle.P.A, Instrumental Methods of
Analysis”, Van Nostrand, C B S Publishers &Distributors (1986).
3. Skoog.D.A, Heller.F.J, Nieman.T.A, Principles of Instrumental Analysis”, WB
Saunders
REFERENCES
1. Sharma.P. P, “How to practice GLP” Vandana Publication.
2. Day.R.A and Underwood.A.L, Quantitative Analysis”, 6th ed., Prentice Hall
of India Pvt. Ltd,(1993).
3. Hunson.J.W, Pharmaceutical Analysis”, Modern Methods, part A & B,
Marcel Dekker.
4. Schirmer.R.E, “Modern Methods of Pharmaceutical Analysis”, Vols 1, 2.
Boca Raton F.L., CRC Press.
5. Mann.C.K, et al., Instrumental Analysis “Harper & Row.
6. Eving.G.W, “Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis, 5th ed., Mc-Graw
Hill Book Company (1985)
7. Silverstein, “Spectrometric identification of Organic Compounds”, 6th Ed.,
John Wiley& Sons, Inc., 1996.
8. Vogel.A.I, “Textbook of Quantitative Chemical Analysis, 5th ed., Addison
Wesley Longman Singapore (1999).
70 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
BT1006 LAB SAFETY AND ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of
instructional
objectives with
student outcomes
1
2
3
4
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Biotechnology
Bioprocess
Chemical
Engineering
x
--
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
BT1008
MICROBIOLOGY
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours – 45
3
0
0
3
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
Introducing the fundamentals of microbiology through the study of the
characteristics of microorganisms, multiplication, growth in different media and
various metabolic pathways. Knowledge of these principles will enable students to
understand how they react under different conditions and how they cause
different diseases and their control
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To highlight the roles and characteristics of microorganisms
2.
To study in detail the growth of microorganisms and impact of environment
on their growth
3.
To evaluate explicitly, the metabolic pathways, role of microbes in public
health; insight into the physical and chemical control of microorganisms
UNIT I - INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY (9 hours)
Basic of microbial existence: History of Microbiology, classification, and
nomenclature of microorganisms. Microscopy: Light and Electron microscopy.
Microscopic examination of microorganisms-morphology and fine structure of
bacteria
71 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT II -MICROBIAL NUTRITION, GROWTH AND METABOLISM (9 hours)
Nutritional requirements of bacteria: Growth curve and Different methods to
quantitative bacterial growth.Aerobic and anaerobic bioenergetics- utilization of
energy. Biosynthesis of important molecules
UNIT III - MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY AND GENETICS (9 hours)
Fungi-Importance, characteristics, morphology, reproduction, physiology
cultivation,and Classification of fungi.Molds and repair association with other
organisms.Bacteriophages- General characteristics, Morphology and
structure.Classification and Nomenclature-Bacteriophages of E.coli.Replication-
Viruses of plants, animals,Structure, and Replication
UNIT IV - MICROBIAL INFECTIONS, TRANSMISSION, AND THEIR MODE OF
ACTION (9 hours)
Sources of infection: Portals of entry and Exit of microbes. Epidemiological
terminologies-Infectious diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae, Basidiomycetes,
and Sexually transmitted diseases- AIDS.Antimicrobial agents:Antibiotics-
Penicillins and Cephalosporins.Broad spectrum antibiotics: Antibiotics from
Prokaryotes. Antibacterial, Antifungal, and Antiviral agents- Mode of action.
Lantibiotics
UNIT V - APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY (9 hours)
Microbial metabolites:Microbial applications in agricultural, biotechnological,
pharmaceutical, and environmental applications. Physical, chemical, and
biological control of microorganisms.Host-microbe interactions such as plant-
microbe interaction& animal-microbe interaction
TEXT BOOKS
1. Pelczar et al., “Microbiology,7th ed., Mc Graw Hill, 2011.
2. Madigan et al., “Brock Biology of microorganisms”, 12th ed., Prentice Hall,
2008.
3. Davis et al., “Microbiology”, 6th ed., Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2010.
4. Joklik et al., “Zinsser’s Microbiology”, 11th ed., Mc Graw-Hill Professional,
2010.
5. Stainer Ry et al., “General Microbiology”, 5th ed., Prentice Hall 1986.
REFERENCES
1. Prescott et al., “Microbiology”, 11th ed., Mc Graw Hill, 2011.
2. Brooks et al., “Medical Microbiology”, 26th ed., Lange Med. 2012.
72 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
BT1008 MICROBIOLOGY
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
F
g
h
i
j
K
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of
instructional objectives
with student outcomes
1
2
3
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Biotechnology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical
Engineering
x
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
BT1010
IMMUNOLOGY
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours - 45
3
0
0
3
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
Aimed at introducing the science of immunology and a detailed study of various
types of immune systems and their classification, structure, and mechanism of
immune activation.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
To familiarize students with
1.
