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3174 Establishment Controller/Networking Server
Installation Guide

Document Number GG24-3061-05

November 1994

International Technical Support Organization
Raleigh Center

Take Note!
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general information under
“Special Notices” on page xxix.

Sixth Edition (November 1994)
This edition applies to:
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed
Licensed

Internal
Internal
Internal
Internal
Internal
Internal
Internal
Internal

Code
Code
Code
Code
Code
Code
Code
Code

Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration
Configuration

Support-A
Support-S
Support-B
Support-C
Support-C
Support-C
Support-C
Support-C

Release
Release
Release
Release
Release
Release
Release
Release

5
5
4
1
2
3
4
5

for use with the IBM 3174 Establishment Controller.
Order publications through your IBM representative or the IBM branch office serving your locality. Publications
are not stocked at the address given below.
An ITSO Technical Bulletin Evaluation Form for readers′ feedback appears facing Chapter 1. If the form has been
removed, comments may be addressed to:
IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization
Dept. 545, Building 657
P.O. Box 12195
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709
When you send information to IBM, you grant IBM a non-exclusive right to use or distribute the information in any
way it believes appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.
 Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1986, 1994. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users — Documentation related to restricted rights — Use, duplication or disclosure is
subject to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.

Abstract

The 3174 Establishment Controller is an important component in multi-protocol
networks involving subarea SNA, Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking, Peer
Communication, Token-Ring and Ethernet LAN, X.25, Frame Relay, Integrated
Services Digital Network, asynchronous communication, and TCP/IP.
In addition, it offers significant functions such as local format storage, dynamic
definition of dependent LUs, ESCON attachment, network management, end-user
productivity enhancements, and multi-host connectivity through single link
multi-host and multiple upstream physical attachments. Using the Multiple
Logical Terminal capability, a user can access multiple host sessions from one
terminal.
This document describes the 3174 features and functions, with emphasis on their
installation, customization, and operation. It is intended for systems engineers
and customer personnel who are installing the 3174. A knowledge of the 3270
Information Display System is assumed.

(832 pages)

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

iii

iv

3174 Installation Guide

Contents
Abstract

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Special Notices
Preface

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Acknowledgments

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xxxix
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Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174
. . . . .
1.1 Brief History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1.1.1 3271/2 Controller
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1.1.2 3274 Control Unit
. . . .
1.1.3 3174 Subsystem Control Unit
1.1.4 3174 Establishment Controller . . . .
1.2 3174 Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
1.3 Attachment Description
1.3.1 Host Attachment . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.2 Terminal Attachment . . . . . . . . .
1.3.3 Multiplexer Configurations . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
1.3.4 IBM Cabling System
1.4 3174 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4.1 Hardware Features . . . . . . . . . .
1.4.2 Microcode Features . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
1.4.3 Licensed Internal Code (LIC)
. . . . . .
1.4.4 Microcode Specify Codes
1.4.5 Microcode RPQs . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.5 Communication Network Management .
. . . . . . .
1.6 Personal Computer Support
1.6.1 3270 Emulation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1.6.2 File Transfer
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1.7 Language Support
.
1.7.1 National Language Support (NLS)
1.7.2 Country Extended Code Page (CECP)
Chapter 2. Installation Planning
.
. . . . . . . .
2.1 Host Attachment
2.1.1 Local Channel . . . . . . .
2.1.2 Remote TP Link . . . . . .
2.1.3 LAN Upstream . . . . . . .
. .
2.2 3270 Terminal Attachment
2.3 ASCII Terminal Attachment . .
2.4 Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5 Planning For Controller Storage
. . . . . .
2.6 Physical Installation
2.6.1 CSU Installation . . . . . .
. . .
2.6.2 9309 Rack Enclosure
2.7 Customization . . . . . . . . . .

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

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Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related International Technical Support Organization Publications
Other Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Chapter 3. Microcode Customization
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3.1 Microcode Release Differences
3.2 3174 Diskettes Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Planning for Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.1 Planning to Configure/Reconfigure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3.2 Planning for Common SNA
3.3.3 Planning for LAN Gateway (Token-Ring Gateway or Ethernet
Gateway) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3.4 Planning for X.25
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3.3.5 Planning for X.25 Token-Ring Gateway (RPQ 8Q0743)
3.3.6 Planning for ISDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3.7 Planning for APPN
3.3.8 Planning for Peer Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3.9 Planning for AEA
3.3.10 Planning for TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3.11 Planning for Frame Relay Communication
3.3.12 Planning for Multi-Host Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3.13 Planning for Port Assignment
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3.3.14 Planning for Response Time Monitor (RTM)
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3.3.15 Planning for PAM
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3.3.16 Planning to Modify Keyboard
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3.3.17 Planning to Copy Files
3.3.18 Planning for Merge Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3.19 Planning for Microcode Upgrade
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3.3.20 Planning for Central Site Change Management
3.3.21 Planning for Encrypt/Decrypt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.4 Customizing Procedures
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3.5 How to Use the Patch Procedure
3.6 How to Display the Online Test Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.7 Using CSCF to View Configuration Data

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Chapter 4. LAN Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
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4.1 Token-Ring Concepts
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.2 Ethernet Concepts
4.3 LAN Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
4.4 LAN Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
4.4.1 Example Address Convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
4.4.2 Getting the 3174 LAN Universal Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.5 3174 Gateways
4.5.1 Advantages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.5.2 Multi-Host Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
4.5.3 Ring Error Monitor or Token-Ring Error Alert for Token-Ring Gateway 79
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
4.5.4 Gateway LAN Adapters
4.5.5 Gateway Microcode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
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4.5.6 Gateway Storage
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4.5.7 Devices Supported
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
4.5.8 Host Software Required
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4.6 3174 Local Gateway
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4.6.1 System Definitions
4.6.2 3174 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
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4.6.3 Definitions Overview
4.7 3174 Remote Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
4.7.1 Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
4.7.2 Implementing Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
4.7.3 3174 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

vi

3174 Installation Guide

4.7.4 Definitions Overview
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4.7.5 3174 Remote Gateway Performance . . . .
4.7.6 NCP Tuning Parameters . . . . . . . . . . .
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4.7.7 Group Poll
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4.7.8 Host Software Planning
4.7.9 Data Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8 Gateway Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4.8.1 3174 Problem Determination Aids
4.9 Gateway Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. .
4.10 PC/3270 Attachment to 3174-11L Gateway
4.10.1 Configuring PC/3270 for LAN Attachment
4.10.2 Customizing the 3174-11L Gateway . . . .
4.10.3 VTAM Definitions (Gateway/Workstation)
4.11 3174 DSPU: Models x3R and x4R . . . . . . . .
4.11.1 Hardware Installation . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.11.2 Microcode Required . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4.11.3 Storage Required
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4.11.4 3174 Customization
4.11.5 3174 DSPU with 37xx Gateway . . . . . . .
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4.12 Backup and Recovery
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4.12.1 3174 Local Gateway
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4.12.2 Planning for Backup/Recovery
4.12.3 Recovery Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4.12.4 3174 Remote Gateway
4.12.5 Disconnecting/Reconnecting from the LAN
4.12.6 At IML Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 5. X.25 Support
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5.1 3174 Implementation . . . .
5.2 Planning for X.25 . . . . . .
5.2.1 Preparing to Customize
5.3 3174 Customization . . . . .
5.4 Operating Procedures . . .
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5.4.1 Keyboard Mapping
5.4.2 PVC Operations . . . .
5.4.3 SVC Operations . . . .
5.4.4 Dial Screen . . . . . . .
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5.5 Packet Types
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5.6 Test Scenarios
5.6.1 3174 as a PVC . . . . .
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5.6.2 3174 as an SVC

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Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ
6.1 Hardware/Software Requirements . .
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6.1.1 3174 Requirements
6.1.2 Diskettes installation . . . . . . .
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6.1.3 3174 Models Supported
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6.1.4 3174 Controller Storage
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6.2 Simultaneous Connections
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6.3 Bridge Protocol Considerations
6.4 Token-Ring PU 2.0 Devices . . . . . .
6.5 Token-Ring Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.6 X.25 PU 2.0 Devices
6.7 X.25 Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.8 Host Link Protocols . . . . . . . . . . .

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Contents

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6.9 X.25 Network Type Supported
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6.10 Functional Description
6.10.1 QLLC Secondary Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.10.2 QLLC Primary Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.10.3 QLLC Combined Gateway
6.11 Identifying Connecting Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.12 Connection Identifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.13 Types of Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.13.1 Default Connection
6.13.2 Demand Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.13.3 Open Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.14 3174 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.14.1 Configure Panel Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.14.2 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway Panel Flow
6.14.3 Microcode Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.14.4 Central Site Change Management
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6.15 Scenario 1: Open Connection (from Token-Ring Device Only)
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6.15.1 Description
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6.15.2 Definitions Overview
6.15.3 3174-11R Gateway Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.15.4 VTAM Definition for 3174-11R Gateway
6.15.5 VTAM Definition for PS/2 (PC/3270) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.15.6 NCP/NPSI Definition for 3745 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.15.7 PS/2 PC/3270 Configuration
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6.15.8 Connection Initiation (from Token-Ring Device Only)
6.16 Scenario 2: Default Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.16.1 Description
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6.16.2 Definitions Overview
6.16.3 3174-11R Gateway Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.16.4 3174-13R Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.16.5 VTAM Definition For 3174-13R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.16.6 Other Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.16.7 Connection Initiation from Token-Ring Device
6.16.8 Connection Initiation from X.25 Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.17 Scenario 3: Open Connection (from X.25 Device Only) . . . . . . . .
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6.17.1 Description
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6.17.2 Definitions Overview
6.17.3 3174-11L Gateway Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.17.4 3174-11R Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.17.5 VTAM Definitions for 3174-11L Gateway And 3174-11R
6.17.6 Connection Initiation (from X.25 Device Only) . . . . . . . . . . .
6.18 Scenario 4: Open Connection (from Token-Ring and X.25 Devices)
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6.18.1 Description
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6.18.2 Definitions Overview
6.18.3 3174-11L Gateway Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.18.4 3174-11R Gateway Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.18.5 PS/2 (PC/3270) Configuration
6.18.6 VTAM Definitions for 3174-11L Gateway, 3174-11R Gateway And
PS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)
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7.1 Introduction
7.2 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3 Storage Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4 Disk Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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7.5 Adapter Installation
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7.6 Network Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.7 Configuration Support-B Release 2 AEA Enhancements
7.8 Configuration Support-C Release 2 AEA Enhancements
7.9 Configuration Support-C Release 5 AEA Enhancements
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7.10 AEA Connectivity
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7.10.1 ASCII Host Support
7.10.2 3270 Host Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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7.10.3 AEA Downstream Support
7.10.4 Supported 3270 Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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7.10.5 Supported 3270 Printers
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7.10.6 Supported ASCII Displays
7.10.7 Supported ASCII Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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7.10.8 Supported Modems
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7.10.9 ASCII Attachment Cabling
7.11 AEA Example Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.12 3174 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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7.12.1 AEA Customizing Terminology
7.12.2 AEA Customizing Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . .
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7.12.3 AEA Customizing Flowchart
7.12.4 AEA Customizing Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.12.5 AEA Default Destination Panel . . . . . . . . . . . .
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7.13 User-Defined Tables
7.13.1 User-Defined Terminal Table (UDT) . . . . . . . . .
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7.13.2 User-Defined Translate Table (UDX)
7.14 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.14.1 Keyboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.14.2 ASCII Operator Information Area . . . . . . . . . .
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7.15 Printing in an AEA Environment
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7.15.1 3270 Printer Emulation
7.15.2 ASCII Printer Emulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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7.15.3 Local Copying
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7.16 ASCII Graphics Support
7.17 ASCII Plotter Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.18 AEA Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 8. ESCON Connection
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8.1 ESCON Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2 3174 ESCON Models . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3 Hardware/Software Requirements . . .
8.4 APPN/APPC for ESCON . . . . . . . . .
8.5 Peer Communication for ESCON Models
8.6 Connectivity Options . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7 MVS MCS Console Support . . . . . . .
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8.8 8 KB RU Size
8.9 3174 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . .
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8.10 Customization Example

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Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity . . . . . . . . .
9.1 Multiple Logical Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1.1 Supported 3270 Hosts via Primary Adapter
9.1.2 Supported 3270 Hosts via CCA . . . . . .
9.1.3 Supported ASCII Hosts . . . . . . . . . . .
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9.1.4 Supported Devices
9.1.5 MLT Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Contents

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9.1.6 Programmed Symbols (PS) Considerations
9.1.7 3174 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1.8 Change Screen Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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9.1.9 Display Model ID
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9.1.10 Session Integration
9.1.11 Local Copy Considerations . . . . . . . . .
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9.2 Concurrent Communication Adapter (CCA)
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9.2.1 Supported Devices
9.3 Single Link Multi-Host Support . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.1 SLMH Via LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.2 SLMH With CCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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9.3.3 SLMH with AEA
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9.3.4 SLMH LAN Gateway
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9.3.5 SLMH with ESCON
9.3.6 SLMH Gateway with ESCON . . . . . . . . .
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9.3.7 SLMH with X.25 or Frame Relay
9.3.8 Multiple Connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4 3174 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples
10.1 Example 1: Remote 3174 . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2 Example 2: Local 3174 with CCA . . . . . . .
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10.3 Example 3: SLMH via Token-Ring
10.4 Example 4: SLMH with CCA . . . . . . . . . .
10.5 Example 5: SLMH Token-Ring Gateway . . .
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10.6 Example 6: SLMH Gateway with ESCON
10.7 Example 7: SLMH with X.25 . . . . . . . . . .
10.8 Example 8: 3174 with AEA . . . . . . . . . . .
10.9 Example 9: SLNM with Frame Relay . . . . .

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Chapter 11. Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)
11.1 Host Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2 3174 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.1 3174 Models Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.2 3174 Microcode Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . .
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11.3 Functional Description
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11.4 VTAM Major Node Types
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11.5 DDDLU Supported Devices
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11.5.1 3270 Devices
11.5.2 Personal Communications/3270 Support . . . . . .
11.6 DDDLU Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.7 3174 PU Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.8 LUGROUP Major Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.9 SDDLU Exit Routine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.10 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.10.1 Display LUGROUP Major Node . . . . . . . . . . .
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11.10.2 Display PU Major Node
11.10.3 Display Dynamically Defined LU . . . . . . . . . .
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11.11 Performance
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11.12 3174 Customization
Chapter 12. Local Format Storage
12.1 LFS without UltraOpt/VTAM
12.1.1 Implementing LFS . . .
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12.1.2 Creating Formats

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12.1.4 Presenting Formats
12.1.5 Other LFS Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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12.1.6 Operator-Selected Formats
12.1.7 Multi-Host Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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12.1.8 3174 Customization
12.1.9 Storage Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.1.10 Exception/Status Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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12.1.11 SNA Sense Codes
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12.1.12 Response Times
12.2 LFS with UltraOpt/VTAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.1 Performance Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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12.2.2 Benefits
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12.2.3 Functional Description
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12.2.4 The Optimizer
12.2.5 The Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.6 Converting from CICS-based to UltraOpt/VTAM-based LFS
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12.2.7 Implementing UltraOpt/VTAM
12.2.8 3174 Storage Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.9 Supported Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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12.2.10 Implementation Steps
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12.2.11 30-Day-Plus Free Trial Program
Chapter 13. Network Management . . . . . . . . .
13.1 Central Site Control Facility . . . . . . . . . .
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13.1.1 NetView Requirements
13.1.2 Using CSCF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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13.1.3 3174 Customization
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13.2 Network Asset Management
13.2.1 Vital Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.2.2 User-Definable Data . . . . . . . . . . . .
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13.2.3 Extended VPD
13.3 Using Network Asset Management Effectively

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Chapter 14. Configuration Support-C Release 2 . . . . . .
14.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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14.2 End-User Productivity Enhancements
14.2.1 Split Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.2.2 Copy from Session to Session . . . . . . . . . . .
14.2.3 HAP Sharing for Local Copy . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.2.4 Local Print Buffering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.2.5 Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.2.6 Token-Ring T1 Timer/Retry Count . . . . . . . . .
14.2.7 5250 Keyboard Emulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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14.2.8 132-Column Support via AEA
14.2.9 Entry Assist Support for ASCII . . . . . . . . . . .
14.2.10 CSCF IML Password Suppression . . . . . . . .
14.3 Telephone Twisted-Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter
Chapter 15. Configuration Support-C Release 3
15.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15.2 APPN Enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . .
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15.3 TCP/IP Telnet Support
15.3.1 Supported TCP/IP Protocols . . . . .
15.3.2 TCP/IP Telnet Terminal Support . . .

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15.3.3 Benefits of 3174 TCP/IP Telnet Support
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15.4 Concurrent communication Adapter (CCA) Support . . . . . .
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15.5 Host Addressable Printer (HAP) Assignment
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15.6 Calculator Function Enhancements
15.7 3174 Peer Communication Improvements . . . . . . . . . . . .
15.8 Benefits of Configuration Support-C Release 3 Enhancements
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15.9 Configuration Support-C Release 3 Limitations

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Chapter 16. Configuration Support-C Release 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16.2 Configuration Support-C Release 4 Enhancements . . . . . . . . .
16.2.1 Benefits of Configuration Support-C Release 4 Enhancements
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16.3 TCP/IP Enhancements RPQ (8Q1041)
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16.3.1 Benefits of TCP/IP Enhancement RPQ (8Q1041)
16.4 Open Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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16.5 Configuration Support-C Release 4 Limitations
Chapter 17. Configuration Support-C Release 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.2 3174 Frame Relay Communications (Feature 7020/7070) . . . . . .
17.2.1 Benefits of Configuration Support-C Release 5 Frame Relay
Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.3 New Extensions to the APPN Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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17.3.1 Benefits of APPN Enhancements
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17.4 Other Configuration Support-C Release 5 Enhancements
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17.4.1 Speed of WAN communications up to 256 Kbps
17.4.2 ASCII Multiple Host Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.4.3 Printer MLT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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17.4.4 Enhanced 5250 Emulation Support
17.4.5 Multiple CECP Language Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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17.4.6 PS/55 -- 3174 Printer Sharing
17.4.7 Benefits of Configuration Support-C Release 5 Enhancements
17.5 Configuration Support-C Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 18. APPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.1 Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.2 An APPN Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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18.3 LEN End Nodes
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18.4 APPN End Nodes
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18.5 APPN Network Nodes
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18.6 APPN and Configuration Support-C
18.6.1 Configuration Support-C Release 1 . . . .
18.6.2 Configuration Support-C Release 2 . . . .
18.6.3 Configuration Support-C Release 3 . . . .
18.6.4 Configuration Support-C Release 4 . . . .
18.6.5 Configuration Support-C Release 5 . . . .
18.7 Functions and Level of Support in the 3174 NN
18.8 3174 APPN LIC Feature Connectivity . . . . . .
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18.8.1 Supported Links
18.8.2 Unsupported Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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18.8.3 3174 APPN Connectivity Summary
18.8.4 3174 Network Node Services . . . . . . . .
18.8.5 Wildcard Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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18.8.6 Shared T2.0/2.1 Link Support
18.8.7 Shared Link Customization Considerations

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18.8.8 Shared Link Customization Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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18.8.9 Connection Networks
18.8.10 Mode and Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.8.11 APPN LIC Compared With T2.1 Passthru Gateway RPQ 8Q0800
18.8.12 Central Site Change Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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18.8.13 Border Node Support
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18.9 3174 APPN and Peer Communication Combined
18.10 Interface Flows between APPN Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.10.1 APPN NNs Establishing CP-CP Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.10.2 APPN NN And APPN EN Establishing CP-CP Sessions . . . . .
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18.10.3 APPN Nodes Establishing an LU-LU Session
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18.11 Hardware/Software Requirements
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18.12 3174 Customization
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18.12.1 Master Menu
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18.12.2 Customize Control Disk Menu
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18.12.3 Model/Attach Panel
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18.12.4 Local (SNA)
18.12.5 SDLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.12.6 Common SNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.12.7 APPN Node Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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18.12.8 Network Resources Definition
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18.12.9 COS Definition

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Chapter 19. Peer Communication
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19.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 557
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19.2 3174-Peer Function
19.3 LAN Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560
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19.4 Bridge Function
19.5 LAN Manager Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 561
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19.6 Peer Communication Considerations
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19.7 3174 APPN and Peer Communication Combined
19.8 Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565
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19.9 Software
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19.10 3174 Customization
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19.10.1 Customize Control Disk Menu
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19.10.2 3174-Peer Definition
19.10.3 3174-Peer Bridge Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573
19.10.4 3174-Peer Bridge Profile Online Test Update . . . . . . . . . . . . 576
19.10.5 LAN Manager Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577
19.11 Peer Workstation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577
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19.12 DOS Support
19.12.1 Configuring NDIS for DOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578
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19.12.2 Packaging
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19.12.3 Compatibility with Novell NetWare
19.12.4 3174 Workstation Peer Communication Support Program (WPCSP) 580
19.12.5 PC/3270 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 582
19.13 OS/2 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583
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19.13.1 Configuring NDIS for OS/2
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19.13.2 Packaging
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19.13.3 Compatibility with Novell′s NetWare
19.14 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585
19.15 Extended Services (ES) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 586
19.15.1 ES Limitations/Coexistence With 3270 DFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 586
19.15.2 ES Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 587

Contents

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Chapter 20. Frame Relay Support
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20.1 Frame Relay Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20.1.1 Background of Frame Relay (FR) . . . . . . . . . .
20.1.2 Frame Relay Network Architecture . . . . . . . . .
20.1.3 Frame Relay Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20.2 3174 Frame Relay Communications (Feature 7020/7070)
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20.3 3174 Implementation
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20.3.1 Model Support
20.3.2 Physical Connection (Physical Layer or Layer 1) .
20.3.3 Adapter Type and Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20.3.4 Logical Connection (Data Link Layer or Layer 2) .
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20.3.5 Local Management Interface
20.3.6 Sample Frame Relay Configurations . . . . . . . .
20.4 3174 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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20.4.1 Definition for the Frame Relay Feature
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20.4.2 Defining the Optional DLCI Addresses
20.4.3 Updated 3174 Customization Panels . . . . . . . .
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20.4.4 Frame Relay Description for Host 1B - 1H
20.4.5 Mapping DLCI to SAP Addresses for the Gateway
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20.4.6 APPN Network Resources
20.4.7 Frame Relay Address in TCP/IP Options Menu . .
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20.4.8 Customization Panel Flow

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Chapter 21. TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.1 3174 TCP/IP Support
21.1.1 Support before RPQ 8Q0935 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.1.2 Support with RPQ 8Q0935/3174 TCP/IP Telnet Support
21.1.3 Support with 3174 TCP/IP Enhancement RPQ (8Q1041)
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21.1.4 Support with 3174 IP Forwarding RPQ (8Q1289)
21.2 TCP/IP Protocols Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.3 3174 Models Supported
21.3.1 Gateway 3174 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.3.2 DSPU 3174 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.4 Devices Supported
21.5 Hosts Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.6 Storage Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.6.1 Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.6.2 Data Buffers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.7 Adding 3174 to a TCP/IP Network
21.7.1 IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.7.2 Customizing IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.7.3 Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.7.4 Name Servers
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21.7.5 3174 Nicknames
21.7.6 How the 3174 TCP/IP TELNET Support Looks at Names
21.7.7 Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.8 Customizing 3174 TCP/IP Telnet Support . . . . . . . . . . .
21.8.1 Example Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.8.2 Panel Flow
21.8.3 Configure AEA and TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.8.4 Enabling AEA and TCP/IP
21.8.5 Defining Port Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.8.6 Mapping Port to Port Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.8.7 Defining 3270 Host and Display Station Sets
21.8.8 Defining TCP/IP Station Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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21.8.9 Defining Default Destinations
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21.8.10 Defining TCP/IP Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.8.11 Defining TCP/IP Routing Information
21.8.12 Defining Domain Name Services . . . . . . . . .
21.8.13 Defining TCP/IP Nicknames . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.8.14 Configure Complete
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21.8.15 LAN Considerations
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21.9 How to Use 3174 TCP/IP Telnet Support
21.10 Terminal Operation with 3174 TCP/IP Telnet Support
21.10.1 Opening a Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.10.2 Escaping to Local Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.10.3 Returning to the Connection Menu
21.10.4 Returning to the Telnet Session . . . . . . . . .
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21.10.5 Telnet Session Resources
21.10.6 Operation: Telnet to RS/6000 Host . . . . . . . .
21.10.7 Operation: Telnet to MVS TCP/IP Host . . . . .
21.10.8 Local Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.10.9 Special Considerations for ASCII Terminals . .
21.10.10 Special Considerations for 3270 Terminals . .
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21.11 If Things Go Wrong...
21.11.1 Online Test / 3,3,26 panel . . . . . . . . . . . .
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21.12 Data Flows

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Chapter 22. ISDN
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22.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.1.1 The ISDN Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.1.2 User Benefits Of ISDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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22.1.3 Additional Advantages
22.1.4 Other Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.1.5 Where the 3174 Fits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.2 Planning for ISDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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22.2.1 Connecting to an ISDN Port
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22.3 ISDN DSPUs Supported
22.4 ISDN Networks Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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22.5 3174 Models Supported
22.6 PS/2 Hardware/Software Requirements . . . . . . . . . .
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22.7 AS/400 Hardware/Software Requirements
22.8 3174 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.8.1 Relationship between Questions 104, 105, And 190
22.8.2 Changes to Questions 104, 105, And 190 . . . . . . .
22.8.3 More ISDN DSPUs Than Available Ports/Addresses
22.9 Example Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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22.9.1 Description
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22.9.2 Definitions Overview
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22.9.3 3174 Customization
22.9.4 VTAM Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.10 Configuring DOS PS/2 for ISDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.10.1 Configuring PC/3270 ISDN Enabler Program . . . .
22.10.2 Running ISDN Configurator . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.11 ISDN Configurator Parameters
22.11.1 Configuring ISDN Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.11.2 Configuring Local/Remote Directory Entries . . . .
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22.11.3 Configuring Adapter Models
22.11.4 Configuring B-Channel Protocol Profiles . . . . . .
22.12 Parameter Checklists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

633
634
636
637
639
639
640
640
642
642
642
643
644
644
644
646
646
654
655
656
657
658

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661
662
662
663
664
664
665
665
666
666
667
667
668
671
672
672
673
673
680
680
681
682
685
685
686
687
698
698
704
711
717
720

Contents

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22.12.1 Create Slot n Adapter Configuration Checklist
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22.12.2 Adapter Configuration − Advanced Options Checklist
22.12.3 D-Channel Options Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.12.4 Create Local Directory Entry Checklist . . . . . . . . .
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22.12.5 Create Advanced Local Directory Entry Checklist
22.12.6 Create Remote Directory Entry Checklist . . . . . . . .
22.12.7 Create Advanced Remote Directory Entry Checklist .
22.12.8 Create Adapter Model Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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22.12.9 Create Advanced Parameters Checklist
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22.12.10 Create D-channel Parameters Checklist
22.12.11 Create IDLC Profile Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Appendix A. 3174 Adapters
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A.1 IBM 3174 Large Controller Card and Adapter Functions
A.1.1 Processor Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.2 512K Storage Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.3 1MB Storage Card
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.4 2MB Storage Card
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A.1.5 4MB Storage Card
A.1.6 Disk Adapter (File Adapter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.7 Terminal Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.8 Port Expansion Feature
A.1.9 Terminal Multiplexer Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.10 Telephone Twisted-Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter . . . . . .
A.1.11 ISDN Gateway Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.12 Channel Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.13 ESCON Channel Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.14 Channel Interface Driver/Receiver Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.15 Type-1 Communications Adapter (V.24/V.35) . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . .
A.1.16 Type-1 Concurrent Communication Adapter (V.24/V.35)
A.1.17 Type-2 Communications Adapter (X.21) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
A.1.18 Type-2 Concurrent Communication Adapter (X.21)
A.1.19 Type-3 Communications Adapter (IBM Token Ring) . . . . . . . .
A.1.20 Type-3A Dual Speed Communications Adapter (IBM Token Ring)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.21 Ethernet Adapter
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.22 Asynchronous Emulation Adapter
A.1.23 Fiber-Optic Terminal Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.24 Encrypt/Decrypt Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2 IBM 3174 Medium Controller Feature Slots
. . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3 IBM 3174 Rack Mounted Controller Feature Slots
Appendix B. 3174 Features
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.1 3174 Model Comparison Summary
B.2 Old 3174 Feature Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.3 New 3174 Feature Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.4 Licensed Internal Code Functions - Configuration Support A, S, and B
. . . . .
B.5 Licensed Internal Code Functions - Configuration Support C
Appendix
C.1 3174
C.2 3174
C.3 3174
C.4 3174

C. 3174 Physical Specifications
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Large Cluster Models 11L, 12L, 11R, 12R, 13R, 14R, and 0xx
Rack Mounted Models 21L, 22L, 21R, 23R, and 24R . . . . .
Medium Cluster Models 61R, 62R, 63R, 64R, and 5xR . . . .
Small Cluster Models 90R, 91R, ,92R, and 8xR . . . . . . . .

Appendix D. 3174 Feature Slot Usage

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3174 Installation Guide

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720
721
722
722
723
724
724
725
726
727
728
729
729
729
729
730
730
730
730
731
731
732
732
732
733
733
733
734
734
734
735
735
735
736
736
736
737
738
738
739
739
741
742
743
745

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749
749
749
750
750

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751

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D.1 Slot Usage for Models 11L, 11R, 12L, 12R, 13R, and 14R
D.2 Slot Usage For Models 21H, 21L, 21R, 22L, 23R, and 24R
D.3 Slot Usage For Models 61R, 62R, 63R, and 64R . . . . .
Appendix E. 3174 Storage Requirements
. . . . . .
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E.1 For Configuration Support-A
E.1.1 MLT Weighting Factors . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.1.2 MLT Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.1.3 Determining Storage Requirements . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
E.2 For Configuration Support-S
E.2.1 MLT Weighting Factors . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.2 MLT Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.2.3 Determining Storage Requirements . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
E.3 For Configuration Support-B
E.3.1 MLT Weighting Factors . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.3.2 MLT Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.3.3 Determining Storage Requirements . . . .
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E.4 For Configuration Support-C
E.4.1 MLT Weighting Factors . . . . . . . . . . . .
E.4.2 Buffered Local Copy Print Weighting Factor
E.4.3 Copy Session To Session Weighting Factor
E.4.4 MLT Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
E.4.5 Determining Storage requirements
Appendix F. APARs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.1 VTAM APARs for Improved Channel Interface
. . . . . . . . . . . .
F.2 CICS and VM/SP APARs
F.3 NetView R3 APARs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F.4 NetView DM PTF Required for CSCM . . . . .
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F.5 APPN APARs
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F.6 AS/400 APARs

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Appendix G. VTAM/NCP Definition Examples
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G.1 Local 3174 Definitions (SNA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.2 Local 3174 Terminal Definition (Non-SNA) . . . . . . . . .
G.3 SDLC 3174 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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G.3.1 SDLC Group Specification for 3174
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G.3.2 Line Macro for SDLC 3174
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G.3.3 SDLC Service Macro Specifications Remote 3174
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G.3.4 3174 PU/LU Specifications for PU3174
G.4 X.25 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.4.1 Single-Host Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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G.4.2 Multi-Host Testing
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G.5 Definitions for 3174 LAN Models
G.5.1 VTAM Definitions for 3174 DSPU Attached via NTRI
G.5.2 NCP Definitions for 3174 DSPU . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.5.3 VTAM Definitions for 3174 Local Gateway and DSPUs
G.6 AS/400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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G.6.1 AS/400 Definitions for 3174-X3R DSPU
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G.6.2 AS/400 Controller and Device Descriptions
Appendix H. 3174 Workstation Networking Module
H.1 Introduction to 8250 HUB . . . . . . . . . . . . .
H.2 Workstation Networking Module Feature (#3174)
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H.3 Hardware Features

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Contents

751
753
753
755
755
755
756
756
757
757
758
758
760
760
762
762
768
768
770
771
771
771
779
779
779
780
780
780
781
783
783
784
785
785
785
785
786
787
787
790
793
793
794
795
798
798
798
799
799
800
801

xvii

Appendix I. Keyboard Layouts
.
. . .
I.1 Base Keyboard Layouts
I.2 Converged Keyboard Layouts
I.3 Enhanced Keyboard Layouts

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803
803
806
811

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815

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819

Appendix J. Abbreviations
Index

xviii

3174 Installation Guide

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Figures
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 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

3174 Microcode Release Diskette Label Information . . . . . . . . . .
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Ethernet CSMA/CD Bus
10Base5 Segment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Locally Administered Adapter Addresses
3174 Local Gateway Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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MVS 3174 Local Gateway Definitions
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VM Local Gateway Definitions
VM Local DSPU Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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VSE Local Gateway and DSPU Definitions
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Definitions Overview for 3174 Local Gateway
Physical Configuration of 3174 Remote Gateway and DSPUs . . . . .
Logical View of 3174 Gateway and DSPUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3174 Remote Gateway Configuration
Definitions Overview for 3174 LAN Remote Gateway . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Gateway Physical Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Gateway Logical View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Polling Sequence in a Group Poll Environment
Extract of NCP Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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DSPU Activation Data Flows
DSPU Deactivation Data Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Test Menu 1TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Logs Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3174 Event Log
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LAN Test Menu
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Token-Ring Status
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Ethernet Status
Token-Ring Adapter Status Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ethernet Adapter Status Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Link Status Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gateway Host Status Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Utilization with Gateway Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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PC/3270 Attachment to 3174-11L Gateway
Adv. Opt. for LAN Attachment via 802.2 Protocol Screen (DOS Mode)
LAN via IEEE 802.2 Link Parameters Window (Windows Mode) . . . .
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3174 Model Definition
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3174 Token-Ring Description
3174 Ethernet Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Local SNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Common Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 LAN Address Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 LAN Transmission Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local SNA Major Node Definition for 3174-11L . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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DSPU I-Frame Size and Maximum Out
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Test Configuration
Scenario 1: One Host with Two 3174 Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Scenario 2: Two Hosts with Two 3174 Gateways
Scenario 3: Two Hosts with Multiple 3174 Gateways . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 4: Two Hosts with Mixed Gateway Types . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 5: Alternate IML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 6: Single Link Multi-Host Support and CCA . . . . . . . . . .
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Scenario 7: Multi-Host LAN Gateway

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xix

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xx

3174 Installation Guide

Backup via a 3174-x3R/x4R with an Alternate Host Attachment
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Backup via Normal Gateway with CCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disconnecting/Reconnecting the LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Logical Channel Assignments
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X.25 Dial Screen for Configuration Support-A
X.25 Dial Screen for Configuration Support-B Release 3 and Later
Releases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Case A: X.25 Connection through TYMNET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Case B: X.25 Connection Using XI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Case A: Connecting through TYMNET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Case B: Connecting through XI, Using XI as a DCE . . . . . . . . . .
Multi-Host Configuration, Using NPSI as a DCE . . . . . . . . . . . .
Case A: Connecting through TYMNET (Outgoing Call) . . . . . . . .
Case B: Using XI (Incoming Call) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3174 Token-Ring Gateway (QLLC Secondary) to X.25
3174 QLLC Secondary Gateway: Physical Configuration . . . . . . .
3174 QLLC Secondary Gateway: Logical View . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 QLLC Primary Connecting to Token-Ring Hosts . . . . . . . . .
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3174 QLLC Primary Gateway: Physical Configuration
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3174 QLLC Primary Gateway: Logical View
3174 Combined QLLC Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Connection
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logical Views
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call Request Packet
Call User Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call User Data Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
Token-Ring Devices Address Assignment Panel
X.25 Devices Address Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X.25 Gateway Default/Open Connections Panel . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X.25 Gateway Bridge Parameters
X.25 Gateway Bridge Parameters for 3174 X.25 TRG with Peer . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X.25 Gateway Bridge Information Panel
. . .
Scenario 1: Open Connection (from Token-Ring Device Only)
Scenario 1: Definitions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 1: NCP/NPSI Definition for 3745 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 1: CONFIG.SYS File for PS/2 Using Peer Communication
Scenario 1: PROTOCOL.INI File for PS/2 Using Peer Communication
Scenario 1: CONFIG.SYS File for PS/2 Using Peer Communication
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 1: Attachment Types Screen
Scenario 1: Advanced Options for 3174 Peer Communication Screen
.
Scenario 1: Connection Initiation (from Token-Ring Device Only)
Scenario 2: Default Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 2: Definitions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 2: VTAM Definition for 3174-13R
Scenario 2: Connection Initiation from QLLC Secondary Gateway .
Scenario 2: Connection Initiation from NPSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
Scenario 3: Open Connection (From X.25 Device Only)
Scenario 3: Definitions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 3: VTAM Definitions for 3174-11L Gateway and 3174-11R .
Scenario 3: Connection Initiation (from X.25 Device Only) . . . . . .
Scenario 4: Open Connection (from Token-Ring and X.25 Devices)
Scenario 4: Definitions Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scenario 4: Attachment Types Screen
Scenario 4: Advanced Options for LAN Attachment Screen . . . . .
. . . . . . .
Scenario 4: CONFIG.SYS for PS/2 Using 802.2 Protocol

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Scenario 4: VTAM Definitions for 3174 Gateways and PS/2 . . . . . . .
Connectivity Summary for Asynchronous Emulation Adapter . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Physical View
AEA Customizing Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Configure Panel (Configuration Support-B Release 2 and Later
. . . . . . . . . . .
Releases up to Configuration Support-C Release 2)
AEA Configure Panel (Configuration Support-C Release 3 and Later) .
AEA Port Set Panel with Configuration Support-B Release 1 and Earlier
Releases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Port Set Panel for Configuration Support-B Release 2 and Later
Releases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Port to Port Set Map Panel (Configuration Support-B Release 3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
and Earlier Releases)
AEA Port to Port Set Map Panel (Configuration Support-B Release 4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
and Later Releases)
AEA Station Set Panel (Configuration Support-B Release 1 and Earlier
Releases) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Station Set Panel (Configuration Support-B Release 2 and Later
Releases) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Station Set Panel (Part 1 of 5)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Station Set Panel (Part 2 of 5)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Station Set Panel (Part 3 of 5)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Station Set Panel (Part 4 of 5)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Station Set Panel (Part 5 of 5)
AEA Default Destination Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Keys for 3270 Emulation on ASCII Keyboards . . . . . . . . . .
Printer Authorization Matrix Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 ESCON Connectivity
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ESCON Single Link Multi-Host
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Link Multi-Host Gateway
Addressing Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port Assignment Panel (3270 Ports)
Port Assignment Panel (AEA Ports) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Change Screen Key Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Model ID
3174 Multi-Host with Concurrent Communication Adapter . . . . . . . .
SLMH DSPU via LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SLMH with CCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SLMH with AEA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SLMH Gateway via LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SLMH with ESCON
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SLMH Gateway with ESCON
SLMH with X.25 or Frame Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Connectivity Example
Remote 3174 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local 3174 with CCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Link Multi-Host Connectivity
SLMH with CCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SLMH Token-Ring Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SLMH Gateway with ESCON
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X.25 Single Link Multi-Host
Remote 3174 with an AEA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Vital Product Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3270 Devices Supporting PSID Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figures

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xxii

3174 Installation Guide

DDDLU Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Local PU Definition for DDDLU
NCP PU and LU Definitions before DDDLU Support . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
NCP PU Definitions Modified to Support DDDLU
Example LUGROUP Major Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display LUGROUP Major Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display PU with Dynamically Defined LU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Dynamically Defined Dependent LU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance without UltraOpt/VTAM and Local Format Storage . . . .
Performance with UltraOpt/VTAM and Local Format Storage . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
NetView CSCF Display - 3174 Test Menu (Page 1)
. . . . . . . . . . . .
NetView CSCF Display - 3174 Test Menu (Page 2)
NetView CSCF Display - Log Event Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetView CSCF Display - 3174 Remote IML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using NPDA CTRL puname LVL Command
VPD Displayed Using 3174 Online Test 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetView Message Response for VPDCMD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using VPDCOLL CLIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
End User Productivity Functions Panel
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setup Screen after Steps 3-8 (WG-2)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setup Screen after Step 9 (WG-2)
Setup Screen after Steps 10-12 (WG-3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setup Screen after Step 13 (WG-3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LT-2 Display in Split Screen Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying and Pasting Data in Split Screen Mode
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HAP Sharing for Local Copy Test Scenario
Device Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PAM Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculator Fields in OIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
Configuration Support-C Release 2 New Station Types
Configuration Support-C Release 2 Cursor Class and Cursor Sequence
Configuration Support-C Release 2 Set Width Options . . . . . . . . . .
132-Column Logmode Entries Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TTP TMA Attachment to Terminals
TTP TMA Connectors and Pin Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
An APPN Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example of a Wildcard Routing to a Subarea Network . . . . . . . . . .
Another Example of a Wildcard Routing to a Subarea Network . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shared T2.0/2.1 Link Support Example
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shared T2.0/2.1 Link Example
Relating Definitions Used in a Connection Network . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
NS/2 Example Mode (QPCSUPP) Used for 5250 Emulation
Example of T2.1 RPQ and Configuration Support-C with APPN . . . . .
APPN and Peer Communication Combined: Logical View . . . . . . . .
APPN NNs Establishing Parallel CP-CP Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
APPN NN and APPN EN Establishing Parallel CP-CP Sessions . . . . .
APPN Nodes Establishing an LU-LU Session in a Connection Network
3174 Customization Panel Flow Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Customizing Master Menu
Customizing Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model/Attach Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local (SNA) Panel
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SDLC Panel
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common SNA Panel
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
APPN Node Definition Panel

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Links to Adjacent Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Qualifying the Network Resources for LEN-SSCP Connections . . . . .
Defining LUs to the 3174 Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
COS Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Correlating Mode Names with COS Table Names
. . . . . .
3174 Peer Communication Function: Physical Configuration
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Communication: Logical View
Peer Communication: Path for 3270 Host Communication . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bridge Profile
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bridge Information and Status
Segment Information and Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Combined APPN and Peer Communication Function: Logical View
Customizing Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Peer Communication Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . .
Format of 3174-Peer Device Address Assigned Automatically
3174-Peer Bridge Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
3174-Peer Bridge Parameters with Online Test Update
Sample CONFIG.SYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample PROTOCOL.INI
Peer Communication: Example CONFIG.SYS File . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Communication: PC/3270 Attachment Type
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Communication: Gateway Address
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LAPS - Configure Workstation
LAPS - Parameters for 3270 Adapter for 3174 Peer Communications .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frame Relay Network
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frame Relay Network Architecture
3174 Models vs. Protocols Supported over Frame Relay
Communication Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A PVC Represented by a Pair of DLCIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Talking to 3174s through a Public FR Network . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Talking to 6611s through a Private FR Network . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Talking to RXR/2 via a Leased Line, Using FR Protocol . . . . . .
Using 3174 in Frame Relay Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frame Relay Description Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frame Relay Optional DLCI Specification Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Frame Relay Customization Host Panel (Host 1A)
Frame Relay Panel for Host 1B - 1H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frame Relay Index Assignment Panel
Network Resources Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Frame Relay IP Address in TCP/IP Options Menu
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Frame Relay Customization Panel Flow
3174 TCP/IP IP Forwarding Example Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protocols Supported by 3174 TCP/IP Telnet Support . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Gateway Configurations with 3174 TCP/IP Telnet Support . . . . .
3174 DSPU Configuration with 3174 TCP/IP Telnet Support . . . . . . .
Classes of IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Resolving Name/Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Router Example
TCP/IP Router Example Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Example Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Customization Panel Flow
Define AEA and TCP/IP Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure AEA and TCP/IP Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA and TCP/IP Configure Panel
Figures

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xxiv

3174 Installation Guide

Port Set Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port to Port Set Map Panel (1 of 3)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port to Port Set Map Panel (2 of 3)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port to Port Set Map Panel (3 of 3)
AEA and TCP/IP Station Set Panel (1 of 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA and TCP/IP Station Set Panel (2 of 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA and TCP/IP Station Set Panel (3 of 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA and TCP/IP Station Set Panel (4 of 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA and TCP/IP Default Destination Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Options Menu
TCP/IP Routing Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Domain Name Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP 3174 Defined Nicknames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA and TCP/IP Configure Complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
Connection Menu Immediately after 3174 IMLed
. . . . . . . . . . .
Connection Menu after 3174 Becomes Active
Connection Menu after 3174 Becomes Active and Enter Pressed
TCP/IP Resources Not Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Connection to RS/6000 Host
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TELNET Local Mode
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS/6000 After Login
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS/6000 After Invoking SMIT
Logging on to MVS TSO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Using NAMES Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Using PING Command to Default Destination . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Using PING Command with Parameters . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Using PING Command - Help
TCP/IP Using PING Command - Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Using CLOSE Command
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Using STATUS Command
TCP/IP Using DISPLAY Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online Test /3,3,26
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP/IP Connection Establishment
ISDN Network Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Possible 3174 ISDN Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PS/2 and 3174 ISDN Connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Address Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Address Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISDN PUID Assignment Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISDN Adapter Definition Panel
ISDN Port Definition Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISDN Channel Definition Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example ISDN Scenario
ISDN Example Scenario Definitions Overview . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring PC/3270 ISDN Enabler Program . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adapter Configuration Edit Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Adapter Configuration Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adapter Configuration Advanced Options Panel . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
Adapter Configuration D-Channel Options Panel
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Directory Configuration Edit Panels
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Local Directory Entry Panel
Create Advanced Local Directory Entry Panel . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Remote Directory Entry Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
Create Advanced Remote Directory Entry Panel
Adapter Models Configuration Edit Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .
. . . .

625
626
627
627
628
630
632
633
633
634
636
637
639
639
640
641
641
644
645
645
645
646
646
647
648
648
648
649
650
651
652
657
659
663
665
670
672
673
675
676
678
679
680
681
686
698
699
700
703
704
705
706
707
709
711

318.
319.
320.
321.
322.
323.
324.
325.
326.
327.
328.
329.
330.
331.
332.
333.
334.
335.
336.
337.
338.

Create Adapter Model Panel
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Advanced Parameters Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create D-channel Parameters Panel
Protocol Profiles Configuration Edit Panels . . . . . . . . . . .
Create IDLC Profile Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
Configuration Support-A MLT Weighting Factors
Configuration Support-A Storage Requirements . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
Configuration Support-S MLT Weighting Factors
Configuration Support-S Storage Requirements . . . . . . . .
. . . . .
Table A: No Multi-Host Support (No SLMH or CCA)
Table B: Multi-Host Is Supported (SLMH and/or CCA) . . . .
Configuration Support-B Storage Requirements . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Gateway Storage Considerations
. . . .
Configuration Support-B Total Storage Requirements
. . . . .
Table A: No Multi-Host Support (No SLMH or CCA)
Table B: Multi-Host Is Supported (SLMH and/or CCA) . . . .
. .
Table 1: Configuration Support-C Storage Requirements
Table 2: 3174 Gateway/CCA Storage Considerations . . . . .
Table 3a: APPN Storage Requirements without X.25 . . . . .
Table 3b: APPN Storage Requirements with X.25 . . . . . . .
Table 4: Configuration Support-C Total Storage Requirements

. . . . .

712
713
716
717
718
755
756
757
759
761
761
763
766
767
769
769
772
776
777
777
778

Figures

xxv

. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .

xxvi

3174 Installation Guide

Tables
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

3174 Basic Machine Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Color/Highlighting Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Local Gateway IOCP Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
Default F and W Values Depending on Device Type
M a x i m u m Window Size Depending on M ax i m u m Transmit I-Frame Size
Relationship Between Packet Size, Max. PIU, and Number Of Packets
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PVC Disconnect Operation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SVC Disconnect Operation
Dial Screen Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 Models Supported By X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ . . . . . . .
3174 Additional Storage Required For X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default/Open Connection
AEA Modem Pin Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AEA Station Types
IBM and Hayes Modem Control Character Substitutes . . . . . . . . . .
MICOM Modem Control Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Sequence to Access Connection Menu
ASCII Control Codes Supported by 3287 Printers - ASCII Emulation . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetView PTFs Required for CSCF
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VPD Functions Supported on IBM Products
Keystroke Sequences for Split Screen Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Token-Ring T1 Timer Selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5250 Emulation Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Functions and Level of Support in the 3174 NN
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported Connectivity
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
APPN Additional Storage Requirements (KB)
APPN LIC Feature Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Communication Additional Storage Requirements (KB) . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Communication LIC Feature Numbers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174-Peer Online Test Updates Allowed
3174 TCP/IP TELNET Support Storage Requirements . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3174 ISDN Gateway Model Support
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISDN Gateway Model Support
Create Slot n Adapter Configuration Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adapter Configuration − Advanced Options Checklist . . . . . . . . . .
D-Channel Options Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Local Directory Entry Checklist
Create Advanced Local Directory Entry Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Remote Directory Entry Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . .
Create Advanced Remote Directory Entry Checklist
Create Adapter Model Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create Advanced Parameters Checklist
Create D-Channel Parameters Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Create IDLC Profile Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VTAM APARs for Improved Channel Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CICS and VM/SP APARs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetView R3 APARs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VTAM/NCP APARs for 3174 APPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OS/400 APARs for 3174 APPN

11
32
. 86
. 95
96
168
172
174
176
189
190
217
274
295
302
302
312
315
434
441
450
469
472
508
511
534
536
565
567
572
614
668
674
720
721
722
722
723
724
724
725
726
727
728
779
780
780
781
781

.
.

xxvii

xxviii

3174 Installation Guide

Special Notices
This publication is intended to help the customer to install and customize the
3174 Establishment Controller and its features. It contains an introduction to the
3174 and descriptions of most of the available features. Where possible, these
descriptions are supported by examples of working 3174 configurations. The
information in this publication is not intended as the specification of any
programming interfaces that are provided by the 3174 Establishment Controller.
See the PUBLICATIONS section of the IBM Programming Announcement for the
3174 Establishment Controller for more information about what publications are
considered to be product documentation.
References in this publication to IBM products, programs or services do not
imply that IBM intends to make these available in all countries in which IBM
operates. Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended
to state or imply that only IBM′s product, program, or service may be used. Any
functionally equivalent program that does not infringe any of IBM′s intellectual
property rights may be used instead of the IBM product, program or service.
Information in this book was developed in conjunction with use of the equipment
specified, and is limited in application to those specific hardware and software
products and levels.
IBM may have
this document.
these patents.
Licensing, IBM

patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter in
The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to
You can send license inquiries, in writing, to the IBM Director of
Corporation, 500 Columbus Avenue, Thornwood, NY 10594 USA.

The information contained in this document has not been submitted to any
formal IBM test and is distributed AS IS. The use of this information or the
implementation of any of these techniques is a customer responsibility and
depends on the customer′s ability to evaluate and integrate them into the
customer′s operational environment. While each item may have been reviewed
by IBM for accuracy in a specific situation, there is no guarantee that the same
or similar results will be obtained elsewhere. Customers attempting to adapt
these techniques to their own environments do so at their own risk.
Reference to PTF numbers that have not been released through the normal
distribution process does not imply general availability. The purpose of
including these reference numbers is to alert IBM customers to specific
information relative to the implementation of the PTF when it becomes available
to each customer according to the normal IBM PTF distribution process.

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

xxix

The following terms, which are denoted by an asterisk (*) in this publication, are
trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United
States and/or other countries:
Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking
AIX
APPN
AT
CICS OS/2
CICS/MVS
CICS/VSE
ES/4381
ES/9370
Enterprise Systems Connection Architecture
ESCON
First Failure Support Technology
GDDM
IBM
Micro Channel
MVS/SP
NetView
Operating System/400
OS/400
Personal Computer XT
PS/2
RISC System/6000
RT Personal Computer
S/390
System/370
Systems Application Architecture
SAA
VM/XA
VTAM
3090

xxx

3174 Installation Guide

ACF/VTAM
AIX/6000
AS/400
CICS
CICS/ESA
CICS/VM
ES/3090
ES/9000
ESA/370
ESA/390
ESCON XDF
FFST
InfoWindow
IBMLink
MVS/ESA
MVS/XA
Operating System/2
OS/2
Personal Computer AT
PC/XT
PROFS
RT
RT PC
System/360
System/390
SystemView
VM/ESA
VSE/ESA
XT
400

The following terms, which are denoted by a double asterisk (**) in this
publication, are trademarks of other companies:
Term Used

Trademark Of

ADDS Viewpoint A-2
ADDS Viewpoint 78
Dasher 210
DEC VT52
DEC VT100
DEC VT220
DEC VT240
DEC VT221
DEC VT340
DOS
Esprit Executive 10/78
Hayes 300, 1200, 1200B
Hazeltine 1500
Hewlett-Packard 2621B
IEEE
INTEL
Lear Siegler ADM 3A
Lear Siegler ADM 5
Lear Siegler ADM 11
Lear Siegler ADM 12
Lear Siegler ADM 1178
Micom 3012+ and 3024+
Microsoft
Minitel 1B
NDIS
Tektronix 4105
Tektronix 4205
Tektronix 4207/8/9
Telenet
Televideo 912
Televideo 970
UKPSS
UltraOpt/VTAM
UNIX
Windows
Wyse 50/60
X Windows
XEROX
3COM

Applied Digital Data Systems, Inc.
Applied Digital Data Systems, Inc.
Data General Corporation
Digital Equipment Corporation
Digital Equipment Corporation
Digital Equipment Corporation
Digital Equipment Corporation
Digital Equipment Corporation
Digital Equipment Corporation
Microsoft Corporation.
Esprit Systems, Inc.
Hayes Microcomputer Products, Inc.
Hazeltine Systems, Inc.
Hewlett-Packard Corporation
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.
INTEL Corporation
Lear Siegler, Inc.
Lear Siegler, Inc.
Lear Siegler, Inc.
Lear Siegler, Inc.
Lear Siegler, Inc.
Micom Systems, Inc.
Microsoft Corporation.
France Telecom
3COM Corporation/Microsoft Corporation
Tektronix, Inc.
Tektronix, Inc.
Tektronix, Inc.
GTE Telenet Communication Corporation
Televideo Systems, Inc.
Televideo Systems, Inc.
British Telecom.
BMC Software, Inc.
X/Open Company, Limited
Microsoft Corporation
Wyse Technology, Inc.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
XEROX Corporation
3COM Corporation

Special Notices

xxxi

xxxii

3174 Installation Guide

Preface
The 3174 Establishment Controller is a very important component in
multi-protocol networks involving subarea SNA, Advanced Peer-to-Peer
Networking (APPN), Peer Communication, Token-Ring and Ethernet LAN, X.25,
Frame Relay communication, Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN),
asynchronous (ASCII) communication, and Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). In addition, it offers significant functions
such as Local Format Storage, Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs, ESCON
attachment, network management, end-user productivity enhancements, and
multi-host connectivity through single link multi-host (SLMH) and multiple
upstream physical attachments. Using the Multiple Logical Terminal (MLT)
capability, a user can access multiple sessions across different protocol
networks from one terminal.
This document describes the 3174 features and functions, with emphasis on their
installation, customization, and operation. It is intended for systems engineers
and customer personnel who are installing the 3174. Knowledge of the 3270
Information Display System is assumed.
The information contained in this document is based on installation experience
at the International Technical Support Organization, Raleigh. Wherever possible,
example scenarios and customization are included for guidance.
The document is organized as follows:
•

Chapter 1, “Introduction to the 3174”
This chapter offers a brief history of the evolution of the 3174 Establishment
Controller from the 3274 Control Unit. The various models available and
their features, both hardware and microcode, are briefly described.

•

Chapter 2, “Installation Planning”
This chapter discusses the planning needed for host and terminal
attachments, cabling, and the physical installation of the 3174, including
customer setup tasks required.

•

Chapter 3, “Microcode Customization”
This chapter describes the planning and procedures required to customize
the 3174 microcode to support desired features and functions.

•

Chapter 4, “LAN Support”
This chapter covers the 3174 attached to a token-ring network or an Ethernet
network, both as a gateway (local and remote) and as a downstream
physical unit (DSPU). It includes topics such as performance, connectivity,
customization, backup/recovery, and considerations when installing them in
different environments such as VM/SP, MVS and VSE.

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

xxxiii

•

Chapter 5, “X.25 Support”
This chapter covers the 3174 attached to an X.25 network as a PU 2.0 device.
It includes operation of the 3174 on permanent virtual circuit (PVC) and
switched virtual circuit (SVC) connections.

•

Chapter 6, “X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ”
This chapter describes the function of the 3174 as a token-ring gateway when
attached to the X.25 network. It includes example scenarios in which the
3174 acts as a QLLC primary and secondary gateway for host access.

•

Chapter 7, “Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)”
This chapter describes the installation and customization of the 3174 AEA.

•

Chapter 8, “ESCON Connection”
This chapter describes the Enterprise Systems Connection (ESCON) optical
fiber channel support provided by the 3174 ESCON models.

