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IMACS
Integrated Multiple Access Communications Server
Reference Guide
Publication 000-001949
Revision 3.6.0
October 1997
Premisys Communications
Trademarks:
Premisys is a registered trademark of Premisys Communications, Inc.
ESS is a registered trademark of Lucent Technologies
SLC is a registered trademark of Lucent Technologies
FCC Registration number: 1H5SNG-73866-DD-E (multiplexer)
1H5SNG-73866-DD-E (integral CSU)
B468NR-68618-DM-E (internal modem)
Canadian Certification number: 1932 5217 A
Canadian DOC Load number: 5
Ringer Equivalence number (REN): 0.8B (multiplexer)
0.2A (internal modem)
Approvals:
UL listed to UL# 1459 Second Edition, Number 9K09
CSA listed to C22.2 No. 950-M89
COPYRIGHT © 1992-1997 Premisys Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.
This publication is protected by federal copyright law. No part of this publication may be copied or distributed,
transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any human or computer language in any
form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, manual or otherwise, or disclosed to third parties without
the express written permission of Premisys Communications, 48664 Milmont Drive, Fremont, California, 94538,
(510) 353-7600, FAX (510) 353-7601.
Premisys makes no representation or warranties with respect to the contents hereof and specifically disclaims any
implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. Further, Premisys Communications
reserves the right to revise this publication and to make changes from time to time in the contents hereof without
obligation of Premisys Communications to notify any person of such revision or changes.
Important Safety Instructions:
1. Read and follow all warning notices and instructions marked on the product or included in this Reference
Guide.
2. This product is intended to be used with a three-wire grounding type plug - a plug which has a grounding pin.
This is a safety feature. Equipment grounding is vital to ensure safe operation. Do not defeat the purpose of the
grounding type plug by modifying the plug or using an adapter.
Prior to installation, use an outlet tester or a voltmeter to check the AC receptacle for the presence of earth
ground. If the receptacle is not properly grounded, the installation must not continue until a qualified electrician
has corrected the problem. If a three-wire grounding type power source is not available, consult a qualified
electrician to determine another method of grounding the equipment.
3. Slots and openings in the cabinet are provided for ventilation. To ensure reliable operation of the product and
to protect it from overheating, these slots and openings must not be blocked or covered.
4. Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord and do not locate the product where persons could step or walk
on the power cord.
5. Do not attempt to service this product yourself, as opening or removing covers may expose you to dangerous
high voltage points or other risks. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel.
6. Special cables, which may be required by the regulatory inspection authority for the installation site, are the
responsibility of the customer.
7. When installed in the final configuration, the product must comply with the applicable Safety Standards and
regulatory requirements of the country in which it is installed. If necessary, consult with the appropriate
regulatory agencies and inspection authorities to ensure compliance.
8. A rare phenomenon can create a voltage potential between the earth grounds of two or more buildings. If
products installed in separate buildings are interconnected, the voltage potential may cause a hazardous
condition. Consult a qualified electrical consultant to determine whether or not this phenomenon exists and, if
necessary, implement corrective action prior to interconnecting the products.
9. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) protection must be used when handling circuit card assemblies and all other
electronic parts covered in this manual.
WARNING
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class "A" Digital Device, pursuant to
part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference
when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate
radio frequency energy, and, if not installed and used in accordance with this Reference Guide, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference, in which case, the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
The authority to operate this equipment is conditioned by the requirement that no modifications will be made to
the equipment unless the changes or modifications are expressly approved by Premisys Communications.
(10-97) i
Table of Contents
Section 1 - Preface
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 1-A-1
How to Use this Reference Guide ................................................................................................................... 1-A-1
T1/E1 Operations............................................................................................................................................ 1-A-2
Page Layout.................................................................................................................................................... 1-A-2
Special Instructions......................................................................................................................................... 1-A-3
Redundant Power Supplies.............................................................................................................................. 1-A-3
Operator Services Requirements..................................................................................................................... 1-A-4
Safety Precautions .......................................................................................................................................... 1-A-4
Grounding................................................................................................................................................... 1-A-4
Power Source.............................................................................................................................................. 1-A-4
Fusing......................................................................................................................................................... 1-A-4
Panel and Cover Removal........................................................................................................................... 1-A-4
Regulatory Compliance Information............................................................................................................... 1-A-5
FCC Part 68 Information............................................................................................................................. 1-A-5
CE Marking ................................................................................................................................................ 1-A-7
Country-Specific Regulatory Compliance Information.................................................................................... 1-A-7
Canada........................................................................................................................................................ 1-A-7
Canadian DOC Information..................................................................................................................... 1-A-7
Japan........................................................................................................................................................... 1-A-8
Class A ITE Notification......................................................................................................................... 1-A-8
Europe ........................................................................................................................................................ 1-A-8
European Telecommunication Approvals................................................................................................ 1-A-8
United Kingdom ......................................................................................................................................... 1-A-8
UK Approval Number............................................................................................................................. 1-A-8
UK Compliance Statements..................................................................................................................... 1-A-8
Germany................................................................................................................................................... 1-A-10
German Approval Number .................................................................................................................... 1-A-10
Safety Warning ..................................................................................................................................... 1-A-10
Customer Service.......................................................................................................................................... 1-A-11
Service...................................................................................................................................................... 1-A-11
Ordering Information................................................................................................................................ 1-A-11
Section 2 - System Information
System Slot Map
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 2-A-1
Two-Sided Unit .............................................................................................................................................. 2-A-1
Front-Loading Unit......................................................................................................................................... 2-A-3
Front-Loading ChassisPower Supplies on Top......................................................................................... 2-A-6
Installation
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 2-B-1
Design Plan .................................................................................................................................................... 2-B-1
Table of Contents Reference Guide v3.6
ii (10-97)
Site Selection and Preparation ........................................................................................................................ 2-B-1
Installation Checklist ...................................................................................................................................... 2-B-2
Unpacking and Mounting the Chassis ............................................................................................................. 2-B-5
Two-Sided Chassis...................................................................................................................................... 2-B-5
Front-Loading Chassis (Power Supplies on Side) ........................................................................................ 2-B-6
Front-Loading Chassis (Power Supplies on Top)......................................................................................... 2-B-7
Mounting the Chassis...................................................................................................................................... 2-B-8
Power Supply and Ringing Generator System................................................................................................. 2-B-9
System Power ............................................................................................................................................. 2-B-9
-48VDC Talk Battery.................................................................................................................................. 2-B-9
Ringing Generators..................................................................................................................................... 2-B-9
US/Europe Jumper.................................................................................................................................... 2-B-10
Chassis Grounding........................................................................................................................................ 2-B-11
Grounding Six-Digit Chassis..................................................................................................................... 2-B-12
Front-Loading Chassis: Power Supplies on Side.................................................................................... 2-B-13
Two-Sided Chassis................................................................................................................................ 2-B-13
Front-Loading Chassis: Power Supplies on Top..................................................................................... 2-B-13
Grounding Four-Digit Chassis................................................................................................................... 2-B-14
Installing the AC Power Supply (8901)......................................................................................................... 2-B-14
Installing the DC Power Supply (8902 or 8907)............................................................................................ 2-B-15
External Power Connector ............................................................................................................................ 2-B-16
8916 Chassis Power Connector ................................................................................................................. 2-B-16
891620 Chassis Power Connector ............................................................................................................. 2-B-16
891822/891823 Chassis Power Connector................................................................................................. 2-B-17
891920 Chassis Power Connector ............................................................................................................. 2-B-17
Installing the 115VAC to -48VDC Converter (8903, 8905 and 8908)............................................................ 2-B-18
Installing the Ringing Generator (8904 or 8906)........................................................................................... 2-B-20
To install the 8904 Ringing Generator: ..................................................................................................... 2-B-21
To Install the 8906 Ringing Generator: ..................................................................................................... 2-B-22
Connecting AC Power .................................................................................................................................. 2-B-23
Using Amphenol Connectors ........................................................................................................................ 2-B-23
Basic Operations
Terminal Interface .......................................................................................................................................... 2-C-1
Logging On .................................................................................................................................................... 2-C-1
Registration .................................................................................................................................................... 2-C-3
Main Screens.................................................................................................................................................. 2-C-4
Introduction to Screens ................................................................................................................................... 2-C-5
Status Screen .................................................................................................................................................. 2-C-6
Configuring the Cards..................................................................................................................................... 2-C-7
Alarms............................................................................................................................................................ 2-C-8
Filters ............................................................................................................................................................. 2-C-9
Report....................................................................................................................................................... 2-C-11
Log........................................................................................................................................................... 2-C-11
Ignore ....................................................................................................................................................... 2-C-11
Modifiers...................................................................................................................................................... 2-C-11
ACO............................................................................................................................................................. 2-C-11
Alarm Handling............................................................................................................................................ 2-C-11
Reinitializing the System.............................................................................................................................. 2-C-13
CPU Card ................................................................................................................................................. 2-C-13
Test and Debug Screen ................................................................................................................................. 2-C-14
ZIP............................................................................................................................................................ 2-C-14
DEBUG .................................................................................................................................................... 2-C-15
Reference Guide v3.6Table of Contents
(10-97) iii
REG.......................................................................................................................................................... 2-C-15
BACKUP.................................................................................................................................................. 2-C-17
Backup Procedure ................................................................................................................................. 2-C-18
RESTORE ................................................................................................................................................ 2-C-19
Restore Procedure ................................................................................................................................. 2-C-19
MAIN ....................................................................................................................................................... 2-C-20
System Operations
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 2-D-1
Assigning the Timeslot Map ........................................................................................................................... 2-D-1
Assigning Timeslots from a User Card............................................................................................................ 2-D-2
Bus-Connect Model .................................................................................................................................... 2-D-2
E&M Card.................................................................................................................................................. 2-D-3
HSU Card ................................................................................................................................................... 2-D-4
Cross-Connect Model.................................................................................................................................. 2-D-5
Using the Configuration Option...................................................................................................................... 2-D-5
Cross-Connecting WAN Timeslots ................................................................................................................. 2-D-8
Using the Test Option for Voice Cross-Connects .......................................................................................... 2-D-22
Broadcast...................................................................................................................................................... 2-D-26
WAN Link to WAN Link.......................................................................................................................... 2-D-32
Test Access Digroups (TADS)...................................................................................................................... 2-D-33
Monitor Circuit......................................................................................................................................... 2-D-34
Split Circuit .............................................................................................................................................. 2-D-36
Release ..................................................................................................................................................... 2-D-37
Terminate and Leave Access..................................................................................................................... 2-D-38
Signaling and Companding Conversion in Bus-Connect Systems.................................................................. 2-D-40
Checking the Timeslot Map.......................................................................................................................... 2-D-42
Recording the Configuration on Paper .......................................................................................................... 2-D-44
Redundant Operations
Introduction.....................................................................................................................................................2-E-1
Power System..................................................................................................................................................2-E-1
CPU Card ........................................................................................................................................................2-E-2
WAN Card.......................................................................................................................................................2-E-3
Enhanced Bus-Connect WAN Redundancy..................................................................................................2-E-4
Cross-Connect WAN Redundancy ...............................................................................................................2-E-6
ADPCM Card ..................................................................................................................................................2-E-8
Section 3 - CPU Card
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-1
8800 CPU Card........................................................................................................................................... 3-A-1
8801 CPU Card........................................................................................................................................... 3-A-1
8804 CPU Card........................................................................................................................................... 3-A-1
CPU Card Settings.......................................................................................................................................... 3-A-2
Changing Passwords ....................................................................................................................................... 3-A-3
Entering Values in Fields............................................................................................................................ 3-A-3
Printing Alarms Remotely .............................................................................................................................. 3-A-4
TCP/IP Network Management ........................................................................................................................ 3-A-8
Network Statistics......................................................................................................................................... 3-A-12
SLIP ......................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-13
Table of Contents Reference Guide v3.6
iv (10-97)
FDL.......................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-13
IP.............................................................................................................................................................. 3-A-14
ICMP........................................................................................................................................................ 3-A-15
TCP .......................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-16
UDP.......................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-18
TELNET................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-18
SNMP....................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-18
Routing......................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-19
IP NET ..................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-21
SubNetMask ............................................................................................................................................. 3-A-21
Slot/Unit ................................................................................................................................................... 3-A-21
Adding Routes .......................................................................................................................................... 3-A-22
Delete a Route .......................................................................................................................................... 3-A-22
Get Information ........................................................................................................................................ 3-A-22
Section 4 - ADPCM Card
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 4-A-1
ADPCM Card Settings.................................................................................................................................... 4-A-1
Section 5 - WAN Card
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 5-A-1
811 DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module ................................................................................................................. 5-A-1
812 CSU Plug-in Module............................................................................................................................ 5-A-1
820 HDSL E1 Plug-in Module .................................................................................................................... 5-A-1
8000 Single T1/E1 Link Card ..................................................................................................................... 5-A-1
8010 Dual T1/E1 Link Card........................................................................................................................ 5-A-1
8014 Dual T1/E1 Link Card (with Relays).................................................................................................. 5-A-2
8011 HDSL E1 WAN Card......................................................................................................................... 5-A-2
Configuring the DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module (811) Rev E1+........................................................................... 5-A-3
Configuring the DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module (811) Rev A1-D1 ...................................................................... 5-A-4
Configuring the DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module 811-F ........................................................................................ 5-A-5
Setting Jumpers for Balanced/Unbalanced E1 Operation................................................................................. 5-A-6
Balanced Operation..................................................................................................................................... 5-A-6
Unbalanced Operation................................................................................................................................. 5-A-6
Installing CSU, DSX/CEPT Modules (811, 812, 820)..................................................................................... 5-A-7
WAN Card Settings for CSU/DSX.................................................................................................................. 5-A-7
Cross-Connect (XCON) ............................................................................................................................ 5-A-18
Performance Monitoring ........................................................................................................................... 5-A-19
Far End Statistics...................................................................................................................................... 5-A-21
Test........................................................................................................................................................... 5-A-22
WAN Card Settings for HDSL E1................................................................................................................. 5-A-25
HDSL Performance Monitoring Screen......................................................................................................... 5-A-32
Reference Guide v3.6Table of Contents
(10-97) v
Section 6 - Interface Cards and External Alarm Cards
Interface Cards
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 6-A-1
8920 Interface Card .................................................................................................................................... 6-A-1
8921 Interface Card .................................................................................................................................... 6-A-2
Interface Card (8925)...................................................................................................................................... 6-A-3
Interface Card (8926)...................................................................................................................................... 6-A-4
Interface Card (8927)...................................................................................................................................... 6-A-5
Interface Card Ports and Functions ................................................................................................................. 6-A-6
Internal Modem .......................................................................................................................................... 6-A-7
Logging On Remotely................................................................................................................................. 6-A-7
Using the Node Port........................................................................................................................................ 6-A-8
Interface Card Settings.................................................................................................................................... 6-A-9
Signaling Conversion Tables ........................................................................................................................ 6-A-11
Remote Terminal System (RTS)................................................................................................................... 6-A-12
Identification ............................................................................................................................................ 6-A-12
Network Priorities..................................................................................................................................... 6-A-13
Intra-Network Communications................................................................................................................ 6-A-13
Terminal Security ..................................................................................................................................... 6-A-13
Changing the 8927 from Balanced to Unbalanced......................................................................................... 6-A-14
External Alarm Cards
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 6-B-1
8401 External Alarm Card .......................................................................................................................... 6-B-1
8402 External Alarm Card .......................................................................................................................... 6-B-1
External Alarm Card Screens (8401 and 8402) ............................................................................................... 6-B-3
8403 External Alarm Card.............................................................................................................................. 6-B-5
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 6-B-5
Alarm Sensors ................................................................................................................................................ 6-B-6
Alarm Switches .............................................................................................................................................. 6-B-8
Voice............................................................................................................................................................ 6-B-10
Features........................................................................................................................................................ 6-B-13
Onboard Buzzer........................................................................................................................................ 6-B-13
US/Euro Jumper........................................................................................................................................ 6-B-13
Voltage Control Switches.......................................................................................................................... 6-B-14
Alarm Sensor Jumpers .............................................................................................................................. 6-B-14
Section 7 - Voice Cards
E & M Card
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 7-A-1
8118 E&M Card ......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-1
8119 E&M Card ......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-1
UL Statement.......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-1
8104 E&M Card ......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-1
8108 E&M Card ......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-1
UL Statement.......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-1
Table of Contents Reference Guide v3.6
vi (10-97)
8112 E&M Card ......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-2
8113 E&M Card ......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-2
8114 E&M Card ......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-2
8115 E&M Card ......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-2
E&M Card Settings......................................................................................................................................... 7-A-3
Test ................................................................................................................................................................ 7-A-9
FXS Card
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 7-B-1
8129 FXS Card ........................................................................................................................................... 7-B-1
UL Statement.......................................................................................................................................... 7-B-1
8122 FXS Card ........................................................................................................................................... 7-B-1
8123 FXS Card ........................................................................................................................................... 7-B-1
8124 FXS Card ........................................................................................................................................... 7-B-1
8125 FXS Card ........................................................................................................................................... 7-B-1
8128 FXS Card ........................................................................................................................................... 7-B-1
FXS Card Settings .......................................................................................................................................... 7-B-2
Test ................................................................................................................................................................ 7-B-8
FXO Card
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 7-C-1
8139 FXO Card........................................................................................................................................... 7-C-1
UL Statement.......................................................................................................................................... 7-C-1
8132 FXO Card........................................................................................................................................... 7-C-1
8133 FXO Card........................................................................................................................................... 7-C-1
8134 FXO Card........................................................................................................................................... 7-C-1
8135 FXO Card........................................................................................................................................... 7-C-1
8138 FXO Card........................................................................................................................................... 7-C-1
FXO Card Settings.......................................................................................................................................... 7-C-2
Test ................................................................................................................................................................ 7-C-7
Setting Jumpers on the FXO Card................................................................................................................. 7-C-12
FXS Coin Card
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 7-D-1
8149 FXS Coin Card................................................................................................................................... 7-D-1
FXS Coin Card Settings.................................................................................................................................. 7-D-1
External Card Connectors and Pinouts ........................................................................................................ 7-D-1
Card Jumper/Switch Settings ...................................................................................................................... 7-D-1
Installing the FXS Coin Card ...................................................................................................................... 7-D-1
FXS Coin Card User Screens and Settings ...................................................................................................... 7-D-2
Main Screen................................................................................................................................................ 7-D-2
Test Screen ................................................................................................................................................. 7-D-7
FXO Coin Card
Introduction.....................................................................................................................................................7-E-1
8159 FXO Coin Card ...................................................................................................................................7-E-1
FXO Coin Card Settings ..................................................................................................................................7-E-1
External Card Connectors and Pinouts .........................................................................................................7-E-1
Card Jumper/Switch Settings .......................................................................................................................7-E-1
Installing the FXO Coin Card.......................................................................................................................7-E-2
Reference Guide v3.6Table of Contents
(10-97) vii
FXO Coin Card User Screens and Settings.......................................................................................................7-E-3
Main Screen.................................................................................................................................................7-E-3
Test Screen ..................................................................................................................................................7-E-8
Section 8 - Data Cards
High Speed Unit (HSU) Cards
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 8-A-1
8202 High-Speed Unit Card........................................................................................................................ 8-A-1
8203 High Speed Unit Card ........................................................................................................................ 8-A-1
8212 High-Speed Unit Card........................................................................................................................ 8-A-1
8214 High-Speed Unit Card V.35 Trunk / User........................................................................................... 8-A-1
8215 High-Speed Unit Card........................................................................................................................ 8-A-1
HSU Card Settings.......................................................................................................................................... 8-A-1
Test .............................................................................................................................................................. 8-A-10
Setting On-board Option Switches................................................................................................................ 8-A-14
Setting Switches on the 8215 HSU Card ................................................................................................... 8-A-14
Using the 1251, 1252 and 1253 Personality Modules .................................................................................... 8-A-15
RS232 Personality Module Description..................................................................................................... 8-A-16
RS232-E Personality Module Description ................................................................................................. 8-A-16
Sub-Rate Unit (SRU) Cards
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 8-B-1
8220 Sub-Rate Data Card............................................................................................................................ 8-B-1
SRU Card Settings.......................................................................................................................................... 8-B-1
Examples........................................................................................................................................................ 8-B-9
Test .............................................................................................................................................................. 8-B-12
Office Channel Unit-Data Port (OCU-DP) Cards
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 8-C-1
8249 OCU-DP Card.................................................................................................................................... 8-C-1
8247 OCU-DP Card.................................................................................................................................... 8-C-1
845 OCU-DP Child Card ............................................................................................................................ 8-C-1
8248 OCU-DP Card.................................................................................................................................... 8-C-1
OCU-DP Card Settings ................................................................................................................................... 8-C-2
Test ................................................................................................................................................................ 8-C-8
OCU-DP Error Correction and Performance Monitoring............................................................................... 8-C-11
Frame Relay Assembler-Disassembler (FRAD) Card
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 8-D-1
8231 FRAD Card........................................................................................................................................ 8-D-1
8231 FRAD Card Main Screen ....................................................................................................................... 8-D-1
8231 FRAD Card Performance Screen............................................................................................................ 8-D-6
DS0 Data Port (DS0-DP)
Introduction.....................................................................................................................................................8-E-1
DS0-DP Card Settings .....................................................................................................................................8-E-1
UL Statement...........................................................................................................................................8-E-1
Table of Contents Reference Guide v3.6
viii (10-97)
Bit-7 Redundant (B7R) Card
Introduction.....................................................................................................................................................8-F-1
8228 Bit-7-Redundant (B7R) Card...............................................................................................................8-F-1
B7R Card Settings ...........................................................................................................................................8-F-2
Basic Rate Interface (BRI) Card
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 8-G-1
8260 BRI Card............................................................................................................................................ 8-G-1
8261 BRI Card............................................................................................................................................ 8-G-1
8262 BRI Card............................................................................................................................................ 8-G-1
UL Statement.......................................................................................................................................... 8-G-1
BRI Circuit Applications ................................................................................................................................ 8-G-2
8260 and 8261 BRI Card Settings................................................................................................................... 8-G-3
The Sealing Current Screen ............................................................................................................................ 8-G-9
Conversion ................................................................................................................................................... 8-G-10
Embedded Operations Channel..................................................................................................................... 8-G-13
Remote NTU Configuration.......................................................................................................................... 8-G-13
NTU Test...................................................................................................................................................... 8-G-17
NTU Status................................................................................................................................................... 8-G-19
BRI (8260/8261) Test ................................................................................................................................... 8-G-21
Performance Monitoring (8260/8261)........................................................................................................... 8-G-25
8262 BRI Card Settings ................................................................................................................................ 8-G-28
8262 BRI Card Main Screen Parameter Options........................................................................................ 8-G-28
Conversion ................................................................................................................................................... 8-G-33
Test .............................................................................................................................................................. 8-G-33
Setting Terminal Type Jumpers on the 8261 ................................................................................................. 8-G-37
Setting Sealing Current Jumpers on the 8261................................................................................................ 8-G-38
Setting Jumpers on the 8262 ......................................................................................................................... 8-G-39
Section 9 - Pinouts
Pinouts
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 9-A-1
Interface Cards (8920 and 8921)..................................................................................................................... 9-A-1
WAN Link Connector................................................................................................................................. 9-A-4
1183 Adapter (600 Chassis) ........................................................................................................................ 9-A-6
1184 Adapter (800 Chassis) ........................................................................................................................ 9-A-6
RS232 Management Port ............................................................................................................................ 9-A-7
RJ11C Modem Port..................................................................................................................................... 9-A-8
RS485 Node Port ........................................................................................................................................ 9-A-8
RS232 Control Terminal Interface Port....................................................................................................... 9-A-9
Interface Card (8925).................................................................................................................................... 9-A-10
RS232 Control Terminal Interface Port..................................................................................................... 9-A-10
WAN Link Connectors ............................................................................................................................. 9-A-11
Interface Card (8926).................................................................................................................................... 9-A-12
Interface Card (8927).................................................................................................................................... 9-A-13
External Alarm Card (8401 and 8402) .......................................................................................................... 9-A-14
External Alarm Card (8403).......................................................................................................................... 9-A-15
E&M Card (8108)......................................................................................................................................... 9-A-19
E&M Card (8115)......................................................................................................................................... 9-A-21
Reference Guide v3.6Table of Contents
(10-97) ix
E&M Card (8118)......................................................................................................................................... 9-A-22
E&M Card (8119)......................................................................................................................................... 9-A-24
FXS Card (8124 and 8125) ........................................................................................................................... 9-A-26
FXS Card (8128 and 8129) ........................................................................................................................... 9-A-27
FXO Card (8134 and 8135)........................................................................................................................... 9-A-28
FXO Card (8138 and 8139)........................................................................................................................... 9-A-29
FXS Coin Card (8149).................................................................................................................................. 9-A-30
FXO Coin Card (8159) ................................................................................................................................. 9-A-31
HSU Card (8202) RS530............................................................................................................................... 9-A-32
RS530 Channel Connectors....................................................................................................................... 9-A-32
HSU Card (8203).......................................................................................................................................... 9-A-34
DB-25 Channel Connectors....................................................................................................................... 9-A-34
HSU Card (8212) V.35 ................................................................................................................................. 9-A-36
V.35 Channel Connectors ......................................................................................................................... 9-A-36
HSU Card (8214) V.35 ................................................................................................................................. 9-A-38
Homologation Notification ....................................................................................................................... 9-A-38
DB-25/V.35 Channel Connectors.............................................................................................................. 9-A-39
HSU Card (8215) RS530 / V.35.................................................................................................................... 9-A-40
RS530/V.35 Channel Connectors.............................................................................................................. 9-A-40
SRU Card (8220).......................................................................................................................................... 9-A-42
OCU-DP Card (8247) ................................................................................................................................... 9-A-43
OCU-DP Card (8248) ................................................................................................................................... 9-A-44
OCU-DP Card (8249) ................................................................................................................................... 9-A-45
DS0-DP Card (8254)..................................................................................................................................... 9-A-46
FRAD Card (8231) ....................................................................................................................................... 9-A-48
B7R Card (8228) .......................................................................................................................................... 9-A-49
BRI Card (8260, 8261, and 8262) ................................................................................................................. 9-A-50
Section 10 - Additional Information
Error Messages
Glossary
Table of Contents Reference Guide v3.6
x(10-97)
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
(10-97) Page 1-A-1
Introduction
Premisys Communications' Integrated Multiple Access Communications Server
(IMACS) allows you to take advantage of the sophisticated network services available
from long-distance companies, telephone companies, specialized carriers and PTTs. By
using these new services, you can increase the capabilities of your private network and
simultaneously reduce costs. This Reference Guide will help you put the IMACS to
work in your networking environment.
The IMACS takes the place of many network access devices, including:
CSUs
DSUs
Channel banks
Drop-and-insert multiplexers
Digital cross-connect systems
By taking over the functions of all these network access devices, a single IMACS
system allows linking a wide range of voice and data equipment over the network,
among them:
LAN bridges and routers
PBXs (analog or digital) and key systems
Fax machines
Terminals and computers
Telephones
Modems
Video CODECs
How to Use this Reference Guide
This Reference Guide is arranged to assist the technician in unpacking, assembling,
configuring, and running the integrated access system. The Reference Guide is divided
into Sections. Some Sections are further subdivided into Chapters.
Section 1 contains the Preface (this chapter).
Section 2, System Operations, consists of five chapters: System Slot Map, Installation,
Basic Operations, System Operations, and Redundant Operations. Section 2 answers
most what-goes-where questions. Other sections give more detailed descriptions of
the procedures involved in configuring and running the IMACS.
The System Slot Map chapter describes the chassis and details the placement of
individual components.
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
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The Installation chapter elaborates upon the previous section and shows various
installation techniques. It also discusses each of the power supplies, converters, and
ringing generators, and provides methods of installing them in the system.
The Basic Operations chapter is an overview that allows users to launch and test the
system and assign values to the alarm warnings. The System Operations chapter
discusses how users define the timeslot map for the individual nodes. The Redundant
Operations chapter deals with power, CPU, WAN, and ADPCM card redundancy
features.
Section 3 contains detailed information on the CPU card.
Section 4 discusses the ADPCM Server Card, which is the only Server card supported
in this release.
Section 5 covers all WAN Cards and their functionalities, including CSU, DSX, HDSL,
and CEPT.
Section 6 discusses the Interface and External Alarm cards.
Section 7 presents the Voice Cards. Currently, these include E&M, FXS, and FXO
cards, as well as FXS and FXO Coin cards.
Section 8 describes the Data Cards. Data cards compatible with this release include the
HSU, SRU, OCU-DP, FRAD, DS0-DP, B7R, and BRI cards.
Section 9 shows Pinouts for all applicable cards. It shows the wiring specifications for
each of the cards.
Section 10 contains a list of error messages and their meanings, as well as a glossary of
frequently encountered terms.
T1/E1 Operations
The IMACS can handle either T1 or E1 operations alone or simultaneously. For
consistency, most of the screenshots in this documentation reflect T1 operation. The
only chapters that specifically address E1 operation are:
Ø System Operations
Ø Basic Operations
Ø Redundant Operations
Ø WAN Card
Page Layout
This Reference Guide was designed to adhere to conventional documentation standards.
The header on each page contains the Revision and Chapter names. The footer of each
page has the version, date of publication, and page number. The page number consists
of the section number, chapter letter, and page.
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
(10-97) Page 1-A-3
Special Instructions
The following recommendations are to be performed by a qualified service person
ONLY.
1. Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.
2. Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically
designed for wet locations.
3. Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone
line has been disconnected at the network interface.
4. Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.
5. E&M wiring must be confined to inside plant ONLY.
6. Never attempt to remove the power panel without first disconnecting input
power cables.
7. Never attempt to operate this system when the power panel screws are
removed. They provide the safety ground for the system.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is
operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate
radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the Reference
Guide, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this
equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference, in which case, the user
will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
Redundant Power Supplies
The following information applies only to systems with redundant power supplies (see
Redundant Operations chapter). The redundant power supply does not share the power
load with other equipment.
1. An equipment grounding conductor that is not smaller in size than the ungrounded
branch-circuit supply conductors, is to be installed as part of the circuit that supplies the
product or system. Bare, covered or insulated grounding conductors are acceptable.
Individually covered or insulated equipment grounding conductors shall have a
continuous outer finish that is either green, or green with one or more yellow stripes.
The equipment grounding conductor is to be connected to ground at the service
equipment.
2. The attachment-plug receptacles in the vicinity of the product or system are all to be
of a grounding type, and the equipment grounding conductors serving these receptacles
are to be connected to earth ground at the service equipment.
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
Page 1-A-4(10-97)
Operator Services Requirements
This equipment is capable of giving users access to interstate providers of operator
services through the use of equal access codes. Modifications by aggregators to alter
these capabilities may be in violation of the Telephone Operator Consumer Services
Improvement Act of 1990 and Part 68 of the FCC Rules.
Safety Precautions
The equipment is designed and manufactured in compliance with Safety Standard
EN60950. However, the following precautions should be observed to ensure personal
safety during installation or service, and prevent damage to the equipment or equipment
to be connected.
Grounding
The equipment can be grounded through the power cord as well as the terminal marked
.