The immune system ,their structure and classification, genetic control of
antibody production, cellular immunology, mechanism of activation in
hypersensitive immune reaction
2.
The role of the immune molecules in infectious diseases, autoimmunity,
and cancer will be discussed
UNIT I - OVERVIEW OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM (10 hours)
Introduction: overview of the immune system-Lymphatic system, Lymphoid
organs, Cells of the immune system and their functions-Immune system. Innate
and Acquired immunity: Cells and processes of Innate immunity—Cells and
organs of the Acquired immunity-Anatomical and Physiological barriers; Innate
immune response and their recognition structures; Pathogen elimination.
Comparative immunity.Plant Immune system. Immunogens and Antigens:
Requirements for immunogenicity; major classes of antigens; antigen recognition
by B and T lymphocytes
73 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT II - ANTIBODY STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONS, B CELL FUNCTION
(10 hours)
Immunoglobulins: Structure and function-- Monoclonal antibodies. B Cell
generation and differentiation: BCR--Antibody diversity: Genetic basis—T-
dependent activation of B cells-B-lymphocyte signal transduction.
Cytokines.Complement.
UNIT III - ANTIGEN – ANTIBODY INTERACTIONS (8 hours)
Antigen- antibody interaction: antibody affinity and activity- Isolation of lymphoid
cells from blood and lymphoid organs--precipitation reaction, agglutination
reaction --Radioimmunoassay, ELISA, Western Blot, Immunoprecipitation-
Immunofluoresence, flow cytometry. Cell culture and experimental animal
models. Analysis of gene expression
UNIT IV - T CELL MATURATION, ACTIVATION, & DIFFERENTIATION (9 hours)
MHC, antigen processing and presentations: T-cell receptors--T-cell maturation,
activation and differentiation-Cell mediated effector responses-Function of CD8+
T cells
UNIT V - IMMUNE SYSTEM IN HEALTH & DISEASE (8 hours)
Hypersensitive reactions--Immune responses to infectious diseases--Tumor
Immunology-Vaccines-Autoimmunity
TEXT BOOKS
1. Richard Coico, Geoffrey Sunshine, Immunology: A short course6th Edition.
Wiley-Blackwell. 2009.
2. Kenneth Murphy, “Janeway’s Immunobiology,” 8th Edition, Garland, 2011.
REFERENCES
1. Sudha Gangal and Shubhangi Sontakke, “Textbook of basic and clinical
immunology,” Universities Press, 2013.
2. Thomas J. Kindt, Barbara A. Osborne, Richard A. Goldsby, Kuby
Immunology,” Sixth edition, W. H. Freeman and Company, 2006.
74 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
BT1010 IMMUNOLOGY
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1
2
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Biotechnology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical Engineering
x
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
BT1012
GENETICS AND CYTOGENETICS
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours - 45
3
0
0
3
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
This course introduces the fundamentals of genetics. It discusses the pattern of
inheritance, chromosome structure, sex linked genes and inherited disorders,
construction of linkage maps and population analysis.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To provide knowledge on the basic laws governing the pattern of inheritance
familiarize the students with the basic concepts and principles of nucleic
acids in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms
2.
To understand the concepts and experiments in preparation of linkage map.
3
To provide knowledge on inherited disorders and population genetics.
UNIT I - MENDELIAN GENETICS (10 hours)
Mendel’s experiments, Mendel’s laws, Gene interaction - Allelic and non-allelic
epistasis, Multiple allelism ABO and Rh factor inheritance, cytoplasmic
inheritance, sex determination, pedigree analysis autosomal, sex linked,
cytoplasmic.
75 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT II - LINKAGE AND RECOMBINATION MAPPING (9 hours)
Chromosome structure and organization, giant chromosomes, Linkage and
crossing over, cytological basis of crossing over Sterns experiment, Mapping
two and three factor cross, preparation of linkage map, somatic cell hybridization,
CGH.
UNIT III - MUTATION AND HUMAN CYTOGENETICS (10 hours)
Changes in chromosome and number, Non-disjunction, Aneuploids in humans
Autosomal - Downs, Patau and Edwards syndrome; Allosomes - Klinefelter and
Turner syndrome, mosaics, position effect, chromosome preparation
leucocytes, bone marrow, amniotic fluid, chorionic villi, Banding, karyotype
preparation and analysis, FISH, Prenatal diagnosis.