•

Chapter 9, “Multi-Host Connectivity”
This chapter describes the Multiple Logical Terminal capability, the
Concurrent Communication Adapter and Single Link Multi-Host support. It
includes descriptions of the multi-host connectivity supported via the LAN
Gateway and X.25 or Frame Relay attachments.

•

Chapter 10, “Connectivity Customization Examples”
Several example scenarios, involving the use of the Multiple Logical
Terminal capability, the Concurrent Communication Adapter and Single Link
Multi-Host support, are presented here for guidance during customization
and system definition.

•

Chapter 11, “Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)”
This chapter describes the functions provided with 3174 microcode, in
conjunction with VTAM, to dynamically define terminals to VTAM. It includes
example VTAM definitions and displays.

•

Chapter 12, “Local Format Storage”
This chapter explains LFS and its use to improve line utilization and
response times. It also describes the software product offered by BMC
Software Inc., UltraOpt/VTAM, which works in conjunction with LFS to
provide even better datastream optimization, line utilization and response
times.

•

Chapter 13, “Network Management”
Features such as Network Asset Management, including Vital Product Data,
and Central Site Control Facility (CSCF) are discussed in this chapter.

•

Chapter 14, “Configuration Support-C Release 2”
Several end-user productivity enhancements are integrated in Configuration
Support-C Release 2 base microcode. These enhancements are described
in this chapter.

xxxiv

3174 Installation Guide

•

Chapter 15, “Configuration Support-C Release 3”
This chapter describes the enhancements introduced in Configuration
Support-C Release 3.

•

Chapter 16, “Configuration Support-C Release 4”
The 3174 Configuration Support-C Release 4 enhancements introduced
together with the Ethernet support are described in this chapter.

•

Chapter 17, “Configuration Support-C Release 5”
The new Frame Relay Communication support, the APPN enhancements
such as APPN over X.25 and Frame Relay and other enhancements
introduced in Configuration Support-C Release 5 are described in this
chapter.

•

Chapter 18, “APPN”
This chapter describes the 3174 as a network node in an Advanced
Peer-to-Peer Networking (APPN) environment.

•

Chapter 19, “Peer Communication”
This chapter describes the function provided by the 3174 that allow coax
attached DOS and OS/2 workstations to communicate as peer devices, as if
they were on a token-ring LAN.

•

Chapter 20, “Frame Relay Support”
This chapter briefly describes the 3174 Frame Relay Communication support
introduced in Configuration Support-C Release 5.

•

Chapter 21, “TCP/IP”
This chapter describes the function of the 3174 as a Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) TELNET client, providing services to
Control Unit Terminal (CUT) mode displays to access 3270, ASCII and TCP/IP
applications from a single terminal.

•

Chapter 22, “ISDN”
This chapter describes the function of the 3174 as an Integrated Services
Digital Network (ISDN) gateway. It includes brief discussions of ISDN
concepts and terminology.

The book includes the following appendixes:
•

Appendix A, “3174 Adapters”

•

Appendix B, “3174 Features”

•

Appendix C, “3174 Physical Specifications”

•

Appendix D, “3174 Feature Slot Usage”

•

Appendix E, “3174 Storage Requirements”

•

Appendix F, “APARs”

•

Appendix G, “VTAM/NCP Definition Examples”

•

Appendix H, “3174 Workstation Networking Module”

•

Appendix I, “Keyboard Layouts”

Preface

xxxv

xxxvi

3174 Installation Guide

Related Publications
The following publications are considered particularly suitable for a more
detailed discussion of the topics covered in this document.
To Become Familiar with the 3174:

Master Index , GC30-3515
3174 Introduction , GA27-3850
To Prepare Your Site for the 3174:

Site Planning , GA23-0213
Physical Planning Template , GX27-2999
To Set Up and Operate the 3174:

Models 1L, 1R, 2R, 3R, 11L, 11R, 12L, 12R, 13R and 14R User’s Guide ,
GA23-0337
Models 21H, 21L, 21R, 22L, 22R, 23R and 24R User’s Guide , GA27-3874
Models 51R, 52R, 53R, 61R, 62R, 63R and 64R User’s Guide , GA23-0333
Models 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R, and 92R User’s Guide , GA23-0313
To Plan for and Customize the 3174:
Configuration Support-A and S

Planning Guide , GA27-3844
Utilities Guide , GA27-3853
Central Site Customizing User’s Guide , GA23-0342
Asynchronous Emulation Adapter Description and Reference , GA27-3872
Configuration Support-B

Planning Guide , GA27-3862
Model 90R Tokenway Planning , GD21-0036
Utilities Guide , GA27-3863
Central Site Customizing User’s Guide , GA27-3868
Asynchronous Emulation Adapter Description and Reference , GA27-3872
Configuration Support-C

Planning Guide , GA27-3918
Utilities Guide , GA27-3920
Central Site Customizing User’s Guide , GA27-3919
ASCII Functions Reference , GA27-3872
To Perform Problem Determination:

Customer Problem Determination , GA23-0217
Status Codes , GA27-3832

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

xxxvii

To Install Features or Convert Models on the 3174:

Fixed Disk Installation and Removal Instructions , GA27-3864
Diskette Drive Installation and Removal Instructions , GA23-0263
Device Control Adapters Installation and Removal Instructions , GA23-0265
Model Conversion Instructions , GA23-0295
Token-Ring Network Feature and Ethernet Network Feature Installation and
Removal Instructions , GA23-0329
Storage Expansion Feature Installation and Removal Instructions , GA23-0330
Communication Adapter Installation and Removal Instructions , GA27-3830
Asynchronous Emulation Adapter Installation and Removal Instructions ,
GA23-0341
Concurrent Communication Adapter and Integrated Services Digital Network
Adapter Installation and Removal Instructions , GA27-3851
Models 21H, 21L, 21R, 22L, 22R, 23R and 24R Feature Installation and
Removal Instructions , GA27-3875
To Use the Asynchronous Emulation Adapter Feature:

Asynchronous Emulation Adapter Description and Reference , GA27-3872
Terminal User’s Reference for Expanded Functions , GA23-0332
To Use the Multiple Logical Terminals Function:

Terminal User’s Reference for Expanded Functions , GA23-0332
To Obtain Datastream Programming and Reference Information:

Functional Description , GA23-0218
Data Stream Programmer’s Reference , GA23-0059
ASCII Functions Reference , GA27-3872
3174 Reference Summary , GX27-3872
3174 Character Set Reference , GA27-3831
3270 X.25 Operation , GA23-0204
To Perform Maintenance (Service Personnel):

Models 1L, 1R, 2R, 3R, 11L, 11R, 12L, 12R, 13R and 14R Maintenance
Information , SY27-2572
Models 21H, 21L, 21R, 22L, 23R and 24R Maintenance Information , SY27-0323
Models 51R, 52R, 53R, 61R, 62R, 63R and 64R Maintenance Information ,
SY27-2573
Models 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R, and 92R Maintenance Information , SY27-2584
CE Reference Summary , SX27-3873
Status Codes , GA27-3832
To Install, Customize, and Service the 8250 Workstation Networking Module
(WNM)

8250 Workstation Networking Module Installation and Customization Guide ,
GA27-4022
3174 Planning Guide - Configuration Support-C , GA27-3918
3174 Utilities Guide - Configuration Support-C , GA27-3920
8250 Workstation Networking Module Problem Determination and Service
Guide , SY27-0342

xxxviii

3174 Installation Guide

Related International Technical Support Organization Publications

The following Redbooks are recommended for a more detailed information of the
following topics covered in this document.
To Use the 3174 TCP/IP Feature:

Using 3174 in TCP/IP Networks , GG24-4172
To Use the 3174 CSCM Feature:

NetView Distribution Manager Release 2 and 3174 Central Site Change
Management Implementation Guide , GG24-3424
NetView DM/2 V2.1 Remote Administrator and New Functions , GG24-4419
To Use the 3174 APPN Feature:

3174 APPN Implementation Guide , GG24-3702
3174 APPN Implementation Guide Update , GG24-4171 (Available 1Q95)
To Use the 3174 Frame Relay Feature:

3174 in Higher Speed WAN and Multiprotocol Networks , GG24-4376
(Available 1Q95)
Other ITSO redbooks:

X.25 Guide , GG24-3458
Automated Configuration Management Using the Information/System-NetView
Bridge Adapter , GG24-3871
Personal Communications/3270 Version 2 Implementation Guide , GG24-3703
Personal Communications/3270 Version 3.1 Implementation Guide , GG24-4173
TCP/IP Tutorial and Technical Overview , GG24-3376
AS/400 ISDN Connectivity , GG24-3517
APPN Architecture and Product Implementations Tutorial , GG24-3669
Local Area Network Reference , GG24-4111
Network Products Reference , GX28-8002
A complete list of International Technical Support Organization publications, with
a brief description of each, may be found in:

Bibliography of International Technical Support Organization Technical
Bulletins, GG24-3070
To get listings of redbooks online, VNET users may type:

TOOLS SENDTO WTSCPOK TOOLS REDBOOKS GET REDBOOKS CATALOG

Related Publications

xxxix

How to Order Redbooks
IBM employees may order redbooks and CD-ROMs using PUBORDER.
Customers in the USA may order by calling 1-800-879-2755 or by faxing
1-800-284-4721. Visa and Master Cards are accepted. Outside the USA,
customers should contact their IBM branch office.
You may order individual books, CD-ROM collections, or customized sets,
called GBOFs, which relate to specific functions of interest to you.

xl

3174 Installation Guide

Other Publications
•

TCP/IP for the IBM 3174 Establishment Controller , G221-3343

•

X.25 1984/1988 DTE/DCE and DTE/DTE Interface Architecture Reference ,
SC30-3409

•

IBM ISDN Interface Co-Processor/2 Model 2 Technical Reference , SA33-3230

•

Integrated Service Digital Networks Data Link Control Architecture Reference ,
SC31-6826

•

Integrated Service Digital Networks Circuit-Switched Signalling Control ,
SC31-6827

•

Planning for Enterprise Systems Connection Links , GA23-0367

•

IBM 3299 Terminal Multiplexer Product Information and Setup , G520-4216

•

IBM 3299 Terminal Multiplexer Model 32 Planning for Optical Fiber Cable ,
GA27-3902

•

3174 Telephone Twisted-Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter (RPQ 8Q0806)
User ′ s Guide , GA27-3929

•

3174 Peer Communication User ′ s Guide RPQ 8Q0718 , GA27-3887

•

3174 Establishment Controller With Local Format Storage , G221-3318

•

3270 Entry Assist User ′ s Guide , GA23-0119

•

VTAM V3.4.1 Resource Definition Reference , SC31-6438

•

VTAM V3.4.1 Messages and Codes , SC31-6433

Related Publications

xli

xlii

3174 Installation Guide

Acknowledgments
The advisors for this project were:
Jose Boo Sanchez
Franchesca Collins
International Technical Support Organization, Raleigh Center

The author of this document is:
Dilip W. Abeyratne, IBM Sri Lanka
This publication is the result of a residency conducted at the International
Technical Support Organization, Raleigh Center.
Thanks to the following people for their invaluable advice and guidance provided
in the production of this document:
Marilyn Beumeler
Sophie L. Dangtran
Joe Czap
3174 Development
Research Triangle Park, Raleigh
Thanks to the following people for the invaluable editorial advice and guidance
provided in the production of this document:
Gail Wojton
Lori Phelps
International Technical Support Organization, Raleigh Center

Thanks also to the following people for their contributions to earlier editions of
this document:

Fifth Edition
Tony Tan, advisor, IBM Raleigh
Carol Ford, author, IBM New Zealand
Werner Erasmus, author, IBM South Africa

Fourth Edition
Penny Frisbie, advisor, IBM Raleigh
Paul Simmonds, author, IBM Australia
Kevin Webb, author, IBM United Kingdom

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

xliii

Third Edition
Penny Frisbie, advisor, IBM Raleigh
Friedrich Ashauer, author, IBM Germany
Terry Muldoon, author, IBM United Kingdom
Katiuska Perez, author, IBM Venezuela
Rodney Jordaan, author, ISM South Africa

Second Edition
Ramiro Saenz, advisor, IBM Raleigh
Friedrich Ashauer, author, IBM Germany
Terry Muldoon, author, IBM United Kingdom
Katiuska Perez, author, IBM Venezuela

First Edition
Ramiro Saenz, advisor, IBM Raleigh
Terry Muldoon, author, IBM United Kingdom

xliv

3174 Installation Guide

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174
The 3174 Establishment Controller is the most fundamental component of the
3270 family of products, which includes display stations, printers and control
units. It connects and controls a cluster of user terminals (display stations,
printers, PCs or PS/2s) to a host computer. Hence, it is frequently referred to as
a cluster controller or a control unit .
Since its introduction, the types of network environment that the 3174 can
participate in grow with each new release of the 3174. Today, it is a key
component in SNA, SDLC, BSC, X.25, ISDN, TCP/IP, APPN*, Frame Relay,
token-ring, Ethernet (frame formats IEEE 802.3 and Ethernet DIX Version 2), and
ASCII networks.
It is the intention of this document to describe the 3174′s features and functions
and to assist the user in installing and implementing the product effectively.
This chapter provides an introduction to the 3174 and the 3270 family of products.
It includes descriptions of:
•

The different models of the 3174

•

Host and terminal attachment capabilities

•

Hardware and microcode features

•

Microcode releases

•

Network management

•

National Language Support, including CECP

1.1 Brief History
The 3270 family of products has been with us now for more than 20 years. During
this period, there were only two major changes to the basic design of the control
unit: the change from the original 3271/2 Controllers to the New Display System
3274 Control Unit, and then the change from the 3274 Control Unit to the 3174
Establishment Controller. Since the introduction of the 3174, there have been
many changes to the communication environment. In response to these
changes, the 3174 has been enhanced with many more features and functions
than both its predecessors put together.

1.1.1 3271/2 Controller
The 3271/2 Controllers were introduced in 1971. The 3271 was a remote
controller supporting BSC at speeds up to 9600 bps. (A later model had SNA
support as a PU T1.) The 3272 was for S/370 channel attachment. Each
supported a maximum of 32 devices, typically a mixture of 3277 display stations
and 3284/3286 printers.
These controllers were hard wired; that is, all the logic was coded in hardware
on cards inside the machine. This made them very fast to start up; you could
simply turn them on and they were ready. However, adding new features and
functions was a major problem. Invariably, it required hardware changes, such
as card replacement and rewiring, which were both time consuming and
inconvenient.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

1

1.1.2 3274 Control Unit
To overcome this problem, IBM* introduced the customizable 3274 in 1977. It
was a radical change from the 3271/2 in that it was designed around an internal
processor programmed with microcode. The microcode could then be tailored
by the user to support the growing number of new features that technology made
available.
Terminals introduced with the 3274 included the first color display station, the
IBM 3279 Color Display Station. The 3279 was originally a four-color display.
With the introduction of the 3270 extended data stream, it became possible to
deliver seven colors with highlighting and graphics.
Terminals designed specifically to attach to the 3274 included the 3278 Display
Station (monochrome), the 3279 Color Display Station and a range of printers,
including the 3287 Printer. These terminals are referred to as Type A (or
Category A) terminals to differentiate them from the Type B (or Category B)
terminals designed for the earlier 3271/2 controllers and which used a different
coax protocol.
The 3274 developed over time to support many features including:
•

V.24 interfaces up to 14.4 Kbps

•

V.35 interfaces up to 56 Kbps

•

X.25 network attachment

•

DFT functions

•

3299 multiplexer

•

RPQs including:
−

Entry Assist

−

Dual Logic (the ability to have two sessions from a CUT mode display).

3274 models included 8-port remote, 12-port remote, 16-port remote, and 32-port
local and remote, units.

1.1.3 3174 Subsystem Control Unit
The development of new technology such as faster internal processors and
smaller packaging led to the introduction of the 3174 Subsystem Control Unit in
1986. The 3174 was designed to enhance the 3270 product line with many new
connectivity options and features. Like the 3274, it was customizable; the
difference was that it used smaller (5.25-inch) diskettes than the 3274 (8-inch
diskettes) and the customization process was simplified and made considerably
faster.
The packaging of the 3174 enabled the installation of many new features such as
the LAN and Asynchronous Emulation Adapters.
New terminals were smaller, lighter and incorporated better ergonomic design.
Image support was now available using the 3193 Display Station “portrait”
monitor.

2

3174 Installation Guide

1.1.4 3174 Establishment Controller
In 1989, IBM introduced a new range of 3174 models and changed the name from
3174 Subsystem Control Unit to 3174 Establishment Controller. This change in
name reflects the expanded role of the 3174 in a business establishment,
providing many connectivity options to both local and wide area networks.
The new models provided increased internal processor speed, 2MB of base
memory (twice that of the previous model) and a 2.4MB diskette drive. The new
diskette drive was needed because the microcode to support the new
connectivity options was growing larger than the existing 1.2MB drives could
sustain.
The current 3174 models include the Tokenway (a small remote token-ring
gateway), rack-mountable 3174s for situations where larger numbers of terminals
need to be attached and Workstation Networking Module (WNM) to integrate
3174 facilities into the IBM 8250 Multiprotocol Intelligent Hub.
New features include:
•

ISDN Basic Rate Interface Adapter, to allow downstream intelligent
workstations to connect via ISDN

•

Telephone Twisted Pair (TTP) multiplexer

•

Concurrent Communication Adapters (CCA), which allow additional SNA or
BSC hosts to physically attach to a single 3174

•

64 coax port capability

•

32-port 3299 Terminal Multiplexer

•

S/390 host attachment over Enterprise Systems Connection (ESCON)
channels using fiber optic cable

These features, and others, will be described in more detail in the remainder of
this document.

1.2 3174 Models
Before the 1989 announcement, the 3174 Subsystem Control Unit consisted of the
following models:
•

01L, 01R, 02R, 03R, 51R, 52R, 53R, 81R and 82R.

In 1989, IBM announced the 3174 Establishment Controller consisting of the
following models:
•

11L, 11R, 12R, 13R, 61R, 62R, 63R, 91R and 92R.

These models supersede each of the original 3174 models and offer a higher
throughput, more base storage and support for a total of 6 MB of storage for the
larger models. They are designed and built with state-of-the-art CMOS
technology and with Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuitry. This new
technology design produces advantages of smaller size, faster circuitry, less
power, additional control storage capacity, and room for growth.
In 1990, six more models were added:
•

90R (Tokenway), 21R, 21L, 12L, 22L and 23R.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

3

In 1991, Model 22R was added for Europe, Middle East, and Africa.
In 1993, three new models were added with the announcement of Ethernet
adapter (FC 3045).
•

14R, 24R and 64R.

Also in 1993, IBM 3174 Workstation Networking Module (WNM), which is also
known as 8250 Workstation Networking Module, was added to the existing 3174
product line to integrate 3174 functionality into the IBM 8250 Multiprotocol
Intelligent Hub.
•

41R and 43R.
See H.2, “Workstation Networking Module Feature (#3174)” on page 800 for
more information about Models 41R and 43R.

We will now look at the characteristics and capabilities of these models. Note
that each model number has a suffix, either “R” for remote or “L” for local,
which indicates the base machine host attachment type. The “R” suffix indicates
a 3174 as being network attached via SDLC, BSC, X.25, Frame Relay or LAN ; the
“L” suffix indicates a 3174 as being attached to the host via parallel or ESCON
channels.
All 3174s, except the WNM, are housed in one of four cabinet types. These are:
•

Large floor-standing models
These models have a dash 0xx or a dash 1xx designation, for example, the
3174-01L or the 3174-11R. They have the capability of supporting:

•

−

Up to 24 Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA) ports

−

Up to two additional host communication adapters (CCAs)

−

Up to four 3174 ISDN BRI Adapter

−

A Token-Ring Gateway

−

An Ethernet Gateway

−

Up to 64 coax ports with the 3270 Port Expansion Feature

Rack-mounted models
These models have a dash 2xx designation, for example, the 3174-21L or the
3174-22R. They are equivalent to the large 1xx models but the packaging
has been compressed to make them fit in a rack. They are only 10 inches
(254 mm) high. These models have only five expansion slots available for
adding extra features. (The 22L and 23R have only four expansion slots.)
They support the same attachments as the large models, but due to the
limited slots cannot accommodate all features at the same time. However,
not many customers configure all features in the same 3174 and thus the
rack-mounted models may be adequate for most situations.

•

Medium-sized desk top models
These models have a dash 5xx or a dash 6xx designation, for example, the
3174-51R or the 3174-63R. They can support 9 to 16 coax devices and,
depending on the specific model type, one or a combination of the following:

4

3174 Installation Guide

−

Asynchronous emulation adapter

−

Token-ring adapter

•

−

Ethernet adapter

−

3174 ISDN BRI adapter

−

Concurrent communication adapter (up to two on some models)

Small table-top models
These models have a dash 8xx or a dash 9xx designation, for example, the
3174-81R or the 3174-90R. These models attach between four and eight coax
devices. The 90R, also known as the Tokenway, is a token-ring gateway.
They do not support the asynchronous emulation adapter or concurrent
communication adapters.

The 3174 Workstation Networking Module (WNM) is housed within the IBM 8250
Multiprotocol Intelligent Hub and it can be customized as two different models,
41R and 43R depending, on the host attachment type. The Model 41R is
attached via remote TP link while the Model 43R is attached via an internal
token-ring adapter which interfaces directly with the 8250 Hub.
See H.2, “Workstation Networking Module Feature (#3174)” on page 800 for
more information on the 3174 Workstation Networking Module.

1.3 Attachment Description
This section describes the attachment capability of the 3174 to hosts and
terminals, and the various multiplexer configurations that can be used for
terminal attachments.

1.3.1 Host Attachment
There are three basic methods of physically attaching the 3174 to the host:
•

•

•

Via local channel
−

Models x1L for the S/370 channel

−

Models x2L for the S/390* ESCON* channel

Via remote TP link
−

Models x1R or 90R (Tokenway) for V.24 or V.35 interfaces

−

Models x2R for X.21 interfaces

Via a LAN
−

Models x3R (token-ring network)

−

Models x4R (Ethernet network)

Local Channel Attach
The 3174 Models 01L, 11L and 21L have Data-Chaining Interlocked, High Speed
Transfer, and Data Streaming channel operational modes. This provides channel
data rates up to 1.0, 1.25, and 2.5 megabytes per second, respectively.
The 3174 Models 12L and 22L attach to the host via the ESCON fiber optic
channel. This channel is capable of attaching the 3174 to eight different physical
hosts via the ESCON Director at distances of up to 5.4 miles (9 km) in three
stages. Performance of the 3174 over ESCON is comparable to that over a S/370
channel.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

5

Remote Link Attach
The 3174 remote attach models provide improved communication capabilities.
The base communication hardware will provide the following interfaces as
applicable to the 3174 model selected. Communication protocol (SDLC, BSC,
X.25 or Frame Relay) is selectable during the customization.
•

Models 01R, 11R, 21R, 41R, 51R, 61R, 81R, 90R and 91R
RS-232C/CCITT V.24 and CCITT V.35 interfaces for SNA/SDLC, BSC, X.25, and
Frame Relay (only for 11R, 21R, 41R and 61R) remote link attachment.
Maximum speeds are 19.2 Kbps for BSC, 64 Kbps for X.25 and 256 Kbps for
SNA/SDLC and Frame Relay.

•

Models 02R, 12R, 22R, 52R, 62R, 82R and 92R
X.21 interface (CCITT V.11) for SNA/SDLC, X.25 and Frame Relay (only for
12R and 62R) remote link attachment. Maximum speeds are 256 Kbps for
SNA/SDLC and 64 Kbps for X.25.

LAN Attach (Token-Ring or Ethernet Attach)
The 3174 provides for attachment of a 3270 Information Display System to the
LAN. Models x3R provide attachment to a token-ring network, and models x4R
provide attachment to an Ethernet network. The token ring may operate at 4
Mbps or 16 Mbps, while the Ethernet operates at 10 Mbps, to provide a good
solution for those users who need fast response times in both local and remote
locations. The 3174s with LAN Attachment can communicate with up to eight host
processors. The host gateway may be one of the following:
•

For a 3174 with a token-ring attachment, 3745, 3720 or 3725 Communication
Controller fit with a Token-Ring Interface Coupler (TIC) and running the
ACF/NCP facility called NCP Token-Ring Interconnection (NTRI).
Note that the 3720 and 3725 TIC is limited to 4 Mbps and that the ACF/NCP
must at least be V4.2 for the 3720 and 3725, or V5 for the 3745 for SNA
support. For TCP/IP over token ring, ACF/NCP must at least be V7.1.
For a 3174 with an Ethernet Attachment, 3745, 3720 or 3725 Communication
Controller fitted with an Ethernet LAN Adapter (ELA) and running ACF/NCP
V6.1 and later.
Note that only the TCP/IP is supported over the Ethernet LAN connected via
a 37xx Communication Controller.

6

3174 Installation Guide

•

A 3174 gateway, that is, a local or remote 3174 fit with either features #3025
or #3026 and running Configuration Support-S, or feature #3044 and running
Configuration Support-B or later for token-ring LAN and feature #3045 and
running Configuration Support-C4 or later for Ethernet LAN.

•

An IBM 3172 Interconnect Controller with a Token-Ring Adapter or an
Ethernet Adapter and running Interconnect Controller Program (ICP).

•

Any directly attached host to the LAN, for example, an IBM AS/400* with a
token-ring gateway feature or Ethernet gateway feature or an IBM Series/1
with a token-ring gateway feature.

1.3.2 Terminal Attachment
The 3174 offers excellent flexibility for terminal attachment. A 3270 terminal, or a
workstation (such as a PC or PS/2*) emulating a 3270 terminal, may be
connected directly to a base Terminal Adapter port, a Terminal Multiplexer
Adapter port, a 3299 Terminal Multiplexer port, or via the new Telephone Twisted
Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter (TTP TMA). ASCII devices (displays, printers
and hosts) can be attached to a 3174 via the AEA ports. PC or PS/2 workstations
can be attached via a LAN or an ISDN network to access a 3174 gateway.
3174 Models 1xL, 2xL, 1xR and 2xR can also have a second terminal adapter,
known as the 3270 Port Expansion Feature, to support an additional 32 terminal
attachments.
First we will discuss the attachment of ASCII devices, then intelligent
workstations, and then 3270 terminals.

ASCII Device Attachment
The Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA) has several functions which will be
covered later in this document. One of them is the attachment of ASCII displays
and printers to the 3174 to allow them to access both 3270 and ASCII hosts.
Each AEA has eight ports which can used to attach to ASCII displays, printers,
and hosts. Depending on the model, a 3174 may support up to three AEAs. The
small models, 8xR and 9xR, cannot support an AEA.

LAN Attachment
Intelligent workstations can participate in a token-ring LAN or an Ethernet LAN
and communicate with a host using the 3174 as a gateway or one of the other
gateways discussed in “LAN Attach (Token-Ring or Ethernet Attach)” on page 6.
The LAN can be, among others, an IBM Token-Ring or a Novell LAN running on
token-ring or Ethernet. With appropriate levels of software and hardware in the
gateways and host, the intelligent workstations can communicate via LU6.2 to
other intelligent workstations and hosts which have the same communication
capabilities elsewhere in the network.

ISDN Attachment
The 3174 ISDN BRI Adapter is a method of attaching remote downstream
intelligent workstations to a 3174. The ISDN BRI Adapter is a card which plugs
into one of the 3174 feature slots. It fits into the large, medium (excluding 5xR),
and rack-mounted 3174s. Each ISDN BRI Adapter has four ports; each port
provides two independent 64 Kbps information channel and one 16 Kbps
information/control channel (see Chapter 22, “ISDN” on page 661 for further
information). Thus, each ISDN BRI Adapter supports up to eight intelligent
workstation connections.
An ISDN BRI Adapter is ordered as feature #3055. It comes with four cables.
Depending on the 3174 model, up to four ISDN BRI Adapters can be used to
support up to 32 DSPU connections.
The ISDN BRI Adapter has been designed to use the IBM Cabling System Type 2
voice grade media (VGM). It will also work with most unshielded telephone
wiring. Caution should be taken when using unshielded wiring in high
electromagnetic noise environments.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

7

Note: ISDN is not currently available in all countries. Please check with your
network provider and your IBM representative for the availability of ISDN
and IBM ISDN products in your location.

3270 Device Attachment via Terminal Multiplexer Adapter
There are two kinds of Terminal Multiplexer Adapter: the normal TMA, which has
eight BNC connectors, and the TTP TMA, which has two 50-pin D-shell
connectors. Both are cards which plug into one of the 3174 feature slots.

Telephone Twisted Pair TMA: The Telephone Twisted Pair TMA is ordered as
feature #3105. The TTP TMA is a high density TMA in that it provides for
attachment of 32 terminals via two 25-pair TTP bulk cables fitted with standard
25-pair telephone company or “telco” connectors.
Two TTP TMAs can be used with the 3270 Port Expansion Feature. This would
allow attachment of 64 terminals using only three slots. The distance between
the terminal and the TTP TMA must not exceed 900 feet (275 meters).

TMA: The standard TMA is ordered as feature #3103. The TMA can use coaxial
cable or IBM Cabling System Types 1, 2 or 3 cables. A short length of coax
connects the TMA input port to one of the Terminal Adapter ports. The TMA
then provides eight ports for terminal attachment. Each Terminal Adapter can
be connected to a maximum of four TMAs. Depending on the type of cable used,
terminals can be up to 4920 feet (1500 meters).

3270 Device Attachment via 3299 Terminal Multiplexer
The 3299 Terminal Multiplexer is similar to the TMA but it is located external to
the 3174. It is attached to the Terminal Adapter at distances of up to 4920 feet
(1500 meters). The terminals can be up to another 4920 feet (1500 meters) away,
depending on the type of cable. See IBM 3174 Site Planning for more detail on
cable distance limitations.
There are four 3299 models available: Models 2, 3, 32 and 32T (Model 1 has been
withdrawn).
•

Models 2 and 3 each attaches up to eight devices. Model 2 can have
terminals attached via coaxial cable or the IBM Cabling System media.
Model 3 can have terminals attached via Telephone Twisted Pair (TTP)
wiring.

•

Model 32 attaches up to 32 devices and may be attached to the 3174 via an
fiber optic cable, a coaxial cable, or the IBM Cabling System media.

•

Model 32T attaches up to 32 devices via TTP wiring without the requirement
of impedance matching devices or baluns between the multiplexer and the
attached devices.

Notes:
1. To use fiber optic cable, a new terminal adapter (the Fiber Optic Terminal
Adapter, feature #3110) is required in the 3174.
2. Fiber connection does not increase the m a x i m um cable distance. What it
does provide, however, is a very clean signal, which is important where 3270
devices are being used in environments with high levels of electromagnetic
noise.

8

3174 Installation Guide

1.3.3 Multiplexer Configurations
Models 01L, 01R, 02R, 03R, 11L, 11R, 12L, 12R, 13R and 14R
Without the 3270 Port Expansion Feature, 3299s and TMAs may be installed in
3174s as follows:
•

One to four IBM 3299 Model 2 or 3299 Model 3 Terminal Multiplexers

•

One to four Terminal Multiplexer Adapter

•

Any combination, up to four, of the 3299 Model 2, 3299 Model 3 or TMAs

•

One 3299 Model 32 attaching up to 32 ports

•

One Telephone Twisted Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter attaching up to 32
ports

•

One to three 3299 Model 32 attaching eight devices per multiplexer

•

A combination of any 8-port multiplexers and the 3299 Model 32 or the 3299
Model 32T for a total of 32 ports.

The 3299 Model 32 or 3299 Model 32T must be installed in port 0 of the
integrated terminal adapter in order to have the maximum 32-port capability. If it
is installed in any other terminal adapter port it will only be capable of attaching
eight terminals.
The 3270 Port Expansion Feature can only be installed on Models 11L, 11R, 12L,
12R, 13R, 14R, 21R, 22R, 22L, 23R and 24R.
With the 3270 Port Expansion Feature, multiplexers may be installed as follows:
•

Any combination, up to eight, of the 3299 Model 2, 3299 Model 3 and
Terminal Multiplexer Adapters

•

One 3299 Model 32 or 3299 Model 32T and any combination, up to four, of the
3299 Model 2 or 3299 Model 3

•

Two 3299 Model 32s

•

Two 3299 Model 32Ts

•

One 3299 Model 32 and one 3299 Model 32T

•

One Telephone Twisted Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter and any
combination (up to four) of the 3299 Model 2, 3299 Model 3, or Terminal
Multiplexer Adapters

•

Two Telephone Twisted Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapters attaching up to
32 ports.

Models 21L, 22L, 21R, 23R and 24R
Without the 3270 Port Expansion Feature, these models can have:
•

Any combination, up to four, of 3299 Model 2, 3299 Model 3 and Terminal
Multiplexer Adapters for a total of 32 ports

•

One 3299 Model 32 or 3299 Model 32T for a total of 32 ports

•

One Telephone Twisted Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter for a total of 32
ports.

With the 3270 Port Expansion Feature, they may be configured as follows:

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

9

•

One 3299 Model 32 or 3299 Model 32T with any combination (up to three) of
3299 Model 2, 3299 Model 32 and Terminal Multiplexer Adapters for a total of
56 ports

•

Two 3299 Model 32s for 64 ports

•

Two 3299 Model 32T for 64 ports

•

One 3299 Model 32 and one 3299 Model 32T for 64 ports

•

One Telephone Twisted Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter with any
combination, up to three, of 3299 Model 2, 3299 Model 3 and Terminal
Multiplexer Adapters for a total of 56 ports

•

Two Telephone Twisted Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter for 64 ports

Two 3299 Model 32s or 3299 Model 32Ts are required to access 64 ports.
One 3299 Model 32 or 3299 Model 32T with combinations of Terminal Multiplexer
Adapters and 8-port 3299s (3299 Model 2 or 3299 Model 3) can only access 56
ports. The Terminal Multiplexer Adapters and 8-port 3299s must be removed
and a 3299 Model 32 or 3299 Model 32T installed to access ports 55 to 63.

Models 41R and 43R (WNM)
These two models are housed within the IBM 8250 Multiprotocol Intelligent Hub.
•

One to four IBM 3299 Model 2 Terminal Multiplexers

•

One 3299 Model 32 or 3299 Model 32T Terminal Multiplexer

Note that the maximum number of 3270 ports available in 3174 WNM is 32.

Models 51R, 52R, 53R, 61R, 62R, 63R and 64R
These medium-sized control units have similar attachment flexibility but with a
maximum attachment capability of 16 terminals. A base control unit has an
integrated 9-port terminal adapter which permits up to nine terminals to be
directly attached or, by using one of the following, up to a maximum of 16
terminals can be attached:
•

Two 8-port 3299 Terminal Multiplexers

•

One 8-port 3299 Terminal Multiplexer for eight terminals, with another eight
terminals connected directly to the other eight terminal adapter ports.

Models 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R and 92R
The small control units (Models 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R and 92R) have a maximum
attachment capability of eight terminals. The base control unit, except for 90R
provides an integrated 4-port terminal adapter which permits up to four terminals
to be directly attached, or using an 8-port 3299 Terminal Multiplexer attached to
port 0, a maximum of eight terminals can be attached (in this case, the
remaining ports of the control unit are disabled). The Model 90R (Tokenway) has
an integrated terminal adapter with only 1-port which permits only one terminal
to be directly attached, or using an 8-port 3299 Terminal Multiplexer, a maximum
of eight terminals can be attached.

10

3174 Installation Guide

1.3.4 IBM Cabling System
When using the 3174 with IBM Cabling System data grade media, cabling to
terminals is via direct attachment to the IBM Cabling System media. A balun
cable assembly is not required at the 3174 end of the cable. Attached devices
may still need baluns at their end.

1.4 3174 Features
A base 3174 comes with a minimum configuration of features as described in
Table 1. In some cases, machines shown with 2.4MB diskette drives may have
actually been delivered with 1.2MB drives during the introduction of the new
models. This would occur if the machine was ordered with Configuration
Support-A. These drives will be upgraded to 2.4MB when and if Configuration
Support-B or Configuration Support-C is ordered.
Table 1. 3174 Basic Machine Configuration
Model

Storage

Diskette

Number of devices supported

01L, 01R, 02R, 03R

1MB

1.2MB

4-32

51R, 52R, 53R

1MB

1.2MB

9-16

81R, 82R

1MB

1.2MB

4-8

11L, 21L, 12L, 22L
11R, 21R, 12R, 22R
13R, 14R, 23R, 24R

2MB

2.4MB

4-64

61R, 62R, 63R, 64R

2MB

2.4MB

9-16

41R, 43R (WNM)

6MB

2.88MB

4-32

90R

2MB

2.4MB

1 or 8, and token-ring gateway

91R, 92R

2MB

2.4MB

4-8

Note that WNM models 41R and 43R need 2.88MB, 3.5-inch 2ED diskettes.

1.4.1 Hardware Features
The following hardware features are optional; see also Appendix D, “3174
Feature Slot Usage” on page 751.

3270 Port Expansion Feature (#3100)
This feature is applicable to 3174 Models 1xx, and 2xx. It allows these
controllers to support 32 additional 3270 devices over coax ports bringing the
total number to 64.
For Models 11L, 11R, 12L, 12R, 13R and 14R, this feature provides a terminal
adapter and supporting hardware to attach the additional devices. Like the base
terminal adapter, this adapter has four Dual Purpose Connectors (DPC), which
support attachment of Terminal Multiplexer Adapters or external 3299s.
For Models 2xx this feature provides a replacement planar board with four DPCs.
See 1.3.3, “Multiplexer Configurations” on page 9 for the possible multiplexer
configurations when using this feature.
Note: The 3270 Port Expansion Feature requires Configuration Support-B
Release 4 or Configuration Support-C.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

11

Terminal Multiplexer Adapter (#3103)
See “3270 Device Attachment via Terminal Multiplexer Adapter” on page 8.

Telephone Twisted Pair Terminal Multiplexer Adapter (#3105)
See “3270 Device Attachment via Terminal Multiplexer Adapter” on page 8.

Fiber Optic Terminal Adapter (#3110)
The Fiber Optic Terminal Adapter provides the ability to attach a 3299 Model 32
to the 3174 Models 1xx, and 2xx via 62.5/125 micron fiber optic media at a
distance of up to 4920 feet (1500 meters). It can also be used with 100/140
micron and 50/125 micron fiber optic cable.
The Fiber Optic Terminal Adapter is a card that attaches to the Terminal Adapter
or to the 3270 Port Expansion Feature (#3100) via a short coaxial cable in a
similar way to the Terminal Multiplexer Adapter. If attached to port 0, it allows
the 3299 Model 32 to support a total of 32 terminals.
The maximum number of Fiber Optic Terminal Adapters in any one controller is:
•

Three for Models 11L, 11R, 12L, 12R, 13R and 14R without the 3270 Port
Expansion Feature

•

Six for Models 11L, 11R, 12L, 12R, 13R and 14R with the 3270 Port Expansion
Feature

•

Three for Models 21L, 21R, 22L, 23R and 24R with or without the 3270 Port
Expansion Feature

This feature does not extend the 3174′s ability to support more ports; the
maximum still remains at 32 terminals without the 3270 Port Expansion Feature
and 64 terminals with the 3270 Port Expansion Feature. Support for multiple
Fiber Optic Terminal Adapters allows multiple 3299 Model 32s to be connected to
a 3174 via fiber optic cable.
When the Fiber Optic Terminal Adapter is connected to a port on the Terminal
Adapter or the 3270 Port Expansion Feature other than port 0, only the first eight
ports (0 through 7) on the attached 3299 Model 32 are active. You may choose to
do this if you have eight or less terminals to install in electromagnetically noisy
environments where coaxial cable may not shield the data signals sufficiently.
The prerequisite microcode releases for Fiber Optic Terminal Adapter support
are:
•

All releases of Configuration Support-C

•

Configuration Support-B Release 3.0 or later

•

Configuration Support-A Release 5.3 or later

Each Fiber Optic Terminal Adapter requires one available 3174 feature slot.
Planning information for determining fiber optic drive distances is supplied in
IBM 3299 Model 032 Planning for Optical Fiber Cable .

12

3174 Installation Guide

Token-Ring Gateway
There are two features currently available for providing a 3174 token-ring
gateway: features #3026 and #3044. Both run at 4 Mbps or 16 Mbps. The 4
Mbps adapter, feature #3025, is no longer available.
Feature #3026 is available for 3174s with the base microcode Configuration
Support-A and it includes Configuration Support-S microcode.
Feature #3044 requires Configuration Support-B or Configuration Support-C to
operate as a gateway. We recommend that you use Configuration Support-B or
Configuration Support-C where possible as it is functionally richer than
Configuration Support-S.
Using this feature, the 3174 controller can participate in a token-ring network as
a DSPU controller attached to the LAN (without gateway) or as a gateway
connecting DSPUs on the token-ring network to a SDLC, X.25 (with the X.25
token-ring gateway RPQ 8Q0743), Frame Relay (with Configuration Support-C
Release 5), or channel-attached SNA host. The 3174 gateway-attached dependent
terminals (both CUT and ASCII) may access upstream token-ring LAN-attached
SNA and TCP/IP hosts.
See 4.5, “3174 Gateways” on page 77 for a full description of 3174 token-ring
gateway implementation.

16/4 Mbps Token-Ring Network Gateway (#3026)
This optional feature comprises Configuration Support-S Release 5 Licensed
Internal Code, the Type 3A Dual Speed 16/4 Mbps Token-Ring Adapter and a
Token-Ring Adapter cable. The Early Token Release function and larger I-Frame
sizes on the token ring are supported with this feature. The ring speed (4 Mbps
or 16 Mbps) can be selected during customization.
This feature is available for 3174 Models x1L and x2L (local models) and for
Models x1R and x2R (remote models) but is not available for Models 8xx or 9xx.
LAN workstations attached to the same token ring as the 3174 gateway can
coexist and operate concurrently with this feature. This feature will not be an
inhibitor to communication that occur on devices locally attached to the 3174,
such as terminals connected to the Terminal Adapter.
If you are upgrading the 3174 to Configuration Support-B or Configuration
Support-C, feature #3026 will function the same as feature #3044.

Type 3A (16/4) Communication Adapter - Alternate IML/Gateway
(#3044)
If you are installing a 3174 with Configuration Support-B, then this is the gateway
adapter you should be using. It costs less than feature #3026 (although more
storage is required to run Configuration Support-B) and it provides more
function.
Feature #3044 can be used with Configuration Support-A as an alternate
configuration. This is described in “Backup Communication Adapter (Alternate
IML)” on page 15.
With Configuration Support-B and Configuration Support-C, feature #3044
provides all the function of feature #3026, plus:

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

13

•

Group polling

•

Single Link Multi-Host support

•

Support for 250 DSPUs

•

Peer Communication LIC (Configuration Support-C) or Peer Communication
RPQ (Configuration Support-B) support

•

APPN LIC (Configuration Support-C) or Type 2.1 Passthru Gateway RPQ
(Configuration Support-B) support

•

8KB RU size (Models 12L and 22L only)

Ethernet Adapter (#3045)
3174 Ethernet connectivity is provided by the Ethernet Adapter feature #3045,
which requires Configuration Support-C Release 4 or Release 5. Using this
feature, the 3174 controller can participate in an Ethernet network as a DSPU
controller attached to the LAN or as a gateway connecting DSPUs on the
Ethernet to an SDLC, Frame Relay or channel-attached SNA host. The 3174
gateway attached dependent terminals (both CUT and ASCII) may access
upstream Ethernet LAN-Attached SNA and TCP/IP hosts with the same level of
support that is provided in a token-ring network.
In both of these configurations, the following functions are available:
•

TCP/IP TN3270 support for locally attached ASCII and CUT displays

•

APPN

•

Peer Communications (for coax-to-coax communication only on the same
3174)

Feature #3045 can be used with Configuration Support C5 as an alternate
configuration. This is described in “Backup Communication Adapter (Alternate
IML)” on page 15.

Second Diskette Drive (#1048)
A second 5.25-inch diskette drive with 1.25MB or 2.4MB capacity is available as
an optional feature. The capacity depends on the microcode level installed.
2.4MB capacity is available only with Configuration Support-B and Configuration
Support-C. It is required for downloading operational microcode to Downstream
Load (DSL) devices such as:
•
•
•

IBM 3179, 3192, and the 3472 Graphics Display Stations
IBM 3193 Image Display Station
IBM 3290 Information Display Panel

It is also required for downloading operational microcode to the Asynchronous
Emulation Adapter (#3020), a Full Copy procedure, central site customization and
Central Site Change Management procedures.
While it is possible to use most offline diskette procedures without the optional
second diskette drive, there are some procedures that require the second
diskette drive. Having a second diskette drive reduces diskette swapping when
customizing a 3174 and when running most utility procedures.
The 3174 Models 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R and 92R do not support the second diskette
drive.

14

3174 Installation Guide

Second Diskette Drive (#1046)
This optional feature has the same functions as #1048 but provides only 1.2 MB
capacity and is supported by all microcode levels. This feature has been
superseded by #1048.
The 3174 Models 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R and 92R do not support the second diskette
drive.

20MB Fixed Disk Drive (#1056)
This optional feature has the same functions as the second diskette drives but
provides a significantly higher capacity and is supported by all current
microcode levels.
This feature is strongly recommended if you require Central Site Change
Management.
The 3174 Models 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R and 92R do not support the fixed disk drive.

Storage Expansion
The 3174 controller storage capacity (as distinct from disk and diskette
capacities) can be expanded by the following optional features:
•

#1012, which provides 1MB storage expansion

•

#1014, which provides 2MB storage expansion

•

#1016, which provides 4MB storage expansion

Storage expansion for the new Models 2xx and 6xx plug directly into the planar
board. That avoids the use of an adapter slot.
The 3174 Models 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R and 92R do not support any storage
expansion.

Backup Communication Adapter (Alternate IML)
If the primary host link (as designated by the model number) fails, a backup link
can be established. A pre-customized control disk must be loaded by IML and
one of the following optional backup adapters must be activated:
•

#3040 Type 1 Teleprocessing Communication Adapter (V.24)

•

#3041 Type 1 Teleprocessing Communication Adapter (V.35)

•

#3042 Type 1 Teleprocessing Communication Adapter (V.35) (France only)

•

#3043 Type 2 Teleprocessing Communication Adapter (X.21)

•

#3044 Type 3A Dual Speed 16/4 Mbps Token-Ring Adapter

•

#3045 Ethernet Adapter

Feature #3044 also supports the Early Token Release function and larger I-Frame
sizes on the Token-Ring. In conjunction with Configuration Support-B or
Configuration Support-C this feature can be used for the Token-Ring Gateway
function.
The 3174 Models 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R and 92R cannot have a backup adapter
installed.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

15

Concurrent Communication Adapter (CCA)
Depending on the 3174 model, one or two of these optional features can be
installed. In addition to the primary host link adapter, a second or third adapter
with the same or different host link protocols as the primary adapter
(SNA/non-SNA channel attach, BSC, SDLC, X.25, token-ring or Ethernet) can be
installed.
Note: Frame Relay communication support does not utilize CCA but only 3174
primary communications link.
Each CCA provides an additional controller appearance in a single 3174. This is
accomplished by having a separate microprocessor, control storage and
communication interface.
If a CCA is installed and customized, directly attached 3270 displays can access
multiple hosts. Up to five MLT sessions can be spread over the primary adapter
and the CCAs. The adapters for the different TP interfaces have the following
feature codes:
•
•
•
•

#3050
#3051
#3052
#3053

Type
Type
Type
Type

1
1
1
2

Concurrent
Concurrent
Concurrent
Concurrent

Communication
Communication
Communication
Communication

Adapter
Adapter
Adapter
Adapter

(V.24/V.28)
(V.35)
(V.35) (France only)
(X.21/V.11).

The maximum number of CCAs supported are as follows:
•

Two for Models 0xx, 1xx, 2xx, 61R and 62R

•

One for Model 51R, 63R and 64R

•

None for Models 52R, 53R, 8xR and 9xR

Up to 64 Kbps are supported by the CCAs for SNA/SDLC and X.25 protocols. Up
to 19.2 Kbps are supported by the CCAs for BSC protocol.
The required microcode for these adapter types is Configuration Support-B or
Configuration Support-C.

ASCII Support
For additional information, see Chapter 7, “Asynchronous Emulation Adapter
(AEA)” on page 263.

General Description: The Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (#3020) provides
facilities to handle ASCII communication. 3270 emulation from ASCII displays
and printers as well as ASCII emulation from 3270 devices are possible.
This feature consists of an adapter card and microcode. A DSL diskette (#9015),
with microcode for the adapter, and a second diskette drive or a fixed disk are
required to support this feature.
This feature can coexist with the Token-Ring Gateway feature #3026 or #3044 or
Ethernet feature #3045 installed on a 1xx, 2xx, or 6xx Model. This coexistence
also requires that Configuration Support-S Release 5, Configuration Support-B,
or Configuration Support-C be installed, depending on the type of LAN.
This feature cannot be installed in the 3174 Models 53R, 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R or
92R.

16

3174 Installation Guide

Asynchronous Emulation Adapter: Each adapter provides eight ASCII ports.
Each 3174 Model 0xx, 1xx and 2xx can have up to three adapters, providing up to
24 ports (expansion slots permitting). Each 3174 Model 51R, 52R, 61R and 62R
can have one adapter, providing up to eight ports.
These ports are in addition to the maximum available on SNA 3174s. The
maximum number of device addresses supported by non-SNA 3174s is still 32.
The adapter supports full-duplex, character-mode, asynchronous transmission of
seven-bit ASCII data with parity. Odd, even, mark, space, and no-parity
encoding are supported. In addition, with Configuration Support-B Release 2 and
later releases, 8-bit ASCII characters are supported.
Ports are configurable in any combination of ASCII terminal emulation, 3270
terminal emulation, or ASCII passthrough.
Each port provides an EIA RS-232 electrical interface, and supports transmission
speeds of 300 bps to 19.2 Kbps via modems over switched or non-switched
communication facilities, or via direct connection without modems.

Serial OEM Interface (SOEMI)
A Serial OEM Interface (SOEMI) is a base function for a non-SNA 3174 Model
01L, 11L, 21L, 12L or 22L that extends the attachment capabilities to a variety of
industry devices from independent manufacturers for engineering, scientific and
manufacturing environments. A protocol based on structured fields (extended
data stream) provides the user with programming flexibility.

Other OEM Adapters: Attachment of instrumentation, measurement and control,
and other equipment can be provided via OEM adapters that provide appropriate
conversion and control functions to industry standard bus interfaces such as
IEEE** 488, IEEE 696, IEEE 796, etc. Applications such as controlling and
measurement, robotics, process control, voice synthesis/recognition, medical
applications and many others could then be implemented via the SOEMI support.

1.4.2 Microcode Features
Many of the features and functions of the 3174 are implemented in microcode;
that is, no special hardware is required to use them. Some of these features are
described here.

Response Time Monitor
The response time monitor function is an integral part of the 3174. It provides for
enhanced network management by permitting the accurate measurement and
recording of transaction times between an inbound host attention (AID) and a
user-defined transaction end.
The data is collected in the 3174 and either viewed locally (by a terminal
attached to the 3174) or retrieved by a host program such as NetView* Session
Monitor for analysis.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

17

Entry Assist
Entry Assist provides display units attached to the 3174 in CUT mode limited
local format, entry and edit control. Some DFT mode workstations, such as the
3179-G, 3192-G and the 3472-G, provide entry assist as part of their base
function.
Entry Assist used with a full screen editor can be used to:
•

Set margins

•

Set tabs

•

Sound the audible alarm when typing reaches the end of the line

•

Wrap words to the next line automatically

•

Delete words

•

Indicate cursor position

Entry Assist support for ASCII terminals is available with Configuration Support-C
Release 2 or later.
For more details on using Entry Assist, see IBM 3270 Entry Assist User ′ s Guide .

Type Ahead
The Type Ahead function allows keystroke entry while the keyboard is locked
from a previous transaction such as a host I/O or a printer busy condition. Type
Ahead is enabled by default during 3174 customization and is available for both
3270 CUT mode and ASCII terminals. When enabled, up to 50 keystrokes can be
stacked while the keyboard is locked.
If you fill the queue, the queue full indicator is displayed. This is reset after a
host I/O occurs and the queue is processed.
Type Ahead is available on Configuration Support-C, and Configuration
Support-B Release 2 or later.

Null/Space Processing
There are two “problem” situations when you are editing text on 3270 displays:
•

One is the situation where you are keying in data in the middle of the
screen, you press Enter and all the characters you carefully positioned are
returned compressed against the left margin of the screen.

•

The second is when you are trying to insert characters into a line with
spaces at the end and you have to move the cursor to the end of the line to
do an EOF on the spaces and then move the cursor back to where you want
to insert.

Both these situations arise because 3270 treats space characters differently from
nulls.
In the 3270 data stream, a null is X′00′ and a space is X′40′. They both appear
on a screen as blank but the space occupies a position on the screen whereas
the null does not. Null/space processing can be used to turn nulls into spaces
for host transmission when the null precedes a character within an entry field on
the screen. A null to space conversion is performed in field positions preceding
the cursor as soon as the field is modified. That solves the first problem. The

18

3174 Installation Guide

second problem is also addressed. With null/space processing, the blanks at the
end of the line can be either nulls or spaces; insert will work either way.
Null/space processing can be turned on or off by the user of any terminal (or
logical terminal). It is toggled on or off by pressing the ExSel key followed by the
Null/Space Processing key (the N key on most keyboards).
Null/space processing is available on Configuration Support-C and on
Configuration Support-B Release 2 or later for use on CUT mode or ASCII
terminals.

Single Link Multi-Host Support
This function is provided by microcode only. With this function up to eight hosts
can be accessed from the 3174′s primary host connection in any of the following
configurations:
•

From a 3174 with a LAN Adapter configured as a DSPU and communicating
to multiple gateways over a LAN

•

Via the 3174 ESCON adapter and then through the ESCON Director to
multiple locally attached SNA hosts

•

Via an X.25 link, with multiple hosts defined on different virtual circuits
through that link

•

Via a Frame Relay network, with multiple hosts defined on different Data Link
Connection Identifiers (DLCI) in the network

Using MLT support, it is possible to define up to five of these hosts to any one
terminal on the 3174; the user may then hot-key between them.
Note: The hosts defined for each terminal are statically defined. A new
customization is required to change them.

Remote Gateway Group Poll
The remote 3174 LAN gateway and all attached DSPUs can be serviced with a
single poll using this function. Previously, DSPUs had to be individually polled,
which limited the performance of the gateway.
With group poll, the gateway responds positively to that poll whenever input is
pending from a LAN-attached device.
In this way, long polling lists are avoided within the NCP (improving NCP
performance) and the number of unproductive polls is significantly reduced on
the line. This in turn reduces the response times for the DSPUs, or allows more
DSPUs to be attached to the remote LAN (see 4.7.7, “Group Poll” on page 110
for more details).
To support group polling, NCP must be at V4.3.2 or V5.3 or later. (Alternately, a
PTF can be applied to V4.3.1 or V5.2.1.)

Network Asset Management
This function can be used in cooperation with NetView to provide inventory
management for both the 3174s and attached terminals in the network.
The 3174 records information about its attached devices every time one is
powered on while plugged into a 3174 port. The information includes the device

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

19

type and characteristics and, with some of the newer terminals, the serial
number is also available.
Data can also be entered manually into the 3174 by an operator for record
keeping. The Network Asset Management (NAM) data is retrieved to NetView in
response to an SNA command on the SSCP-PU session.
To support NAM, VTAM V3.1.1 and NetView R3 for MVS/XA, MVS/ESA, VM/SP,
VM/XA on the owning host are required.
For processing the data gathered by NetView, products like Service Level
Reporter (SLR), Information Management or other equivalent products are
necessary.

Intelligent Printer Data Stream Support
Intelligent Printer Data Stream (IPDS) support for the IBM 4224 Printer, and other
IBM All Points Addressable (APA) printers, is a structured field approach to
management and control of printer processes. It is designed to allow the
presentation of text, raster images, vector graphics, bar codes and previously
stored overlays at any point on a page.
IPDS commands within the data stream also enable the host processor to control
media handling, error recovery, and the down-loading and management of
symbol sets (fonts) and printer stored objects, such as overlays and page
segments. The printer can later use these stored objects to construct a printed
page. IPDS can significantly reduce the load on the host processor.
Printers capable of IPDS are supported by SNA and non-SNA 3174s.
IPDS depends on programming support outside the controller.