For detailed information on grounding procedures,
please see the Grounding section in the Installation chapter.
Power Source
AC: 120 Volts @ 2.0 amps / 240 Volts @ 1 amp, 50/60 Hz
DC: +24 Volts @ 3.0 amps / -48 Volts @ 1.5 amps
Additionally, the DC source must provide a means of disconnecting power from the
supply, and the supply voltage must be provided from an isolated source complying
with SELV requirements of EN60950.
Fusing
To avoid fire hazard, use only the fuse with the specified type and rating for the
equipment.
Panel and Cover Removal
Removal of covers and panels should only be attempted by qualified service or
operations persons.
Never attempt to operate the equipment with power panel fasteners removed, or
removal of power panel cover without first disconnecting input power.
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
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Regulatory Compliance Information
FCC Part 68 Information
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules. On the rear panel of the
equipment is a label that contains, among other information, the FCC registration
number and ringer equivalence number (REN) for this equipment. If requested, this
information must be provided to the telephone company. Tables Preface-1, -2 and -3
show the Ringer-Jack configuration information necessary for FCC registration.
The equipment has FCC Registration Number 1H5SNG-73866-DD-E. This equipment
uses the following USOC jacks: RJ11C, RJ21X, RJ2EX, RJ2FX, RJ2GX and RJ2HX.
The REN is used to determine the quantity of devices which may be connected to the
telephone line. Excessive RENs on the telephone line should not exceed five (5.0). To
be certain of the number of devices that may be connected to the line, as determined by
the total RENs, contact the telephone company to determine the maximum RENs for
the calling area.
If this equipment causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone company will
notify you in advance that temporary discontinuance of service may be required. If
advance notice is not practical, the telephone company will notify you as soon as
possible. Also, you will be advised of your right to file a complaint with the FCC if
you believe it is necessary.
The telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or
procedures that could affect the operation of the equipment. If this happens, the
telephone company will provide advance notice in order for you to make the necessary
modifications to maintain uninterrupted service.
This equipment cannot be used on telephone company-provided coin service.
Connection to Party Line Service is subject to state tariffs.
This equipment is hearing-aid compatible.
The following information is required for registration with the FCC and is placed on the
rear panel of each unit:
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2)
this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
Complies with Part 68 FCC Rules
FCC Registration Number: 1H5SNG-73866-DD-E
Ringer Equivalence: 0.8 B
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
Page 1-A-6(10-97)
Table Preface-1. FCC Registration Information
Reg.
Status MTS/WATS
Interfaces Model # Ringer Equiv.
Number SOC Networ
k USOC Canadian
Jacks
M02LS2 8138 0.4B (ac),
0.0 (dc) ----- RJ11X CA11X
M02GS-2 8138 0.4B (ac),
0.0 (dc) ----- RJ11X CA11X
Reg. 02LS2 8920 0.8B (ac),
0.0 (dc) ----- RJ11X CA11X
Table Preface-2. FCC Registration Information
Reg. Analog PL
Interfaces Model # SOC Network
USOC Canadian
Jacks
Reg. 0L13C 8128 9.0F RJ21X CA21A
Reg. 02LR2 8128 9.0F RJ21X CA21A
Reg. TL11M 8128 9.0F RJ2EX CA2EA
Reg. TL12M 8128 9.0F RJ21FX CA2FA
Reg. TL11E 8108, 8118 9.0F RJ2EX CA2EA
Reg. TL12E 8108, 8118 9.0F RJ2FX CA2FA
Reg. TL31M 8108, 8118 9.0F RJ2GX CA2GA
Reg. TL32M 8108, 8118 9.0F RJ2HX CA2HA
Reg. TL31E 8108, 8118 9.0F RJ2GX CA2GA
Reg. TL32E 8108, 8118 9.0F RJ2HX CA8HA
Table Preface-3. FCC Registration Information
Reg. Digital
Interfaces Model # SOC Network
USOC Canadian
Jacks
Reg. 04DU9-BN 8000, 8010* 6.0Y RJ48 CA81A
Reg. 04DU9-DN 8000, 8010* 6.0Y RJ48 CA81A
Reg. 04DU9-1KN 8000, 8010* 6.0Y RJ48 CA81A
Reg. 04DU9-1SN 8000, 8010* 6.0Y RJ48 CA81A
Reg. 04DU9-1ZN 8000, 8010* 6.0Y RJ48 CA81A
Reg. 04DU9-BN 8000, 8010** 6.0P N/A ---
Reg. 04DU9-DN 8000, 8010** 6.0P N/A ---
Reg. 04DU9-1KN 8000, 8010** 6.0P N/A ---
Reg. 04DU9-1SN 8000, 8010** 6.0P N/A ---
M04DU5-24 8249 6.0F RJ48 CA81A
M04DU5-48 8249 6.0F RJ48 CA81A
M04DU5-56 8249 6.0F RJ48 CA81A
M04DU5-96 8249 6.0F RJ48 CA81A
* with 812 CSU ** with 811 DSX
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
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CE Marking
The CE mark is affixed to the equipment that conforms to the following Commission
Directives:
EMC Directive - 89/336/EEC on the approximation of the laws of the
Member States relating to electromagnetic compatibility.
Low Voltage Directive - 73/23/EEC on the harmonization of the laws of
the Member States relating to electrical equipment designed for use within
certain voltage limits.
Telecom Directive - 91/263/EEC on the approximation of the laws of the
Member States concerning telecommunications terminal equipment,
including the mutual recognition of their conformity.
Country-Specific Regulatory Compliance Information
Canada
CANADIAN DOC INFORMATION
NOTICE TO USERS OF THE CANADIAN TELEPHONE NETWORK
The Canadian Department of Communications label identifies certified equipment.
This certification means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network
protective, operational and safety requirements. The Department does not guarantee
the equipment will operate to the user's satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be
connected to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The equipment
must also be installed using an acceptable method of connection. In some cases, the
company's inside wiring associated with a single line individual service may be
extended by means of a certified connector assembly (telephone extension cord). The
customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions may not prevent
degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized Canadian maintenance
facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this
equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company
cause to request to disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection the electrical ground connection of the
power utility, telephone line and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are
connected together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural areas.
Caution: Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but
should contact the appropriate electrical inspection authority, or electrician, as
appropriate.
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
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The Load Number (LN) assigned to each terminal device denotes the percentage of the
total load to be connected to a telephone loop which is used by the device to prevent
overloading. The termination on a loop may consist of any combination of devices
subject only to the requirement that the total of all the Load Numbers of all the devices
does not exceed 100.
Japan
CLASS A ITE NOTIFICATION
Europe
EUROPEAN TELECOMMUNICATION APPROVALS
Under the Telecommunications Terminal Directive the following connections are
approved:
The Dual WAN card (8010), the Single WAN card (8000) and the 120 ohm version of
the DSX/CEPT Module (811) are approved for connection to ONP unstructured 2048
kbiVs digital leased lines with G.703 interfaces, following assessment against CTR12
United Kingdom
UK APPROVAL NUMBER
The BABT approval number is M606037.
The Dual WAN card (8010), the Single WAN card (8000) and the 75 ohm version of
the DSX/CEPT Module (811), connected via the BNC connector panel (1183) are
approved for connection to UK 2048 kbiVs digital leased lines with G.703 (75Ohm)
interfaces.
UK COMPLIANCE STATEMENTS
The E1 Interface is approved in the UK for direct connection to PTO-provided circuits
operating at data rates up to 2.4Mbit/s.
The E1 Interface comprises a combination of single or dual WAN cards, CEPT module
and connector panels as listed in the UK approval documentation.
The approved configuration options are shown below.
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
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WAN Card
Single/Dual
800020/801020
CEPT Module
811 Interface Card
89xx Connector Panel
1181/1181UK
1183/1183UK
118320
1184
PTN
I/F
The 89xx Interface Card is also listed in the approval documentation and provides a
direct metallic path between the CEPT module and appropriate Connector Panel.
The power required by the host and the total of all adapter cards installed within the
host environment, together with any auxiliary apparatus, shall not exceed the power
specification of the host apparatus.
The power requirements for this E1 interface are:
8901 PSU
AC Mains: 100 - 240 Vrms, 47 - 63 Hz
DC Output: +5VDC 2A, +12VDC 1.2A, -12VDC 0.2A
8902 PSU
DC Input: 35 - 60 VDC, ± 15%, 120KVA max.
DC Output: +5.6VDC 2.5A, -5.2VDC 1.0A
+12VDC 1.9A, -12VDC 1.0A
It is essential that, when other option cards are introduced which use or generate a
hazardous voltage, the minimum creepages and clearances specified in the table below
are maintained. Suitable user protection to ensure compliance with EN 60950 should
be present on the card. A hazardous voltage is one which exceeds 42.2V peak AC or
60VDC. If you have any doubt, seek advice from a competent installation engineer
before installing other adapters into the host equipment.
The equipment must be installed such that with the exception of the connections to the
host, clearance and creepage distances shown in the table below are maintained
between the card and any other assemblies which use or generate a voltage shown in the
table below. The large distance shown in brackets applies where the local environment
is subject to conductive pollution or dry non-conductive pollution which could become
conductive due to condensation. Failure to maintain these minimum distances would
invalidate the approval.
Clearance (mm) Creepage (mm) Voltage Used or Generated By
Host or Other Cards
2.0 2.4 (3.8) Up to 50Vrms or VDC
2.6 3.0 (4.8) Up to 125Vrms or VDC
4.0 5.0 (8.0) Up to 250Vrms or VDC
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
Page 1-A-10 (10-97)
4.0 6.4 (10.0) Up to 300Vrms or VDC
For a host or other expansion card
fitted in the host, using or generating
voltages greater than 300V (rms or
DC), advice from a competent
telecommunications safety engineer
must be obtained before installation of
the relevant equipment
Above 300Vrms or VDC
Germany
GERMAN APPROVAL NUMBER
The German approval number is A118 142F.
SAFETY WARNING
SPEZIFISCHE SICHERHEITSMAßNAHMEN
DIE EINRICHTUNG IST GEMÄß DEM SICHERHEITSSTANDARD EN60950
ENTWORFEN UND HERGESTELLT WORDEN. DOCH DIE FOLGENDEN
SICHERHEITSMAßNAMEN SOLLEN EINGEHALTEN WERDEN. UM IHRE
PERSÖNLICHE SICHERHEIT BEI INSTALLATION ODER BEI WARTUNG
SICHERZUSTELLEN UND UM SCHADEN AN DER EINRICHTUNG ODER AN
DER ZUM ANSCHLUß BESTIMMTEN EINRICHTUNG ZU VERMEIDEN.
ERDUNG
Die Einrichtung kann genauso durch das Netzanschlußkabel wie durch das mit
gekennzeichnete Terminal geerdet werden.
STROMVERSORGUNG
Wechselspannung 120/240 Volts 2/1 Amps 50/60 Hertz
Gleichstrom 24/48 Volts 1/1.5 Amps
Die Gleichstromversogung muß zusätzlich den Strom von der Versorgung abstellen
können, und die Versorgungsspannung muß von einer isolierten Quelle gemäß der
SELV-Voraussetzungen von EN60950 versorgt werden.
SCHMELZSICHERUNG
Um Brandgefahr zu vermeiden, dürfen Sie nur die Sicherung von der vorgeschriebenen
Sorte und Nennwerte für die Einrichtung gerbrauchen.
ENTFERNUNG VON PLATTEN UND ABDECKUNGEN
Die Abdeckungen und Platten sollen nur von einem qualifizierten Wartungs- oder
Operationsperson entfernt werden.
Betreiben Sie nie die Einrichtung, wenn die Stromplattenverschlüsse entfernt worden
sind, und entfernen Sie nie die Stromplattenabdeckung, ohne zuerst die
Stromversorgung abzustellen.
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
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Customer Service
Service
If you require technical assistance with the installation, operation or maintenance of
products purchased directly from Premisys or you wish to return a product under
Warranty for repair, please call:
Premisys Technical Support at (510) 353-7686.
If you purchased the Premisys product from an authorized dealer, distributor, Value
Added Reseller (VAR) or a third party, please contact that vendor for technical
assistance and warranty support.
Ordering Information
To order equipment, cables or additional copies of this Reference Guide, please call:
Premisys Customer Service at (510) 353-7600.
Reference Guide v3.6 Preface
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Reference Guide v3.6 System Slot Map
(10-97) Page 2-A-1
Introduction
The system offers the choice of three chassis and employs four types of cards. This
chapter specifies the slots in which cards of different types may be installed in the three
chassis.
The chassis options are:
1. Front-Loading Chassis - Power Supplies on Side: This chassis provides
full functionality for smaller systems that require few options and small
capacity.
2. Two-Sided Chassis: With front and rear-facing card cages, this chassis
provides maximum system functionality and capacity.
3. Front-Loading Chassis - Power Supplies on Top: This chassis provides the
same functionality and capacity as the two-sided chassis with front facing
card cages.
The following types of cards may be installed in the chassis:
1. Common cards (CPU and Interface cards)
2. User cards (Voice, Data and Alarm cards)
3. WAN cards (single or dual T1/E1,or HDSL)
4. Communications Server cards (ADPCM)
All cards slide into slots in the front of the front-loading systems or the front and back
of the two-sided chassis. Rail guides in the top and bottom of the slots align the cards
with the connectors for easy insertion.
Two-Sided Unit
Figure Slot-1 shows the front of the chassis (often called the Network side) with the slot
numbers labeled. Cards inserted from the Network side have plastic face plates with a
handle in the middle and a retaining screw on the bottom of the cards. Figure Slot-2
shows the back of the chassis (often called the User side) with the slot numbers labeled.
Cards inserted from the User Side have metal face plates with handles at the top and
bottom. Those cards have screws on both the top and bottom of the face plates. Push
the cards firmly into the chassis until the face plate touches the chassis. Screw the face
plates to the chassis so the cards cannot come loose accidentally.
The two-sided chassis has an error-free card placement system. Certain card types are
"keyed" to fit only in their own slots. User cards, for instance, will not seat properly in
the CPU Slots (C-1 and C-2). Table Slot-1 describes card placement and should be used
to determine setup arrangements.
Always put blank face plates over any slots you are not using. Blank face plates help
protect the installed cards from contamination, and are an integral part of the air
circulation system that keeps the system cool. Also, the blank face plates are required
for compliance with UL regulations.
System Slot Map Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-A-2(10-97)
C1C2P1P2P3W1W2W3W4
F1F2
1
2
3
EUR/US
JP1
Figure Slot-1. Two-Sided Chassis - Front View
R1R2R3R4R5
IFU2U1U3U4U5U6U7U8
AC
R
G
R
+ + +- - - C
O
M
VNVB
VA
Figure Slot-2. Two-Sided Chassis - Rear View
Reference Guide v3.6 System Slot Map
(10-97) Page 2-A-3
Table Slot-1. Card Placement: Two-Sided Chassis
Type of Card # of Cards Slots Used Notes
CPU Cards 1-2 C1-C2 One required in either slot
Server Cards 1-3 P1-P3 ADPCM cards; any slot
WAN Cards 1-4 W1-W4 One required
Interface Card 1IF Required
Alarm Cards 0-8 U1-U8 Internal/External, any user
slot
E&M Cards 0-8 U1-U8 2/4 wire voice, any user slot
FXO Cards 0-8 U1-U8 2 wire voice, any user slot
FXS Cards 0-8 U1-U8 2 wire voice, any user slot
B7R Cards 0-8 U1-U8 FDL Mux, any user slot
BRI Cards 0-8 U1-U8 BRI, any user slot
DS0-DP Cards 0-8 U1-U8 4 wire data, any user slot
FRAD Cards 0-8 U1-U8 Frame Relay, any user slot
HSU Cards 0-8 U1-U8 High speed data, any user slot
OCU-DP Cards 0-8 U1-U8 4 wire data, any user slot
SRU Cards 0-8 U1-U8 Sub-rate data, any user slot
Main Power (AC/DC) 1-2 F1-F2 AC or DC power Supplies
Optional Power 0-2 R1-R5 AC/DC converter
Optional Ringer 0-5 R1-R5 Ringing generator
Front-Loading Unit
Figures Slot-3 and Slot-4 show the front-loading chassis. Designed to maximize the use
of space, the front loading chassis has a common bus that allows all cards to be placed
in similar slots. The combination slots for this unit are P1-P4 (Communications Server
card slots) and W1-W4 (WAN slots). Together, these slots are sometimes referred to as
slots U1-U8 (when used for voice, data or alarm cards).
Cards have either metal face plates or plastic face plates. Push the cards firmly into the
chassis until the face plate touches the chassis. Screw the face plates to the chassis so
the cards cannot come loose accidentally.
As with the two-sided chassis, the user should always put blank face plates over any
slots you are not using. Blank face plates help protect the installed cards from
contamination and are an integral part of the air circulation system that keeps the
system cool. Also, the blank face plates are required for compliance with UL
regulations.
Table Slot-2 describes card placement and should be used to determine setup
arrangements.
System Slot Map Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-A-4(10-97)
C1C2P1P2P3P4W1W2W3W4IF
S1S2R1
AC
R
G
R
C
O
M
+V-V
Figure Slot-3. Front-Loading Chassis - Power Supplies on Side (older model)
C1C2P1P2P3P4W1W2W3W4IF
F1F2R1
AC
R
G
R
+ + +- - - C
O
M
VNVB
VA
1
2
3
EUR/US
JP1
Figure Slot-4. Front-Loading Chassis - Power Supplies on Side (newer model)
Reference Guide v3.6 System Slot Map
(10-97) Page 2-A-5
Table Slot-2. Card Placement: Front-Loading Chassis - Power Supplies on Side
Type of Card # of Cards Slots Used Notes
CPU Cards 1-2 C1-C2 One required in either slot
Server Cards 1-3 P1-P3 ADPCM Cards
WAN Cards 1-4 W1-W4 One required
Interface Card 1IF Required
Alarm Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 Internal/External, any user
slot
E&M Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 2/4 wire voice, any slot
FXO Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 2 wire voice, any slot
FXS Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 2 wire voice, any slot
B7R Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 FDL Mux, any slot
BRI Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 BRI, any slot
DS0-DP Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 4 wire data, any slot
FRAD Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 Frame Relay, any slot
HSU Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 High speed data, any slot
OCU-DP Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 4 wire data, any slot
SRU Cards 0-7 P1-4, W1-4 Sub-rate data, any slot
Main Power (AC/DC) 1-2 S1-S2 AC or DC power Supplies
Optional Power 0-1 S1-S2 AC/DC converter
Optional Ringer 0-1 R1 Ringing generator
System Slot Map Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-A-6(10-97)
Front-Loading ChassisPower Supplies on Top
Figure Slot-5 shows the front-loading chassis with the power supplies on top. This
chassis has three server card slots (P1-3), four WAN card slots (W1-4), and eight user
card slots (U1-8). Slots S1 and S2 can accommodate up to two power supplies, while
slots R1-5 can accommodate up to five power converters or ringing generators. Table
Slot-3 describes card placement and should be used to determine setup.
AC
RGR
VN
VB
+
+
+
-
-
-
COM
VA
R1R2R3R4R5S1S2
C1C2P1P2P3W1W2W3W4IFU1U2U3U4U5U6U7U8
1
2
3
EUR/US
JP1
Figure Slot-5. Front-Loading Chassis - Power Supplies on Top
Reference Guide v3.6 System Slot Map
(10-97) Page 2-A-7
Table Slot-3. Card Placement: Front-Loading Chassis - Power Supplies on Top
Type of Card # of Cards Slots Used Notes
CPU Cards 1-2 C1-C2 One required in either slot
Server Cards 1-3 P1-P3 ADPCM Cards; any slot
WAN Cards 1-4 W1-W4 One required
Interface Card 1IF Required
Alarm Cards 0-8 U1-U8 Internal/External, any user slot
E&M Cards 0-8 U1-U8 2-/4-wire voice, any user slot
FXO Cards 0-8 U1-U8 2-wire voice, any user slot
FXS Cards 0-8 U1-U8 2-wire voice, any user slot
B7R Cards 0-8 U1-U8 FDL Mux, any user slot
BRI Cards 0-8 U1-U8 BRI, any user slot
DS0-DP Cards 0-8 U1-U8 4-wire data, any user slot
FRAD Cards 0-8 U1-U8 FRAD, any user slot
HSU Cards 0-8 U1-U8 High-speed data, any user slot
OCU-DP Cards 0-8 U1-U8 4-wire data, any user slot
SRU Cards 0-8 U1-U8 Sub-rate data, any user slot
Main Power (AC/DC) 1-2 F1-F2 AC or DC power supplies
Optional Power 0-2 R1-R5 AC/DC converter
Optional Ringer 0-5 R1-R5 Ringing generator
System Slot Map Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-A-8(10-97)
DC Power Supply Fuse
The DC power supply fuse is located on the chassis next to the DC external power
supply connectors on the front or rear panel (depending on chassis model). This fuse is
used to protect any over current on the network voltage (Vn) located on the DC
connector panel. Table Slot-4 lists the part numbers of approved replacement fuses.
Figure Slot-6 shows the location of the fuse replacement cartridge.
Table Slot-4. Replacement Fuses for the DC Power Supply
Manufacturer 250VDC 5A
Bussman GDC
Littlefuse 218005
AC
R
G
R
+
+
+
-
-
-
C
O
M
V
N
V
B
V
A
Replacement Fuse Cartridge
Figure Slot-6. Replacement Fuse Cartridge on Chassis
Reference Guide v3.6 Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-1
Introduction
The Installation section provides the user with information to unpack and assemble the
Integrated Access Controller. The installation checklist on the next page is provided for
the experienced user as a road map of installation procedures. This chapter will discuss
the unit, power supplies, and different hardware configurations for some of the cards.
The physical installation of the cards that make up the system is discussed in the
Slotmap chapter. Configuration of these cards is presented in later chapters.
Design Plan
The installation should be based upon a thoroughly considered, documented design
plan. Such a plan assures that the necessary components are on hand to implement the
system requirements and that the site can accommodate them.
Site Selection and Preparation
A site survey should be performed to avoid unforeseen problems. A site survey involves
a physical check on key information about a site, including building codes, floor plans,
available power, existing wiring and grounding.
An integrated access device requires a reasonably dust-free operating environment, such
as a computer room or a wiring closet. Do not install the chassis in direct sunlight,
which may increase the unit’s temperature and discolor the chassis. You may mount
the chassis on a wall or in an equipment rack, or place it on a table or other flat surface.
The unit can operate on either AC or DC power when equipped with the proper power
supply. Table Install-2 lists the electrical and environmental requirements.
The mounting brackets (supplied) are required for table top installations to assure
proper airflow in the chassis. The top and bottom of the unit must be clear of any
objects.
When the chassis is installed in a rack, allow a minimum of 2 inches (1.6 cm) space
between the chassis and the equipment above and below the unit for proper ventilation.
Caution: The chassis MUST be installed horizontally for proper ventilation and
cooling effect.
Each customer must provide either space or climate control to assure an ambient
temperature less than approximately 40° C for reliable operations. If heat dissipation is
a problem, increase the space between rack mounted units or install commercially
available heat baffles above and below each chassis.
A wide variety of system functions and capacities can be supported by various
combinations of system cards. Table Install-3 lists the specifications for all components
supported by the system in Version 3.6.
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-2(10-97)
Installation Checklist
Complete and document design plan
Perform site survey and preparation
Unpack and mount chassis
Remove power supply covers (as needed)
Install ground connection
Install AC or DC power supply
Install 115VAC to -48VDC converter (if applicable)
Install ringing generator (if applicable)
Install CPU Card
Configure and install WAN card plug-in modules on WAN card (see Section 5)
Install WAN Card
Install Interface Card
Install all other Cards. Set all jumpers and switches as required before installation. See
Table Install-1 and relevant card chapters in this manual.
Verify voltages (all power supplies in the chassis)
Verify fuse rating
Connect VT-100 to Interface Card with cable (see Basic Operations chapter)
Replace power supply covers
Connect AC power cord or apply DC voltage
Verify that power supplies, CPU, and WAN cards come up with green LEDs on
Register the system (refer to Basic Operations Chapter)
Set Alarm Filters (refer to Basic Operations Chapter)
Test Alarm History (remove card - restore card)
Configure CPU Card (refer to CPU Card Chapter)
Configure WAN Card(s) (refer to WAN Card Chapter)
Configure Interface Card (refer to Interface Card Chapter)
Configure all other Cards (refer to Individual Card Chapters)
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-3
Table Install-1 Module Switches and Jumpers
Card Model Jumpers or Switches Options
WAN: CSU Module 812 JP1-3
WAN: DSX/CEPT Module 811 JP1-4 T1/E1, 75 ohm/120 ohm
WAN: HDSL Plug-in 820
Interface Card 8927 JP2-4 balanced/unbalanced operation
Alarm Card 8401 JP1-4 Active/Passive
Alarm Card 8403 JP1-4 Active/Passive
E&M Card 8108
E&M Card 8115 SW1-4 GND/BAT options
E&M Card 8118 SW1-4 GND/BAT options
E&M Card 8119 SW1-4 GND/BAT options
FXS Card 8124 SW1-4 GND/BAT options
FXS Card 8128
FXO Card 8134 P1-8: JP1,2 MRD option
FXO Card 8135 P1-8: JP1,2 MRD option
FXO Card 8138 P1-8: JP1,2 MRD option
FXO Card 8139 P1-8: JP1, 2 MRD option
FXS Coin Card 8149
FXO Coin Card 8159
HSU Card 8202 P 1, 2 switch RS530/V.35 IF option
HSU Card 8203 JP2
HSU Card 8212
HSU Card 8214 JP1-JP2
HSU Card 8215 P 1-4 switch RS530/V.35 IF option
SRU Card 8220 JP2, JP3, JP9
OCU-DP 8249 JP3-JP4
OCU-DP 8248 JP1-JP7
OCU-DP 8247 JP1-JP7
OCU-DP 8246 JP1
OCU-DP 845
DS0-DP Card 8254 JP1, JP3
FRAD Card 8231 JP1, JP2, JP9
B7R Card 8228
ADPCM Card 8871
BRI-U Card 8260 JP1, JP2, JP9, JP101 -
JP602
BRI-U Card 8261 J101-801 LT/NT option
J102-802 7.5/15 ma sealing current
BRI-ST Card 8262 JP1, JP2, JP5, JP6,
JP101 - JP804
Table Install-2. Electrical and Environmental Requirements
Parameter Requirement
AC Power (110VAC) 90/135VAC 50/60Hz
AC Power (220VAC) 175/264VAC 50/60Hz
DC Power (-48VDC) -35/-60VDC
DC Power (+24VDC) +18/+32VDC
Power consumption 125W (typical)
Temperature (operating) 0° to 50° C, 32° to 122° F
Temperature (storage) -20° to 80° C, -4° to 176° F
Humidity 0% to 95% relative humidity, non-condensing
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-4(10-97)
Table Install-3. Physical Specifications
Height Width Depth Weight Power
Item Model inches cm inches cm inches cm lb Kg Watt BTU/hr
System Unit 8916 9.0 22.9 17 43.2 9.13 23.2 8.5 3.96 -- --
System Unit 8918 9.0 22.9 17 43.2 15.38 39.0 11.0 5.0 -- --
System Unit 8919 9.0 22.9 17 43.2
AC Power Supply 8901 5.62 14.3 2.13 5.4 8.13 20.6 1.67 .76 -- --
-48VDC Power Supply 8902 5.62 14.3 37.6 8.13 20.6 1.75 .80 -- --
24VDC Power Supply 8907 5.62 14.3 37.6 8.13 20.6 1.75 .80 -- --
AC/DC Converter 8903 5.62 14.3 2.75 7.0 8.13 20.6 2.0 .91 -- --
Power Converter 8905 5.62 14.3 2.75 7.0 8.13 20.6 2.0 .91
Ringing Generator 8906 5.62 14.3 1.38 3.5 6.0 15.2 1.5 .68 -- --
CPU Card 8800 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .75 .32 1.4 4.78
CPU Card 8801 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .75 .32 13.41
CPU Card 8804 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .75 .32 1.4 4.78
WAN Card 8000 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .75 .32 1.1 3.75
WAN Card 8010 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .75 .32 1.5 5.12
WAN Card (HDSL) 8011 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .75 .32
WAN Card 8014 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .75 .32 26.83
CSU Module 812 3.69 9.37 2.13 5.4 .38 .95 .062 .028 0.25 0.85
DSX/CEPT Module 811 3.63 9.22 2.06 5.2 .50 1.27 .062 .028 0.45 1.54
HDSL Plug-in 820
Interface Card 8920 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 0.6 2.05
Interface Card 8921 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45
Interface Card 8925 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 0.15 0.51
Interface Card 8926 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 0.2 0.68
Interface Card 8927 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 0.18 0.62
Alarm Card 8401 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .5 .23 0.4 1.37
E&M Card 8108 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 3.4 11.61
E&M Card 8115 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 1.75 5.97
E&M Card 8118 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 3.4 11.61
E&M Card 8119 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 3.5 11.94
E&M Card 8115 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0
FXO Card 8134 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.25 .57 3.5 11.94
FXO Card 8135 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.25 .57 3.5 11.94
FXO Card 8138 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.25 .57 723.9
FXO Card 8139 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.25 .57 723.9
FXS Card 8124 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 4.85 16.54
FXS Card 8125 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 4.85 16.54
FXS Card 8128 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 9.7 33.12
FXS Card 8129 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 9.7 33.12
FXS Coin Card 8149 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 9.7 33.12
FXO Coin Card 8159 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 9.7 33.12
SRU Card 8220 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .5 .23 4.6 15.7
FRAD Card 8231 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0
HSU Card 8202 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .5 .23 3.4 11.61
HSU Card 8203 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0
HSU Card 8212 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .5 .23 2.5 8.54
HSU Card 8214 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .5 .23 2.5 8.54
HSU Card 8215 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .5 .23 3.5 11.94
OCU-DP 8249 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .5 .23 2.4 8.2
OCU-DP 8248 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 5.1 17.41
OCU-DP 8247 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 5.1 17.41
OCU-DP 10-Port 8246 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5
OCU-DP 845 8.0 20.3 .5 6.25 15.9 .75 .32 5.1 17.41
DS0-DP Card 8254 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .5 .23 3.1 10.58
ADPCM Card 8871 8.0 20.3
B7R Card 8228 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 .5 .23 4.6 15.7
BRI-U Card 8260 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0 1.0 .45 6.3 21.48
BRI-U Card 8261 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0
BRI-ST Card 8262 8.0 20.3 .94 2.4 7.5 19.0
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-5
Unpacking and Mounting the Chassis
When you receive the system, unpack the boxes and check the chassis and cards for
damage. If any part of the unit is damaged, contact the shipping company to file a
claim. The shipping company representative will also tell you how to submit a claim,
where to send the unit, and give you any special instructions you may need.
Pack the unit in the original packing materials and send it by prepaid freight to the
address you received. If the original packing materials are unavailable, pack the unit in
a sturdy box and surround it with shock-absorbing material.
The front and back of the two-sided unit must be accessible for inserting cards. Voice,
data, WAN, and power cables are also attached to connectors at the rear of the chassis.
The front-loading model of the Integrated Access Controller does not need access to the
back side of the unit. Table Install-4 lists the minimum clearances between the
equipment and the nearest object for rack-mounted, wall-mounted or table-top
installations.