UNIT IV - RECOMBINATION AND MAPPINGIN BACTERIA (8 hours)
Mechanisms of recombination, Mapping transformation, Transduction mapping
generalized and specialized transduction, conjugation interrupted mating
analysis, Fine structure in merozygotes.
UNIT V - POPULATION GENETICS (8 hours)
Hardy Weinberg equilibrium, calculating allelic frequency, Application of Hardy
Weinberg equilibrium, Random genetic drift, founders effect, genetic equilibrium.
TEXT BOOK
1. Gardner, Simmons, Sunstad, Principles of Genetics,” 8th edition – John
Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2003.
REFERENCE
1. Monroe W. Strickberger, Genetics,” 3rd edition – Phi Learning, 2008.
BT1012 GENETICS AND CYTOGENETICS
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
I
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1
2
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Biotechnology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical Engineering
x
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
76 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
BT1007
LAB SAFETY AND ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES LAB
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours – 30
0
0
2
1
Prerequisite
BT1006
PURPOSE
The PURPOSE of this course is to give a comprehensive understanding of the
various techniques used in the analysis of compounds and drugs by different
branches of biotechnology. The student will gain thorough information on the
principles of the techniques.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To impart knowledge about the working of the instruments
2.
To teach the application of techniques in biotechnology and related fields
3.
To apply the concepts in the interpretation of the data.
LISTOF EXPERIMENTS
1. Studies on pH titration curves of amino acids/ acetic acid and determination
of pKavalues.
2. Separation of serum protein by horizontal submerged gel electrophoresis.
3. Determination of concentration of dye by Colorimetry
4. Study of UV absorption spectra of macromolecules (protein, nucleic acid,
bacterial pigments).
5. Determination of functional groups of protein by FT-IR
6. Separation of bacterial lipids/amino acids/sugars/organic acids by TLC or
Paper Chromatography.
7. HPLC –Demonstration
8. FPLC-Demonstration
9. LC-MS Demonstration
10. Principles of Microscopy-SEM and TEM-Demonstration
11. Atomic Adsorption Spectroscopy – Demonstration
REFERENCE
1. Lab Manual
77 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
BT1007 LAB SAFETY AND ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES LAB
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1
2
3
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Biotechnology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical Engineering
x
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
BT1009
MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours – 60
0
0
4
2
Prerequisite
BT1008
PURPOSE
Provides an opportunity to experimentally verify the theoretical concepts studied.
It also helps in understanding the theoretical principles in a more explicit and
concentrated manner.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To enable the students to understand the basic concepts involved in the
isolation, identification and characterization of different kinds of
microorganisms
2.
To impart the proper handling experience of microorganisms
3.
To provide the complete practical experience on microbiological methods
and getting useful microbial products.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Aseptic technique and Media preparation
2. Culturing of microorganisms– in broth and in plates (pour plates, streak
plates, isolation, and preservation of bacterial cultures)
3. Growth Kinetics (Bacterial Growth Curve)
4. Isolation, enumeration and purification of microbes from a given sample
78 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
5. Staining Techniques (Simple, Gram staining, and spore staining)
6. Motility test by Hanging drop method
7. Biochemical Characterization of Bacteria
a. Oxidation/Fermentation Test
b. Catalase, Oxidase, and Urease Tests
c. IMViC test
d. Hydrogen Sulfide Test and Nitrate Reduction Test
e. Casein and Starch Hydrolysis
8. Identification of bacteria using 16s-rRNA method
9. Kirby-Bauer assay
10. Screening and characterization of bioactive molecules from bacteria
REFERENCES
1. Russell Bey, “Microbiology Laboratory Manual”, Thomson Learning, 2000.
2. Tabo.N,“Laboratory Manual in Microbiology”, Rex Bookstore, Inc 2004.
BT1009 MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
J
k
x
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objective with student
outcomes
1
2
3
1
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Biotechnology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical Engineering
x
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
BT1011
IMMUNOLOGY LABORATORY
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours - 60
0
0
4
2
Prerequisite
BT1010
PURPOSE
A laboratory course with an opportunity to experimentally verify the theoretical
concepts already studied.
79 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To enable the students to understand the theoretical concepts in Immunology.
2.
To provide students with some experience in methods used in immunology,
particularly the use of specific antibody in biomolecular applications.
3.