1.4.3 Licensed Internal Code (LIC)
There are four different versions of 3174 microcode currently available. These
versions of microcode are now licensed and will be referred to as “Licensed
Internal Code” in 3174 documentation.
For convenience and understanding, the term 3174 microcode or simply
microcode is used more often in this document.

Microcode Releases/Levels
The latest microcode releases/levels, as of July 1994, are:
•

Configuration Support-A Release 5.6

•

Configuration Support-S Release 5.6

•

Configuration Support-B Release 4.4

•

Configuration Support-C Release 5.0

The microcode level is shown on the diskette label. For example, a
Configuration Support-C Control diskette at Release 5.0 will have the following
information printed on the label:

20

3174 Installation Guide

DISKETTE TYPE: 2.4 MB 3174 CONTROL
LICENSED INTERNAL CODE - PROPERTY OF IBM
MACHINE 3174

P/N 74F3319

E/C C98883

ML94167

MICROCODE LVL C5.0

Figure 1. 3174 Microcode Release Diskette Label Information

LVL C5.0 means the diskette is Configuration Support-C Release 5 and ML94167
means the microcode level is at Julian date, day 167 of 1994.
Each 3174 model will support only certain microcode release levels. See B.2,
“Old 3174 Feature Summary” on page 741 and B.3, “New 3174 Feature
Summary” on page 742 for the release levels supported.

Configuration Support-A
Configuration Support-A is the original microcode offered with the 3174. It
provides all of the base functions of the 3174 and includes support for the
following features:
•

Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

•

2.4MB diskette drive

•

20MB fixed disk

•

Type 1 Teleprocessing Communication Adapter (V.24/V.28 or V.35) used as
an alternate configuration

•

Type 2 Teleprocessing Communication Adapter (X.21) used as an alternate
configuration

•

Type 3 (4 Mbps) Token-Ring Adapter used as an alternate configuration

•

Type 3A Dual Speed (16/4 Mbps) Token-Ring Adapter used as an alternate
configuration.

•

Storage expansion to 4MB

•

Central Site Customizing Utility

•

Central Site Change Management

•

Intelligent Printer Data Stream (IPDS)

•

Multiple Logical Terminals (MLT)

•

Country Extended Code Page (CECP)

•

Response Time Monitor (RTM)

•

Terminal Multiplexer Adapter (TMA)

•

Network Asset Management (NAM)

•

Serial Original Equipment Manufacturer Interface (SOEMI)

•

Encrypt/Decrypt

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

21

Configuration Support-S
Configuration Support-S is delivered as part of the 3270 Token-Ring Gateway
feature #3026. (In the past it was also supplied with the 4 Mbps Token-Ring
Gateway adapter #3025.)
Configuration Support-S includes all the functions of Configuration Support-A,
plus the gateway support.

Configuration Support-B
Concurrent with the announcement of the 3174 Establishment Controller, IBM
also announced Configuration Support-B.

Configuration Support-B Release 1: Release 1 included all the features of
Configuration Support-A and Configuration Support-S except for the
Encrypt/Decrypt support, the 7232 Dual Control Unit Multiplexer, and Physical
Services Header (PSH) protocol on X.25 host connections. In addition, some new
functions were included:
•

Storage expansion to 6MB

•

Concurrent Communication Adapter

•

Single link multi-host support

•

Token-ring gateway enhancements including:
−

Group polling

−

250 DSPU support

Since Release 1, there have been three more releases. Each new release adds
to the functions provided by the previous release.

Configuration Support-B Release 2: Release 2 was a significant release; it
provided many new functions and feature support including:
•

Local Format Storage

•

Enhancements to AEA including:
−

8-bit ASCII support enabling NLS and graphics

−

UDT (User-Defined Terminal Table)

−

UDX (User-Defined Translate Table)

•

Type Ahead

•

Null/Space Processing

•

Extended Vital Product Data

•

Central Site Control Facility

•

Support for Models 21L, 21R and 90R

Configuration Support-B Release 3: Release 3 offers the following:

22

3174 Installation Guide

•

Enterprise Systems Connection (ESCON) channel on Models 12L and 22L

•

Support for 3299 Model 32

•

Enhancements to token-ring gateway support including:
−

Ability of token-ring attached devices to access a host via the CCA

−

Full duplex line support for token-ring gateway

−

8KB RU size for Models 12L and 22L gateways.

•

Multiple host access over X.25 networks

•

Support for X.25 1984 implementation

•

Remote IML via online tests.

Configuration Support-B Release 4: Release 4 offers the following:
•

Support for the 3270 Port Expansion Feature (64-port)

•

Support for 4 MB storage expansion feature, providing 6 MB total storage on
Models 61R, 62R, and 63R.

Configuration Support-B Licensed Internal Code is an optional feature. It is
available using the following feature codes for the different models:
•

#5010 for Models 0xx, 1xx and 2xx

•

#5060 for Models 51R, 53R and 6xR

•

#5090 for Models 90R, 91R and 92R

Configuration Support-C
In 1991, IBM announced Configuration Support-C to support ISDN, Peer
Communication and APPN.
Configuration Support-C includes all the features in Configuration Support-B. It
requires 3MB of memory and either two 2.4MB diskette drives or one 2.4MB
diskette drive and a hard disk.
Configuration Support-C is an optional feature. It is available using the following
feature codes for the different models:
•

#6010 for models 0xx, 1xx, and 2xx

•

#6015 to upgrade from Configuration Support-B for Models 0xx, 1xx, and 2xx

•

#6060 for Models 51R, 53R and 6xR

•

#6065 to upgrade from Configuration Support-B for Models 51R, 53R and 6xR.

Configuration Support-C Release 1: Release 1 with the Advanced Peer-to-Peer
Networking (APPN) feature (#7010 or #7060) allows the 3174 to be a network
node, providing services to support low-entry networking (LEN) nodes and APPN
end nodes (EN).
Release 1 with the Peer Communication feature (#8010 or #8060) allows
DOS-based intelligent workstations (with PRPQ P85114 Workstation Peer
Communication Support Program) and OS/2-based intelligent workstations (with
Extended Services) the ability to communicate with each other and access the
resources available on the IBM Token-Ring Network.
Release 1 also provides support for ISDN downstream intelligent workstations

Configuration Support-C Release 2: Release 2 integrates the following end-user
enhancements into Configuration Support-C base microcode:
•

Split screen

•

Copy from session to session

•

Local print buffer sharing

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

23

•

HAP sharing for local copy

•

Calculator function

•

Token-ring T1 timer/retry count

•

5250 keyboard emulation

•

132 column support via AEA

•

Entry Assist support for ASCII

•

CSCF IML password suppression

See Chapter 14, “Configuration Support-C Release 2” on page 445 for further
information.

Configuration Support-C Release 3: The functional capabilities of the 3174 are
extended with Configuration Support-C, Release 3 which supports connections to
SNA, APPN, and TCP/IP environments. Release 3 builds on the APPN and Peer
Communication (LAN over Coax) capabilities of Release 2.
New APPN enhancements include:
•

3174 APPN NN compatibility in environments where the host is a LEN node,
APPN EN, APPN NN, Migration Data Host (MDH) or an Interchange Node (IN).

•

Support for multiple links into a LEN subarea from an APPN network
comprised of 3174s and other APPN nodes.

•

Support for the transfer of 3270 and APPN data streams across a single
SDLC or token-ring link between a 3174 and an AS/400 running OS/400 V2R2
or later.

These APPN enhancements complement the new APPN functions provided by
VTAM V2R1 and NCP V6R2 and allow APPN node-to-node communications
across SDLC, parallel channel and token-ring host links.
Release 3 also provides the following enhancements:
•

Integration of TCP/IP Telnet support (RPQ 8Q0935) allows 3270 CUT terminals
and ASCII display stations attached to a 3174 to communicate with TCP/IP
servers using Telnet.

•

Concurrent Communication Adapter (CCA) support is expanded from 32 ports
to 64 ports.

•

Calculator function enhancements add percent and hexadecimal support.

•

Increased flexibility for HAP assignment allows a HAP printer to be assigned
an LT other than 1A2.

•

Improvements to the customization procedure for 3174 Peer Communication.

•

Additional keyboard support for 5250 Emulation.

See Chapter 15, “Configuration Support-C Release 3” on page 481 for further
information.

Configuration Support-C Release 4: Release 4 supports only the 3174s with
Ethernet capability and fulfills the September 15, 1992, Statement of Direction for
3174 Ethernet LAN support and TN3270 support for TCP/IP. Release 4
enhancements include:

24

3174 Installation Guide

•

TCP/IP enhancements such as TN3270 support, TCP/IP dependent host
printer support, and SNMP MIB-II support available through RPQ 8Q1041.

•

PC-based application sharing solutions.

See Chapter 16, “Configuration Support-C Release 4” on page 487 for further
information.

Configuration Support-C Release 5: Release 5, announced in June 1994,
includes all functions of Configuration Support-C Release 3 and Ethernet support
provided in Configuration Support-C Release 4. In addition to that, the following
major enhancements are integrated into the 3174 Licensed Internal Code:
•

Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking (APPN), which:
−

Provides APPN functions for dependent traffic without requiring a
boundary attachment to an SNA host.

−

Provides APPN X.25 and APPN Frame Relay communications support.

−

Supports focal points for APPN network management.

−

Supports attachment to APPN boarder nodes.

−

Supports central directory server (CDS).

•

Frame Relay Communications feature that supports SNA 3270, LAN Gateway,
APPN, and TCP/IP.

•

Support for higher speed WAN communications (up to 256 Kbps for X.21 and
V.35 for SDLC and Frame Relay communications).

•

5250 Emulation enhancements.

•

MLT support for printers.

•

HAP support for CCA hosts.

•

Multi-host ASCII support that allows devices attached to the 3174 through an
AEA Adapters to access multiple hosts.

•

Multiple CECP Language support that allows customization of a unique
language for each host.

•

Personal Systems/55 (PS/55) multistation printer sharing support.

See Chapter 17, “Configuration Support-C Release 5” on page 493 for further
information.

1.4.4 Microcode Specify Codes
The following specify codes can be specified when ordering 3174 microcode.
The specify codes are used when central site customization and distribution of
microcode is desired.

#9005 Inhibit LIC Shipment: This specify code blocks the shipment of Licensed
Internal Code and related documentation with the 3174. A Limited Function
Utility diskette, which cannot be used to customize the 3174 unlike the
full-function Utility diskette, is shipped instead.
You would specify this feature for remote 3174s to which microcode is delivered
from a central site, either physically or electronically.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

25

#9006 Central Site Diskette Distribution Aid: This specify code identifies the
3174 as the central site controller and enables the customer to order all
combinations of microcode configuration support levels, RPQs and Downstream
Load diskettes.
This specify code provides automatic shipment of microcode updates.

#9007 Configuration Support-S Central Site LIC Shipment: This specify code
enables the central site customer to order Configuration Support-S LIC for the
central site 3174 for customizing purposes only. This specify code is to be used
in conjunction with #9006, which identifies the central site 3174. This specify
code cannot be ordered on 3174s that have #9005 Inhibit LIC Shipment or on
3174s that are not designated as central site 3174s with #9006.
#9008 Central Site Distribution Aid for Models 21L and 21R: This specify code
identifies the Model 21L or 21R as the central site 3174. When the Model 21L or
21R is the central site 3174, only Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later
releases apply. Therefore, all the 3174s in the distribution network must operate
at Configuration Support-B Release 2 or later. It enables a customer to order
the LIC, RPQs, and DSL code for the central site 3174.
#9009 Central Site Distribution Aid for Models 12L and 22L: This specify code
identifies the Model 12L or 22L as the central site 3174. When the Model 12L or
22L is the central site 3174, only Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later
releases apply. Therefore, all the 3174s in the distribution network must operate
at Configuration Support-B Release 3 or later. It enables a customer to order
the LIC, RPQs, and DSL code for the central site 3174.

1.4.5 Microcode RPQs
An RPQ (Request for Price Quotation) is an alteration or enhancement,
requested by customers, to the functional capabilities provided by the base
microcode. An RPQ diskette can contain up to 30 RPQs. Up to ten RPQs can be
merged on to a 3174 Control diskette, by selecting the Merge RPQ procedure
from the 3174 customization panel.
Occasionally, an RPQ is packaged as a new set of Control and Utility diskettes;
in this case, it is referred as a Control Disk RPQ.
Some of the more significant RPQs available are described in this section.

3174 Peer Communication RPQ (8Q0718)
The 3174 Peer Communication RPQ is available with Configuration Support-B. It
is also available as the Peer Communication Licensed Internal Code feature with
Configuration Support-C.
Note: The Configuration Support-C Peer Communication LIC feature is primarily
intended for intelligent workstations coax-attached to the 3174 Token-Ring
models (x3R) since the internal bridging function is available only to access the
external Token-Ring Network
The 3174 Peer Communication RPQ provides the following function for DOS and
OS/2* workstations attached to the 3174 via coax ports.
•

26

3174 Installation Guide

Peer-to-peer communication between intelligent workstations, allowing them
to form a local area network segment

•

Bridge functions to access the IBM Token-Ring Network for functions such as
print/file servers

•

Local management functions for problem determination of the LAN segment.

There are prerequisites for the intelligent workstations to function as
coax-attached peer workstations (also known as 3174-Peer devices). DOS
workstations require the IBM 3174 Workstation Peer Communication Support
Program, 5799-PHL (PRPQ P85114). OS/2 workstations require Extended
Services.
The 3174 Peer Communication RPQ supports LAN applications that enable
access to file/print servers attached to the 3174, as well as to workstations and
servers attached to IBM Token-Ring LANs.
Support for LAN applications is provided concurrently with support for S/370 host
access applications via existing IBM 3270 emulation programs.
The following IBM LAN application programs have been tested for compatibility
with the 3174 Peer Communication RPQ:
•

IBM Personal Communications/3270 V1.01 and later (see note 1)

•

IBM PC LAN Program V1.32

•

IBM DOS LAN Requester packaged with the IBM OS/2 LAN Server V1.2

•

IBM Advanced Program to Program Communications/PC V1.11

•

IBM 3270 Workstation Program V1.12

•

IBM AS/400 PC Support Version 1 Release 3 (see note 2)

•

IBM PC/Host File Transfer and Terminal Emulator Program (FTTERM) V2.1
(see note 3).

Notes:
1. IBM Personal Communications/3270 supports 3174 Peer Communication only
when used in a conventional memory environment. Running in Expanded
Memory Specification (EMS) memory is not supported.
2. AS/400 PC Support is not supported with 3278/3279 Emulator Adapter P/N
1602507.
3. FTTERM is supported when communicating with the IBM LAN Asynchronous
Communications Server (LANACS).
IBM PC 3270 Emulation Program Entry Level is not compatible with Peer
Communication.
In order for a 3174 Peer device to communicate with an SNA host application
through a 3174 (all applicable models except the 3174 x3R/x4R), the 3174 is
configured as a token-ring gateway. The 3174 Peer devices are treated as
DSPUs by the host and they are configured as such in the gateway. These
3174-Peer devices are not restricted to using the 3174 gateway but may use any
appropriate gateway.
Capability is provided for the management of the LAN segment formed by the
3174 and the workstations attached to it; this segment is also known as the 3174
Peer segment. Management functions can be accessed via the 3174 online
tests, which allow problem diagnosis and updates to the network configuration.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

27

These online tests may also be accessed using the Central Site Control Facility
(CSCF). CSCF allows multiple LAN segments to be centrally managed. Refer to
IBM 3174 Establishment Controller Peer Communication User ′ s Guide , for more
detail.
The 3174 Peer Communication RPQ provides approximately one fifth (1/5) the
aggregate bandwidth of a 4 Mbps token ring. Response times for
server/requester file copy functions will be equal to or better than response
times for devices attached to a 3174 Model 11L running Workstation Program
Version 1.x. in file transfer mode with an SNA host. Response times will vary
with the amount of data being transferred, the location of the server/requester in
the configuration, and the 3174 system load.
The 3174 Peer Communication RPQ is intended for customers who require both
host interactive access and IBM Token-Ring connectivity for DOS and OS/2
workstations attached to 3174s via existing 3270 wiring and have not rewired (or
cannot rewire) the workstation location to the IBM Cabling System.
For customers with existing 3270 wiring, the 3174 Peer Communication RPQ
provides a migration path for evolving from a computing environment that is
exclusively host interactive, to an environment that also includes LAN capability.
It is intended as a migration vehicle until rewiring to the IBM Cabling System can
be carried out.
There are several significant differences between the 3174 Peer Communication
RPQ support and a token-ring LAN that should be understood. For example, the
3174 Peer Communication RPQ support provides a unique MAC layer function.
Together with WPCSP, it allows the 802.2 and NetBIOS protocols to operate in
the 3174 Peer Communication environment. Any application that is specific to
the Token-Ring MAC layer (802.5) function will not operate with the 3174 Peer
Communication support.
The following 3174 models and token-ring features can use the 3174 Peer
Communication RPQ:

28

3174 Installation Guide

•

Model 01L with #3026, #3030 or #3044

•

Model 01R with #3026, #3030 or #3044

•

Model 02R with #3026, #3030 or #3044

•

Model 03R with #3030

•

Model 11L with #3026 or #3044

•

Model 11R with #3026 or #3044

•

Model 12L with #3044

•

Model 12R with #3026 or #3044

•

Models 13R and 23R

•

Model 21L with #3044

•

Model 21R with #3044

•

Model 22L with #3044

•

Model 51R with #3026, #3030 or #3044

•

Model 53R with #3030

•

Model 61R with #3026 or #3044

•

Model 62R with #3026 or #3044

•

Model 63R.

Configuration Support-B Release 1.1 or later is required and additional 3174
controller storage is needed for the 3174 Peer Communication RPQ.
The 3174-Peer devices require:
•

One of the following computers and associated adapter:
−

IBM PC, PC/XT*, PC/AT, and PS/2 Models 25/30/30-286 with the IBM
3278/3279 Emulation Adapter

−

IBM PS/2 Models 50Z/55/60/70/P70/80 with the IBM 3270 Connection card

•

IBM DOS 3.3 or later

•

IBM 3174 Workstation Peer Communication Support Program (WPCSP)

•

Approximately 70KB of memory is required in the computer for WPCSP

See Chapter 19, “Peer Communication” on page 557 for further information.

T2.1 Passthru Gateway RPQ (8Q0800)
The Type 2.1 Passthru Gateway RPQ, for users of Configuration Support-B,
extends the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway support to allow LAN attached devices to
establish T2.1 and PU 2.0 sessions with channel and TP attached hosts.
The T2.1 gateway function parallels the existing PU 2.0 support. That is, a logical
connection is provided to a LAN attached T2.1 node which gives the appearance
that the node is directly attached to the host. The gateway serves to map either
the device subchannel addresses or SDLC poll addresses to LAN MAC
addresses and vice versa.
The gateway function has been expanded to handle XID3 transfer between the
host and the LAN devices. Upon successful completion of the XID3 sequence the
gateway “opens” the linkstation and enters a passthrough mode for the data
transfers between the host and devices.
Link termination for T2.1 devices is dependent on the protocol of the upstream
link (SDLC or channel). Termination can occur as a result of host request,
device request, or link failure.
Customization for the Type 2.1 Passthru Gateway RPQ is similar to that of the
current gateway support. Prerequisites include the following:
•

Type 3A Dual Speed (16/4) Communication Adapter

•

Configuration Support-B Licensed Internal Code

•

Models 01L, 01R, 02R, 51R may require additional storage

•

For 3174 remote models, VTAM V3R2 or later is required

•

For 3174 local models with a VM system, VTAM V3R3 is required

•

For 3174 local models with an MVS system, VTAM V3R4 is required

•

NCP V4R3 is required for 3725

•

NCP V5R2 is required for 3720 or 3745

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

29

The Type 2.1 Passthru Gateway RPQ will only operate for link connections made
via the primary link (TP or Channel) to an SNA host.
See Chapter 6, “X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ” on page 187 for further
information.

X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ (8Q0743)
The X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ which was initially based on Configuration
Support-B Release 3, extends the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway support by adding
connectivity to multiple IBM hosts via the X.25 network.
The current release of the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ is based on
Configuration Support-C Release 3. For the Configuration Support-C Release 5,
the planned date of availability of the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ is
December 30, 1994.
The X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ also allows IBM hosts on the token ring to
access devices on the X.25 network. A token-ring device communicates with an
X.25 device via a session over a switched virtual circuit (SVC). The current X.25
Token-Ring Gateway RPQ does not support permanent virtual circuits (PVCs).
Each 3174 may have up to 200 simultaneous connections (SVCs) between
token-ring and X.25 devices. Up to 200 SVCs are available via the primary link
with a maximum of 25 SVCs via each CCA; that is, the total number of SVCs is
200 over three physical links. These SVCs can be shared by a pool of PCs.
The X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ would be of benefit in some of the following
situations:
•

Remote token-ring attached PCs needing access to one or more hosts via
the X.25 network

•

Sites that need to provide access to one or more local hosts to remote
workstations coming in through the X.25 network but either do not have IBM
NCP Packet Switching Interface (NPSI) installed in their 37xx or do not have
a 37xx Communication Controller

•

Sites using X.25 for disaster recovery

See Chapter 6, “X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ” on page 187 for further
information.

3174 TCP/IP Telnet RPQ (8Q0935)
The 3174 TCP/IP Telnet RPQ extends the 3174 into the TCP/IP networking
environment. Together with Configuration Support-C Release 2 as the base
microcode, the RPQ provides a TCP/IP Telnet client function. This function is
integrated into the 3174 Configuration Support-C Release 3 and later LIC. It adds
support in the 3174 for TCP/IP protocols, allowing the 3174 to communicate
directly with TCP/IP hosts via a token ring.
With the 3174 TCP/IP Telnet RPQ, a 3270 CUT, ASCII or DFT-E (CUT side of
DFT-E) terminal attached to a 3174 can establish a Telnet session with a TCP/IP
server anywhere in the existing LAN/WAN network. The 3174 communicates via
its token-ring interface with the TCP/IP host.

30

3174 Installation Guide

The host/server may be attached directly to the same token ring as the 3174, or
it may exist anywhere in the network reachable through that token ring and any
bridges or routers.
Using 3174 MLT and the TCP/IP TELNET function, a user may access a
combination of SNA, ASCII and TCP/IP hosts (up to five hosts) concurrently from
a single terminal.
When using TCP/IP, a coax-attached display terminal can access full-screen
(24x80 characters) TELNET applications, by emulating a DEC** VT100**, DEC
VT220**, DG Dasher 210**, or IBM 3101 terminal.
See Chapter 21, “TCP/IP” on page 605 and the ITSO publication Using 3174 in
TCP/IP Networks , GG24-4172, for further information.

3174 TCP/IP Enhancement RPQ (8Q1041)
In December 1993, Configuration Support-C Release 4 was announced. Included
in this announcement was the 3174 TCP/IP Enhancement RPQ 8Q1041, which will
provide:
•

TN3270 support

•

TCP/IP dependent host printer support

•

SNMP MIB-II support

This RPQ was made available in April 1994, and is based on Configuration
Support-C Release 4. With RPQ 8Q1041, therefore, the TCP/IP capabilities of the
3174 are extended further.
Note: The RPQ 8Q1041, which is a control disk RPQ for Configuration Support-C
Release 4 LIC, enables Token-Ring LAN support (the Configuration Support-C
Release 4 base LIC does not allow a token-ring LAN to be customized).
See 21.1.3, “Support with 3174 TCP/IP Enhancement RPQ (8Q1041)” on page 606
and Chapter 9, ″3174 TCP/IP Enhancement RPQ 8Q1041″ in the ITSO publication
Using 3174 in TCP/IP Networks , GG24-4172 for further information.

3174 IP Forwarding RPQ (8Q1289)
The IP Forwarding RPQ 8Q1289, which is based on Configuration Support-C
Release 5 LIC, provides IP forwarding between a LAN interface and a Frame
Relay interface. This RPQ enables intelligent workstations that are not attached
to the 3174 using Peer Communications, access to TCP/IP hosts via the Frame
Relay links.
IP forwarding allows devices on the LAN and Frame Relay to send IP datagrams
to the 3174 with a destination IP address other than the 3174′s IP address. If the
3174 has a route to the destination IP address, it will forward the datagram on its
way.
Since the 3174 actually provides static IP routing for LANs attached intelligent
workstations to TCP/IP hosts, it is also known as IP routing. However, RPQ
8Q1289 does not support routing protocols (RIP, for example) and only static
(pre-customized) routes are used in the 3174.
See 21.1.4, “Support with 3174 IP Forwarding RPQ (8Q1289)” on page 607 for
further information.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

31

7 Color AEA Support RPQ (8Q1467)
This RPQ allows ASCII devices connected to the 3174 using the 3270 Emulation
Feature to display seven colors and four types of highlighting by appearing to the
application to have an Extended Attribute Buffer (EAB).
The sequences used to generate the additional colors and highlighting are ANSI
commands. These sequences cannot be changed. When using reverse video, the
background color sequence is sent. The sequences consist of
′1B 5 B < p a r m > 6 D ′X ( E S C < l e f t b r a c k e t > < p a r m > m ) , w h e r e < p a r m > i s o f
the items in the table below:
Table 2. Color/Highlighting Parameters
ASCII Parameter

Hex
value of
ASCII

Reverse
video
value

Color/highlight

0

′30′ X

All attributes off

1

′31′ X

Intense mode on

4

′34′ X

Underscore on

5

′35′ X

Blink on

7

′37′ X

Reverse Video on

30

′3330′ X

′3430′ X

Normal color (Black)

31

′3331′ X

′3431′ X

Red

32

′3332′ X

′3432′ X

Green

33

′3333′ X

′3433′ X

Yellow*

36

′3336′ X

′3436′ X

Blue (Cyan)*

35

′3335′ X

′3435′ X

Pink

36

′3336′ X

′3436′ X

Turquoise/Cyan

37

′3337′ X

′3437′ X

White

Note: These colors also send the Intense Mode Sequence except for reverse
video.
Customization: The answer to Question 722 must be V6 or U1 in order to use
this feature. Any station set with these answers will be automatically set up for 7
color mode.
Station type V6 has been modified to match the UDT.
Limitations:

32

3174 Installation Guide

•

The ANSI color and highlight sequences cannot be changed with a UDT.

•

Only Station Types U1 and V6 may use this feature.

1.5 Communication Network Management
Communication Network Management products support the 3174 error detection
and configuration reporting. However, the enhancements and changes made in
the 3174 require the following programs at the specified levels for central site
problem determination:
•

For all models except those with the LAN feature:
−

NPDA V3R2
- APAR PP43332 (PTF UP90223) for MVS/370
- APAR PP43337 (PTF UP90224) for MVS/XA
- APAR VM22413 (PTF UV90110) for VM

−
•

•

NetView.

For models with the Token-Ring Gateway feature:
−

ACF/VTAM V3R1.1

−

NetView V1R1

For models with the Ethernet feature:
−

ACF/VTAM V3R4

−

NetView V2R3

Response Time Monitor (RTM) is a base 3174 function. It is supported at the
host by:
•

NLDM Rel 2 for VM/SP

•

NLDM Rel 3 for MVS/370, MVS/XA*, and VSE

•

NetView

RTM may also be used without host support.

1.6 Personal Computer Support
1.6.1 3270 Emulation
The 3174 supports IBM PCs and PS/2s configured to operate with:
•

IBM Personal Computer 3278/79 Emulation Control Program V1, P/N 6024134
and V2, P/N 8665780.

•

IBM PC 3270 Emulation Program, Entry Level, P/N 59X9904.

•

IBM PC 3270 Emulation Program Entry Level V1.1, P/N 75X1037

•

IBM PC 3270 Emulation Program Entry Level V1.2, P/N 75X1085

•

IBM PC 3270 Emulation Program Entry Level V2.0

•

3270 Workstation Program V1.0 (P/N 74X9921) and V1.1 P/N 75X1088

•

IBM PC 3270 Emulation Program V3.0, P/N 59X9969

•

RT* Personal Computer 3278/79 Emulation Program, PP 5669-052

•

IBM Virtual Machine/Personal Computer Release 2 P/N 6467040

•

PC/VM Bond Release 2, P/N 6467022
Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

33

•

VM Bond Release 2.1, P/N 6476128

•

IBM Virtual Machine/Personal Computer Release 2, P/N 6467040

•

Personal Services/PC Release 1.04 (P/N 6403826) or higher

•

AIX/RT Workstation Host Interface Program, 5601-189

•

DrawMaster* Workstation Support, 5601-100

•

Personal Communications/3270 V1.01, P/N 15F7121

•

Personal Communications/3270 V2.0, P/N 91F8594 or 91F8595

•

Personal Communications/3270 V3.0, P/N 42G0452 or 42G0458

•

Personal Communications/3270 V3.1, P/N 79G0425

•

Personal Communications/3270 V4.0, P/N 20H1749

•

Personal Communications, AS/400 and 3270 V4.0 for Windows, P/N 22H6146

•

Personal Communications, AS/400 V4.0 for Windows, P/N20H1624

•

OS/2 Extended Edition V1.2, P/N 15F7143 or 15F7144

•

OS/2 Extended Edition V1.3, P/N 15F7195 or 15F7196

•

OS/2 Extended Services, P/N 96F8326 or 96F8327

Not all of the above listed programs are still supported by IBM.

1.6.2 File Transfer
The 3174 supports the following host file transfer programs which allow the PCs
and PS/2s to transfer files:
•

PC Bond, PP 5664-298

•

VM/PC, PP 5664-319

•

MVS/TSO, PP 5665-311

•

VM/SP, PP 5664-281

•

DISOSS for MVS, PP 5665-290

•

DISOSS for VSE, PP 5666-270

•

PROFS*, PP 5664-309 (Personal Computer Connection Extended).

1.7 Language Support
The 3174 offers two levels of language support: the basic support and an
extended support called Country Extended Code Page (CECP).

1.7.1 National Language Support (NLS)
The 3174 supports the following keyboard languages:

34

3174 Installation Guide

•

Austrian/German

•

Belgian

•

Belgian (New)

•

Brazilian

•

Brazilian (New)

•

Bulgarian Latin

•

Canadian Bilingual

•

Croatian/Serbian/Slovenian

•

Cyrillic

•

Cyrillic (Bulgarian)

•

Cyrillic (Macedonian/Serbian)

•

Cyrillic (Russian)

•

Czech

•

Danish

•

EBCDIC World Trade

•

English (UK)

•

English (USA)

•

English (USA ASCII International)

•

English (USA ASCII-7)

•

English (USA ASCII-8)

•

Finnish

•

French

•

Greek

•

Greek (New)

•

Hungarian

•

Icelandic

•

Italian

•

International

•

Japanese English

•

Japanese Katakana

•

Macedonian/Serbian Latin

•

Netherlands

•

Norwegian

•

Polish

•

Portuguese

•

ROECE Latin

•

Romanian

•

Slovak

•

Spanish

•

Spanish-speaking

•

Swedish

•

Swiss/French (New)

•

Swiss/German (New)

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

35

•

Thai

•

Turkish

•

Yugoslavic

In addition, some specialized keyboards are supported including:
•

APL

•

APL2

•

EBCDIC (WT)

•

TEXT

1.7.2 Country Extended Code Page (CECP)
CECP is an extension of each Latin-based national language code page, to a
191-code-point language code page for the following languages:
•

Austrian/German

•

Belgian (New)

•

Brazilian (New)

•

Canadian Bilingual

•

Danish

•

English (UK)

•

English (US)

•

Finnish

•

French

•

Italian

•

Netherlands

•

Norwegian

•

Portuguese

•

Spanish

•

Spanish-speaking

•

Swedish

•

Swiss/French (New)

•

Swiss/German (New)

When used in conjunction with CECP-capable displays and printers, CECP allows
you to use symbols from languages other than the one for which the 3174 is
customized.
Devices which support CECP when attached to a 3174 include:

36

3174 Installation Guide

•

3191 Models D, E and L

•

3192 Models C, D, F, L and W

•

3472 InfoWindow*

•

3481/3482 InfoWindow II

•

3812 Printer Model 2

•

3816 Printer Models 01D and 01S

•

4224, 4234 and 6262 printers

•

ASCII attached devices

CECP is invoked by responding to customization question 123 with a 1; it also
requires the response in question 121 to be one of the CECP-capable languages
listed above. It will be active then for all CECP-capable devices powered on and
connected to that 3174.
To understand CECP, it is first necessary to know what a code page is. A code
page is the table which translates the hexadecimal code sent to the 3174 into
commands or into graphical characters (for display or printing). These
hexadecimal codes are referred to as code points in the code page. 3270
commands use the same code points for all languages; the 3270 commands are
confined to using code points X′00 ′ through X′3F′. The remaining code points
(X′40′ through X′FF′) are mapped to graphical characters. However, not all of
the available code points in this range are used. Different languages can use
different code points for their own unique characters.
Before CECP, inconsistencies exist between different implementations of the
code pages, with some languages using different code points for the same
character.
With CECP, one universal character set has been defined. This universal set
contains 190 characters plus the space character required to support all CECP
languages. It is known as character set 697 .
There are host programming considerations for CECP. First, the host application
must be capable of accepting without error all the 190 CECP code points.
Second, the application must be using the code points as CECP characters. You
should be aware that if you are using some of the code points which were
unassigned before CECP was available that you could encounter problems with
existing application data bases (see “System Considerations”).

System Considerations
You may need to consider whether host programs accept CECP data before
customizing for CECP. When CECP is supported, conventions may need to be
adopted. IBM host applications, vendor applications, and in-house applications
may be affected.
CECP generally doubles the number of valid I/O code points generated from a
keyboard and sent inbound. It is the customer′s responsibility to ensure that
host programs and data bases can accept CECP data. Be careful of the
following:
•

Host filters

•

Host use of previously defined I/O code points

•

Data integrity

You may be required to keep track of which data sets will or will not be CECP.

Chapter 1. Introduction to the 3174

37

Host Filters: Filters in host programs could generate undesired results. The
filters might reject or translate some CECP-unique graphic code points from their
original values to incorrect values. This might cause a data loss, a program
check, or undetected, erroneous alteration of data.
Host Use of Previously Undefined I/O Code Points: Since a user could not
directly enter previously undefined character code points, a host program could
be using those code points for other purposes without causing conflicts before
CECP support. However, with CECP support, host usage of these previously
undefined code points may now result in conflict with the CECP usage.
One example would be if a host application (such as a data base manager) used
the previously undefined character code points as control codes (such as end of
file markers).
Another example would be a host application that used the previously undefined
character code points as values for a special font (such as APL).

38

3174 Installation Guide

Chapter 2. Installation Planning
The smooth installation of any system or subsystem is usually related to the
amount of planning that is performed before the installation. The 3174 is no
different in this respect to any other system or subsystem.
The 3174 is designated a customer setup (CSU) machine. This means that you,
the customer, is responsible for unpacking, installing, testing and customizing
the 3174. If you are familiar with the installation of 3274 Control Units, you will
find the 3174 is an easier proposition.
If you are installing a 3174 Model 01L, 11L or 21L, there are a few tasks that will
be performed by the IBM Service Representative.
The starting point for planning before the actual installation is the 3174 Site
Planning manual, which contains a Site Planning Checklist. You should use this
checklist for planning your installation.

2.1 Host Attachment
Host attachment of the channel and link attached 3174s is the same as an
equivalent 3274. I/O and NCP generation should be done as though an
equivalent 3274 were being attached.

2.1.1 Local Channel
The 3174 Model 01L, 11L and 21L attaches to the host via parallel channel
interface cables (Bus and Tag) in the same way as the 3274 channel attached
models. For these models, you will need an IBM Service Representative to
perform the following tasks:
•

Connecting the 3174 to the channel using Bus and Tag cables.

•

Connecting the power control and sequence cable if required.

•

Altering the channel priority switches if required. The default setting is for
high priority .

•

Checking the UCW setting if required. UCWs are only used on 43xx and
earlier processors running in non-XA/ESA mode. In the later/larger models,
for example, 3090* and ES/9000*, the IOCDS is used to define I/O. The
IOCDS is prepared by the systems programmer.

The 3174 should be customized before the IBM Service Representative is called.
The following customization questions relate to channel operations:
•

Question 104: Controller Address

•

Question 105: Upper Limit Address

•

Question 222: Support of Command retry

•

Question 224: Mode of Data Transfer

•

Question 225: Channel Burst Size

This is the only part of the installation that needs to be performed by the IBM
Service Representative. The rest of the installation is customer setup (see 2.6.1,
“CSU Installation” on page 44).
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

39

One difference between the 3274 and the 3174 is that the Bus and Tag cables
need to be between 1.5 feet (0.455 meters) and 3 feet (0.915 meters) longer to
accommodate the 3174. The floor cutout for the cables is different as well. This
is because the channel cables attach to the lower right of the 3274 whereas they
attach to the top left of the 3174.
The 3174 Models 12L and 22L attach to the S/390 ESCON channels via optical
fiber cable (see 2.6.1, “CSU Installation” on page 44).

2.1.2 Remote TP Link
When attaching the communication cable (also known as a modem cable, data
set cable or TP interface cable) to the 3174, it is important that you use the cable
supplied with the 3174. Cables from a 3274 will not work because the DCE
interface is at the end of the IBM-supplied cable, not at the 3174 communication
adapter socket.
For example, the 3174 V.35 cable looks like a V.24 cable with an extra stub cable
attached at the end. This is not the case. Attempting to remove the V.35 stub
cable and using the resulting cable as a V.24 cable will not work. Also, the 3174
is able to detect what kind of cable is attached. If an improper cable is attached,
an error occurs.

2.1.3 LAN Upstream
The 3174 Models x3R and x4R provide for LAN communication to an SNA host.
Communication to the host is through a host gateway. Typical gateways are: an
IBM 37xx Communication Controller with the ELA or TIC with NCP Token-Ring
Interconnection (NTRI) feature, or a 3174 with the LAN Gateway feature. The
LAN gateway feature is available on local and remote attached 3174 models.
The 3174 Models x3R have a Token-Ring Adapter that provides attachment to the
IBM Token-Ring Network and similarly, Models x4R have an Ethernet Adapter
that provides attachment to the Ethernet Network.
Like the other large 3174 models, up to 32 terminals may be attached to Models
03R, 13R, 14R, 23R, 24R and 43R, and up to 16 terminals may be attached to the
Models 53R, 63R and 64R. Models 13R and 14R may have the 3270 Port
Expansion Feature installed for attachment of up to 64 terminals.

2.2 3270 Terminal Attachment
3270 terminals (displays and printers) may be attached to the 3174 in several
ways:
•

Directly to the Terminal Adapter ports

•

To the Terminal Multiplexer Adapter ports

•

To the 3299 Terminal Multiplexer ports

•

A mix and match of the previous methods

When directly attaching to the IBM Cabling System Type 1 or Type 2 data grade
media, no baluns is needed when the Dual Purpose Connector (DPC) is used.
For Telephone Twisted-Pair TMA attachment, see 14.3, “Telephone Twisted-Pair
Terminal Multiplexer Adapter” on page 477.

40

3174 Installation Guide

Large 3174s (not Model 2xx)
The large-sized 3174 models have an adapter called the Terminal Adapter (TA).
The TA has four BNC connectors which can be used to directly attach up to four
terminals. The TA ports are normally used with either a TMA or a 3299 Terminal
Multiplexer attached to each of the four ports, giving a total of up to 32 ports on
each 3174. The large 3174 models may also have the 3270 Port Expansion
Feature installed. This feature provides four more BNC connectors which would
be used with either a TMA or a 3299 Terminal Multiplexer. The feature provides
an additional 32 ports for the large model 3174s so that a total of 64 devices may
be attached.

Terminal Multiplexer Adapter (Models 0xx, 1xx and 2xx only)
This is a 3174 adapter that is customer setup and is plugged into the logic board.
The TMAs use different slot positions in the logic board depending on the 3174
model and other installed options (see Appendix D, “3174 Feature Slot Usage”
on page 751).
Each TMA is attached to one of the four Terminal Adapter ports with a short
coax cable. You may then attach up to eight devices to the TMA ports. If you
are using the IBM Cabling System, you do not need baluns when the DPC is
used.

3299 Terminal Multiplexer
The 3299 Terminal Multiplexer is a device that multiplexes the datastreams from
Category A 3270 devices onto a single cable. It has connectors for attaching the
terminals and a connector for attaching a cable to the TA port. The device is
powered from a normal wall outlet.
There are four models of the 3299 Terminal Multiplexer: Models 2, 3, 32 and 32T.
Model 2 or Model 3 may attach to the 3174 via coax cable or the IBM Cabling
System with a DPC. Model 32 can attach via coax, fiber optic or IBM Cabling
System media. Model 32T uses TTP to attach devices without having the
requirement of impedance matching devices or baluns.
If you use the IBM Cabling System with the Model 2, a DPC at the 3299 Terminal
Multiplexer end of the cable is required. When used with the IBM Cabling
System, some IBM (older) terminals require baluns at their end of the IBM
Cabling System cable.
You may attach 3299 Terminal Multiplexers to any of the four TA ports. This
means that you may have a single cable (coax or IBM Cabling System) running
out to a cluster of users, where you install a 3299 Terminal Multiplexer. It is at
the user work area that you attach the terminals to the 3299 Terminal
Multiplexer. This can be a considerable cost saving in cables and makes
problem determination easier because of the reduced number of cables running
to the same area of the building. You may also ′mix and match′ TMAs and 3299
Terminal Multiplexers on a single 3174, thereby giving you the best combination
desired.

Chapter 2. Installation Planning

41

WNM 3174s (Models 41R and 43R)
3174 WNM, which is plugged into the IBM 8250 Multiprotocol Intelligent Hub, can
attach up to 32 devices through four TA ports.

Medium 3174s (Models 5xR and 6xR)
A medium-sized 3174 can attach up to 16 terminals. At the back of each
controller are nine BNC connectors labeled 0 through 8. All nine ports may be
used to directly attach terminals, giving up to nine devices on each 3174.
However, ports 0 and 8 are special ports and may have 3299 Terminal
Multiplexers attached to them. This means that by using one 3299 Terminal
Multiplexer attached to port 8 and attaching terminals to ports 0 through 7 you
can have up to 16 terminals attached.
Alternatively, you may attach a 3299 Terminal Multiplexer to port 0 and then
attach the terminals to the 3299 Terminal Multiplexer. With this configuration,
ports 1 through 7 can not be used. You can attach another terminal to port 8
(giving you a total of nine terminals), or attach another 3299 Terminal Multiplexer
to port 8 (giving you a total of 16 terminals).
TMAs are not available for the medium-sized 3174 models.

Small 3174s (Models 8xR and 9xR)
The small-sized 3174 models can attach up to eight terminals. At the back of
each controller are four BNC connectors labeled 0 through 3. You can have up
to four terminals attached directly to these ports or attach a 3299 Terminal
Multiplexer to port 0 for a maximum of eight terminals (in this case, ports 1, 2
and 3 cannot be used).
Note: 3174 Model 90R only has one BNC port for connection of a terminal or a
3299 Model 2 or Model 3.

2.3 ASCII Terminal Attachment
An Asynchronous Emulation Adapter feature in a 3174 provides asynchronous
serial communication ports for a switched or leased connection to 3270 or ASCII
hosts.
The AEA functions provided are:
•

ASCII Terminal Emulation
Selected 3270 displays can emulate an IBM 3101 or DEC VT100 display, and
3270 printers can emulate an ASCII printer, for connection to a ASCII host(s)
or public data network.

•

3270 Terminal Emulation
ASCII displays can emulate a 3178 Model C2 or 3279 Model 2A (4-color
display), and ASCII printers can emulate a 3287 Model 2, for connection to an
IBM host.

•

ASCII Pass-Through
ASCII displays and printers can connect to ASCII hosts and public data
networks through the AEA.

See Chapter 7, “Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)” on page 263 for
further information.

42

3174 Installation Guide

2.4 Cabling
The 3174 is designed to work with either coax or the IBM Cabling System, both
with or without baluns. However, you should be aware that if you use coax,
attached devices may be up to 4920 feet (1.5 km) away; if the IBM Cabling
System is used, attached devices may be up to 3280 feet (1.0 km) away if the
device requires a balun, or 4920 feet (1.5 km) away if the device supports the
DPC. These distances refer to the terminal if it is attached to a TMA or to the
3299 Terminal Multiplexer.

Coax Cabling
If you use coax then your cabling will be the same as for a 3274.

IBM Cabling System
If you use the IBM Cabling System then the 3174 has a facility that you should
know about.
Previously, in order to use a 3270 type device on the IBM Cabling System media,
it was necessary to install a balun (BALancer/UNbalancer) at each end of the
cable. This meant that all of the ports on a controller need to have baluns
attached and the device at the other end of the cable also need to have a balun.
Baluns are no longer required at the controller end of the cable when a DPC is
used. This is because the Terminal Adapter and the TMAs have been designed
with the IBM Cabling System in mind. Devices at the other end of the cable may
or may not need a balun depending on the device. For example, the 3299 Model
2 does not need a balun at its end of the cable (3299 Model 2 requires the DPC).
The 3299 Model 32 has DPCs which allow direct attachment to either coax cable
or IBM Cabling System without the need for a balun or equivalent. Devices may
also be attached to the 3299 Model 32 via specified telephone twisted-pair wire
(that is, IBM Cabling System Type 3) and the IBM 3270 Dual Purpose Connector
to Twisted-Pair (DPC-T3) Adapter or equivalent.
Refer to the IBM 3299 Product and Setup Information for specific information
regarding maximum attachment wire lengths.

2.5 Planning For Controller Storage
Certain functions may require that storage expansion features be installed in the
3174. The older 3174 Subsystem Control Units have 1 MB of storage installed in
the base machine and are able to support a maximum of 4 MB of storage. The
newer 3174 Establishment Controllers have 2 MB of storage installed in the base
machine and are able to support a maximum of 6 MB of storage with
Configuration Support-B Release 4 or Configuration Support-C.
To support the functions desired, you must plan for additional controller storage
if your 3174 configuration includes functions such as:
•

Multiple Logical Terminals

•

Central Site Change Management

•

Asynchronous Emulation Adapter

•

Local Format Storage

Chapter 2. Installation Planning

43

•

Multi-Host Support

•

3270 Port Expansion Feature

•

Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking

•

Peer Communication

•

Frame Relay Communication

•

LAN Gateway (Token-Ring Gateway and Ethernet Gateway)

•

ISDN Gateway

•

RPQs

See Appendix E, “3174 Storage Requirements” on page 755 when determining
amount of storage required.

2.6 Physical Installation
The physical installation of any of the 3174 models is relatively easy. The new
machines are customer setup (CSU) so that the IBM Service Representative is
only needed to attach the channel interface (Bus and Tag) cables for Models 01L,
11L or 21L.

2.6.1 CSU Installation
Before you begin: Consult the manuals which are shipped with your 3174,
particularly the following:
•

3174 Site Planning

•

3174 Planning Guide , for your specific microcode release level

To set up and operate: Consult the following manuals:
•

3174 Model 1L, 1R, 2R, 3R, 11L, 11R, 12L, 12R, 13R and 14R User′ s Guide

•

3174 Model 21L, 21R, 22L, 23R and 24R User ′ s Guide

•

3174 Model 51R, 52R, 53R, 61R, 62R, 63R and 64R User′ s Guide

•

3174 Model 81R, 82R, 90R, 91R and 92R User ′ s Guide

•

8250 Workstation Networking Module Installation and Customization Guide
(for Models 41R and 43R)

To install a 3174:
1. Review any 3174 installation tips available on InfoSys or IBMLink*.
2. Remove packaging and place the machine in the position that it will occupy
when operational.
3. Power switch:
•

Model 01L, 11L and 21L: Turn the channel interface switch to offline the
power control switch to local and the power switch to 0 (off).

•

All others: Move the power switch to 0 (off).

4. Install any optional features that you need and attach any remote
communication cables or Token-Ring cable to the adapters.
5. Route the power cord out of the front bottom corner of the control unit and
plug it into a grounded electrical outlet.

44

3174 Installation Guide

6. Install the Utility diskette and run diagnostics as described in the Setup
Instructions in the 3174 User′ s Guide .
7. Attach a CUT or DFT/E terminal to port 0 and perform the customization.
8. Communication cables:
•

Model 01L, 11L and 21L: Ask the IBM Service Representative to attach
the channel interface and power sequencing (if used) cables to the
machine.

•

Model 12L and 22L: Connect fiber optic cable as per the Setup
Instructions in the 3174 User′ s Guide .

•

Attach the communication cable to the data communication equipment or
equivalent.

9. Attach the terminal cables to the 3174.
10. Make sure the customized Control diskette is ready and the DSL diskette (if
needed) is in drive 2.
11. IML the 3174.
12. Turn the channel interface switch to online for Models 01L, 11L, or 21L and
vary the channel addresses online.
13. Activate the 3174 and attached devices.

2.6.2 9309 Rack Enclosure
The 9309 Rack Enclosure provides mounting space and power distribution for
3174 Models 2xx, the rack-mounted controllers. The 9309 is available in two
models:
•

Model 1 is 1.0 m (39.3 inches) high

•

Model 2 is 1.6 m (62.1 inches) high

Both models conform to the 19-inch mounting dimension and universal hole
spacing pattern in the Electronic Industries Association (EIA) RS-310C standard
for racks, panels, and associated equipment. Both models of the 9309 feature
have:
•

Minimal floor space requirement

•

AC power distribution and sequencing of six outlets

•

Emergency power-off control

The outlets provide 220-volt single phase power. Single phase and 3-phase
versions of the rack enclosure are available. Each 9309 is provided with an
emergency power off control.
The rack-mounted models are specified as being 10 inches in height but, in
reality, will take approximately 10.5 inches due to the hole placement in a 9309.
Each 3174 Model 2xx is six EIA units high (an EIA unit is 1.75 inches). Thus, five
rack-mounted models can fit in an IBM 9309 Model 2.
In terms of EIA units:
•

9309 Model 1 can accommodate 19 EIA units

•

9309 Model 2 can accommodate 32 EIA units

Chapter 2. Installation Planning

45

Thus, five 3174 Model 2xx require 30 of the 32 available EIA units in a 9309 Model
2 rack.
In the 3174 Site Planning manual, the cable specifications for S/370 channels
used for interconnecting rack-mounted 3174 Model 21L within the rack are shown
as:
•

Cable Group 0790 (2.5 ft)

•

Cable Group 0799 (4.5 ft)

•

Cable Group 0185 should be used for cables to and from a 9309

Recommendations on rack mounting are contained in the 3174 Site Planning
manual.
Feature #9030 provides rails for mounting the 3174 Model 21L in a 9309, and a
shortened power cord for 9309 use.
Note: #9030 is not orderable for the 3174 Model 21R.

2.7 Customization
Customization consists of two phases:
•

Planning, which is mostly done prior to installation

•

Procedures, which is performed at installation time

See Chapter 3, “Microcode Customization” on page 47 for further information.

46

3174 Installation Guide

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization
Customizing is the process of tailoring the microcode supplied with the 3174 to
support various displays, printers, methods of host attachment, features and
functions that a particular 3174 will handle.
One of the problems of customizing the 3274 was its “user friendliness,” or
comparative lack of it, and often the need to treat each customization slightly
differently from the last.
With the introduction of the 3174 Establishment Controller, the customizing
process is now much easier and faster, while still retaining the basic advantages
of a customizable device:
•

Flexibility

•

Ease of adding new features and functions

•

Ease of upgrading the microcode level

•

Central site customization and change management

Simplicity is particularly important to the user with only a small number of
controllers, where the need to customize is infrequent which, in turn, precludes
the development of a high level of skill in this area. Because of the considerably
reduced time required to customize, the large network user also increases
productivity as a result of this time saving. These larger organizations can also
benefit from the use of central site customizing and Central Site Change
Management.

3.1 Microcode Release Differences
With each new release of the 3174 microcode or Licensed Internal Code, new
customizing questions have been added to support new features and functions.
In some releases, customizing questions have been modified to offer additional
options; in other releases, customizing questions have been added or deleted to
reflect the changes.
The functional differences between the different releases of Configuration
Support-A, S, B and C are discussed in 1.4.3, “Licensed Internal Code (LIC)” on
page 20.

3.2 3174 Diskettes Types
All 3174 microcode are delivered on 1.2MB or 2.4MB 5.25-inch diskettes. The
only exception is the microcode of 3174 Workstation Networking Module (WNM)
Models in which the microcode is delivered on 2.8MB, 3.5 inch diskettes. The
diskettes contain the microcode needed for the operation of the 3174, including
various utilities used during customization and problem determination. These
diskettes consist of the following:
•

Control diskette

•

Control Extension diskette (with Configuration Support-C only)

•

Utility diskette

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

47

•

Limited Function Utility diskette

•

Downstream Load diskettes

•

Request For Price Quotation (RPQ) diskettes

Not all of these diskettes are supplied or required by every user.

Control Diskette
Two Control diskettes are delivered with every 3174. A backup may be made
from an ordinary IBM High Capacity 1.2MB 5.25 inch diskette or IBM 2ED 2.4MB
5.25 inch diskette (or 3.5 inch diskette for WNM Models), depending on the
microcode release level, by using utilities contained on the Utility diskette. We
recommend that you make this backup before customizing.
The Control diskette contains the code required for:
•

System bring-up

•

Normal operation

•

Language support

•

Diagnostics

After the Control diskette is customized, it also contains:
•

Customization parameters

•

Any patches applied to correct problems

•

Any RPQs for additional functions

When a customized Control diskette is used to IML the 3174, the 3174 is made
operational (ready to be put online and allow terminal sessions to become
active).

Control Extension Diskette
With Configuration Support-C, more base microcode is supplied on a separate
diskette known as the Control Extension diskette, in addition to the normal
Control diskette. This Control Extension diskette must be used with the Control
diskette to IML the 3174. Hence, Configuration Support-C requires two 2.4 MB
diskette drives, or one 2.4 MB diskette drive and a hard disk.
Any DSL code, required for Asynchronous Emulation Adapter and graphics or
image displays, and the Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking and Peer
Communication LIC features must also be merged to the Control Extension
diskette if these features are needed for your environment.
With the 3174 Value Package, Configuration Support-C base code, Advanced
Peer-to-Peer Networking LIC and Peer Communication LIC are pre-loaded on the
20 MB hard disk. Diskettes are provided for backup.

Utility Diskette
The Utility diskette contains the microcode necessary to run various utilities,
including the following:

48

3174 Installation Guide

•

Customize the Control diskette

•

Merge DSL code

•

Copy files

•

Perform diagnostics

•

Manage disk and diskettes

•

Upgrade microcode for new releases

•

Define devices, for example, for multi-host access

•

Define the Printer Authorization Matrix

•

Perform central site customizing

•

Perform central site change management

Limited Function Utility Diskette
As the name implies, this diskette contains a limited set of utilities to run
diagnostics, copy files and identify the customizing keyboard. The LFU should
be used at network sites where the 3174 customization changes are managed
from the central site. This diskette has fewer utility options and cannot be used
to customize the Control diskette, thus preventing unauthorized reconfiguration
of the network site 3174.
The LFU is supplied if you order specify code #9005 Inhibit LIC Shipment.

Downstream Load (DSL) Diskette
Downstream Load diskettes are required to support devices or features that
need microcode to be downloaded from the 3174. Devices or features needing
DSL microcode include the IBM 3290 Information Display Panel, the IBM
3179-G/3192-G/3472-G Graphics Displays, the IBM 3193 Image Display and the
Asynchronous Emulation Adapter.
A DSL diskette contains the system bring-up and control microcode required for
a specific device or feature. The DSL code for several devices and features can
be merged onto one diskette for normal operation.
As previously mentioned, DSL code for Configuration Support-C should be
merged onto the Control Extension diskette.

Request for Price Quotation (RPQ) Diskette
An RPQ diskette contains microcode required to support special features or
functions requested by customers for specific environments. The RPQ is an
alteration or addition to the functional capabilities provided by the base code.
An RPQ is merged onto the Control diskette. Note that:
•

There may be up to 30 RPQs per diskette supplied.

•

25 KB of control diskette space is reserved for RPQs.

•

Up to 10 RPQs may be merged onto a single Control diskette.

Some RPQs are supplied as a complete set of Control and Utility diskettes.
These RPQs are known as “Control Disk RPQs” and must be used as a set.
They cannot be merged onto another Control diskette. One example of such a
Control Disk RPQ is the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ 8Q0743.
See 1.4.3, “Licensed Internal Code (LIC)” on page 20 for details of some of the
more significant RPQs.