Table Install-4. Minimum Rack and Wall-Mount Clearances
Clearance Front Back* Top Bottom
Inches 10 15 2 2
Centimeters 25 38 5 5
* required for the two-sided chassis only
Two-Sided Chassis
The 891822 and 891823 two-sided chassis have twelve holes on each side of the chassis
(see Figure Install-1). These holes facilitate mounting the unit in any standard EIA 19-
or 23-inch rack (48.2 or 58.4 cm). The two holes on the bottom of the unit (t) can be
used for mounting on a table or other flat surface.
Top
B
o
t
t
o
m
B
a
c
k
F
r
o
n
t
t t
Figure Install-1. Mounting Holes (2-Sided Chassis)
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-6(10-97)
Front-Loading Chassis (Power Supplies on Side)
The 8916 chassis has seven holes on each side of the chassis (as shown in Figure
Install-2). These holes can be used to mount the unit in any standard EIA 19- or 23-
inch rack (48.2 or 58.4 cm). The two holes on the bottom of the unit (t) can be used for
mounting on a table or other flat surface.
T
o
p
Bottom
B
a
c
k
F
r
o
n
t
t
t
Figure Install-2. Mounting Holes (8916 Front-Loading Chassis)
The 891620 chassis has eight holes on each side of the chassis (as shown in Figure
Install-3). These holes can be used to mount the unit in any standard EIA 19- or 23-
inch rack (48.2 or 58.4 cm). The two holes on the bottom of the unit (t) can be used for
mounting on a table or other flat surface.
T
o
p
Bottom
B
a
c
k
F
r
o
n
t
t
t
Figure Install-3. Mounting Holes (891620 Front-Loading Chassis)
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-7
Front-Loading Chassis (Power Supplies on Top)
The 891920 chassis has eight holes on each side of the chassis (as shown in Figure
Install-4). These holes can be used to mount the unit in any standard EIA 19- or 23-
inch rack (48.2 or 58.4 cm). The two holes on the bottom of the unit (t) can be used for
mounting on a table or other flat surface.
Top
Bottom
B
a
c
k
F
r
o
n
t
t
t
Figure Install-4. Mounting Holes (Front-Loading Chassis, Power Supplies on Top)
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-8(10-97)
Mounting the Chassis
To mount the chassis to the rack, attach the metal brackets (see Figure Install-5) to the
sides of the chassis with the four 10-32x1/4 screws (brackets and all screws provided in
the installation pack). Four 12-24x1/2 screws are needed to attach the chassis to the
rack. The brackets are reversible to allow mounting in 19- or 23-inch racks (48.2 or
58.4 cm). You can attach the brackets using holes at the front of the chassis, back of
the chassis or near the middle. If you mount the brackets in the middle of the chassis,
you can reduce the amount of space required behind it for cables. However, the front
and the back must be accessible to insert and remove cards.
To attach the unit to the wall, use the template of the hole pattern (provided) and copy
to a backboard. The backboard should be 1/2" to 3/4" construction grade plywood.
Attach the unit with the 4-10x5/8 screws provided. The wall mount position must be
with the power supplies closest to the wall.
If you are placing the unit on a tabletop or other hard surface, it is mandatory to assure
clearance for proper airflow in the chassis. Make sure the chassis is accessible from the
front, and has at least 3/4 inches (2 cm) clearance above the chassis. The metal
brackets (see Figure Install-5) should be attached to provide the additional clearance
needed for attaching cables to the user cards for both the two-sided and front-loading
systems. Attach the brackets to the side of the chassis using the two (t) holes. Place the
plastic abrasion-protective inserts ("feet") in the holes provided near the ends of the
bottom of the bracket.
Key:OvalHolesforRack Attachment
Round HolesforRack Attachment
HolesforTabletop Attachment
HolesforPlasticInserts("Feet")
Figure Install-5. Hole Pattern on the Mounting Bracket
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-9
Power Supply and Ringing Generator System
The power supply and ringing generator system can consist of up to two power supplies,
two AC to DC converters and up to four ringing generators. External -48VDC talk
battery and external ringing generators may be used instead of the internal units. Use
the following guidelines to determine your power supply and ringing generator
requirements.
System Power
The system will always require one of the following power supplies:
Ø AC (8901)
Ø -48VDC (8902)
Ø +24VDC (8907)
Even though the 8907 power supply has specifications listed as negative throughout
this manual, it can be used with positive voltage (+24VDC). Because of the
extremely small number of applications that would require it, the conversion
procedure is not covered in this manual. If you are considering using +24VDC,
please call the customer service number listed in the Preface.
For backup, you may add a second power supply (see Preface for specific UL
requirements when adding a redundant power supply). Redundant power supplies are
not load-sharing.
-48VDC Talk Battery
In addition to the power supplies, a -48 VDC talk battery is required whenever there are
analog voice cards present in the system unless all of those are E&M ports and are used
in Transmission Only (TO) mode, or when Type 1 signaling is used.
A -48VDC power source is also required for use with:
Ø External Alarm card
Ø OCU-DP card
Ø BRI card (to provide sealing current)
If the unit is powered by the AC (8901) supply, either the 8903 Internal 115VAC to
-48VDC or 8905 120/240VAC to -48VDC Converter or an external source will be
required for the -48VDC talk battery. The 8903 AC to DC converter is available only
for 115VAC sources. Use 8905 for 220 VAC locations.
Ringing Generators
Ringing generators are required whenever there are FXS cards in the unit or if any FXO
ports are used in Manual Ringdown (MRD) mode. Ringing voltage may be provided
from an external source or by using the 8906 Ringing Generator. The 8906 requires a
-48VDC source in the system.
Customers having the older 8904 Ringing Generator may still use it.
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-10 (10-97)
Warning: The 8904 must never be used in the same system with an 8906 ringing
generator.
Warning: The 8904 and 8906 ringing generators are incompatible with external
ringing devices.
The 8904 provides ringing voltage of 105VAC (nominal) at 20 Hz for 11
simultaneously ringing voice ports, while the 8906 provides ringing voltage of 100VAC
for the same number of ports. With normal call activity, a single ringing generator
might provide all of the power necessary to run the system. In a group where incoming
calls are at a minimum, 30-50 stations could share the same ringing generator. Small
groups with heavy incoming call volumes might require two or more ringing generators.
This card will not quit with a heavy load, it will just have weaker and slower ringing
abilities. That condition should alert you to the need for additional equipment.
The compatibility of power sources and ringing generators that can be used together are
summarized in Table Install-5.
Table Install-5. Power Supply Options Compatibility Table
Power
Sources AC
(8901) -48VDC
(8902) Converter
(8903) Converter
(8905) Ringer
(8906)+24VD
C
(8907)
-48VDC
External Ringer
External Ringer
(8904)
AC (8901) --- yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
-48VDC
(8902) yes --- no no yes no yes yes yes
Converter
(8903) yes no --- yes yes no no yes yes
Converter
(8905) yes no yes --- yes no no yes yes
Ringer
(8906)yes yes yes yes --- no yes NO NO
+24VDC
(8907) yes no no no no --- no yes yes
-48VDC
External yes yes no no yes no --- yes yes
Ringer
External yes yes yes yes NO yes yes --- NO
Ringer
(8904) yes yes yes yes NO yes yes NO
US/Europe Jumper
Prior to inserting any cards and powering up the chassis, jumper JP1 on the 891620,
891822/23, and 891920 chassis must be set to US or European configuration. The
jumper is located on the resource card backplane, and is accessible from the chassis
front. The default setting is US. The resource cards must also have the jumper set
consistent with the chassis. See the Slot Map chapter for more detailed information on
this feature.
1
2
3
E
UR/US
JP1
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-11
Chassis Grounding
! ! ! PLEASE READIMPORTANT ! ! !
When using any CPU revision B or C in a six-digit chassis as depicted in
figures Install-6 through Install-9, or in a four-digit chassis as depicted in
figure Install-10 with a voice ringer card installed, the chassis must be
properly grounded to ensure reliable operation.
In order to identify which CPU you have, you must either visually look at the white
sticker that has been placed on the back of the mainboard. It indicates the type and
revision of CPU that is being installed. If you do not have revision B or C CPU’s as
stated above, then please disregard this notice.
To ensure proper operation in a chassis with an external power connector like those
shown below, it is crucial that each chassis is properly grounded. This section details
grounding procedures for each type of chassis. This information presumes that the
operator and/or installer has some knowledge of grounding issues. Please refer to Field
Alert Bulletin 108-000004 for a top level grounding tutorial.
The chassis ground is usually connected to the earth ground directly (using the chassis
ground screw) or via the power cord.
In order to minimize electrical potential between grounds, chassis ground ( ) and
common signal ground (COM) in the terminal power connector should be connected
with a jumper wire or bridge.
Improper grounding may cause a difference in electrical potential between the chassis
and the terminal equipment, which could damage the cards, the terminal equipment, or
both.
IF YOU ARE UNCLEAR ABOUT STANDARD GROUNDING PROCEDURES,
PLEASE CONSULT WITH YOUR NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR.
Ø
×
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-12 (10-97)
Front-Loading Chassis: Power Supplies on Side
Figure Install-6 details the possible ground connections for the external power
connector of the front-loading chassis with power supplies on the side.
R
G
R+ + +- - -
VNVAVB
C
O
M
Optional Telecom Ground
-
+
AC* third wire* ground
-48VDC Return
-48 VDC Supply
AC PLUG
48 VDC PSU
(Note: Optional Telecom Ground Connection:
It may be required when the 48VDC PSU output is
not grounded or when the system is AC powered. It
is only needed for the proper operation of the
Telecom Ground Start and E&M signaling circuits.
For Additional information please refer to Field Alert
Bulletin 108-000001).
POWER CONNECTIONS
Figure Install-6. Ground Connections (Front-Loading Chassis: Power Supplies on Side)
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-13
Two-Sided Chassis
Figure Install-7 details the possible ground connections for the external power
connector of the two-sided chassis.
R
G
R+ + +- - -
VNVAVB
C
O
M
Optional Telecom Ground
AC* third wire* ground
-48VDC Return
-48 VDC Supply
AC PLUG
48 VDC PSU
(Note: on Optional Telecom Ground Connection:
It may be required when the 48VDC PSU output is
not grounded or when the system is AC powered. It
is only needed for the proper operation of the
Telecom Ground Start and E&M signaling circuits.
For Additional information please refer to Field Alert
Bulletin 108-000001).
POWER CONNECTIONS
-
+
Figure Install-7. Ground Connections (Two-Sided Chassis)
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-14 (10-97)
Front-Loading Chassis: Power Supplies on Top
Figure Install-8 details the possible ground connections for the external power
connector of the front-loading chassis with power supplies on the top.
RGR
+
+
+
-
-
-
COM
VN
VA
VB
Optional Telecom Ground
AC* third wire* ground
-48VDC Return
-48 VDC Supply
AC PLUG
48 VDC PSU
(Note: on Optional Telecom Ground Connection:
It may be required when the 48VDC PSU output is
not grounded or when the system is AC powered. It
is only needed for the proper operation of the
Telecom Ground Start and E&M signaling circuits.
For Additional information please refer to Field Alert
Bulletin 108-000001).
-
+
POWER CONNECTIONS
Figure Install-8. Ground Connections (Front-Loading Chassis: Power Supplies on
Top)
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-15
Grounding Four-Digit Chassis
The front-loading chassis (revision C1 or greater) has a terminal block connector near
the AC power connection and main power fuse, as shown in Figure Install-9.
R
G
R
C
O
M
+V-V
Figure Install-9. Chassis External Power Connector (rev. C1+)
As with the six-digit chassis, this chassis must be properly grounded for reliable
operations and safety. This is accomplished by strapping the common ground
connector (COM) to the earth ground connector ( ), as shown in Figure Install-10
below.
R
G
R
+-
VV
C
O
M
Optional Telecom Ground
AC* third wire* ground
-48VDC Return
-48 VDC Supply
AC PLUG
48 VDC PSU
(Note: on Optional Telecom Ground Connection:
It may be required when the 48VDC PSU output is
not grounded or when the system is AC powered. It
is only needed for the proper operation of the
Telecom Ground Start and E&M signaling circuits.
For Additional information please refer to Field Alert
Bulletin 108-000001).
POWER CONNECTIONS
-
+
Figure Install-10. Chassis Ground Connections (Front-Loading Chassis: Power
Supplies on Side).
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-16 (10-97)
Installing the AC Power Supply (8901)
To install the AC Power Supply proceed with the following steps. Table Install-6 lists
the power supply specifications.
1. Remove the panel covering the front power slots. You may insert or
remove the power supply module while power is on or off.
2. Hold the power supply by its metal handle and align the printed circuit
board (PCB) edges with the rail guides of either power supply slot (F1 or
F2 for two-sided systems, S1 or S2 for front loading systems). Push the
module in until it is firmly seated in the backplane connector and replace
the panel that covers the front power supply slots.
Table Install-6. AC Power Supply Specifications
Parameter Rating
Output Power Continuous 50W
Output Power Peak (60 sec) 70W (10% duty cycle)
Input Current (maximum) 1.7A at 120VAC 60Hz full rated output load
Source Input Current (maximum) 3A
Inrush Surge Current max 3.7A peak at 240VAC cold start
Input Frequency 47-63Hz
Efficiency min 65%
Approvals UL, FCC, CSA
Installing the DC Power Supply (8902 or 8907)
Table Install-7 lists specifications for the 8902 (-48VDC) and 8907 (+24VDC) power
supplies.
Table Install-7. DC Power Supply Specifications
Parameter 8902 Rating 8907 Rating
Output Power 50W continuous 50W continuous
Input Power -35 to -60VDC +18 to +32VDC
Source Input Current (Max) 3A 5A
Approvals UL, FCC, CSA UL, FCC, CSA
Perform the following steps to install:
1. Remove the panel covering the front power slots. You may insert or
remove the power supply module while power is on or off.
2. Hold the power supply by its metal handle and align the PCB edges with
the rail guides of either power supply slot (F1 or F2 for two-sided systems,
S1 or S2 for front loading systems). Push the module in until it is firmly
seated in the backplane connector, and replace the panel that covers the
front power supply slots.
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-17
External Power Connector
8916 Chassis Power Connector
A terminal block connector is attached to the 8916 chassis near the AC power
connection and main power fuse. Figure Install-11 shows the connector.
R
G
R
C
O
M
+V-V
Figure Install-11. 8916 External Power Connector (rev. C1+)
Six Phillips-head screws are attached to the terminal block on the chassis. The two end
screws anchor the connector to the chassis, and the one on the left acts as the chassis
ground. The other screws are used to connect power wires from other sources. The
"+V" screw is used for power return. The "RGR" screw is used for an external ringer.
Wiring should be done according to a wiring plan that takes into account the size of the
wire, type of insulation, length of the wire and environmental conditions of the
installation site. All wires should be secured according to local requirements. A 14
gauge ground wire less than 20 feet in length is recommended. The Common and
Ground terminals may need to be strapped together.
All connections should be made using insulated ring terminals like the one shown in
Figure Install-12.
Size 6
.300 inch
(3.4 cm)
Figure Install-12. Ring Terminal (insulated) Specifications
891620 Chassis Power Connector
The power connector blocks are the same for all chassis with six-digit product numbers.
Diagrams of these chassis that display the placement of the power connector block can
be found in the Slot Map chapter.
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-18 (10-97)
Grounds and power feeds are connected to the power connector block by inserting and
fastening the wires in the proper slot. The screw adjacent to each slot can be loosened
or tightened to secure the connection. For safety reasons, no more than one-eighth of
an inch (0.125") of the connecting wire should be exposed. No uninsulated wire
should be visible from the power connector block.
Figure Install-13 shows the power connector block for the 891620. This block provides
for dual power connections at VA and VB where redundant power feeds are required.
Connection VA feeds power supply slot F1. Connection VB feeds power supply slot F2.
In addition, VN can be connected to a -48v source for powering voice cards and circuits.
The COM (common) is used for signal reference. RGR (ringer) connection is used
when an external ringer is connected to the chassis. Ringer bias is selected by the
connection to VN+ or VN-.
Note: If -48vdc is applied to VA or VB DO NOT connect external power to VN
R
G
R
+ + +- - -
VNVAVB
C
O
M
Figure Install-13. 891620 Terminal Power Connector
891822/891823 Chassis Power Connector
Figure Install-14 shows the power connector block for the 891822 and 891823. This
block provides for dual power connections at VA and VB where redundant power feeds
are required. Connection VA feeds power supply slot F1. Connection VB feeds slot F2.
In addition, VN can be connected to a -48v source for powering voice cards and circuits.
The COM (common) is used for signal reference. RGR (ringer) connection is used
when an external ringer is connected to the chassis. Ringer bias is selected by the
connection to VN+ or VN-.
Note: If -48vdc is applied to VA or VB DO NOT connect external power to VN
R
G
R
+ + +- - -
VNVAVB
C
O
M
Figure Install-14. 891822/891823 Terminal Power Connector
891920 Chassis Power Connector
Figure Install-15 shows the power connector block for the 891920. This block provides
for dual power connections at VA and VB where redundant power feeds are required.
Connection VA feeds power supply slot F1. Connection VB feeds power supply slot F2.
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-19
In addition, VN can be connected to a -48v source for powering voice cards and circuits.
The COM (common) is used for signal reference. RGR (ringer) connection is used
when an external ringer is connected to the chassis. Ringer bias is selected by the
connection to VN+ or VN-.
Note: If -48vdc is applied to VA or VB DO NOT connect external power to VN
RGR
+
+
+
-
-
-
COM
VN
VA
VB
Figure Install-15. 891920 Terminal Power Connector
Installing the 115VAC to -48VDC Converter (8903, 8905 and
8908)
Do not install the 8903 if the unit is connected to an external -48VDC power source.
1. For the two-sided chassis, remove the panel covering the rear power slots.
Install the module in any of the five rear slots while power is on or off.
For the front-loading chassis, remove the panel covering the front power
slots. Install the module in slot S1 or S2 while power is on or off.
2. Hold the converter by the metal handle and align the PCB edges with the
slot rail guides in the power supply cage. Gently push the module in until
it is firmly seated in the backplane connector.
3. When the power supply is installed and the power is on, the green LED on
the front panel of the converter should be on. If the LED goes off,
something is wrong. Check that the supply is properly seated in the
connector and replace the panel that covers the power slots.
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-20 (10-97)
Table Install-8. AC to DC Converter Specifications
Parameter Rating
Output Power 75 Watt Max
Output Voltage -48VDC
Output Current 1.5A DC
Hold Up Time 20 mSec minimum at full load and 117VAC input
Input Voltage 90-135VAC
Frequency 110VAC=60Hz
Efficiency 0.83
Heat Dissipation 55 BTU per hour
Approvals UL, FCC, CSA
Fuse - 1.5 A 250V
Handle
Power
Bus
Edge
Connector
Figure Install-16. AC-to-DC Converter Layout
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-21
Installing the Ringing Generator (8904 or 8906)
The 8904 provides ringing voltage of 105VAC (nominal) at 20 Hz for 11
simultaneously ringing voice ports, while the 8906 provides ringing voltage of 100VAC
(nominal) for the same number of ports.
If more than one ringing generator is required in the same chassis, they must have the
same part number. The 8904 and 8906 Ringing Generators cannot be mixed in a
single chassis. Note: Ringing Generator 8904 is a discontinued product. If you are in
need of Technical Assistance, please contact Product Support at (510) 353-7686.
Ensure that the system has a -48VDC power source before installing either of the
modules. You may install up to four (4) ringing generators on the two-sided chassis
depending upon availability of slots. The front-loading system with the power supplies
on the side can have only one ringing generator.
The outputs of all ringing generators are linked together by OR circuits on the ringing
bus. In cases where more than one generator is installed, one must be jumpered as
MASTER and the others must be jumpered as SLAVE. The master ringing generator
will synchronize the ringing signals on the ringing bus. (For more information on
configuring the MASTER/SLAVE jumpers, please see the diagrams of the 8904 and
8906 later in this chapter.)
Table Install-9 lists the specifications for the 8904 and the 8906.
Table Install-9. Ringing Generator Specifications
Parameter 8904 Rating 8906 Rating
Input Power 44-56VDC 45-56VDC
Input Current 70mA no load, 350mA
full load 250mA RMS
Efficiency 0.6 0.6
Heat Dissipation 25 BTU per hour 12 BTU per hour
Output Power 10W 30W@56V
25W @48V
22.5W@45V
Output Voltage 105VAC 100VAC
Output Current 100mA 250mA
Output Frequency 20Hz 20Hz
Distortion <3% <3%
Approvals UL, CSA UL (pending)
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-22 (10-97)
To install the 8904 Ringing Generator:
1. Be sure that power is off before inserting or removing the 8904
ringing generator.
2. For the two-sided chassis, remove the panel covering the rear power slots.
You may install the module in any of the five rear slots. For the front-
loading chassis, remove the panel covering the front power slots. Install
the module in slot R1 only.
3. Make sure that jumper W201 is installed if this is the only 8904 ringing
generator in the unit, or if it is the MASTER ringing generator (see Figure
Install-17).
4. Remove jumper W201 if this is a SLAVE ringing generator. Remove the
jumper by cutting it with wire cutters.
5. Hold the ringing generator by the metal handle and align the PCB edges
with the slot rail guides in the power supply backplane. Gently push the
module in until it is firmly seated in the backplane connector.
6. When the supply is installed and power is on, the LED on the rear panel of
the ringing generator should flicker at a rate of 20 times per second. If
this LED is not flickering, something is wrong. Check that the
Master/Slave settings are correct and that the module is firmly seated in
the connector.
5. Replace the panel that covers the rear power slots.
Master/Slave Jumper
W201
Fuse - 1.0A 250V
Power
Bus
Edge
Connector
(remove if using as slave)
Figure Install-17. 8904 Ringing Generator Layout
Reference Guide v3.6Installation
(10-97) Page 2-B-23
To Install the 8906 Ringing Generator:
1. You must make sure that power is off before inserting or removing the
ringing generator.
2. For the two-sided chassis, remove the panel covering the rear power slots.
You may insert or remove the module in any of the five rear slots. For the
front-loading chassis with power supplies on the top, remove the panel
covering the front power slots, and insert or remove the module in any of
the five slots. For the front-loading chassis with power supplies on the
side, you may insert or remove the module in slot R1 only.
3. The JP1 jumper is factory-preset to the MASTER configuration (see
Figure Install-18). You do not need to change this jumper if this is the
MASTER ringing generator, or the only ringing generator in the system.
If this is a SLAVE ringing generator, move the jumper on JP1 from the
lower pins (MASTER) to the upper pins (SLAVE).
4. Hold the ringing generator by the metal handle and align the PCB edges
with the slot rail guides in the power supply backplane. Gently push the
module in until it is firmly seated in the backplane connector.
5. When the supply is installed and power is on, the LED on the rear panel of
the ringing generator should flicker at a rate of 20 times per second. A
problem is indicated if this LED is not flickering,. Check that the
Master/Slave settings are correct and that the module is firmly seated in
the connector.
6. Replace the panel cover.
Power
Bus
Edge
Connector
Slave
Master
JP1
Master/Slave
Jumper
Figure Install-18. 8906 Ringing Generator Layout
Installation Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-B-24 (10-97)
Connecting AC Power
Attach the AC power source to the system at the AC power socket. This socket
accommodates the standard 3-prong molded power cord supplied with the system.
Secure the power cord to the rack or cabinet for strain relief and route it down to the
bottom of the chassis.
Using Amphenol Connectors
Many of the cables used to connect cards in the Integrated Access Controller to wiring
devices use Amphenol connectors at either one or both ends of the cable. The
traditional Amphenol connector placed the connector at a right angle to the cable itself,
(see Figure Install-19) thus preventing the screw at the bottom of the connector from
being properly attached without removing the hood. This type of cable connector is not
recommended for use with this system.
Amphenol
Cable
Figure Install-19. Undesirable Amphenol Connectors
Newly designed cables mount the Amphenol connector at a 25° angle to the cable and
use screws that can be twisted by fingertips to attach the connector from both the top
and the bottom. Other types of cables mount the connector at a 90° angle (see Figure
Install-20). It is suggested that cables of this design be used with the cards in your
system.
Amphenol
Cable
Amphenol
Amphenol
Cable
Figure Install-20. Preferred Amphenol Connectors
Reference Guide v3.6 Basic Operations
(10-97) Page 2-C-1
Terminal Interface
The system is controlled through a serial interface to a VT-100 terminal or a PC
running a terminal emulation program. Connect the terminal or selected PC COM port
to the Interface card TERM jack. Set the terminal’s communications parameters as
follows:
9.6 kbps; 8 data bits; no parity; 1 stop bit.
Logging On
When both the system and your terminal are on, the log-on screen shown in Figure
Basic-1 will normally appear. If the screen stays blank after 30 seconds, press the
<Enter> key to display the screen. If the screen remains blank, check your terminal
settings and connections. (For remote log-on procedures, see the Interface Card
chapter.)
When the system is started for the first time after initial installation, you will see the
Registration screen. See the Registration section later in this chapter for instructions.
If new system firmware or a different type of CPU has been installed, you will be asked
to Zip the system. For instructions check Reinitializing the System later in this
chapter.
Node_1 | | 12-
31
IMACS
Integrated Multiple Access Communications Server
Copyright (C) Premisys Communications Inc 1991-1996
Password:
Node: Node_1
Version: 3.6x
Figure Basic-1. The Log-On Screen
Basic Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-C-2(10-97)
The initial Log-On passwords correspond to one of four access level names. For
example, the manager access level has the preset password Manager. Passwords are
case-sensitive. See Table Basic-1 for a listing of all passwords and access levels. For
procedures used to change passwords, see the CPU Card chapter later in this guide.
Table Basic-1. Access Levels
Access
Level Initial
Password Description
Superuser ********* Special access for maintenance and diagnostics, to be
used as directed by a certified technician.
Manager Manager Full access to all configuration options, diagnostic
features and password management.
Operator Operator Read/write access to configuration and diagnostic
features.
Viewer Viewer Read-only access to configuration and diagnostic
features.
If you are configuring the system for the first time, log in as Manager. If you are
maintaining the system after its initial configuration, the password has probably
changed from "Manager;" consult your network administrator for the current password.
Type the password and press the <Enter> key to display the main screen for your
system.
Reference Guide v3.6 Basic Operations
(10-97) Page 2-C-3
Registration
When the system is started for the first time, the registration screen will appear.
Answer the questions shown at the bottom of the screen, and the system will
automatically respond with the correct application parameters and prompts.
The registration procedure consists of the three steps shown below.
1. Enter the vendor code. If no other vendor code is specified, enter the
vendor code 101.
2. Select the type of chassis used (either front-loading with power supplies
on the side, front-loading with power supplies on top, or the two-sided
chassis).
3. Confirm the proposed changes by selecting (Y for yes or N for no). Figure
Basic-2 shows the completed Registration screen.
Node_1 | Welcome to Registration | 12-31-99 14:33
Vendor Code: 101
1. Front - Loading Only / Power Supplies on side
2. Front - Loading Only / Power Supplies on top
3. Front & Rear Loading Only / Power Supplies on side
Select one: 3
Is the Information on this screen correct (Y/N)?
Figure Basic-2. Screen Layout
Basic Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-C-4(10-97)
Main Screens
After login you will see one of the two following screens: Figure Basic-3 shows the
main screen for a front-and-rear loading Integrated Access Controller; Figure Basic-4
shows the main screen for a front-loading only system. Depending on the number of
cards installed in your system, your screen may show more or fewer cards than seen in
these figures. For consistency and simplicity hereafter, this manual shows only screens
for the front-and-rear loading Integrated Access Controller.
Node_1 | | 12-31-99
14:33
Slot Installed Status Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU XCON IF INTF+modem
C2 CPU XCON RDNT U1 ALR
P1 ADPCM-64 U2 E&M 4Wx8-6
P2 ADPCM-64 U3 FXS 2Wx8-9
P3 ADPCM-64 U4 FXO 2Wx8-9
W1 CSU+CSU U5 HSU 366x2
W2 CSU+CSU U6 OCU-DPx5
W3 CEPT+CEPT U7 FRAD-18
W4 CEPT+CEPT U8 SRU-232x10
F1 PS1 RI RINGER
F2 PS2
Alarms | Config| Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | sEr | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure Basic-3. Main Screen for Front-and-Rear Loading System
Reference Guide v3.6 Basic Operations
(10-97) Page 2-C-5
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU XCON
C2 CPU XCON RDNT
P1/U1 HSU-366x2
P2/U2 ADPCM-64
P3/U3 ALR
P4/U4 SRU-232x10
W1/U5 CSU+CSU
W2/U6 B7R-8
W3/U7 OCU-DPx2
W4/U8 BRI U-IFx8
IF INTF+modem
S1
S2
S3
RI RINGER
Alarms | Config| Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | sEr | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure Basic-4. Main Screen for Front-Loading Only System
Basic Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-C-6(10-97)
Introduction to Screens
After you have determined configuration requirements, you can log on and set the cards
to implement a custom network design. For each card, the system presents a screen that
shows the options and allows you to set them.
All screens have the same general layout, as shown in Figure Basic-5.
Node_1 | IF INTF+modem 8923 Rev A2-0 Ser 01103 | 12-31-99 14:33
1 OOS U3
PRIMARY CLK int
EXT RATE n/a
EXT FORMAT n/a
EXT FRAME n/a
SECONDARY CLK int
EXT RATE n/a
EXT FORMAT n/a
EXT FRAME n/a
CURRENT CLK int
int ext
Save | Undo | Refresh | Time | ACO | proFiles | taBs | Ports | Main
Figure Basic-5. Screen Layout
The dark line at the top of the card is the Header Information Line. This line lists
the node identity (Node_1 in the figure above), card identity, time, and date.
The small dark area in the upper right, immediately below the header, displays
alarm summary information. In this example, the alarm reveals an Out of Service
(OOS) card in slot U-3. If no alarms are active, nothing will be displayed in this
location.
The area just below the node ID is the Parameter Settings section of the screen.
This section displays current or default settings from the range of user options
available on each card.
The Status and Data Entry Change Line is located near the bottom of the card on
the left-hand side. This line allows the user to select the options for each
parameter.
The dark line at the bottom of the screen displays the Menu of Actions. Each
action contains one capitalized letter. Press the capitalized letter of an action on
the keyboard to perform the described action.
Reference Guide v3.6 Basic Operations
(10-97) Page 2-C-7
It is very important that you record the configuration information for each card as you
determine its settings. You, or someone servicing the system at a later date, will need
this information to aid in troubleshooting. A simple way to record your configuration is
to photocopy the setting tables in the card sections of this guide and write the
information for your configuration in the column labeled Initial Setting. Store these
pages in a safe place, where they can be available to anyone servicing the system.
Status Screen
A quick way to check activity of the ports of all system cards is to use the Status screen.
Figure Basic-6 shows the Status screen. The lowercase letters that follow card entries
show the status of each port on the cards. The possible values are "s" (Standby), "a"
(Active), "t" (Test), "l" (Loopback) and "r" (Redundant).