To understand various methods and their applications, and interpretation of
results
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Blood grouping
2. Leukocyte counting – Total leukocyte and differential leukocyte
3. Isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)
4. Antigen-antibody reaction -Haemagglutination,
5. Precipitation reaction-Widal and VDRL
6. Immunodiffusion – Single Radial Immuno Diffusion (SRID)
7. Immunodiffusion – Double Immuno Diffusion (DID)
8. Immunoelectrophoresis – Rocket Immunoelectrophoresis
9. Immunoelectrophoresis – Counter Current Immunoelectrophoresis
10. ELISA
11. Immunoprecipitation
12. Western blotting
13. Flow cytometry
REFERENCES
1. Immunology Laboratory manual.
2. Arti Nigam,Archana Ayyagari, “Lab Manual in Biochemistry, Immunology and
Biotechnology”, Mc Graw Hill Education, India, 2007.
BT1011 IMMUNOLOGY LABORATORY
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objective with student
outcomes
1
3
2
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
4.
Broad area
Biotechnology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical
Engineering
x
--
--
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
80 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
BT1013
CELL BIOLOGY LABORATORY
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours - 60
0
0
4
2
Prerequisite
BT1003
PURPOSE
Provides an opportunity to experimentally verify the theoretical concepts. It also
helps in understanding the theoretical principles in a more explicit and
concentrated manner.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To impart practical knowledge about cell growth and cell differentiation
2.
To develop skill in isolation and identification of cell organelles using
advanced tools
3.
To learn about cancer cell culture and to check the cell toxicity of different
products
4.
To provide practical skill in handling molecular techniques like PCR and
western blotting
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Cell cycle Mitosis and Meiosis
2. Cell organelles – Isolation of mitochondria, chloroplast and lysosome
3. Cell morphology Staining of hepatocytes, adipocytes and osteocytes
4. Cell toxicity Quantification of mitochondrial dehydrogenase and plasma
membrane lactate dehydrogenase
5. Cancer cells Culture of tumor cells and transformed cell lines
6. Mutation – Isolation of genetic variants
7. Mendelian principles Genetic crosses in fruit fly
8. Chromosome preparation - Karyotyping
9. Nucleus – Isolation of nuclear proteins by western blotting
10. Heterochromatin Polytene and lampbrush chromosome
REFERENCES
1. John Davey, Mike Lord, “Essential Cell Biology: A Practical Approach”,
Oxford University Press, 2003.
2. Robin Harris, John Graham, David Rickwood, Cell Biology Protocols”, John
Wiley & Sons, 2006.
3. Thomas Robert Mertens, Robert L Hammersmith, Genetics Laboratory
Investigations”, Benjamin Cummings, 2006.
81 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
Course Designed by
Department of Biotechnology
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1
1
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering Sciences
and Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Biotechnology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical
Engineering
x
-
-
5.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
82 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
SEMESTER – IV
LE1008
GERMAN LANGUAGE PHASE II
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours- 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
LE1003-German Language Phase I
PURPOSE
Familiarity in German language will be helpful for the students in preparing their
resumes in German. Proficiency in the language will be an added asset for the
students to have an edge in the present day highly competitive and global job
market.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To enable the students to speak and understand about most of the activities
in the day to day life.
2.
The students will be able to narrate their experiences in Past Tense.
3.
The students will be able to understand and communicate even with German
Nationals.
4.
By the end of Phase II the students will have a reasonable level of
conversational skills.
UNIT I (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen: Zimmersuche, Möbel
Grammatik: Verben mit trennbaren Vorsilben im Präsens und Perfekt. Verben mit
trennbaren Vorsilben und Modalverben imPräsens. Verben mit untrennbaren
Vorsilben im Perfekt. Unregelmäßige und gemischte Verben im Perfekt.
UNIT II (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen: Kleidung ,Farben , Materialien.
Grammatik : formelle Imperativsätze mit “Sie informelle Imperativsätze
Vorschläge mit “wir” – “sollen/wollenwir”—Soll ich? Modalpartikeln “doch” “mal”
“doch mal.
UNIT III (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen : Sehenswürdigkeite (Prater, Brandenburger
Tör,Kolossium, Eifeltürm)
Grammatik : Ortsangaben mit Akk. und Dativ “alle”,”man” Indefinitepronomen
“etwas”, “nichts”,
83 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT IV (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen : Wegbeschreibung/ Einladung interkulturelle
Erfahrung.
Grammatik : Verwendung von Präsens für zukünftigen Zeitpunkt.