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

49

3.3 Planning for Customization
The main tasks necessary for customizing the 3174 are:
1. Planning for the configuration
2. Completing the configuration worksheets, which will then contain responses
to be used for the customization procedures
3. Running the customization procedures
Each of these tasks may consist of a number of steps. Each task may be carried
out by a different person. Running the customization procedures is the only
mandatory task; the preceding two tasks are optional but highly recommended.
To plan for your customization, you should use the worksheets found in the back
of the 3174 Planning Guide for the appropriate microcode release. These
worksheets may be freely copied and a set should be made for each 3174 to be
customized. When doing this, only include those sheets that you are actually
going to use. For example, you only need the BSC sheet from the various
communication options sheets if that is the protocol that you will be using. Also,
if you do not intend to configure local copy facilities, do not bother to include the
PAM (Printer Authorization Matrix) Worksheet.
There are several steps involved in the planning. Which steps need to be
carried out will depend on your desired configuration:

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3174 Installation Guide

•

Planning to Configure/Reconfigure

•

Planning for Common SNA

•

Planning for LAN Gateway (Token-Ring Gateway and Ethernet Gateway)

•

Planning for X.25

•

Planning for X.25 Token-Ring Gateway (RPQ 8Q0743)

•

Planning for ISDN Gateway

•

Planning for APPN

•

Planning for Peer Communication

•

Planning for AEA

•

Planning for TCP/IP

•

Planning for Frame Relay Communication

•

Planning for Multi-Host Support

•

Planning for Port Assignment

•

Planning for Response Time Monitor

•

Planning to Define Devices, including PAM

•

Planning to Modify Keyboards

•

Planning to Copy Files

•

Planning for Merge Procedure

•

Planning for Microcode Upgrade

•

Planning for Central Site Change Management (CSCM)

•

Planning for Encryption (not supported in Configuration Support-B and C).

We will now look at some of these planning steps.

3.3.1 Planning to Configure/Reconfigure
Configuration needs to be done for each 3174 and is similar to the operation
needed on a 3274.
At some time in the future a customer may wish to reconfigure when making
changes to the hardware, the host, or terminal attachment. For example, a new
printer has been added and you wish to define it in the PAM, or you may have
changed the protocol from a BSC to an SDLC host attachment. In each of these
cases, a new worksheet should be completed reflecting the changes.

3.3.2 Planning for Common SNA
When you attach the 3174 to a host using an attachment type that is not BSC
(that is, customizing question 101: Host Attachment response is not a 1), then
you must provide responses to some of the questions on the Common SNA
panel.
The Common SNA panel allows you to specify whether CSCM and/or APPN will
be used, the network ID, control point name, LU name and connection network
name.
You should ensure that names used are unique throughout your network.

3.3.3 Planning for LAN Gateway (Token-Ring Gateway or Ethernet Gateway)
LAN attachment is another way to attach a 3174 to SNA hosts. While its
upstream link to a host may use channel or SDLC SNA protocols, the 3174 also
acts as a gateway for LAN or Peer Communication devices on its downstream
side. These devices can then access applications on the host through the 3174
gateway.
The devices on the LAN or Peer Communication segment are configured as
downstream PUs (DSPUs). The number of DSPUs that a 3174 gateway can
support is dependent on:
•

•

•

•

The type of LAN Adapter:
−

4 Mbps Token-Ring Adapter supports 140 DSPUs maximum.

−

16/4 Mbps Token-Ring Adapter supports 250 DSPUs maximum.

−

Ethernet Adapter supports 250 DSPUs maximum.

The microcode release level:
−

Configuration Support-S supports 140 DSPUs maximum.

−

Configuration Support-B and C support 250 DSPUs maximum.

The hardware model:
−

Models 01L, 01R, and 02R support 140 DSPUs maximum.

−

Model 51R supports 72 DSPUs maximum.

−

Models 11L, 11R, 12L, 12R, 21L, 21R, 22L, 41R, 61R and 62R support 250
DSPUs maximum.

Whether ISDN DSPUs are configured
Each ISDN DSPU configured means one less DSPU available for the LAN.

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

51

•

Whether a 3174 ESCON gateway supports maximum 8KB RU size
If maximum 8KB RU size is required, the maximum number of DSPUs is
reduced to 100.

•

All the DSPUs may be assigned to one primary host, or shared across
primary and secondary hosts. Each DSPU assigned to one host means one
less DSPU available for the other hosts. Each CCA supports 50 DSPUs
maximum.

•

The amount of controller storage.

Each DSPU is customized in the 3174 gateway to allow mapping of the DSPU′ s
MAC address and SAP to a channel control unit address (CUADDR) or an SDLC
link address (ADDR).
You should ensure you have the right hardware, microcode level, and controller
storage required for your 3174 gateway. You should also ensure that each
combined LAN and SAP address is unique in your network and is correctly
mapped to the host channel or SDLC address assigned by your network
administrator.
For further information, see Chapter 4, “LAN Support” on page 69

3.3.4 Planning for X.25
The major difference between configuring for an X.25 attachment compared with
the other attachment types is that you get an extra panel 332: X.25 Options to fill
in. This panel requires information about the X.25 network, such as:
•

Network type

•

Logical channel numbers

•

Logical channel assignments

•

DTE addresses

•

Closed user group

•

Window size

•

Packet size

•

Recognized Private Operating Agency

•

Connection options

•

Incoming and outgoing call options, such as:
−

Reverse charging

−

Packet/window size negotiation

−

Throughput class

You should consult your network administrator for the correct responses to be
used from the appropriate X.25 and NPSI parameters.
For further information, see Chapter 5, “X.25 Support” on page 157.

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3174 Installation Guide

3.3.5 Planning for X.25 Token-Ring Gateway (RPQ 8Q0743)
With the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ 8Q0743, it is possible for a 3174
Token-Ring Gateway to support connectivity to hosts or PU 2.0 devices in the
X.25 network.
Planning for this function requires you to understand the role of the 3174 in
providing the gateway connectivity, either as a QLLC primary or a QLLC
secondary, for each connection desired. You will also need to decide on the
type of connections, open or default, to be used.
Customizing is similar to the normal X.25 support except that a complete set of
Control and Utility diskettes is used for the RPQ. Question 150, where you
specify the type of Gateway support (LAN and ISDN), the digit 1 must be
answered with a 1 and the digit 2 with a 0 to enable the Token-Ring Gateway
function.
Again, you should consult your network administrator for the correct responses
to be used from the appropriate X.25 and NPSI parameters.
For further information, see Chapter 6, “X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ” on
page 187.

3.3.6 Planning for ISDN
Configuration Support-C provides support for the installation of an ISDN BRI
Adapter in the 3174. This is a particularly useful means for remote dial-up from
PS/2 workstations to host applications, using the 3174 as an ISDN gateway.
The 3174 is customized as an ISDN gateway to support up to 32 devices or
workstations in an ISDN network. These devices are seen as DSPUs by the 3174
in the same manner as token-ring DSPUs.
When configuring for ISDN support, the response to question 101: Host
Attachment is similar to the response used for a channel or SDLC SNA 3174 LAN
Gateway support. The difference is that the digit 2 in question 150: Gateway
(LAN and ISDN) needs to be a 1 while the digit 1 is entered with a 0.
You should plan for sufficient addresses to be used for LAN DSPUs and ISDN
DSPUs. The total number of addresses is given by the difference between
questions 104 and 105. The number of DSPUs allocated for ISDN use is given by
your response to question 190: Number of ISDN DSPUs. The remainder can be
used for LAN DSPUs.

(Q.105 minus Q.104) minus Q.190 = Number of LAN DSPUs available
You should consult your network administrator for the correct ID to be used for
identifying each ISDN DSPU.
For further information, see Chapter 22, “ISDN” on page 661.

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

53

3.3.7 Planning for APPN
Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking is an enhancement to IBM′s Systems
Network Architecture and node Type 2.1 architecture. It allows interconnection
of peer systems of widely differing sizes into dynamic topology networks.
The 3174 provides APPN functions by means of an APPN Licensed Internal Code
feature. This LIC feature enables the 3174 to act as a network node (NN) for
communication over LAN, SDLC, X.25, Frame Relay and S/370 parallel channel
links.
The 3174 APPN LIC feature is delivered on a 1.2 MB diskette which must be
merged onto the Control Extension diskette. Starting with Configuration
Support-C Release 5, the APPN feature code is pre-merged onto the Extension
diskette.
You are required to specify the network ID, control point name, and connection
network name for the 3174 NN during customization. These names should be
unique throughout your network.
Note that if the response in question 502: Logical Unit Name is the same as the
response in question 511: APPN Control Point Name, CSCM will use the same
LU 6.2 as that used for the NN functions.
You should be aware of the need to define a node both as a DSPU (question 940)
and as a T2.1 node (Network Resources panel) for it to use shared T2.1/2.0 links.
For further information, see Chapter 18, “APPN” on page 501.

3.3.8 Planning for Peer Communication
Peer Communication allows intelligent workstations attached to a 3174 via
existing 3270 wiring to form a LAN segment that may be bridged to an LAN
Network. The intelligent workstations, known as 3174-Peer devices, can then
communicate with other 3174-Peer devices attached to the same 3174, or to
other intelligent workstations on the LAN Network.
Each 3174-Peer device can use a MAC address automatically assigned by the
3174 during operation. Because this address is port-dependent, you should be
aware that relocation of your 3174-Peer device to another port will cause you
connectivity problems.
A better approach is to assign an address to a 3174-Peer device using
naming/addressing conventions established for your network. This will provide
port-independent addressing and flexibility for relocating your intelligent
workstations as needed. You should discuss the addresses required for your
3174-Peer devices with your network administrator to ensure uniqueness.
If any of the intelligent workstations require host communication, or access to a
LAN, or APPN functions, then you need a Type 3A Dual Speed (16/4 Mbps)
Token-Ring Adapter. In any of these situations, bridging functions are required
and are provided by the Type 3A Dual Speed Token-Ring Adapter.
Note that for host communication, the 3174-Peer device must be defined as a
DSPU to the gateway it uses.
For further information, see Chapter 19, “Peer Communication” on page 557.

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3174 Installation Guide

3.3.9 Planning for AEA
The Asynchronous Emulation Adapter provides the ability for:
•

3270 displays and printers, in ASCII terminal emulation mode, to
communicate with ASCII hosts

•

ASCII displays and printers, in 3270 terminal emulation mode, to
communicate with IBM hosts

•

ASCII displays and printers, in ASCII pass-through mode, to communicate
with ASCII hosts

When planning for AEA you should use the worksheets in the 3174 Planning
Guide. These should be copied and used for documentation support for each
3174.
When customizing for AEA support, you need to understand various concepts
and terminology used, such as port, port type, port set, station, station type,
station set, terminal characteristics, modem type, Connection Menu, default
destination, and so on. You will also need to know specific information about the
display stations, printers, hosts, ports and modems the ASCII devices are
attached to.
For further information, see Chapter 7, “Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)”
on page 263.

3.3.10 Planning for TCP/IP
TCP/IP for the 3174 is supported on coaxially attached displays operating in CUT
mode and AEA-Attached ASCII displays. TCP/IP support for the 3174 allows these
displays to communicate with any TCP/IP server or host (IBM or non-IBM)
accessible through LAN (Token-Ring or Ethernet) or Frame Relay network.
The TCP/IP server or host can be attached directly to the LAN or Frame Relay
network, or exist anywhere in the network that can be reached by any bridges or
routers. MLT support provides up to five concurrent sessions with 3270 hosts,
ASCII hosts or TCP/IP destinations for a single display stations.
For AEA-Attached displays, the 3174 uses an ASCII Pass-Through mode of
operation to communicate transparently with the TCP/IP application or server.
Although TCP/IP does not require an AEA, planning for TCP/IP involves many of
the same considerations as planning for AEA, and some additional
considerations.
The second digit of the question 700, which comes under the“AEA and TCP/IP
Configure” must be answered with a 1 or 2 to set the TCP/IP option on. The
worksheets in the 3174 Planning Guide should be used for documentation
purposes.
For further information, see Chapter 21, “TCP/IP” on page 605.

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

55

3.3.11 Planning for Frame Relay Communication
Frame Relay is a multiprotocol service that uses virtual circuits. Configuration
Support-C Release 5 is required to support 3174 Frame Relay Communication
and response 9 to the configuration question 101 activates this facility.
Worksheets Frame Relay Description and Frame Relay Optional DLCI Definitions
in the 3174 Planning Guide as well as your Frame Relay network subscription
should be used. The 3174 supports up to 254 DLCIs using a Type 1 or Type 2
Communication Adapter.
For SNA, you must define a unique combination of DLCI and SAP for each Frame
Relay host on the primary link and every DSPU that will be communicating
through the 3174 with a Frame Relay host.
For TCP/IP over Frame Relay, you must define an IP address for the 3174. You
do not need to define individual DLCIs for TCP/IP because Inverse Address
Resolution Protocol (InARP) is used on the active virtual circuits to identify which
virtual circuits can support IP protocols.
For further information, see Chapter 20, “Frame Relay Support” on page 589.

3.3.12 Planning for Multi-Host Support
The 3174 can be configured to access multiple 3270 hosts. Using the MLT
function, each terminal connected to a 3174 port can access up to five host
sessions. All five sessions can be conducted with one host, or each session can
be conducted with a different host.
There are two types of multi-host support:
•

Multi-session access via multiple physical links
An example would be a 3270 terminal with MLT accessing hosts via a 3174′ s
primary communication adapter as well as accessing hosts via the 3174′ s
CCAs.
The Concurrent Communication Adapter is a 3174 hardware feature which
provides access to an additional (also known as a secondary) 3270 host link.

•

Multi-session access via a single physical link
This is more commonly known as Single Link Multi-Host (SLMH) support. An
example would be a 3270 terminal with MLT accessing multiple hosts via a
3174-13R′s single upstream Token-Ring Adapter link.

With Configuration Support-B Release 3, SLMH is also extended to X.25
attachments, allowing access up to eight hosts via the primary link, and four
hosts on each of the secondary links.
With Configuration Support-B Release 3 or later, therefore, the 3174 provides
three types of SLMH support:
•

Via ESCON

•

Via Token-Ring Network

•

Via X.25

Configuration Support-C-C Release 4 or later provides SLMH support via an
Ethernet Network

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3174 Installation Guide

Configuration Support-C Release 5 provides SLMH support via Frame Relay
network.
Each of the hosts in a multi-host environment is identified by a 2-character ID (for
example, host ID 2D):
•

•

The first character indicates the link type:
−

1 indicates the primary link

−

2 or 3 indicates a secondary link (one provided by a CCA)

The second character indicates the host designation:
−

A indicates the primary host

−

B through H indicates a secondary host

To enable multi-host support, you must respond to question 101 with an M. In
addition, you assign each session to the host ID desired via the Logical Terminal
Assignment (LTA) panel.
For further information, see Chapter 9, “Multi-Host Connectivity” on page 331.

3.3.13 Planning for Port Assignment
Port assignment allows you to map the sessions through a specific port on the
3174 to host LU addresses (LOCADDRs). The planning requirement is different,
depending on your response to question 116: Individual Port Assignment and the
microcode level you are using.

Configuration Support-A/S
There are three possible responses to question 116: 0, 1 or 2. You have to use
response 1 or 2 if you are providing multi-sessions through the MLT function for
CUT devices or using DFT devices, such as the IBM 3290 Information Panel or
the IBM 3270 Personal Computer.

Response 0: This response is the default. With this response, the 3174 will
automatically assign port addresses and you will not see panel 117: Port
Assignment and panel 118: Port Addresses. If you have a Model 0xx, 1xx, or 2xx,
then 32 port addresses will be assigned, whether you need them (that is, you do
have 32 devices attached) or not. This can be wasteful on addresses. Similarly,
16 addresses for the Models 5xR and 6xR, and eight addresses for Models 8xR
and 9xR, will be automatically assigned.
Response 1 This response allows you to specify just the number of sessions per
port; the 3174 will automatically assign individual addresses. To do this, simply
fill in the number of sessions per port in the #IS column on the 117: Port
Assignment panel. : With multi-sessions, the 3174 will assign addresses as
follows: First, addresses will be assigned sequentially to all of the primary
sessions starting at port zero. When completed, the next available addresses
will be assigned to the secondary sessions for each port.
You can put a zero against any port not required at this time so that addresses
will not be allocated to it.
When you press PF8 during the actual customizing process, the 3174 will fill in
the 118: Port Addresses panel for you. You cannot change the addresses (in
hexadecimal) assigned in panel 118; it is for your information only.

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

57

Using this response, you should be aware that when updating the port
assignment in the future for devices added or removed, all of the addresses will
be re-assigned by the 3174. This re-assignment can cause mismatch between
device characteristics and LU definitions. To avoid this mismatch, you should
use response 2.

Response 2: This response is used if you wish to control the assignment of
individual addresses to specific ports. You will probably use this response to
prevent the mismatch of devices with their LU definitions, if you have DFT
devices, or if you are using the MLT function for CUT terminals with multiple
sessions.
When using this response, you have to enter the local addresses in panel 117 in
decimal. Once again the 3174 will fill in panel 118 for you.

Configuration Support-B/C
In Configuration Support-B/C, the response to question 116 can be one to four
alphanumeric digits grouped into two pairs. The first (leftmost) pair represents
the assignment of 3270 address. The second pair represents the assignment of
AEA addresses.
Depending on your configuration, you may not be specifying all four digits; you
may have a one, two, or four-digit response. The default response is 0 for the
first digit, followed by three blanks. If your response to the first digit is 0, 1 or 2,
then leave the rest of the digits to the default value (blank).

First Digit Response 0: This response means that the 3174 automatically
assigns one address to each 3270 port.
Use this response if you:
•

Want only one 3270 address per port

•

Do not want to plan for port assignment

•

Do not want any AEA addresses assigned

First Digit Response 1: This response means that you specify the number of
addresses for each 3270 port and the 3174 will automatically assign individual
addresses accordingly. You could put a zero for any port not required at this
time so that addresses will not be allocated.
Use this response if you:
•

Plan to assign port addresses on a port-by-port basis

•

Plan to use MLT on your CUT devices

•

Plan to have ASCII devices access 3270 hosts

•

Plan to use DFTs with multiple interactive sessions

First Digit Response 2: This response means that you assign the individual
addresses to each 3270 port. The reasons for using this response are the same
as for responding with a 1.
First Two-Digit Response SX: In this response, S is entered as an alphabet
character and X equals a number from 1 to 5. Use this response if you:
•

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3174 Installation Guide

Want to specify the number of addresses to be assigned to each 3270 port

•

Answer either part of question 110 with a non-zero response

•

Do not plan to have ASCII devices access 3270 hosts

•

Plan to use DFTs with multiple interactive sessions

Note that the same number of addresses will be assigned to all 3270 ports and
the addresses will be automatically assigned. Responses S1 through S5 are
only allowed on SNA host attachments.

Response SXAY: Response SX, with the rightmost digits blank, do not result in
AEA port address assignment.
In response SXAY, S and A are entered as alphabet characters, and X and Y
equal numbers from 1 to 5. Use this response if you:
•

Want to specify the number of addresses to be assigned to each 3270 port
and the number of addresses to be assigned to each AEA port

•

Want to have the individual addresses automatically assigned

•

Plan to have ASCII devices access 3270 hosts

•

Answer questions 110 and 703 with non-zero responses

The maximum number of addresses that can be assigned is 253. The
customizing utility prioritizes the assignment of addresses. If the number of
addresses in your response exceeds 253, either some ports do not get any
addresses or they get fewer addresses than you requested.
Do not respond to the AY part of question 116 if:
•

The host is non-SNA

•

The 3174 model number is 53R

If the response to question 101: Host Attachment is M (for multi-host support),
the second part of question 116 appears only for the 1A host.

3.3.14 Planning for Response Time Monitor (RTM)
RTM is a standard function on all 3174s. Ideally it should be used as part of the
Communication Network Management (CNM) operation. However, even in a
standalone form, it is a valuable tool in the management and control of
information systems.
If you do not wish to use RTM, answer question 127: Response Time Monitor
Definition with two zeros.
If you wish to use RTM, then the first digit of question 127 asks you whether you
have host support for RTM and where the RTM data is displayed (ports 26-00 or
27-00 only, or all ports). Even without host support you can use RTM as a
valuable management tool.
The second digit allows you to specify the event used to signify a transaction
end:
•

When the first character is received on the screen

•

When the keyboard becomes unlocked

•

When a Change Direction or End Bracket command is received

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

59

•

When the last character is received on the screen

If the response to question 127 is other than two zeros, you will get another
panel (128: RTM Definition) to allow you to classify an RTM measurement into
one of five time counters. You can specify the maximum RTM value for four of
these counters; the fifth is an overflow counter.
The RTM function will not be discussed further in this publication. For further
information, see the appropriate 3174 Functional Description and 3174 Planning
Guide manuals for your microcode level.

3.3.15 Planning for PAM
Printer Authorization Matrix (PAM) defines which printers the display stations in
a cluster can use for local copy, host printing and shared copy operations. With
a local copy, data is transferred directly from the display buffer to the printer
buffer for printing. With host printing, data is sent from the host to the printer.
With shared copy operations, a printer can be used for both local copy and host
printing.
If your printers are used only for host printing (that is, no local copy or shared
copy operations), you do not need to define a PAM.
The PAM worksheet can be thought of as being in two parts, the top half and the
bottom half. The top half defines the printer and the bottom half assigns the
display stations that may use it. By using multiple worksheets, you may define
up to 47 printers. You can define printers which are attached to the base 3270
adapter ports, the 3270 Port Expansion Feature ports and the AEA ports.
The first field required is the port number of the first printer that you wish to
define (port 26-00 cannot be specified). The next field defines the printer mode
of operation allowed:
•

0=Host only
In this mode, only host printing is permitted on the printer; it is protected
from local (screen) copies. Since this is the default mode, a PAM is not
needed if you only wish to use the printers for host printing and not for local
copying.

•

1=Local only
In this mode, only local copying is permitted on the printer when a display
operator presses the Print key. If the display is operating in SNA, the host
can initiate a local copy from the display buffer. However, the printer is
protected from host-directed print operations.

•

2=Shared
In this mode, both local copying and host-directed printing is permitted on
the same printer. It is possible, therefore, for local copy data to be
intermixed with host-directed print data inadvertently. To avoid this, you
should follow installation rules and proper programming practices.

The next field allows you to group printers into classes. For example, you may
wish to group all of the same type of printers into one class, group all printers
on the same floor into another class, or group printers for some other reason.

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3174 Installation Guide

Finally, in the bottom half of the worksheet, simply put an X on the line
corresponding with the printer defined under the port number of any terminal
that you wish to authorize for local copy to that printer.
Note that:
•

With Configuration Support-A/S, you select the Define PAM option from the
Customize Control Disk menu.

•

With Configuration Support-B/C, you use a two-digit response for question
800: Printer Authorization Matrix (PAM) on the Device Definition panel to:
−

Not define a PAM, by using a 00 response

−

Define a PAM, excluding printers attached via the 3270 Port Expansion
Feature, by using a 10 response

−

Define a PAM for all printers, including printers attached to the 3270 Port
Expansion Feature, by using a 11 response

Also, note that the Printer Assignment ID in the OIA identifies the printer or class
of printers to which a local copy will be directed.
•

A printer class is a number in the range 70 through 85.

•

If question 800=10, then a specific printer is indicated by its port number ,
where:

•

−

01 through 31 means ports 26-01 through 26-31

−

32 through 39 means ports 21-00 through 21-07 (the first AEA)

−

40 through 47 means ports 22-00 through 22-07 (the second AEA)

−

48 through 55 means ports 23-00 through 23-07 (the third AEA)

If question 800=11, then a specific printer is indicated by its PAM entry
number , from 01 through 47.

See “Printer Authorization Matrix (PAM)” on page 316 for further information.

3.3.16 Planning to Modify Keyboard
The purpose of the Modify Keyboard Utility is to create unique keyboard layouts
that meet specific user or application requirements. These modified keyboard
layouts can be used on IBM display stations with modifiable keyboards.
This utility is not for use with the DFT displays such as the IBM 3179-G Color
Graphics Display or the 3192-G Color Graphics Display. The keyboard definition
utility for these displays is supplied with their individual DSL code (see the
appropriate display description manual).
Most characters, symbols, and functions can be relocated, deleted, or duplicated
from almost any key position. However, there are some restrictions:
•

The display station used with this utility must be connected to 3174 port
26-00. Terminals with modifiable keyboards must be working in 3278/79
emulation mode.

•

Local keys that do not send scan codes to the 3174 should not be used for
copy or exchange operations (for example, the SetUp, Copy, or Play keys).

•

Typematic assignment cannot be modified.

•

Certain keys cannot be copied or moved.

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

61

Question 136 refers to four standard keyboard layouts:
•

Converged Typewriter

•

Converged APL

•

Converged Data Entry

•

Enhanced Typewriter.

Question 137 refers to which modified keyboard layouts, identified by the
keyboard ID A, B, C, or D, are to be configured in the 3174. The total number of
standard and modified keyboards cannot exceed four.
Use the Planning to Modify Keyboards chapter of the 3174 Planning Guide along
with the keyboard layout from the worksheet section. Decide which of the
keyboards you wish to modify. Fill out the keyboard layout worksheet and use it
with the Modify Keyboard Utility.

3.3.17 Planning to Copy Files
These procedures allow you to copy from one diskette to another diskette, from
a diskette to a fixed disk, from one fixed disk to another fixed disk, or from a
fixed disk to a diskette.
The options available are:
•

Full Copy
This procedure duplicates a diskette, including any customization data
present, onto another 1.2 MB or 2.4 MB IBM High Capacity 5.25 inch diskette.
It takes just over two minutes for the actual copying process whereas the
Copy Customizing Data procedure takes less than half as long. Copying to
an unformatted diskette adds about 30 seconds.

•

Modify and Copy
This procedure is similar to the Full Copy but allows you to change some
customization responses on the diskette that you are copying to. This is a
useful utility if you wish to produce “pattern diskettes” which can then be
modified for individual 3174s.

•

Copy Customizing Data
This procedure copies configuration (also known as customizing or
customization) data from one Control diskette to another Control diskette at
the same release levels.
You can use this utility to make a backup Control diskette immediately after
customizing a Control diskette; it saves time and trouble should the original
be lost or damaged. It only takes about one minute for the actual copying
process, a considerable saving over the 3274.
The target diskette must be a Control diskette; hence, IBM supplies two
Control diskettes with every microcode package to allow you to easily create
a backup.

•

Copy Patches
This procedure copies the patch files from one diskette to another that are at
the same release levels. This operation can be performed on both the
Control or Utility diskettes.

•

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3174 Installation Guide

Copy PAM

This procedure copies the PAM data from one Control diskette to another
Control diskette at the same release levels. With Configuration Support-B
and later, the Copy PAM procedure is incorporated in the Copy Device
Definition procedure.
•

Copy Modified Keyboards
This procedure copies modified keyboard tables from one Control diskette to
another Control diskette at the same release levels.

•

Copy RPQs
This procedure copies merged RPQ data from one Control diskette to
another. Be aware that doing so erases any RPQs already on the diskette
that you are copying to. To move an RPQ from one diskette to another while
retaining the original RPQs, use the Merge RPQ Procedure.

The following copy utilities are available with Configuration Support-B and later:
•

Copy Device Definition
This procedure copies the Device Definition files from one Control disk to
another. The Device Definition files can consist of one or more of the
following:

•

−

Logical Terminal Assignment

−

Printer Authorization Matrix

−

Prompts for Extended Vital Product Data

−

Integrated Services Digital Network (Configuration Support-C only).

Copy Vital Product Data
This Configuration Support-B procedure copies the Vital Product Data files
from one Control disk to another. These Vital Product Data files are not
created during 3174 customizing. They are created when a user on an
attached terminal uses Online Test 5, Option 2 (Update Controller Vital Data)
and Option 4 (Update Port Vital Data) to enter Extended Vital Product Data.
Of course, to do this, the Control Disk must be IMLed in the 3174.
With Configuration Support-C, the Copy Vital Product Data procedure is
incorporated in the Copy User Data procedure.

•

Copy User Data
This Configuration Support-C procedure copies Vital Product Data and
3174-Peer parameters from one Control diskette to another. The Vital
Product Data is entered on the Control diskette via Online Test 5, Options 2
and 4. The 3174-Peer parameters may be entered through Online Test 9,
Option 10 (Update 3174-Peer Bridge Profile) or Option 12 (Update LAN
Manager Profile), or changed by the updates received from the LAN Network
Manager, or specified during customization.

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

63

3.3.18 Planning for Merge Procedures
Merge RPQs
The Merge RPQs procedure, selectable from the Customize Control Disk menu,
allows you to:
•

Include or omit RPQs resident on a Control diskette at IML time

•

Delete RPQs from a Control diskette

•

Merge RPQs from an RPQ diskette to the Control diskette

You use Merge RPQs procedure to move RPQs from the IBM-supplied RPQ
diskette to the Control diskette, from where you can include or omit them from
IML.
Remember an RPQ diskette can have up to 30 RPQs on it. A Control disk has
space for 10 RPQs whether they are included or omitted at IML. If you need
more space, then you can delete unwanted RPQs from the Control diskette.

Merge DSL
The Merge DSL procedure, selectable from the Master Menu, allows you to
merge the DSL code required for several devices onto one DSL diskette.
If a 3174 has any DSL devices attached, then it must have a second diskette
drive or a fixed disk drive for the use of the DSL code. Examples of DSL devices
are the IBM 3290 Information Display and the 3179-G Color Graphics Display.
The DSL diskette contains microcode needed by the DSL device; the 3174 will
download this microcode to the device when the device powers on.
With Configuration Support-C, the Merge DSL procedure is also used to merge
the APPN and Peer Communication LIC features (supplied on 1.2 MB DSL
diskettes) to the Control Extension diskette.

3.3.19 Planning for Microcode Upgrade
Every now and then, IBM may issue a new level of Utility and Control diskettes
for maintenance reasons and/or to add new functions to the 3174. However, the
customization data is not available on the new diskettes. The Microcode
Upgrade procedure allows you to transfer customization data from an existing
Control diskette to the new Control diskette. Note that this procedure copies
only the customization data from an older to a newer release level, whereas the
Copy Customizing Data procedure copies customization data at the same
release levels.

3.3.20 Planning for Central Site Change Management
Using NetView Distribution Manager Release 2 and later or NetView DM/2 V2.1,
Central Site Change Management (CSCM) is a method for managing and
distributing microcode and customization data to 3174s in a SNA network. To
use CSCM, you build a library of 3174 customization data using the Central Site
Customizing Utility (CSCU).
The CSCU provides facilities for:

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3174 Installation Guide

•

Creating the base configuration

•

Configuring the AEA

•

Defining the PAM

•

Defining devices (Configuration Support-B/C only)

The microcode and customization data are packaged as “data objects.” Thus,
there are data objects for Control microcode, Utility microcode, patches, RPQs,
basic configuration data, AEA customization data, PAM customization data, and
so on.
CSCM functions allow the 3174 to:
•

Retrieve data objects from a 3174 to a NetView Distribution Manager
repository

•

Send data objects from a NetView Distribution Manager to a network site
3174

•

Install data objects on the network site 3174

•

Delete data objects which have been installed non-removably (permanently)

•

Remove data objects which have been installed removably (temporarily)

•

Activate the 3174 when commanded by NetView Distribution Manager

To use CSCU, you select the Central Site Customizing option from the Master
Menu.
To use CSCM, you need to respond to questions 500: CSCM Unique, 501:
Network ID and 502: Logical Unit Name. Any 3174 that will participate in the
CSCM network has to be defined to VTAM as a CSCM device; this is achieved by
coding an LU with a LOCADDR=1.
Although CSCM is provided for the 3174 with Configuration Support-A/S Release
4, we recommend that you use the latest releases (Release 5.4), or Configuration
Support-B, or Configuration Support-C.
For further information, see the ITSO Books NetView Distribution Manager
Release 2, 3174 CSCM Implementation Guide , and NetView DM/2 V2.1 Remote
Administrator and New Functions and also the appropriate 3174 Central Site
Customizing User ′ s Guide .

3.3.21 Planning for Encrypt/Decrypt
The Encrypt/Decrypt Adapter #3680 feature provides an adapter for 3174 Models
01R, 02R and 03R to encrypt and decrypt data between SNA nodes. It is no
longer available as of July 7, 1989.
Currently, the Encrypt/Decrypt Adapter is available as an RPQ 8Q0742. This RPQ
supports 3174 Models 01R, 02R, 11R and 12R, and requires either Configuration
Support-A/S Release 5 or Configuration Support-B Release 4.1.
An Encrypt/Decrypt Utility provides options to:
•

Initialize or change the master key value

•

Display the verification pattern

•

Verify the security of the master key value

•

Test the proper functioning of the Encrypt/Decrypt Adapter

To use this utility, you need:
Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

65

•

The adapter security key (this is a real key)

•

A master key value (this is a code)

•

A control Unit ID

Since the Encrypt/Decrypt Adapter protects your data from unauthorized
disclosure, only authorized persons should use these procedures.
For further information, see the Configuration Support-A/S 3174 Utilities Guide .

3.4 Customizing Procedures
This section describes the procedures used to customize the 3174. If worksheets
have been used during planning, customizing the 3174 is a relatively easy
process. All you need to do is transfer the worksheet responses to the 3174
customizing panels when prompted.
Like the 3274, the display used for the customizing procedures must be attached
to port 0 of the 3174. It must also be a CUT terminal, such as a 3471 or similar,
or the CUT mode of a DFT-E terminal, such as the 3472-G.
The 3174 Utilities Guide contains information on how to:
•

Display the Master Menu

•

Identify the customizing keyboard

•

Configure the Control diskette

•

Merge RPQs

•

Merge DSL code

•

Modify keyboards

•

Upgrade microcode

It is not necessary to explain all the procedures because they are really so easy
to use, being menu driven. We have included two of the more commonly used
procedures here for your convenience.

How To Display the Master Menu
To display the Master Menu:
•

Put the Utility diskette in drive 1.

•

Hold the Alt 1 button and press IML.
−

•

The 3174 status display shows 40.

Press Enter.
The 3174 will now start loading the microcode from the Utility diskette in
drive 1.

If you have two diskette drives:
•

Put the Utility diskette in drive 2.

•

Hold the Alt 1 button and press IML.
−

•

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3174 Installation Guide

The 3174 status display shows 40.

Type 0240 on the keypad (02 indicates the diskette drive 2).

•

Press Enter.
The 3174 will now start loading the microcode from the Utility diskette from
drive 2.

If your Utility microcode is on a fixed disk, you can load it by typing:
•

0340 if it is on the first fixed disk

•

0440 if it is on the second hard disk

As the 3174 loads the Utility microcode, the number in the status display will
increment until it reads 7000. When that happens, the Master Menu will be
displayed on the CUT terminal attached to port 0.
If the number in the status display stops during the loading process for longer
than 45 to 60 seconds, look up the number in the 3174 Status Codes . For
example, the status displays 7080. This code means that there is a problem with
the display attached to port 0, such as the display may not be powered on or the
coax cable may not be connected.

Identifying Customizing Keyboard
If you wish to use one of the following keyboards to customize the 3174, then you
need to identify it before you start the customization procedures:
•

Austrian/German

•

Belgian

•

French AZERTY

•

Italian

•

Japanese English

•

Japanese Katakana

If your keyboard is not one listed above, ignore this procedure.

3.5 How to Use the Patch Procedure
Patches are provided to correct for defects found with 3174 microcode. There
are two types of patches:
•

PC patches
PC patches are applied to link-edited microcode that is contained on the
Control diskette.
PC patches are prefixed with the letters PC.

•

Zap patches
Zap patches are applied to prelinked microcode that is contained on the
Control, Utility (including Limited Function Utility) or DSL diskette.
Zap patches are prefixed with the letters:
−

ZC for Control microcode

−

ZU for Utility and Limited Function Utility microcode

−

ZM for DSL microcode

Chapter 3. Microcode Customization

67

To apply patches, type P at the Master Menu. (Note that the patch procedure is
not an option on the Master Menu.) When you press Enter, the Patch Menu will
be displayed to show options that allow you to:
•

Patch a Control diskette

•

Patch a Utility diskette

•

Patch a DSL diskette

•

Patch a Limited Function Utility diskette

You can then take the following actions:
•

Add a patch (adding a patch does not make it active)

•

Include it in the IML process (that is, make it active)

•

Omit it from the IML process (that is, make it inactive)

•

Delete it altogether from the diskette

If you are need to add patches, you should carefully follow the specific
instructions that are supplied with each patch. The 3174 Maintenance
Information manual for your model includes general instructions on how to apply
each type of patch.

3.6 How to Display the Online Test Menu
During normal operation, you may need to look at the 3174 customization data or
error logs, or update certain parameters online. You can do so by using the
online Test Menu from a CUT display. To display the online Test Menu:
•

Hold down the Alt key and press the Test key.

•

When Test appears in the OIA, press PF12.

To exit from the online Test Menu:
•

Hold down the Alt key and press the Test key again.

Beginning with Configuration Support-B Release 2, the online tests can also be
accessed using Central Site Control Facility (CSCF).

3.7 Using CSCF to View Configuration Data
Central Site Control Facility gives you the ability to perform certain online tests
from a NetView (Release 3 and later) terminal, including viewing the
configuration data for a specific 3174. The NetView operator can test any 3174
attached to the same host as the operator′s terminal by entering the command:
CSCF PU=resname (where resname is the 3174 PU name)
The online Test Menu will be displayed at the NetView terminal. You can then
select the test(s) required. Except for certain tests that need to be carried out by
a terminal physically attached to a 3174, such as Color Convergence, the online
tests selectable via CSCF is the same as those selectable via Alt Test.
For further information, see 13.1, “Central Site Control Facility” on page 433.

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Chapter 4. LAN Support
This chapter discusses the 3174s which attach to the LAN network. The type of
LAN can be either token-ring network or Ethernet network. It also describes
experiences in the installation of 3174 LAN (Token Ring and Ethernet) attached
models and gateways in a test environment with different operating systems and
other LAN (token-ring and Ethernet) attached devices.
Readers will find useful tips regarding physical installation, customization,
operating system considerations, backup/recovery, and performance.

4.1 Token-Ring Concepts
The IBM Token-Ring Network is a general purpose Local Area Network (LAN)
with a star-wired ring topology, using baseband signalling and token-passing
protocols conforming with IEEE 802.5 standards. Device attachments conforming
with IEEE 802.2 and 802.5 standards may communicate over an IBM Token-Ring
Network.
The token-passing protocol for ring access control is based on a predefined
24-bit pattern, called a token , which continuously circulates around the ring.
When a station has data to transmit, it waits until its station adapter receives a
free token (token bit=0). Upon capturing the free token, the station creates a
frame by setting the token bit to 1. It then inserts source and destination
addresses, certain control information and the data to be sent to the destination
station, and starts frame transmission.
During the time the frame is being transmitted, no token is available on the ring
and no other station can initiate a transmission. Thus, collisions on the ring are
avoided. The frame is passed (received, regenerated and retransmitted) from
one station to another on the ring until it is received by a station with a matching
destination address.
The destination station copies the data to its internal buffers, sets control bits to
indicate that it recognized the address and successfully copied the data, and
retransmits the frame.
When the frame returns to the source station following successful transmission
and receipt, it is removed from the ring. The source station creates a new free
token and transmits it on the ring, thereby allowing other stations access. Until
the source station releases a free token, the rest of the stations are unable to
transmit.
To reduce the amount of time a station has to wait for a free token, a function,
known as Early Token Release , is available with the 3174 16/4 Mbps Dual Speed
Token-Ring Adapter when it is customized for 16 Mbps ring speed operation.
With Early Token Release, a sending station releases a free token following
frame transmission without waiting for the transmitted frame to return. This
enhances the utilization of the ring by allowing one token and one or more
frames to circulate on the network at the same time.

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

69

4.2 Ethernet Concepts
Ethernet (802.3) is currently the most widely used LAN protocol in the world.
Since its introduction to the marketplace in the 1970s it has been established
among a wide range of users.
Invented by Xerox** in the early 1970s and brought to the marketplace as
Ethernet V.1, the protocol was then developed by a consortium of DEC**, Intel**
and Xerox. This consortium brought out a new version of Ethernet in 1980 called
Ethernet (DIX) V2. They also published the architecture and took it to the
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) to have it accepted as an
international standard. The IEEE ratified the Ethernet DIX V2 standards with
some slight modifications as IEEE 802.3. The 802.3 standard has since been
approved by a number of other organizations including the American National
Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization
(ISO 8802-3). Today both Ethernet V2 and 802.3 LANs are widely implemented
across all areas of the marketplace.

CSMA/CD
Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) is the name
of the protocol used on the Ethernet (802.3) bus to control the operation of the
network. An example of CSMA/CD is shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. Ethernet CSMA/CD Bus

In a CSMA/CD bus, when a station wants to transmit data on the network bus, it
first listens to see if the bus is free (that is, no other station is transmitting). If
the bus is available, the station starts transmitting data immediately. If the bus
is not available (that is, another station is transmitting), the station waits until the
activity on the bus stops and a predetermined period of inactivity follows before
it starts transmitting.

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If a
the
but
the

collision occurs (that is, another station starts to transmit at the same time),
stations will stop transmitting data immediately after the collision is detected,
they continue to transmit a jamming signal to inform all active stations about
collision.

In response to this signal, each transmitting station stops transmitting and backs
off before attempting to transmit again. This causes each station to wait for a
random amount of time before starting the whole process again beginning with
the process of carrier sensing. If a station′s subsequent attempt results in
another collision, its wait time will be doubled.
This process may be repeated up to 16 times, after which the station, if still
unsuccessful, reports a transmission error to the higher layer protocols.

Ethernet Topologies
In an Ethernet (802.3) network, various types of cables can be used to provide
the physical link between the workstations. The media used can be thick or thin
coax, twisted pair, or fiber optic cable.
Thick coax is also known as 10Base5 or Thicknet. Thin coax is also referred to
as 10Base2 or Thinnet. When using coax (thick or thin), this cable acts as the
bus to which the workstations are connected. In the case of thick coax, an
external transceiver is required. A transceiver is a device which permits the
attachment of a workstation cable to the Ethernet. In the case of thin coax, the
transceiver can be an external device or mounted onboard the network interface
card (NIC).
Coax networks do not require structured wiring in the building, which makes
them ideal for use in old buildings. However, they have the disadvantage of not
providing management capability and fault isolation. For example, a break in the
bus cable will render the whole network idle because all workstations are
attached in line along the cable.
To enable the use of structured wiring in an Ethernet environment, a standard
known as 10BaseT has been developed which provides a point-to-point link
between the workstations and a central hub over twisted pair wiring. The hub
contains a Multistation Access Unit (MAU) function on each of its ports. It also
contains a repeater function which allows these point-to-point segments to
communicate with each other. The hubs can also be connected to extend the
size of the network and the number of stations that can be attached to them.
Because of the existence of hubs, a 10BaseT network provides a much better
management and fault isolation capability than the coax-based networks.
Fiber optic cables are used to provide point-to-point links, typically as a
backbone between concentrators, to interconnect buildings or cross long
distances within a building. However, it is also possible to use fiber optic cables
as a means of providing connections to workstations. There are various
standards covering the use of fiber optic cables in an Ethernet (802.3)
environment. These standards are described briefly in the following sections.
The physical size of a network and the number of stations attached to it varies
according to the type of medium used to construct the network. However, users
can build a network consisting of mixed topologies by using repeaters and
bridges. Also, such mixed topologies are made possible by intelligent hubs such
as the IBM 8250, which provide various repeater, bridge, media and
Chapter 4. LAN Support

71

management functions via a number of modules which can be installed in the
hub. The following sections provide a brief description of the various standards
used in Ethernet (802.3) networks.

10Base5 (Thicknet)
The names given to the IEEE 802.3 standards provide some information as to the
capabilities and requirements of the implementation. In the case of 10Base5
they have the following meaning:
•

10 indicates the data rate (10 Mbps)

•

Base indicates the transmission type (Baseband)

•

5 indicates the maximum cable length (500 meters)

10Base5 (thicknet) uses a very high quality coaxial cable for the bus. This cable
is very thick (10 mm in diameter) which makes it difficult to manipulate
particularly if it is being run into work areas and needs to go in and out of
ducting. The cable is generally marked every 2.5 meters to indicate where
transceivers can be attached.
Attachment of workstations to the coaxial cable is done by attaching a
transceiver to the cable and attaching the workstation to the transceiver via an
AUI (Attachment Unit Interface) cable. This is shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3. 10Base5 Segment

Note that terminators are used at both ends of the segment to prevent the signal
from being reflected back when it reaches the end of the segment.
In modern environments 10Base5 topology is not very practical. The difficulties
of manipulating the bus cable, rerouting AUI cables, attaching transceivers, etc.,
means that installations of this nature are inherently inflexible and unable to
accommodate the rate of change that is expected of most local area networks
today.
Despite the drawbacks associated with this type of installation, 10Base5 has
been widely installed. The use of multiport transceivers with a thinner and more

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flexible five meter transceiver cable has made it somewhat easier to add or
remove workstations and enable most connections to be made without having to
manipulate the thick coaxial cable. Also, despite the fact that 10Base5 has
become less popular for providing access to the LAN directly it is still widely
used, particularly in situations where relatively few attachments are required and
change is limited.

10Base2 (Thinnet)
As a means of addressing the problems associated with 10Base5, the 10Base2
standard was defined.
The name 10Base2 was chosen because of the characteristics of this type of
network as shown below:
•

10 indicates the data rate (10 Mbps)

•

Base indicates the transmission type (Baseband)

•

2 indicates the maximum cable length (200 meters)

Note: the actual length permitted on a 10Base2 segment is 185 meters.
10Base2 uses a much lower grade of coaxial cable than 10Base5. The cable is
also a lot thinner and more flexible which makes it easier to manipulate and
capable of being brought right up to the workstation. This, in conjunction with
the fact that the 10Base2 transceiver function is generally integrated into most of
the Ethernet adapters, provides the user with the option to connect the
workstation to the bus directly and avoid the use of AUI cable. However,
because of the lower quality of the cable, there is a reduction in both the
segment length available and number of transceivers supported when compared
to 10Base5.
A 10Base2 segment consists of a number of thin coax cables connected to each
other via a number of T-connectors. In addition to connecting the two cables
together, a T-connector provides a BNC connection for attaching the workstation.
The use of BNC type connectors makes adding and removing transceivers a
straightforward task in a 10Base2 network.
Because of the relative simplicity of running and attaching stations to it, 10Base2
is often used to extend the services offered by an existing 10Base5 network.
10Base2 and 10Base5 segments can coexist in the same LAN. Repeaters or
bridges can be used to connect the segments.
The advantage of 10Base5 in terms of the segment length available can be
utilized for parts of the LAN where change will be minimal such as through ducts
and risers to provide a backbone bus.
The advantage of 10Base2 in terms of the cable itself being easier to manipulate
plus the relative ease with which transceivers can be added and removed can
be utilized in areas of the LAN where changes will be made more frequently to
the configuration of the network.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

73

10BaseT
The 10BaseT standard was defined by IEEE to address the requirement of
running Ethernet/802.3 over the structured cabling systems using twisted pair
copper wires. Although, actually completed prior to the EIA/TIA 568 standard, a
10BaseT Ethernet (802.3) LAN requirement would be met by a cabling system
that conformed to EIA/TIA 568.
The term 10BaseT stands for the following attributes:
•

10 indicates the data rate (10 Mbps)

•

Base indicates the transmission type (Baseband)

•

T indicates the medium (Twisted Pair)

10BaseT is a star topology in which the workstations are attached to a central
hub . The hub acts as a multiport repeater between a number of segments in
which each segment is a point-to-point connection between a workstation and a
port on the hub.
A segment can also be a point-to-point connection between two hub ports. This
would allow you to set up a network consisting of multiple hubs. Also, by taking
advantage of bridges and repeaters (which normally are offered as modules
which can be installed on these hubs), networks consisting of mixed topologies
of 10BaseT, 10Base5, and 10Base2 can be constructed.

4.3 LAN Terminology
In referring to LAN devices in the context of host communication, the following
terms are often used:
•

Gateway

•

Downstream Physical Unit (DSPU)

•

Bridge

A gateway is the host communication server. It links the LAN to the host
network, translating the LAN protocol into that used for the host link. The
gateway may also reassemble frames for transmission.
A DSPU is the device on the LAN requiring host connection via the gateway. It
is also known as a network station .
A bridge connects one LAN segment to another such that the interconnected
segments appear as one logical ring. These segments may be quite close to
one another, or they may be separated by great physical distances over the wide
area network.

4.4 LAN Addresses
The LAN address field is six bytes (48 bits) long and usually represented as a
12-digit hexadecimal number. It is, with minor variations in format, used as the
source address and the destination address in frames sent from network station
to network station.
There are two different forms of LAN addresses: a universally administered
address and a locally administered address.

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Universally Administered Address
A universally administered address (UA) is an address assigned by IEEE and
“burned” into the adapter ROM by the manufacturer at the factory. Hence, it is
also known as the burned-in address or the hard-coded address .
Some manufacturers have been assigned universal addresses that contain an
organizationally unique identifier. For example, IBM has an identifier of
X′10005 A′. All IBM Token-Ring and Ethernet cards that use the IBM Token-Ring
and Ethernet chip sets have the first six digits (of the 12-digit hexadecimal
address) start with X′10005 A′.
IEEE ensures uniqueness of the first six digits among vendors; each vendor
ensures uniqueness for the other six digits within its organization.

Locally Administered Address
A locally administered address (LAA) is an address typically administered by an
network administrator and given to the adapter during customization. Because it
can be changed relatively easily, it is also known as the soft address .
For a LAN environment without a host connection, the IEEE universal address
may be useful. The advantage of using the universal address is its guaranteed
uniqueness and the avoidance of local address administration. Be sure to keep
a list of stations, some topology information, and the corresponding universal
addresses for LAN management.
When a LAN is being set up for host connection through a gateway, the locally
administered address is a more suitable implementation. The reasons are:
•

Generation of future DSPU devices is impossible for burned-in addresses as
you will not know what the address will be.

•

If a defective adapter is replaced, you will not have to update the
customization to include the new address.

•

From an operational point of view (CNM and LAN management) it may be
useful to make the address informative and meaningful, instead of a random
number.

4.4.1 Example Address Convention
The locally administered address is represented by 12 hexadecimal digits. The
general format of such an address is:

4000cddddddd
The first four digits are fixed as X′4000′. The first digit 4 indicates a locally
administered address; the next three digits are reserved and set to zeros. The
last eight digits may have any value less than or equal to X′7FFFFFFF′.
The following is one example of an address convention adopted for an
organization. The topology information used is the subarea number of VTAM or
NCP, the LAN number where the device is attached and a serial number within
this LAN. One digit is used to define the station type.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

75

┌────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│
LOCALLY ADMINISTERED ADDRESS (12 DIGITS)
│
├───────────────────┬────────────────────────────────────┤
│ FIXED (4 DIGITS) │
VARIABLE (LAST 8 DIGITS)
│
├───────────────────┼────────────────────────────────────┤
│
4000
│
abbccddd
│
└───────────────────┴────────────────────────────────────┘
┌────────────────────────────────────┐
│ a = Station Type:
│
│
0 ─ Not used (optional)
│
│
1 ─ 37XX Gateway
│
│
2 ─ 3174 Gateway
│
│
3 ─ PS/2 DSPU
│
│
4 ─ 3174 DSPU
│
│
5 ─ AS/400 DSPU
│
│
6 ─ other downstream PUs
│
│
7 ─ reserved
│
│
8─F ─ not allowed
│
├────────────────────────────────────┤
│ bb = Subarea number of NCP or VTAM │
├────────────────────────────────────┤
│ cc = LAN number
│
├────────────────────────────────────┤
│ ddd= Unique identifier
│
└────────────────────────────────────┘
Figure 4. Locally Administered Adapter Addresses

4.4.2 Getting the 3174 LAN Universal Address
After proper installation of the LAN Adapter, you may obtain its burned-in or
universal address by following the steps presented here.
The alphabetic characters of the universal address appear as other symbols; for
this reason, the following table is included to help the user to correctly interpret
them.

Bits 4-7
-------A
B
C
D
E
F

76

3174 Installation Guide

Character displayed
------------------- (dash)
E
H
L
P
(blank)

•

Insert the Utility diskette into diskette drive 1.

•

At the operator panel, press and hold the Alt 1 key.

•

Holding the Alt 1 key, press and release the IML key.

•

When 40 is displayed, press Enter.

•

The display connected to port 26-00 will show the Master Menu.

•

Enter a 4; the Diagnostic Test Menu appears.

•

If you have a Token-Ring Adapter, enter 3110
31 is the hardware group (HG) of the adapter.
10 is the function code (FC) to display universal address.

•

16 digits, for example 453510005A939428, will be displayed. In this example,

4535 is the status code
10005A is IBM′s manufacturer ID
(the first two bits in byte 0 of a UA are 00)
(the first two bits in byte 0 of an LAA are 01)
939428 is the unique portion of this adapter address.
•

If you have an Ethernet Adapter, enter 4110
41 is the hardware group (HG) of the adapter.
10 is the function code (FC) to display a universal address.

•

16 digits, for example 308210005AC80048, will be displayed. In this example,
3082 is the status code
10005A is IBM′s manufacturer ID
(the first two bits in byte 0 of a UA are 00)
(the first two bits in byte 0 of an LAA are 01)
C80048 is the unique portion of this adapter address.

•

To make another selection, press Enter.

4.5 3174 Gateways
This section addresses the 3174 LAN feature; however, you should be aware that
there are other IBM gateways available. The most suitable gateway will be
determined by factors such as the function required, your budget and in many
cases on what hardware is already installed.
Other IBM gateways include:
•

3720, 3725 or 3745 Communication Controllers with ACF/NCP and NTRI
implemented. This can be used as a very high performance gateway for
large token-ring networks as it supports very fast host links and has the
benefit of being able to route traffic at the session level.

•

The IBM 3172 Interconnect Controller can be used as a local (channel
attached) gateway in situations where only a dedicated controller is required
(no other device support).

•

A PS/2 with OS/2 Communications Manager/2 can be used as a remote
gateway for smaller LANs.

•

A PS/2 with DOS and an emulator such as Personal Communications/3270
can also be used as a gateway but this is again less functional.

4.5.1 Advantages
Some of the advantages and benefits of the 3174 LAN Gateways are:
•

It can be installed in a wide variety of configurations such as local and
remote, both 4 Mbps and 16 Mbps for token-ring gateway and 10 Mbps for
Ethernet gateway with multiple host support.

•

Easy customization and maintenance
Personnel experienced in customizing the 3174 will have to learn only a few
new parameters. These new parameters have default values which, in most
cases, will produce ready-to-run configurations.
Customization for backup units can be avoided if the Copy Customizing Data
procedure is used. The Upgrade Microcode procedure allows the customer

Chapter 4. LAN Support

77

to upgrade the microcode level of the 3174 gateway. Each procedure will
take about two minutes.
•

Ring Error Monitor (REM) and Token-Ring Error Alerts facility of the
token-ring gateway.
This facility allows the token-ring errors to flow through the gateway and be
reported to NetView in the host as alerts. As several 3174 Token-Ring
Gateways can be active at the same time in the token-ring network,
additional information can be added to identify which gateway is reporting
the alerts.

•

Triple function gateway/controller/APPN node
The 3174 LAN Gateway can also be used as the controller for its attached
terminals, as well as a network node for EN,s and LEN,s.

•

Efficient backup/recovery
It is possible to define and IML two 3174 LAN Gateways with the same LAN
addresses. The gateway which finishes the IML first will become the active
gateway and the other will become the backup gateway. See 4.12, “Backup
and Recovery” on page 143.

•

Performance versus cost
The 3174 local gateway can handle from 35 to 40 transactions per second
with a utilization of 65 to 70% at a relatively low cost.

•

Reliability
Because the 3174 is dedicated to providing host access to its supported
devices, it is not affected by other things happening in the network. A PS/2
gateway, if not dedicated, may require re-booting if a hang occurs in a user
program and this would disrupt all users of the gateway.
If a problem does occur on a 3174, it can be restarted without affecting a
large part of the network such as would occur if a 37xx required an IML.