Node_1 | | 12-31-99
14:33
Slot Installed Status Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU XCON IF INTF+modem
C2 CPU XCON RDNT U1 ALR ssss
P1 ISDN-PRI ssssssss U2 E&M 4Wx8-6 ssssssss
P2 ADPCM-64 ssssssss U3 FXS 2Wx8-9 ssssssss
P3 INV MUX ssss U4 FXO 2Wx8-9 ssssssss
W1 CSU+CSU ss U5 HSU 366x2 ss
W2 CSU+CSU rr U6 OCU-DPx5 sssss
W3 CEPT+CEPT ss U7 FRAD-18 ssssssss
W4 CEPT+CEPT rr U8 SRU-232x10 ssssssssss
F1 PS1 RI RINGER
F2 PS2
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | Oos| cpusWtch
Figure Basic-6. The Status Screen
Pressing the s key again will return the screen without status settings. If the system is
restarted by log-off/log-on activity or loss of power, the screen will also return to its
normal condition.
Basic Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-C-8(10-97)
Configuring the Cards
The main screen lists all the installed cards next to their slot numbers. To access the
screen for each card, move the cursor using the arrow keys to highlight the card and
press the <Enter> key.
Use the arrow keys and the <Enter> key to move around on the screens. When
changing card parameters, some settings require you to enter values, while others allow
you to select from a list of possible options. When a list of possible options is
available, use the right and left arrow keys to move through the options. Use the
<Enter> key to select the setting under the cursor. Use the right and left arrow keys to
select the option you want or type over the old value using the keyboard. Press the
<Enter> key to select the option or enter the value. After all choices are made, save
your changes by pressing s.
To access the menu of actions at the bottom of the screen, make sure no option is
selected and then press the capitalized letter that represents the action you want.
Menu of Actions
Table Basic-2 show the Menu of Actions for the Main Screen.
Table Basic-2. Main Screen Menu of Actions
Action Function
Alarms Brings up the Alarm screen. Refer to "Alarms" later in this chapter.
Config Sets up the system using a standard configuration. Refer to "Using the
Configuration Option" later in the System Operations Chapter.
Del Removes an OOS card from system memory.
accepTRemoves card settings. Used when replacing a card in one slot with a
different kind of card (see below).
Xcon Brings up the cross-connect screens. See System Operations chapter.
sYsBrings up the system screen. Provides for high-level system testing
and maintenance.
Logout Logs the user off the system.
sEr (serialization) Identify the card in a given slot
Oos Set the card out of service
cpusWtch Switches from the active CPU to the redundant CPU card. See
Redundancy chapter.
Configure each card to match the system settings previously determined. On the main
screen, select each card in turn and change the options for that card as appropriate.
Select the Save action after making all the changes for a card; then return to the main
screen to configure the next card. Once configured, card settings (by slot) are
permanently stored in the NVRAM on the Interface Card. Similar cards may be
replaced without having to reconfigure the new card. If you replace the card with a
different type of card, the system will ask if you want to lose the current card settings.
Press t (accepT) to allow this transaction.
Reference Guide v3.6 Basic Operations
(10-97) Page 2-C-9
Alarms
Alarms warn you of problems and alert you to possible hardware or facility failures.
The Alarm sub-screens are accessed from the main screen by pressing the "A" key. The
Alarm screen displays the currently active alarms, if any, and provides access to the
Alarm Filters screen and the Alarm History screen. Figure Basic-7 shows the Alarm
screen with one active alarm.
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
Active Alarms: 1 Page 1 of 1
00023 W1-1 CSU+CSU C CGA_RED 12-31-99 12:41:21
Refresh | pgUp | pgDn | History | Filters | Main
Figure Basic-7. The Alarm Screen
The first entry shows the Alarm Number (a sequential number from one to 65,535) used
to identify the alarm for tracking and maintenance (in this case, #00023). The second
entry shows the location of the problem by card slot number (in this case, w1-1). The
third column shows the type of card affected (in this case, a WAN card with two CSU
modules). The fourth entry shows the alarm modifier (in this case, C [critical]). See a
later section in this chapter for more information about alarm modifiers. The fifth entry
shows the type of alarm generated (in this case, CGA_RED). The sixth entry shows the
date of the alarm and the last entry shows the time the alarm was logged (in this case,
12-31-99 at 12:41:21).
Basic Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-C-10 (10-97)
Filters
You can set filters for each alarm so that the alarm reports occurrences in a number of
different ways. Figure Basic-8 shows the Alarm Filters screen accessed by pressing "F"
on the main Alarm screen.
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
OOS Out of Service report crit aco-on
NOS No Signal report major aco-off
LOS Loss of Sync report minor aco-off
YEL Yellow Alarm report info aco-off
AIS Alarm Info Signal report crit aco-off
CGA_RED Carrier Group–Red report crit aco-off
CGA_YEL Carrier Group–Yellow report crit aco-off
EER Excessive Error Rate report crit aco-off
SENSOR Alarm card sensor report crit aco-off
DCHAN D-chan out of service report crit aco-off
SWITCH Switch to redundant card report crit aco-off
UCA User card/port alarm report crit aco-off
RESET System reset report crit aco-off
ACO Alarm Cut-Off report crit n/a
SYNC Clock Sync Alarm report crit aco-off
EER-3 Error rate above 10e-3 report crit aco-off
PLC_OOF DS3 PCLP Out of Framing report crit aco-off
PLC_LOF DS3 PCLP Losst of Frame report crit aco-off
PLC_YEL DS3 PCLP Yellow Alarm report crit aco-off
Save | Undo | Refresh | Main
Figure Basic-8. The Alarm Filters Screen
The first column shows the alarm abbreviation that is shown on the screen when an
alarm is generated. The second column shows the alarm title. The third column
contains the filters ignore, report and log. The fourth column contains the filter
modifiers info, minor, major and critical. The last column sets the ACO alarm aco-
off and aco-on. All of these options are explained later in this chapter.
The filter in the third column will take precedence over its modifier. If, for instance,
you have an alarm filter set to ignore, the setting of the modifier as info, minor, major
or critical will be ignored as well. Table Basic-3 identifies the alarms and their
meanings.
Alarm filters should be set prior to activation of card ports!
Reference Guide v3.6 Basic Operations
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Table Basic-3. Alarm Filters
Filter Alarm Meaning
OOS Out of Service The card, power supply or ringing generator is faulty or has been
removed from the unit.
NOS No Signal Incoming WAN signal is lost.
LOS Loss of Synchronization Frame Alignment is lost.
YEL Yellow Alarm The system has received a Yellow Alarm signal from a remote device.
Usually received when the device loses WAN signal or
synchronization.
AIS Alarm Information Signal The system has received a Blue Alarm signal from a remote device.
Usually received when the remote or intermediate device has a major
failure.
CGA_RED Carrier Group Alarm - Red The local incoming WAN signal has a serious problem and trunk
conditioning is started. After receiving a RED alarm (NOS or LOS) for
2-3 seconds, the system initiates the appropriate trunk conditioning
sequence (see voice cards for information about the TC_CGA setting)
and sends a Yellow Alarm to the remote device. If the system is in
drop/insert mode, it also sends an AIS signal to the downstream
equipment.
CGA_YEL Carrier Group Alarm - Yellow The system has initiated trunk conditioning in response to a Yellow
Alarm from a remote device. After 2-3 seconds, the system initiates
the appropriate trunk conditioning sequence (see voice cards for
information about the TC_CGA setting)
EER Excessive Error Rate The error rate measured by the system has exceeded the threshold set
on the WAN card.
SENSOR Alarm Card Sensor The Alarm Card sensor has received an alarm indication from an
attached device.
DCHAN D-chan out of service If the network side D channel looses contact with the user side, an
alarm message will be generated. The alarm message will show the
slot # and D channel # where the problem exists.
SWITCH Switch to redundant card The primary card has failed and the system has switched to the
redundant card. See the Redundant Operations Chapter.
UCA User card/port alarm One or more active ports on a user card are not working properly.
Voice ports will show an alarm for excessive signaling transitions and
data ports will show an alarm for exceeding the data error threshold.
RESET System reset The system has been reset by either loss of power or by system
software upgrade.
ACO Alarm Cut-Off The ACO option forces you to manually clear certain alarms. Without
this option, self-correcting alarms might not be noticed. When the
ACO option is set to either Report or Log and the modifier is set to
Major, alarms will report normally but will also generate an ACO
alarm. If the modifier is set to Minor, it will not generate the ACO
alarm. If the filter is set to Ignore, no alarms will be generated.
SYNC Clock Sync Alarm The SYNC alarm is generated when either the primary or secondary
external clock source is lost. This alarm is in addition to the condition
that lost the clock source (CGA-RED or OOS).
EER-3 Excessive Error Rate (10e-3) While using transcoder operations for E1 that involve downstream
tributaries, setting EER-3 to "report" will cause an alarm to appear on
the local system when E1 transmission errors exceed 10e-3 (1 in 1000).
The local EER-3 alarm will identify the effected WAN link (i.e., W1-1)
and take it out of service. Simultaneously, the downstream tributary
will receive an AIS alarm to warn them of the condition.
PLC_OOF DS3 PLCP Out of Framing Physical Layer Convergence protocol is Out of Framing
PLC_LOF DS3 PLCP Loss of Frame Physical Layer Convergence protocol has lost framing
Basic Operations Reference Guide v3.6
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PLC_YEL DS3 PLCL Yellow Alarm Physical Layer Convergence protocol is reporting a yellow alarm
Report
Setting the filter for the various alarms to report causes the alarm indication to be sent
to a remote device (see the Interface Card chapter), displays the alarm report on the
screen, and logs the alarm in the Alarm History.
Log
Setting the filter for the alarms to log, displays the alarm report on the screen and logs
the alarm in the Alarm History (see later in this chapter).
Ignore
Setting the filter for the alarms to ignore, will cause the alarm indication to be ignored
by the system.
Modifiers
Each alarm may also be designated as info, minor, major and critical. The filter
modifier shows on both the active alarm and alarm history screens.
When used in conjunction with the External Alarm card, the occurrence of any alarm
designated as critical will trigger a form-C contact on the External Alarm card which,
in turn, can serve to activate an external device such as a bell or light. Similarly, the
occurrence of any alarm designated as major would trigger a different contact and
therefore activate a different external indicator. (See External Alarm Card chapter.)
ACO
ACO (Alarm Cut Off) is an additional security feature used by the system to alert the
operator of alarms that clear themselves while the unit is unattended. If ACO is set to
report or log, any alarm set to report or log with a major modifier will cause an
additional alarm message to appear on the screen. This message, known as the ACO
alarm message, must be manually cleared by the operator. Used with the node port of
the Interface card (see Interface card chapter), ACO can also trigger some external
alarm device such as a bell or light that must also be manually cleared by the operator.
ACO alarms must be cleared from the Interface card screen.
Alarm Handling
The report alarm function attempts to send alarm information to a remote printer,
Network Management System or other logging device, in addition to logging the alarm
in the Alarm History log. These features use the built-in serial port and modem on the
Interface card. You need to change settings on the Printout Alarms screen or IP screen
on the Interface card to activate these special functions. (See Interface Card for more
information.)
Alarms set to either log or report record occurrences automatically to the Alarm
History log. You can access the Alarm History log from the Main Alarm screen by
pressing the "H" key from the Main Alarm Screen.
Reference Guide v3.6 Basic Operations
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Figure Basic-9 shows the Alarm History Screen. While the history screen is displayed,
you can update the list with any new alarms that occur by selecting Refresh from the
bottom menu of actions. You can delete all entries in the log by selecting Clear from
the menu of actions on the history screen by pressing the “c” key.
All alarms (except those set to ignore) appear in the Alarms field (in the upper right
corner of the screen), regardless of their setting on the filters screen. The display in the
alarms field is the abbreviated version of the alarm name and slot number. For
example, OOS U3 indicates that the card in user slot three is out of service.
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
History Alarms: 4 Page 1 of 1
00012 W1-1 CSU+CSU C CGA_RED 12-31 12:22:00 12-31 12:23:00
00011 W1-1 CSU+CSU M NOS 12-30 08:02:09 12-30 09:30:00
00010 W1-1 CSU+CSU I YEL 12-30 10:45:00 12-30 11:15:55
00009 C1 CPU XCON m RESET 12-28 16:35:17 12-28 22:02:00
Refresh | Clear | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure Basic-9. The Alarm History Screen
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Reinitializing the System
Information about cards inserted, card settings, WAN connections, passwords and other
data is stored on the nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM) on the Interface Card. When most
card types are removed and replaced, the NVRAM remembers the card settings and if
the same kind of card is inserted in the slot, there will be no need to reprogram the
settings. If, on the other hand, a card is replaced with a different type of card, then the
system will offer the operator the option of deleting the old card, so that the new
parameters can be established (see Accept function in Configuring the Cards, earlier
in this chapter).
CPU Card
One exception to the rule in the previous paragraph is changing the CPU card type
between standard bus-connect, enhanced bus-connect or cross-connect. When a CPU
card is removed and replaced by a like CPU card, the system will reevaluate the
NVRAM and assign the old system parameters to the new CPU card (including
passwords).
If the CPU card is replaced with one of the other types of CPU card, or in some cases
with the same type of CPU card that is equipped with a different version of firmware,
the new CPU card will want to cold-start the system (overwrite NVRAM information
on the Interface card). The screen shown as Figure Basic-10 will be shown.
*** NVRAM on INTF Card is not available, Software revision has been changed ***
Press ‘Z’ to zip the System
Zip | zAp | Debug | Reg | Main
Figure Basic-10. Cold Start NVRAM Screen
If the new CPU card was inserted in error, the process can be stopped by removing the
wrong CPU card and replacing it with the correct type of card.
Reference Guide v3.6 Basic Operations
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Warning: Pressing the Z command from the Menu of Actions will start the ZIP process.
"Zipping " the system deletes all of the information stored on NVRAM on the Interface
Card and resets the system. All cards must then be completely reconfigured.
When the Z key is pressed, the system will display the main log-in screen and ask for
password authorization from either Manager or Operator access levels. After the
correct password, the system will ask the question, "OK to Zip the system (y/n)"? If Y
is pressed, the system will test and reinitialize itself. All NVRAM information will be
erased from the Interface card and a new log-in screen will appear.
Test and Debug Screen
Advanced configuration and diagnostics are available through the use of the sYs
(System) command from the Menu of Actions of the Main Screen. Pressing Y brings
up the Test and Debug screen shown in Figure Basic-11.
Test and Debug
Zip | Debug | Reg | Backup | rEstore | Main
Figure Basic-11. Test and Debug Screen
ZIP
Caution: The Z (Zip) command allows the user with Operator (and higher) password
authority to reset the entire system. Since the settings for all cards in the system will be
reset to their original factory settings, "zipping" the system should be thoroughly
considered prior to implementation. The Zip screen is shown as Figure Basic-12.
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Test and Debug
Zip will reboot the system. Ok to Zip (y/n)?
Zip | Debug | Reg | Backup | rEstore | Main
Figure Basic-12. Zip Screen
DEBUG
The D (Debug) command is only available to factory software engineers with a
password authorization higher than "Superuser." It gives access to the system software
coding.
REG
The R (Registration) command allows the user with Operator (and higher) password
authority to change the registration of the system. The user must have the information
shown below to properly reregister the system. There should be no reason for this
command to be used during normal operation of the system.
The registration procedure consists of the three steps shown below. Answer the
questions at the bottom of the screen and the system will automatically respond with the
correct application parameters and prompts.
1. Enter the vendor code. If no other vendor code is specified, enter the
vendor code 101.
2. Select the type of chassis used (either front-loading with power supplies
on the side, front-loading with power supplies on top, or the two-sided
chassis).
Confirm the proposed changes by selecting y for yes or n for no). Figure Basic-13
shows the completed Registration screen.
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Node_1 | Welcome to Registration | 12-31-99 14:33
Vendor Code: xxx
1. Front - Loading Only / Power Supplies on side
2. Front - Loading Only / Power Supplies on top
3. Front & Rear Loading Only / Power Supplies on side
Select one: 3
Is the Information on this screen correct (Y/N)?
Figure Basic-13. Registration Screen
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BACKUP
The Backup command backs up system information to a text file in the PC that is
running the terminal emulation program. The Backup command allows backup of
information on a system-wide or card-by-card basis. It also backs up Alarm Filters,
Alarm History, Installation Table and Cross Connect information. It is best to back up
information after any significant changes in system configuration and at intervals that
assure that alarm history and other operating information will be maintained
dependably. Figure Basic-14 shows the Backup Screen. The Backup procedure is
detailed below.
Node_1 | NVRAM Backup | 12-31-99 14:33
C1 backup Install Table backup
C2 backup Cross Connect backup
P1 backup Alarm Filters backup
P2 backup Alarms History backup
P3 backup
P4 backup
W1 backup
W2 backup
W3 backup
W4 backup
IF backup
U1 backup
U2 backup
U3 backup
U4 backup
U5 backup
U6 backup
U7 backup
U8 backup
Go | Copy | Main
Figure Basic-14 Backup
The Backup procedure creates a text file in which the parameters for the chosen cards
are encoded. This information can then be used by the Restore command (see below)
to restore the parameters to certain cards, or to the whole unit.
Because the Backup command creates a simple text file, the actual commands for the
Backup procedure will vary depending on the computer system and terminal software
you are using to interface with the unit. The following procedure is specific to
Windows 95 using Microsoft Terminal software, but can be easily modified to adapt to
other systems and software.
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BACKUP PROCEDURE
1. From the Main Screen, type Y (for sYs)
2. Type B (for Backup). The screen in Figure Basic-14 lists all slots and
categories with the default option backup. If you wish to do a full
backup, proceed to Step 3.
If you do not want to backup a certain slot, use the arrow keys to highlight
it, and press <Enter>. The choices no and backup appear at the bottom of
the screen. Use the left arrow key to highlight no, and press <Enter>. The
slots or categories deselected will show no after the slot or category and
will not be backed up. If you wish to deselect a number of entries in
sequence, press C (for Copy) to change the next slot or category to match
the slot or category you have just deselected.
3. In the Microsoft Terminal menu bar, select the Transfers pull-down
menu.
4. From the Transfers pull-down menu, select Receive Text File.
5. In the "Receive Text File" field, select the name of the file and its
directory location. When you select OK a bar will appear at the bottom of
the screen, with two buttons, Stop and Pause, as well as the number of
bytes and the name of the file being received.
6. Type G (for Go). The screen will fill with scrolling text. When the text
stops scrolling, you will see the message "BACKUP COMPLETE, hit 'm'
to go back to menu."
7. At this point, turn the transfer function off by selecting the Stop button at
the bottom of the screen. The text file containing all the parameters for
the selected cards and categories has now been saved.
8. Type M to return to the NVRAM Backup screen. This will allow you to
double-check that your backup selections were correct. Type M again to
return to the Test and Debug screen.
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RESTORE
The Restore command restores all selected card and system information from a file
created by the Backup procedure.
The Restore procedure is detailed below. This procedure is specific to the use of
Microsoft Terminal in Windows 95, but can be easily modified for other systems and
software.
RESTORE PROCEDURE
1. From the Main Screen, type Y (for sYs)
2. Type E (for rEstore). In the screen shown in Figure Basic-15, the default
for all slots and categories is restore. To do a full restore, proceed to Step
3.
If you do not want to restore a certain slot, use the arrow keys to highlight
it, and press <Enter>. The choices no and backup appear at the bottom of
the screen. Use the left arrow key to highlight no, and press <Enter>. The
slots or categories deselected will show no after the slot or category and
will not be restored. To deselect a number of entries in sequence, press C
(for Copy) to change the next slot or category to match the entry you have
just deselected.
3. Type G (for Go). You will see the message
"Restore is active. Press <ESC> twice to end".
4. In the Microsoft Terminal menu bar, select the Transfers pull-down
menu.
5. From the Transfers pull-down menu, select Send Text File.
6. At the bottom of the screen, you will see the progress of the file as it is
received by the unit. (On some systems, you will not see any progress
indicator.) When the restoration is complete, you will see the message
"Restore COMPLETED, press <ESC> twice to end." At this point, all
parameters for the selected cards and categories have been restored.
7. Pressing <ESC> twice will bring up the message "Resetting..." and then
show the following prompt: "Restore is done, do you wish to restart now
(y/n)?" Selecting Y will cause the unit to reinitialize itself using the
restored parameters. You will be required to log in again.
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Node_1 NVRAM Restore 12-31-99 14:33
C1 restor
eInstall Table restore
C2 restor
eCross Connect restore
P1 restor
eAlarm Filters restore
P2 restor
e
P3 restor
e
P4 restor
e
W1 restor
e
W2 restor
e
W3 restor
e
W4 restor
e
IF restor
e
U1 restor
e
U2 restor
e
U3 restor
e
U4 restor
e
U5 restor
e
U6 restor
e
U7 restor
e
U8 restor
e
Go Copy Main
Figure Basic-15. Restore Screen
Note: The Alarm History field does not display on the Restore Screen because alarm
history can only hold 32k of memory. This history information can be saved to a
separate storage device (i.e. Personal Computer) indifferently for future reference and
use.
MAIN
The "M" (Main) command returns the user to the main system screen.
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Introduction
The primary purpose of your equipment is to maximize the use of incoming and
outgoing T1/E1 lines by assigning specific channels (DS0s) to perform voice, data and
cross-connect functions. These system operations are described in detail in this chapter.
Assigning the Timeslot Map
The system operations described in this chapter use two types of CPU, bus-connect
(Models 8800 and 8804) and cross-connect (Model 8801). For the purposes of this
chapter, the operation of the Model 8804 CPU is identical to that of the Model 8800
CPU. As a result, the 8804 CPU is not explicitly covered in this chapter. Differences
between it and the 8800 are discussed in the CPU card section.
The cross-connect CPU differs in application from the bus-connect models because of
the DS0 cross-connect module that allows you to select and assign independent
connections of one DS0 to another. In this chapter we will refer to these connections as
"pass-through" circuits because they link a DS0 from one T1/E1 link to another through
the system. Using the cross-connect CPU also allows the user to have up to eight
separate T1/E1 links on four WAN cards in any cross-connect combination possible.
The next six sections describe ways to administer the network and assemble bandwidth
portions to meet these needs. Where applicable, each section first addresses bus-
connect systems with Model 8800 CPUs and then cross-connect systems with Model
8801 CPUs.
Ø The first section deals with assigning incoming and outgoing user card ports to
T1/E1 channels (timeslot).
Ø The second section describes a time-saving tool known as the "Configuration"
option that automatically assigns sequential WAN timeslot to ports on analog voice
cards and allows WANs to be assigned without any cards.
Ø The third section concerns cross-connecting WAN timeslot to other WAN timeslot
in both bus-connect and cross-connect systems.
Ø The fourth section addresses a special application that is supported in cross-connect
systems only: the ability to broadcast a data signal over multiple WAN aggregates.
Ø The fifth section describes signaling status, signaling conversion and companding
conversion in bus-connect systems.
Ø The sixth section shows you how to view the timeslot map after the assignments
and cross-connects are made.
In this manual, we define "assigning timeslots" as the process of connecting user card
ports to WAN timeslots, and "cross-connecting timeslots" as the process of connecting
WAN timeslots to other WAN timeslots.
System Operations Reference Guide v3.6
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Assigning Timeslots from a User Card
The timeslot map specifies the connections between all incoming and outgoing lines
connected to the system. It allows you to split the bandwidth of T1/E1 lines into
amounts appropriate for normal voice and data communications. A timeslot map
comprises all the connections you define for all the cards in the system.
Bus-Connect Model
A system equipped with a Model 8800 bus-connect CPU can access only two T1/E1
links and has two modes accessed from the WAN card screen: Drop-and-Insert (d-i)
and Terminal (term). Note: When voice is going through the d-i, signaling must be
turned on for voice to work correctly. Drop-and-Insert mode allows you to route part of
the bandwidth of one of the T1/E1 lines to user cards while the unit automatically
routes the rest to the other WAN link. In Terminal mode you can route the bandwidth
of both T1/E1 links to user cards only. A description of the process follows.
Timeslot assignment will be as unique as each customer's needs. A system using an
E&M card and HSU card in T1 operation is used as an example here to illustrate the
timeslot assignment process. Many different arrangements of timeslot assignments are
possible with these two cards. Figure System-1 illustrates of one of those ways. In
Drop-and-Insert mode, you can define a route on the timeslot map that assigns WAN
port 1-1 timeslots (TS) 1-8 to ports 1-8 on the E&M card and TS#9-16 to the first port
on the HSU card which is programmed to operate as an 8xDS0 super-rate data port.
The remaining 8 timeslots will automatically be cross-connected to the corresponding
timeslots on WAN port 1-2. The E&M card illustrates the case in which each port on
the card can be assigned to only a single WAN timeslot (see Figure System-2). The
HSU card illustrates the case in which one port may be assigned to multiple WAN
timeslots using a table (see Figure System-3). All other available cards are assigned to
timeslots in a similar manner, and specific instructions are included in each card
chapter.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
WAN 1-1
TS# 1-8
TS# 9-16
TS# 17-24
WAN 1-2
TS# 17-24
E&M
Card
HSU
Card
1
2
Figure System-1. A Drop-and-Insert Mode for T1 Operations
Reference Guide v3.6System Operations
(10-97) Page 2-D-3
E&M Card
You can define a timeslot map from any user card (data or voice) for connections
involving that user card, or from a WAN card for connections involving only WAN
cards. For example, Figure System-2 shows the E&M card screen for the above
example, from which you can define a timeslot map as follows:
1. From the Main Screen, select the E&M card.
2. Select the WAN port to which you want to assign the E&M port. In our
example, this would be WAN w1-1.
3. Select TS for each port and a number for the corresponding timeslot on the
WAN port will appear at the bottom of the screen. You can change the
number by using the up and down arrow keys and the <Enter> key.
4. Change the STATE for each port you intend to use from stdby to actv.
5. Select Save from the menu of actions at the bottom of the screen to save
your changes.
Node_1 | U1 E&M 4Wx8ER 8119 Rev A2-0 Ser 00101 | 12-31-99
14:33
12345678
STATE actv actv actv actv actv actv actv actv
WAN w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1
TS 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08
MODE e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m
R2 TYPE n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Rx TLP 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Tx TLP 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
CODING u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law
TC CGA idle idle idle idle idle idle idle idle
LB off off off off off off off off
PATTRN none none none none none none none none
HYBRID n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
SIG CONV off off off off off off off off
RATE 64k 64k 64k 64k 64k 64k 64k 64k
ADPCM n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
08
Save | Undo | Refresh | Copy | Test | Main
Figure System-2. E&M Card with Timeslot Selection Displayed
DACOM Timeslot Renumbering
The E&M Card timeslot selection screen shown above can be modified for DACOM
format. The timeslot data will be translated into DACOM format using a new assigned
vendor code. This will allow the renumbering of timeslots so they will be displayed into
Korean format.
If Vendor Code indicates DACOM, then renumbered timeslots will be displayed using
the Korean format. Timeslots 1 through 15 will be unchanged. Timeslots 17 through 31
will be renumbered as 16 through 30, and timeslot 16 will be renumbered as 31.
System Operations Reference Guide v3.6
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Note: ONLY use this option to reassign the timeslots on the E&M Card to DACOM.
Otherwise, DO NOT change your vendor code.
HSU Card
Figure System-3 shows the HSU card screen for the example in Figure System-1, from
which you can define a timeslot map as follows:
1. From the Main Screen, select the HSU card.
2. Select the WAN port to which you want to assign the HSU port. In our
example, this would be WAN w1-1.
3. Select the TS table and all 24 timeslots will appear at the bottom of the
screen. Place an X under all appropriate timeslots using the space
bar to either select or delete timeslot assignment, and then press the
<Enter> key. In the example, the HSU port is assigned eight timeslots
(numbers 9-16).
4. Change the STATE for each port you intend to use from stdby to actv.
5. Select Save from the menu of actions at the bottom of the screen to save
your changes.
Node_1 | U2 HSU-530x2 8202 Rev C0-0 Ser 00054 | 12-31-99
14:33
1 2
STATE stdby stdby
WAN/SRV w1-1 w1-1
MODE dce dce
TS table table
RATE 64K 64K
Tx CLOCK int int
CLOCK PLRTY norm norm
DATA PLRTY norm norm
CTS perm perm
CTS DELAY 0 0
LOCAL LB off off
LB GEN MODE dds dds
LB GEN off off
LB DET w/to w/to
ISDN CONN no no
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
x x x x x x
Save | Undo | Refresh | Copy | Test | Dial | Perf | Main
Figure System-3. HSU Card Screen with the Timeslot Selection Displayed
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DACOM Timeslot Renumbering
The HSU Card timeslot selection screen shown above can be modified for DACOM
format. The timeslot data will be translated into DACOM format using a new assigned
vendor code. This will allow the renumbering of timeslots so they will be displayed into
Korean format.
If Vendor Code indicates DACOM, then renumbered timeslots will be displayed using
the Korean format. Timeslots 1 through 15 will be unchanged. Timeslots 17 through 31
will be renumbered as 16 through 30, and timeslot 16 will be renumbered as 31.
Note: ONLY use this option to reassign the timeslots on the HSU Card to DACOM.
Otherwise, DO NOT change your vendor code.
Cross-Connect Model
The difference between bus-connect and cross-connect model 8801 is that the cross-
connect model allows you to access two T1/E1 links for each of four WAN cards for a
total of eight T1/E1 links. Since there is no d-i or term mode setting, all WAN card
connections to other WAN cards are accomplished through the cross-connect option on
the main screen and must be individually specified (see later section in this chapter).
User cards on systems equipped with the cross-connect CPU are assigned to WAN
timeslots in exactly the same manner as bus-connect versions.
Using the Configuration Option
Both bus-connect and cross-connect systems support the ability to automatically assign
timeslots to E&M, FXS and FXO cards using the configuration option from the main
screen. Figure System-4 shows a picture of the timeslot assignments for four E&M
cards using E1 operations. The configure option automatically assigns the 8 ports from
E&M card #1 to timeslots 1-8, seven ports from E&M card #2 to timeslots 9-15, and the
8 ports from E&M card #3 to timeslots 17-24, timeslots 25-31 are assigned to E&M
card #4, ports 1-7. The configuration option only works with WAN ports 1-1 and 1-2.
With a T1 WAN port, the configuration option would automatically assign the eight
ports from the first E&M card to timeslots 1-8, the eight ports from the second E&M
card to timeslots 9-16 and the eight ports from the third E&M card to timeslots 17-24.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
WAN 1-1 = E1
TS# 1-8
TS# 9-15
TS# 17-24
E&M
Card
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
E&M
Card
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
E&M
Card
TS# 25-31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
E&M
Card
#1 #2 #3
#4
System Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-D-6(10-97)
Figure System-4. Timeslot Map Using Configuration Option in E1 Operation
In order to use the Configuration Option, the following constraints apply:
Ø You must be configuring 3 vacant adjacent user slots for T1 operation or 4 vacant
adjacent user slots for E1 operation. Cards must be sequentially in order (i.e. U1,
U2, U3).
Ø You need to set the MODE on the WAN port to term.
Ø The 3 or 4 cards you intend to configure must be the same type (see below).