UNIT V (6 hours)
Wichtige Sprachhandlungen: Essen und Trinken im Restaurant ,
Partyvorbereitung und Feier
Grammatik: Nomen aus Adjektiven nach “etwas”und “nichts” Nomen aus dem
Infinitiv von Verben, zusammegesetzte Nomen und ihre Artikel. Adjektive im Nom.
und Akk. nach unbestimmten Artikel, Negativartikel und Possessivartikel.
TEXT BOOK
Studio d A1. Deutsch als Fremdsprache with CD.(Kursbuch und Sprachtraining).
REFERENCES
1. German for Dummies
2. Schulz Griesbach
LE01008 GERMAN LANGUAGE PHASE II
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-4
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
84 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
LE1009
FRENCH LANGUAGE PHASE II
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours- 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
LE1004- French Language Phase I
PURPOSE
To enable the students communicate effectively with any French speaker and
have a competitive edge in the international market.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To enable students access information on the internet
2.
To receive and send e mails
3.
To assist students in gaining a certain level of proficiency to enable them to
give the level 1 exam conducted by Alliance Française de Madras.
4.
To enhance their lexical and technical competence.
UNIT I (6 hours)
1. Grammar and Vocabulary: The second group verbs: Finir, rougir, grossir,
grandir . “Les preposition de temps”: à, en, le, de 7h à 8h, jusqu’ à, vers.
2. Listening and Speaking the semi- vowels: Voilà, pollutant. Writing –the
days of the week. Months, technical subjects, time, “les spécialités
scientifiques et l’ année universitaire, paragraph writing about time table.
3. Reading -- Reading of the text and comprehension – answering questions
UNIT II (6 hours)
Grammar and Vocabulary The adjectives, the nationality, feminine & masculine
noun forms “les métiers scientifiques”.
Listening and Speaking – Vowels: soirée, année, près de, très.
Writing Countries name, nationality, “les métiers scientifiques”, numbers from:
69 to infitive and some measures of unit.
Reading Comprehension – reading a text.
UNIT III (6 hours)
Grammar and Vocabulary near future, The demonstrative adjectives, Express
the aim by using the verb, Listening and Speaking –“La liaison interdite en
haut”. Writing – some scientific terms, French expressions to accept an invitation.
Sentence framing. Reading Comprehension – reading a text.
85 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT IV (6 hours)
Grammar and Vocabulary –the verbs: manger, boire , the partitive articles
Listening and Speaking “le ‘e’ caduc Writing- the food, the ingredients, fruits,
vegetables, expression of quantity, paragraph writing about food habits. Reading
reading a text.
UNIT V (6 hours)
Grammar and Vocabulary les prepositions de lieu”: au à la, à l’, chez, the
reflexives verbs, verbs to nouns. Listening and Speaking – “le ‘e’ sans accents ne
se prononce pas. C’est un “e” caduc. Ex: quatre, octobre. les sons (s) et (z)-
salut , besoin. Writing paragraph writing about one’s everyday life, French
culture. Reading Comprehension -- reading a text or a song.
TEXT BOOK
1. Tech French
REFERENCES
1. French for Dummies
2. French made easy: Goyal publishers
3. Panorama
LE1009 FRENCH LANGUAGE PHASE II
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-4
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
86 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
LE 1010
JAPANESE LANGUAGE PHASE II
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours- 30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
LE1005- Japanese Language Phase I
PURPOSE
To enable students to learn a little advanced grammar in order to improve their
conversational ability in Japanese.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To help students learn Katakana script (used to write foreign words)
2.
To improve their conversational skill.
3
To enable students to know about Japan and Japanese culture.
4.
To improve their employability by companies who are associated with
Japan.
UNIT I (8 hours)
Introduction to Verbs; Ikimasu, okimasu, nemasu, tabemasu etc.
Grammar – usage of particles de, o, to, ga(but) and exercises
Common daily expressions and profession.
Katakana script and related vocabulary.
Religious beliefs, Japanese housing and living style.
Conversation – audio
UNIT II (8 hours)
Grammar :Verbs –Past tense, negative - ~mashita, ~masen deshita..
i-ending and na-ending adjectives - introduction
Food and transport (vocabulary)
Japanese food, transport and Japanese tea ceremony.