4.5.2 Multi-Host Gateway
One of the major differences between the gateways is the host routing
capabilities. In an SNA network, the subarea network has routing designed into
it. This is implemented in the SNA layers of VTAM and NCP and it means that
with just a single link, a user can access any application in the network so long
as it resides on one of the host processors which form part of that network. If
you need to access a host processor in another network, then you can use the
SNI (SNA Network Interconnect) implementation at the NCP level.
For many reasons, such as complexity, security and software compatibility, many
customers choose not to implement SNI. Also, if one of the host processors is
an AS/400 or any other processor type which will communicate downstream to a
PU T2.0 but not participate in the SNA subarea routing, then an alternate means
of connectivity is required.
The routing provided by the 3174 is at a physical level rather than the dynamic
routing of the subarea network. You define each terminal′s connection at
customization time and if the user wishes to change hosts, it is done by
hot-keying.
So, the 3174 multi-host support can be used to provide simultaneous access to
multiple hosts, either in the same network or in other networks and to a wide

78

3174 Installation Guide

variety of hosts in a simpler manner than the NCP gateways; however you will
need to install a separate line to each 3174 which requires these additional
connections. The SLMH (Single Link Multi-Host) support now available in the
3174 (see 9.3, “Single Link Multi-Host Support” on page 342) improves on this
situation but it is still different to NCP routing.
Consider the differences between using SNI and 3174 SLMH. With SNI, only one
link is required for anyone in the network to have access to another host. The
session is set up by VTAM and the user may be entirely unaware that he or she
is connected to a different network.
To achieve this using the SLMH feature of the 3174, a gateway and a separate
line would have to be set up on each LAN in the organization where a user
requires access to the other network. The user would hot-key to the other
session when changing from one host to the other. The decision then comes
down to:
•

How many users need access to other hosts

•

Where they are located

•

What kind of hosts

•

How much you want to spend on communication lines

4.5.3 Ring Error Monitor or Token-Ring Error Alert for Token-Ring Gateway
The 3174 Token-Ring Gateway microcode includes a function to report token-ring
errors to the host. This function is called the Ring Error Monitor or Token-Ring
Error Alert; it performs analysis of non-random error conditions on a realtime
basis. In case of a failure of one of the stations in the ring, the REM or
Token-Ring Error Alert derives information indicating the two consecutive
adapters and the media in between them most likely to be causing a failure.
Other types of ring errors are also accumulated and reported to NetView when
thresholds have been exceeded. The information is presented to the host on the
SSCP-PU session in the form of alerts, link events and PD statistics.
This is one of the advantages of the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway compared to the
NCP gateway. It presents information about the entire Token-Ring Network to
the host, while the TIC (the Token-ring Interface Coupler used on the 37xx
Communication Controllers) is only able to report its own status. Token-Ring
errors are shown at the operator panel of the 3174 as 5xx and 8xx status codes,
and hardware errors of the Token-Ring Adapter are shown as 3xx status codes.
Note: When you elect to customize for the Ring Error Monitor, you must also
customize for the Alert function, otherwise the REM data cannot be sent up to
the host.

4.5.4 Gateway LAN Adapters
There are four 3174 LAN Adapter features which provide gateway support:
•

Feature #3025

•

Feature #3026

•

Feature #3044

•

Feature #3045

Chapter 4. LAN Support

79

Feature #3025
Feature #3025 is now obsolete. It was limited to 4 Mbps and did not support the
Early Token Release or the larger ring frame size. It will not be covered in any
detail here; however, you may consider it compatible with the new adapters
providing they are installed at 4 Mbps and do not use Early Token Release or
greater than 2KB frames. Feature #3025, if installed, can be recognized by the
card type 9350.

Features #3026 And #3044
Feature #3026 and feature #3044 both use the same hardware adapter. This is
card type 9351. The difference between them is that feature #3026 comes with
Configuration Support-S and feature #3044 does not have any microcode
included. To use feature #3044 as a gateway, you need to have Configuration
Support-B or Configuration Support-C installed on your 3174.
Notes:
1. Feature #3026 can be used with Configuration Support-B or Configuration
Support-C and you will get the same function as feature #3044. However,
you will pay more for this configuration as the price of feature #3026 includes
the price of the Configuration Support-S Licensed Internal Code.
2. Feature #3044 will work with Configuration Support-S but unless you have
already installed feature #3025 or #3026 on your 3174, you will not be
licensed to use Configuration Support-S. Keep in mind that Configuration
Support-B or Configuration Support-C provides additional functions, such as
multi-host gateway support and group polling.
When you order the gateway feature, you will also receive a 2.4 m (8 ft) adapter
cable with a connector to the adapter on one end and an IBM Cabling System
data connector at the other end, which can be inserted into an IBM 8228
Multistation Access Unit port or an 8230 Controlled Access Unit Lobe Attachment
Module port.

Features #3045
Feature #3045, which is card type 9344 and 3174 Configuration Support-C
Release 4 or Release 5, facilitate the 3174 to attach to Ethernet LANs in
configurations similar to token-ring configurations supported by the same models
of the 3174. This feature provides IEEE 802.3 and Ethernet DIX Version 2 frame
format network support. It provides the interface to attach to 10Base5, 10Base2,
and 10BaseT networks using one of the following three connectors on the
adapter:
•

1OBase5 15-pin D-SUB

•

10Base2 BNC

•

10BaseT RJ-45

Gateway Models Required
The LAN Gateway feature can be installed on any 3174 models except:

80

3174 Installation Guide

•

DSPU 3174 Models x3R or x4R

•

Smaller 3174 Models 8xR and 9xR

Notes:
1. The Model 90R comes with the gateway already installed.
2. A 3174 with a token-ring gateway (feature #3044 and Configuration Support-B
or Configuration Support-C) installed can be customized as a DSPU. You
may find this useful for contingency planning (see “Scenario 5: Alternate
IML” on page 151).

4.5.5 Gateway Microcode
The gateway is supported by 3174 microcode Configuration Support-S, B or C.
If you are installing feature #3026 you will get Configuration Support-S Control
and Utility diskettes to replace your existing Configuration Support-A diskettes.
Configuration Support-S, unlike Configuration Support-A, does not support BSC
communication, X.25, nor will it operate as a DSPU.
Configuration Support-B or C is the preferred microcode level to use for the 3174
LAN Gateway. It has more function than Configuration Support-S for gateway
support and it is still being enhanced, whereas Configuration Support-S will not
have any new functions added.
Some Configuration Support-B or C features not supported by Configuration
Support-S include the following:
•

Group polling

•

Support for 250 DSPUs

•

Single link multi-host support

•

Multi-host gateway (CCA access from gateway)

•

X.25 gateway support (via RPQ)

•

Duplex multi-point support

Configuration Support-C supports the functions available in Configuration
Support-B; in addition, it supports:
•

Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking

•

Peer Communication

•

Integrated Services Digital Network

•

Ethernet

•

Frame Relay Communication

•

Optimizing Token-Ring T1 timer and retry count

•

DLUR

See the appropriate chapter in this document for further information.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

81

4.5.6 Gateway Storage
The amount of 3174 storage required to support the gateway feature depends on:
•

Which level of microcode you use
Configuration Support-B or C is functionally richer than Configuration
Support-S but it requires more storage.

•

How many DSPUs will be attached to this gateway

To calculate the controller storage required, see Appendix E, “3174 Storage
Requirements” on page 755.
For a start, if you are installing a gateway with Configuration Support-B or C, you
will need at least 2176KB of storage, which is enough to support up to 28 DSPUs.
With 3MB of storage you can service up to 72 DSPUs.
If you installing a gateway and require the Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking
and Peer Communication functions of Configuration Support-C, the minimum
storage required is 4MB.
Storage is available for the 3174 in either 1, 2 or 4MB increments to a maximum
of 6 MB on the Models 1xx, 2xx, and 6xx. We recommend that you use the
larger increments if feature slots are scarce; the storage cards in the large 3174s
occupy the same slots as some of the feature cards.
Be aware that the older 3174s (Models 0xx and 5xx) have only 1MB base storage
and the newer 3174s (Models 1xx, 2xx, and 6xx) have 2MB of base storage.

Model 90R Gateway Storage
The Model 90R deserves special mention when it comes to calculating storage
for your gateway. It uses a subset of Configuration Support-B and has a
maximum of 2MB storage. Hence, it has limited capabilities and does not
support DSL devices, CSCM, MLT, and so on. However, it is has one base 3270
coax port for attaching one terminal directly (or eight terminals via a 3299
Terminal Multiplexer) and is able to support up to 40 DSPUs as a token-ring
gateway.

4.5.7 Devices Supported
The 3174 LAN Gateway feature with Configuration Support-B or C can support up
to 250 DSPUs while Configuration Support-S can only support up to 140
token-ring attached DSPUs.
The actual number of DSPUs you should have going through a 3174 LAN
Gateway will depend on several factors, including:
•

Speed of the upstream communication port(s)

•

Response time required

•

Use of group polling on remote gateways

•

Volume of traffic expected to flow through the gateway

•

Storage available in the 3174

•

Number of terminal devices attached to the gateway

Devices which can be attached to the 3174 LAN Gateway as DSPUs include the
following:

82

3174 Installation Guide

•

3174 Models x3R and X4R

•

PC or PS/2 using APPC/PC

•

System/36 PU using APPC

•

System/36 using 3270 emulation

•

AS/400 PU using APPC

•

AS/400 using 3270 emulation

•

IBM RT System using OEM 3270 emulation

•

IBM RS/6000 using OEM 3270 emulation

•

IBM 9370

•

PC or PS/2 with 3270 Workstation Program 1.1

•

PC or PS/2 with OS/2 EE 1.1 or later

•

PC or PS/2 with PC 3270 Emulation Program V3.0 operating as a PU

•

PC or PS/2 with Personal Communications/3270, either as a stand-alone
station or as a gateway for other downstream users

•

PC or PS/2 with Communications Manager/2

Note: A PC using PC 3270 Emulation Program V3.0 is a PU through the 3174
LAN Gateway when configured as a:
•

Stand-alone station.

•

Gateway, supporting other PCs configured as network stations.
The PC gateway is defined as a DSPU in the 3174 LAN Gateway; the
PC network stations are defined as LUs in the PC gateway but are not
defined in the 3174 LAN Gateway.

•

Gateway with network station; that is, it is a both a gateway
supporting other PCs configured as network stations, as well as a
network station in its own right.

The number and type of SNA LUs supported by each PU are transparent to the
3174 LAN Gateway. Each DSPU attached to the LAN appears to the host as an
addressable PU T2.0.
The local channel attached gateway can only be an SNA device and the DSPUs
are addressed as contiguous sub-channel addresses starting from the gateway
address.
DSPUs attached to a remote SDLC gateway are addressed as multi-point
controllers with contiguous addresses starting from the gateway address.
During customization of the 3174 LAN Gateway a range of LAN addresses for
DSPUs are defined. The 3174 LAN Gateway will provide services to DSPU
devices with these addresses. If DSPUs have to be added or deleted, a
re-customization of the 3174 LAN Gateway is necessary to update the address
list.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

83

Coax Attached Devices
Apart from performance considerations, the 3174 LAN Gateway does not affect
the operation of the 3270 displays and printers, or intelligent workstations,
attached by coax to the 3174.

4.5.8 Host Software Required
The minimum levels of host software required to support the 3174 Token-Ring
Gateway are:
•

ACF/VTAM under MVS, VM and VSE
VTAM Version 2 Release 1 and later support the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway.

•

ACF/NCP V4.3.1 or V5.2.1 if group polling is required (see 4.7.7, “Group Poll”
on page 110). Otherwise no specific version or release is required as the
remote 3174s; both gateway and DSPU configurations will appear as
controllers on a multi-point line.

•

NetView Version 1

•

Application programs supporting 3274-41A with Configuration Support-D Rel.
65 need not be altered, unless they interpret certain SNA sense information
(see 3174 Planning Guide ).

For a list of the software maintenance required for 3174 Token-Ring Gateway
support, see Appendix F, “APARs” on page 779.
The minimum levels of host software required to support the 3174 Ethernet
Gateway are:
•

ACF/VTAM under MVS, VM
VTAM Version 3 Release 4 and later support the 3174 Ethernet Gateway.

•

ACF/NCP Version 6 Release 1 and later

•

NetView Version 2 Release 3

4.6 3174 Local Gateway
The 3174 local gateway is an easy and efficient way to connect DSPU devices to
the host. Because it is channel attached, it can handle a very high throughput.
The gateway feature can be installed on any 3174 Model xxL configured as an
SNA controller.
The following sections describe the environment and definitions required to
install a local gateway. See 4.7, “3174 Remote Gateway” on page 99 for similar
details on remote gateway installation.
Most of this information is documented from installation experiences at our test
facility. Figure 5 on page 85 illustrates the configuration we used.

84

3174 Installation Guide

┌───────────────────┐
│ Host Processor │
└─────────┬─────────┘
│ Channel addresses
│ E40 through E46
┌────┴────┐
E41
│ 3174 │
E46
┌─────┐
│ Gateway │
┌─────┐
│3174 │
│ E40 │
│PS/2 │
└──┬──┘
└────┬────┘
└──┬──┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌─────┴──────────────┴───────────────┴────┐
│
LAN
│
└────┬──────────┬──────────┬──────────┬───┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌──┴──┐
┌──┴──┐
┌──┴──┐
┌──┴──┐
│3174 │
│PS/2 │
│PS/2 │
│PS/2 │
└─────┘
└─────┘
└─────┘
└─────┘
E42
E43
E44
E45
Figure 5. 3174 Local Gateway Configuration

4.6.1 System Definitions
The 3174 local gateway is supported in the following operating system
environments:
•

MVS

•

VM/SP

•

VSE (token-ring gateway support only)

Host Addressing
In all of these environments, when using a 3174 local gateway, a LAN device
becomes an SNA PU with attached LUs. Each PU appears to VTAM and to the
host operating system as if it was a local SNA 3270 control unit. Within VTAM
each control unit (PU) is identified by its own separate channel address. The
3174 local gateway resolves this channel address to the device′s LAN address
by use of an internal table that is defined during customization.
Thus, to begin your host I/O (and VTAM planning), you need to identify the PU
requirements for your LAN. Then you need to define for your operating system
the channel addresses for the PUs. See 4.5.7, “Devices Supported” on page 82
for a list of downstream devices requiring a defined channel address.
In our example, we have a 3174 local gateway and six PUs using it as a gateway.
The addresses defined are E40 for the 3174 local gateway, and E41, E42, E43,
E44, E45 and E46 for the DSPUs (a total of seven addresses).
Due to past procedures for addressing devices, to have proper operation of the
3174 local gateway you should:

Chapter 4. LAN Support

85

•

Ensure that the host IOCP and host operating system address range start on
a hex 16 boundary. That is, the last digit of the address is 0. For example,
200, 240, 2C0, 480, and 860 are valid.

•

Try to have the address range defined to the host consist of a multiple of
eight devices. That is, the last address will end in hex ′7′ or hex ′F′. The
following represent valid ranges:
−

200 through 207 (8 addresses)

−

200 through 20F (16 addresses)

−

200 through 21F (32 addresses)

For our example with six DSPU devices you should, at a minimum, define to the
host (IOCP and IO gen) the address range of E40 through E4F.
These are not 3174 restrictions; the 3174 base address does not need to start on
a 0 boundary nor does it require a multiple of eight addresses defined. These
limitations exist within IOCP and the operating system IOS subsystems. Since
I/O and host IOCP generations are not quickly implemented, you should consider
defining extra device addresses. A recommendation is to use larger address
ranges of 16 or 32 devices for the I/O generation. Thus, instead of generating 16
devices for our simple example above, we would define a block of 32. In VM
systems it is mandatory to do this; in MVS and VSE, this addressing is desirable.
Be aware, however, that in defining extra devices, the unused addresses may
cause operator messages at host IPL time indicating these addresses are not
available. Unused addresses also consume storage on the 3174 and the host.
In addition, you should ensure that the channel having the 3174 local gateway
has an appropriate address range to allow for future growth.

Host I/O Configuration Definitions
There are some special considerations for the IOCP when defining the 3174 local
gateway because of the number of devices addressed. A non-gateway SNA 3174
supports only one I/O address at a time, whereas the gateway has several.
It is important that you review the following differences and restrictions.
For 370 mode channel operations the unit control word (UCW) sharing differs
between the gateway 3174 and the non-gateway 3174. These differences are
illustrated in the following table.
Table 3. 3174 Local Gateway IOCP Requirements
Channel Type

Non-gateway
3174

Gateway 3174 (and DSPU Devices)

370 Byte

Non-shared

Shared for 308x or 3090 otherwise non-shared

370 Block

Non-shared

Shared

370/XA Byte

Non-shared

Non-shared

370/XA Block

Non-shared

Shared or non-shared

To specify shared status you code the SHARED= parameter with either Y or YB.
Y should be used for S/370 block mode. In 370 and XA byte mode SHARED=N
is required. 370 XA block may be specified with YB or N.

86

3174 Installation Guide

For IOCP definitions treat the 3174 LAN Gateway and the LAN addresses as 3791,
3705, or 3725 controllers. Typically a 3791 definition is used with MVS and either
3705 or 3725 with a VM system to agree with the SCP′s Input/Output. Since the
UNIT=parameter content on the CNTLUNIT statement is not validated, many
users are now coding UNIT=3174S (S for SNA) for documentation purposes
rather than using 3705, 3725, or 3791L.
The 3174 requires that PROTOCL=D be specified.
Warning
The 3174 local gateway and its associated channel address range must be
defined in a single CNTLUNIT IOCP statement. Use of multiple CNTLUNIT
statements can cause IOS071I Start Pending errors or performance problems.

It is also recommended that the beginning address in the UNITADD parameter
ends with hex 0 and that the number of addresses should be a multiple of eight.
Remember that the 3174 is fooling the system into thinking that there are
multiple real SNA 3174 controllers attached when there is really only one. To
make this work correctly the single statement is required to inform IOCP
scheduling of only one 3174. A hex 0 boundary for the first address with a
multiple of eight makes the definition more consistent with older control units
having multiple addresses. The use of xx0 address and multiple of eight
addresses will prevent any IOCP (or operating system) scheduling mistakes that
could be caused by scheduling techniques that would assume these boundaries.

MVS Definitions
An IODEVICE macro must be coded for the 3174 local gateway and the attached
DSPUs. The UNIT parameter of the IODEVICE macro must be coded 3791L. The
ADDRESS parameter of the IODEVICE macro allows specification of multiple LAN
attached devices. In our example we have coded a range of 16 addresses.
The definition for our example 3174 local gateway is shown in Figure 6.

DEVE40 IODEVICE UNIT=3791L,ADDRESS=(E40,16)
Figure 6. MVS 3174 Local Gateway Definitions

Note: For Models 12L and 22L, the IODEVICE macro is coded 3174.

VM/SP Definitions
The following examples are valid VM definitions for the 3174 local gateway and
the attached DSPUs. These definitions can be used if the gateway is attached to
a virtual guest machine (for example, VSE/VCNA) or if the gateway is attached to
the native VTAM directly under VM.
The definition for our example 3174 local gateway is shown in Figure 7 on
page 88.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

87

RDEVICE ADDRESS=E40,DEVTYPE=3705,ADAPTER=TYPE4,MODEL=H8,
CPTYPE=NCP
RCTLUNIT ADDRESS=E40,CUTYPE=3705,FEATURE=16-DEVICE
RCHANNEL ADDRESS=E,CHTYPE=BLKMPXR

X

Figure 7. VM Local Gateway Definitions

The FEATURE parameter of the RCTLUNIT macro specifies the maximum number
of attached DSPUs supported by a single 3174 local gateway. The value given in
the FEATURE parameter must be a multiple of eight.
The definitions for our example DSPUs are shown in Figure 8.

RDEVICE ADDRESS=E41,DEVTYPE=3705,ADAPTER=TYPE4,MODEL=H8,
CPTYPE=NCP
RDEVICE ADDRESS=E42,DEVTYPE=3705,ADAPTER=TYPE4,MODEL=H8,
CPTYPE=NCP
RDEVICE ADDRESS=E43,DEVTYPE=3705,ADAPTER=TYPE4,MODEL=H8,
CPTYPE=NCP
RDEVICE ADDRESS=E44,DEVTYPE=3705,ADAPTER=TYPE4,MODEL=H8,
CPTYPE=NCP
RDEVICE ADDRESS=E45,DEVTYPE=3705,ADAPTER=TYPE4,MODEL=H8,
CPTYPE=NCP
RDEVICE ADDRESS=E46,DEVTYPE=3705,ADAPTER=TYPE4,MODEL=H8,
CPTYPE=NCP

X
X
X
X
X
X

Figure 8. VM Local DSPU Definitions

With Configuration Support-S, where the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway supports a
maximum of 140 DSPUs, the FEATURE parameter should be coded as follows to
support the full number: FEATURE=144-DEVICE.
With Configuration Support-B or Configuration Support-C, where the 3174 LAN
Gateway supports a maximum of 250 DSPUs, the FEATURE parameter should be
coded as FEATURE=256-DEVICE.
The value given in the ADDRESS parameter of the RCTLUNIT macro must end
with a 0.
An RDEVICE macro must be coded for the gateway itself and for each LAN
attached 3174 or workstation PU.
Warning
If there are more DSPU definitions in the 3174 LAN Gateway than VM
RDEVICE macro definitions, any attempt to bring up the gateway will lead to a
VTAM hang.

VSE Definitions
VSE/SP 2.1 will not automatically recognize and generate ADD statements for
locally attached 3174 Models 01L, 11L, 12L, 21L, and 22L. The user must
manually include ADD statements, as shown in Figure 9 on page 89.

88

3174 Installation Guide

For the Gateway:

ADD E40,3791L,EML
For the DSPUs:

ADD
ADD
ADD
ADD
ADD

E41,3791L,EML
E42,3791L,EML
E43,3791L,EML
E44,3791L,EML
E45,3791L,EML

Figure 9. VSE Local Gateway and DSPU Definitions

The emulation parameter (EML) is necessary to inform VSE/SP 2.1 that the 3174
Models 01L, 11L, 12L, 21L or 22L is to be handled as a 3274-A41.

VTAM Definitions
If n LAN nodes are supported through a single 3174 gateway, n + 1 VTAM PU
macros must be coded for local, channel attached SNA controllers. A
sub-channel address must be defined for the gateway and each LAN attached
3174 or workstation PU. The sub-channel address assigned to the gateway must
be the lowest address in the LAN, and all sub-channel addresses must be
contiguous.
In VTAM Version 3.1.1, the SECNET parameter of the PU macro must be set to
YES for all DSPUs but not for the gateway itself.
The size of the host buffers multiplied by the number of host buffers must be
large enough to accommodate:
•

Link Header (min. 4 bytes, max. 32 bytes) (LH)

•

Transmission Header (TH)

•

Request Header (RH)

•

A minimum of 256 bytes of user data (RU)

The size of the host buffers is defined in the ACF/VTAM start options:
•

MVS: the buffsize value of the IOBUF buffer pool

•

VSE: the buffsize value of the LFBUF buffer pool

The number of host buffers is defined in the MAXBFRU parameter of the PU
macro for the local SNA minor node.

4.6.2 3174 Customization
If the LAN feature is installed on a 3174 already used as a non-SNA or as an
SNA channel attached controller, a new customization must be performed with
Configuration Support-S, Configuration Support-B or Configuration Support-C,
depending on the type of the LAN. If the 3174 was used as a non-SNA controller,
the host system definitions must be done again. Remember that the gateway
customization can be done in any model of the 3174. (At IML time, the 3174 will
determine whether there is any incompatibility between the hardware and the
microcode.)

Chapter 4. LAN Support

89

Only those customization questions dealing with the LAN Gateway feature are
discussed in this chapter. The 3174 microcode level used is Configuration
Support-C Release 5. See Chapter 10, “Connectivity Customization Examples”
on page 351 for 3174 LAN Gateway customization examples.

Question 100: Model Designation
Enter xxL in response to this question, since the gateway is a channel attached
model, where xx is the appropriate model number as written on the box label.

Question 101: Host Attachment
Enter a 5 (SNA-Channel) in response to this question if single host support is
required.
Enter an M in response to this question if multi-host support is required. If
multi-host is chosen, you will be presented with a customization screen for each
host you define. Multi-host is covered in more detail in Chapter 9, “Multi-Host
Connectivity” on page 331.

Question 102: LAN Adapter Type
The response to this question depends on the LAN Adapter type.
•

1 = Token-Ring

•

2 = Ethernet

Question 080: Token-Ring Address
This question appears if you specify a 1 for question 102.
The response cannot be all zeros. The format of the address is:

4000cddddddd
Where 4000 is the fixed part of the address
c
must not be greater than X′7′
d
can be any value from X′0′ to X′F′
See 4.4.1, “Example Address Convention” on page 75.

Question 082: Token-Ring Speed
The response to this question specifies the token-ring speed of the LAN.
•

0 = 4 Mbps - Normal token release

•

1 = 16 Mbps - Normal token release

•

2 = 16 Mbps - Early token release

Note that:

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3174 Installation Guide

•

Response 0 is valid for both feature #3025 and #3044 (Adapter type 9350 and
9351) and it is the default value.

•

Response 1 and 2 are valid only for feature #3044 (Adapter type 9351).

Question 084: Ethernet Address
This question appears if you specify a 2 for question 102.
The response cannot be all zeros and the format of the address is similar to
question 080.

Question 086: Ethernet Media Type
The response to this question specifies the media type of the Ethernet network.
•

2 = 10Base2

•

5 = 10Base5

•

T = 10BaseT

Question 088: Ethernet Frame Format
The response to this question specifies the type of Ethernet frame format you are
going to use.
•

1 = IEEE 802.3

•

2 = Ethernet V2

•

3 = Both

The default value is 1.

Question 104: Control Unit Address
Enter the two-digit address of the gateway.
The host system recognizes this as the I/O address assigned to the 3174 LAN
Gateway SNA PU. For example, enter 40 if the CUADDR parameter of the VTAM
PU macro for the gateway has been coded E40 (E being the channel address).

Question 105: Upper Limit Address
This question works, in conjunction with question 104, to set the range of channel
addresses that the 3174 will recognize. Question 104, the lowest actual
sub-channel address, and question 105, the upper sub-channel address, provide
the range of sub-channels used by the gateway feature. This range defines the
number of DSPUs being configured. The sub-channel range is checked to
ensure that it does not exceed the maximum number of DSPUs supported by the
feature (plus one for the gateway itself). The response to question 105 minus the
response to question 104, therefore, cannot be greater than 140 (X′8C′) for
Configuration Support-S and 250 (X′FA′) for Configuration Support-B and
Configuration Support-C.
Addresses reserved (even if they are not used) cannot be used by other devices
on the channel.
If you do not want to define any DSPUs attached to the 3174, your response to
question 105 must be 00 or must be equal to the response to question 104. This
prevents the LAN customization panels from being presented.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

91

Question 150: Token-Ring Network Gateway
This question applies to Configuration Support-B and requires a single-digit
response. (There is no equivalent question in Configuration Support-S since it is
intended specifically to support the Token-Ring Gateway feature).
Enter a 1 to include gateway support.

Question 150: Gateway (LAN and ISDN)
This question applies to Configuration Support-C and requires a two-digit
response.
Enter a 1 in the first digit to include LAN gateway support. (The second digit
response specifies whether you wish to include ISDN gateway support.)

Question 223: Attention Delay Value (SNA)
Although attention delay is not implemented for the 3174 LAN Gateway feature,
enter any value between 10 and 99 (ms) to go to the next customization panel.
Therefore, any response entered here will be ignored by the gateway microcode.

Question 900: LAN Address and SAP
The format of the LAN Adapter address and SAP is:
4000cddddddd ss
Where 4000cddddddd is the LAN Address specified in question 080 or 084
ss is the SAP address and defaults to X′04′

Question 905: Ring Error Monitor (REM)
This question applies to Configuration Support-S and Configuration Support-B.
The response must be:
•

1 for REM active (default response)

•

0 for REM inactive.

If your response is 1, you must turn on the alert function in question 220: Alert
Function so that REM data can be sent to the host.

Question 905: Token-Ring Error Alerts
This question applies to Configuration Support-C.
The response must be:
•

•

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3174 Installation Guide

0 to report critical token-ring errors:
−

Beaconing lasting more than one minute

−

Beaconing during adapter opening

−

Auto-removal of the adapter

1 to report critical and non-critical token-ring errors:
−

Critical errors as above

−

Temporary beaconing

−

REM-detected 3174 status codes

−

Beaconing lasting less than one minute

•

2 not to report any Token-Ring errors.
You will probably want this response if you have more than one 3174
connected to the same host and the same token-ring.

If your response is 0 or 1, you must turn on the alert function in question 220:
Alert/CMIP Event Report Function so that REM data can be sent to the host.
When the alert function in question 220 is turned on, you should be aware of its
impact on question 221: 3174 Alert/CMIP Control Point.

Question 908: Link Subsystem Name
This question applies to Configuration Support-S and Configuration Support-B.
The response must be:
•

Six alphanumeric characters with Configuration Support-S and Configuration
Support-B Release 2 or earlier.

•

Eight alphanumeric characters with Configuration Support-B Release 3 or 4.

The default value is IBMLAN.
This name should be unique (no imbedded blanks) for each 3174. You should
use your installation naming conventions because the name identifies the 3174
which sends the alert to the host.

Question 908: LAN Link Subsystem Name
This question applies to Configuration Support-C.
The response must be eight alphanumeric characters (no imbedded blanks).
The default value is IBMLAN.

Question 940: LAN Address Assignment


S
40
41
43
45





_______ 940: LAN Address Assignment _______

LAN
4000
4000
4000
4000

PF: 3=Quit

Address
3174 0001
3174 0002
3001 0036
3001 9119
4=Default

SAP
04
04
04
04

T

S

1
0
0

42
44
46

7=Back

8=Fwd

40/LOCL
Entry 001 of 006
LAN Address
SAP
T
4000 3174 0003
4000 3001 0016
4000 3001 0034

9=RtnH

10=PageBack

04
04
04

1
0
0

11=PageFwd



This question is displayed as a panel with four columns in the left half of the
panel and the same four columns repeated in the right half. The panel displays
as many half-line entries as are defined by the range of host addresses in
questions 104 and 105. The first entry is for the gateway and cannot be altered
on this panel; it is already filled based on your responses to question 900. Each
of the other entries map a host sub-channel address to a DSPU LAN address.
•

S address (column 1)
Column 1 contains the sub-channel addresses. They are provided
automatically and are derived from the range of addresses entered in
questions 104 and 105. If the number of addresses is greater than the
number of entries fitting on one panel, additional panels will be presented.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

93

•

LAN address (column 2)
Column 2 is where you enter the 12-digit LAN address of each DSPU (see
4.4.1, “Example Address Convention” on page 75).

•

SAP (column 3)
Column 3 defines the service access point (SAP) identifier. The combination
of the LAN address and the SAP ID must be unique.
Some attaching products may appear as multiple SNA physical units. Each
of these products has a single LAN address and multiple SAP IDs (refer to
the appropriate installation manual for more information for the product you
wish to attach). A 3174 DSPU using SLMH is an example of a device with a
single LAN address and multiple SAP IDs.
For a 3174 DSPU running Configuration Support-A, its SAP ID must be
entered as 04; this SAP ID is hard-coded within the microcode. Only one link
connection is maintained over this SAP.
For a 3174 local gateway running Configuration Support-S, its SAP ID is also
hard-coded as 04 and is forced during the customization (you cannot specify
the SAP ID via question 900).
The SAP ID specified must be a multiple of four in the range of X′04′ through
X′EC′; the default is X′04′.

•

T (column 4)
Column 4 allows you to specify the type of device for each DSPU:
−

0=workstation (default response)

−

1=3174 Establishment Controller

−

2=8KB RU devices, valid only for ESCON Attached 3174 Controllers
(Q.100=12L or 22L) with Token-Ring Adapter (Q.102=1), if configured to
support 8KB RU sizes (Q.241=1).

Your response will also determine the default maximum I-frame size and
maximum transmit window size (maximum-out) presented on the next panel
(question 941: LAN Transmission Definition).
A 0 response sets the I-frame size to 256 bytes and the maxout to 2. A 1
response sets the values to 2042 and 2 respectively. The 0 response is
suitable for workstations. However, if you have a 3174 DSPU or any device
which can handle large RU sizes then you should use the large values
instead as this will improve the efficiency of the LAN.

Question 941: LAN Transmission Definition


S
40
41
43
45





____ 941: LAN Transmission Definition _____

LAN Address
4000 3174 0001
4000 3174 0002
4000 3001 0036
4000 3001 9119

PF: 3=Quit

4=Default

SAP
04
04
04
04

F

W

S

3
0
0

2
2
2

42
44
46

7=Back

8=Fwd

40/LOCL
Entry 001 of 006
LAN Address
SAP
F W
4000 3174 0003
4000 3001 0016
4000 3001 0034

9=RtnH

10=PageBack

04
04
04

3
0
0

2
2
2

11=PageFwd



The LAN Transmission Definition panel first presents the default maximum
transmit I-frame size (F) and the maximum transmit window size (W) based on

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3174 Installation Guide

the device type response in question 940. The default values are shown in
Table 4 on page 95.
Table 4. Default F and W Values Depending on Device Type
DSPU Device Type

Default I-Frame Size (F)

Default Window Size (W)

T = 0 (workstation)

F=0 (265 bytes)

W=2

T = 1 (controller)

F=3 (2042 bytes)

W=2

T=2 (8 KB RU device)

F=5 (8201 bytes)

W=2

If you wish to accept the default values, just press the PF8 key (FWD) and
continue the customization process.
If you wish to change the default values, then valid entries for the maximum
I-frame size are:
•

0 for 265 bytes

•

1 for 521 bytes

•

2 for 1033 bytes

•

3 for 2042 bytes

•

4 for 4105 bytes

•

5 for 8201 bytes

Notes:
1. For controllers with a 4-Mbps Token-Ring Gateway Adapter, transmit I-frame
size (F) ranges from 265 to 2042 bytes.
2. For controllers with a 16/4-Mbps Token-Ring Gateway Adapter, transmit
I-frame size (F) ranges from 265 to 2057 bytes.
3. For controllers with a 10-Mbps Ethernet Gateway Adapter, transmit I-frame
size (F) ranges from 265 to 1493 bytes.
4. Response 5 is valid only for ESCON Attached 3174 Controllers with 16/4
Token-Ring Gateway Attachment installed.
5. In responding to this question, you need to consider the route over which
data will flow. If at link activation, there does not exist a route from the 3174
DSPU to the gateway that supports the specified I-frame size, then the
I-frame size is downgraded to the maximum supported by the available
route.
6. The ma x i mu m I-frame size include the SNA header: six bytes for the
transmission header and three bytes for the request/response header.
The maximum window size is the number of I-frames the 3174 LAN Gateway
transmits before waiting to receive an acknowledgment. The valid maximum
window size is based on your entry for the F field. Current implementation of
this algorithm yields the following:

Chapter 4. LAN Support

95

Table 5. Maximum Window Size Depending on Maximum Transmit I-Frame Size
Max. I-Frame Size (F)

Max. Window Size (W)

0 (=265 bytes)

7

1 (=521 bytes)

7

2 (=1033 bytes)

4

3 (=2042 bytes)

2

4 (=4105 bytes)

1

5 (=8201 bytes)

1

The sub-channel address, ring address and SAP ID values from question 940 are
also displayed but are protected from modification.

I-Frame Size and Window Size Considerations: This section applies only to
3174-x3R DSPUs using Configuration Support-A or Configuration Support-B
Release 1 and describes the following considerations:
•

The maximum transmit I-frame size (F field) in question 941 in the 3174
Token-Ring Gateway is related to the maximum receive I-frame size in
question 380 in the 3174 DSPU.

•

The maximum transmit window size (W field) in question 941 in the 3174
Token-Ring Gateway is related to the maximum receive window size in
question 381 in the 3174 DSPU.

In Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later, questions 380 and 381 have been
deleted from the customizing panels. The following default receive values are
used instead:
•

For a 4 Mbps token ring: I-frame size=2042 bytes, window=1

•

For a 16 Mbps token ring: I-frame size=4105bytes, window=1

Accepting the default values given by the customizing procedure for the gateway
and the DSPU will give an operative environment. However, you should consider
the following to improve the performance of the token-ring network and the total
system response time.
The I-frame sizes of the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway and the DSPU must be the
same. If the DSPU is a 3174, the response to the F field should match the
response to question 380.
The W field of the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway specifies the number of frames it
will send to the DSPU before suspending transmission to await
acknowledgement. Question 381 defines the number of frames that the 3174
DSPU will receive before it sends an acknowledgement (if inbound data is being
sent to the host, this Token-Ring acknowledgement will be piggybacked on the
data).
The acknowledgement frame sent by the 3174 DSPU adds very little to token-ring
congestion. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that you set question 381 to
1. This ensures the receiver (the 3174 DSPU) acknowledges every frame and
there is very little chance that the sender (the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway) will
have to suspend transmission while waiting for acknowledgement from the
receiver. If token-ring congestion is a concern to you, a value greater than 1
could be specified in question 381.

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3174 Installation Guide

The W field in question 941 should be set to a value greater than the response to
question 381. This will allow the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway to continue
transmission while the 3174 DSPU is processing the data it received already and
sending the response back to the gateway.
If they are equal, then the gateway will probably suspend when it has
transmitted the number of frames specified by the W field. This is because the
gateway will not receive the acknowledgement until the 3174 DSPU has received
all the frames sent by the gateway. That is, there is a waiting delay between
transmission and acknowledgement that degrades response times.
The W field value should never be set less than value in question 381 because
this will definitely cause suspension of transmission while waiting for
acknowledgement, and thus degrade response times.
If the path from the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway to the 3174 DSPU contains
Token-Ring bridges, there may be justification for making the difference between
the W field and the question 381 value greater than 1. This is because of the
delay introduced by the bridge copying data from one ring to another.
In addition, you must remember when specifying W field values that the buffers
are retained by the gateway until the data in the buffers are acknowledged. If
the W field is significantly large, then the gateway could deplete its buffer
resources frequently and thus decrease performance.
If the value in question 381 is set to 1, then the best value for the W field is 2 or 3
if no bridges are used and slightly larger (for example, 4) if bridges are used.
These values will allow uninterrupted transmission (by eliminating the waiting for
acknowledgement) and will prevent buffer resources in the gateway from being
depleted.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

97

4.6.3 Definitions Overview
┌─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│VM System Generation Macros:
│
│ RDEVICE ADDRESS=E40,DEVTYPE=3705,ADAPTER=TYPE4,
│
│
MODEL=E8,CPTYPE=NCP
│
│ RDEVICE ADDRESS=E41,DEVTYPE=3705,ADAPTER=TYPE4,
│
┌───┤
MODEL=E8,CPTYPE=NCP
│
│ │
:
│
│ │ RCTLUNIT ADDRESS=E40,CUTYPE=3705,FEATURE=16-DEVICE │
│ │ RCHANNEL ADDRESS=E,CHTYPE=BLKMPXR
│
│ └─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
│ ┌─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│ │MVS System Generation Macros:
│
├───┤ IODEVICE ADDRESS(E40,8),UNIT=3791L
│
│ └─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
│ ┌─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│ │IOCP Generation Macros:
│
│ │ CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=E40,UNITADD=(40,8),UNIT=3791L,
│
├───┤
SHARED=Y,PROTOCL=D
│
│ │ IODEVICE ADDRESS=(E40,8),UNIT=3791L,STADET=N,
│
│ │
CUNUMBR=E40
│
│ └─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
┌───────┐ │ ┌─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│
│ │ │VSE System Generation Macros:
│
│ HOST ├──┤ │ ADD E40,3791,EML
│
│
│ └───┤ ADD E41,3791,EML
│
├───────┤
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
│
│
┌─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│ VTAM ├──────┤VTAM Local SNA Major Node:
│
│
│
│ VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
│
└──┬┬───┘
│ PU
CUADDR=E40,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,
│
││
│
MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,
│
││
│
USSTAB=US327X,VPACING=0
│
││
│ LU
LOCADDR=2
│
││
│
:
│
││
│ PU
CUADDR=E41,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,
│
││
│
MAXBFRU=12,MODETAB=AMODETAB,
│
││
│
DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,USSTAB=US327X,
│
││
│
VPACING=0,SECNET=YES
│
││
│ LU
LOCADDR=2
│
││
│
:
│
││
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
││
┌─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
┌──┴┴───┐
│3174-x1L Gateway Customization:
│
│
│
│ 104: 40
(Gateway sub-channel address) │
│
│
│ 105: 4F
(Upper sub-channel address)
│
│3174-1L├──────┤ 900: 4000 3174 0E40 (Gateway′ s LAA)
│
│
│
│ 940: 4000 3174 0E41 (DSPUs LAA: E41 through E4F) │
│
│
│ 941: F=3
(I-frame size)
│
└───┬───┘
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
│
┌───┴───┐
│ L │
┌─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│ A │
│3174-x3R/x4R DSPU Customization:
│
│ N │
│ 106: 4000 3174 0E41 (DSPU′ s LAA)
│
└───┬───┘
│ 107: 4000 3174 0E40 (Gateway′ s LAA)
│
│
│ 382: 1801
│
┌───┴───┐
│ 383: 2
│
│
│
│
│
│ 3174 ├──────┤
│
│x3R/x4R│
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
└───────┘

Figure 10. Definitions Overview for 3174 Local Gateway

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3174 Installation Guide

4.7 3174 Remote Gateway
There is frequently a requirement to access a remote host site across a wide
area network based on IBM′s System Network Architecture (SNA). The LAN and
SNA networks use different protocols at the link level; it is the essential function
of a LAN gateway to convert between SNA Synchronous Data Link Control
(SDLC) formats, LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Logical Link Control
(LLC) formats. The conversion is transparent to higher-level protocols such as
Logical Unit Type 6.2 and the 3270 data stream.

Remote Gateway Physical Configuration
The 3174 remote gateway, as shown in Figure 11, is attached to the host via a
leased full-duplex or half-duplex SDLC line running data half-duplex. SDLC and
X.21 switched connections are not supported . X.25 switched virtual circuits
(SVC) and permanent virtual circuits (PVC) can be supported when using RPQ
8Q0743, X.25 Token-Ring Gateway.
Note: A Frame Relay communication can be supported with Configuration
Support-C Release 5. See 20.4, “3174 Customization” on page 597 for more
information
The 3174 attaches to a 308x, 3090, 4341, 4361, 4381 or 9370 via a 3720, 3725, 3745
or 3746 Communication Controller. It can also attach to a 4361 Integrated
Communication Adapter or a 9370 Telecommunications Subsystem Controller.

Figure 11. Physical Configuration of 3174 Remote Gateway and DSPUs

Chapter 4. LAN Support

99

Remote Gateway Logical View
VTAM and NCP view the 3174 remote gateway and its DSPUs as stations on a
multi-point SDLC link. Outbound data is addressed to DSPUs using SDLC station
addresses. The 3174 remote gateway references an address translation table to
route the data on to the destination DSPU. It also converts between SDLC and
token-ring frame formats by stripping the SDLC link header and trailer and
enclosing the remaining TH, RH and RU in MAC/LLC headers and trailers. The
process is reversed for inbound data.

┌───────────────────┐
│
SNA HOST
│
S/370 ├───────────────────┤
Host │
VTAM
│
└────────┬─┬────────┘
│ │
┌─────┴─┴──────┐
37xx │
NCP
│
└──────•───────┘
•
•
•
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
┌───────┐
┌───────┐
┌───────┐
│SNA PU │
│SNA PU │
│SNA PU │
└───────┘
└───────┘
└───────┘
3174 Remote
PC or PS/2
3174-x3R/
Gateway
x4R
Figure 12. Logical View of 3174 Gateway and DSPUs

4.7.1 Highlights
The following is a summary of the advantages and benefits of the 3174 remote
gateway:
•

Triple functions: gateway, cluster controller and APPN NN
The gateway can be installed in a 3174 that is also used as a controller for
attached terminals and a network node for EN,s and LEN,s that it serves.
Under heavy loads, 3174 capacity may become a critical factor.
The 3174 LAN Gateway can be attached to a communication link at up to 256
Kbps. This compares favorably with PC-based gateways that have a
maximum speed of either 9600 bps or 19.2 Kbps, depending on the model.
The faster line speed and lower transmission delays may lead to improved
response times for end users.

•

Capacity
The 3174 LAN Gateway is designed to support up to 250 DSPUs, although in
practice the actual number supported may be fewer. By comparison,
PC-based gateways are limited in any event to five downstream devices (in
the case of a DFT-attached PC) or 32 downstream devices (in the case of a
PC attached via an SDLC adapter).

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The 3174 remote gateway requires no special software at the host apart from
an NCP able to support a multi-point link. The gateway itself is an adapter
installed by the customer in the 3174. Assuming the installer is familiar with
3174 customization, the microcode is easily prepared.
•

Ring Error Monitor and Token-Ring Error Alert
This capability allows token-ring errors, in the form of alerts, to flow through
the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway to the NetView hardware monitor.

•

Remote IML
This capability allows an operator, using a NetView console, to IML a remote
3174 via the online test panels.

•

•

Remote Management
−

Using NetView Distribution Manager or NDM for OS/2, you can customize
and upgrade the microcode from the central site.

−

Central Site Control Facility allows local and remote 3174 management
by allowing a NetView operator to invoke test and IML commands (see
13.1, “Central Site Control Facility” on page 433 for more details).

Group poll
Using the group poll function you can improve on the response times of the
remote users and reduce overheads in the NCP (see 4.7.7, “Group Poll” on
page 110 for further details).

4.7.2 Implementing Gateway
Implementation of the 3174 remote gateway consists of the following tasks:
•

Installing the LAN gateway adapter in the 3174.

•

Creating an NCP to support the line and downstream devices.

•

Customizing the control microcode for gateway support.

•

Customizing the DSPUs.

The material presented here is based on the configuration at ITSO Raleigh
Center, as shown in Figure 13 on page 102.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

101

┌───────────────────┐
│
VM
│
├───────────────────┤
│
MVS SA20
│
└─────────┬─────────┘
┌─────┴─────┐
│ 3725
│
│ SA13
│
└─────┬─────┘
│
│ SDLC link
│ 9600 bps
│
┌───┴───┐ 3174-11R
│
│ #3044/#3045
└───┬───┘
│
┌──┐ ┌───────────────────────────┴────────────────────────────┐ ┌──┐
│ │ │
│ │ │
│PC├──┤
LAN
├──┤PC│
└──┘ │
│ └──┘
└─────────┬─────────────────┬─────────────────┬──────────┘
│
│
│
┌───┴───┐
┌───┴───┐
┌───┴───┐
│ 3174 │
│ 3174 │
│ PC │
└───────┘
└───────┘
└───────┘
x3R/x4R
x3R/x4R
Figure 13. 3174 Remote Gateway Configuration

4.7.3 3174 Customization
Several customization questions are specific to the 3174 remote gateway. The
questions described here are for the 3174 microcode Configuration Support-C
Release 5 with the responses that are specific to the 3174 remote gateway.
The 3174 Planning Guide , is the appropriate source of planning information for
the other questions. You should regard the material presented here as
supplementary information.

Question 100: 3174 Model Designation
No change, just the addition of new models.

Question 101: Host Attachment
This is dependent on whether you are planning for multiple host support, SDLC,
X.25 or Frame Relay connection. The valid responses for a 3174 remote gateway
are:

102

•

2=SDLC

•

3=X.25 (Token-Ring LAN adapter only. See note below)

•

9=Frame Relay

•

M=Multi-Host Support

3174 Installation Guide

Note:
If you are configuring the X.25 attached 3174 with Token-Ring LAN adapter as a
remote gateway, it needs the RPQ 8Q0743 - X.25 Token-Ring Gateway. See
Chapter 6, “X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ” on page 187 for more details.

Questions 104: Controller Address
The response is the address of the 3174 remote gateway and should match the
ADDR operand in the NCP PU statement.

Question 105: Upper Limit Address
The response is the highest address to be used for your DSPU. For the 3174
local gateway, it is the highest sub-channel address; for the 3174 remote
gateway, it is the highest SDLC station address.
With a 3174 remote gateway configuration, each DSPU functions logically as a
PU on a multi-point line. NCP refers to each DSPU by a one-byte SDLC station
address. The question 104 response will be the address of the PU in the 3174
LAN Gateway. The question 105 response will be the highest SDLC station
address that can be given to a DSPU. The difference between the two responses
is the range of addresses that can be used for LAN DSPUs going through the
3174 remote gateway.
With Configuration Support-C, the range of addresses is also shared with ISDN
DSPUs. The number of DSPUs that can be assigned for ISDN is given by
question 190: Number Of ISDN DSPUs, and are allocated addresses starting at
question 150. Whatever addresses are not allocated to ISDN DSPUs are then
available for LAN DSPUs.
For example, assume we have the following responses:
•

Question 104=C1

•

Question 105=C6

•

Question 190=2

In this example, the SDLC address of the 3174 remote gateway will be C1, one
ISDN DSPU will be allocated address C6 and the second C5, leaving addresses
C4, C3 and C2 available for LAN DSPUs. If question 190 had been 5, then you
will not be able to configure for any LAN DSPUs.
You can cater for future growth by customizing for a greater number of
addresses than you currently need. Since the theoretical maximum capacity of
the gateway is 250 DSPUs, values with a difference of greater than 250 (X′FA′)
will be rejected.

Question 080: Token-Ring Address
See “Question 080: Token-Ring Address” on page 90.

Question 082: Token-Ring Speed
See “Question 082: Token-Ring Speed” on page 90.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

103

Question 084: Ethernet Address
See “Question 084: Ethernet Address” on page 91.

Question 086: Ethernet Media Type.
See “Question 086: Ethernet Media Type” on page 91.

Question 088: Ethernet Frame Format
See “Question 088: Ethernet Frame Format” on page 91.

Question 150: LAN Gateway
See “Question 150: Token-Ring Network Gateway” on page 92.

Question 150: Gateway (LAN and ISDN)
See “Question 150: Gateway (LAN and ISDN)” on page 92.

Question 900: LAN Address and SAP
See “Question 900: LAN Address and SAP” on page 92.

Question 905: Ring Error Monitor
See “Question 905: Ring Error Monitor (REM)” on page 92.

Question 905: Token-Ring Error Alerts
See “Question 905: Token-Ring Error Alerts” on page 92.

Question 908: Link Subsystem Name
See “Question 908: Link Subsystem Name” on page 93.

Question 908: LAN Link Subsystem Name
See “Question 908: LAN Link Subsystem Name” on page 93.

Question 912: Group Poll Address
This panel allows you on the gateway 3174 to code an additional polling address,
which must be outside the polling address range as specified in Questions 104
and 105.
This address must also match the value specified in GP3174= for all the PU
definitions requiring group poll on the same line group in the NCP definitions.
See 4.7.5, “3174 Remote Gateway Performance” on page 106 and 4.7.8, “Host
Software Planning” on page 114 for further information.

Question 940: LAN Address Assignment
See also “Question 940: LAN Address Assignment” on page 93.
This panel establishes the address translation table used by the 3174 remote
gateway to map SDLC address to LAN addresses.
SDLC addresses are provided automatically in column 1 based on the range of
values indicated in questions 104 and 105.
LAN addresses of DSPUs are entered in column 2. The adapter address of the
gateway is provided automatically from the response to question 900 and is
assigned to the lowest SDLC address.

104

3174 Installation Guide

Column 3 contains the service access point (SAP) address for the DSPU. This is
the “port” through which an application in the DSPU requests the services of the
underlying communication protocols. A SAP ID must be a multiple of four in the
range X′04′ to X′EC′.
The default value is X′04′, the standard SAP ID defined by IBM to interface
between SNA and LAN protocols. The required SAP address for devices running
PC 3270 Emulation Program V3, APPC/PC and for 3174 Models x3R and x4R is
also X′04′. For Workstation Program V1.1 it is X′08′.
In situations where there is a requirement for a DSPU to support multiple SAP
IDs (such as when migrating from 3270 emulation to the Workstation Program) it
is possible to code the LAN address more than once with different SAP IDs.
Indicate in Column 4 whether the device is a workstation (response=0) or a
3174-x3R/x4R (response=1). The response will also be 1 for an AS/400.

Question 941: LAN Transmission Definition
See “Question 941: LAN Transmission Definition” on page 94.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

105

4.7.4 Definitions Overview
┌──────────────────────────────────────────────┐
┌───────┐
│NCP Definitions:
│
│ HOST │
│ LINE ADDRESS=(08,FULL),
│
├───────┤
│
DIAL=NO,
│
│ VTAM │
│
LNCTL=SDLC,...
│
└───┬───┘
│ PU
ADDR=C1,MAXDATA=521,DATAMODE=HALF, │
│
│
GP3174=E1,
│
┌───┴───┐
│
SECNET=NO
│
│ 37xx ├──────┤ LU
LOCADDR=2
│
└───┬───┘
│ LU
LOCADDR=3
│
│
│ PU
ADDR=C2,MAXADATA=521,DATAMODE=HALF, │
│
│
GP3174=E1,
│
│
│
SECNET=YES
│
│
│ LU
LOCADDR=2
│
│
│ LU
LOCADDR=3
│
│
│
:
│
│
│ PU
ADDR=C6,MAXADATA=521,DATAMODE=HALF, │
│
│
GP3174=E1,
│
│
│
SECNET=YES
│
│
│ LU
LOCADDR=2
│
│
│ LU
LOCADDR=3
│
│
└──────────────────────────────────────────────┘
│
┌──────────────────────────────────────────────┐
┌───┴────┐
│ 3174-x1R/x2R Customization:
│
│
│
│ 104: C1
(Gateway address)
│
│3174-x1R├─────┤ 105: C6
(Upper SDLC address) │
│
│
│ 150: 1 0
(Gateway support)
│
│3174-x2R│
│ 900: 4000 3174 0240 (Gateway′ s LAA)
│
│
│
│ 940: 4000 3174 0241 (DSPUs′ LAA)
│
└───┬────┘
│ 941: 3
(Frame size)
│
│
└──────────────────────────────────────────────┘
┌───┴────┐
│
│
│
│
│ LAN │
│
│
│
│
└───┬────┘
┌──────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│
│ 3174-x3R/x4R DSPU Customization:
│
│
│ 106: 4000 3174 0241 (DSPU′ s LAA)
│
┌───┴────┐
│ 107: 4000 3174 0240 (Gateway′ s LAA)
│
│ 3174 ├─────┤ 382: 1801
(Frame size)
│
│ x3R/x4R│
│ 383: 2
│
└────────┘
└──────────────────────────────────────────────┘
Figure 14. Definitions Overview for 3174 LAN Remote Gateway

4.7.5 3174 Remote Gateway Performance
This section discusses some of the performance characteristics of the 3174
remote gateway, concentrating on the SDLC lines. Tuning becomes more critical
as more devices use the gateway and traffic volumes increase.

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3174 Installation Guide

SDLC Multi-Point Lines
The performance characteristics of the 3174 remote gateway are influenced by
the SDLC multi-point polling mechanism. A useful reference on this subject is
Tuning and Problem Analysis for NCP SDLC Devices . A brief summary of the
mechanism is provided here.

Service Order Table Polling
When PUs on the link are active, they receive data or are polled for input in the
sequence in which they are listed in the Service Order Table (SOT). The time it
takes to pass through the SOT determines the rate at which DSPUs receive polls
and, therefore, the performance they experience. Inactive PUs are not polled.
Factors that affect the time it takes to pass through the SOT include the number
of entries being polled (that is, the number of active devices), the line speed and
the line propagation delay (the delay induced on transmission due to factors
such as modem transit time and line length).

Group Poll
Prior to group poll, data flowing from the stations on the LAN arrived
asynchronously at the gateway but were queued at the 3174 until a poll
containing the station′s specific address arrives. This waiting for the specific
poll at the 3174 increases the response time.
With NCP′s group poll support and Configuration Support-B Release 1 and later,
the waiting time is significantly reduced by allowing data from any station, whose
address matches the group poll address, to flow inbound when the gateway
receives a group poll.
The group poll address is a two-character hexadecimal address that you can
specify in question 912: Group Poll Address. This address must be outside the
range of addresses specified for questions 104 and 105 and must not be X′FF′.
The levels of host software required to support group poll are as follows:
•

NCP V4 Release 3.1

•

NCP V5 Release 2.1

•

SSP V3 Release 4.1

Each of the above requires Small Programming Enhancements (SPEs). (An
SDLC-attached 3174 without the gateway feature cannot use group poll.)