The following steps and series of figures demonstrate the Configuration Option in E1
operation:
1. Place the cursor on the first of the 4 slots you intend to install. In Figure
System-5, slots U5-U8 will be assigned to the 30 user timeslots on the E1
WAN port. Press c to initiate the configuration option.
2. Select the type of card (E&M-600, E&M (extended range), FXS-900, FXS-
600Ω, FXO-900 or FXO-600 as shown in Figure System-5.
3. Select the WAN port to which you wish to assign the voice cards (W1-1 or
W1-2) as shown in Figure System-6.
4. The system automatically builds the necessary timeslot structure, but since
the user slots are vacant, the system will register Out Of Service alarms for
each of the 4 cards, as shown in Figure System-7. Inserting the four E&M
cards will turn off the alarm condition.
5. Figure System-8 shows the WAN Xconnect screen with the correctly
assigned timeslots.
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14:33
Slot Installed Status Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU XCON IF INTF+modem
C2 U1 ALR
P1 ADPCM-64 U2 E&M 4Wx8-6
P2 ADPCM-64 U3 FXS 2Wx8-9
P3 ADPCM-64 U4 FXS 2Wx8-9
W1 CEPT+CEPT U5
W2 CEPT+CEPT U6
W3 CSU+CSU U7
W4 CSU+CSU U8
F1 PS1 R1 RINGER
F2 PS2
e&m-6 e&mer fxs-9 fxs-6 fxo-9 fxo-6
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs| Logout | cpuSwtch
Figure System-5. Configuration Screen (select operation)
Node_1 | | 12-31-99
14:33
Slot Installed Status Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU XCON IF INTF+modem
C2 U1 ALR
P1 ADPCM-64 U2 E&M 4Wx8-6
P2 ADPCM-64 U3 FXS 2Wx8-9
P3 ADPCM-64 U4 FXS 2Wx8-9
W1 CEPT+CEPT U5
W2 CEPT+CEPT U6
W3 CSU+CSU U7
W4 CSU+CSU U8
F1 PS1 R1 RINGER
F2 PS2
w1-1 wan1-2
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs| Logout | cpuSwtch
Figure System-6. Configuration Screen (select WAN card)
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14:33
Slot Installed Status Slot Installed Status OOS U8
C1 CPU XCON IF INTF+modem OOS U7
C2 U1 ALR OOS U6
P1 ADPCM-64 U2 E&M 4Wx8-6 OOS U5
P2 ADPCM-64 U3 FXS 2Wx8-9
P3 ADPCM-64 U4 FXS 2Wx8-9
W1 CEPT+CEPT U5 E&M 4Wx8-6 OOS
W2 CEPT+CEPT U6 E&M 4Wx8-6 OOS
W3 CSU+CSU U7 E&M 4Wx8-6 OOS
W4 CSU+CSU U8 E&M 4Wx8-6 OOS
F1 PS1 R1 RINGER
F2 PS2
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs| Logout | cpuSwtch
Figure System-7. Configuration Screen (with Alarms noted)
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14:33
TS XCON TS CIRCUIT_ID TS XCON TS CIRCUIT_ID OOS U8
0 frame align 64k 16 cas 64k OOS U7
1 U5-1 A-01 user_circuit 17 U7-1 A-17 user_circuit OOS U6
2 U5-2 A-02 user_circuit 18 U7-2 A-18 user_circuit OOS U5
3 U5-3 A-03 user_circuit 19 U7-3 A-19 user_circuit
4 U5-4 A-04 user_circuit 20 U7-4 A-20 user_circuit
5 U5-5 A-05 user_circuit 21 U7-5 A-21 user_circuit
6 U5-6 A-06 user_circuit 22 U7-6 A-22 user_circuit
7 U5-7 A-07 user_circuit 23 U7-7 A-23 user_circuit
8 U5-8 A-08 user_circuit 24 U7-8 A-24 user_circuit
9 U6-1 A-09 user_circuit 25 U8-1 A-25 user_circuit
10 U6-2 A-10 user_circuit 26 U8-2 A-26 user_circuit
11 U6-3 A-11 user_circuit 27 U8-3 A-27 user_circuit
12 U6-4 A-12 user_circuit 28 U8-4 A-28 user_circuit
13 U6-5 A-13 user_circuit 29 U8-5 A-29 user_circuit
14 U6-6 A-14 user_circuit 30 U8-6 A-30 user_circuit
15 U6-7 A-15 user_circuit 31 U8-7 A-31 user_circuit
Refresh | Test | Main
Figure System-8. WAN Card Timeslot Screen
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(10-97) Page 2-D-9
Cross-Connecting WAN Timeslots
After assigning user cards to timeslots, the remaining WAN bandwidth may be assigned
to pass-through connections between T1/E1 links.
Bus-Connect Model
In bus-connect mode, the choice of Mode from the WAN card will automatically
determine how WAN timeslot cross-connects are made. Whatever mode is selected
will apply to both T1 and E1 links. In the d-i mode, all timeslots on one T1/E1 link
that are not assigned to user ports will be cross-connected to the other link on a one-to-
one basis. In the term mode, no cross-connect circuits are possible. Note that if a
Model 8804 CPU is used, then a Dual WAN card in slot W3 can only be used in term
mode. W3 Does Not support voice cards 8212, 8220 and 8221.
If the Dual WAN card in slot W1 is optioned with one T1 port (DSX or CSU) and one
E1 port (CEPT), and if that card is set to operate in d-i mode, then the cross-connect
map used by the system for unassigned ports will be as shown in Table System-1.
Table System-1. T1 to E1 Cross-Connect Map in d-i Mode
T1 DS0 E1 DS0 T1 DS0 E1 DS0
1 1 13 17
2 2 14 18
3 3 15 19
4 5 16 21
5 6 17 22
6 7 18 23
7 9 19 25
8 10 20 26
9 11 21 27
10 13 22 29
11 14 23 30
12 15 24 31
Cross-Connect Model
Cross-connecting WAN timeslots with the cross-connect model is performed from the
Main screen. To access this function, select "X" from the Menu of Actions on the Main
screen. Choosing "Add" from the Menu of Actions provides the fields used to program
all of the "pass through" circuits in your network. Figure System-9 shows the "Add"
fields. Table System-2 lists the circuit parameters along with the possible and default
values.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
new_circuit w1-1 00x64 off w1-1 00x64 off d n/a n/a
Save
Figure System-9. The CPU Cross-Connect Screen
Reference Guide v3.6System Operations
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Table System-2. Cross-Connect Card Setting Options and Defaults
Parameter User Options Default
CIRCUIT ID Any combination of letters or numbers up to 14 characters
including spaces new_circuit
W/U w1-1 w1-2 w2-1 w2-2 w3-1 w3-2 w4-1 w4-2 w1-1
TS/BW table 00
TEST off all0 all1 m_oos 1:1 1:7 lpbk 300Hz 1kHz
3kHz off
W/U w1-1 w1-2 w2-1 w2-2 w3-1 w3-2 w4-1 w4-2 w1-1
TS/BW table 00
TEST off all0 all1 m_oos 1:1 1:7 lpbk 300Hz 1kHz
3kHz off
TYPE v v&s d d
TC
v n/a no
v&s e&m fxsl fxsg fxsd plar dpo fxol fxog fxod
dpt user* mrd e&m
d n/a n/a
CNV
pcm
conv none A-mu mu-A none
sig
conv none ANSI-CCITT CCITT-ANSI ABCD-ABAB
ABCD-AB01 none
*selection of user will require user bit pattern information to be entered
Circuit Identification
A "circuit" is defined as a group of one or more DS0s that are cross-connected from one
WAN link to another. Each circuit can carry voice or data traffic, and each is given its
own name to facilitate cross-connect management within the system. The "CIRCUIT
ID" field allows the user to define and name individual pass-through circuits. The
default value is "new circuit" and can be changed to show any pertinent title for the
pass-through connection, although each circuit ID must be unique. The title can
contain up to fourteen letters or numbers, of upper and lower case, including spaces and
underscore (_), dash (-). In Figure System-10, the circuit is identified as SF01-NY01.
Warning: When cross-connecting multiple independent data DS0s (not a superrate
circuit) between WAN aggregates in a cross-connect system, you must program each
data DS0 cross-connect independently of the others. Note: Crossconnecting multiple
DS0s in v mode maintains DS0 integrity. Attempting to save time by cross-connecting
those independent data DS0s as one superrate circuit could cause data errors. This
limitation does not apply to voice DS0s.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
new_circuit w1-1 00x64 off w1-1 00x64 off d n/a n/a
SF01-NY01
Save
Figure System-10. New Circuit Selection
W/U (WAN Unit)
The first WAN Unit column is the T1/E1 link from which the pass-through connection
begins. (Since these circuits are bi-directional, the concept of beginning or ending is
used for illustrative purposes only.) The options are all of the WAN cards and ports,
and the identification uses the same convention (w1-1, w1-2, etc.) seen earlier. If a
WAN card is not present in the W/U selected, an error message is generated. The
example shown in Figure System-11, shows the selection of WAN 1-1.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
new_circuit w1-1 00x64 off w1-1 00x64 off d n/a n/a
SF01-NY01
Save
Figure System-11. The WAN Unit Options
TS/BW
The first Timeslot/Band Width column shows the different timeslots from WAN 1-1
that will be assigned to this pass-through connection. Figure System-12 shows the
selection of timeslots 8-12 from WAN 1-1 assigned to the start of the connection. Any
number of timeslots from 1-24 would be acceptable for T1 operations and from 1-15
and 17-31 for E1 operations. The bandwidth is automatically assigned. Selection is
made using the space bar and the arrow keys. The arrow key moves from slot to slot
and the space bar toggles between selecting and deselecting the timeslot.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 00x64 off w1-1 00x64 off d n/a n/a
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
x x x x x
Save
Figure System-12. The Timeslot/Bandwidth Options
Test (for Data Circuits)
The first Test column allows the user to select the test pattern to be applied to this
circuit in the direction of the first WAN link specified. Figure System-13 shows the
options which are selected by highlighting the choice and pressing the return key. The
choices are off (no testing), all 0 (all zeros), all 1 (all ones), m_oos (Multiplexer Out Of
Synchronization), 1:1 ("one to one" pattern where a 1 is followed by one zero), 1:7
("one to seven" pattern where a 1 is followed by seven zeros), lpbk (loopback), 300 Hz
(steady 300 cycle tone), 1kHz (steady 1000 cycle tone), and 3kHz (steady 3000 cycle
tone). When the circuit is saved, the system will send the selected pattern toward the
first end of the circuit on each DS0 to facilitate testing. When circuit testing is finished,
"Test" should be returned to the "off" position. The loopback (lpbk) option places the
circuit in loopback in the direction of the first WAN link specified.
If you are dealing with a voice cross-connect circuit (with or without signaling), test
capabilities are accessed from the WAN cross-connect screen. This feature is
discussed at the end of this section.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 05x64 off w1-1 00x64 off d n/a n/a
off all 0 all 1 moos 1:1 1:7 lpbk 300Hz 1kHz 3kHz
Save
Figure System-13. The Test Options
W/U (WAN Unit)
The second WAN Unit column is the T1/E1 link in which the pass-through connection
ends. The options are all of the WAN cards and ports. If a WAN card is not present in
the W/U selected, an error message is generated. The example shown in Figure
System-14, shows the selection of WAN 3-2.
TS/BW
The second Timeslot/Band Width column shows the different timeslots from WAN 3-2
that will be assigned to this pass-through connection. Figure System-14 shows the
selection of 5 timeslots from WAN 3-2 assigned to the end of the connection. Any
number of timeslots from 1-24 would be accepted for T1 operations and from 1-15 and
17-31 for E1 operations. The bandwidth is automatically assigned. Selection is made
using the space bar and the arrow keys. The arrow key moves from slot to slot and the
space bar toggles between selecting and deselecting the timeslot. The number of DS0s
assigned to this half of the cross-connect circuit must equal the number assigned to the
other. If not, the system will reject the connections and generate an error message.
System Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-D-16 (10-97)
Test (for Data Circuits)
The second Test column allows the user to select the test pattern to be applied to this
circuit in the direction of the second WAN link specified. Figure System-14 shows the
option set at off. Like the previous Test column, the choices are: off (no testing), all 0
(all zeros), all 1 (all ones), m_oos (Multiplexer Out Of Synchronization), 1:1 ("one to
one" pattern where a 1 is followed by one zero, and then another one), 1:7 ("one to
seven" pattern where a zero is followed by a 1 and 7 zeros, and then another one), lpbk
(loopback), 300 Hz (steady 300 Hz tone), 1kHz (steady 1000 Hz tone), and 3kHz
(steady 3000 Hz tone). When the circuit is saved, the system will send the selected
pattern toward the second end of the circuit on each DS0 to facilitate testing. When
circuit testing is finished, "Test" should be returned to the "off" position. The
Loopback (lpbk) option places the circuit in loopback in the direction of the first WAN
link specified.
If you are dealing with a voice cross-connect circuit (with or without signaling), test
capabilities are accessed from the WAN cross-connect screen. This feature is
discussed at the end of this section.
Type
The Type column selects the mode of operation for the pass-through circuit. Figure
System-14 shows the selection of Type. The choices are v (voice) requiring no trunk
conditioning; v&s (voice with signaling) which will preserve A/B (robbed bit) signaling
on the selected timeslots and provide trunk conditioning; and d (data) which also
supports trunk conditioning.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 05x64 off w3-2 05x64 off dn/a n/a
v v&s d
Save
Figure System-14. The Type Options
Reference Guide v3.6System Operations
(10-97) Page 2-D-17
TC
The operator may define the pattern to be transmitted on a cross-connected circuit
should one of the two WAN links that define that circuit fail. This is known as Trunk
Conditioning and the selections available are based upon the selection in the Type
column.
For d (data), no choice is available and the system automatically shows n/a (not
applicable). An example of this is shown above as Figure System-14.
For v&s (voice with signaling) the choices shown in Figure System-15 are user (a user
defined bit pattern, as shown in Figure System-16, that is requested when user is
selected), e&m, fxsl (foreign exchange station-loop start), fxsg (foreign exchange
station-ground start), fxsd (foreign exchange station-defined network), plar (private
line-automatic ringdown), dpo (dial pulse-originating), fxol (foreign exchange office-
loop start), fxog (foreign exchange office-ground start), fxod (foreign exchange office-
defined network), dpt (dial pulse-terminating), and mrd (manual ringdown).
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 05x64 off w3-2 05x64 off v&s e&m no
TC CGA e&m idle e&m idle
e&m fxsl fxsg fxsd plar dpo fxol fxog fxod dpt user
mrd
Save
Figure System-15. The User Option Screen
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 05x64 off w3-2 05x64 off v&s e&m no
TC CGA user 0x00 user 0x00
Enter 2 hex digits: 0x00
Save
Figure System-16. The User Bit Pattern Selection Screen
For v (voice options) , no choice is available and the system automatically shows n/a
(not applicable). An example of this is shown as Figure System-17.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 05x64 off w3-2 05x64 off v&s e&m no
Save
Figure System-17. The Voice Options Screen
Reference Guide v3.6System Operations
(10-97) Page 2-D-19
CNV
The Conversion (CNV) parameter allows the user to request that PCM companding and
signaling conversion be performed on this cross-connect circuit. Since these
conversions only apply to voice circuits, if the TYPE selected is data (d), then the only
acceptable value here is n/a. Similarly, if the TYPE selected is voice without signaling
(v), the system will only allow you to request PCM companding conversion. If the
TYPE is voice with signaling (v&s), then you can select any combination of
companding and/or signaling conversion.
If the TYPE is v or v&s, the system will first ask you to "Select PCM CONV:" for
defining the type of companding conversion you require. (See Figure System-18.) The
options are no companding conversion (none), convert the incoming A-law signal to
mu-law (A-mu) and convert the incoming mu-law signal to A-law (mu-A).
If the TYPE is v&s, the system will prompt you to "Select SIG CONV:" for selecting
the type of signaling conversion needed. (See Figure System-19.) The first option is
default signaling conversion (none) where a bit pattern of "0000" will automatically be
converted to "0001" in the T1 to CEPT direction.
The second option (ANSI-CCITT) will convert the incoming ANSI signaling to CCITT
signaling. The third option (CCITT-ANSI) convert the incoming CCITT signaling to
ANSI signaling. These two options are complementary (i.e. if either one is selected in
one direction, the other is automatically selected for the reverse direction). When
convert is selected then the TC field is used to select what type of conversion is used
from the TABS field on the interface card.
The fourth option (ABCD-ABAB) will convert the incoming CEPT signaling to T1
signaling for an ESF or D4 cross-connect. The fifth option (ABCD-AB01) will convert
the incoming T1 signaling to CEPT signaling for a ESF or D4 cross-connect. These
two options are complementary (i.e. if either one is selected in one direction, the other
is automatically selected for the reverse direction).
Because of space limitations in the CNV column on the screen, the system will display
a summary notation of the choices just made. The possible values are no (no
conversion), sig (signaling is converted, but not the PCM), pcm (PCM is converted, but
not the signaling) and p&s (both signaling and PCM are converted). Figure System-20
illustrates those options.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 05x64 off w3-2 05x64 off v&s e&m pcm
Select PCM CONV: none A-mu mu-A
Save
Figure System-18. Selecting PCM Conversion
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 05x64 off w3-2 05x64 off v&s e&m pcm
Select SIG CONV: none ANSI-CCITT CCITT-ANSI ABCD-ABAB ABCD-AB01
Save
Figure System-19. Selecting Signaling Conversion
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 05*64 off w3-2 05*64 off v n/a no
SF01-PHX11 w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off v&s e&m sig
SEA4AX w2-1 01*64 off w3-1 01*64 off v&s e&m pcm
Test w2-2 01*64 off w3-2 01*64 off v&s e&m p&s
Add | uPdate | dElete | pgUp | pgDn | View all | Tads | Main
Figure System-20. Completed Circuits
Menu of Actions
Table System-3 shows the Menu of Actions for the Completed Circuits screen.
Table System-3. Menu of Actions
Action Function
Add Add allows you to program additional pass-through cross-connects in
the system. If mistakes are made during the add process, pressing the
up arrow or down arrow key will terminate this operation.
uPdate The uPdate action is initiated by pressing the "p" key. With this
command, you can change any of the parameters of a pass-through
connection. As shown in Figure System-22. Use the arrow keys to
highlight the area to be changed and close the transaction using the "S"
(Save) command.
dElete The dElete action is initiated by pressing the "e" key. Use this
command to delete existing pass-through connections. As shown in
Figure System-21, the system will prompt you to delete the circuit, and
the "y" key must be pressed to complete the transaction.
pgUpThe pgUp (page up) action is initiated by pressing the "u" key. Since
the system can handle many different cross-connect circuits, you may
exceed a single screen. New pages will be added automatically to
accommodate additional circuits. The page count feature at the top of
the screen shows you the current page and the total amount of cross-
connect pages. Use this command to scroll up through the pages of
cross-connect information.
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pgDnThe pgDn (page down) action is initiated by pressing the "d" key. This
action is similar to the pageUp command. Use this command to scroll
down through the pages of cross-connect information.
View all The View all action is initiated by pressing the "v" key. This action is
used to access the Broadcast screen discussed in a later section.
Tads The Test Access Digroups (TADs) function is a remote test access for
data cross connects that pass through the system according to
publication TR-TSY-000343, Issue #1, June 1986. A test center can
access the Integrated Access Controller and assign a non-intrusive
testing circuit between the unit and the test center via another WAN
link. See the TADs section later in this chapter.
Main Pressing "m" (Main) will return the user to the main cross-connect
screen.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-NY01 w1-1 05*64 off w3-2 05*64 off v n/a no
Delete Selected Circuit (y/n)?
Add | uPdate | dElete | pgUp | pgDn | View all | Tads | Main
Figure System-21. The Delete Cross-Connect Screen
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TS XCON TS CIRCUIT_ID TS XCON TS CIRCUIT_ID
1 13
2 14
3 15
4 16
5 17
6 18
7 19
8 w3-2 1 SF01-NY01 20
9 w3-2 2 SF01-NY01 21
10 w3-2 3 SF01-NY01 22
11 w3-2 4 SF01-NY01 23
12 w3-2 5 SF01-NY01 24
Refresh | Test | Main
Figure System-22. The Updated WAN Card Screen
Using the Test Option for Voice Cross-Connects
Voice and data circuits differ in the way in which the test function is accessed. While
the user can set up test patterns on data circuits on the cross-connect screen from the
main screen, users testing voice circuits must use a subscreen of the WAN Xconnect
card screen. Figure System-23 shows the error message that appears when the user
attempts to access testing of voice circuits from the CPU Xconnect screen.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF01-HSTN4C w3-1 02*64 off w2-2 02*64 off v&s e&m p&s
MIFL42A-SF01 w2-1 01*64 off w3-1 01*64 off d n/a n/a
NY66-WDC18a w2-1 01*64 off w2-2 01*64 off v&s e&m p&s
SF01-HSTN4C w3-1 02*64 off w2-2 02*64 off v&s e&m p&s
Channel test is available from WAN XCON screen. Press any key to continue . . .
Save
Figure System-23. Message on CPU Xconnect Screen
Figure System-24 shows the WAN Xconnect screen for the voice circuit used in this
example. Place the cursor over the selected circuit and press the "t" key to bring up the
Test Screen shown in Figure System-25. This screen splits the circuit into two parts
with your location as the midpoint. The first column of test parameters will apply to
that portion of the circuit on WAN 2-1, timeslot 13. The second column of test
parameters will apply to that portion of the circuit on WAN 2-2, timeslot 13.
Table System-4 lists the test parameters along with the possible and default values.
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TS XCON TS CIRCUIT_ID TS XCON TS CIRCUIT_ID
1 u2-1 A-01 user_circuit 13 w2-2 13 NY66-WDC18a
2 u2-2 A-02 user_circuit 14
3 u2-3 A-03 user_circuit 15
4 u2-4 A-04 user_circuit 16
5 u2-5 A-05 user_circuit 17
6 18
7 19 w3-1 5 MIFL42A-SF01
8 20
9 21
10 u2-6 A-06 user_circuit 22
11 u2-7 A-07 user_circuit 23
12 u2-8 A-08 user_circuit 24
Refresh | Test | Main
Figure System-24. Highlighted Circuit on WAN Xconnect Screen
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
w2-1 ts13 w2-2 ts13
TX ABCD mon mon
PATTERN off off
MON Tx ABCD 0000 0101
MON Rx ABCD 1111 1111
CONVERSION p&s p&s
TYPE v&s v&s
WAN STATE stdby stdby
mon set
Refresh | Test | Main
Figure System-25. Test Screen and ABCD Bit Set Option
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Page 2-D-26 (10-97)
Table System-4. WAN Cross-Connect Test Screen Options
Parameter User Options Default
Tx ABCD mon set mon
PATTERN off all 0 all 1 m_oos 1:1 1:7 lpbk
300Hz 1kHz 3kHz off
MON Tx ABCD information only - no user options
MON Rx ABCD information only - no user option
CONVERSION information only - no user option
TYPE information only - no user option
WAN STATE information only - no user option
Tx ABCD
The Transmit ABCD bit parameter allows the user to observe the bit pattern being sent
on the transmit side of the line (mon) or to set a different pattern for testing that portion
of the circuit (set). Choosing set brings up a small four character window at the bottom
of the screen and allows the user to type in a new pattern of ones and zeros. Figure
System-26 shows a diagram of the process. When Tx ABCD for WAN 2-1 is set to
mon, the WAN 2-1 column reflects the ABCD bits being sent out on WAN 2-1. This
pattern should be identical to the Rx ABCD on WAN 2-2 (unless the conversion table is
used). When Tx ABCD for WAN 2-1 is set to set, the user supplies a bit pattern of four
1s and 0s for the new ABCD bits. The Rx ABCD stream from WAN 2-2 is broken at
circle #1, and the new pattern is inserted into the Tx ABCD stream. The same applies
for mon and set for WAN 2-2. The bit stream will be broken at circle #2.
WAN XCONN
Rx ABCD
1 2
Network
WAN 2-2
Rx ABCD
WAN 2-1
Tx ABCD
WAN 2-2
Tx ABCD
WAN 2-1
Figure System-26. Voice Test Diagram
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(10-97) Page 2-D-27
PATTERN
The Pattern parameter allows the user to choose a test pattern to be transmitted as PCM
data on the selected side of the circuit. The options are off, all 0 (zeros), all 1 (ones),
m_oos (multiplexer out of synchronization), 1:1 (a one followed by a zero and then
another one), 1:7 (a zero followed by a one and seven zeros, then another one), lpbk
(loopback), 300 Hz (300 Hz tone), 1kHz (1000 Hz tone) and 3kHz (3000 Hz tone).
Since the Tx ABCD only changes signaling bits, this option allows the user to choose
the test pattern. A different pattern can be sent on either side of the circuit.
MON Tx ABCD
The Monitor Transmit ABCD bit information field shows the bit pattern being
transmitted on the outbound circuit. It can be changed by using the set command. This
parameter is for information only.
MON Rx ABCD
The Monitor Receive ABCD bit information field allows the bit pattern being received
on the inbound circuit. This parameter is for information only, it is not changeable by
the user.
CONVERSION
The Conversion information field shows the user the conversion setting selected from
the cross-connect screen. The possible values are no (no conversion), sig (signaling is
converted, but not the PCM), pcm (PCM is converted, but not the signaling) and p&s
(both signaling and PCM are converted). This parameter is for information only, it is
not changeable by the user on this screen.
WAN STATE
The WAN State information field shows the current status of the port. The possible
values are stdby, actv, test (the operator is actively controlling the circuit), OOS (the
WAN port is Out of Service) and CGA (the WAN port assigned has a CGA alarm).
This parameter is for information only, it is not changeable by the user on this screen.
Broadcast
One of the special features of WAN timeslot assignment in cross-connect systems is the
ability to copy a data signal and send it to multiple locations without disturbing the
original circuit. This feature is called Broadcast (meaning multi-cast, not to be
confused with broadcast quality video).
An example of this feature would be a major company that transmits data lecture from
the corporate headquarters in Denver to the sales office in San Francisco. Sales offices
in Salt Lake City, Houston and Phoenix would like to be in the data lecture as well.
The master circuit (Denver to San Francisco) is a two-way circuit (i.e., both ends can
send and receive data). The other ends of the broadcast circuits (the sales offices in Salt
Lake City, Houston and Phoenix) can only receive the output of the Denver end of the
master circuit (i.e., they will not be able to take part in the discussion in real time).
System Operations Reference Guide v3.6
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The following series of figures shows how the process works.
Figure System-27 shows the main cross-connect screen. In this example, T1 circuits
connected at the Denver office go to San Francisco (w1-1), Houston (w1-2), Salt Lake
City (w2-1) and Phoenix (w2-2). This screen only shows the cross-connects made from
WAN cards to WAN cards, not User cards to WAN cards.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/B
WTEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
SF-SLC w1-1 01*6
4off w2-
101*64 off v n/a no
HST-PHX w1-2 01*6
4off w2-
201*64 off v n/a no
Add | uPdate | dElete | pgUp | pgDn | View all | Tads | Main
Figure System-27. Main Cross-Connect Screen
Broadcast circuits can be initiated, updated or deleted only from the broadcast screen.
To access the Broadcast option, press the "V" (View all) selection from the menu of
options and the All Circuits screen (Figure System-28) is displayed. In addition to the
WAN to WAN cross-connects, this screen also shows User card to WAN card timeslot
assignments for all WAN cards.
Because this screen shows all WAN timeslots that are either assigned to user cards or
cross-connected to other timeslots, it could be quite full.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/B
WTES
TW/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
user_circui
tw4-1 06*5
6off w1-
106*56 off d n/a n/a
user_circui
tw4-2 06*5
6off w2-
206*56 off d n/a n/a
SF-SLC w1-1 01*6
4off w2-
101*64 off v n/a no
HST-PHX w1-2 01*6
4off w2-
201*64 off v n/a no
Bcast | uPdate | dElete | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-28. All Circuits Screen
In addition to the two WAN to WAN cross-connects shown in Figure System-28, an
HSU circuit from slot u4-1 to the San Francisco T1 circuit on WAN 1-1 and an HSU
circuit from slot u4-2 to Phoenix on WAN 2-2 are shown in Figure System-29.
To select the broadcast option, place the cursor over the User card circuit that will be
copied (in this case, it will be the Denver end of the Denver to San Francisco link on
WAN 1-1) and press the "b" (Broadcast) key from the menu of options. The screen
shown in Figure System-29 will show the dynamics of the first copy of that circuit.
Pressing the "Enter" key allows users to access and modify connection options.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
user_circui
tw4-1 06*56 off w1-1 06*56 off d n/a n/a
user_circui
tw4-2 06*56 off w2-2 06*56 off d n/a n/a
SF-SLC w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off v n/a no
HST-PHX w1-2 01*64 off w2-2 01*64 off v n/a no
user_circui
tw4-1 06*56 off w1-1 00*56 off b/d n/a no
Lecture
Save
Figure System-29. Add Broadcast Screen
In this example, the broadcast circuit is labeled "Lecture" for easier identification later
when the circuit will be disconnected.
Figure System-30 shows the selection of a second destination for the broadcast circuit.
In this example, that destination is Salt Lake City, which is accessed through WAN w2-
1. The timeslot selection is shown in Figure System-31. Selecting "S" (Save) from the
Menu of Actions will save the parameters of the new circuit. Figure System-32 shows
the new circuit. Note that the circuit type is "b/d" (broadcast/data).
Similar actions will duplicate this circuit for the other destinations. Figure System-33
shows the completed circuits.
To disconnect the circuits when the program is finished, highlight the circuit to be
disconnected with the cursor and press the "e" key and the screen shown in Figure
System-34 will appear. Selecting "y" will permanently delete the copied circuit while
leaving the original circuit intact.
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
user_circuit w4-1 06*56 off w1-1 06*56 off d n/a n/a
user_circuit w4-2 06*56 off w2-2 06*56 off d n/a n/a
SF-SLC w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off v n/a no
HST-PHX w1-2 01*64 off w2-2 01*64 off v n/a no
Lecture w4-1 06*56 off w1-1 06*56 off b/d n/a no
w1-1 w1-2 w2-1 w2-2 w3-1 w3-2 w4-1 w4-2
Save
Figure System-30. "To" Destination Selection
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYP
ETC CNV
user_circuit w4-1 06*56 off w1-1 06*56 off d n/a n/a
user_circuit w4-2 06*56 off w2-2 06*56 off d n/a n/a
SF-SLC w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off v n/a no
HST-PHX w1-2 01*64 off w2-2 01*64 off v n/a no
Lecture w4-1 06x56 off w2-1 01x64 off b/d n/a no
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
x x x x x x
Save
Figure System-31. Timeslot Selection
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
user_circuit w4-1 06*56 off w1-1 06*56 off d n/a n/a
user_circuit w4-2 06*56 off w2-2 06*56 off d n/a n/a
SF-SLC w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off v n/a no
HST-PHX w1-2 01*64 off w2-2 01*64 off v n/a no
Lecture w4-1 06*56 off w2-1 06*56 off b/d n/a no
Bcast | uPdate | dElete | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-32. Completed Broadcast Circuit
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
user_circuit w4-1 06*56 off w1-1 06*56 off d n/a n/a
user_circuit w4-2 06*56 off w2-2 06*56 off d n/a n/a
SF-SLC w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off v n/a no
HST-PHX w1-2 01*64 off w2-2 01*64 off v n/a no
Lecture w4-1 06*56 off w2-1 06*56 off b/d n/a no
Lecture w4-1 06*56 off w1-2 06*56 off b/d n/a no
Lecture w4-1 06*56 off w2-2 06*56 off b/d n/a no
Bcast | uPdate | dElete | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-33. Three Broadcast Circuits
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CIRCUIT ID W/U TS/BW TEST W/U TS/BW TEST TYPE TC CNV
user_circuit w4-1 06*56 off w1-1 06*56 off d n/a n/a
user_circuit w4-2 06*56 off w2-2 06*56 off d n/a n/a
SF-SLC w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off v n/a no
HST-PHX w1-2 01*64 off w2-2 01*64 off v n/a no
Lecture w4-1 06*56 off w2-1 06*56 off b/d n/a no
Lecture w4-1 06*56 off w1-2 06*56 off b/d n/a no
Lecture w4-1 06*56 off w2-2 06*56 off b/d n/a no
Delete Selected Circuit (y/n)?