Kanji Seven elements of nature (Days of the week)
Conversation – audio
UNIT III (6 hours)
Grammar - ~masen ka, mashou
Adjectives (present/past – affirmative and negative)
Conversation – audio
UNIT IV (4 hours)
Grammar – ~te form
Kanji – 4 directions
Parts of the body
Japanese political system and economy
Conversation – audio
87 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT V (4 hours)
Stationery, fruits and vegetables
Counters – general, people, floor and pairs
TEXT BOOK
1. First lessons in Japanese, ALC Japan
REFERENCES
1. Japanese for dummies. Wiley publishing co. Inc., USA.
2. Kana workbook, Japan foundation
LE1010 JAPANESE LANGUAGE PHASE II
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-4
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences
(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
LE1011
KOREAN LANGUAGE PHASE II
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours-30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
LE1006-Korean Language Phase I
PURPOSE
To enable students achieve a basic exposure on Korea, Korean language and
culture. To acquire basic conversational skill in the language.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To help students learn the scripts.
2.
To make the students acquire basic conversational skill.
3
To enable students to know about Korean culture.
4.
To create an advantageous situation for the students to have better
opportunity for employability by companies who have association with
Korea.
88 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT I (9 hours)
Lesson 1 <Review of Vowels and Consonants>, Lesson2 < Various Usages of
“To be”>, Lesson3 < Informal form of “to be”> <Basic Conversation,
Vocabularies and Listening>
UNIT II (9 hours)
Lesson 4 < Informal interrogative form of “to be”>, Lesson 5 < To be, to have,
to stay>, Lesson 5 < Advanced Interrogative practice>, Lesson 6 < Types of
Negation>, <Basic Conversation, Vocabularies and Listening>
UNIT III (9 hours)
Lesson 7 < Honorific forms of noun and verb2>, Lesson8 < Formal
Declarative2>, Lesson 9 < Korean Business Etiquette>, <Basic Conversation,
Vocabularies and Listening>
UNIT IV (3 hours)
Lesson 10 <Field Korean as an Engineer1>, <Field Korean as an Engineer2>
<Basic Conversation, Vocabularies and Listening>
TEXT BOOK
1. Korean through English 2 (Basic Korean Grammar and Conversation)
REFERENCES
1. Bharati Korean (Intermediate Korean Grammar)
2. Hand-outs
3. Various visual media such Movie CD, Audio CD, and music
4. Collection of vocabularies for engineering field.
LE1011 KOREAN LANGUAGE PHASE II
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1-4
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering Sciences
and Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
89 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
LE1012
CHINESE LANGUAGE PHASE II
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours-30
2
0
0
2
Prerequisite
LE1007-Chinese Language Phase I
PURPOSE
To enable students achieve a basic exposure on China, Chinese language and
culture. To acquire basic conversational skill in the language.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To help students learn the Chinese scripts.
2.
To make the students acquire basic conversational skill.
3
To enable students to know about China and Chinese culture.
4.
To create an advantageous situation for the students to have better
opportunity for employability by companies who have association with
china.
UNIT I
1. Greetings
Questions and answers about names
Introducing oneself
Receiving a guest
Making corrections
New words: you) 好(goodwell
工作(workjob)人 (personnelstaff member) (May I
ask…) (expensive valuable) 姓(one’s family name is
2. Questions and answers about the number of people in a family
Expressing affirmation/negation
Questions and answers about the identity of a person same or not.
New words: 家(familyhome) 有(have) 几several
爸爸 (father(mother) 哥哥 (elderly brother
UNIT II
A. About places
B. About numbers
C. if one knows a certain person
D. Expressing apology
E. Expressing affirmation/negation
F. Expressing thanks.
90 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
New Words:
客人(guest,visitor) (here)中文(Chinese) (right, correct
生(student) 多(many, a lot
Grammar:Sentences with a verbal predicate
UNIT III
Introducing people to each other
A. Exchanging amenities
B. Making/Negating conjectures
C. Questions and answers about nationality
Grammar: Sentences with an adjectival predicate
UNIT IV
A) About places to go
Indicating where to go and what to do
Referring to hearsay.
Saying good-bye
B) Making a request
Questions and answers about postcodes and telephone numbers
Reading dates postcodes and telephone numbers
Counting Renmibi
Grammar:Sentences with a subject-verb construction as its predicate
Sentences with a nominal predicate
UNIT V
A. Asking and answering if someone is free at a particular time
B. Making proposals
C. Questions about answers about time
D. Making an appointment
E. Telling the time
F. Making estimations
TEXT BOOK
1. New Chinese Course 1- Beijing Language and Culture University Press
REFERENCES
1. New Practical Chinese Reader Textbook (1) – Beijing Language and Culture
University Press
2. 40 Lessons For Basic Chinese Course I – Shanghai Translation Press
3. My Chinese Classroom - East China Normal University Press
91 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
LE1012 CHINESE LANGUAGE PHASE II
Course Designed by
Department of English and Foreign Languages
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1 - 4
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects (P)
x
--
--
--
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
PD1004
APTITUDE-II
L
T
P
C
Total Contact Hours - 30
1
0
1
1
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To enhance holistic development of students and improve their employability
skills.