Duplex Multi-Point
Prior to duplex multi-point, you had to define any line that includes a 3174
remote gateway as half-duplex in NCP:
LINE ADDRESS=(linenumber,HALF)
This is because the 3174 is an SDLC two-way alternate station; that is, it can
send and receive alternately but it cannot send and receive at the same time.
With a 3174 remote gateway, this poses a problem, as shown by the following
example:
1. NCP sends data and asks for a response to station A, a DSPU on the LAN.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

107

2. The 3174 LAN Gateway disables its receiver and starts transmitting the
response from station A. This is the normal way a two-way alternate station
operates.
3. In the meantime, NCP starts transmitting data to station B, another DSPU on
the LAN.
4. Because the gateway receiver is disabled, the gateway will not receive the
frame(s) sent by NCP for station B.
With Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later, support has been added to
allow the 3174 remote gateway to have its receiver enabled while transmitting,
vice-versa. You can now define the line which includes a 3174 remote gateway
as full duplex in NCP, resulting in potential performance improvements for all
users on the line:
LINE ADDRESS=(linenumber,FULL)
Note that the SDLC protocol code has not changed; that is, each station
continues to be a two-way alternate station.

4.7.6 NCP Tuning Parameters
SERVLIM
Contact polling (the transmission of a SNRM, SNRME or DISC) is not subject to
the data polling cycle. After the number of passes through the Service Order
Table specified by SERVLIM, the NCP performs one contact poll for a PU. On the
next contact poll it looks for an outstanding SNRM, SNRME or DISC for the next
entry in the Service Order Table. SERVLIM, thus, determines the ratio of
activation/deactivation processing to normal data transfer. Setting the value
high (its maximum is 254) means that relatively few attempts are made to
contact a PU in order to activate it. While this may help performance for active
users by reducing the time spent transmitting and waiting for responses to
contact polls, it has a negative impact on resource activation times. This effect
may be more marked in the remote LAN environment since two polls are
required to establish connectivity between the NCP and each DSPU (see the
session activation flow diagram later in the chapter).
In environments where 3270 emulation is being started and terminated frequently
and devices powered on and off, which is often the case with PC users, a high
value should not be specified. The long wait for the VTAM USS MSG10 message
after requesting a host session may be considered unacceptable. During the
tests we found that a SERVLIM value of 254 led to resource activation times of
some minutes. We recommend setting SERVLIM to 4 as a good starting point for
your installation.

SERVICE
By giving a DSPU multiple entries in the Service Order Table it is polled more
frequently. This is a good way to give preferential treatment to particular
devices. The order of the DSPUs in the table does not have any effect on
performance.
It is also possible to reduce the number of entries in the Service Order Table
where Personal Communications/3270 is used by customizing one PC as a
gateway with several PC network stations rather than customizing each PC as a
standalone station. That is, the PC gateway is the only DSPU customized in the

108

3174 Installation Guide

3174 remote gateway and the PC network stations are defined as LUs in the PC
gateway. This could reduce the contribution of the polling delay to total
response time. However, device path-lengths will increase due to the NetBIOS
sessions between gateway and network stations. Furthermore, host access from
network stations is dependent on the availability of the PC gateway.

PAUSE
The objective of the PAUSE operand on the LINE macro is to introduce a delay
between passes through the Service Order Table so that the impact of excessive
negative polling on communication controller CCU utilization is reduced. If the
NCP completes a pass through the Service Order Table before the PAUSE time
elapses, it waits for the timer to elapse before it begins the next pass. It may be
possible to reduce response times by setting PAUSE to 0 if there are few lines
competing for CCU cycles. If there are many lines the increased polling that
ensues reduces the cycles available for data processing rather than polling and
may therefore be harmful to performance. See 4.7.7, “Group Poll” on page 110
for further considerations.

PASSLIM
The objective of the PASSLIM operand is to limit the amount of data transmitted
to a PU in one pass through the Service Order Table so that it does not
monopolize the link. In order to avoid a staggered screen-paint, it should not be
set so low that only a small portion of the screen is sent on each pass through
the Service Order Table. For example, it takes about eight PIUs to paint a full
1920 character screen for a single workstation running Personal
Communications/3270 since data will be sent to the DSPU in 256-byte segments.
If this is a standalone station with only one LU to support, 8 is a suitable value.
If it is a PU with multiple LUs to support, setting PASSLIM high enough to allow
each LU to receive a full screen on a pass through the table may adversely
affect performance of other PUs. As a general rule in such circumstances, you
should set PASSLIM less than or equal to MAXOUT.

HDXSP
If HDXSP (Half-Duplex Send Priority) is coded as YES, outbound data is sent as
soon as possible without waiting for the turn of the PU in the Service Order
Table. This improves performance for large numbers of PUs on a line with low
traffic frequency.

PACING
PACING is used to control the flow of traffic on an LU-LU session. It is useful
where the secondary LU is a printer or a display that will be doing large
amounts of file transfer to and from the host. You may wish to examine the
possibility of using inbound and outbound pacing to reduce excessive line
utilizations when DSPUs are sending files to and from the host.
Inbound pacing is agreed at BIND time and should therefore be specified in the
logmode entry for the device (see Appendix F of VTAM Programming ).
Outbound pacing can be defined in either the logmode entry or the NCP LU
macro. If a non-zero value is coded in the logmode entry, the NCP value is
overridden. If a zero entry is coded in the logmode entry, the NCP value is used.
Outbound pacing is particularly useful in preventing the transmission of more
data to a device (such as a PC printer) than it can handle and may therefore
reduce line utilization.
Chapter 4. LAN Support

109

4.7.7 Group Poll
Using the group poll enhancement, you change the way the NCP handles the
devices defined. Instead of sequentially polling each device in the SOT looking
for data to receive, it sends a group poll on its first available “free” frame (no
data to send), and will accept data from any device defined in the group poll
range.
The group poll is set up in the 3174 via customization question 912: Group Poll
Address; this identifies the gateway′s group poll address. In the NCP definitions,
you specify the gateway′s group poll address in the PU statement for each DSPU
participating in group polling. When NCP finds a station (PU) in the SOT for
which a transmission is pending, it sends the data and then sends a specific poll
to the station address. None of the other 3174′s stations in the network answers
this poll because NCP does the address resolution.
If there are no pending transmissions to any stations in the SOT, the NCP polls
the gateway using the unnumbered poll command and the gateway′s group poll
address. The gateway recognizes this as a group poll and sends traffic from one
station, followed by the unnumbered response. In this way it increases the
possibility that a poll results in a useful transaction which could increase the
response time for end-users.

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3174 Installation Guide

Group Poll Customization Example
Remote Gateway Physical Configuration

┌────────┐
│ HOST │
│
│
└───┬────┘
┌─┴──┐
│37xx│
└─┬──┘
│/│ SDLC line L13008
│
┌───┴───┐
│ C1 │ 3174 GATEWAY
└───┬───┘
┌─────────┴─────────┐
│
LAN
│
└──┬─────────────┬──┘
┌──┴──┐
┌──┴──┐
│ C2 │.......│ C6 │
└─────┘
└─────┘
3174
3174
DSPU
DSPU
Figure 15. Remote Gateway Physical Configuration

Remote Gateway Logical View

┌────────┐
│ HOST │
└───┬────┘
│
│
┌─┴──┐
SDLC line L13008
│
├─────┬───────┬───────────────┐
│37xx│ ┌──┴──┐ ┌──┴──┐
┌──┴──┐
└────┘ │ C1 │ │ C2 │.........│ C6 │
└─────┘ └─────┘
└─────┘
3174
3174
3174
GATEWAY DSPU
DSPU

Figure 16. Remote Gateway Logical View

Chapter 4. LAN Support

111

NCP Definitions for Group Poll
This example is an extract from the NCP loaded into a 3725 at the ITSO, Raleigh
Center. We have defined line 08 as full duplex to a 3174 Token-Ring Gateway
with 3174 DSPUs on the token-ring network.

*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
L13008 LINE ADDRESS=(08,FULL),ANS=CONTINUE,CLOCKNG=EXT,DUPLEX=(FULL),X
ETRATIO=30,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,LPDATS=LPDA2,MAXPU=10,
X
NPACOLL=YES,PAUSE=.51,SERVLIM=10,SPEED=9600,
X
SRT=(,64)
SERVICE MAXLIST=10,ORDER=(P13008A,P13008B,P13008C,P13008D,P13008E,
X
P13008F)
P13008A PU ADDR=C1,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=521,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,PACX
ING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=NO,PUTYPE=2,GP3174=AE2
T13008A1 LU LOCADDR=2
T13008A2 LU LOCADDR=3
:
P13008B PU ADDR=C2,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=265,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,PACX
ING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=NO,PUTYPE=2,GP3174=AE2
T13008B1 LU LOCADDR=2
T13008B2 LU LOCADDR=3
:
P13008C PU ADDR=C2,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=265,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,PACX
ING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=YES,PUTYPE=2
T13008C1 LU LOCADDR=2,MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008C2 LU LOCADDR=3
:
P13008F PU ADDR=C6,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=265,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,PACX
ING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=NO,PUTYPE=2,GP3174=AE2
T13008F1 LU LOCADDR=2
T13008F2 LU LOCADDR=3
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*

Notes:

1 PAUSE value, see note on group poll performance
2 A group poll address, unique to any real 3174 address defined on this
line.

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3174 Installation Guide

SNA Data Flow for Group Poll
The data flow shown in Figure 17 was taken from a trace on line L13008 of the
example.

───────────────
───────────────
Normal data flows between C1, C2,..C6 and NCP.
┌──────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│When the host has no data for any specific device │
│on the LAN,it then issues a group poll.
│
└──────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
AE33
───────────────

1. Group Poll address=AE.

C133
2. Gateway C1 responds with
────────────────
no requests to send.
AE33
───────────────

3. Group Poll again.

C2 ″I″
4. C2 now has data to transmit
────────────────
and the gateway sends it on
″I″ data
the next ″free″ poll issued.
────────────────
C2RR
───────────────

5. The host does a specific
poll back to C2.

C2RR
6. C2 has no more data.
────────────────
AE33
───────────────

7. Host still has no data for
any device, so issues group
poll.

C133
8. Gateway responds with no
────────────────
data to transmit.

Figure 17. Polling Sequence in a Group Poll Environment

Group Poll Performance
There are several considerations concerning line performance that must be
reviewed if using group poll.
As discussed in 4.7.6, “NCP Tuning Parameters” on page 108, the SOT, PAUSE,
and HDXSP are tuned to give the best line performance. With group poll added
the line handling characteristics are changed.
The first point is that HDXSP=YES is only valid with PAUSE=0; bearing that in
mind, you should then look at how PAUSE can affect group poll:

Chapter 4. LAN Support

113

•

With PAUSE=0, the NCP will, at the first free poll (no data to transmit), start
to send the group poll. It sends the group poll xx times (where xx is the
number of active devices multiplied by the SERVLIM parameter).
For example, with three devices active out of the five devices defined in the
SOT and a SERVLIM=10, you would see 30 group polls before a SERVICE
poll is performed.

•

With a non-zero PAUSE value, at the first free poll you again send the group
poll but you only poll one device, not all the active devices in the SOT. So
you would see only 10 group polls before a SERVICE poll is performed.

On a large LAN, this can have a significant effect on activation times if you have
large numbers of PUs defined.
The 3174 must be upgraded to Configuration Support-B Release 1, and later or
Configuration Support-C, and customized for the group poll function via question
912 before this support can be generated in NCP.
The NCP group poll enhancement is described in the cover letter for PTF
UR90157 and the following related APARs:
•

IR83735

SSP V3R4.1 MVS

•

IR83776

SSP V3R4.1 VSE

•

IR83775

SSP V3R4.1 VM

•

IR83751

NCP V5R2.1 MVS/VSE/VM

•

IR83826

NCP V4R3.1 MVS/VSE/VM

4.7.8 Host Software Planning
This section discusses some of the host software planning considerations for the
3174 remote gateway, concentrating on the NCP considerations.

VTAM
There are no specific VTAM considerations although you may need to generate a
suitable logmode entry for file transfer. If a 3270 emulation DSPU is to transfer
files to and from TSO or CMS at the host it should access these applications
using a logmode with the query bit turned on in the PSERVIC macro.
The following logmodes are used by 3270 emulation LUs at the ITSO:

M2SDLCQ MODEENT LOGMODE=M2SDLCQ,FMPROF=X′ 0 3 ′ , TSPROF=X′ 0 3 ′ ,
PRIPROT=X′ B1′ , SECPROT=X′ 9 0 ′ , COMPROT=X′3080′,
RUSIZES=X′8587′,PSERVIC=X′028000000000185000007E00′

X
X

M3287SCS MODEENT LOGMODE=M3287SCS,FMPROF=X′ 0 3 ′ , TSPROF=X′ 0 3 ′ ,
PRIPROT=X′ B1′ , SECPROT=X′ 9 0 ′ , COMPROT=X′3080′,
RUSIZES=X′87C7′ , PSNDPAC=X′ 0 1 ′ , SRCVPAC=X′ 0 1 ,
SSNDPAC=X′ 0 0 ′ , PSERVIC=X′01000000E100000000000000′

X
X
X

The first sample is for a display LU. The second is for a printer LU in SNA
Character String (SCS) mode. Notice that pacing has been requested from the
host to the printer (PSNDPAC and SRCVPAC). This is to prevent data being
transmitted to the printer faster than it can be processed.

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3174 Installation Guide

It is also possible to use the dynamic reconfiguration facility to add DSPUs
without the need to regenerate an NCP. This requires the creation of
appropriate dynamic reconfiguration data sets in VTAM as described in VTAM
Installation and Resource Definition .

NetView
No specific changes are required of NetView for the gateway although you will
probably want to update CLISTs and online documentation to reflect the new
resources. For instance, the LAN introduces a new level of resource names and
problem determination procedures may differ from those followed for
coaxially-attached terminals.

ACF/NCP
An SDLC multi-point definition should be created in the NCP. Some of the
important parameters are indicated in Figure 18. A more complete extract from
the NCP used in the tests is included in Appendix G, “VTAM/NCP Definition
Examples” on page 783. Parameters which influence performance are
discussed in 4.7.6, “NCP Tuning Parameters” on page 108.

L13008

SERVICE
P13008A
T13008A1
T13008A2
P13008B
T13008B1
T13008B2
P13008C
T13008C1
T13008C2
P13008F
T13008F1
T13008F2

LINE ADDRESS=(08,FULL1),ANS=CONTINUE,CLOCKNG=EXT,
X
DUPLEX=(FULL),ETRATIO=30,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,LPDATS=LPDA2, X
MAXPU=10,NPACOLL=YES,PAUSE=.52,SERVLIM=102,
X
SPEED=9600,SRT=(,64)
MAXLIST=10,ORDER=(P13008A,P13008B,P13008C,P13008D,P13008E,
X
P13008F)
PU ADDR=C1,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=521,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,PACX
ING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=NO,PUTYPE=2,GP3174=AE3
LU LOCADDR=2
LU LOCADDR=3
:
PU ADDR=C2,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=265,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,PACX
ING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=NO,PUTYPE=2,GP3174=AE3
LU LOCADDR=2
LU LOCADDR=3
:
PU ADDR=C2,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=265,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,PACX
ING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=YES4,PUTYPE=2
LU LOCADDR=2,MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
LU LOCADDR=3
:
PU ADDR=C6,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=265,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,PACX
ING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=NO,PUTYPE=2,GP3174=AE3
LU LOCADDR=2
LU LOCADDR=3

Figure 18. Extract of NCP Source

Notes:

1 See “LINE” on page 116 for ADDRESS value.
2 See 4.7.7, “Group Poll” on page 110 for explanation of dependencies.
3 See “PU” on page 116 for GP3174 value.
4 See “PU” on page 116 for PUDR value.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

115

LINE
•

ADDRESS can now be (xxx,FULL) with Configuration Support-B Release 3 or
later. Prior to these levels, the ADDRESS parameter can only be coded as
half-duplex.

•

MAXPU specifies the maximum number of PUs this line will support,
including the PU in the gateway. You should specify a value high enough to
cater for current and anticipated requirements.

SERVICE
•

MAXLIST indicates the maximum number of entries that will be listed in the
Service Order Table. You should define a high enough value to cater for
anticipated growth.

•

SERVICE is a list of the PUs supported by the 3174 gateway (including the PU
in the gateway itself). The list builds the Service Order Table that
determines the sequence in which PUs receive outbound data or are polled
for inbound data.

PU
Three types of PU are shown in Figure 18 on page 115. The first is the PU for
the gateway itself. The second is a 3174 with group poll, and the third is a PC
attached to the LAN running Personal Communications/3270.
•

ADDR is the SDLC station address of the PU. The lowest ADDR value is the
response to question 104 in the 3174 customization and is the PU inside the
gateway 3174. The highest ADDR value should be less than or equal to the
response to question 105 in the 3174 customization. The responses to
question 940 maps the LAN addresses to the ADDR values.

•

MAXDATA can be coded as 521 bytes for the 3174 LAN Gateway because it
has a larger buffer than the PC. The same value would be coded for a
3174-x3R/x4R DSPU.

•

PUDR, when specified as YES, permits the deletion of this PU from one line
and its addition to another one using the VTAM dynamic reconfiguration
facility. This may be the case if the backup strategy involves dynamic
reconfiguration.
Planning for dynamic reconfiguration should also include the allocation of
sufficient empty PU control blocks in the NCP and an indication of the
maximum number of LUs that can be added to any of the PUs in the pool.
This is done via the NUMBER and PU operands of the PUDRPOOL definition
statement.

•

GP3174 is specified as GP3174=xx, where xx is a unique polling address not
in the ADDR= range used for this line group. This address should match
that coded in question 912 in the 3174 remote gateway.
If you use group poll you should note that you cannot use PUDR as
discussed above.

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3174 Installation Guide

4.7.9 Data Flows
The following diagrams depict the flow of network data through a 3174 remote
gateway as DSPUs are activated and deactivated. These diagrams are included
to aid problem determination.

Problem Determination Tools
Data flows between the host and DSPUs can be analyzed using two trace tools
which complement each other:
•

SNA line traces formatted using the Advanced Communication
Function/Trace Analysis Program (ACF/TAP).
These trace data between the host and the gateway.

•

The IBM Token-Ring Trace and Performance Program.
This traces data between the gateway and the DSPU.

DSPU Activation Data Flows
Figure 19 on page 118 outlines the flow of data in a situation where the DSPU
and associated LUs are being activated (perhaps as part of a cascaded network
initialization procedure) but the end user has not yet requested a 3270 emulation
session.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

117

┌────────────┐ ┌─────┐
┌───┐ ┌────────────────────────┐ ┌───┐
│
VTAM
├──┤ NCP ├──────────────┤ ├─┤
LAN
├─┤ │
│
├──┤
│ SDLC Link
└───┘ └────────────────────────┘ └───┘
│ 1.V NET,ACT│ └─────┘
Gateway
PU B
└────────────┘
3174
────────────────── 2.CONTACT
────────────────── Resp.
─────────────────── 3.SNRM
─────────────────── 4.DM
──────────────────────────── 5.TEST
──────────────────────────── Resp.
──────────────────────────── 6.XID
┌────────────────┐
│7.Session not │
│ yet requested │
└────────────────┘
─────────────────── 8.SNRM
─────────────────── 9.DM
o
o
o
┌────────────────┐
│10.User requests│
│ 3270 session │
└────────────────┘
──────────────────────────── 11.XID
──────────────────────────── Resp.
─────────────────── 12.SNRM
─────────────────── 13.DM
──────────────────────────── 14.TEST
──────────────────────────── Resp.
──────────────────────────── 15.XID
──────────────────────────── XID Resp
──────────────────────────── 16.SABME
──────────────────────────── 17.UA
─────────────────── 18.SNRM
─────────────────── 19.UA
───────────────── 20.CONTACTED
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── 21.ACTPU
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Resp.
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── 22.ACTLU
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Resp.

Figure 19. DSPU Activation Data Flows

1. The network operator issues a VARY NET command to activate the DSPU or
VTAM initializes resource activation when the NCP major node is activated.
2. VTAM sends a CONTACT request to the NCP.
3. The NCP queues a SNRM request, which is sent when it is the turn of this
DSPU to receive a contact poll.
4. The gateway recognizes that it has no link to the DSPU so returns a DM to
the NCP in order that it does not timeout waiting for a response and can
continue with other processing pending establishment of the link to the
DSPU.

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5. The gateway 3174 sends a TEST request to the DSPU. This and the
subsequent response constitute a basic test of the transmission path
between the gateway and the DSPU.
6. The gateway sends an XID to the DSPU. No response is received because
3270 emulation has not been started.
7. The DSPU does not continue link activation activity until a session is
requested by the 3270 emulation program.
8. On subsequent passes through the polling cycle, the NCP resends the
pending SNRM to the gateway for the DSPU.
9. The gateway recognizes that there still is no link to the DSPU and returns a
DM to the SNRM requests.
10. Sometime later the end user requests a 3270 session.
11. An XID flows from the DSPU to the gateway. The gateway returns a
response acknowledging the request.
12. Following the session request from the DSPU, the next SNRM received by
the gateway re-starts the link activation procedure.
13. The gateway recognizes that there still is no link to the DSPU and returns a
DM to the NCP.
14. The gateway sends a TEST request to the DSPU and receives a response.
15. The gateway sends an XID to the DSPU. This time an XID response is
received from the DSPU.
16. The gateway sends a SABME, the LAN link connection request command.
17. The DSPU acknowledges the SABME request with a UA (positive response).
The link is now established, and both devices reset their send and receive
counters.
18. On a subsequent pass through the polling cycle, the NCP resends the
pending SNRM to the gateway for the DSPU.
19. The gateway returns a UA to the NCP recognizing that there now exists a
LAN link from the gateway to the DSPU.
20. NCP informs VTAM that it has CONTACTED the DSPU.
21. An ACTPU request is eventually sent by VTAM to the DSPU.
22. Positive response to the ACTPU is followed by ACTLUs to the devices
attached to the PU.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

119

DSPU Deactivation Data Flows
Figure 20 outlines the sequence of events when a user terminates the 3270
session either by ending the 3270 task or by powering off the workstation.

┌────────────┐ ┌─────┐
┌───┐ ┌────────────────────────┐ ┌───┐
│
VTAM
├──┤ NCP ├──────────────┤ ├─┤
LAN
├─┤ │
│
├──┤
│ SDLC Link
└───┘ └────────────────────────┘ └───┘
│
│ └─────┘
Gateway
PU B
└────────────┘
3174
┌──────────────┐
│1. User ends │
│3270 session │
─────────────────────────────────────── 2.REQDISCONT
└──────────────┘
─────────────────────────────────────── 3.DACTLU
─────────────────────────────────────── Resp.
─────────────────────────────────────── 4.DACTPU
──────────────────────────────────────── Resp.
──────────────────── 5.DISC
──────────────────── 6.UA
──────────────────── 7.SNRM
──────────────────── 8.DM
──────────────────────────── 9.TEST
──────────────────────────── Resp.
────────────────────────────10.XID

Figure 20. DSPU Deactivation Data Flows

1. The end user terminates the session by ending the 3270 task.
2. The gateway detects the loss of the downstream connection and builds a
REQDISCONT RU for transmission to the host. This has byte 3 set to X′81′
indicating the Contact Immediate option.
3. On receipt of the REQDISCONT, VTAM sends DACTLUs for devices attached
to the PU. The gateway responds to these on behalf of the DSPU.
4. VTAM sends a DACTPU to deactivate the DSPU. Again, the gateway
generates a response.
5. NCP sends a DISC request breaking the SDLC connection between the host
and the DSPU.
6. The gateway returns a positive (UA) response to the DISC.
7. The NCP recommences polling of the DSPU as a result of the Contact
Immediate option on the REQDISCONT.
8. The DSPU is now registered as PCTD2 by VTAM. The periodic arrival of the
SNRM at the gateway causes it to re-attempt connection with the DSPU in
the manner described in the previous diagram.

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3174 Installation Guide

4.8 Gateway Management
This section looks at some of the management aspects of the 3174 LAN
Gateway. We will consider some of the facilities available for network
management.

4.8.1 3174 Problem Determination Aids
The 3174 test facilities, invoked by pressing Alt+Test from a CUT device,
Alt+Scroll Lock from a PC/3270 Workstation running under DOS, Ctrl+Page
Down from a PC/3270 running under Windows, or remotely via CSCF and a
NetView defined console with Configuration Support-B Release 2 or later have
been extended to provide information specific to the LAN Gateway.
The functions accessible from the Test Menu are described in detail in 3174
Customer Extended Problem Determination , GA23-0217. Shown below are some
sample panels from Configuration Support-C Release 5 demonstrating the type
of information available relating to the gateway. The following panels are
described to give you an idea of the types of information available to help you
solve problems.





__________ 3174 Test Menu 1TEST __________
Test
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11,p
12
A,n
D,n,m

Description

page 1 of 2

Terminal check
Display event logs and response time log
Display configuration panels
3270 device status information
Reset logs and cable errors
Display vital data
Display Control Areas
Color convergence
Extended functions and program symbols
LAN tests
Port wrap tests
Trace control p=password
Asynchronous emulation adapter tests
Alert to Host ID n n=1A-1H,2A-2D,3A-3D
Dump device on port n, HG m n=0-31 m=26-27

Select Test; press ENTER ===>





Figure 21. 3174 Test M e n u 1TEST

This is the main 3174 Test Menu panel 1TEST and option 1 to display the Logs
Menu.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

121



________________ Logs Menu _________________
Option
1,n
2
3,n
4,n,m
5,xxxx
6,n,m
7
8
9,n

Description

Current log mode:



NORMAL

Response time log for host ID n n=1A-1H,2A-2D,3A-3D
All events logged
Hardware group n n=0-99
Port n, Hardware group m n=0-31,m=0-99
Status Code replace x′ s with search digits
Host Address n, host ID m n=0-254,m=1A-1H,2A-2D,3A-3D
Change log mode normal/intensive
Event log summary by category and hardware group
Host ID n n=1A-1H,2A-2D,3A-3D

To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select Option; press ENTER ===>





Figure 22. 3174 Logs M e n u

Choose option 2 of this panel to display the ″All events logged″.



____________ Log Records - All _____________



Relative Day/Time since last POR: 004/06:36
Day Time SC QA PHG_PN CHG_PN ID HA Extended data bytes B1-B16
B1 B3 B5 B7 B9 B11 B13 B15
004 06:35 0854 20 00
0000 0000
004 06:35 0498 05 00
1A
8014 0001
004 06:35 0854 09 00
8014 0001 RAI
004 06:34 0854 20 00
0000 0000
004 06:34 0498 05 00
1A
8014 0001
004 06:34 0854 09 00
8014 0001 RAI
004 06:33 0854 20 00
0000 0000
004 06:33 0498 05 00
1A
8014 0001
004 06:33 0854 09 00
8014 0001 RAI
004 06:32 0854 20 00
0000 0000
004 06:32 0498 05 00
1A
8014 0001
PHG_PN=PrimaryHG_PN
HG=Hardware Group SC=Status Code ID=Host ID
CHG_PN=ConnectionHG_PN PN=Port Number
QA=Qualifier
HA=Host Address
To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select Test; press ENTER ===>





Figure 23. 3174 Event Log

The status codes and qualifiers are interpreted using 3174 Customer Extended
Problem Determination .
Status codes are sent to NetView in the form of NMVTs.

122

3174 Installation Guide





______________ LAN Test Menu _______________
Option

Description

1
2
3
4
5,*
6
7,*
8
8,h
9
10
11
12
13
* = n or h

Monitor LAN status
Display LAN adapter status summary
Reset LAN adapter status counters
Display link status summary for all links
Display link status summary
Reset link status counters for all links
Reset link status counters
Display Gateway host status summary for all links
Display host status summary for all host id h
3174-Peer status
3174-Peer bridge profile
3174-Peer bridge status
LAN Manager Profile
Re-open LAN adapter
or h,n where n=link address h=host ID

To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select Option; press ENTER ===>





Figure 24. LAN Test M e n u

This menu is invoked by selecting option 9 from the 3174 Test Menu 1TEST.




________________ LAN Status ________________
4738-Local LAN Adapter is Token-Ring
4698-Local LAN Adapter open

4694-The test has been active for 00000 minutes.

To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select Test; press ENTER ===>





Figure 25. Token-Ring Status

This menu is invoked by choosing option 1 from the LAN Test Menu and defining
the LAN Adapter type as Token-Ring. The LAN Status panel indicates the status
of the Token-Ring Adapter. The 4698 message indicates that the adapter is
open. It will change to 4697 if the adapter closes for some reason (for example,
if the cable is removed from the 8228).

Chapter 4. LAN Support

123



________________ LAN Status ________________



4739-Local LAN Adapter is Ethernet
4697-Local LAN Adapter closed
4741-Media Error - Transceiver not working?
Cable fault?
Cable disconnected?

4694-The test has been active for 00000 minutes.

To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select Test; press ENTER ===>





Figure 26. Ethernet Status

This menu is invoked by taking Option 1 from the LAN Test Menu and LAN
Adapter type is Ethernet. The LAN Status panel indicates the status of the
Ethernet Adapter. The 4697 message indicates that the adapter is closed due to
cable disconnection. It will change to 4698 once the adapter opens.




────Token─Ring Adapter Status Summary──────
Adapter Address ─

40003174000104

Customized links ─ 005

Line Errors
Internal Errors
Burst Errors
ARI/FCI Errors
Abort Delimiters
Lost Frames
Receive Congestion
Frame Copied Errors
Frequency Errors
Token Errors

Adapter Status ─ Open
Active Links ─ 003

Counters
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000

Overflow
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select ===_
PF: 3=Quit
12=Test Menu





Figure 27. Token-Ring Adapter Status Summary

This menu is invoked by taking Option 2 from the LAN Test Menu. If the LAN
Adapter type is Token-Ring the Token-Ring Adapter Status Summary panel
indicates the number of errors detected for the token ring by category.

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3174 Installation Guide





_____ Ethernet Adapter Status Summary ______
Address - 400031740001

Closed

Alignment Errors
FCS Errors
Single Collision Frames
Multiple Collision Frames
SQE Test Errors
Late Collisions
Internal MAC Transmit Errors
Carrier Sense Errors
Excessive Deferrals
Frames Too Long
Frames Too Short
Internal MAC Receive Errors

Links: Customized - 005

Counters
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000

Active - 000

Overflow
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select Test; press ENTER ===>





Figure 28. Ethernet Adapter Status Summary

This menu is invoked by taking option 2 from the LAN Test Menu. If the LAN
Adapter type is Ethernet the Ethernet Adapter Status Summary panel indicates
the number of errors detected for the Ethernet by category.




───────────Link Status Summary─────────────
Link Address
40000031400204
40000031400404
40000031400504
Primary/Secondary
01/00
01/00
01/00
Trans I─frames
00000007 ─ 0
00000030 ─ 0
00000007 ─ 0
Rec I─frames
00000005 ─ 0
00000022 ─ 0
00000005 ─ 0
Transmit Errors
00000000 ─ 0
00000000 ─ 0
00000000 ─ 0
Received Errors
00000000 ─ 0
00000000 ─ 0
00000000 ─ 0
T1 Expired
00000000 ─ 0
00000000 ─ 0
00000000 ─ 0
Com/Res Ind
01
01
01
01
01
01



To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select ===_
PF: 3=Quit
12=Test Menu



Figure 29. Link Status Summary

Option 4 of the LAN Test Menu, the Link Status Summary panel, shows traffic
characteristics of each DSPU during this counting period, including the number
of frames transmitted and received, the number of times the T1 or reply timer
expired and the last command/response sent. The Primary/Secondary values
indicate the LAN primary and secondary states for the link station, where ″01″ for
primary state identifies the link as being open.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

125




────────Gateway Host Status Summary────────
Customized Links ─ 006
Address Range ─ C1 ─ C6
Host
Address
C1
C3
C5

Link
Status
02
02
02

LAN
Address
400031740001 04
400000314002 04
400000314004 04

Host
Address
C2
C4

Link
Status
00
02

LAN
Address
400000314001 04
400000314003 04

To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select ===_
PF: 3=Quit
12=Test Menu





Figure 30. Gateway Host Status Summary

This panel was introduced in Configuration Support-S Release 2 to show the
number of links declared to the microcode at customization time and the status
of each link.
Field

Description

Customized Links The number of links declared in customization
Address Range

The host address range declared in customization

Host Address

The address assigned each link during customization

Link Status

The two-digit status code representing the status of the link
•

•

LAN Address

126

3174 Installation Guide

For local models:
−

00 = The LAN attached physical unit is in disconnect
mode

−

02 = The LAN attached physical unit is connected

For remote models:
−

00 = SNRM required

−

01 = SNRM received

−

02 = Connected/active

−

03 = Poll timeout

The station address assigned to each link during
customization. This address is the six-byte LAN Adapter
address followed by the one-byte SAP address.

4.9 Gateway Performance
The performance information presented in this section is intended to provide
guidance in planning for your system. For the most current information, the IBM
Systems Engineer should consult INFOSYS.

3174 Gateway Utilization
The 3174 LAN Gateway functions as a passthrough multiplexer for LAN traffic to
and from a host. Its passthrough capacity determines the upper limit of the
traffic flow and, therefore, the total number of workstations and devices that can
be usefully accommodated on LAN-attached 3174s. The 3174 LAN Gateway does
not care about source or destination device type, only about the characteristics
and rate of the traffic.
The utilization of the 3174 with the LAN (Token-Ring) Gateway feature can be
summarized in the following table:

┌───────────┬─────────────┬────────────────────────────────┐
│
│
│
Utilization (%)
│
│
│
├────────────┬───────────┬───────┤
│ CU/Term │
TPM
│
3174
│ 3174
│ Ring │
│
│
│ 3R/53R │ Gateway │
│
├───────────┼─────────────┼────────────┼───────────┼───────┤
│ 1/1
│
6.7
│
.95
│
.20
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ 1/32
│
214
│
30
│ 6.5
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ 10/320
│
2140
│
│
65
│ 15─17 │
└───────────┴─────────────┴────────────┴───────────┴───────┘

Figure 31. 3174 Utilization with Gateway Feature

The first line in the table shows that the utilization of the 3174 gateway is 0.2
percent when a single terminal attached to a controller is transacting 6.7 type
A-1200 transactions per minute (TPM). The next line shows the increase in
utilization when the number of terminals on a single 3174 Model 03R is
increased to 32, each processing 6.7 transactions per minute. The third line
shows the number of terminals and controllers have been increased to 320 and
10 respectively (to 20 in the case of the Model 53R), again, with a transaction
load of 6.7 TPM per terminal.
According to this information, the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway can handle a
maximum of 35 to 40 transactions per second (TPS) resulting in a controller
utilization of 65 to 70 percent. With this traffic, the ring utilization is in the range
of 15 to 17 percent. When the aggregate transaction demand from devices
attached to 3174 controllers with a token ring starts to exceed the thresholds
presented in this document, operations continue without loss of data but
response times increase, and data transfer rates drop.
The cited performance characteristics were obtained by customizing for an
I-frame size of 2042 bytes on the token-ring network, and a window size of 2.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

127

See customization Question 941. Using a smaller frame-size for large messages
substantially increases utilization of the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway for a given
amount of data to be transported, because overhead processing increases. As a
result, traffic-handling capacity of the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway may be reduced
by as much as fifty percent, depending on the application.
For Models 3R and 53R, the answers to configuration Questions 380, 381, 382,
and 383 were assumed to be 2042, 1, 2042, and 2, respectively.
Note: With Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later, Questions 380 and 381
have been deleted. See “I-Frame Size and Window Size Considerations” on
page 96 for a detailed explanation of the values in these questions.
On the SNA level, one acknowledgement message has been assumed to follow
the ″write″ operations in both type A-1200 benchmarks and file transfers. While
an SNA acknowledgement message does not add much to response time, it does
significantly increase gateway utilization, thereby decreasing the maximum
amount of traffic that the gateway can handle.

File Transfer Considerations
An aggregate rate of concurrent file transfers of 60KB per second would produce
65 percent utilization in the 3174 gateway, which is the recommended maximum.
Please consider that file transfer and interactive transactions have to share the
resources of the 3174 LAN Gateway. For example, when you want to allow for a
combined average file transfer rate of 20 KB per second, do not plan for more
than 24 type A-1200 transactions through the gateway. (The actual rate
associated with a given file transfer depends on many factors such as
workstation type and host support).

3174 DSPU vs. Channel-Attached 3274
Preliminary analysis indicates that it may be possible to migrate from channel
attached 3274 control units to the new LAN-attached 3174s and realize an
improvement in performance. For short data stream applications, such as
alphanumerics, user response times across the LAN can be less than those for
direct channel attachment via the current 3274 control units. Major reasons for
the performance improvement include a faster processor and channel adapter in
the 3174-01L (and even more in the 3174-11L), improvements in microcode, and
the ability of the LAN to support data transfer rates in the megabit-per-second
range. In a sample analysis, user response times were compared for a simple
interactive workload (40-bytes in and 1400-bytes out) on two system
configurations. The first configuration consisted of 3278 displays directly attached
to 3274 controllers on an S/370 channel.
The second configuration had the 3278 displays on 3174 controllers located
within a building complex on the token-ring network. The token-ring network, in
turn, is connected to a 3174 controller on an S/370 channel. The subsystem
response times (excluding the S/370 response time) for the Token-Ring
configuration were 40-80 percent of response times for the channel attached
3274s. The smaller percentage occurred at higher terminal transaction rates
where the greater throughput capacity of the 3174 was an advantage. For
terminals emulating the 3278, the internal delays of the terminals may be large
compared to the subsystem response times, so the improvement may not be
noticeable to the user. These preliminary performance analyses were obtained
from simulation models using simple, homogeneous workloads. Performance for
a particular customer′s workload and environment may be different.

128

3174 Installation Guide

4.10 PC/3270 Attachment to 3174-11L Gateway

Figure 32. PC/3270 Attachment to 3174-11L Gateway

In this connectivity scenario, a Personal Communications/3270 (PC/3270) V4.0
workstation is connected via a LAN to a 3174-11L Establishment Controller acting
as a gateway. The PC/3270 V4.0 workstation will have two sessions to the S/370
host.
For this example, we need to do the following:
•

Configure the PC/3270 V4.0 workstation to access the 3174-11L gateway

•

Customize the 3174-11L gateway to allow the PC/3270 V4.0 workstation to
attach as a downstream PU (DSPU)

•

Define the 3174-11L as a channel attached SNA major node in VTAM

•

Define the PC/3270 V4.0 workstation as a DSPU, with two LUs, in VTAM

Note: Not all of the required configuration, customization or definition screens
will be shown, only those that are significant to the example are included.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

129

4.10.1 Configuring PC/3270 for LAN Attachment



Advanced Options for LAN Attachment via 802.2 Protocol
More: -+
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Enter the required information.
Total number of LAN sessions . . . . . .

2

Link name

lan1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Destination address

. . . . . . . . . .

Number of sessions for this gateway



. .



[400031740004]
[2]

Physical Unit ID . . . . . . . . . . . .

[04001]

Adapter number . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0]

Remote SAP/Local SAP . . . . . . . . . .

[04]/[04]

Block ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[061]

PIU size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0265]

F1=Help F3=Exit F7=Backward F8=Forward



Figure 33. Adv. Opt. for LAN Attachment via 802.2 Protocol Screen (DOS Mode)

On this screen, we configure the PC/3270 V4.0 workstation as follows:
•

Specify the destination address (400031740004) of the 3174-11L gateway

•

Specify the number of sessions (2) destined for the gateway

•

Specify a PUID (04001) for the workstation

•

Use the default SAP (04) for the 3174-11L gateway

•

Use the default Block ID (061) for the workstation

•

Use the default PIU size (265 bytes) for the workstation

In this configuration, the PUID and Block ID are not really necessary. The only
parameters that must match are the destination address and the PIU size . The
3174 does the task of mapping PUs to downstream LAN addresses.

Figure 34. LAN via IEEE 802.2 Link Parameters Window (Windows Mode)

130

3174 Installation Guide

On the PC/3270 V4.0 Windows Mode Customize Communication window choose
the LAN card and the LAN via IEEE 802.2 attachment and click on the Configure...
button. Open the Link Parameters, which will bring you to the figure shown in
Figure 34. Select the same parameters as for Full Function DOS Mode. The
advanced link parameters are not used, the default value will match this
configuration. To get the second session, you can just start the new customized
WorkStation icon twice.

4.10.2 Customizing the 3174-11L Gateway
Next, we customize the 3174-11L with Token-Ring LAN adapter as a gateway for
the PC/3270 V4.0 workstation. The 3174-11L has Configuration Support-C
Release 5 microcode installed.





______________ Model / Attach ______________

Online Test Password

098 -

Product Assistance Data
099 - 3174 NUMBER 4 SN AE206 SNA TRN GATEWAY
3174 Model

100 - 11L

Host Attachment

101 - 5

1-BSC
2-SDLC
3-X.25
4-Non-SNA Channel
5-SNA Channel

LAN adapter type

102 - 1

0-none
1-Token Ring
2-Ethernet

6-SDLC, X.21 Switched
7-Token-Ring
8-Ethernet
9-Frame Relay
M-Multi-host

NSO selection
103 - 0000000000000000
Select Test; press ENTER ===>





Figure 35. 3174 Model Definition

Questions 98 through 101 specify the 3174 model and host attachment type, and
some descriptive information. In this example, we have a 3174-11L that is
channel attached to an S/370. If you have a 3174-x1R (that is, a
remotely-attached model) as a gateway, the customization is similar as far as
the LAN connections are concerned.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

131



__________ Token-Ring Description __________

Token-Ring Address:

080 - 4000 3174 0004

Token-Ring Speed

082 - 1



0- 4Mbps
1-16Mbps
2-16Mbps with early Token Release





Figure 36. 3174 Token-Ring Description

Questions 080 and 082 specify the address and the speed of the Token-Ring
Adapter of the 3174 Token-Ring Gateway.
If the LAN adapter installed in the 3174 gateway is an Ethernet adapter, the
response to Question 102 would be a 2 and the following panel allows you to
specify the characteristics of the Ethernet adapter.



__________ Ethernet Description __________

Ethernet

Address:

084 - 4000 3174 0004

Ethernet media type

082 - 2 (2-10base2
5-10base5
T-10baseT)

Ethernet frame format

088 - 3 (1-IEEE 802.3
2-Ethernet V2
3-Both)







Figure 37. 3174 Ethernet Description

Questions 084, 086 and 088 specify the address, the media type and the frame
format of the Ethernet adapter of the 3174 Ethernet Gateway respectively.

132

3174 Installation Guide





_______________ Local SNA ________________
LOCL
104 - 40

105 - 5F

108 - 23AE206

110 - 3 0000

116 - S2 __

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 01100110

126 - 01000000

127 - 5 1

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 1 0 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0

141 - A

150 - 1 0

165 - 0

166 - A

172 - 0

173 - 00000101 175 - 123456

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

222 - 0

223 - 10

224 - 2

- 0

179 - 0 0 0

190 - 00

225 - 4

242 - 0





Figure 38. 3174 Local SNA

The Local (SNA) screen has most of the questions that define the 3174-11L and
the host link. Of interest the for 3174 LAN Gateway are Questions 104, 105, and
150:
•

Question 104 is where you specify the 3174-11L address for host attachment.
The 3174-11L is attached to subchannel address B40; therefore, we enter 40
as our response to this question.
Note: Only the last two digits of the address are is required in Questions
104 and 105.

•

Question 105 is where you specify, for a 3174 LAN gateway, the upper limit
address of DSPUs. A DSPU could be a 3174-x3R/x4R (that is, a token-ring or
Ethernet attached model), an AS/400, an OS/2 CM/2 workstation or a PC/3270
V4.0 workstation. Each DSPU requires a subchannel address and also a
VTAM PU statement.
We will use B5F as the upper limit address; therefore, we enter 5F in
response to this question. The DSPUs will then have available addresses
B41 through B5F.
In this example, the PC/3270 V4.0 workstation will use address B41. Address
B41 will later be related to the LAA of the PC/3270 V4.0 workstation through
Question 940.

•

Entering a 1 for the first digit of Question 150 specifies the LAN gateway.





______________ Common Network ______________
40/LOCL
900 - 4000 3174 0004 04



PF: 3=Quit

4=Default

905 - 1

7=Back

8=Fwd

908 - TSCLAN

9=RtnH



Figure 39. 3174 C o m m o n Network

Chapter 4. LAN Support

133

On the Common Network screen, The last two digits of the question 900 defines
the SAP of the 3174-11L an the LAA is picked up from the question 082. This is
what you have configured in the PC/3270 V4.0 workstation as the destination
address .
Question 940
This Question is used to define the mapping of channel addresses to the LAA of
the DSPUs, including our PC/3270 V4.0 workstation.
In our example, we configured our PC/3270 V4.0 station with an LAA of
400000004001 in its CONFIG.SYS file. We, therefore, specify 400000004001 as the
″LAN Address″ to match the subchannel address 41. (Since the 3174 is
connected to channel B, the address becomes B41.)
The SAP for PC/3270 V4.0 (SNA) is X′04′.
The T value on this screen specifies the type of DSPU device: 0 for workstation
and 1 for 3174 Establishment Controllers.


S
40
41
43
45
47
49
4B
4D
4F
51
53
55
57
59
5B
5D




PF: 3=Quit

S
40
5F



LAN
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000

_______ 940: LAN Address Assignment _______
Entry 001 of 031
Address
SAP
T
S
LAN Address
SAP
T
3174 0004
04
0000 4001
04
0
42
4000 0000 4002
04
0
0000 4003
04
0
44
4000 0000 4004
04
0
0000 4005
04
0
46
4000 0000 4006
04
0
0000 4007
04
0
48
4000 0000 4008
04
0
0000 4009
04
0
4A
4000 0000 400A
04
0
0000 400B
04
0
4C
4000 0000 400C
04
0
0000 400D
04
0
4E
4000 0000 400E
04
0
0000 400F
04
0
50
4000 0000 4010
04
0
0000 4011
04
0
52
4000 0000 4012
04
0
0000 4013
04
0
54
4000 0000 4014
04
0
0000 4015
04
0
56
4000 0000 4016
04
0
0000 4017
04
0
58
4000 0000 4018
04
0
0000 4019
04
0
5A
4000 0000 401A
04
0
0000 401B
04
0
5C
4000 0000 401C
04
0
0000 401D
04
0
5E
4000 0000 401E
04
0

4=Default

7=Back

8=Fwd

3174 Installation Guide

11=PageFwd

_______ 940: LAN Address Assignment _______
Entry 031 of 031
LAN Address
SAP
T
S
LAN Address
SAP
T
4000 3174 0004
04
4000 0000 401F
04
0

All responses are correct
PF: 3=Quit 4=Default
7=Back

8=Fwd

Figure 40. 3174 LAN Address Assignment

134

9=RtnH

9=RtnH

10=PageBack








Question 941
Question 941 will define the frame size and window size of each DSPU.
The F value represents the frame size, or PIU size. F=0 will allow a maximum
PIU of 265 bytes, to match the value used in our PC/3270 V4.0 configuration.
The W value is the transmit window size, which is the number of frames sent
before waiting to receive an acknowledgement.


S
40
41
43
45
47
49
4B
4D
4F
51
53
55
57
59
5B
5D




LAN
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000

PF: 3=Quit

Address
3174 0004
0000 4001
0000 4003
0000 4005
0000 4007
0000 4009
0000 400B
0000 400D
0000 400F
0000 4011
0000 4013
0000 4015
0000 4017
0000 4019
0000 401B
0000 401D

4=Default

SAP
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04

F

W

S

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7

42
44
46
48
4A
4C
4E
50
52
54
56
58
5A
5C
5E

7=Back

8=Fwd

40/LOCL
Entry 001 of 031
LAN Address
SAP
F W
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000
4000

0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000

4002
4004
4006
4008
400A
400C
400E
4010
4012
4014
4016
4018
401A
401C
401E

04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04

9=RtnH

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7

11=PageFwd

____ 941: LAN Transmission Definition _____

S
40
5F





____ 941: LAN Transmission Definition _____

LAN Address
4000 3174 0004
4000 0000 401F

SAP
04
04

F

W

0

7

All responses are correct
PF: 3=Quit 4=Default
7=Back

8=Fwd

S




40/LOCL
Entry 031 of 031
LAN Address
SAP
F W

9=RtnH

10=PageBack



Figure 41. 3174 LAN Transmission Definition

Chapter 4. LAN Support

135

4.10.3 VTAM Definitions (Gateway/Workstation)
The 3174-11L, the PC/3270 V4.0 workstation and other DSPUs are defined here in
a single local SNA major node. This could have been done in two VTAM node
definitions: one for the 3174-11L and its coax terminals, and another for the
DSPUs, including our PC/3270 V4.0 workstation.
Each of these downstream stations has two LUs defined. PC/3270 V4.0 supports
up to eight LUs for DOS mode and 26 for Windows mode, so you could have the
maximum LUs defined under each PU.
We will use a logmode (DLOGMOD) called DYNAMIC. This logmode allows the
user to define the screen size at the workstation. VTAM and the host
applications can dynamically adjust to the workstation′s configured screen sizes.

**********************************************************************
* LOCAL SNA MAJOR NODE FOR THE 3174-11L AT B40
*
**********************************************************************
VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
PUB40
PU
CUADDR=B40,
3174-11L GATEWAY
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
MAXBFRU=20,
MODETAB=MT3270,
DLOGMOD=T3279M2,
PACING=0,
PUTYPE=2,
SECNET=NO,
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
USSTAB=USSNSCS,
VPACING=0
LUB4002 LU
LOCADDR=2,DLOGMOD=T3279M2
LUB4003 LU
LOCADDR=3,DLOGMOD=T3279M2
..
.
LUB4064 LU
LOCADDR=64,DLOGMOD=T3279M2
LUB4065 LU
LOCADDR=65,DLOGMOD=T3279M2
**********************************************************************
* DOWNSTREAM PC/3270 WORKSTATIONS ON THE 3174-11L
*
**********************************************************************
PUB41
PU
CUADDR=B41,
EXAMPLE PC ON 3174-11L GATEWAY
DLOGMOD=DYNAMIC,
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
MAXBFRU=20,
MODETAB=MT3270,
PACING=0,
PUTYPE=2,
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
USSTAB=USSNSCS,
SECNET=YES,
VPACING=0
LUB4102 LU
LOCADDR=2
LUB4103 LU
LOCADDR=3
Figure 42 (Part 1 of 2). Local SNA Major Node Definition for 3174-11L

136

3174 Installation Guide

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

PUB42

PU

LUB4202 LU
LUB4203 LU
..
.
PUB5F
PU

LUB5F02 LU
LUB5F03 LU

CUADDR=B42,
DLOGMOD=DYNAMIC,
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
MAXBFRU=20,
MODETAB=MT3270,
PACING=0,
PUTYPE=2,
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
USSTAB=USSNSCS,
SECNET=YES,
VPACING=0
LOCADDR=2
LOCADDR=3

OTHER PC ON 3174-11L GATEWAY

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

CUADDR=B5F,
DLOGMOD=DYNAMIC,
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
MAXBFRU=20,
MODETAB=MT3270,
PACING=0,
PUTYPE=2,
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
USSTAB=USSNSCS,
SECNET=YES,
VPACING=0
LOCADDR=2
LOCADDR=3

OTHER PC ON 3174-11L GATEWAY

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

Figure 42 (Part 2 of 2). Local SNA Major Node Definition for 3174-11L

4.11 3174 DSPU: Models x3R and x4R
The 3174 Models x3R attach to the token-ring network and the Models x4R attach
to the Ethernet network as the primary link and communicate with a host as
DSPUs through a gateway. A 3174 Model x3R/x4R can also communicate with
multiple hosts via its primary link when using Single Link Multi-Host support.
Each 3174 DSPU can connect up to:
•

16 3270 and 8 ASCII workstations on the smaller models

•

64 3270 (with the 3270 Port Expansion Feature) and 24 ASCII workstations on
the larger models.

For DFT workstations with multiple sessions or CUT terminals with the MLT
function these controllers support up to 320 LUs (see 9.1, “Multiple Logical
Terminal” on page 331 for details).
If you are customizing for multiple gateways then you have to code the
additional gateways as you do for all multiple host configurations by specifying
an M to question 101 and then defining the additional hosts as normal.
Unlike the PCs attached to the LAN, devices attached to these 3174 models
(token-ring models x3R only) are not be able to communicate directly with other
devices on the LAN unless:

Chapter 4. LAN Support

137

•

For Configuration Support-B, the 3174 has RPQ 8Q0718 for Peer
Communication installed (see “3174 Peer Communication RPQ (8Q0718)” on
page 26 for further details).

•

For Configuration Support-C, the 3174 has Peer Communication feature LIC
installed (see Chapter 19, “Peer Communication” on page 557 for futher
details).

4.11.1 Hardware Installation
3174 models with the upstream Token-Ring Adapter card are:
•

3174-13R has up to 64 ports and manages up to 320 LUs.

•

3174-23R has up to 64 ports and manages up to 320 LUs.

•

3174-63R has up to 16 ports and manages up to 80 LUs.

3174 models with the upstream Ethernet Adapter card are:
•

3174-14R has up to 64 ports and manages up to 320 LUs.

•

3174-24R has up to 64 ports and manages up to 320 LUs.

•

3174-64R has up to 16 ports and manages up to 80 LUs.

Functionally, the models are identical. You can also change existing 3174-x1R
(V.24/V.35 interface) or 3174-x2R (X.21 interface) models to 3174-x3R or x4R
models simply by installing the token-ring adapter or the Ethernet adapter and
customizing a new control diskette. The available 3174-13R/14R conversion
package includes the following:
•

Token-ring or Ethernet adapter

•

Control and Utility diskettes

•

Adapter cable

No additional storage expansion is needed for this conversion. The microcode
determines which adapter of the 3174 is operational and customized.

4.11.2 Microcode Required
The microcode includes a Utility diskette and a Control diskette (for
Configuration Support-C Control Extension diskette is also needed) with the
microcode needed to handle the LAN connection. This microcode is
implemented in Configuration Support-A Release 2 and later for Token-Ring LAN
and Configuration Support-C Release 4 and later for Ethernet LAN and therefore
supports all standard 3174 functions.

4.11.3 Storage Required
There are no additional storage requirements for these models.
Since these downstream PUs communicate with the host through gateways, they
appear to the host access methods and applications like a PU type 2.0. Certain
sense information generated by these PUs is different from that generated by the
3274 control units (see 3174 Functional Description ).

138

3174 Installation Guide

4.11.4 3174 Customization
Before your 3174 can be used as a downstream cluster controller, it has to be
properly customized. Only those customization questions dealing with the LAN
attachment are discussed in this chapter. The 3174 microcode level used here is
Configuration Support-C Release 5.
If you have to decide whether data should be compressed the recommendation
is that locally attached devices should transmit non-compressed data because of
the high channel speed and remotely attached devices should compress data to
be transmitted because of the lower line speed.

Question 100: Model Designation
The response to this question is x3R or x4R, where x is the model type.

Question 101: Host Attachment
Depending on the response to this question, the next two customization panels
displayed relates to the environment chosen. If your response is 7 (Token-Ring
Attachment), the next two panels presented are the Token-Ring Description
panel and the Local Area Network panel. Similarly, if your response is 8
(Ethernet Attachment), the next two panels presented are the Ethernet
Description panel and the Local Area Network panel.
Multi-host configurations and responses are covered in Chapter 9, “Multi-Host
Connectivity” on page 331.

Question 102: LAN Adapter Type
The response to this question is a 1 if the LAN Adapter type is Token-Ring
Adapter (Models x3R) or a 2 if the LAN Adapter type is Ethernet Adapter (Models
x4R).

Question 080: Token-Ring Address
This question appears if you specify a 1 for question 102.
The response cannot be all zeros. The format of the address is:

4000cddddddd
Where 4000 is the fixed part of the address
c
must not be greater than X′7′
d
can be any value from X′0′ to X′F′
See 4.4.1, “Example Address Convention” on page 75.

Question 082: Token-Ring Speed
The response to this question specifies the token-ring speed of the LAN.
•

0 = 4 Mbps - Normal token release

•

1 = 16 Mbps - Normal token release

•

2 = 16 Mbps - Early token release

Note that:
•

Response 0 is valid for both feature #3025 and #3044 (Adapter type 9350 and
9351) and it is the default value.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

139

•

Response 1 and 2 are valid only for feature #3044 (Adapter type 9351).