Bcast | uPdate | dElete | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-34. Delete Broadcast Circuit
WAN Link to WAN Link
Circuits from a WAN link to a WAN link can also be duplicated from the broadcast
screen. The same procedure is used to establish multiple connections for WAN to
WAN circuits.
Back in Figure System-30, highlighting the WAN link circuit on slot w1-1 will allow
you to cross-connect duplicate information to any other WAN link needed.
System Operations Reference Guide v3.6
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Menu of Actions
Table System-5 shows the Menu of Actions for the Broadcast screen.
Table System-5. Menu of Actions
Action Function
Bcast Bcast allows you to program additional broadcast cross-connects in the
system. If mistakes are made during the add process, pressing the up
arrow or down arrow key will terminate this operation.
uPdate The uPdate action is initiated by pressing the "p" key. With this
command, you can change any of the parameters of a broadcast
connection. Use the arrow keys to highlight the area to be changed
and close the transaction using the "s" (Save) command.
dElete The dElete action is initiated by pressing the "e" key. Use this
command to delete existing broadcast connections. As shown in
Figure System-34 earlier, the system will prompt you to delete the
circuit, and the "y" key must be pressed to complete the transaction.
pgUpThe pgUp (Page Up) action is initiated by pressing the "u" key. Since
the system can handle many different circuits, you may fill the screen
allotment for data. New pages will be added automatically to
accommodate additional circuits. The page count feature at the top of
the screen shows you the current page and the total amount of pages of
information. Use this command to scroll up through the pages of
cross-connect information.
pgDnThe pgDn (Page Down) action is initiated by pressing the "d" key.
This action is similar to the pgUp command. Use this command to
scroll down through the pages of cross-connect information.
Main Pressing "m" (Main) will return you to the cross-connect screen.
Test Access Digroups (TADS)
The Test Access Digroups (TADS) is a remote test access for data cross connects that
pass through the system according to publication TR-TSY-000343, Issue #1, June 1986.
A test center can access the system and assign a non-intrusive testing circuit between
the unit and the test center via another WAN link. For the purposes of this discussion
on Test Access Digroups, the figures show a 64kbps data circuit between Fremont, CA.
and Jacksonville, FL. Figure System-35 shows the cross-connect screen with the data
circuits connected.
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CIRCUIT ID FACILITY TEST EQUIPMENT TEST TYPE TC CNV
Jacksonville w1-1 01*64 off w1-2 01*64 off d moos n/a
moNitor | spLit | Release | Tla | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-35. The TADS Screen
In Figure System-35, the data circuit called "Jacksonville" is connected on a single time
slot between WAN1-1 and W1-2.
Monitor Circuit
With the monitor circuit, the data test center (by remote access) creates a "hitless"
monitor connection (i.e., one that can be created, maintained and dropped without
affecting the information on the circuit being tested) between the data test center and
the Node_1 Device.
Highlighting the desired circuit and pressing the "N" key, brings up the add monitor
circuit screen shown in Figure System-36.
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CIRCUIT ID FACILITY TEST EQUIPMENT TEST TYPE TC CNV
Jacksonville w1-1 01*64 off w1-2 01*64 off d moos n/a
new_circuit w1-1 00*64 off w1-1 00*64 off m/d moos n/a
moNitor | spLit | Release | Tla | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-36. The Add Monitor Circuit Screen
Cross connect information is added in a similar fashion to the Add Broadcast screen
mentioned in the last section. Figure System-37 shows the completed monitor circuit.
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CIRCUIT ID FACILITY TEST EQUIPMENT TEST TYPE TC CNV
Jacksonvill
ew1-1 01*64 mon w1-2 01*64 off d moos n/a
monitor ckt w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off m/d moos n/a
monitor ckt w1-2 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off m/d moos n/a
moNitor | spLit | Release | Tla | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-37. Completed Monitor Circuit
Reference Guide v3.6System Operations
(10-97) Page 2-D-37
Figure System-38 shows a diagram of how the Monitor circuit splits the original cross
connect circuit for testing.
Notice how the test circuit uses two 64kbps WAN timeslots, one for the transmit side
and one for the receive side of the line.
Fremont DTE
Jacksonville DCE
Data Test Center Equip
W1-2 #1
W1-1 #1(T)
W1-2 #1
W1-1 #1(R)
W2-1 #1
W2-1 #2
Figure System-38. Monitor Circuit Diagram
Split Circuit
Pressing the "L" command from the Menu of Actions allows you to split the circuit
through the data test center equipment. New circuit information is added in the same
way as with the monitor circuit.
With the Split Circuit, the data test center splits the circuit and connects it to their
equipment. Unlike the Monitor test circuit, the Split test circuit is intrussive and all
transmit and receive data must pass through the equipment at the data test center.
Figure System-39 shows the TADS screen with a split circuit completed. It uses two
64kbps timeslots (like the Monitor circuit). Figure System-40 shows a diagram of the
split test circuit.
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CIRCUIT ID FACILITY TEST EQUIPMENT TEST TYPE TC CNV
Jacksonvill
ew1-1 01*64 spl w1-2 01*64 off d moos n/a
split ckt w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off s/d moos n/a
split ckt w1-2 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off s/d moos n/a
moNitor | spLit | Release | Tla | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-39. TADS Screen with Split Circuits
Fremont DTE
Jacksonville DCE
Data Test Center Equip
W1-2 #1
W1-1 #1(T)
W1-2 #1
W1-1 #1(R)
W2-1 #1
W2-1 #2
Figure System-40. Split Circuit Diagram
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(10-97) Page 2-D-39
Release
Pressing the "R" command from the Menu of Actions allows you to release the circuit
from the data test center equipment. The system will verify the action desired with a
yes/no question.
With the Release Circuit, the Data Test Center removes the connection between the
circuit being tested and restores the circuit to its preaccessed state.
Figure System-41 show the TADS screen with the release verification.
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CIRCUIT ID FACILITY TEST EQUIPMENT TEST TYPE TC CNV
Jacksonvill
ew1-1 01*64 spl w1-2 01*64 off d moos n/a
split ckt w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off s/d moos n/a
split ckt w1-2 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off s/d moos n/a
Restore Selected Circuit (y/n)?
moNitor | spLit | Release | Tla | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-41. TADS Restore Circuit Screen
Terminate and Leave Access
The Terminate and Leave Access (TLA) circuit gives the data test center the capability
to terminate one or both directions of transmission on a circuit by inserting an
unassigned channel code (01111111) in the outgoing transmission path(s). The TLA
feature is useful in circuit provisioning to turn circuits up and down remotely, and in
testing multipoint circuits to isolate and remove noisy bridge legs from service.
Figure System-42 shows the TLA screen with the choice of Monitor (mon) or
Unassigned Channel Code (uca) to be applied to the highlighted circuit. (If TLA had
been applied to a Split circuit, the choices would have been spl or uca.)
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CIRCUIT ID FACILITY TEST EQUIPMENT TEST TYPE TC CNV
Jacksonville w1-1 01*64 mon w1-2 01*64 off d moos n/a
monitor ckt w1-1 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off m/d moos n/a
monitor ckt w1-2 01*64 off w2-1 01*64 off m/d moos n/a
Jacksonville w1-1 01*64 mon w1-2 01*64 off d moos n/a
mon uac
moNitor | spLit | Release | Tla | pgUp | pgDn | Main
Figure System-42. TLA Circuit State Screen
Menu of Actions
Table System-6 shows the Menu of Actions for the TADS screen.
Table System-6. Menu of Actions
Action Funtion
moNitor The Monitor command allows the user to create a monitor circuit at the
WAN interface. See section above.
spLit The Monitor command allows the user to create a split circuit at the
WAN interface. See section above.
Release The Release command allows the user to release and restore a split
circuit or a monitor circuit. See section above.
Tla The Terminate and Leave Access (TLA) command is the capability to
terminate one or both directions of transmission on a circuit. See
section above.
pgUpThe pgUp) action is initiated by pressing the "u" key. Since the system
can handle many different TADS circuits, you may fill the screen
allotment for data. New pages will be added automatically to
accommodate additional circuits. Use this command to scroll up
through the pages of TADS information.
pgDnThe pgDn (Page Down) action is initiated by pressing the "d" key. This
action is similar to the pgUp command. Use this command to scroll
down through the pages of cross-connect information.
Main Pressing "m" (Main) will return you to the cross-connect screen.
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Signaling and Companding Conversion in Bus-Connect
Systems
User card ports may or may not have a signaling mode applied to them when assigned
to a timeslot. Typically, analog voice cards (i.e., E&M, FXO, FXS) will have their
analog signaling information converted to digital signaling bits which are then inserted
into the digital bitstream. Data card circuits (i.e., HSU, SRU, etc.), on the other hand,
do not require the system to perform any signaling processing or conversion.
Unlike DS0s terminating on voice or data cards in the system that will have controlled
signaling parameters, circuits that "pass through" your system must have signaling
assigned to them by the user. This ensures that the WAN cards either maintain existing
signaling patterns as in T1-T1 circuits or change and convert them for circuits going
from a T1 to an E1 environment.
In Figure System-43, timeslots 1-8 and 13-18 are connected to user cards and therefore
will have signaling automatically turned off or on by the system depending on the type
of user ports that are assigned to them. Of the pass-through connections on the other
timeslots, you can either select signaling or no signaling depending the type of
equipment or channel facility on which it is ultimately terminated. For voice circuits,
you would probably want to enable signaling, and for data equipment, you would
probably want to disable signaling (the default). Further, this screen allows you to
request that signaling conversion and/or companding conversion be performed on pass-
through circuits.
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TS XCONNECT BW
CNV TS XCONNECT BW CNV
1 u2-1 voice 64k sig 13 u5-1 data 06x56k
2 u2-2 voice 64k sig 14 u5-1 data 06x56k
3 u2-3 voice 64k sig 15 u5-1 data 06x56k
4 u2-4 voice 64k sig 16 u5-1 data 06x56k
5 u2-5 voice 64k sig 17 u5-1 data 06x56k
6 u2-6 voice 64k sig 18 u5-1 data 06x56k
7 u2-7 voice 64k sig 19 w1-2 ts-19 64k no
8 u2-8 voice 64k sig 20 w1-2 ts-20 64k no
9 u1-2 ts-9 64k no 21 w1-2 ts-21 64k no
10 u1-2 ts-10 64k no 22 w1-2 ts-22 64k no
11 u1-2 ts-11 64k no 23 w1-2 ts-23 64k no
12 u1-2 ts-12 64k no 24 w1-2 ts-24 64k no
Save | Undo | Refresh | sIgnaling | Main
Figure System-43. WAN Cross-Connect Screen
System Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-D-42 (10-97)
To change the signaling and/or companding options of a voice circuit on a WAN card
using the drop-and-insert mode, place the cursor over the timeslot you wish to change
and select I (sIgnaling) from the Menu of Actions. Table System-7 shows the matrix of
choices for the handling of signaling, signaling conversion and companding conversion.
Table System-7. Signaling and Companding Options
Select
Signaling Select PCM CONV Select SIG CONV Select SIG
TYPE
none (no choice)
yes none, A-mu, mu-A ANSI-CCITT, CCITT-ANSI,
ABCD-ABAB, ABCD-AB01 e&m, fxs,
plar, fxo
no none, A-mu, mu-A (no choice) (no choice)
The first option is Select Signaling. The choices are either yes or no, depending upon
the type of circuit passed through the system (voice or data). Whichever choice is
made, the system will then prompt you to select PCM companding conversion. The
choices for Select PCM CONV are none, A-mu (A-Law to Mu-Law, E1 to T1
conversion) and mu-A (Mu-Law to A-Law, T1 to E1 conversion).
On a normal data service, you would probably choose no and none. A voice circuit on
a T1-T1 "pass through" might require signaling enabled but not converted, so the
choices would be yes (to pass voice signaling through), and none (the PCM does not
have to be converted), and none (the signaling does not have to be converted).
If, for instance, you have an international voice circuit passed through your system to a
North American T1 circuit, you would probably need to have both signaling and PCM
conversion converted. Choosing yes for Select Signaling will bring up your Select
PCM CONV options, followed by a prompt to select the signaling conversion for this
circuit.
The first option is default signaling conversion (none) where a bit pattern of "0000" will
automatically be converted to "0001" in the T1 to CEPT direction.
The second option (ANSI-CCITT) will convert the incoming ANSI signaling to CCITT
signaling. The third option (CCITT-ANSI) converts the incoming CCITT signaling to
ANSI signaling. These two options are complementary (i.e. if either one is selected in
one direction, the other is automatically selected for the reverse direction).
The fourth option (ABCD-ABAB) will convert the incoming CEPT signaling to T1
signaling for an ESF or D4 cross-connect. The fifth option (ABCD-AB01) will convert
the incoming T1 signaling to CEPT signaling for a ESF or D4 cross-connect. These
two options are complementary (i.e. if either one is selected in one direction, the other
is automatically selected for the reverse direction).
If signaling conversion is enabled for that circuit, you will then be asked to Select SIG
TYPE. The choices are e&m, fxs, plar and fxo. After this final choice, the screen
updates the signaling and conversion information on that circuit.
Reference Guide v3.6System Operations
(10-97) Page 2-D-43
Figure System-44 shows the WAN card cross-connect screen for a bus-connect system.
Timeslots 19-24 show all of the possible choices for pass through circuits. The values
are no (signaling is not passed through and neither PCM nor SIG are converted), pcm
(signaling is not passed through, PCM is converted, SIG is not converted), sig-no
(signaling is passed through and there is no PCM or SIG conversion), sig-sig (signaling
is passed through, PCM is not converted, SIG is converted), sig-pcm (signaling is
passed through, PCM is converted, SIG is not converted) and sig-p&s (signaling is
passed through, both PCM and SIG are converted).
Node_1 | W1 CSU+CSU 8010 Rev A6-2 Ser 00101 | 12-31-99 14:33
TS XCONNECT BW
CNV TS XCONNECT BW CNV
1 u2-1 voice 64k sig 13 u5-1 data 06x56k
2 u2-2 voice 64k sig 14 u5-1 data 06x56k
3 u2-3 voice 64k sig 15 u5-1 data 06x56k
4 u2-4 voice 64k sig 16 u5-1 data 06x56k
5 u2-5 voice 64k sig 17 u5-1 data 06x56k
6 u2-6 voice 64k sig 18 u5-1 data 06x56k
7 u2-7 voice 64k sig 19 w1-2 ts-19 64k no
8 u2-8 voice 64k sig 20 w1-2 ts-20 64k pcm
9 u1-2 ts-9 64k no 21 w1-2 ts-21 64k no
10 u1-2 ts-10 64k no 22 w1-2 ts-22 64k sig
11 u1-2 ts-11 64k no 23 w1-2 ts-23 64k pcm
12 u1-2 ts-12 64k no 24 w1-2 ts-24 64k p&s
Save | Undo | Refresh | sIgnaling | Main
Figure System-44. Signaling and Companding Options
Checking the Timeslot Map
Once the timeslots are selected and assigned, the list of all DS0 connections (the
timeslot map) can be viewed through the WAN card Xconnect screen for both bus-
connect and cross-connect systems. (In the bus-connect version, changes of signaling
status [trunk conditioning] can also be done from this screen [see previous section]).
You can see the results of your assignment selections by checking the timeslot map as
follows:
1. From the Main Screen, select the WAN card in slot W-1.
2. Type <x> to bring up the timeslot screen (see Figure System-45).
3. Selecting <m> for Main will return you to the WAN card screen.
4. Selecting <m> for Main again will return you to the Main screen.
System Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-D-44 (10-97)
Node_1 | W1 CSU+CSU 8010 Rev A6-2 Ser 00101 | 12-31-99
14:33
TS XCON TS CIRCUIT ID TS XCON TS CIRCUIT ID
1 u2-1 D-01
user_circuit 13
2 u2-1 D-02
user_circuit 14
3 u2-1 D-03
user_circuit 15
4 u2-1 D-04
user_circuit 16
5 u2-1 D-05
user_circuit 17
6 u2-1 D-06
user_circuit 18
7 u2-1 D-07
user_circuit 19 u2-1 A-01 user_circuit
8 20 u2-1 A-02 user_circuit
9 21 u2-1 A-03 user_circuit
10 22 u2-1 A-04 user_circuit
11 23 u2-1 A-05 user_circuit
12 24 u2-1 A-06 user_circuit
Save | Undo | Refresh | Main
Figure System-45. Timeslot Screen in T1 Operation
Figure System-46 shows the same example displayed on a bus-connect system using E1
connections in d-i mode. (Timeslot #16 will not be available for assignment on
either the HSU table or the voice card timeslots.) Like T1 operation in d-i mode,
unspecified timeslots are automatically assigned to corresponding slots on the other
WAN port on the same card.
DACOM Timeslot Renumbering
The WAN Card timeslot selection screen shown above can be modified for DACOM
format. The timeslot data will be translated into DACOM format using a new assigned
vendor code. This will allow the renumbering of timeslots so they will be displayed into
Korean format.
If Vendor Code indicates DACOM, then renumbered timeslots will be displayed using
the Korean format. Timeslots 1 through 15 will be unchanged. Timeslots 17 through 31
will be renumbered as 16 through 30, and timeslot 16 will be renumbered as 31.
Note: ONLY use this option to reassign the timeslots on the WAN Card to DACOM.
Otherwise, DO NOT change your vendor code.
Reference Guide v3.6System Operations
(10-97) Page 2-D-45
Node_1 | W1 CEPT+CEPT 8010 Rev A6-2 Ser 00101 | 12-31-99
14:33
TS XCON TS CIRCUIT_ID TS XCON TS CIRCUIT_ID
0 frame align 64k 16 cas 64k
1 U5-1 A-01 user_circuit 17 U7-1 A-17 user_circuit
2 U5-2 A-02 user_circuit 18 U7-2 A-18 user_circuit
3 U5-3 A-03 user_circuit 19 U7-3 A-19 user_circuit
4 U5-4 A-04 user_circuit 20 U7-4 A-20 user_circuit
5 U5-5 A-05 user_circuit 21 U7-5 A-21 user_circuit
6 U5-6 A-06 user_circuit 22 U7-6 A-22 user_circuit
7 U5-7 A-07 user_circuit 23 U7-7 A-23 user_circuit
8 U5-8 A-08 user_circuit 24 U7-8 A-24 user_circuit
9 U6-1 A-09 user_circuit 25 U8-1 A-25 user_circuit
10 U6-2 A-10 user_circuit 26 U8-2 A-26 user_circuit
11 U6-3 A-11 user_circuit 27 U8-3 A-27 user_circuit
12 U6-4 A-12 user_circuit 28 U8-4 A-28 user_circuit
13 U6-5 A-13 user_circuit 29 U8-5 A-29 user_circuit
14 U6-6 A-14 user_circuit 30 U8-6 A-30 user_circuit
15 U6-7 A-15 user_circuit 31 U8-7 A-31 user_circuit
Refresh | Test | Main
Figure System-46. Timeslot Screen in E1 Operation
Recording the Configuration on Paper
After you set up your initial system configuration and define your timeslot map, take
the time to record this information on paper. Recording the initial configuration in a
logical manner will pay for itself if you have a problem later.
Record the information in any way that makes sense to you and your colleagues.
Whatever your approach, it is suggested that you also note the initial settings for each
card in copies of the T1 or E1 operation tables provided as Tables System-8 and -9.
Store all the initial configuration information in a safe place where anyone needing to
service the system can easily find it.
System Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-D-46 (10-97)
Table System-8. Timeslot Recording Form (T1 Operation)
WAN Port # _______ - _______
TS Number Card Type Port Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Reference Guide v3.6System Operations
(10-97) Page 2-D-47
Table System-9. Timeslot Recording Form (E1 Operation)
WAN Port # _______ - _______
TS Number Card Type Port Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Reference Guide v3.6 Redundant Operations
(10-97) Page 2-E-1
Introduction
The system can be configured with redundant features that will switch operations from
failed critical components to "backup" replacements with the minimum loss of service
possible in the event of equipment failure.
The four areas of redundant operations are the power system (load share), the CPU
card, the WAN card and the ADPCM network.
Power System
Each of the power supply components is designed to switch to alternative units (if
available) in the event the primary unit fails. Additionally, the defective unit will
create a system alarm upon failure to alert the operator of the condition so that suitable
diagnostic and repair work may be initiated. The units covered by these redundancy
parameters are:
8901 AC Power Supply
8902 DC Power Supply
8906 Ringing Generator (Master only, see below)
8907 DC Power Supply
Upon failure, the LED on the 8903 or 8905 AC to DC Power Converter will be turned
off but will not generate a system alarm (unless the system is equipped with the 8902
External Alarm card).
If the "Master" 8906 Ringing Generator fails, an alarm will be generated and the LED
will turn off. If a "slave" Ringing Generator fails, the LED will turn off but no alarm
will be generated by the system.
Figure RDNT-1 shows the main screen of a cross-connect system in which Power
Supply #1 (PS1) has failed. The Power Supply failure is noted in the alarm message in
the top right hand corner of the screen.
Redundant Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-E-2(10-97)
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
Slot Installed Status Slot Installed Status PS1
OOS
C1 CPU XCON IF INTF+modem
C2 CPU XCON RDNT U1 ALR
P1 ADPCM-64 U2 E&M 4Wx8-6
P2 ADPCM-64 U3 FXS 2Wx8-9
P3 ADPCM-64 U4 FXO 2Wx8-9
W1 CSU+CSU U5 HSU 366x2
W2 CSU+CSU U6 OCU-DPx5
W3 CEPT+CEPT U7 FRAD-18
W4 CEPT+CEPT U8 SRU-232x10
F1 PS1 OOS RI RINGER
F2 PS2
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure RDNT-1. Redundant Power Systems (Two-Sided Chassis)
CPU Card
CPU Card redundancy is valuable to the user because of the criticality of the CPU card
to the operation of the entire system. CPU redundancy is supported in both cross-
connect and enhanced bus-connect units using two 8801 or 8804 models respectively.
A CPU card installed in slot C2 will become the redundant mate of the one in slot C1, if
they are both of the same type.
Switching from one CPU card to the other is triggered by any one of the following
conditions:
A software command issued by the operator
Removal of the active CPU card
Failure or malfunction of the active CPU card
During a CPU redundancy switch over, disruptions to voice and data traffic are
momentary and traffic will recover automatically.
Figure RDNT-2 shows the Main screen of a cross-connect system. The CPU in slot C1
is active and the CPU in slot C2 is the redundant mate. When the command
"cpusWtch" is selected from the Menu of Actions, the system will prompt the user with
the yes/no question.
Figure RDNT-3 shows the same screen after the switch. The CPU card in slot C1 now
shows redundant and the CPU in slot C2 now shows as the active mate. Note: This
switch is intrusive and will cause an outage.
Reference Guide v3.6Redundant Operations
(10-97) Page 2-E-3
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU RCON
C2 CPU RCON RDNT
P1/U1 E&M 4Wx8-6
P2/U2 FXS 2Wx8-9
P3/U3 FXO 2Wx8-9
P4/U4 HSU 366x2
W1/U5 CSU+CSU
W2/U6 CSU+CSU
W3/U7 CEPT+CEPT
W4/U8 CEPT+CEPT
IF INTF+modem
S1 PS1
S2 PS2
RI RINGER
OK to switch to redundant CPU (y/n)?
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure RDNT-2. Redundant CPU Cards (Front-Loading Chassis)
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU RCON RDNT
C2 CPU RCON
P1/U1 E&M 4Wx8-6
P2/U2 FXS 2Wx8-9
P3/U3 FXO 2Wx8-9
P4/U4 HSU 366x2
W1/U5 CSU+CSU
W2/U6 CSU+CSU
W3/U7 CEPT+CEPT
W4/U8 CEPT+CEPT
IF INTF+modem
S1 PS1
S2 PS2
RI RINGER
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure RDNT-3. CPU Switchover (Front-Loading Chassis)
WAN Card
T1 and E1 WAN redundancy is supported in enhanced bus-connect systems (Model
8804 CPU) and in cross-connect systems (Model 8801 CPU). It is not supported in the
standard bus-connect systems (Model 8800 CPU).
Redundant Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-E-4(10-97)
In both cases, the user may define in software, one or more events that can trigger a
WAN redundancy switchover from among the following options:
A software command issued by the operator
The removal of the active WAN port or card
The failure or malfunction (OOS) of the active WAN port or card
CGA alarm declaration on the active WAN port or card
During a WAN redundancy switchover, disruptions to voice and data traffic are
momentary and traffic will recover automatically.
Enhanced Bus-Connect WAN Redundancy
In enhanced bus-connect systems, a single or dual WAN card that is installed in slot W2
automatically becomes the redundant mate of the WAN card in slot W1. Similarly, a
WAN card in slot W4 automatically becomes the redundant mate of the WAN card in
slot W3. This is known as 1x1 redundancy and a "Y-adapter" (Model 1239) is required
to bring the outputs of each pair of WAN ports onto the same facility. The "master"
WAN card and its redundant mate must be equipped with the same mix of DSX, CSU
or CEPT modules and those must be placed in the same positions on both cards. If an
incompatible WAN card is installed in a redundant slot, then the system will "reject"
that card. If a Dual WAN is used in "terminate" mode, only the failed WAN port will
switch to its redundant mate. If the Dual WAN card is programmed for "drop and
insert" mode, both ports will switch even if only one has failed.
Figure RDNT-4 shows the Main screen (status screen selected) of the enhanced bus-
connect system. In this example, the two ports on WAN-1 are paired with the two ports
on WAN-2, while the two ports on WAN-3 are paired with the two ports on WAN-4.
Figure RDNT-5 shows the main WAN card screen for the card in slot W3 with port 1
selected. The software command "sWitch" is selected from the choices in the Menu of
Actions and the system delivers the prompt shown in the same figure. Pressing "y" will
complete the transaction and the traffic on WAN port 3-1 will be switched to WAN port
4-1. The main screen (Figure RDNT-6) now shows WAN port 4-1 as the active port
and WAN port 3-1 as the redundant port.
Note: There are no internal test functions available for WAN #3 or #4.
Reference Guide v3.6Redundant Operations
(10-97) Page 2-E-5
Node_1 | | 12-31-99
14:33
Slot Installed Status Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU RCON IF INTF+modem
C2 U1 ALR s s s s
P1 U2 E&M 4Wx8-6 s s s s s s s
s
P2 U3 FXS 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s
s
P3 U4 FXO 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s
s
W1 CSU+CSU a a U5 HSU 366x2 s s
W2 CSU+CSU r r U6 HSU 366x2 s s
W3 CEPT+CEPT a a U7 HSU 366x2 s s
W4 CEPT+CEPT r r U8 OCU-DPx5 s s s s s
F1 PS1 RI RINGER
F2 PS2
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure RDNT-4. RCON WAN Cards (Two-Sided Chassis)
Node_1 | | 12-31-99
14:33
CSU CSU
STATE actv STATE actv
MODE term MODE term
FORMAT esf FORMAT esf
LINE CODE b8zs LINE CODE b8zs
PULSE n/a PULSE n/a
LINE LEN 0 LINE LEN 0
SLIP LIM 126 SLIP LIM 126
AIS none AIS none
LINE LB off LINE LB off
LOCAL LB off LOCAL LB off
CH LB off CH LB off
LB ADDR 01 LB ADDR 01
LB DET w/to LB DET w/to
ESF/NMS RP at&t ESF/NMS RP at&t
EER THRHD 10e-4 EER THRHD 10e-4
RDNT RULES none RDNT RULES none
OK to switch to the redundant WAN (y/n)?
Save | Undo | Refresh | Xcon | Perf | Test | sWitch | Main
Figure RDNT-5. RCON WAN Card Switchover
Redundant Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-E-6(10-97)
Node_1 | | 12-31-99
14:33
Slot Installed Status Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU RCON IF INTF+modem
C2 U1 ALR s s s s
P1 U2 E&M 4Wx8-6 s s s s s s s
s
P2 U3 FXS 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s
s
P3 U4 FXO 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s
s
W1 CSU+CSU r a U5 HSU 366x2 s s
W2 CSU+CSU a r U6 HSU 366x2 s s
W3 CEPT+CEPT r r U7 HSU 366x2 s s
W4 CEPT+CEPT a a U8 OCU-DPx5 s s s s s
F1 PS1 RI RINGER
F2 PS2
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure RDNT-6. RCON WAN Cards (Two-Sided Chassis)
Cross-Connect WAN Redundancy
In cross-connect systems, WAN redundancy requires the installation of a Dual WAN
card with Relays (Model 8014) in slot W4. That WAN card with Relays acts as the
redundant card for the WAN cards installed in slots W1 through W3 provided it is
equipped with matching DSX, CSU or CEPT plug-in modules and that the plug-in
modules are installed in the correct positions. This is known as 1xN redundancy and,
following a redundancy switchover, the relay module on the 8014 switches the output
of the redundant WAN card to the correct pins on the WAN connector of the Interface
card. Note that if a Model 8014 Dual WAN card with Relays is installed in slots W1,
W2 or W3, then it will function as a standard Dual WAN card. Also, if the plug-ins of
a Model 8014 installed in slot W4 do not match those of a WAN card in slot W1,
W2 or W3, then it cannot act as that card's redundant mate. Even though the
system will not reject the card, it will simply not switch even if the active WAN card
fails. Finally, if a standard WAN card is installed in slot W4, then WAN redundancy
cannot be supported by the system. In cross-connect systems redundancy
switchovers occur on a WAN card (not port) basis and the whole card must match
the redundant card in slot W4 for the switchover to occur. Note: In the 8014 there
must never be a physical T-1 connection to WAN 4 that is being used as a Redundant
WAN.
Figure RDNT-7 shows the main screen (status screen selected) of a cross-connect
system. In this example the two CSU ports in WANs 1, 2 and 3 are backed-up by the
two ports in W4.