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To improve verbal aptitude, vocabulary enhancement and reasoning ability
of the student.
UNIT I (6 hours)
Critical Reasoning – Essay Writing
UNIT II (6 hours)
Synonyms – Antonyms - Odd Word - Idioms & Phrases
UNIT III (6 hours)
Word Analogy - Sentence Completion
UNIT IV (6 hours)
Spotting Errors - Error Correction - Sentence Correction
92 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
UNIT V (6 hours)
Sentence Anagram - Paragraph Anagram - Reading Comprehension
ASSESSMENT
1. Objective type – Paper based /Online – Time based test
TEXT BOOK
1. Personality Development -Verbal Work Book, Career Development Centre,
SRM Publications
REFERENCES
1. Green Sharon Weiner.M.A & Wolf Ira K.Barron’s New GRE,19th Edition.
Barron’s Educational Series, Inc, 2011.
2. Lewis Norman, Word Power Made Easy, Published by W.R.Goyal Pub, 2011.
3. Thorpe Edgar and Thorpe Showich, Objective English. Pearson Education
2012.
4. Murphy Raymond, Intermediate English Grammar, (Second Edition),
Cambridge University Press, 2012.
PD1004 - APTITUDE-II
Course Designed by
Career Development Centre
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcome
1
3.
Category
General(G)
Basic
Sciences(B)
Engineering
Sciences and
Technical Arts(E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
MA1034
BIOSTATISTICS
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours =60 Hours
4
0
0
4
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
To develop an understanding of the methods of probability andstatistics which are
used to model engineering problems.
93 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To gain knowledge in measures of central tendency and dispersion.
2.
To appropriately choose, define and/or derive probability distributions such as
the Binomial, Poisson and normal distribution to solve engineering problems.
3.
To learn how to formulate and test the hypotheses about means, proportions
and standard deviation to draw conclusions based on the results of statistical
tests in large sample.
4.
To learn how to formulate and test the hypotheses about means, variances for
small samples using t and F test for small sample and have knowledge on
ANOVA.
5.
To understand the fundamentals of quality control and the methods used to
control systems and processes.
UNIT I - INTRODUCTION TO BIO-STATISTICS (NUMERICAL PROBLEMS ONLY)
(12 hours)
Handling univariate and bivariate data - Measures of central tendency - Measures
of dispersion -Skewness & Kurtosis - Correlation and Regression.
UNIT II - PROBABILITY & THEORETICAL DISTRIBUTIONS (12 hours)
Probability concepts - conditional probability - Baye's theorem - one - dimensional
random variables - expectation, variance, moments. Theoretical distributions :
Binomial, Poisson, Normal (Problems only).
UNIT III - TESTING OF HYPOTHESIS (12 hours)
Introduction - Large sample tests based on normal distribution - Test for single
mean, difference between means - proportion, difference between proportion -
standard deviation, difference between standard deviation -Chi-square test for
goodness of fit - Independence of attributes.
UNIT IV - ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE (12 hours)
Small sample tests based on t and F distribution - Test for, single mean,
difference between means, Paired t-test, test for equality of variances. ANOVA-
one -way classification, Two-way classification.
UNIT V - STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL (12 hours)
Introduction - Process control - control charts for variables - X and R, X and s
charts control charts for attributes: p chart, np chart, c chart.
94 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
TEXT BOOK
1. Gupta.S.C and Kapoor.V.K, Fundamentals of Mathematical Statistics, 11th
extensively revised edition”, Sultan Chand & Sons, 2007.
REFERENCES
1. Gupta.S.C & Kapoor.V.K, Fundamentals of Applied Statistics”, Sultan Chand
and Sons, New Delhi, 2003.
2. Ewans.W & Grant.G, Statistical Methods in Bio informatics - An
Introduction”, Springer, 2nd edition,2005.
MA 1034 - BIOSTATISTICS
Course Designed by
Department of Mathematics
1.
Student outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1-5
1-5
3.
Category
General
(G)
Basic Sciences
(B)
Engg. Sci.&
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
4.
Approval
23rd Meeting of Academic Council, May 2013
CH1052
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES I -
MECHANICAL OPERATIONS AND MOMENTUM
TRANSFER
L
T
P
C
Total No. of Contact Hours - 45
3
0
0
3
Prerequisite
Nil
PURPOSE
This course is concerned with filtration and agitation operations and behavior of
fluids
INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
To To understand the basic concepts of filtration and agitation and mixing
2.