Question 084: Ethernet Address
This question appears if you specify a 2 for Question 102.
The response cannot be all zeros and the format of the address is similar to
Question 080.

Question 086: Ethernet Media Type
The response to this question specifies the media type of the Ethernet Network.
•

2 = 10Base2

•

5 = 10Base5

•

T = 10BaseT

Question 088: Ethernet Frame Format
The response to this question specifies the type of Ethernet frame format you are
going to use.
•

1 = IEEE 802.3

•

2 = Ethernet V2

•

3 = Both

The default value is 1.

Question 106: LAN and SAP of the 3174
This question applies only to a 3174 to be customized as a DSPU. The response
must contain 14 hexadecimal digits for the LAN address and SAP. The first 12
digits contain the LAN address specified in the question 080 for Token-Ring
Adapter or Question 084 for Ethernet Adapter and it is fixed. 4000cddddddd ss
Where - 4000cddddddd contains the token-ring address or Ethernet
address specified in Q.082 or Q.084
- ss is the SAP address and defaults to X′04′
Note: The SAP address can only be specified in Configuration Support-B
Release 2 and later and Configuration Support-C where SLMH is supported.
Previous levels of microcode will force this value to be X′04′.

Question 107: Gateway Address and SAP
This question applies only to a 3174 to be customized as a DSPU. The response
must contain 14 hexadecimal digits for the LAN address and SAP of the gateway.

4000cddddddd ss
Where 4000 is the fixed part of the address
c
must not be greater than X′7′
d
can be any value from X′0′ to X′F′
ss is the SAP address and defaults to X′04′
Note: The SAP address can only be specified in Configuration Support-B
Release 2 and later and Configuration Support-C where SLMH is supported.
Previous levels of microcode will force this value to be X′04′.
The user-specified portion will be determined by the addressing conventions in
force in the installation, see 4.4.1, “Example Address Convention” on page 75.

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Question 215: Physical Unit Identification
The Physical Unit Identification (PUID) consists of five hexadecimal digits in the
range X′00000′ through X′FFFFF′. The default value is X′00000′. Each PUID in
the network should be unique because it identifies the 3174 to the host in
response to an XID command.
The PUID is mandatory if the 3174 DSPU uses a 37xx gateway and must match
the IDNUM parameter in the switched major node for the 3174 DSPU.
The PUID has no significance if the gateway is a 3174. There is no IDNUM
parameter in the PU statement of a local SNA node. However, we recommend
supplying a unique value since the type of gateway may change (for example, for
backup reasons).

Question 382: Transmit I-Frame Size
This question has been given different names in the different releases (the
question number stays the same):
•

Configuration Support-A - Maximum Transmission I-Frame Size

•

Configuration Support-B Release 1 - Maximum Transmission I-Frame Size

•

Configuration Support-B Release 2 - Maximum Outbound I-Frame Size

•

Configuration Support-B Release 3 - Maximum Ring I-Frame Size

•

Configuration Support-B Release 4 - Maximum Ring I-Frame Size

•

Configuration Support-C - Transmit I-Frame Size

All of the names refer to the same thing; that is, the maximum size of the I-frame
that the 3174 sends over the LAN.
The response consists of four numerical characters (padded with leading zeros if
necessary). The default value is 0521.
Notes:
1. The response to this question depends on your gateway and LAN
configuration.
2. The I-Frame size should include the length of the SNA transmission header
(six bytes) and the request/response header (three bytes).
3. Valid responses are:
•

For a 3174 with a 4 Mbps Token-Ring Adapter installed: 0265 to 2042

•

For a 3174 with a 16/4 Mbps Token-Ring Adapter installed: 0265 to 2057

•

For a 3174 with a 10 Mbps Ethernet Adapter installed: 0265 to 1033

Question 383: LAN Maximum Out
The response specifies the maximum number of link level I-Frames that the 3174
DSPU transmits before it waits for an acknowledgement. It may also be referred
to as the transmit window size.
The response must be a number from 1 to 7. The default value is 2.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

141

Notes:
1. The response to this question depends on your gateway and LAN
configuration.
2. The following figure specifies valid responses based on the associated
I-Frame size given in the response to Question 382.

┌──────────────────────────┬─────────────────────┐
│ I─Frame size entered
│
LAN
│
│ as response to Q.382
│
Maximum Out
│
├──────────────────────────┼─────────────────────┤
│ 265 <= X <= 521 bytes │
7
│
│ 522 <= X <= 1033 bytes │
7
│
│ 1034 <= X <= 2042 bytes │
4
│
└──────────────────────────┴─────────────────────┘
Figure 43. DSPU I-Frame Size and Maximum Out

4.11.5 3174 DSPU with 37xx Gateway
The 3174 DSPU communicating with the host via a 37xx Communication
Controller must be defined to VTAM in a switched SNA major node and to NCP
as a PU 2.0 attached to a switched SDLC link (the TIC must be defined to NCP as
a PU T1 attached to a leased line). The IDBLK number carried in the inbound
XID command is 017 (the same as for a 3174/3274 attached to a real switched
line).
A 3745 can support 9999 DSPUs, a 3725 can support 2440 DSPUs, and a 3720 can
support 522 DSPUs. If a DSPU must communicate through a second gateway (for
example, a second TIC or another 3720/25) with a different LAN address, you
must re-IML the 3174 with a Control diskette that has the second gateway
address customized as the destination, unless you are running multi-host
support.
The gateways used for the tests were a 3725 channel attached to the host with
two different TICs attached to two different rings and, in another case, a remote
3720 connected via an INN link to a local channel attached 3720.

Differences Between the 3174 DSPU and a PC
The two major differences between a 3174 DSPU and a PC with Personal
Communications/3270 using a 37xx gateway are:
1. The 3174 DSPU normally has more than two LUs defined. Adjust your
LUDRPOOL parameter accordingly. Likewise, having several LUs per PU
affects the MAXLU value on the logical lines PU statement.
2. The 3174 DSPU allows receiving and transmission of larger Token-Ring
frames. This impacts your coding of the MAXOUT parameter in the switch
major node PU, your specification of frame sizes received, RCVBUFC=, and
frames transmitted by the TIC, MAXTSL=.

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DSPU Examples.
See Chapter 10, “Connectivity Customization Examples” on page 351 for
examples of VTAM, NCP, and 3174 customization questions for 3174s defined as
DSPUs.

4.12 Backup and Recovery
4.12.1

3174 Local Gateway
Test Configuration
This section describes the configuration installed at ITSO Raleigh Center to test
different backup/recovery scenarios and file transfer from a 3270 PC to different
operating systems through different gateways.

┌───────────────────┐
│
VM/SP
│
├─────────┬─────────┤
│ VM
│ MVS
│
┌──────┐
│ VTAM │
├───────────────┤ 3720 │
│ SA33 │ SA13 │
└─┬────┘
└───┬─────┴────┬────┘
│
│
│
│/│
┌────────┘
└─────────┐
│
│
│
│
┌───┴──┐ ┌──────┐
┌──┴───┐
┌───┴──┐
│3174─L│ │3174─R├──────────────┤ 3725 │
│ 3720 │
└───┬──┘ └──┬───┘
└─┬─┬──┘
└───┬──┘
│
│┌───────────────────┘ │
│
┌─────────────┴───────┴┴─┐
┌──────────┴─────────────┴─────┐
│
│
│
│
│
LAN 1
│
│
LAN 2
│
│
│
│
│
└─────┬─────────┬─────┬──┘
└──┬──────┬─────────────┬──────┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ ┌──────┐ │
│
│
┌───┴──┐ ┌──┴───┐ └───┤Bridge├───┘ ┌──┴───┐
┌──┴───┐
│3174─R│ │ PC │
└──────┘
│ PC │
│AS/400│
└──────┘ └──────┘
└──────┘
└──────┘
Figure 44. Test Configuration

3174 and 3725 gateways were channel attached to different subareas, one under
VM/VTAM and the other under MVS. Both virtual machines were linked via a
virtual channel-to-channel connection. The 3720 gateway was line-attached to
another 3720 which was in turn channel attached to the same MVS system.
Different DSPUs (such us the 3174-03R, AS/400 and PCs using 3270 emulation or
APPC/PC) were set up to test with all the gateways, to different operating
systems, and applications.
Two different token-ring LANs linked via a bridge were installed to test
backup/recovery scenarios when the gateways were located in the same or

Chapter 4. LAN Support

143

different ring of the DSPUs. The 3725 was attached to both rings with two
different TICs.

4.12.2 Planning for Backup/Recovery
The 3174 LAN Gateway offers powerful backup/recovery possibilities. Personnel
responsible for network planning and installation should consider the information
presented here and tailor it to their own environments.
Different scenarios are offered as suggestions for gateway backup and LAN
recovery. The number of 3174 LAN gateways, the LAN gateway addresses and
the number of hosts are some of the different factors taken in consideration. A
scenario with mixed types of gateways is also presented.
Network topology can be accommodated to fit any of these environments. As
this document deals with the 3174, you will not find information regarding LAN
topologies or LAN design; other manuals should be consulted for such
information.

Backup Planning
The following points should be considered for backup planning:
•

Number of gateways
The number of transactions per second that flow through the gateway
determines the number of gateways needed. Use different tools
(SNAP/SHOT, FIVE3270, 3X74 Performance Guidelines manual, etc.) to
determine the load the gateway is going to handle.
Each gateway should have its own backup controller ready to restart the
traffic in case the normal gateway fails.

•

Number of hosts
The number of hosts (and how they are interconnected) determines the way
the 3174 LAN Gateways (normal and backup) should be attached.

•

LAN topology
Any LAN topology is accepted by the 3174 LAN Gateways and by the DSPUs.
Bridges are transparent from the gateway and DSPU points of view.

Recovery Planning
When the gateway fails, the 3174 DSPUs and all the LAN-attached stations that
were using the gateway start sending a TEST command to the gateway address
(and only to this address). If there is no answer in the LAN where the DSPUs
are attached they send every other TEST command with the broadcast bit on;
these commands are propagated through the bridges if they are present. 3174
DSPUs keep sending the TEST command until a backup gateway is activated or
the failed gateway is recovered.
In case of failure of one or more DSPUs, the 3174 LAN Gateway only attempts to
connect them for each CONTACT received from the host (just one for initial
processing). In an error situation where the link was operational and fails, the
LAN Adapter attempts recovery; then VTAM is notified with an INOP, and VTAM
may attempt recovery one time depending on what was specified to VTAM. The
3174 LAN Gateway does not make a continual attempt to connect by itself.

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If you are running Configuration Support-S your 3174 does not have the ability to
attach to two different hosts. A second controller should be attached to a
different host or to a different channel in the same host; this creates full gateway
backup and complete recovery scenario from the gateway and the host points of
view.
If two gateways are attached to two different hosts and customized with the
same LAN address in two different LANs, they can be active at the same time.
In such a scenario, if the normal gateway fails, recovery to the backup gateway
by the DSPUs is automatic and almost instantaneous.
•

3174 LAN gateways with same address
If you have customized two 3174 LAN Gateways with the same LAN address
(on the same LAN), the first 3174 LAN Gateway will IML and open its LAN
Adapter successfully. When you IML the second 3174 LAN Gateway, it tries to
open its LAN Adapter but will fail because of the duplicate address. It
displays a status code of 881-01 (if the two gateways are in the same ring)
but stays operational for its coax attached devices.
If the normal gateway fails you activate, via NetView, the “backup” gateway.
Any DSPUs defined in the local major node of the backup gateway is able to
re-establish a host session, as the backup gateway has the same LAN
address as the now inactive normal gateway. If you need to recover a large
number of DSPUs, you may wish to include all the necessary commands in a
NetView CLIST.
If only one host is present, deactivation/activation of the involved local major
nodes is necessary. If local major node definitions are located in different
hosts, both can be active at the same time.
If both gateways are attached to different rings connected via a bridge,
duplicate address checking is not done. In this case, both 3174 LAN
gateways come up initially without returning the status code 881. This is the
best recovery approach that can be offered with the 3174 LAN gateway since
it requires only a NetView command from the CNM console with no re-IML of
DSPUs and/or movement of people. However, you should be aware of the
total number of DSPUs for both rings going through one gateway, especially
when this total is close to the limit the microcode is able to support.

•

3174 LAN gateways with different addresses
Another alternative could be be that you have a normal gateway and a
backup gateway with different LAN addresses. The advantage is that both
can be active at the same time in the same LAN and they can share the load
of the LAN traffic. If one gateway fails, the second can take over if all the
DSPUs of the failing gateway are re-IMLed with the operative gateway
address. Probably this alternative will not be acceptable in most
installations since it is disruptive and requires gateway address changes to
each DSPU.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

145

4.12.3 Recovery Scenarios
Scenario 1: One Host with Two 3174 Gateways

┌──────────────┐
│
Host A
│
│
│
│
│
└───┬─────┬────┘
│
│
┌─────────────┘
└───────────────┐
┌───┴───┐
┌───┴───┐
│3174─ │
│3174─ │
│ x1L │
│ x1L │
│┌─────┐│
│┌─────┐│
││#3044││
││#3044││
││ / ││
││ / ││
││#3045││
││#3045││
└┴──┬──┴┘
└┴──┬──┴┘
│
│
┌──────┴───────────────────────────────────┴──────┐
│
│
│
LAN
│
└────────┬──────────────┬────────────────┬────────┘
│
│
│
┌───┴───┐
┌──┴───┐
┌───┴───┐
│3174─ │
│ PC │
│AS/400 │
│x3R/x4R│
└──────┘
│
│
└───────┘
└───────┘
DSPU 1
DSPU 2
DSPU 3

Figure 45. Scenario 1: One Host with Two 3174 Gateways

This is the simplest scenario. The second 3174 LAN Gateway handles the traffic
when the normal 3174 LAN Gateway fails.

146

•

Both gateways have the same LAN address.

•

All DSPUs point to the LAN gateway address.

•

Recovery should be done as described in “Recovery Planning” on page 144.

•

For better reliability, each gateway should be attached to a different host
channel.

3174 Installation Guide

Scenario 2: Two Hosts with Two 3174 Gateways

┌──────────────┐
┌──────────────┐
│
Host A
│
CTC
│
Host B
│
│
├────────────────────┤
│
│
│
│
│
└──────┬───────┘
└──────┬───────┘
│
│
┌───┴───┐
┌───┴───┐
│3174─ │
│3174─ │
│ x1L │
│ x1L │
│┌─────┐│
│┌─────┐│
││#3044││
││#3044││
││ / ││
││ / ││
││#3045││
││#3045││
└┴──┬──┴┘
└┴──┬──┴┘
│
│
┌──────┴───────────────────────────────────┴──────┐
│
│
│
LAN
│
└────────┬──────────────┬────────────────┬────────┘
│
│
│
┌───┴───┐
┌──┴───┐
┌───┴───┐
│3174─ │
│ PC │
│AS/400 │
│x3R/x4R│
└──────┘
│
│
└───────┘
└───────┘
DSPU 1
DSPU 2
DSPU 3

Figure 46. Scenario 2: Two Hosts with Two 3174 Gateways

This scenario is more complex than the previous one. The following points
should be considered:
•

There is not enough traffic flowing through the gateway to justify more than
one active gateway at a time.

•

End users need to access applications in both hosts through cross-domain
facilities they already have in place. The figure above shows a
channel-to-channel facility.

•

In order to provide the best recovery capabilities, the second 3174 LAN
Gateway should be attached to host B.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

147

Recovery:
•

Host resources
As two hosts are available in this scenario, VTAM definitions for network
resources can be active at the same time. This allows you to recover all the
DSPUs with only one ACTIVATE command from the CNM console if the
gateway or the host fails.

•

Failure of normal 3174 LAN Gateway
Activation of LAN-attached controllers should be done with the procedure
already explained. Interactive users of applications in host A should regain
access to them through a cross-domain route from host B; users of host B
applications access them directly.

•

Failure of host A
In this scenario, the normal 3174 LAN Gateway senses that host A has failed
and terminates the sessions for its local terminals but keeps the LAN
Adapter open, since there was no error in the LAN. This adapter should be
forced closed before attempting to recover the traffic through the backup
3174; otherwise the backup 3174 LAN Gateway will find a duplicated address
and will not open its own adapter.
The only way to force the adapter closed is either to physically disconnect
the 3174 from the LAN or to interrupt it with an IML (or by powering it off).
Interactive users of applications in host B get direct connection to this host.
Users of applications in host A have to stand by until the host is recovered
(or they may access any available application in host B).

•

Failure of host B
Users of applications in host A should not be aware that host B is not
available. Users of host B will have to stand by until the host is recovered or
they may access any available application in host A.

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3174 Installation Guide

Scenario 3: Two Hosts with Multiple 3174 Gateways

┌──────────────┐
┌──────────────┐
│
Host A
│
CTC
│
Host B
│
│
├────────────────┤
│
│
│
│
│
└─────┬───┬────┘
└────┬────┬────┘
│ │
│
│
│ │
┌────────────────────┘
│
│ └─────┼───────────────┐
│
│
│
│
│
┌───┴───┐ ┌───┴───┐
┌───┴───┐ ┌───┴───┐
│3174─ │ │3174─ │
│3174─ │ │3174─ │
│ x1L │ │ x1L │
│ x1L │ │ x1L │
│┌─────┐│ │┌─────┐│
│┌─────┐│ │┌─────┐│
││#3044││ ││#3044││
││#3044││ ││#3044││
││ / ││ ││ / ││
││ / ││ ││ / ││
││#3045││ ││#3045││
││#3045││ ││#3045││
└┴──┬──┴┘ └┴──┬──┴┘
└┴──┬──┴┘ └┴──┬──┴┘
│
│
│
│
┌──────┴─────────┴───────────────┴─────────┴────┐
│
D1
D1
D2
D2 │
│
│
│
LAN
│
└────────┬──────────────┬────────────────┬──────┘
│
│
│
┌───┴───┐
┌──┴───┐
┌───┴───┐
│3174─ │
│ PC │
│AS/400 │
│x3R/x4R│
└──────┘
│
│
└───────┘
└───────┘
DSPU 1
DSPU 2
DSPU 3

Figure 47. Scenario 3: Two Hosts with Multiple 3174 Gateways

This scenario assumes higher traffic volumes through the gateway, forcing it to
have more than one active gateway at any one time. There are three kinds of
users: a group which accesses applications only in host A, another group which
accesses applications only in host B and a third group which accesses
applications in both hosts.
Every 3174 LAN Gateway should have a backup gateway customized with the
same address but channel attached to the other host. That is, a normal 3174
with address D1 attached to host A and its backup 3174 with the same address
D1 attached to host B.
Recovery procedures are similar to the previous scenarios; the important point
to remember here is that the backup 3174 should be attached to a different host.
The group of users accessing applications in host A should be routed through
the gateway with the D1 address; the group of users accessing applications in
host B should be routed through the gateway located in address D2. Multi-host
access should be done through the conventional cross-domain links.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

149

Scenario 4: Two Hosts With Mixed Gateway Types

┌──────────────┐
┌──────────────┐
│
Host A
│
CTC
│
Host B
│
│
├────────────────────┤
│
│
│
│
│
└──────┬─┬─────┘
└──────┬───────┘
│ └──────────────────────────────┐ │
│
Twintail│ │
┌───┴───┐
┌┴──┴───┐
│3174─ │
│ 372x │
│ x1L │
│ 374x │
│┌─────┐│
│┌─────┐│
││#3044││
││ TIC ││
││ / ││
││ / ││
││#3045││
││ ELA ││
└┴──┬──┴┘
└┴──┬──┴┘
│
│
┌──────┴───────────────────────────────────┴──────┐
│
LAN
│
└────────┬──────────────┬────────────────┬────────┘
│
│
│
┌───┴───┐
┌──┴───┐
┌───┴───┐
│3174─ │
│ PC │
│ S/36 │
│x3R/x4R│
└──────┘
│
│
└───────┘
└───────┘
DSPU 1
DSPU 2
DSPU 3

Figure 48. Scenario 4: Two Hosts with Mixed Gateway Types

This scenario considers that a 3174 LAN Gateway is working as the backup for a
37xx, or vice versa. The same considerations given in previous scenarios apply
for this one.
Note:
One important point to remember is that host definitions for the DSPUs
are different depending on the gateway they are using.
In the case of the 3174, they are defined as channel attached controllers
in a local major node, while in the case of the 37xx, they are defined as
remote controllers in a switched major node.
This scenario combines the best of both worlds. It can be used by a customer
installing a LAN interface in an existing 37xx and wants to have a full
backup/recovery capability without having to install a second 3725.
If gateways are attached to different hosts and different LANs, both gateways
and their VTAM resources for the DSPUs can be active at the same time; in this
case recovery is automatic and almost instantaneous.

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3174 Installation Guide

Scenario 5: Alternate IML
┌───────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
Host A
│
│
Host B
│
│
│
│
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬──────┘
│
│
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
│ 3174─11L │
│
│
├─────┬─────┤
│
│
│#3044│#304x├──────────────────┤ 372x/374x ├──────┐
│ / │
│
│
│
│
│#3045│
│
│
│
│
└──┬──┴─────┘
└───────────┘
│
│
│
┌──────┴──────────────────────────────────────────┐ │
│
LAN
│ │
└─────┬─────────────────┬───────────────────┬─────┘ │
│
│
│
│
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
┌──────┴─────┐ │
│ 3174─
│
│ 3174─
│
│3174-13R/14R│ │
│ 13R/14R │
│ 13R/14R │
│
┌─────┤ │
│
A
│
│
B
│
│ C │#304x├───┘
└───────────┘
└───────────┘
└──────┴─────┘
Figure 49. Scenario 5: Alternate IML

For 3174 Models 01L/11L, 03R/13R and 14R, features #3040 through #3043
provide an additional communication adapter with a V.24, V.35 or X.21 interface.
These adapters cannot be used concurrently with the primary host link and
require an IML after loading another pre-customized Control diskette.
If host A fails, the local channel attached gateway can be re-IMLed with a
Control diskette customized for a TP interface, thus giving the Model 11L the
appearance of an Model 11R or 12R. The local gateway becomes a remote
gateway attached via a TP link and 37xx to host B.
With devices A, B and C, the base microcode (that is, without gateway
customized) supports the upstream LAN attachment. In this example, device C
also has an alternate TP link (#3040 through #3043) installed. Under normal
operation, device C is IMLed as a DSPU.
In a token-ring network, for backup purposes, the customer has also installed a
feature #3026, with its accompanying Configuration Support-S microcode
customized for gateway functions. If the normal 3174 Token-Ring Gateway fails,
device C can be IMLed with its alternate configuration to become a 3174 remote
gateway for devices A and B. This may not be a cost-effective solution.
A better alternative would be to install feature #3044 with either Configuration
Support-B or Configuration Support-C in device C for a token-ring network. With
this adapter/microcode combination, device C can use the #3044 feature for
normal operation as a DSPU and for backup operation as a remote gateway. A
Control diskette appropriately customized for the alternate configuration must be
prepared for backup operation.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

151

In a Ethernet Network, feature #3045 needs to be installed with Configuration
Support-C Release 4 or later.

If the 3174 local gateway fails, it disconnects from the LAN. Hence, device C can
now be IMLed with the same gateway address, and serve the same DSPUs, as
the failed local gateway.
After device C is alternate IMLed as a remote gateway, all LAN attached devices
can communicate with host B via the remote gateway C and the 37xx.

Scenario 6: Single Link Multi-Host Support and CCA

┌───────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
Host A
│
│
Host B
│
│
│
│
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬──────┘
│
│
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
│ 3174─11L │
│
37xx │
│
│
│
│
├───────────┤
├───────────┤
│#3044/#3045│
│ TIC/ELA ├──────┐
└─────┬─────┘
└─────┬─────┘
│
│
│
│
┌─────────┴──────────────────────────────┴──────┐
│
│
LAN
│
│
└─────┬─────────────────┬─────────────────┬─────┘
│
│
│
│
│
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
│
│ 3174─
│
│ 3174─
│
│ 3174─13R/│
│
│ 13R/14R │
│ 13R/14R │
│ 14R┌─────┤
│
│
A
│
│
B
│
│ C │ CCA ├─────┘
└───────────┘
└───────────┘
└─────┴─────┘
Figure 50. Scenario 6: Single Link Multi-Host Support and CCA

With Configuration Support-B and later and the Concurrent Communication
Adapters (feature #3050, #3051 and #3053 for a V.24, V.35 or X.21 interface), new
backup possibilities are provided.
From a 3174 with Configuration Support-B or later and up to two CCAs installed,
up to three hosts can be accessed concurrently from direct attached devices.
DFT devices with multiple host sessions and CUT devices using the MLT function
can spread up to five sessions over the primary host link and up to two
secondary links in any combination. If host A fails it has no impact on the
sessions to host B. The operator can hot-key between those sessions.
In addition to the Concurrent Communication Adapter, Configuration Support-B
and later supports concurrent access to as many as eight hosts over the primary
LAN link. This support is known as Single Link Multi-Host and is a
microcode-only function with no additional hardware requirements (other than
controller storage).
What is described for MLT sessions over different CCAs is also true for the
multi-host access over a single link and even for the combination of both

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functions: up to five MLT sessions can be spread over up to ten hosts (eight via
the LAN and two via CCAs) from a device directly attached to a 3174. The user
can then hot-key between those five sessions.

Scenario 7: Multi-Host LAN Gateway

┌───────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
Host A
│
│
Host B
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬──────┘
│
│
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
│ 3174─11L │
│
│
├─────┬─────┤
│
│
│#3044│
├──────────────────┤
37xx ├──────┐
│ / │ CCA │
│
│
│
│#3045│
│
│
│
│
└──┬──┴─────┘
└───────────┘
│
│
│
┌──────┴────────────────────────────────────────┐
│
│
LAN
│
│
└─────┬─────────────────┬─────────────────┬─────┘
│
│
│
│
│
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
│
│ 3174─
│
│ 3174─
│
│3174-13R/ │
│
│ 13R/14R │
│ 13R/14R │
│ 14R ┌─────┤
│
│
A
│
│
B
│
│ C │ CCA ├─────┘
└───────────┘
└───────────┘
└─────┴─────┘
Figure 51. Scenario 7: Multi-Host LAN Gateway

With Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later, the recovery and connectivity
options have been further enhanced by allowing a DSPU to access the CCAs
installed in the 3174 LAN Gateway.
A terminal on DSPU B using its five
through the gateway′s primary link.
through the same gateway and then
connection. DSPU C has the added
a third path back to host B.

available MLT sessions can access host A
You can also access host B by going
accessing the CCA and using its host
connectivity option of using its own CCA as

Note: There is a maximum of 50 DSPUs that can access an SNA host through
each Concurrent Communication Adapter.
In a remote LAN this method of multiple connections or backup option becomes
attractive as there can be considerable cost savings on lines and hardware as
you will not require a Concurrent Communication Adapter in each 3174.
In the case of DSPU C a 3174-13R/14R you also have the alternate IML capability
and backup TP line. This is also true in the case of the Models 12L, 22L, 23R
and 24R.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

153

4.12.4 3174 Remote Gateway
Scenario 1: Alternate Host Attachment

Figure 52. Backup via a 3174-x3R/x4R with an Alternate Host Attachment

This option offers line and controller backup for a 3174 remote gateway using an
alternate host attachment feature #3040 (V.24/V.28), #3041 (V.35) or #3043 (X.21)
for Models 13R, 14R, 23R and 24R only. These communication adapters cannot
be used concurrently with the primary communication adapter and hence
requires an re-IML to change them into a remote gateway configuration.
Once re-IMLed, the 3174 (previously a DSPU) can now function as a gateway
until the normal line or gateway is fixed. When that happens, you can restore
the 3174s to their normal configurations.
If the line to the normal gateway fails, the normal gateway can be re-IMLed as a
DSPU to the backup gateway, thus allowing CUT or DFT devices attached to it to
continue accessing the host. Note that this is only possible if feature
#3044/#3045 is installed.

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3174 Installation Guide

Scenario 2 - Concurrent Communication Adapter
This option involves installing a CCA feature #3050 (V.24/V.28), #3051 (V.35) or
#3053 (X.21) in the normal 3174 LAN Gateway, providing a secondary link to the
same host.

Figure 53. Backup via Normal Gateway with CCA

If the CCA is a leased connection all devices connected to the gateway and
DSPUs are able to start a second session to the the host and hence provide
concurrent access to the host. With this type of connection the one link is really
backup for the other. Note that the CCA is only capable of supporting 50 DSPUs.

Chapter 4. LAN Support

155

4.12.5 Disconnecting/Reconnecting from the LAN
The following figure shows the recovery steps necessary if the connector to the
LAN is pulled off at the gateway or at the DSPU.

┌────────────────┬──────────────────────────┬──────────────────────────┐
│
│
Gateway
│
DSPU
│
│ Operation
├────────┬────────┬────────┼────────┬────────┬────────┤
│
│Operator│ Adapter│ VTAM │Operator│ Adapter│ VTAM │
│
│ Panel │ Status │ Status │ Panel │ Status │ Status │
├────────────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┤
│ Gateway LAN
│ 880─05 │ CLOSED │ ACTIV │ 583─09 │ OPEN │ PSUB 1 │
│Connector pulled│
│ 4693 │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ wire f.│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ LAN reconnect │ 3174 │ OPEN │ ACTIV │ ″
│ ″
│ ″
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ V INACT,F
│ ″
│ ″
│ ″
│ 3174 │ ″
│ IINOP/ │
│ V ACT,DSPU
│
│
│
│
│
│ ACTIV │
├────────────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┤
│ DSPU LAN
│ 3174 │ OPEN │ ACTIV │ 580─05 │ CLOSED │ PSUB1 │
│Connector pulled│
│
│
│
│ 4693 │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ wire f.│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ LAN reconnect │ ″
│ ″
│ ″
│ ″
│ ″
│ ″
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ IML DSPU │ ″
│ ″
│ ″
│ 505─01 │ OPEN │ ″
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ V INACT,F
│ ″
│ ″
│ ″
│ 3174 │ ″
│ IINOP/ │
│ V ACT,DSPU
│
│
│
│
│
│ ACTIV │
└────────────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┘
Figure 54. Disconnecting/Reconnecting the LAN

4.12.6 At IML Time
If, for any reason, a 3174 DSPU must be re-IMLed, the result depends on the
status of LU-LU sessions at IML time. If no LU-LU session exists, the controller
becomes ready immediately at the end of IML. If LU-LU sessions are broken by
the IML, the PU must be deactivated with the force option after IML and
re-activated again before the 3174 will be become available. The status of the
LU-SSCP sessions does not matter.
If, for any reason, a 3174L gateway must be re-IMLed all LU-LU sessions (to the
native attached devices and to devices attached to the DSPUs) are ended
logically in VTAM. This means that at the end of the IML process all devices
become available (under VM/VTAM, all VM sessions to CUT devices are
reestablished).
If, for any reason, a 3174 LAN Gateway must be switched offline from the
channel, status code 503 will be displayed at the 3174 LAN Gateway and a status
code 583 will be displayed at all 3174 DSPUs. After the gateway is switched
back online, all 3174s will recover the session with the host and display a status
code 3174.

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3174 Installation Guide

Chapter 5. X.25 Support
The 3174 models that can communicate with host systems through an X.25
Packet Switched Data Network (PSDN) are Models x1R and x2R. With
Configuration Support-B Release 3 or later, support in the 3174 conforms to
IBM′s X.25 Architecture as detailed in X.25 1984/1988 DTE/DCE and DTE/DTE
Interface Architecture Reference . It includes considerations for the 1988 CCITT
Recommendations X.25 as well as ISO X.25 standards 7776 and 8208. Previous
microcode releases support the 1980 CCITT Recommendations.
With the announcement of Configuration Support-C Release 5, APPN traffic can
be transported over an X.25 network to other APPN nodes.
See Chapter 18, “APPN” on page 501 for further information.
It is important that you have some X.25 knowledge when connecting to an X.25
PSDN, and several points must be considered before attempting to customize
the 3174. This chapter provides:
•

A summary of the X.25 features supported by the 3174

•

Planning guidelines for installing a 3174 in an X.25 network

•

3174 configuration and operation hints

•

Scenarios used to test the 3174 X.25 feature

Further information can be found in the following manuals:
•

3174 Planning Guide

•

X.25 Guide

•

3270 Information Display System X.25 Operation

5.1 3174 Implementation
The older 3174 models can operate up to a maximum speed of 19.2 Kbps; the
newer models with Configuration Support-C Release 5 Licensed Internal Code
can operate up to a maximum speed of 256 Kbps using an X.25 attachment. The
physical interface can be X.21 or X.21bis.
In an X.25 network, the 3174 uses SNA/SDLC protocols at the higher layers for
communication, making the transport system transparent. This allows the user
to operate as in an SNA environment, establishing sessions with VTAM
applications (like TSO, CICS), in one or more domains. The SNA logical link
controls supported by the 3174 are:
•

Qualified Logical Link Control (QLLC), logical link control type 3

•

Physical Services Header (PSH), logical link control type 2

You need to use PSH if the 3174 is to be attached to the X.25 network via a
Network Interface Adapter (NIA). With current products, there should be no
reason to do this. We recommend that you use QLLC for SNA X.25 attachments
because it takes advantage of the integrated X.25 support in IBM host and
subsystems. With Configuration Support-B Release 1 and later, PSH is no longer
supported.

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

157

The 3174 access to the network is a four-wire link using the Link Access Protocol
Balanced (LAPB) protocol.

Virtual Circuits
The 3174 supports both switched virtual circuits (SVCs) and permanent virtual
circuits (PVCs). A PVC can be thought of as a point-to-point, four-wire leased
line. An SVC can be thought of as a point-to-point, four-wire switched line.
Sessions between the host and 3174 attached devices are multiplexed on a
virtual circuit.
Prior to Configuration Support-B Release 3, only a single X.25 link was supported
and within that link only one virtual circuit could be established.
Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases as well as Configuration
Support-C include many X.25 enhancements. One of the major enhancements is
Single Link Multi-Host support over X.25. With these later releases, up to eight
hosts on the primary adapter and up to four hosts on each of the secondary
adapters (CCA) can be defined. These connections can be a mixture of PVCs
and SVCs.
If you use PVCs, the 3174 attempts to open the link at IML time. When
customizing, you define a single PVC for each host you wish to access.
If you use SVCs, you can establish a connection in a number of ways including:
•

Manually from a Dial screen on the 3174

•

The new autocall feature, which initiates the call request automatically
whenever the first device with a logical terminal defined to the required host
is powered on

•

By responding to an incoming call from the host

X.25 Options
The following X.25 options are supported by the 3174:
•

Data Packet sizes of 64, 128, 256, or 512 bytes

•

Packet-size negotiation

•

Modulo 8 or 128 for packet level sequence numbering

•

Packet window sizes of 1 to 7 for modulo 8

•

Packet window sizes of 1 to 11 for modulo 128

•

Packet window size negotiation

•

Connection Identifier

•

Recognized Private Operating Agency

•

Closed User Group

•

Reverse charging

•

Throughput class negotiation

These options are specified during customization, a summary of which is
provided in 5.3, “3174 Customization” on page 161. However we recommend
that you use the 3174 Planning Guide at the correct microcode release level for
the detailed responses.

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3174 Installation Guide

Configuration Support-B Release 3 Enhancements
We have already mentioned some of the new functions available with
Configuration Support-B Release 3. In summary, these functions are:
•

Support for the 1988 CCITT X.25 Recommendations

•

Multiple host access using the primary and Concurrent Communication
Adapter links

•

Multiple host access using a single link, either primary or CCA

•

Autocall/autodisconnect for SVC operation

•

Enhancements to X.21 and X.25 Dial screens

•

Support for larger PIU sizes to 521 bytes

Configuration Support-C Release 5 Enhancements
APPN NN extends connectivity to X.25 Networks. APPN X.25 support is built on
the existing X.25 Single Link Multi-host support and provides equivalent X.25
options.

5.2 Planning for X.25
This section provides some guidance and planning considerations for attaching a
3174 to a X.25 network.

Financial
When planning the network, the main consideration is usually to find the correct
balance between the financial cost and the function required. You should be
aware that packet switched network costs are usually volume dependent,
regardless of whether switched or permanent virtual circuits are used or the
distance between the communicating ends. Packet switched networks may be a
more economical alternative for terminal locations that are widely dispersed and
have low traffic volumes. You need to determine when it is more economical to
use leased lines or circuit-switched networks.
The use of X.25 may save on hardware costs. Instead of running multiple lines
on a 37xx and using modem racks, multiplexers, banks of switches etc., with
X.25, you need only one line into the network for all of your devices (assuming,
of course, that it can handle the traffic).

Performance
If you are planning to use X.25 as the protocol in a private SNA network, it adds
an overhead to the performance of the network and the capacity of the
components such as the 37x5. All other things being equal, SDLC is more
efficiently processed in an IBM network.
It is necessary to be aware that in an PSDN, there are no guarantees for
continuous throughput. Frequently, PSDNs use flow control mechanisms, such
as limiting window sizes or maximum packet lengths, in order to regulate the
input/output rate for all users. The user should have a realistic idea of the
response times that can be expected. Good performance can be obtained with
careful planning and tuning of the definitions used in the network.

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

159

Function
With the advent of Single Link Multi-Host support for X.25, the cost of using X.25
may be more attractive for situations where multiple host access is required
from remote sites. For example, you can access both an S/370 host and an
AS/400 host over a single connection, whereas to do this with SDLC requires
either two lines or a host router program such as Host Command Facility (HCF).

5.2.1 Preparing to Customize
When you are customizing a 3174 for X.25, you are asked many questions that
require careful preparation. This is especially true if you are using SVCs. X.25
networks offer a wide variety of options and, unfortunately, this makes the job of
the network planner more difficult.
You are advised to meet with the company providing the X.25 facilities to discuss
your specific requirements, and review these facilities against the X.25 functions
supported by your 3174 and host software.
Consider some of the following:
•

Level of CCITT Recommendations supported

•

Line speed

•

Type of virtual circuit (SVC or PVC)

•

Number of logical channels to be useds

•

Call initiation for a SVC

•

Frame window size

•

Packet window size

•

Parameter negotiation
This facility allows the negotiation of data flow control parameters on a per
call basis and is applicable to SVCs only. When an SVC is established, the
DTE and DCE agree about the packet and window sizes, with one packet size
and one window size specified for each direction.

•

Closed user group
This facility provides better security because calls can only be established
between DTEs belonging to the same group.

•

Reverse charge
This facility permits data communication expenses to be centralized.

•

Throughput class negotiation
This facility allows negotiation of the throughput class to be used, which
affects the effective rate at which data can be transferred.

Customizing the 3174 for X.25 involves defining the facilities and options you
have subscribed to with your network provider.

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3174 Installation Guide

5.3 3174 Customization
This section summarizes the specific X.25 questions asked during customization.
The 3174 Planning Guide is where you find the details and sample worksheets
for the X.25 customization panels

Question 101: Host Attachment
When customizing for X.25, the response to this question must be 3 for a single
host configuration and M for the multi-host support (with Configuration Support-B
Release 3 or later releases and with Configuration Support-C).

Question 215: Physical Unit Identification (PUID)
If you are working with a switched virtual circuit (SVC) you must give a unique
identifier to the 3174 PU. The value is used in the QXID when the connection is
being established (see the SVC examples later in this chapter). If you are using
a VTAM host, the PUID must match the IDNUM parameter on the PU macro in
the switched major node definition for this 3174. For other host types, there is an
equivalent definition for this identifier, such as:
•

EXCHID of the AS/400 or System/38

•

REMOTE XID of the System/36

Note: PUID is not sent in the XID if the X.25 link is shared T2.0/T2.1 or pure T2.1

Question 372: Autocall/Autodisconnect
This is a new feature for Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases.
This question requires a two-digit response.
Digit 1 - Enable autocall function:
•

0=No autocall (default response)

•

1=Enable DIAL autocall

•

2=Enable DIRECT autocall (X.21 switched only)

Digit 2 - Enable autodisconnect function:
•

0=No autodisconnect (default response)

•

1=Enable autodisconnect

The autocall and autodisconnect functions are independent of one another; you
can enable or disable one without affecting the other.
These functions, if used, may reduce network charges for X.21 switched or X.25
SVC connections:
•

With autocall enabled, the 3174 dials the host when the first terminal powers
on or when a new logical terminal becomes active, such as happens during
a Change Screen sequence. The 3174 will dial the host if a connection does
not already exist.

•

With autodisconnect enabled, the 3174 disconnects from the host when the
last terminal becomes inactive or powers off..

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

161

Question 400: Network Type
Note: The response to this question depends on the microcode level.
Prior to Configuration Support-B Release 3, question 400 requires a two-digit
response, as follows:
•

00=CCITT recommended network with announced IBM support (default
response)

•

01=Connection is to the Netherlands DATANET-1

•

02=Connection is to the UKPSS** or TELENET**.
UKPSS is the United Kingdom Packet Switched Service; TELENET is the
General Telephone and Electronics Communications Corporation service.

With Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases, question 400 requires
a four-digit response, as follows:
•

First two digits:
−

00=CCITT recommended network with announced IBM support (not
DATANET-1) (default response)

−

01=Connection is to the Netherlands DATANET-1

Note: Response 02 is no longer valid for this question. Use 00 if your
network is UKPSS, TELENET, or any X.25 network for which IBM has
announced support.
•

•

Third digit indicates the level of CCITT Recommendation X.25 supported:
−

0=1980 level (default response)

−

1=1984 and beyond

Fourth digit indicates the type of diagnostic codes the 3174 should use for
errors reported to the network:
−

0=Use SNA diagnostic codes (default response)

−

1=Use ISO diagnostic codes

Question 401: Circuit Type
The 3174 can support four circuit types; which of these should be used will
depend on your network subscription.
•

1=Permanent virtual circuit (PVC).

•

2=Incoming (SVC) call only; that is, only the host can call the 3174.

•

3=Outgoing (SVC) call only; that is, only the 3174 can call the host.

•

4=Two-way (SVC) call; that is, either the 3174 or the host can initiate the call
to the other. This also the default response.

Question 402: Logical Channel Identifier
Prior to Configuration Support-B Release 3, the response is the logical channel
identifier of the virtual circuit specified in question 401, whether it is a PVC or an
SVC.
With Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases, the response is the
logical channel identifier for a PVC only. Of course this means that you have
specified the circuit type is PVC in question 401. To specify logical channel

162

3174 Installation Guide

identifiers for SVCs, use questions 461 through 466. The response should be in
the range 0000 through 4095; refer to your network subscription for this number.

Question 403: Logical Link Control
With Configuration Support-B Release 1 and later releases, this question is not
presented because the 3174 no longer supports PSH, only QLLC. If you are
customizing Configuration Support-A, then respond as follows:
•

0=PSH control

•

1=QLLC control

PSH protocol support allows the 3174 to communicate with equipment attaching
to the network via the Network Interface Adapter (now obsolete). IBM products
with integrated X.25 support use QLLC protocols.

Question 409: X.25 Keyboard Support Options
This question allows you to specify how you would use the Extension mode keys
for X.25 functions. The response consists of eight digits (default 10100100).
•

Digits 1 and 2: DISC Key
The response specifies whether the DISConnect key is enabled and from
which port it can be used on an attached terminal.

•

−

00=DISC key is not supported.

−

01=DISC key is supported only on port 26-00 or 27-00; this overrides
digit 5 response.

−

10=DISC key supported according to digit 5 response (default).

−

11=Not a valid response.

Digits 3 and 4: LOCAL and COMM Keys
The response specifies whether the LOCAL and COMM keys are enabled
and from which port they can be used.

•

−

00=LOCAL and COMM keys are not supported.

−

01=LOCAL and COMM keys are supported on port 26-00 or 27-00; this
overrides digit 5 response.

−

10=LOCAL and COMM keys are supported according to digit 5 response
(default).

−

11=Not a valid response.

Digit 5: X.25 Keys
The response specifies whether the Extension mode keys for X.25 functions
are supported on all attached CUT terminals or only from the CUT terminal
attached to port 26-00 or 27-00.

•

−

0=X.25 keys supported only on port 26-00 or 27-00 (default)

−

1=X.25 keys supported on all ports (except those with a DFT attached)

Digit 6: Dial Screen Display
Valid responses are:
−

0=Display all fields on the Dial screen.
This allows the operator to change customized or default values on a
per-call basis.

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

163

−

1=Display only the HNAD field on the Dial screen.
This allows the operator to enter or change only the number to be called
(default).

•

Digit 7: Disconnect/Local Mode Operation
Valid responses are:
−

0=If no SNA sessions are active, pressing the DISC (SVC) or LOCAL
(PVC) key performs operation requested.
If any session is active, pressing the key once inhibits the rest of the
keyboard. Pressing the key a second time (twice) initiates the operation.
This is the default response.

−
•

1=The DISC (SVC) or LOCAL (PVC) key immediately performs the
operation requested, whether sessions are active or not.

Digit 8: Reserved
This digit is reserved and defaults to 0.

Question 420: Incoming Call Options
Requires an eight-digit response that specifies how the 3174 will handle calls
from the host (incoming calls) that include various optional facilities. Refer to
your network subscription to determine which facilities are available.
If question 409 digit 6 is 0, then all fields will be displayed on the Dial screen.
The operator can change the incoming call responses in the IOPT field if desired.
The response is:
•

0=No (default)

•

1=Yes

•

Digit 1: Host DTE Address
Specifies whether to validate the host DTE address in incoming calls.

•

Digit 2 and 3: Reverse-Charge Facility
Specify whether to accept incoming calls with reverse-charge facility:

•

−

00=Do not accept reverse-charge Call Requests.

−

01=Accept calls with the reverse-charge facility equal to reverse-charge
requested.

−

10=Accept calls with the reverse-charge facility equal to reverse-charge
not requested.

−

11=Accept calls with the reverse-charge facility whether
reverse-charges are requested or not.

Digit 4: Negotiated Packet Size Facility
Specifies whether to accept incoming calls that include the negotiated packet
size facility.

•

Digit 5: Negotiated Window Size Facility
Determines whether incoming calls that want to change the maximum
number of packets that can cross the DTE/DCE interface before receiving an
acknowledgment are accepted.

•

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3174 Installation Guide

Digit 6: Connection Identifier

Specifies whether to validate the Connection Identifier (CID) on incoming
calls (SVC). This may be required in some networks. If specified, the 3174
compares the CID on incoming calls against the value you specify in
question 452.
•

Digit 7: Throughput Class Negotiation
Specifies whether to accept incoming calls that want to change the
communication speed.

•

Digit 8: Reserved

Question 421: Outgoing Call Options
Requires an eight-digit response that specifies the facilities supported by the
3174 when it calls the host (outgoing calls). Refer to your network subscription
to determine which facilities are available.
If question 409 digit 6 is 0, then all fields will be displayed on the Dial screen.
The operator can change the outgoing call responses in the OOPT field if
desired.
The response is:
•

0=No (default)

•

1=Yes

•

Digit 1: 3174 DTE Address
Indicates whether the 3174 DTE address is supplied in the Call Request
packet.

•

Digits 2 and 3: Reverse-Charge Facility
Specifies whether the 3174 will try to make calls with reverse charging:

•

−

00=Do not include reverse-charge request in the Call Request.

−

01=Request reverse-charge via reverse-charge facility.

−

10=Request no reverse-charge via reverse-charge facility.

−

11=Invalid response.

Digit 4: Negotiated Packet Size Facility
Specifies whether the 3174 tries to negotiate the packet size during the
session establishment.

•

Digit 5: Negotiated Window Size Facility
Specifies whether the 3174 wants to change the packet window size for the
call.

•

Digit 6: Connection Identifier
Specifies whether the Connection Identifier (CID) is supplied in the Call
Request. If specified, the 3174 takes the value you specify in question 452 as
its CID.

•

Digit 7: Throughput Class Negotiation
Specifies whether to change the communication speed in outgoing calls.
This option is not supported by NPSI but the user could get support by using
the DATE facility.

•

Digit 8: Reserved

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

165

Question 423: Host DTE Address
Enter a maximum of 15 digits (0 through 9) for the host DTE address. This
address is required if the 3174 supports:
•

Incoming calls only and the calling host DTE address must be validated

•

Outgoing calls only (the host DTE address is used as destination)

•

Two-way calls (the host DTE address is used as destination and must be
supplied on the outgoing calls)

Whether question 409 digit 6 is 0 or 1, the host DTE address HNAD field is always
displayed on the Dial screen. The operator can be change this address to call
another host if desired.

Question 424: 3174 DTE Address
Enter a maximum of 15 digits (0 through 9) for the 3174 DTE address. This
address may be required if the 3174 supports:
•

Outgoing calls only

•

Two-way calls (for the outgoing calls)

In both cases, the address is required only if you specify that it is to be included
in the outgoing call via the outgoing call options.

Question 430: Negotiated Packet Size
Valid responses are:
•

1=64-byte packet

•

2=128-byte packet

•

3=256-byte packet

•

4=512-byte packet

For SVC: This value defines the maximum packet size that the 3174 can accept in
an incoming call, or request in an outgoing call, when packet size is being
negotiated (if negotiation is specified in questions 420 or 421). This size can be
changed on the Dial screen NPKT field, if displayed.
For PVC: With Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases, this value
is also used for a PVC where the packet size is not negotiable; it is used to set
the packet size. The value used should be compatible with your network and
your host.

Question 431: Packet Sequence Numbering
•

0=Modulo 8 (default)

•

1=Modulo 128

Specify 1 if your network supports this and you wish to use the extended packet
sequence numbering (refer to your network subscription). Your response affects
questions 432 and 435.

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3174 Installation Guide

Question 432: Negotiated Window Size (NWND) or PVC Window
Size
•

01 through 07=Valid range if question 431=0 (modulo 8)

•

01 through 11=Valid range if question 431=1 (modulo 128)

For SVC: The value you select sets the window size limit to which the 3174 can
negotiate when processing an incoming call if question 420 digit 5=1. It also
sets the window size to be requested in the Call Request packet in an outgoing
call if question 421 digit 5=1. The response can be changed on the Dial screen
NWND field, if displayed.
For PVC: The value you select sets the window size for the PVC. It remains
constant at this value as there is no negotiation.

Question 433: K-Maximum Out
The response is a number from 1 through 7 (default=2).
It specifies the maximum number of link level I-frames that the 3174 can transmit
before waiting for an acknowledgement. This is essentially a checking
mechanism to ensure that the information exchange is error-free. For an
error-free access line, better throughput is obtained if the largest value is used.
Refer to your network subscription for the maximum supported.

Question 434: Nonstandard Default Packet Size
Specifies the default packet size which you have subscribed in your network
subscription:
•

1=64-byte packet

•

2=128-byte packet (default)

•

3=256-byte packet

•

4=512-byte packet

Before Configuration Support-B Release 3, the response is used to select the
3174 packet size when any of the following conditions applies:
•

An outgoing call which does not include the negotiated packet size facility
(question 421 digit 4=0)

•

An incoming call that does not include the negotiated packet size facility

•

For a PVC connection

The response can be changed on the Dial screen DPKT field, if displayed.
With Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases, question 434 is not
used for a PVC. The PVC gets this value from your response to question 430.
The response is now used to select the packet size for an SVC when packet size
negotiation is not used.
Table 6 on page 168 shows the relationship between packet size, maximum PIU
size (as specified in question 370: Maximum Inbound I-Frame Size) and the
number of data packets required.

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

167

Table 6. Relationship Between Packet Size, Max. PIU, and Number Of Packets
Max. PIU Size
(Question 370)

Packet Size

Number of Data Packets
for Max. PIU Size

If Q . 3 7 0 = 0 ,
max. P I U = 2 6 5

64
128
256
512

5
3
2
1

If Q . 3 7 0 = 1 ,
max. P I U = 5 2 1

64
128
256
512

9
5
3
2

Question 435: Nonstandard Default Window Size
Specifies the default window size which you have subscribed in your network
subscription:
•

01 through 07=Valid range if question 431=0 (modulo 8)

•

01 through 11=Valid range if question 431=1 (modulo 128)

Before Configuration Support-B Release 3, the response is used to select the
3174 window size when any of the following conditions applies:
•

An outgoing call which does not include the negotiated window size facility
(question 421 digit 5=0)

•

An incoming call that does not include the negotiated window size facility

The response can be changed on the Dial screen NWND field, if displayed.
With Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases, question 435 is not
used for a PVC. The PVC gets this value from your response to question 431.
The response is now used to select the window size for an SVC when window
size negotiation is not used.

Question 440: Throughput Class Negotiation
The response is used to set the priority for packets in:
•

An outgoing call if the throughput class negotiation facility is included
(question 421 digit 7=1).

•

An incoming call if the throughput class negotiation facility is included
(question 420 digit 7=1). In this case, the 3174 will accept the requested
throughput class in an incoming call if it less than or equal to your response.
If not, your response is returned as the class the 3174 will accept.

Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases provides an additional
response D, which represents 64,000 bps.
The answer can be changed on the Dial screen TCLS field, if displayed. Refer to
your network subscription to determine if this facility is supported.

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3174 Installation Guide

Question 441: Closed User Group
A response to this question is optional. If used, the two-digit response should be
in the range 00 through 99 (use leading zero if necessary). A value entered here
is included in the outgoing call request. The response can be changed on the
dial screen CUG field, if displayed. Refer to your network subscription to
determine if this facility is supported.

Question 442: Recognized Private Operating Agency
A response to this question is optional. If used, the four-digit response should
be in the range 0000 through 9999 (use leading zeros if necessary). A value
entered here is included in the outgoing call request. The response can be
changed on the dial screen RPOA field, if displayed. Refer to your network
subscription to determine if this facility is supported.

Question 450: Link Level Transmit Timeout
The response is the T • or Tp value. You should set it to that required in your
network subscription. The 3174 timer will be ± 20% of the value specified.
You must respond to this question as no default is supplied. The valid range of
values is 0001 through 2540, in tenths of a second. For example, 13.5 seconds is
specified as 0135; that is, 13.5 divided by 0.1 equals 0135 (padded with a leading
zero).
For values greater than 25.0 seconds, the tenths digit is ignored. For example,
26.1 seconds is treated as 0260.

Question 451: Number Of Retries
The response is the N • or Np value. You should set it to that required in your
network subscription.
You must respond to this question as no default is supplied. The valid range of
values is 01 through 99.

Question 452: Connection Identifier (CID)
An eight-character alphanumeric value that identifies the PU involved in a virtual
circuit.
Before X.25 Single Link Multi-Host (that is, before Configuration Support-B
Release 3), a 3174 could only communicate with one host over a single virtual
circuit, SVC or PVC, through the X.25 network. The 3174 could identify the host
by the host DTE address (question 423); similarly, the host could identify the 3174
by the 3174 DTE address (question 424). In this single-host environment, the CID
can be used for call verification (like a password) for added security.
With X.25 SLMH (that is, with Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later
releases), a 3174 could communicate with several hosts, or have several
sessions with the same hosts, simultaneously. The 3174 is able to present
multiple PU images to the host or hosts, with each PU image over a separate
virtual circuit. The CID provides a means to identify the PU image within the
3174, and is used as follows:
•

If question 420 digit 6=1, the response is used to validate the CID in an
incoming call.

•

If question 421 digit 6=1, the response is included as the CID in an outgoing
call.

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

169

At the host, CID is coded in the NPSI X25.OUFT macro USRFILD and USRFIL2
parameters. For example, if question 452 response is PRIMARY1, the
corresponding NPSI statement would appear as follows:

:
X25.OUFT INDEX=1,
USRFILD=010000D7D9C9D4C1,
USRFIL2=D9E8F100000000
:
Note that the alphanumeric CID in question 452 needs to be coded as
hexadecimal values in NPSI.
The response can be changed on the Dial screen CID field, if displayed.

Question 453: Connection Options
This question applies to Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases
only.
It is an eight-digit field but only the responses in the first two digits are used.
Digits 3 through 8 are reserved.
•

•

Digit 1: CCITT X.25 Architecture Level:
−

0=1980 (default)

−

1=1984 and beyond

Digit 2: Diagnostic Code Type:
−

0=SNA (default)

−

1=ISO

Digit 2 identifies the type of diagnostic codes the 3174 should use for Clear
Request or Reset Request packets when breaking the connection with the
remote DTE.
The response can be changed on the Dial screen COPT field, if displayed.