Reference Guide v3.6Redundant Operations
(10-97) Page 2-E-7
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU XCON
P1/U1 E&M 4Wx8-6 s s s s s s s s
P2/U2 FXS 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s s
P3/U3 FXO 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s s
P4/U4 HSU 366x2 s s
W1/U5 CSU+CSU a a
W2/U6 CSU+CSU a a
W3/U7 CSU+CSU a a
W4/U8 CSU+CSU r r
IF INTF+modem
S1 PS1
S2 PS2
RI RINGER
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure RDNT-7. XCON WAN Cards (Front-Loading Chassis)
Figure RDNT-8 shows the main WAN card screen for the card in slot W1 with port 1-1
selected. The software command "sWitch" is selected from the choices in the Menu of
Actions and the system delivers the prompt shown. Pressing "y" will complete the
transaction and the traffic on the card in slot W1 will be switched to the 8014 card in
slot W4. The main screen (Figure RDNT-9) now shows both ports on the card in slot
W4 as active port and the ports on the card in slot W1 as redundant.
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
CSU CSU
STATE actv STATE actv
MODE xcon MODE term
FORMAT esf FORMAT esf
LINE CODE b8zs LINE CODE b8zs
PULSE n/a PULSE n/a
LINE LEN 0 LINE LEN 0
SLIP LIM 126 SLIP LIM 126
AIS none AIS none
LINE LB off LINE LB off
LOCAL LB off LOCAL LB off
CH LB off CH LB off
LB ADDR 01 LB ADDR 01
LB DET w/to LB DET w/to
ESF/NMS RP at&t ESF/NMS RP at&t
EER THRHD 10e-4 EER THRHD 10e-4
RDNT RULES n/a RDNT RULES none
OK to switch to the redundant WAN (y/n)?
Save | Undo | Refresh | Xcon | Perf | Test | sWitch | Main
Figure RDNT-8. Switchover in Cross-Connect System
Redundant Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-E-8(10-97)
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
Slot Installed Status
C1 CPU XCON
P1/U1 E&M 4Wx8-6 s s s s s s s s
P2/U2 FXS 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s s
P3/U3 FXO 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s s
P4/U4 HSU 366x2 s s
W1/U5 CSU+CSU r r
W2/U6 CSU+CSU a a
W3/U7 CSU+CSU a a
W4/U8 CSU+CSU a a
IF INTF+modem
S1 PS1
S2 PS2
RI RINGER
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure RDNT-9. XCON WAN Cards (Front-Loading Chassis)
ADPCM Card
This system can employ ADPCM cards that use voice compression technology to
effectively increase the digital voice transmission capabilities of voice cards (E&M,
FXS or FXO) or WAN links. See the ADPCM chapter in the Server Cards section for
complete technical details about the ADPCM card.
Each system allows one, two, or three ADPCM cards located in slots P1 through P3,
depending on slot availability. In systems with two or three ADPCM cards, any one of
the cards can be selected as the redundant backup. No restrictions exist about slot
order.
Figure RDNT-10 shows a console with three ADPCM cards. The ADPCM card in slot
P1 is highlighted. Pressing the "Enter" key will bring up the ADPCM main screen
shown as Figure RDNT-11.
Reference Guide v3.6Redundant Operations
(10-97) Page 2-E-9
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
Slot Installed Status Slot Installed Status
C1 IF INTF+modem
C2 U1 ALR s s s s
P1 ADPCM-64 s s s s s s s s U2 E&M 4Wx8-6 s s s s s s s s
P2 ADPCM-64 s s s s s s s s U3 FXS 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s s
P3 ADPCM-64 s s s s s s s s U4 FXO 2Wx8-9 s s s s s s s s
W1 CSU+CSU s s U5 HSU 366x2 s s
W2 CSU+CSU s s U6 OCU-DPx5 s s s s s
W3 CEPT+CEPT s s U7 FRAD-18 s s s s s s s s
W4 CEPT+CEPT s s U8 SRU-232x10 s s s s s s s s s s
F1 PS1 RI RINGER
F2
Alarms | Config | Del | accepT | Xcon | sYs | Logout | Oos | cpusWtch
Figure RDNT-10. Selecting the Redundant ADPCM Card
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
12345678
STATE stdby stdby stdby stdby stdby stdby stdby stdby
USER n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
WAN w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1
TS 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
ADPCM WAN w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1
ADPCM TS 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
TYPE v v v v v v v v
RATE 32k 32k 32k 32k 32k 32k 32k 32k
SIG MODE e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m
CODING u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law
TC CGA idle idle idle idle idle idle idle idle
stdby actv rdnt
Save | Undo | Refresh | pg_Left | pg_riGht | Main
Figure RDNT-11. The ADPCM Card Main Screen
Highlighting the STATE parameter and pressing the "Enter" key shows a new option
"rdnt." Selecting "rdnt" as the STATE for any of the ADPCM ports and saving the
changes will cause the entire card to become the redundant ADPCM card for the
system. The main screen will change and look like the one shown in Figure RDNT-12.
Redundant Operations Reference Guide v3.6
Page 2-E-10 (10-97)
Node_1 | | 12-31-99 14:33
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
STATE rdnt rdnt rdnt rdnt rdnt rdnt rdnt rdnt
USER n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
WAN w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1
TS 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
ADPCM WAN w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1 w1-1
ADPCM TS 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
TYPE v v v v v v v v
RATE 32k 32k 32k 32k 32k 32k 32k 32k
SIG MODE e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m
CODING u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law
TC CGA idle idle idle idle idle idle idle idle
Save | Undo | Refresh | pg_Left | pg_riGht | Main
Figure RDNT-12. The ADPCM Card Main Screen
Should either card in slots P2 or P3 fail for any reason, the entire voice compression
network will switch to the redundant card in slot P1. When the Out of Service
condition is repaired, the card in the slot that previously failed will become the
redundant card for the system.
The system does not have to have any of the ADPCM cards redundant. All three slots
(P1-P3) can be used for traffic on ADPCM voice networks.
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Introduction
This section discusses the installation and operation of the CPU card. It describes the
three types of CPU Cards and includes the following main topics:
Ø CPU Card Settings
Ø Printing Alarms Remotely
Ø TCP/IP Network Management
Ø Network Statistics
Ø Routing
The CPU Card controls all operations of the system. One CPU Card is required for all
installations. Two Models 8801 or 8804 CPUs can be used for CPU redundancy.
8800 CPU Card
The 8800 is the base model CPU Card. It supports up to two T1 or E1 WAN ports (on
one WAN Card). The 8800 requires that you install the WAN Card in slot W1 and that
all channels be assigned to time slots on links W1-1 and W1-2. A system that uses an
8800 CPU card is said to operate in "standard bus-connect" mode. The 8800 CPU does
not support redundant operations.
8801 CPU Card
The 8801 CPU card supports complex applications requiring more than two WAN ports
and the ability to cross-connect DS0s between WANs. The 8801 supports up to four
WAN Cards for a total of eight T1 or E1 WAN ports and has a built-in cross-connect
module. A system that uses an 8801 CPU card is said to operate in "cross-connect"
mode. Two Model 8801 CPUs can be installed in slots C1 and C2 to achieve CPU
redundancy. The 8801 also supports 1xN WAN redundancy. (See the Redundant
Systems chapter.)
8804 CPU Card
The 8804 CPU supports two T1 or E1 WAN links in slot W1-1 and W 1-2 with a
redundant card (similarly configured) in slot W2. It supports another two T1 or E1
WAN links in slot W3-1 and W3-2 with a redundant card (similarly configured) in slot
W4. If the T1/E1 link in w1-1 fails for any reason, the system will automatically switch
to the similarly configured card in slot w2-1 (W1-2 would switch to W2-2 in the same
way).
Slot W3 can support either a Single or a Dual T1/E1 WAN card. If the T1/E1 link in
w3-1 fails for any reason, the system will automatically switch to the similarly
configured card in slot w4-1 (w3-2 would switch to w4-2 in the same way).
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Note that WAN ports in slot W3 can operate only in "terminate" mode and can
only support 8202, 8213 or 8215 HSU card ports and OCU-DP ports from an 8247
5 or 10-port OCU-DP card. No other voice or data ports can be assigned to the
WAN card in slot W3 in this mode.
A system that uses an 8804 CPU is said to operate in "enhanced bus-connect" mode.
Two Model 8804 CPUs can be installed in slots C1 and C2 to achieve CPU redundancy.
The 8804 also supports 1x1 WAN redundancy. (See the Redundant Systems chapter.)
CPU Card Settings
Figure CPU-1 shows the main CPU card screen. Fill in the fields on the screen to
configure the CPU for your site and system. Use the commands at the bottom of the
screen to perform various system functions. Table CPU-1 lists the commands.
Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8801 Rev C3-0 Ser 00202 | 12-31-99
14:33
NODE ID Node_1
SUPERUSER **************
MANAGER Manager
OPERATOR Operator
VIEWER Viewer
SYS CONT System Contact
SYS LOC System Location
SYS PH# 5106231574
ALRM SEQ all
ACO cur
C1 Active Host 3.60 Voice 3.60
Save | Undo | Refresh | Prt | tcp/Ip | Main
Figure CPU-1. CPU Card Screen
The CPU screen has ten setting fields: Node ID, four passwords, System Contact
Person, System Location, System Phone Number, Alarm Sequence and Alarm Cutoff.
The Node ID must be unique within each user’s network for each unit. The
Superuser password level is reserved for use by factory personnel only.
The other three levels are referred to as "manager," "operator" and "viewer"
respectively. The user sets these values on the CPU card screen, shown in Figure CPU-
1. Each password can be up to 14 characters long (alphabetic and numeric only). Note
that passwords are case-sensitive. For more information about passwords, and changing
the settings on this card, refer to Logging On in the Basic Operations chapter.
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The System Contact Person is the name of the person to contact.
The System Location is where the system resides.
The System Phone Number is the phone number used by a remote user to engage the
system in a VT-100 session (using either ISDN D channel dialing or the Remote
Integrated Terminal System described in the Interface chapter). Up to ten numeric
characters can be placed in this field.
The Alarm Sequence establishes how the sequence number for alarms is generated. If
this parameter is set to all, any alarm generated by the system will be assigned a
sequence number. If this parameter is set to report , only those alarms set to report will
be assigned a sequence number. See the Basic Operations chapter for additional
information on setting alarm reporting characteristics.
The Alarm Cut Off (ACO) option reports a status to the user based on the setting latch
(condition held) or cur (current condition).
The CPU screen also displays the status of each CPU (Active or Redundant), the type of
CPU installed and the version of the voice and host software.
Changing Passwords
Depending on the security procedures for your network, you may need to change
passwords frequently. The best passwords are at least 6 and no more than 12 characters
long, are not found in a dictionary, and contain both letters and numbers. Because the
system is case-sensitive, you can capitalize some of the letters in the passwords to give
you more possible combinations. Perform the following steps to change the system
passwords:
1. Log on to the system at the Manager access level and select the CPU card
from the main screen.
2. Highlight the password you want to change and press the <Enter> key.
3. Type the new password (up to 14 characters, alphanumeric, case sensitive
(no spaces allowed)) over the old password and press the <Enter> key.
4. Make sure the password appears as you want it (passwords are case-
sensitive) and save your changes.
Entering Values in Fields
To change the value in a field:
1. Use the arrow keys to scroll to the field.
2. Press the <Enter> key to open the entry area at the bottom of the screen.
3. If the system offers a set of choices, use the arrow keys to scroll to your
choice and press <Enter> again.
If data entry is required, type in the data and press <Enter>.
4. When desired entries have been made press s (Save) to save the entries.
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Menu of Actions
Table CPU-1 shows the Menu of Actions for the CPU Card.
Table CPU-1. CPU Card Screen Menu of Actions
Action Function
Save Saves changes to settings.
Undo Returns all settings to the last saved state.
Refresh Updates certain time-related information fields that are not
automatically updated (i.e. performance and test data).
Prt Initiates alarm printing to remote device. Refer to Printing Alarms
Remotely in this section.
tcp/IpSets up communications with a Network Management System via
SNMP or TELNET. Refer to TCP/IP Network Management in this
section.
Main Returns to the main terminal screen. If changes are made to settings
and not saved, you will be prompted to save or lose changes.
Printing Alarms Remotely
Often integrated access controllers are placed in unsupervised locations (equipment
closets, etc.). With no one present to detect alarms that might occur, the system
administrators have no way of knowing that the unit is not operating properly.
The basic solution to the Network Management problem is the Print Alarm feature.
Each system can be programmed to call a predetermined telephone number at specific
intervals and report the presence of selected system alarms. Alarms are chosen to print
remotely by selecting the Report option in the alarm filters (see Basic Operations
chapter).
The user can employ either an external modem (with faster transmission rates) or the
internal modem (2.4kbps) on many of the Interface cards to send system alarms to a
remote logging device such as a printer or personal computer. If using the internal
modem, the user should connect the remote device to a V.22 bis 2.4kbps asynchronous
modem set to auto-answer, eight data bits, one stop bit, and no parity. When the
modem connected to the remote logging device answers, the system sends the alarm
messages as a string of ASCII characters formatted with carriage returns and line feeds
and hangs up the call. More information on this process can be found later in this
chapter.
The network administrator can also call the phone number associated with the system
modem and initiate a two-way, interactive VT-100 session with the system to determine
the nature of the problem and dispatch technicians if necessary.
Another Network Management solution is the TCP/IP feature discussed later in this
chapter. If the TCP/IP network management system is active, the Print Alarm
feature will not operate.
Using the TCP/IP feature automatically converts alarm messages into SNMP traps for
forwarding to downstream NMS equipment.
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Figure CPU-2 shows the Print Alarm screen. Table CPU-2 lists the settings controlled
on the screen along with their possible and default values.
Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8801 Rev C3-0 Ser 00202 | 12-31-99 14:33
1
PRT ALARMS off
PRT PHONE#
PRT RETRY 1
PRT ATTEMPTS 1
PRT MAJOR&CRIT 1
PRT MINOR&INFO 1
ELEMENT 1 number
ELEMENT 2 alarm
ELEMENT 3 model
ELEMENT 4 address
ELEMENT 5 time
ELEMENT 6 severity
Save | Undo | Refresh | Main
Figure CPU-2. Print Alarm Screen
Table CPU-2. Print Alarm Options and Defaults
Parameter User Options Notes Default
PRT ALARMS off direct modem 1off
PRT PHONE# telephone number (up to 14 numbers)
PRT RETRY 1-60 1
PRT ATTEMPTS 1-99 1
PRT MAJOR&CRIT 1-500 1
PRT MINOR&INFO 1-32000 1
ELEMENT 1 alarm model address time
severity number empty 2number
ELEMENT 2 alarm model address time
severity number empty 2alarm
ELEMENT 3 alarm model address time
severity number empty 2model
ELEMENT 4 alarm model address time
severity number empty 2address
ELEMENT 5 alarm model address time
severity number empty 2time
ELEMENT 6 alarm model address time
severity number empty 2severity
NOTES
1. The Print Alarms option must be off if TCP/IP is on.
2. The choice of empty will eliminate that element from the NMS report.
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PRT ALARMS
The Print Alarms option sets parameters for alarm output to a remote device. The
system uses the modem on the Interface card to call a remote device or Network
Management System. The system sends the alarm information for all alarm filters set
to Report (see Alarms in the Basic Operations chapter). Set the Printout Alarms
setting to off to disable all external alarm-generated messages. The direct setting sends
all alarms reported since the last report cycle to a local device through the DB-9
computer port. The modem setting sends all alarms reported since the last report cycle
to a remote device through the modem port.
The remote device may be any asynchronous ASCII device which can accept lines of
text up to 80 characters long. It must support XON/XOFF flow control and be capable
of attaching to an asynchronous dial-up modem. Figure CPU-3 shows an OOS alarm
reported to a remote device.
The device’s modem must be compatible with CCITT Rec. V.22 bis and support
connections at 2.4kbps. Set the modem for auto answer mode. Both the device and
modem should be set for 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity.
PRT PHONE#
The Print Phone Number is the number the modem dials when sending alarms to the
remote device. The number may be up to 14 digits long.
PRT RETRY
The Print Retry field determines the number of time the system will wait between
attempts to redial the remote device. The retry interval can be from 1-60 minutes.
PRT ATTEMPTS
1. The Print Attempts is the maximum number of times the system attempts
to contact the remote device before giving up. The number of attempts
can range from 1-99.
PRT MAJOR
The Print Major field is the maximum number of time the system will wait from the
occurrence of a major alarm until it places a call to the remote device to report it. The
interval-cycle can be from 1-500 seconds. All alarm reports designated as "Major"
(see Alarms in the Basic Operations chapter) will be reported at that time. For
example, if the user specifies an interval-cycle of 300 seconds (5 minutes), every major
alarm that occurs during a 5 minute period will be reported at the end of that cycle.
The Print Major interval-cycle starts from the most recent of:
1. The end of the last Major cycle (if no alarms occur).
2. When parameters are saved using the Save command from the Menu of
Actions.
3. 40 seconds after the last alarm message is reported.
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PRT MINOR
The Print Minor field is the maximum number of time the system will wait from the
occurrence of a minor alarm until it places a call to the remote device to report it. The
interval-cycle can be from 1-32,000 seconds. All alarm reports designated as "Minor"
(see Alarms in the Basic Operations chapter) will be reported at that time. For
example, if the user specifies an interval-cycle of 3,600 seconds (60 minutes), every
minor alarm that occurs during a 60 minute period will be reported at the end of that
cycle.
The Print Minor interval-cycle starts from the most recent of:
1. The end of the last Minor cycle (if no alarms occur).
2. When parameters are saved using the Save command from the Menu of
Actions.
3. 40 seconds after the last alarm message is reported.
When the specified interval-cycle for major or minor alarms is reached, the system will
send a list of the accumulated alarms sorted by the elements below. To avoid
congestion, alarm reporting is limited at the remote device or Network Management
System to the first 40 lines of non-reported alarms. The system will then wait 40
seconds and send the next 40 lines, and continue sending in that way (i.e. 40 lines, wait
40 seconds) until finished with the entire list of non-reported alarms. Forty seconds
after the last alarm message is reported, the new interval-cycle starts.
ELEMENT 1-6
The elements of the alarm configuration (see the Basic Operations Chapter), alarm,
model, address, time, severity, number, or empty can be arranged in any order that is
most helpful for the user. For instance, the user might want the order of the alarm
configuration to be severity, time, model, address, alarm, and number, while another
might want the sequence to be model, time, alarm, address, severity, and number.
Elements 1-6 can order these variables in any way needed.
NO=Node_1
AK=7
NU=00038
AL=OOS
ML=8840
UN=P2
ON=07-20-95 14:44:12
OF=07-20-95 16:12:16
SV=C
END
Figure CPU-3. Remote Printout of Alarms
For example, Figure CPU-3 shows the Node Name, "Node_1," Acknowledgment
Number 7, Alarm Number 38, Alarm type is Out of Service, Model 8840, Address
Number P2, Time on 7/20/95 at 14:44:12, Time off 7/20/95 at 16:12:16, and Severity is
Critical.
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Menu of Actions
Table CPU-3 shows the Menu of Actions for the Print Alarms Screen.
Table CPU-3. Print Alarms Screen Menu of Actions
Action Function
Save Saves changes to settings.
Undo Returns all settings to the last saved state.
Refresh Used on Testing and Monitoring screens to update statistics and on
other screens to redraw the screen.
Main Returns to the CPU card main screen. If changes are made to settings
and not saved, you will be prompted to save or lose changes.
TCP/IP Network Management
This section presents another type of Network Management System supported by this
unit for diagnosing and reporting trouble at unsupervised locations. SNMP alarm traps
and TELNET configuration can transmit over this path. Both formats can use the 4kbps
FDL (Facility Data Link) on a T1 link using ESF format, the SA4 on an E1 link, a full
DS0 on a T1/E1 link, or the computer port of the Interface card using SLIP protocol.
If you do not understand the NMS concepts of IP addressing, SNMP, SLIP,
TELNET and Ping, please consult with your network administrator before
attempting to install or repair components presented in this section.
If the FDL is used to transmit and receive information, a Lucent Technologies DACSII
(6.1 or higher) or DACSII ISx (3.0 or higher) is used to convert the FDL/IP information
to a full DS0. (On a point-to-point circuit, a DACSII is not needed.)
If you have a small number of remote units to supervise, one of the Network
Management System options is to use a B7R (Bit-7 Redundant) card at the NMS site.
One through eight remote units send alarm information on the FDL/SA4 of a DS1 to
either a DACSII on eight individual DS0s and multiplex the contents into a single
38.4kbps asynch circuit using SLIP protocol for use by a communication server or
terminal server for routing to a Local Area Network. (See B7R card chapter.)
Using IP addresses, the network management center can communicate directly with the
affected unit, diagnose the problem, and dispatch a technician if necessary.
Figure CPU-4 shows how a typical system might be set up to make use of this feature.
This figure shows eight integrated access controllers (from different geographic
locations) reporting alarms through the TCP/IP interface to workstations at the network
site using the procedure mentioned above.
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Terminal Server
4Kbps TCP/IP
Single 38.4Kbps
Asynch SLIP Circuit
System #1
FDL Circuits
System #2
System #3
System #4
System #5
System #6
System #7
System #8
DACSII
T1/E1
LAN
Workstations
B
7
R
Up to 8 DS0s
Concentrator
Unit
Figure CPU-4. Typical TCP/IP Network Management System
Figure CPU-5 shows the TCP/IP screen. Table CPU-4 shows the TCP/IP screen
parameters and options.
Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8801 | Rev A2-0 Ser 01103 | 12-31-99 14:33
1
HOST IP STATUS stdby
HOST IP ADDR 0.0.0.0
HOST NETMASK 0.0.0.0
DEFAULT IP PORT n/a
DEFAULT IP SLOT n/a
DEFAULT IP UNIT n/a
RPT1 IP ADDR 0.0.0.0
RPT1 COMMUN STR
RPT2 IP ADDR 0.0.0.0
RPT2 COMMUN STR
RPT3 IP ADDR 0.0.0.0
RPT3 COMMUN STR
Ping | Netstat | rOute | Save | Undo | Refresh | Main
Figure CPU-5. TCP/IP Screen
CPU Card Reference Guide v3.6
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Table CPU-4. TCP/IP Screen Parameters and Options
PARAMETER User Options Notes Default
HOST IP STATUS stdby actv stdby
HOST IP ADDR IP address 0.0.0.0
HOST NETMASK IP address 0.0.0.0
DEFAULT IP PORT off local wan serv 1off
DEFAULT IP SLOT n/a 1n/a
DEFAULT IP UNIT n/a 1n/a
RPT1 IP ADDR IP address 0.0.0.0
RPT1 COMMUN STR blank
RPT2 IP ADDR IP address 0.0.0.0
RPT2 COMMUN STR blank
RPT3 IP ADDR IP address 0.0.0.0
RPT3 COMMUN STR blank
NOTES
1. The user options depend upon the selection in the Default IP Port selection. All user
options are explained below.
HOST IP STATUS
The Host IP Status is the IP address status for this specific integrated access controller.
HOST IP ADDR
The Host IP Address is the IP address for this specific integrated access controller. If
the B7R is used for this NMS, the Port IP address must be the same as the one entered
in the ADDR field of that card.
HOST NETMASK
The Host Netmask is used to indicate how much of the IP address is used for host
addressing and how much is used for network addressing. If the B7R card is used for
this NMS, this address must be the same as the one entered in the NETMSK field of
that card.
DEFAULT IP PORT
The Default IP Port setting tells the CPU card where IP packets will be sent or received.
The options are off (to disable Network Management System), local (information will
be sent over the DB-9 computer serial port to NMS equipment), wan (information will
be sent over the WAN FDL or a DS0 [chosen on the WAN card main screen with
ESF/NMS RPT option]), or serv (information sent over WAN DS0s through the
Ethernet connection to the NMS equipment).
If this parameter is set to local, wan or serv the Print Alarms feature (mentioned in the
previous section) must be set to off. If local is chosen for this setting, the internal
modem will not operate.
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DEFAULT IP SLOT
The Default IP Slot options are determined by the choice of Default IP Port. If off or
local is selected for that parameter, this option will show n/a. If wan is selected, the
options for this parameter will show W1-W4 (the WAN card slot that transmits and
receives NMS information). If serv is selected, the options for this parameter are P1-P3
(the Server card slot that transmits and receives NMS information).
DEFAULT IP UNIT
The Default IP Unit options are determined by the choice of Default IP Port. If off or
local is selected for that parameter, this option will show n/a. If wan or serv is selected
above, the options for this parameter will be 1-2 (corresponding with the WAN or
Server port).
RPT1 IP ADDR
The RPT1 IP Address is the IP address of the first Network Management System host
running a SNMP trap server.
RPT1 COMMUN STR
The RPT1 Community String holds the community string for the first NMS host
running a SNMP trap server. The community string provides additional security by
rejecting messages that do not contain the correct string. There must be some entry in
this field to enable RPT1.
RPT2 IP ADDR
The RPT2 IP Address is the IP address of the second Network Management System
host running an SNMP trap server.
RPT2 COMMUN STR
The RPT2 Community String holds the community string for the first NMS host
running an SNMP trap server. The community string provides additional security by
rejecting messages that do not contain the correct string. There must be some entry in
this field to enable RPT2.
RPT3 IP ADDR
The RPT3 IP Address is the IP address of the third Network Management System host
running an SNMP trap server.
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RPT3 COMMUN STR
The RPT3 Community String holds the community string for the first NMS host
running an SNMP trap server. The community string provides additional security by
rejecting messages that do not contain the correct string. There must be some entry in
this field to enable RPT3.
Menu of Actions
Table CPU-5 shows the Menu of Actions for the TCP/IP screen.
Table CPU-5. TCP/IP Screen Menu of Actions
Action Function
Ping Test to see if the connected device responds to an echo request message.
After entering the IP address of the host device, the status line will
display, "Testing . . ." The next message will tell if the host is alive or
down.
Netstat Displays the Network Statistics. See below.
rOute Shows the Routing screen. See Routing section below.
Save Saves changes to settings.
Undo Returns all settings to the last saved state.
Refresh Used on Testing and Monitoring screens to update statistics and on
other screens to redraw the screen.
Main Returns to the CPU card main screen. If changes are made to settings
and not saved, you will be prompted to save or lose changes.
Network Statistics
The Network Statistics screens provide maintenance and diagnostic information for the
different protocols supported by this equipment. Statistics begin to accumulate when
the TCP/IP Port is changed from off to local or wan and will continue to store
information until it is turned off. Figure CPU-6 shows the first of four network
statistics screens. Figures CPU-7 through -9 show the other three screens.
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Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8801 Rev C3-0 Ser 00202 | 12-31-99 14:33
NETSTAT Page 1 of 4
SLIP
MTU Size 240
Bytes Received 0
Packets Received 0
Packets Discarded 0
Packets Dropped - Buffer 0
Buffer Overflow 0
Packets Sent Out 0
Bytes Sent Out 0
FDL
MTU Size 240
Frames Received 0
Frames Aborted on Receive 0
Frames To Transmit from Above 0
Frames Transmitted 0
Frames Aborted on Transmit 0
pgUp | pgDn | Refresh | Main
Figure CPU-6. TCP/IP Network Statistics Screen
SLIP
The MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) Size field shows the largest number of user-
data (e.g., the largest size of an packet) that can be sent in a single frame. The MTU for
this system is 210 with overhead = 240.
The Bytes Received field shows the number of bytes received by the local system from
the network host.
The Packets Received field shows the number of packets (unit of bytes, roughly similar
to an IP datagram) received by the local system from the network host.
The Packets Discarded field shows the number of packets sent by the network host that
were discarded by the local system. Packets are discarded because they either exceed
the MTU or are not complete.
The Packets Dropped - buffer field shows the number of incoming packets that were
dropped because there was not enough free memory to buffer them.
The Buffer Overflow field shows the occurrences of buffer overflow at the local system.
The Packets Sent Out field shows the number of packets transmitted by the local system
to the network host.
The Bytes Sent Out field shows the number of bytes transmitted to the network host by
the local system.
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FDL
The MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) Size field shows the largest number of bytes
that can be sent in a single frame. The default MTU is 210 with overhead = 240.
The Frames Received field shows the number of frames received by the local system
from the network host.
The Frames Aborted on Receive field shows the number of frames that were aborted
when received by the local system from the network host. Frames are aborted because
they either exceed the MTU or are not complete.
The Frames to Transmit from Above field shows the number of frames that were sent
by the local system to the TCP layer of the network host.
The Frames Transmitted field shows the number of frames sent from the local system to
the network host.
The Frames Aborted on Transmit field shows the number of frames aborted when
transmitted by the local system to the network host. Frames are aborted because they
either exceed the MTU or are not complete.
Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8801 Rev C3-0 Ser 00202 | 12-31-99 14:33
NETSTAT Page 2 of 4
IP
Default TTL 255
Datagrams Received 0
Datagrams Discarded 0
Datagrams Delivered Above 0
Datagrams From Above 0
Datagrams Sent 0
TX Wait for RAM 0
TX Aborted - mailbox short 0
ICMP
Messages Received 0
Messages Discarded 0
Messages Sent 0
Echo Requests Received 0
Echo Replies Sent 0
Echo Requests Sent 0
Echo Replies Received 0
Dest Unreachable Sent 0
pgUp | pgDn | Refresh | Main
Figure CPU-7. TCP/IP Network Statistics Screen
IP
The Default TTL field shows the Time To Live for information packets from
transmission to delivery. The TTL for this system is 255 seconds.
The Datagrams Received field shows the number of IP datagrams (packets) received by
the local system from the network host.
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The Datagrams Discarded - checksum field shows the number of datagrams that were
discarded by the local system.
The Datagrams Discarded - protocol field shows the number of IP datagrams that were
discarded by the local system because the protocol used is not supported. The
supported transmit protocols are IP, ICMP, TCP and UDP. The supported receive
protocols are IP and TCP.
The Datagrams Delivered Above field shows the number of datagrams sent to the TCP
layer of the network host to the local system.
The Datagrams From Above field shows the number of information or traps sent by the
local system to the UDP or TCP layer of the network host.
The Datagrams Sent field shows the total number of datagrams sent by the local system
to the network host.
The TX Waits for RAM field shows the total number of datagrams sent by the local
system which were delayed by lack of free RAM memory.
The TX Aborted - mailbox short field shows the total number of datagrams aborted by
the local system because of a mail subsystem overflow.
ICMP
The Messages Received field shows the number of ICMP messages received by the
local system from the network host.
The Messages Discarded field shows the number of ICMP messages by the network
host that were discarded (for any reason) by the local system.
The Messages Sent field shows the number of ICMP messages sent by the local system
to the network host.
The Echo Requests Received field shows the number of "ping" message requests
received by local system by the network host. This figure is part of the total messages
received.
The Echo Replies Sent field shows the number of "ping" message requests transmitted
to the network host. This figure is part of the total messages sent.
The Echo Requests Sent field shows the number of "ping" requests sent to the network
host by the local system. This figure is part of the total messages sent.
The Echo Replies Received field shows the number of "ping" message replies received
by the local system. This figure is part of the total messages received.
The Destination Unreachable Sent field shows the number of ICMP messages that were
discarded upon receipt by the network host because they were improperly addressed.