To study the nature of fluids and flow characteristics.
3.
To teach knowledge about the fluid transportation and metering devices.
UNIT I - FILTRATION (9 hours)
Introduction: cake filters- Discontinuous pressure filter: principle and working of
filter press- Continuous vacuum filter: principle and working of rotary drum
95 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
filters- Centrifugal Filter: principle and working of suspended batch centrifuges-
filter media- filter aids- principles of cake filtration- pressure drop through filter
cake- compressible and incompressible filter cakes- filter-medium resistance-
constant pressure filtration- continuous filtration- constant rate filtration- working
principle of centrifugal filters.
UNIT II - AGITATION AND MIXING OF LIQUIDS (9 hours)
Dimensional analysis: Buckingham's Πtheorem. -Principles of agitation:
agitation equipment- flow patterns: prevention of swirling- draft tubes. Standard
turbine design- power consumption- power correlation- significance of
dimensionless groups- effect of system geometry- calculation of power
consumption in Newtonian liquids.Blending and mixing: blending of miscible
liquids- blending in process vessels- stratified blending in storage tanks- jet
mixers- motionless mixers- mixer selection.
UNIT III - FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA (9 hours)
Nature of fluids: incompressible and compressible- hydrostatic equilibrium-
manometers- potential flow- boundary layer- the velocity field- laminar flow-
Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids: Newton's-law of viscosity- turbulence-
Reynolds number and transition from laminar to turbulent flow- Eddy viscosity-
Flow in boundary layers: laminar and turbulent flow in boundary layers-
boundary-layer formation in straight tubes.
UNIT IV - KINEMATICS OF FLOW & FLOW PAST IMMERSED BODIES (9 hours)
Streamlines and stream tubes: equation of continuity- Bernoulli equation- pump
work in Bernoulli equation. Flow of incompressible fluids in conduits and thin
layers- Hagen-Poiseuille equation- von Karman equation- roughness parameter-
friction losses in Bernoulli equation- couette flow. Drag coefficients- drag
coefficients of typical shapes- Ergun equation- terminal settling velocity- Free and
hindered settlings: Stokes' law- Newton's law- criterion for settling regime-
Fluidization: conditions for fluidization- minimum fluidization velocity.
UNIT V - TRANSPORTATION & METERING OF FLUIDS (9 hours)
Introduction to pipe and tubing: joint and fittings- stuffing boxes- mechanical
seals- gate valves and globe valves- plug cocks and ball valves- check valves.-
Classification and selection of pumps: Reciprocating and rotary pumps
Centrifugal pump– Pump characteristics– Fans- blowers and compressors–Steam
jet ejector.Types of metering devices: Application of Bernouli equation to venturi
meter and orifice meter- flow rate calculations from the readings of venture meter-
orifice meter and pitot tube.
96 Biotech-2013 SRM (E&T)
TEXT BOOKS
1. Warren L. Mccabe, Julian C. Smith and peter Harriott, "Unit Operations of
Chemical Engineering", 6th Edn., McGraw Hill International Edition, New
York, 2001.
2. Coulson.J.M, Richardson.J.F, Backhurst.J.R and Harker.J.M, "Coulson &
Richardson's Chemical Engineering", Vol. II, 4th Edn., Butter worth
Heinemann, Oxford, 1996.
REFERENCES
1. Anup K Swain, Hemalata Patra , Roy.G.K, Mechanical operations”, Tata -
McGraw Hill, 2010.
2. Noel de Nevers, "Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineers", 2nd Edn., McGraw
Hill International Editions.
3. White.F.M, “Fluid Mechanics”, 4th Edn, McGraw-Hill Inc, 1999.
4. Narayanan.C.L & Bhattacharya, "Mechanical Operation for Chemical
Engineering", 1993.
5. Darby.R,”Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics”, Marcel Dekker, 1998.
CH1052 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES I –
MECHANICAL OPERATIONS AND MOMENTUM TRANSFER
Course Designed by
Department of Chemical Engineering
1.
Student outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
I
j
k
x
x
x
2.
Mapping of instructional
objectives with student
outcomes
1
2
3
3.
Category
General (G)
Basic
Sciences (B)
Engg. Sci. &
Tech. Arts (E)
Professional
Subjects(P)
x
4.
Broad Area
Biotechnology
Bioprocess
Engineering
Chemical Engineering