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Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8801 Rev C3-0 Ser 00202 | 12-31-99 14:33
NETSTAT Page 3 of 4
TCP State = LISTEN
Packets Received 0
Packets Discarded - Checksum 0
Packets Discarded - Port 0
Packets Discarded - Window 0
Bytes Delivered Above 0
Bytes From Above 0
Packets Sent 0
ACKs Received 0
Packets Sent - reset 0
Packets Sent - ACK 0
Packets Retransmitted 0
RTT Increased 0
RTT Decreased 0
Connections Opened 0
Connections Closed 0
Connections Aborted 0
Packets Tx Aborted - RAM 0
pgUp | pgDn | Refresh | Main
Figure CPU-8. TCP/IP Network Statistics Screen
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol is a transport layer, connection-oriented, end-to-end
protocol. It provides reliable, sequenced, and unduplicated delivery of bytes to a
remote or local user. TCP provides reliable byte stream communication between pairs
of processes in hosts attached to interconnect networks.
The Packets Received field shows the number of TCP packets received by the local
system from the network host.
The Packets Discarded - Checksum field shows the number of TCP packets that were
discarded by the local system because the checksum failed.
The Packets Discarded - Port field shows the number of TCP packets that were
discarded by the local system because the port assignment was incorrect.
The Packets Discarded - Window field shows the number of TCP packets that were
discarded by the local system because the window data was incorrect.
The Bytes Delivered Above field shows the number of information or traps sent from
TCP layer of the network host to the local system.
The Bytes From Above field shows the number of information or traps sent to the TCP
layer of the network host from the local system.
The Packets Sent field shows the total number of TCP packets that were transmitted to
the network host by the local system.
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The ACKs Received field shows the total number of acknowledgments that were
received by the local system from the network host.
The Packets Sent - reset field shows the total number of TCP packets that were
transmitted by the network host to the local system.
The Packets Sent - ACK field shows the total number of TCP acknowledgment packets
that were transmitted by the network host to the local system.
The Packets Retransmitted field shows the total number of TCP packets that were
retransmitted by the local system to the network host.
The RTT Increased field shows the number of times the retransmission time-out was
increased because the system was busy.
The RTT Decreased field shows the number of times the retransmission time-out was
decreased because the system was not busy.
The Connections Opened field shows the total number of connections that were opened
by the local system to the network host.
The Connections Closed field shows the total number of connections that were closed
by the local system to the network host.
The Connections Aborted field shows the number of times the connection was aborted
because either the number of consecutive retransmission’s was equal to 10 or
retransmission time-out was equal to 15 minutes.
The Packets TX Aborted - RAM field shows the total number of packets sent by the
local system which were aborted because of the lack of free RAM memory.
Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8801 Rev C3-0 Ser 00202 | 12-31-99 14:33
NETSTAT Page 4 of 4
UDP
Packets From Above 0
Packets Sent 0
TELNET
Bytes Received 0
Bytes Received as Commands 0
Bytes Delivered Above 0
Bytes Replied as Commands 0
Bytes From Above 0
Bytes Sent 0
Sessions Opened 0
Sessions Closed 0
TX Wait for Buffer 0
SNMP
PDUs Sent 0
Traps Sent 0
pgUp | pgDn | Refresh | Main
Figure CPU-9. TCP/IP Network Statistics Screen
CPU Card Reference Guide v3.6
Page 3-A-18 (10-97)
UDP
User Datagram Protocol is a transport layer, connectionless mode protocol, providing a
datagram mode of communication for delivery of packets to a remote or local user.
The Packets From Above field shows the number of UDP packets sent by the local
system to the network host.
The Packets Sent field shows the number of UDP packets transmitted from the local
system to the network host.
TELNET
The Bytes Received field shows the total number of bytes that were received by the
local system from the network host.
The Bytes Received as Commands field shows the total number of bytes that were
received as commands by the local network from the network host.
The Bytes Delivered Above field shows the total number of bytes that were transmitted
by the network host to the local system.
The Bytes Replied as Commands field shows the total number of bytes that were
transmitted as commands by the local system to the network host.
The Bytes From Above field shows the total number of bytes that were received by the
network host from the local system.
The Bytes Sent field shows the total number of bytes that were transmitted by the local
system to the network host.
The Sessions Opened field shows the total number of sessions that were opened by the
local system with the network host.
The Sessions Closed field shows the total number of sessions that were closed by the
local system with the network host.
The TX Wait for Buffer field shows the total number of transmissions that were delayed
by the local system for free memory in the buffer.
SNMP
The PDUs Sent field shows the number of Protocol Data Units sent from the local
system. A Protocol Data Unit is a data object exchanged by protocol machines, usually
containing both protocol control information and user data.
The Traps Sent field shows the total number of SNMP traps that were transmitted by
the local system to the network host.
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Menu of Actions
Table CPU-6 shows the Menu of Actions for the Network Statistics screen.
Table CPU-6. Network Statistics Screen Menu of Actions
Action Function
pgUpScrolls forward through network statistics one page at a time.
pgDnScrolls backward through network statistics one page at a time.
Refresh Since the system does not update statistics automatically, the Refresh
command must be used to update information in statistics fields.
Main Returns to the CPU card IP screen. If changes are made to settings and
not saved, you will be prompted to save or lose changes.
Routing
The system supports multi-point routing of Internet Protocol (IP) packets to either a
local Network Management System over the computer port or to a remote NMS over
the B7R card, timeslot #24 or the Facilities Data Link (FDL) of a T1 link. (For E1 links,
the information is sent on the B7R card, timeslot #31 or the SA4.)
If you want to use an entire timeslot (either 24 or 31) for remote NMS routing, no
action needs to be taken. If a B7R card is used or you want to use the FDL or SA4, an
additional selection must be made on the WAN card. For T1 links the selection is made
on the ESF/NMS RP parameter and on E1 links it is made on the COM/NMS RP
parameter. (See the WAN card and B7R card chapters for further information.)
All packets arriving on any of the optional paths or the local port will be treated by the
IP stack as follows:
If the packet's destination address matches that system's address, the packet is
processed locally.
If the address is not the same, the unit will search the routing table to find a remote
address that matches the destination of the packet.
If a match is not found for the packet, it is routed to the interface specified in the
DEF DEST field. If the default destination matches the interface the packet arrived
from, the packet is dropped.
All IP addresses between the Remote Start and Remote End addresses must go to the
same WAN link. If you are unclear about IP Addresses, please consult with your
Network Administrator.
Figure CPU-10 shows a typical routing application. Even though 24 integrated access
controllers are used in this example, the number of remote units is virtually unlimited
except for bandwidth and link-down considerations.
CPU Card Reference Guide v3.6
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S2
S4
S3
S1
S6
S8
S7
S5
S10
S9
S11
S12
S14
S13
S15
S16
S18
S17
S19
S20
S22
S21
S23
S24
Comm Serv
S25
Figure CPU-10. Routing Feature Diagram
In the diagram above, 24 integrated access controllers will transmit alarm information
to an IP routing Controller (System 25) by the optional paths of separate WAN links.
The network administrator assigns IP addresses for each system on the TCP/IP screen of
each unit's interface card (PORT IP ADDR). System 20 is connected by any of the
optional paths to System 25 which supports NMS equipment (the communications
server) by either a local SLIP connection directly from the CPU card or any of the
optional paths of a WAN link. In this example, all alarms received by any of the 24
Controllers will be forwarded to Controller 25 on a single WAN link.
Each of the 24 reporting units use System 25's IP address as the RPT1 IP ADDR on the
TCP/IP screen of its interface card. First routing is initiated by the off/on command for
each sub-unit. The IP address for REM STRT is the lowest IP address of the sub-units
controlled by that port. The IP address for REM END is the highest IP address of the
sub-units controlled by that port. The local port is included to be able to transmit the IP
packets generated by the routing unit to the same destination. In most cases, the DEF
DEST of all units controlled by this router will be the same place (either the local port
or optional WAN paths to a distant location).
The column headings are associated with the incoming WAN link associated with the
IP location of the remote systems. For example, if you expect incoming information
from system #1 on WAN 1-1, you would assign the IP address for system #1 between
the REM STRT and REM END for WAN 1-1.
Figure CPU-11 shows the Routing screen and Table CPU-6 lists the options for that
screen.
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Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8802 Rev C3-0 Ser 00672 | 12-31-99 14:33
page: 1 of 1 IP STATIC ROUTING
IP Net SubNetMask SLOT/UNIT
Save | Refresh | Add | dEl | Get | pgUp | pgDn | Main |
Figure CPU-11. Routing Screen
Table CPU-6. Settings for Routing Parameters
Parameter User Options Default
IP NET a valid SubNet or Gateway address ip
SUBNETMASK a valid Netmask IP address ip
SLOT/UNIT wan: W1-1 through W2-4
serv: P1-P3
user: not supported
local: COMP
w1-1
IP NET
The IP Net field shows a valid SubNet or Gateway address of a device located on this
system unit.
SubNetMask
The Remote Netmask field shows the Netmask of a device located remotely from this
system. Any valid Netmask is acceptable. The remote netmask information is the same
as that placed on the remote unit's TCP/IP screen.
Slot/Unit
The Default Destination specifies where to route packets received from a remote device
and the routing device to downstream NMS equipment (either the optional paths of a
WAN link or the local SLIP port).
CPU Card Reference Guide v3.6
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Menu of Actions
Table CPU-7. Routing Screen Menu of Actions
Action Function
Save Saves changes to settings.
Refresh Used on Testing and Monitoring screens to update statistics and on
other screens to redraw the screen.
Add Open the data entry screen to add a route
dEl Delete a route
Get Get information on routing destinations
PgUpGo to a previous page of routing paths
PgDnGo to the next page of routing paths
Main Returns to the CPU card main screen. If changes are made to settings
and not saved, you will be prompted to save or lose changes.
Adding Routes
In the Routing Screen, type a (Add) to present a data entry screen. A data line appears
near the bottom of the screen for the four address parameters of Table CPU-6. Use the
right/left arrow keys to scroll to the desired field. Press <Enter> to present the
corresponding data entry field (Figure CPU-11). Type in the correct address
parameters, up to three digits (0-255) in each segment of the address, using the right
arrow key to move to the next segment. Press <Enter> again to move the entered
address into the data line. Use the left/right arrow keys to move on to the next address
to be entered and repeat the process. The Slot/Unit field offers the entry categories
shown in Figure CPU-12. Scroll to the desired category and press<Enter> to present
one of the choices shown in Table CPU-6. Scroll to the desired value and press
<Enter>. When valid address and destination parameters have been added, type s to
save the address. The system will not save an invalid address. To exit the Add screen
without saving press the up or down arrow key.
Delete a Route
In the Routing Screen, scroll to the route to be deleted. With the route highlighted,
press e to delete.
Get Information
To obtain addressing information, press g for Get. The system displays the destination
variables wan, serv, user, and local across the bottom of the screen. Use the left/right
arrow keys to scroll to the desired destination and press <Enter> to select. The choices
available under each of these options are then displayed. Now highlight the desired
option and press <Enter> again to initiate the search. The system responds:
Sending RIP Request. Please wait ...
Press any key to cancel
After the system sends RIP request, the IP Static Routing screen will return, displaying
valid IP Net (address), SubNetMask, and Slot/Unit information.
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Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8802 Rev C3-0 Ser 00672 | 12-31-99 14:33
page: 1 of 1 IP STATIC ROUTING
IP Net SubNetMask SLOT/UNIT
0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 w1-1
Save
Figure CPU-12. Routing Address Entry
Node_1 | C1 CPU XCON 8802 Rev C3-0 Ser 00672 | 12-31-99 14:33
page: 1 of 1 IP STATIC ROUTING
IP Net SubNetMask SLOT/UNIT
0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 w1-1
wan serv user local
Save
Figure CPU-13. Slot/Unit Options
CPU Card Reference Guide v3.6
Page 3-A-24 (10-97)
Table CPU-8. Slot Unit Options
Slot/Unit Options Description Default
WAN w1-1 through w4-2 w1-1
SERV P1 through P3 P1
USER not supported
LOCAL
Reference Guide v3.6 ADPCM Card
(10-97) Page 4-A-1
Introduction
The 8871 ADPCM card is a plug-in resource card for the system. The card has 32 pairs
of voice compression engines that accept input directly from voice, SRU or BRI cards
in the same system unit or voice traffic on WAN links through the system. ADPCM
cards require a matching card at the other end to decompress the voice channels to
normal 64K operation. Except for SRU which uses h link to extract data from timeslot.
Each pair of compression engines utilize one 64Kbps DS0 for two compressed
channels. In Figure ADPCM-1 the eight numbers at the top of the screen represent the
first four pairs of compression engines. Each engine can compress 64Kbps voice traffic
to either 24Kbps, 32Kbps or 40Kbps (depending upon compression quality needed).
The rate of any DS0 is 64Kbps, so the sum of the compression rates for engine #1 and
#2 must equal that figure. If, for instance, you assign a 32Kbps circuit to engine #1,
engine #2 can only accept a 32Kbps circuit. A 40Kbps circuit can only be paired with a
24Kbps circuit and vice-versa.
The compression engines work in pairs. Engine numbers 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5 and 6, 7
and 8, are paired. Each member of the pair must have the same ADPCM WAN and
ADPCM TS. Additionally, both members of the compression engine pair must be active
before either port will operate.
The ADPCM card can compress low speed asynchronous data transmission (19.2Kbps
or less) from an SRU port that will occupy a 24Kbps engine. Each data circuit must be
paired with a 40Kbps voice channel. It can also compress B channel voice traffic from
the BRI card without restriction of compression rates.
Each unit can have up to three ADPCM cards installed (two normal ADPCM cards and
one redundant card). See the Redundant Operations chapter for further information
about redundant ADPCM cards.
The ADPCM card supports Transition Signaling as defined by ANSI T1.302-1989 with
the exception of the Alarm bits. ANSI T1.302 specifies signaling at the 32Kbps
compression rate. The ADPCM card uses this scheme for 24Kbps and 40Kbps although
it is not included in the standard. Table ADPCM-1 summarizes the signals supported by
each transcoder data rate. User channel configuration must adhere to these
specifications.
Table ADPCM-1. Signal Compression Rates
Transcoder
Rate Voice
Quality
(MOS)*
Modem Data DTMF FAX
24Kbps 3.6-3.8 Range no under study no
32Kbps 4.0-4.3 Range up to 4.8 Kbps
V.32 9.6 Kbps
OK Group II
40Kbps 4.0-4.3 Range up to 12 Kbps
V.32 14.4 (tbd)
OK Group III
* MOS - Mean Opinion Score based upon subjective evaluation
ADPCM Card Reference Guide v3.6
Page 4-A-2(10-97)
ADPCM Card Settings
Figure ADPCM-1 shows the ADPCM screen. Table ADPCM-2 lists the settings
controlled on this screen along with their possible and default values.
Node_1 | P1 ADPCM-64x1 8871 Rev D0-0 Ser 00259 | 12-31-99 14:33
Version #:0.1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
STATE stdby stdby stdby stdby stdby stdby stdby stdby
USER n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
WAN/SERV none none none none none none none none
TS n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
ADPCM W/S none none none none none none none none
ADPCM TS n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
TYPE v&s v&s v&s v&s v&s v&s v&s v&s
RATE 24K 24K 24K 24K 24K 24K 24K 24K
SIG MODE e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m e&m
CODING u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law u-law
TC CGA idle idle idle idle idle idle idle idle
Save | Save | Undo | Refresh | < | > | sWitch | Main
Figure ADPCM-1. The ADPCM Card Screen
Table ADPCM-2. ADPCM Card Setting Options and Defaults
Parameter User Options Default
STATE stdby actv rdnt stdby
USER n/a uX-1 through uX-8 n/a
WAN/SERV none w1-1 through w4-2 MORE
BACK P1 P2 P3 w1-1
TS n/a 01-24 01-31 01
ADPCM W/S w1-1 w1-2 w2-1 w2-2 w3-1 w3-2 w4-1 w4-2 w1-1
ADPCM TS n/a 01-24 01-31 01
TYPE v&s v trnsp v&s
RATE 24K 32K 40K 24K
SIG MODE n/a e&m fxs plar fxo e&m
CODING u-law a-inv u-law
TC CGA idle busy idle
STATE
The State setting determines whether the port is active or inactive. When assigning
ADPCM engine pairs for WAN traffic, set the State setting to stdby (standby) for ports
you are not using or have not yet configured. Set it to actv (active) for ports that are
ready for use.
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Setting the State to rdnt (redundant) for any port on an unused card will cause that card
to act as the redundant back-up for all of the other ADPCM cards in that unit. Once a
card is designated as a redundant ADPCM card the only way it can be used for regular
ADPCM traffic is to change the state of the selected port back to either actv or stdby .
When assigning ADPCM engine pairs from user cards, changing the port from stdby to
actv and saving the selection information on the user card screen will cause the system
to automatically assign an ADPCM engine.
When the engine is assigned from a user card, no changes can be made from the
ADPCM card screen to any of the fields.
USER
The User setting identifies the User card and port connected to this engine. This is the
place where the ADPCM card will expect incoming (not compressed) voice, sub-rate
data or B channel traffic. If assigned from a voice card, SRU or BRI card port, this
selection will show the user slot and port number (i.e. u5-2 for the card in slot U5, port
#2). If you are assigning a WAN timeslot, this setting will show n/a.
WAN/SERV
The WAN/SERV setting identifies the incoming WAN or server link connected to this
engine. This is the place where the ADPCM card will expect incoming (not
compressed) voice. This option shows the choices: none, w1-1through w4-2 and MORE
on the first line of choices. If you select MORE it offers the choices of P1, P2, or P3.
Choose none if you are assigning from a voice card or SRU card port; choose from w1-
1 - w2-4 if assigning from a WAN card, and P1-P3, if assigning from a server card.
TS
The Timeslot parameter selects the specific timeslot on the WAN link chosen in the
previous setting that the ADPCM card can expect incoming voice traffic. The options
are determined by the equipment on the WAN link selected in the previous setting. If
WAN 1-1 is equipped with either a CSU or DSX module, the options are 1-24. If a
CEPT module is installed on that link, the options are 1-15 and 17-31 . If you are
assigning from a voice card, SRU card or BRI card port, this setting will show n/a.
ADPCM W/S
The ADPCM W/S setting identifies the outgoing WAN link to which the engine is
connected. This option shows the choices: none, w1-1through w4-2. If you are
assigning either from a voice card, SRU or BRI card port or voice traffic from a WAN
timeslot, this setting will show w1-1 through w4-2. This is the WAN link to which the
ADPCM card will route outgoing (compressed) traffic.
ADPCM TS
The ADPCM Timeslot parameter selects the specific timeslot on the WAN link chosen
in the previous setting that the ADPCM card will send outgoing compressed traffic. The
options are determined by the equipment on the WAN link selected in the previous
setting. If WAN 1-1 is equipped with either a CSU or DSX module, the options are 1-
24. If a CEPT module is installed on that link, the options are 1-15 and 17-31 .
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Page 4-A-4(10-97)
TYPE
The Type parameter identifies the voice and signaling requirements for the incoming
circuit. The options are v (voice), v&s voice and (signaling) and trnsp (transparent).
The v setting is used when the input to the ADPCM channel is a 64Kbps channel and
inband signaling is not required. The v&s setting is used when the input to the ADPCM
channel is a 64Kbps voice channel and the ADPCM card must provide inband
signaling.
The trnsp setting allows the user to map the output of SRU ports to the ADPCM
channel. Sub-Rate Data will be clocked into the ADPCM channel at an input rate equal
to 24Kbps and then passed transparently (non-compressed) through the ADPCM card to
the appropriate WAN timeslot. This could be useful when the user has an odd number
of voice channels and wants to utilize the empty engine pair of the last ADPCM
channel.
B channel traffic from the BRI card also uses the trnsp Type setting but is not restricted
in its compression rates.
If the engine is assigned from a voice card, this selection will show v&s. If assigned by
an SRU or BRI card, it will show trnsp . It cannot be changed from this screen.
RATE
The Rate parameter identifies the compression requirements for the incoming circuit.
The options are 24K, 32K and 40K (the pair of engines must be equal to 64Kbps).
If this engine is assigned from a user card port, the selection will show the value that
was chosen on that port. It cannot be changed from this screen.
SIG MODE
The Signal Mode parameter identifies the type of signaling required for the incoming
circuit. If v&s was chosen in the Type setting, the options are e&m, fxs, plar and fxo. If
v or trnsp were chosen in the Type setting, the only option is n/a.
If this engine is assigned from a user card, the selections are uX-1 through uX-8. The
default is n/a.
CODING
The Coding parameter identifies the PCM format required for the incoming circuit. The
choices are u-law or a-inv .
If this engine is assigned from a voice or BRI card, this selection will show the value
that was selected for that port. If this engine is assigned from an SRU card, this
selection will show u-law . It cannot be changed from this screen.
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(10-97) Page 4-A-5
TC CGA
The Trunk Conditioning CGA parameter identifies the type of trunk conditioning
required for the incoming circuit. If v&s were chosen in the Type setting, the options
are idle or busy. If trnsp or v was chosen in the Type setting, the only option is n/a.
If this engine is assigned from a voice card, this selection will show the value that was
selected on the voice card port. If assigned from an SRU or BRI card port, the field will
show n/a. It cannot be changed from this screen.
Menu of Actions
Table ADPCM-3 shows the Menu of Actions for the ADPCM Card.
Table ADPCM-3. The ADPCM Card Screen Menu of Actions
Action Function
Save Saves changes to settings.
Undo Returns all settings to the last saved state.
Refresh Updates certain time-related information fields that are not
automatically updated (i.e. performance and test data).
<Scroll to the left
>Scroll to the right
sWitch Switches an active ADPCM card to its redundant mate.
Main Returns to the main screen. If changes are made to settings and not
saved, you will be prompted to save or lose changes.
ADPCM Card Reference Guide v3.6
Page 4-A-6(10-97)
Reference Guide v3.6 WAN Card
(10-97) Page 5-A-1
Introduction
This section discusses the WAN cards and the plug-in modules that define their
communications functions. It covers physical configuration of the plug-in modules and
their installation as well as the software configuration, monitoring and testing of the
cards after installation.
WAN cards manage the flow of data through your network. They are also the point of
T1/E1 termination and generate or receive clocking. Both CSU and DSX modules are
used to connect to T1 facilities operating at 1.544 Mbps. The CEPT module is used
internationally for connection to a 2.048 Mbps E1 facility.
WAN cards equipped with CSU or DSX modules will also act as the "near end"
termination point for Subscriber Loop Carrier (SLC96) facilities as outlined in
publication TR-TSY-000008, Issue 2, August 1987.
Additional information about WAN card functions is included in the Installation
chapter, System Operations chapter and Redundancy chapter.
811 DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module
The DSX/CEPT plug-in module supports either DSX or CEPT modes. It is mounted on
the WAN Card. DSX is a T1 operation and CEPT is an E1 operation. Jumper settings
on the module specify DSX or CEPT operation. Information about installing the
module and changing jumper settings is included in this chapter.
812 CSU Plug-in Module
The CSU plug-in module is required for Channel Service Unit (CSU) operation in a T1
environment. Like the 811, it is mounted on the WAN Card.
820 HDSL E1 Plug-in Module
The HDSL E1(High-bit-rate Digital Subscriber Line) module is a plug-in for the 8011
HDSL E1 WAN card. It provides transport for E1 rate (2.048 mbps) data over copper
cable without mid-span repeaters or conditioning.
8000 Single T1/E1 Link Card
The single T1/E1 Link Card is the basic WAN Card. It has a single port for DSX/CEPT
or CSU operation.
8010 Dual T1/E1 Link Card
The dual T1/E1 Link Card has two ports for either DSX/CEPT or CSU operation or a
combination of the two. The Dual T1/E1 Link Card will work with only one plug-in
module as long as the WAN port without the plug-in module remains in the standby
state. However, a CGA_RED alarm will be generated for that port.
WAN Card Reference Guide v3.6
Page 5-A-2(10-97)
8014 Dual T1/E1 Link Card (with Relays)
In Cross-Connect systems, the dual T1/E1 Link Card (with relays), when placed in slot
W-4, acts as a redundant card for up to three standard WAN Cards located in slots W-1,
W-2 and W-3. This is known as 1xN redundancy. The relay module on this card will
switch its output to the correct pins on the WAN connector on the Interface Card. If
placed in any other slot, it will behave like an ordinary WAN card.
Note: If the plug-ins of the Model 8014 installed in slot w4 do not match those of a
WAN card in slot w1, w2 or w3, then it cannot act as that card’s redundant mate.
8011 HDSL E1 WAN Card
The 8011 HDSL E1 WAN Card is a dual-port card that provides HDSL services by
incorporating the 820 HDSL E1 plug-in module.
Reference Guide v3.6WAN Card
(10-97) Page 5-A-3
811 WAN Module
When installing the 811 CSU/DSX module on the 8000 WAN or 8010 WAN, there are
situations in which the plastic standoffs do not allow the module to seat correctly on the
WAN board (see Figure WAN-1).
TOP VIEW
HOLES for Plastic Standoffs
Side View
Remove all plastic standoffs
Figure WAN-1. Removal of Plastic Standoffs - 811 WAN Module
When assembling and installing the module on the WAN card, it is our advice that the
plastic standoffs be removed to eliminate the possibility of errors on the associated
T1 or E1 lines. For this reason, the plastic standoffs are no longer being supplied by
the manufacturer for new WAN modules.
WAN Card Reference Guide v3.6
Page 5-A-4(10-97)
Configuring the DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module (811) Rev E1+
The Model 811 DSX/CEPT Revision E1+ plug-in module (see Figure WAN-2 and
WAN-3) provides jumper settings for impedance compensation. The 811 offers either
T1 or E1 (75 or 120 operation). To configure the 811, change the jumper positions
on the pins according to Figures WAN-4 through WAN-6. The unit is shipped as
shown in Figure WAN-4.
Jumpers
Figure WAN-2. 811 DSX/CEPT Module (Top View)
Figure WAN-3. 811 DSX/CEPT Module (End View)
Figure WAN-4. Jumper Settings for T1 Operation
Figure WAN-5. Jumper Settings for E1 (75Ω75Ω)
Figure WAN-6. Jumper Settings for E1 (120Ω120Ω)
Reference Guide v3.6WAN Card
(10-97) Page 5-A-5
Configuring the DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module (811) Rev A1-D1
The Model 811 DSX/CEPT Revision A1-D1 plug-in module (see Figure WAN-7 and
WAN-8) provides jumper settings for impedance compensation. The 811 offers either
T1 or E1 (75 or 120 operation). To configure the 811, change the jumper positions
on the pins according to Figures WAN-9 through WAN-11. The unit is shipped as
shown in Figure WAN-9.
Jumpers
Figure WAN-7. 811 DSX/CEPT Module (Top View)
Figure WAN-8. 811 DSX/CEPT Module (End View)
Figure WAN-9. Jumper Settings for T1 Operation
Figure WAN-10. Jumper Settings for E1 (75Ω75Ω)
Figure WAN-11. Jumper Settings for E1 (120Ω120Ω)
WAN Card Reference Guide v3.6
Page 5-A-6(10-97)
Configuring the DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module 811-F
Jumpers
set to
E1-75
811-F
Figure WAN-12. 811 DSX/CEPT Module (Top View)
The DSX/CEPT 811-F module is shown above in Figure WAN-12. This module may
be optioned for T1, E1/120 Ohms or E1/75 Ohms. The specific jumper option
configuration is shown on the card itself. The jumpers shown on this graphic are set to
E1/75 Ohms.
Reference Guide v3.6WAN Card
(10-97) Page 5-A-7
Setting Jumpers for Balanced/Unbalanced E1 Operation
E1 links can be set either to be balanced or unbalanced by setting jumpers on the
DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module (811) or the 1183 external distribution panel, or both. (See
Table WAN-1 for information on which revisions of the DSX/CEPT Plug-in Module
have jumpers.) The 1183 and 118320 connector block mounts in place of the cover on
the 8916 and 891620 front-loading chassis (see Figure WAN-13) and connects to the
Interface Card via a 50-pin cable. Each BNC connector has its own jumper. The 1184
connector block mounts on the 8918xx chassis.
Table WAN-1.
Selectability of Bal/Unbal jumpers on the DSX/CEPT module (by revision)
Revision ØØ
ÚÚ DSX/CEPT Module ABC D EF
811 Yes Yes n/a Yes No No
81120 No No n/a n/a n/a n/a
10193
UNBAL BAL
RX
Options on the Rear
UNBAL BAL
RX
Rx TX
Rx TX
Rx TX
Rx TX
Rx
TX
Rx
TX
Rx
TX
Rx
TX
Figure WAN-13. 1183 E1 Interface Adapter
Balanced Operation
For balanced E1 operation, the jumpers on both the 1183 panel and each DSX/CEPT
Plug-in Module should be set to "balanced" prior to installation.
Unbalanced Operation
For unbalanced E1 operation, the jumpers should be set to "unbalanced" in one location
only, and set to "balanced" in all other cases. When multiple cards with jumpers are
installed, the unbalanced jumper should be set on the card nearest the E1 line.
When the 1183 or 1184 panel is present, it is considered nearest to the E1 line, and the
corresponding jumper on the rear of the panel would be set to "unbalanced" while all
other module jumpers would be set to "balanced."
WAN Card Reference Guide v3.6
Page 5-A-8(10-97)
Installing CSU, DSX/CEPT Modules (811, 812, 820)
Plug-in modules used to activate WAN cards must be installed prior to insertion of the
WAN card into the unit. Figure WAN-13 shows a diagram of the WAN card and the
correct placement of these modules. If, for example, your system had a T1 link (DSX)
and an E1 link (CEPT), you would receive two DSX/CEPT modules. Using Figure
WAN-14 as a guide, place the DSX module in the slot reserved for WAN 1-1 (reference
only, not shown this way on actual card). Insert the pins for TX in JP #10, while
simultaneously inserting the pins for RX in JP #9 and the 24-pin end connector pins in
JP #6. After changing the jumpers to convert the DSX module to CEPT, place the
CEPT module in the slot reserved for WAN 1-2. Insert the TX pins into JP #15, the RX
pins into JP #14, and the 24-pin end connector pins into JP #13.
The CSU module connectors are inserted in the same manner.
Retaining
Power
Bus
Edge
Connector
XILINX
XILINX
JP6
JP10
JP9
JP13
JP14
JP15
(WAN 1-1)
(WAN 1-2)
Figure WAN-14. Inserting DSX/CEPT/CSU Modules
WAN Card Settings for CSU/DSX
Since both CSU and DSX configurations are T1 operations, Figure WAN-15 shows the
WAN card screen for CSU/DSX operation. Table WAN-2 lists the CSU/DSX settings
controlled on the screen along with their possible and default values. For information
about cross-connects and the timeslot map used to connect your WAN to voice and data
ports or equipment, see the System Operations chapter.
Reference Guide v3.6WAN Card
(10-97) Page 5-A-9
In addition to the Local and Line Loopbacks described below, a Single or Dual Link
card that is equipped with a CSU plug-in module will recognize and respond to
industry-standard T1 loop-up and loop-down codes that are generated from the network
or from a remote device. It will ignore those codes if the Single or Dual Link card is
equipped with a DSX plug-in module.
Node_1 | W1 CSU+DSX 8010 Rev A6-2 Ser 00101 | 12-31-99
14:33
CSU DSX
STATE stdby STATE stdby
MODE xcon MODE xcon
FORMAT esf FORMAT esf