Logical Channel Numbering (Questions 461-466)
Before Configuration Support-B Release 3, the 3174 supports only one virtual
circuit; its type is specified in question 401: Circuit Type. Whether PVC or SVC,
the channel number is specified in question 402: Logical Channel Identifier.
With Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases, the 3174 supports
multiple virtual circuits:
•

If the circuit type is PVC (question 401=1), the channel number is specified
in question 402.

•

If the circuit type is SVC, the channel numbers are specified as follows:
−

For incoming calls only (question 401=2):
- Question 461: Lowest Incoming Channel
- Question 462: Highest Incoming Channel

−

For outgoing calls only (question 401=3):
- Question 465: Lowest Outgoing Channel
- Question 466: Highest Outgoing Channel

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3174 Installation Guide

−

For two-way calls (question 401=4):
- Question 463: Lowest Two-Way Channel
- Question 464: Highest Two-Way Channel

The total number of channels specified, including PVCs, must not exceed 255.
The channel numbers must be assigned in ascending order, as shown in
Figure 55.

0
Reserved for Interface Control
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
1
:
│
n

Q.402: Logical Channel Identifier (PVC)
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
n+1
Q.461: Lowest Incoming Channel
:
│
m

Q.462: Highest Incoming Channel
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
m+1
Q.463: Lowest Two-Way Channel
:
│
o

Q.464: Highest Two-Way Channel
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
o+1
Q.465: Lowest Outgoing Channel
:
│
p

Q.466: Highest Outgoing Channel
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
:
│
Not Assigned
4095


Figure 55. Logical Channel Assignments

Some networks used channel 0 for control purposes only; some can assign the
Highest Outgoing Channel to be 4095. Refer to your network subscription for the
logical channel numbers that should be used.

5.4 Operating Procedures
When the 3174 is IMLed and ready, what you have to do to establish an X.25
connection depends on the type of virtual circuit customized and subscribed to.

5.4.1 Keyboard Mapping
The 3174 permits the operator of an attached CUT device (like a 3178 or 3472) to
connect and disconnect from the X.25 network, initiate an outgoing call or to
modify incoming call parameters.
To support PVC operations, the following keys are provided:
•

LOCAL key to disconnect

•

COMM key to reconnect

To support SVC operations, the following keys are provided:
•

DIAL key to display the Dial screen, which displays fields for incoming and
outgoing call options, ready for an outgoing call

•

DISC key to disconnect from the network and go into call ready state

•

LOCAL key to disconnect from the network and go into local state

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

171

•

COMM key to change from the local to the call ready state.

These keys are active when the keyboard enters Extended Select (or Extension)
mode, by pressing the ExSel key on current IBM displays. On some older
displays, Extended Select can be entered by pressing Alt EOF keys
simultaneously. You will get a  symbol in the OIA when in Extended Select.
Once you are in this mode, you can invoke the X.25 keys. Keyboards vary
greatly in layout but on a US English typewriter keyboard, these keys are:
•

Character 1 key=DIAL

•

Character 2 key=LOCAL

•

Character 3 key=COMM

•

Character 5 key=DISC

If you are using a different keyboard, then the keys are the ones occupying the
same positions on the central keyboard layout. See 3174 Terminal User ′ s
Reference for Expanded Functions or Appendix I, “Keyboard Layouts” on
page 803 for keyboard mapping.
Note that the LOCAL, COMM and DISC keys can be enabled and disabled to
prevent operator intervention via question 409.

5.4.2 PVC Operations
If you are using PVC, the 3174 operation is similar to that on a leased SDLC line.
The 3174 will attempt to open the PVC link when IML completes. Once the link is
open, X.25 operation is possible.
In PVC operations, you use the LOCAL and COMM keys (in Extension Mode,
represented by the  symbol) to perform disconnect and reconnect operations,
respectively. You may disable these keys through question 409: X.25 Keyboard
Support Options, digits 3 and 4.

Disconnect Operation
The LOCAL key allows you to disconnect the 3174 from the PVC. When you
press LOCAL the first time, the 3174 will determine if any SNA sessions are
active and will act as shown in Table 7, according to your customized response
in question 409.
Table 7. PVC Disconnect Operation
Q.409 Response

No Sessions
Active

Sessions Active

Digit 7 = 0

Disconnect
immediately

Disconnect if LOCAL pressed twice (see
note)

Digit 7 = 1

Disconnect
immediately

Disconnect immediately

Note: The Operator Communication Check and Input Inhibited indicators are
displayed and no action is taken if LOCAL is pressed once.

172

•

To disconnect, press LOCAL a second time.

•

To cancel the disconnect operation, press Reset.

3174 Installation Guide

Reconnect Operation
When the 3174 is in the local state, press COMM to restart the network
connection. After a short delay to establish link and circuit controls, the PVC link
becomes operational and the Network In Use indicator is displayed.

5.4.3 SVC Operations
For an SVC, you may be required to initiate the calls to connect and disconnect
the 3174 from the X.25 network.

Autocall/Autodisconnect
With Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases, question 372 digit 1
can be customized so that the 3174 will automatically attempt to connect to a
X.25 host when the first logical terminal becomes active; that is, when the
terminal powers on or when a logical terminal is first reached in the Change
Screen sequence.
Question 372 digit 2 can also be customized for automatically disconnecting the
3174 from a X.25 host when the last logical terminal becomes inactive or powers
off.
The autocall and autodisconnect functions are independent of one another; you
can enable or disable one without the other.

Call Ready/Incoming Call Operation
In the call ready state, the DIAL and the LOCAL keys are active and an
incoming call (from the host) can be processed. No operator action is required
for an incoming call. You may, however, change the parameters for accepting
an incoming call (see “Dial In Operation”).
Incoming call packets are accepted in the call ready state; the Incoming Call In
Process indicator is displayed. When the circuit is connected, the indicator is
reset.

Dial In Operation
To initiate an outgoing call, or to modify the call parameters for an incoming or
outgoing call, use the DIAL key. When the DIAL key is pressed in the call
ready state, it initiates keyboard reset and clear functions simultaneously. The
Dial screen is then displayed (see Figure 56 on page 175 and Figure 57 on
page 175) with the Dial-In indicator in the OIA.
To change the call parameters, fill in the desired values, with the I/O
(Incoming/Outgoing Call Control) field set to 1, and press Enter. This will
validate the field values. If successfully validated, the 3174 will store the values
either to allow an incoming call or as parameters in an outgoing call.
To initiate an outgoing call, fill in the desired values, with the I/O
(Incoming/Outgoing Call Control) field set to 0, and press Enter. The 3174
initiates the call and an Outgoing Call In Process indicator is displayed in the
OIA. When the call is connected, the Network In Use indicator is displayed.

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

173

Disconnect Operation
The DISC key allows you to disconnect the 3174 from the SVC, similar to the
LOCAL key in PVC. When you press DISC the first time, the 3174 will
determine if any SNA sessions are active and will act as shown in Table 8,
according to your customized response in question 409 (digit 7 is used for both
PVC and SVC).
Table 8. SVC Disconnect Operation
Q.409 Response

No Sessions
Active

Sessions Active

Digit 7 = 0

Disconnect
immediately

Disconnect if LOCAL pressed twice (see
note)

Digit 7 = 1

Disconnect
immediately

Disconnect immediately

Note: The Operator Communication Check and Input Inhibited indicators are
displayed and no action is taken if DISC is pressed once.
•

To disconnect, press DISC a second time.

•

To cancel the disconnect operation, press Reset.

The disconnect sequence can also be initiated by the 3174 receiving a Clear
Indication packet. The cause and diagnostic codes from the Clear Indication
packet are displayed in the OIA.
When the disconnect is complete, the Call Ready indicator is displayed and the
connection can be re-established by an incoming or outgoing call again.

Local Operation
The LOCAL key allows you to place the 3174 from a call ready state to a local
state for SVC operation. The Local Mode indicator is displayed.
In the local state, all incoming calls and outgoing requests are rejected. The
3174 is disconnected from the link.
To open the link again and place the 3174 into a call ready state, press the
COMM key.

5.4.4 Dial Screen
If you are using SVCs, you can initiate the connection from a Dial screen. This
screen appears when you press the DIAL key. The number of fields displayed
on the Dial screen depends on your response:
•

If question 409 digit 6=0, all fields are displayed.

•

If question 409 digit 6=1, only the HNAD field is displayed.

There are two formats of the Dial screen, depending on the microcode level.
Figure 56 on page 175 shows the Dial screen for Configuration Support-A. Note
that this screen is also used for Configuration Support-B Releases 1 and 2 but
without the QLLC field (Configuration Support-B Release 1 and later releases
support only QLLC and, therefore, the PSH option is no longer available).

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3174 Installation Guide






HNAD

=

123456789012345

CID
NPKT
NWND
RPOA
CUG
QLLC
TCLS
DPKT
DWND
OOPT
IOPT
I/O

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

A0000076
1
07
1898
32
1
9
1
02
00000000
00000000
0



Figure 56. X.25 Dial Screen for Configuration Support-A

Figure 57 shows the Dial screen for Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later
releases, with the following changes:
•

DPKT and DWND are removed because these parameters have slightly
different meanings with Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later
releases should no longer be changed on a per-call basis.

•

COPT (connection options) is added.

•

CID is now displayable.




HNAD

=

123456789012345

CID
NPKT
NWND
RPOA
CUG
TCLS
OOPT
IOPT
COPT
I/O

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

A0000076
1
07
1898
32
9
00000000
00000000
00000000
0





Figure 57. X.25 Dial Screen for Configuration Support-B Release 3 and Later Releases

The I/O field is displayed only in two-way calls. It is used as follows:
•

0=Store the values on the Dial screen and initiates an outgoing call.

•

1=Store the values on the Dial screen only; does not initiate an outgoing
call.

The rest of the fields are explained in 5.3, “3174 Customization” on page 161.
The Dial screen can be reset after an unsuccessful call by pressing the Reset
key after pressing the Clear key. Table 9 on page 176 relates the fields to the
customizing questions.

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

175

Table 9. Dial Screen Parameters
Field

Related Customization Question

HNAD

Question 423: Host DTE address

CID

Question 452: Connection Identifier

NPKT

Question 430: Negotiated Packet Size

NWND

Question 432: Negotiated Window Size

RPOA

Question 442: Recognized Private Operating Agency

CUG

Question 441: Closed User Group

TCLS

Question 440: Throughput Class Negotiation

DPKT

Question 434: Nonstandard Default Packet Size

DWND

Question 435: Nonstandard Default Window Size

OOPT

Question 421: Outgoing Call Options

IOPT

Question 420: Incoming Call Options

COPT

Question 453: Connection Options

5.5 Packet Types
The following briefly describes the X.25 packet types supported by the 3174.
Some of these packet types are used in the test scenarios.
•

Call Request (SVC)
Sent by the 3174 when an outgoing call is made using the dial operation or
when an autocall is performed for the first logical terminal powered on. The
packet contains the host DTE address and optional information, input during
customization, which matches your network subscription.

•

Incoming Call (SVC)
Received by the 3174 when the host is initiating a call. The packet contains
information which is validated against the call parameters you have
customized.

•

Call Accepted (SVC)
Sent by the 3174 after it has accepted an Incoming Call packet.

•

Call Connected (SVC)
Received by the 3174 as confirmation that the remote DTE has accepted the
3174′s Call Request packet. The SVC is now in data-ready state and SNA
protocols may begin.

•

Clear Request (SVC)
Sent by the 3174 when a disconnect is initiated by the operator using the
DISC key, by the network during normal circuit termination, when
autodisconnect is configured and the last logical terminal powers off, or
when certain errors are detected. Cause and diagnostic codes are included
(see 3174 Status Codes manual).

•

Clear Indication (SVC)
Received by the 3174 as a result of a normal clearing sequence, or as a
result of problems detected by the network or the remote DTE. The 3174

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3174 Installation Guide

responds with a Clear Confirmation packet and logs the cause and
diagnostic codes.
•

Clear Confirmation (SVC)
Sent by the 3174 to acknowledge receipt of a Clear Indication packet, or
received by the 3174 as an acknowledgement from the network to a Clear
Request it (the 3174) had sent.

•

Reset Request (PVC)
Sent by the 3174 when it detects certain X.25 errors. It logs cause and
diagnostic codes, and then attempts to reopen the circuit. The SNA layers
must be reactivated through a QSM (SNRM), ACTPU, ACTLU sequence.
The Reset Request is also sent by the 3174 when the LOCAL key is pressed.

•

Reset Indication (PVC|SVC)
Received by the 3174 when problems are detected by the network or by the
remote DTE. It logs cause and diagnostic codes, and then stops the circuit.
The SNA layers must be reactivated through a QSM (SNRM), ACTPU, ACTLU
sequence.

•

Reset Confirmation (PVC|SVC)
Sent by the 3174 to acknowledge receipt of a Reset Indication packet, or
received by the 3174 as an acknowledgement from the network to a Reset
Request it (the 3174) had sent.

•

Restart Request (PVC|SVC)
Sent by the 3174 when it is resetting the link after it has detected certain X.25
errors, or an open-link operation is performed. Open-link operations are
performed when:

•

−

The 3174 is IMLed.

−

Local mode has been entered and the COMM key is pressed.

−

The link has been closed because of an error condition. In this event,
the 3174 logs cause and diagnostic codes, and then immediately
attempts to re-open the link.

Restart Indication (PVC|SVC)
Received by the 3174 from the remote DTE requesting to initialize packet
level operation. The 3174 responds with a Restart Confirmation packet and
shuts the link down.

•

Restart Confirmation (PVC|SVC)
Sent by the 3174 to acknowledge receipt of a Restart Indication packet, or
received by the 3174 when link initialization has completed as a result of a
Restart Request.

•

Data (PVC|SVC)
Used to send and receive data once the circuit has been established.

•

Receive Not Ready (PVC|SVC)
When received by the 3174, it stops transmission until a Receive Ready
packet is received. The 3174 does not send a Receive Not ready packet.

•

Receive Ready (PVC|SVC)

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

177

Sent by the 3174 in response to any Data packet that is received unless an
outgoing Data packet is ready for transmission.
When received by the 3174, it indicates that the 3174 may continue
transmission.
•

Diagnostic (PVC|SVC)
Received by the 3174 when a reset, clear, or restart packet is not
appropriate. The 3174 logs the cause and diagnostic information but takes
no further action.

5.6 Test Scenarios
The 3174 was tested with different hosts (System/36, System/38, System 308x and
a System 3090) installed at ITSC Raleigh. Data flows from the different tests
made with the 3174 in an X.25 environment are presented. They can be used as
a guide to the normal control flows expected. Scenarios for System/38 are not
presented here because data obtained was exactly the same as for System/36.
The following IBM products were used:
•

3174 using microcode level Configuration Support-A Release 1.4

•

3174 using microcode level Configuration Support-B Release 3 for the
multi-host scenario

•

NPSI V1R4.3

•

NPSI V2R1 for the multi-host scenario

•

VTAM V3R1.1

•

VTAM V3.3 ESA for the multi-host test

•

NCP V4R2.0

•

X.25 Interconnection PRPQ V1.R1.0 (XI)

•

System/36* SSP Release 5

•

System/38* CPF Release 8

Using microcode level Configuration Support-C it would be obtained similar data
flows.

178

3174 Installation Guide

5.6.1 3174 as a PVC
Different scenarios were tested with the 3174 in a PVC environment. The
connections to a VTAM system and System 36/38 were tested; the results can be
observed in the following figures.

Access To A VTAM System
This test includes host access using a PSDN (Case A) and using XI instead of an
X.25 network (Case B).

Case A: X.25 Connection Through TYMNET

┌───────┬────┐
┌───────┐
│
│
│
│
│
│TSO
│
│
│
│
├───────┤ V │
┌──┬───┐ │
│
│
│ T │
│N │ N │ │
│ ┌──────┐
│
│ A │
│C │ P │ │ T │ │
│
┌──┐
│Other │ M │
│P │ S │ │ Y │ │3174 │
│3 │
│Appls │
├──────┤ │ I ├───┤ M ├───┤ML
├────┤1 │
│
│ V │
│V │ │ │ N │ │A1.4 │
│8 │
├───────┤ 3 │
│4 │ R │ │ E │ │
│
│0 │
│NETVIEW│
│
│ │4.2│ │ T │ └──────┘
└──┘
│
│
│
└──┴───┘ │
│
└───────┴────┘
│
│
│
│
└───────┘
SABM ──────
IML
. . .
Process
DISC ──────
. . .
SABM ──────
. . .
────── UA
────── Restart Request
Restart Confirm ──────
QSM ────────────────────
──────────────────── QUA
ACTPU ────────────────────
──────────────────── +RSP
. . .

Figure 58. Case A: X.25 Connection through TYMNET

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

179

Case B: X.25 Connection Using XI
The following scenario shows the configuration used for Case B. As it can be
seen, XI was used instead of the X.25 Network.

┌───────┬────┐
│
│
│
│TSO
│
│
├───────┤ V │
┌──┬───┬───┐
│
│ T │
│N │ N │ X │
┌──────┐
│
│ A │
│C │ P │ I │
│
│
┌──┐
│Other │ M │
│P │ S │ │
│3174 │
│3 │
│Appls │
├──────┤ │ I │ ├───────────────┤ML
├────┤1 │
│
│ V │
│V │ │ │
│A1.4 │
│8 │
├───────┤ 3 │
│4 │ R │ R │
│
│
│0 │
│NETVIEW│
│
│ │4.2│ 1 │
└──────┘
└──┘
│
│
│
└──┴───┴───┘
└───────┴────┘
Disc Mode ───────
IML
. . .
Process
────────── Flag
───────
────────── SABM
UA ──────────
────────── Restart Request
Restart Confirm. ──────────
Disc Mode

QSM ────────────────────────
─────────────────────── QUA
ACTPU ────────────────────────
─────────────────────── +RSP
. . .

Figure 59. Case B: X.25 Connection Using XI

180

3174 Installation Guide

Access to System/36
Again, two different scenarios were tested:
•

Case A: Accessing S/36 host using a PSDN.

•

Case B: Accessing S/36 host via XI.

Configurations for these tests and the resulting data flows are presented below.

Case A: Connecting through TYMNET

┌────────────┐
┌───────┐
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌──────┐
│
│
│ T │
│
│
┌──┐
│
│
│ Y │
│3174 │
│3 │
│ System/36 ├──────────────┤ M ├───────────┤ML
├────┤1 │
│
│
│ N │
│A1.4 │
│8 │
│
│
│ E │
│
│
│0 │
│
│
│ T │
└──────┘
└──┘
│
│
│
│
└────────────┘
│
│
│
│
└───────┘
DISC ──────
IML
. . .
Process
DISC ──────
────── FLAG
SABM ──────
────── UA
────── Restart Request
Restart Confirm ──────
QXID ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── QXID
QSM ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── QUA
ACTPU ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── +RSP
. . .

Figure 60. Case A: Connecting through TYMNET

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

181

Case B: Connecting through XI, Using XI as a DCE

┌────────────┐
┌───────┐
│
│
│ NCP V4│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ + │
│
│
│
│
┌──────┐
│
│
│XI R1.0│
│
│
┌──┐
│
│
│
│
│3174 │
│3 │
│ System/36 ├──────────────┤ + ├───────────┤ML
├────┤1 │
│
│
│
│
│A1.4 │
│8 │
│
│
│ NPSI │
│
│
│0 │
│
│
│ R4.3 │
└──────┘
└──┘
│
│
└───────┘
└────────────┘
DISC ──────
IML
. . .
Process
────── FLAG
DISC ──────
────── SABM
UA ──────
────── Restart Request
Restart Confirm ──────
QXID ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── QXID
QSM ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── QUA
ACTPU ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── +RSP
. . .

Figure 61. Case B: Connecting through XI, Using XI as a DCE

182

3174 Installation Guide

Access to Multi-Hosts
In this case, even though there was really only one host, the 3174 sees four
different hosts over different PVCs. SVCs could have been used instead for one
or any of the connections.
The 3725 used is simulating a PSDN by having STATION=DCE specified in the
X25.MCH macro of the NCP gen. VTAM and NCP see four different PUs
downstream.

Multi-Host Configuration, Using NPSI as a DCE

┌───────┬────┐
│
│
│─┐
│TSO
│
│ │─┐
├───────┤ V │ │ │─┐
│ .
│ T │ │ │ │
│ . │ A │ │ │ │
┌────┬────┐
│
. │ M ├──────────────┤ N │ N │
┌──────┐
│
│
│ ├────────────┤ C │ P │
│
│
┌──┐
│
│ V │ │ ├──────────┤ P │ S │
│3174 │
│3 │
├───────┤3.3 │ │ │ ├────────┤
│ I ├───────────┤ML
├────┤4 │
│NETVIEW│
│ │ │ │
│ V │
│
│B3.0 │
│7 │
│
│
│ │ │ │
│4.3 │ V │
│
│
│2 │
└───────┴────┘ │ │ │
│
│2.1 │
└──────┘
└──┘
└───────┴────┘ │ │
└────┴────┘
└───────┴────┘ │
└───────┴────┘
DISC ──────
IML
. . .
Process
────── FLAG
DISC ──────
────── SABM
UA ──────
────── Restart Request
Restart Confirm ──────
QXID ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── QXID
QSM ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── QUA
ACTPU ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── +RSP
. . .

Figure 62. Multi-Host Configuration, Using NPSI as a DCE

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

183

5.6.2 3174 as an SVC
The ability of the 3174 to work in a SVC was tested too; in one test the 3174
started the connection by making an outgoing call and in the other, the 3174
waited for the call which is initiated from the host. Connections to a VTAM
system and System 36/38 were tested again.

Access to a VTAM System
This test included host access using a PSDN (Case A) and using XI (Case B).
The incoming call and the outgoing call capability of the 3174 were tested.

Case A: Connecting through TYMNET (Outgoing Call)

┌───────┬────┐
┌───────┐
│TSO
│
│
│
│
├───────┤ V │
┌──┬───┐ │
│
│
│ T │
│N │ N │ │ T │ ┌──────┐
│
│ A │
│C │ P │ │ Y │ │
│
┌──┐
│Other │ M │
│P │ S │ │ M │ │3174 │
│3 │
│Appls │
├──────┤ │ I ├───┤ N ├───┤ML
├────┤1 │
│
│ V │
│V │ │ │ E │ │A1.4 │
│8 │
├───────┤ 3 │
│4 │ R │ │ T │ │
│
│0 │
│NETVIEW│
│
│ │4.2│ │
│ └──────┘
└──┘
│
│
│
└──┴───┘ │
│
└───────┴────┘
│
│
└───────┘
DISC ──────
IML
. . .
Process
DISC ──────
. . .
────── Flag
SABM ──────
────── UA
────── Restart Request
Restart Confirm ──────
───────────────────── Call Request
Call Accepted ─────────────────────
QXID ─────────────────────
───────────────────── QXID
(IDBLK=017, IDNUM=A0076)
QSM ──────────────────────
────────────────────── QUA
ACTPU ────────────────────────────────
──────────────────────────────── +RSP
NMVT ────────────────────────────────

Figure 63. Case A: Connecting through TYMNET (Outgoing Call)

184

3174 Installation Guide

Case B: Using XI (Incoming Call)

┌───────┬────┐
│
│
│
│TSO
│
│
├───────┤ V │
┌──┬───┬───┐
│
│ T │
│N │ N │ │
┌──────┐
│
│ A │
│C │ P │ │
│
│
┌──┐
│Other │ M ├──────┤P │ S │ X │
│3174 │
│3 │
│Appls │
│
│ │ I │ I ├───────────┤ML
├────┤1 │
│
│ V │
│V │ │ │
│A1.4 │
│8 │
├───────┤ 3 │
│4 │ R │ R │
│
│
│0 │
│NETVIEW│
│
│ │4.2│1.0│
└──────┘
└──┘
│
│
│
└──┴───┴───┘
└───────┴────┘
...
DISC ──────
...
DISC ──────
────── SABM
UA ──────
────── Restart Request
Restart Confirm ──────
Call Request ─────────────────────
───────────────────── Call Accepted
QXID ─────────────────────
───────────────────── QXID
(IDBLK=017, IDNUM=A0076)
QSM ─────────────────────
───────────────────── QUA
ACTPU ────────────────────────────────
─────────────────────────────── +RSP
NMVT ────────────────────────────────
. . .

Figure 64. Case B: Using XI (Incoming Call)

Chapter 5. X.25 Support

185

186

3174 Installation Guide

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ
With the support described in Chapter 4, “LAN Support” on page 69, the 3174
can act as a gateway (either local or remote) for other 3174s and workstations.
These other 3174s and workstations are DSPUs accessing the 3174 gateway via
a LAN.
With the support described in Chapter 5, “X.25 Support” on page 157, the 3174
can connect up to 16 host systems using Single Link Multi-Host (available with
Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later releases) via an X.25 network. In
this environment, the 3174 acts as a QLLC secondary station communicating with
the QLLC primary station at the host end (NPSI in 37xx Communication
Controller, or the integrated X.25 support in other hosts). The PU 2.0 function in
this QLLC secondary station serves the LUs that are locally attached to the 3174.
Hence, this PU is sometimes referred to as the Local PU .
One common requirement is to combine the functions provided by the
Token-Ring Network and X.25 support: a 3174 Token-Ring Gateway that connects
to the X.25 network, using X.25 Single Link Multi-Host, and allowing other 3174s
and workstations as DSPUs to access up to 16 host systems. The Request for
Price Quotation (RPQ) 8Q0743 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway is provided to meet this
requirement.
With the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ, the 3174 acts as a gateway to allow
other 3174s and workstations on the Token-Ring to access multiple hosts in the
X.25 network. The 3174 gateway can be connected to the X.25 hosts via the
same (one) X.25 network or up to three different X.25 networks. In this
environment, the 3174 still acts as a QLLC secondary station, with the exception
that it is also a gateway. Hence, it is referred to as a QLLC secondary gateway .
The X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ provides another important function: the 3174
can also act as a gateway to allow PU 2.0 devices in the X.25 network, such as
other 3174s and workstations, to access hosts on the Token-Ring. In this
environment, the 3174 acts as a QLLC primary station as well as being a
gateway to the hosts on the Token-Ring. Hence, it is referred to as a QLLC
primary gateway .
It should be noted that all the X.25 support functions can exist together in one
3174. In other words, a 3174 can be a local PU, a QLLC secondary gateway and
a QLLC primary gateway all at the same time and provide Single Link Multi-Host
access over the X.25 network.
Details of the capabilities provided by X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ will be
described in this chapter, which assumes you have prior knowledge of X.25
networking (see Chapter 5, “X.25 Support” on page 157). This chapter uses
material from the following publications:
•

X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ 8Q0743 Cover Letter , (provided with the RPQ
package)
−

P/N 71F9161 - Configuration Support B - Release 3

−

P/N 43G3268 - Configuration Support C - Release 3

•

3174 Planning Guide , for the appropriate release

•

3174 X.25 Operation .

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

187

6.1 Hardware/Software Requirements
This section details the hardware and software requirements for the 3174
gateway, other 3174s and workstations using the gateway, and host systems.

6.1.1 3174 Requirements
To use the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ, you need the following in the 3174
gateway:
•

Configuration Support-B Release 3 and later or Configuration Support-C
Release 2.1 and later Licensed Internal Code
The current release of the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ is based on
Configuration Support-C Release 3 1 offered as a “Control Disk RPQ,” which
means that the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ is packaged as a set of
Control and Utility diskettes, not to be merged with the Control and Utility
diskettes you are currently using.

•

At least 3MB of controller storage

•

Type 3A Dual Speed 16/4 Mbps Communication Adapter (the Token-Ring
Adapter card)

•

For Models 01L, 11L, 21L and 22L: Concurrent Communication Adapter(s) or
Alternate host attachment to allow connection X.25 network. In case of
Alternate host attachment, the 3174 must be customized as an x1R or x2R
model

Model 3174-x3Rs support the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ when an alternate
configuration is selected. The appropriate Alternate IML adapter must be
installed. For example, a 3174-13R must have a Type 1 Teleprocessing
Communication Adapter (feature #3040) with additional controller storage. Using
the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ microcode, you can now configure the
3174-13R as a 3174-11R X.25 Token-Ring Gateway.

6.1.2 Diskettes installation
The RPQ provides a set of five diskettes which replace the diskettes provided
when the standard Configuration Support-C is ordered. They are:
•

A CONTROL diskette

•

A UTILITY diskette

•

A CONTROL EXTENSION DSL diskette

•

An APPN DSL diskette

•

A PEER DSL diskette

Note:
Even if the APPN or the PEER are not configured it is mandatory that the APPN
and PEER DSL diskettes be merged with the CONTROL EXTENSION DSL diskette
at the time of the RPQ installation.

1

For CS-C Release 5, the planned date of availability of the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ is December 30, 1994.

188

3174 Installation Guide

6.1.3 3174 Models Supported
Table 10 shows the 3174 models supported by the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway
RPQ.
Table 10. 3174 Models Supported B y X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ
Attachment
Model

Primary Link

First CCA

01L

No(*)

Yes

Yes

01R

Yes

Yes

Yes

02R

Yes

Yes

Yes

11L

No(*)

Yes

Yes

12L

No(*)

Yes

Yes

11R

Yes

Yes

Yes

12R

Yes

Yes

Yes

21L

No(*)

Yes

Yes

21R

Yes

Yes

Yes

22L

No(*)

Yes

Yes

22R

Yes

Yes

Second CCA

Yes

41R

Yes

N/A

N/A

51R

Yes

No(**)

N/A

61R

Yes

Yes

No(**)

62R

Yes

Yes

No(**)

90R

Yes(***)

N/A

N/A

N/A =Model does not support this feature.
(*) =X.25 connection not possible on primary link of local models.
(**) =CCA card slot is used by the Token-Ring Adapter.
(***)=The number of simultaneous gateway connections cannot be more
than 40. In addition, it is limited by the largest window
size value and by the maximum of 0.5M storage available, on
this model, for the RPQ (see Table 11 on page 190).

6.1.4 3174 Controller Storage
3174 controller storage requirements depend on the number of simultaneous
connections and the largest window size to be used. The following questions
affect the largest window size:
•

Question 420: Incoming Call Options (digit 5=Negotiated Window Size
Facility)

•

Question 421: Outgoing Call Options (digit 5=Negotiated Window Size
Facility)

•

Question 431: Packet Sequence Numbering

•

Question 432: Negotiated Window Size (NWND) or PVC Window Size

•

Question 435: Nonstandard Default Window Size

The largest window size is determined as follows:

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

189

•

•

If question 420 digit 5=1, then the largest window size is given by your
response in question 432 as follows:
−

If question 431=0, then question 432=01 through 07 (modulo 8).

−

If question 431=1, then question 432=01 through 11 (modulo 128).

If question 420 digit 5=0, then the largest window size is given by your
response in question 435 as follows:
−

If question 431=0, then question 435=01 through 07 (modulo 8).

−

If question 431=1, then question 435=01 through 11 (modulo 128).

Table 11 shows the additional storage required for a given window size and
number of simultaneous connections. For example, if you specify a window size
of 6 (question 432 or 435) and you need 1 to 116 simultaneous connections, then
the minimum additional storage required is 1 MB.
Table 11. 3174 Additional Storage Required For X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ
Simultaneous Connections With Additional:

Largest
Window Size

0.5MB

1.0MB

1.5MB

2

1-54

55-178

179-200

3

1-48

49-158

159-200

4

1-43

44-141

142-200

5

1-39

40-128

129-200

6

1-35

36-116

117-197

198-200

7

1-33

34-108

109-183

184-200

8

1-30

31-99

100-168

169-200

9

1-28

29-92

93-156

157-200

10

1-26

27-86

87-146

147-200

11

1-25

26-82

83-139

140-196

2.0MB

6.2 Simultaneous Connections
The connections can share, on a contention basis, a pool of X.25 Switched
Virtual Circuits (SVC) and/or use a set of Permanent Virtual Circuit s (PVC).
The RPQ allows up to 200 simultaneous SVC and PVC connections between
token-ring and X.25 devices for a 3174 Controller. These connections can involve
1 to 200 X.25 unique destinations (Data Terminal Equipment numbers) and 1 to
200 token-ring attached devices. Each X.25 link (Primary and Secondary) has its
own pool of SVCs and its own set of PVCs.
Your 3174 Communication Adapter(s) configuration determines the number of
possible gateway connections:

190

•

When only the Primary Link is installed, its supports up to 200 gateway
connections

•

When the Primary and one or two Secondary Link(s) are installed, it supports
a total of 200 gateway connections with a maximum of 20 on each
Secondary.

3174 Installation Guide

For example, assume all three links are installed and the secondary are
configured for 20 SVCs each. In this case, the secondary pools each have 20
SVCs and the primary pool can only have a maximum of 160 SVCs.
Your X.25 network subscription must allow for the maximum number of
connections required.

6.3 Bridge Protocol Considerations
The 3174 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway function appears as a bridge to the
token-ring devices.
The token-ring attached products must be able to generate all-routes broadcast
messages. Consequently, these token-ring attached products must support the
bridge protocol.

6.4 Token-Ring PU 2.0 Devices
The PU 2.0 devices that can be attached to a Token-Ring to use a 3174 X.25
Token-Ring Gateway are:
•

3174 Models x3R

•

3174-Peer Device

•

PS/2 or PC using IBM OS/2 Extended Edition V1.1 or later

•

PS/2 or PC using IBM Communications Manager/2

•

PS/2, PC or 3270-PC using 3270 Workstation Program V1.1 (with maintenance
release 1.1.2 or later)

•

PS/2 or PC using APPC/PC (as a PU 2.0 node)

•

Personal Communications/3270 V1.01 or later

•

Any device supporting:
−

PU 2.0

−

IEEE 802.2 Logical Link Control Sub-Layer

−

Bridge connectivity

A token-ring attached device that needs simultaneous connections with more
than one host through a given gateway must support multiple Data Link Control
(DLC) connections with the gateway. This means that the token-ring attached
device must implement multiple PU images within the device.

6.5 Token-Ring Hosts
The hosts that can be attached to a token ring to use a 3174 X.25 Token-Ring
Gateway are:
•

AS/400 or 9370, via direct attachment to the token ring

•

S/370 or S/390, via a 37xx NCP/NTRI attachment

•

S/370 or S/390, via a 3174 local or remote Token-Ring Gateway

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

191

6.6 X.25 PU 2.0 Devices
The PU 2.0 devices that can be attached to an X.25 network are:
•

3174 Establishment Controller

•

PS/2

•

Programmable Network Access (PNA)

•

Devices supporting QLLC Secondary

6.7 X.25 Hosts
The hosts that can be attached to an X.25 network via a 37xx Communication
Controller and NPSI are:
•

308x

•

3090

•

4361

•

4381

•

9370

•

9x21

Note:
Both SVC and PVC connections are supported via NCP/NPSI but the PVC
connections need to have the APARs reference IR23851 and IR24784 installed in
NPSI.
Also, the following IBM hosts provide integrated X.25 connections (that is without
a 37xx Communication Controller), and can be accessed from the token-ring PUs
attached to the 3174 but through SVC connections only.
•

S/36

•

S/38

•

AS/400

The token-ring devices will use the 3174 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway to
communicate through the X.25 network with these hosts.

6.8 Host Link Protocols
Using an X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ on one of the 3174 links does not affect
the attachment types used on other links; for example, it is possible to configure
a 3174 so that a user of a locally attached terminal switches from a session with
an X.25 host to a session with an SDLC host or an APPN host.
Except for the following list of host link protocol considerations, there are no
restrictions on the protocol used on either the Primary Host of the Primary Link
(1A) or the Primary Host of the Secondary Link(s) (2A,3A).

192

•

The Primary Link (1A, 1B-1H) protocol must be SNA when any Secondary
Link is configured with the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ.

•

The Primary link can be customized or not for APPN:

3174 Installation Guide

−

If customized for APPN, the following attachments are supported:
- Local Channel
- SDLC

−

If not customized for APPN, the following attachments are supported:
- Local Channel
- SDLC
- X.21 or X.25

•

The Primary Link does not necessarily have to be configured with the X.25
Token-Ring Gateway RPQ.
Note: The Primary Link cannot be customized for the X.25 Token-Ring
Gateway RPQ if it is customized for APPN or for the ISDN Gateway. In this
case, the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ will have to be customized on a
Secondary Link.

•

Token-ring related alerts are reported on the PU owning the Token-Ring
Adapter (Primary Link).

•

The X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ can coexist in a controller with
Secondary Link(s) configured for a non-SNA protocol. In this configuration,
only the 3174 locally attached terminals can access the Secondary Link(s)
non-SNA hosts.

6.9 X.25 Network Type Supported
The X.25 networks that can be attached to a 3174 with X.25 Token-Ring Gateway
RPQ are the same as those supported by 3174 Configuration Support-B Release
3 and later releases (see the description of question 400: Network Type). Note
that, with this release, Single Link Multi-Host via the X.25 connection is
supported.

6.10 Functional Description
With the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ, the 3174 can act as a:
•

QLLC secondary gateway

•

QLLC primary gateway

•

QLLC combined gateway

These new capabilities are additional to its role as a QLLC secondary station,
providing PU support to locally attached LUs (the local PU function). All the X.25
support functions can exist together in one 3174. In other words, a 3174 can be a
local PU, a QLLC secondary gateway and a QLLC primary gateway all at the
same time and provide Single Link Multi-Host access over the X.25 network.

6.10.1 QLLC Secondary Gateway
Figure 65 on page 194 represents a schematic diagram of a QLLC Secondary
configuration.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

193

┌─────┐
┌─────┐
┌─────┐
┌─────┐
┌─────┐
┌─────┐
│Hosts│
│Other│
│Hosts│
│Other│
│Hosts│
│Other│
│1A-1H│
│Hosts│
│2A-2D│
│Hosts│
│3A-3D│
│Hosts│
└──┬──┘
└──┬──┘
└──┬──┘
└──┬──┘
└──┬──┘
└──┬──┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
******************
******************
******************
* X.25 Network *
* X.25 Network *
* X.25 Network *
******************
******************
******************
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌─┬────┴────┬───────────┬────────┐
│
│
│ │Type 1 or│
│ CCA-1 │
│
│
│ │Type 2 CA│
│........├─────┘
│
│ └─────────┘.......... │QLLC Sec│
│
│
.QLLC Sec. ├────────┤
│
│
.......... │ CCA-2 │
│
├───────────┐ ┌───┐
│........├─────────────────────────┘
│TRN Adapter│ │LOC│
│QLLC Sec│
└─────┬─────┴─┴─┬─┴──┬─┬┴────────┘
│
│
│ │
│
│
│ │
┌─────┴─────┐ │
│ │
│Token-Ring │ │
│ │
└┬────┬────┬┘ │
│ └──┐
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌┴┐ ┌┴┐ ┌┴┐ ┌┴┐ ┌┴┐ ┌┴┐
│ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │
└─┘ └─┘ └─┘ └─┘ └─┘ └─┘
PU 2.0 Devices Peer Terminals
Dev
Figure 65. 3174 Token-Ring Gateway (QLLC Secondary) to X.25
•

•

Terminals can communicate with:
−

Hosts 1A to 1H via the primary link

−

Hosts 2A to 2D via the CCA-1 link

−

Hosts 3A to 3D via the CCA-2 link

PU 2.0 devices on TRN or PU 2.0 Peer devices can communicate with any
host on X.25 network

Figure 66 on page 195 shows a typical configuration.

194

3174 Installation Guide

Figure 66. 3174 QLLC Secondary Gateway: Physical Configuration

In this example, the PS/2 is a PU 2.0 device coax attached to the 3174-13R with
Peer Communication active. The 3174-11R acts as a QLLC secondary gateway to
allow the PS/2 (or any PU 2.0 attached to the Token-Ring) to access the 9370,
3090 or AS/400 hosts on the X.25 network. The display attached to the 3174-11R
gateway is also able to access any host attached to the primary or secondary
links.
Figure 67 on page 196 shows the logical view of this configuration.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

195

Figure 67. 3174 QLLC Secondary Gateway: Logical View

From a logical viewpoint, the 3174-11R gateway provides a bridge between the
devices on the real token ring and the host attached to the “virtual ring,” which
is really the X.25 network. The token-ring devices are seen by the host as PU 2.0
devices attached through the 3174-11R gateway. Depending on the “front-end”
attached to the host, these PU 2.0 devices may be defined as local SNA major
nodes (in the case of a 3174 “front-end”) or as switched major nodes (in the
case of a 3745/NPSI “front-end”).

196

3174 Installation Guide

6.10.2 QLLC Primary Gateway
Figure 68 represents a schematic diagram of a QLLC Primary configuration. The
QLLC Primary function of the 3174 (2) allows the following possible connections:
•

•

Terminals can communicate with:
−

Hosts 1A to 1H via the primary link

−

Hosts 2A to 2D via the CCA-1 link

−

Hosts 3A to 3D via the CCA-2 link

PU 2.0 devices on the X.25 network can communicate with any host on
token-ring network.

┌─────┐PU 2.0 Devices
┌─────┐
PU 2.0
┌─────┐
PU 2.0
│Hosts│ ┌─┐ ┌─┐ ┌─┐
│Hosts│
┌─┐
│Hosts│
┌─┐
│1A-1H│ │ │ │ │ │ │
│2A-2D│
│ │
│3A-3D│
│ │
└──┬──┘ └┬┘ └┬┘ └┬┘
└──┬──┘
└┬┘
└──┬──┘
└┬┘
│
│ │ │
│
│
│
│
│
│ │ │
│
│
│
│
*******************
******************
******************
* X.25 Network *
* X.25 Network *
* X.25 Network *
*******************
******************
******************
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌─┬────┴────┬───────────┬────────┐
│
│
│ │Type 1 or│
│ CCA-1 │
│
│
│ │Type 2 CA│
│........├─────┘
│
│ └─────────┘.......... │QLLC Pri│
│
│
.QLLC Pri. ├────────┤
│
│
.......... │ CCA-2 │
│
├───────────┐
│........├─────────────────────────┘
│TRN Adapter│
│QLLC Pri│
└─────┬─────┴───┬────┬──┴────────┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌─────┴─────┐ │
│
│Token-Ring │ │
│
└─────┬─────┘ │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌───┴───┐
┌┴┐ ┌┴┐
│3174 or│
│ │ │ │
│NCP
│
└─┘ └─┘
└───┬───┘ Terminals
│
│
┌──┴──┐
│Host │
└─────┘
Figure 68. 3174 QLLC Primary Connecting to Token-Ring Hosts

Figure 69 on page 198 shows a typical configuration.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

197

Figure 69. 3174 QLLC Primary Gateway: Physical Configuration

In this example, one 3174-11R is a PU 2.0 device attached to the the X.25
network. The other 3174-11R, attached to the token ring, acts as a QLLC primary
gateway to allow the 3174-11R PU 2.0 device (or any PU 2.0 device attached to
the X.25 network) to access the 9370, 3090 or AS/400 hosts on the Token-Ring.
The display attached to the 3174-11R gateway is also able to access any host
attached to the primary link.
Figure 70 on page 199 shows the logical view of this configuration.

198

3174 Installation Guide

Figure 70. 3174 QLLC Primary Gateway: Logical View

From a logical viewpoint, the 3174-11R gateway provides a bridge between the
hosts on the real token ring and the PU 2.0 devices attached to the “virtual ring,”
which is really the X.25 network. The X.25 devices are seen by the host as PU 2.0
DSPUs attached through the 3174-11R gateway.

6.10.3 QLLC Combined Gateway
Figure 71 on page 200 represents a possible combination of the QLLC Gateway
functions.
•

•

Terminals attached to 3174-A can communicate with:
−

Hosts 1A to 1H via the primary link

−

Hosts 2A to 2D via CCA

PU 2.0 devices on TRN-1 and PU 2.0 Peer devices on the 3174-A can
communicate with:
−

Any host attached to X.25 Network-1 via QLLCS-2

−

Any host attached to X.25 Network-2 via QLLCS-3

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

199

−
•

Terminals attached to 3174-B can communicate with:
−

•

Hosts 1A to 1H via the primary link

PU 2.0 devices on TRN-2 and PU 2.0 Peer devices on the 3174-B can
communicate with:
−

•

Any host attached to TRN-2 via QLLCS-3 and QLLCP-1

Any host attached to X.25 Network-2 via QLLCS-1

Host on TRN-2 can communicate with:
−

Any PU 2.0 device on TRN-1 via QLLCP-1 and QLLCS-3

−

Any PU 2.0 device on X.25 Network-2 via QLLCP-1

┌─────┐
┌─────┐
┌─────┐
┌─────┐ PU 2.0 Devices
│Hosts│
│Other│
│Hosts│
│Other│
┌─┐ ┌─┐ ┌─┐
│1A-1H│
│Hosts│
│1A-1H│
│Hosts│
│ │ │ │ │ │
└──┬──┘
└──┬──┘
└──┬──┘
└──┬──┘
└┬┘ └┬┘ └┬┘
│
│
│
│
│ │ │
│
│
│
│
│ │ │
********************
***********************************
* X.25 Network-1 *
*
X.25 Network-2
*
********************
***********************************
│
│
│
3174-A │
│
│
3174-B
┌───────┴─┬─────────┬───────┐
│
┌────┴────┬─────────────────┐
│Type 1 or│
│ CCA │
│
│Type 1 or│
│
│Type 2 CA│
│
├─────┘
│Type 2 CA│
│
├─────────┘
│
│
├─────────┘
│
│..........
│.......│
│.........
........│
│ QLLCS-2 .
│QLLCS-3│
│QLLCP-1 .
.QLLCS-1│
│..........
└───────┤
│.........
........│
├───────────┐
│
├───────────┐
│
│TRN Adapter│
│
│TRN Adapter│
│
└─────┬─────┴─────────┬────┬┘
└─────┬─────┴─────────┬────┬┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌─────┴──────┐
│
│
┌─────┴──────┐
│
│
│Token-Ring-1│
│
│
│Token-Ring-2│
│
│
└┬────┬────┬─┘
│
│
└───┬────────┘
┌┴┐ ┌┴┐
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ │ │ │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
└─┘ └─┘
┌┴┐ ┌┴┐ ┌┴┐
┌┴┐ ┌┴┐
┌───┴───┐ │
Terminals
│ │ │ │ │ │
│ │ │ │
│3174 or│ │
└─┘ └─┘ └─┘
└─┘ └─┘
│NCP
│ ┌┴┐
PU 2.0 Devices
Terminals
└───┬───┘ │ │
│
└─┘
│
PU 2.0 Device
┌──┴──┐
│Host │
└─────┘
Figure 71. 3174 Combined QLLC Gateway

200

3174 Installation Guide

6.11 Identifying Connecting Devices
Before you install and customize a 3174 gateway, you should take an overall
view of the token-ring and X.25 devices you are trying to connect.
Using the configuration shown in Figure 72 as an example, you wish to connect
device A on Token Ring 1 with host B via NPSI, and host C via Token Ring 2.
Device A cannot directly address either of these hosts because of the X.25
network.
By installing the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ in 3174 GW-1 and GW-2, these
3174s will perform a bridging function between device A and host B, and device
A and host C.
Note that device D can either be a 37xx Communication Controller with NTRI
(NCP Token-Ring Interconnection) or another 3174. If another 3174 is used, you
do not install the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ is this 3174.
Figure 72 shows the physical connection desired.

Device A is connected so as to access host B and host C through the
Token-Rings and X.25 network.
QLLC
QLLC
Secondary
Primary
Station
Stations
───┬────
───┬────
│

┌────┐
│
┌────┐ │Host│
┌───────┐
│
********
│NPSI├───┤ B │
│
│

*
*───┤
│ └────┘
┌─┐ │ Token │ ┌────┐ * X.25 * └────┘ ┌───────┐
│A├──┤ -Ring ├──┤3174├───* Network* ┌────┐ │
│ ┌────┐ ┌────┐
└─┘ │ 1 │ │GW-1│ *
*───┤3174│ │ Token │ │NTRI│ │Host│
│
│ └────┘
********
│GW-2├──┤ -Ring ├─┤ or ├──┤ C │
└───────┘
└────┘ │ 2 │ │3174│ └────┘
│
│ └────┘
└───────┘ D

Figure 72. Physical Connection

From a logical viewpoint, however, the device A and hosts B and C see each
other as shown in Figure 73 on page 202.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

201

Logical View From Host B
Host B sees device A as if it were connected through an X.25 network.
┌────┐
┌────┐ │Host│
********
│NPSI├───┤ B │
*
*───┤
│ └────┘
┌─┐
* X.25 * └────┘
│A├──────────────────────* Network*
└─┘
*
*
********
Logical View From Host C
Host C sees device A as if it were connected through bridged
Token-Rings.
Logical View From Device A
Device A also sees hosts B and C as if they were connected through
bridged Token-Rings.
┌────┐
┌───────┐
********
│Host│
│
│
*
*───┤ B │
┌─┐ │ Token │ ┌────┐ * Virtual* └────┘ ┌───────┐
│A├──┤ Ring ├──┤
├───* Ring * ┌────┐ │
│ ┌────┐ ┌────┐
└─┘ │ 1 │ │
│ *
*───┤
│ │ Token │ │NTRI│ │Host│
│
│ └────┘
********
│
├──┤ Ring ├─┤ or ├──┤ C │
└───────┘ Bridge
└────┘ │ 2 │ │3174│ └────┘
Bridge │
│ └────┘
└───────┘ D

Figure 73. Logical Views

To identify the connecting devices (in this case, devices include host and PU 2.0
devices), Device A, host B and host C are each assigned a token-ring address
when customizing the 3174 gateways (Device A and host B addresses in GW-1,
and host C address in GW-2). Host B does not have a real token-ring address
since it is not attached to a real token ring. However, it will still be assigned an
address using the token-ring address format (a “virtual” token-ring address)
which will be used by device A when it wishes to communicate with host B.
During call establishment, the Call Request packet contains a Call User Data
(CUD) field. The CUD, in turn, contains an eight-byte Connection Identifier (CID)
which is used to identify the two ends of the connection.
We need a way, however, to specify the six-byte (12-hexadecimal digit)
source/origin and destination token-ring addresses in the CID. This is done by
allocating a two-byte field for a source short identifier (SID) and another two-byte
field for a destination SID in the CID. The SIDs are then related to Token-Ring
addresses via entries in the 3174 gateway customization panels. Using these
entries, the 3174 gateways are able to map the Token-Ring addresses to SIDs,
and vice versa. Thus, the 3174 gateway transforms source and destination
Token-Ring addresses into source and destination SIDs, places them in the Call
Request packet CID and sends the packet through the X.25 network.

202

3174 Installation Guide

6.12 Connection Identifier
In an X.25 Call Request packet, shown in Figure 74, is a 12-byte field known as
the Call User Data (CUD).

Octet 0
1

2

3-n

n+1
:
:
:
m

Bit
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
┌──────────────────────┬────────────────────┐
│
General Format
│ Logical Channel
│
│
Identifier
│
Group Number
│
├──────────────────────┴────────────────────┤
│
Logical Channel Number
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Packet Type Identifier
│
│
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
│ Call Request
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Address Block:
│
│
Calling DTE Address Length
│
│
Called DTE Address Length
│
│
Calling DTE Address
│
│
Called DTE Address
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Facility Length
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Facilities
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Call User Data
│
└───────────────────────────────────────────┘

Figure 74. Call Request Packet

The CUD field is made up of several sub-fields, as shown in Figure 75. Note that
the last eight bytes are used for the Connection Identifier (CID).

Octet 0

1

2

3
4
5
6-7
8-9
10-11

Notes:

Bit
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
┌───────────────────────────────────────────┐
│
Protocol Identifier
│
│
1
1
r
r
DCI
0
1
1
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Field Format Identifier
│
│
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Reserved
│
│
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Reserved
│
│
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
X.25 Gateway Identifier
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
QLLC Identifier
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Destination SID
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Origin SID
│
├───────────────────────────────────────────┤
│
Not Used
│
└───────────────────────────────────────────┘

DCI
DCI
r =
Not

─────────
│
│
Connection
Identifier
│
│
│

─────────

= 0 for standard diagnostic codes
= 1 for SNA-specific diagnostic codes
reserved and set to 0
Used = set to blanks (X′ 4 0 ′ )

Figure 75. Call User Data

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

203

The figure shows the values that can be contained in each field of the
Connection Identifier (CID):

──────── CALL USER DATA ─────────
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
─────── CID ─────────
Cn 01 00 00 xx xx xx xx xx xx 40 40
│ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │
│ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ └──┘
│ │ ├──┘ │ │ │ │ │ │ Not used (2 bytes)
│ │ │
│ │ │ │ │ │
│ │ │
│ │ │ │ └──┘
│ │ │
│ │ │ │ Origin SID (2 bytes)
│ │ │
│ │ │ │
│ │ │
│ │ └──┘
│ │ │
│ │ Destination SID (2 bytes)
│ │ │
│ │
│ │ │
│ │
│ │ │
│ └── QLLC ID: F4 = QLLC Secondary Gateway
│ │ │
│
F8 = QLLC Primary Gateway
│ │ │
│
Other = reserved
│ │ │
│
│ │ │
│
│ │ │
└───── Gateway ID: C5 = 3174 X.25 Gateway
│ │ │
Alphanumeric = 3174 Local PU
│ │ │
Other = reserved
│ │ │
│ │ └─────────── 2 bytes (reserved)
│ │
│ │
│ └────────────── Field Format ID: 01 = CID present
│
│
└───────────────── Protocol ID: C3 = QLLC with 00 diagnostic codes
CB = QLLC with 80 diagnostic codes

Figure 76. Call User Data Contents

The meaning of the various fields are explained below:
•

Protocol Identifier
The Protocol Identifier (PI) is used by IBM SNA X.25 DTEs to distinguish
between SNA-to-SNA connections and SNA-to-non-SNA connections, as well
as the selection of the LLC procedure to be used for the SNA-to-SNA
connections.
The Diagnostic Code Indicator (DCI) is the only bit that can change:

•

−

If the 3174 initiates a call, the DCI bit is set according to your response in
question 400: Network Type digit 4 (SNA or ISO diagnostic codes) and
question 453: Connection Options digit 2 (diagnostic code type).
Depending on the DCI setting, the Protocol Identifier may either be X′C3′
or X′CB′. The default is X′C3′.

−

If NPSI initiates a call, the CUD0 and CTCP keywords will set the PI.

Field Format Identifier
The Field Format Identifier (FFI), when present, defines the format of the rest
of the CUD field. With current products, the FFI can either be X′00′ or X′01′:
−

204

3174 Installation Guide

If FFI=00, then the CID is not present and an incoming call is routed to
the local PU function within the 3174.

−

•

If FFI=01, then the call is routed to either the QLLC primary gateway or
the QLLC secondary gateway function within the 3174, depending on the
QLLC ID value.

X.25 Gateway Identifier
The following values select the function within the 3174 gateway:

•

−

X′C5′ (character E)=3174 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway

−

Any other alphanumeric character=3174 local PU

−

Any other characters are reserved

QLLC ID
The following values select the QLLC protocol to be used by the 3174
gateway:

•

−

X′F4′ (character 4)=QLLC secondary protocols

−

X′F8′ (character 8)=QLLC primary protocols

−

Any other characters are reserved

Destination SID
Is a two-byte field that maps to a destination Token-Ring address via
customization in the 3174 gateway.

•

Origin SID
Is a two-byte field that maps to an origin Token-Ring address via
customization in the 3174 gateway.

•

Not Used
Is a two-byte field that is not used and set to X′40′ (blanks).

In customizing the 3174 gateway, the eight characters in question 452 are used
to specify the CID as described below:
•

First character=X.25 Gateway Identifier

•

Second character=QLLC ID

•

Third and fourth characters=Destination SID

•

Fifth and sixth characters=Source/Origin SID

•

Seventh and eighth characters=blanks

6.13 Types of Connections
X.25 charges are usually based on connection time, traffic volume (number of
packets) and the number of call attempts. To assist in controlling these charges
and manage the SVCs you have subscribed to for your X.25 Token-Ring Gateway
environment, the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ offers three types of connection:
•

Default Connection

•

Demand Connection

•

Open Connection

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

205

6.13.1 Default Connection
This type of connection is desirable for relatively permanent connections, such
as between a 3174-x3R on a token ring to a host on the X.25 network, or for
devices not capable of initiating or re-establishing a connection, such as
printers. The connection is automatically established or re-established
whenever appropriate, for example, when the 3174-x3R completes IML.
The 3174 reserves one SVC for each Default Connection. For Default
Connections, the Token-Ring device, the X.25 device and connection between
them must all be explicitly defined to the 3174 during customization. To allow
control over the SVC, you can specify the retry count, retry delay and inactivity
timer values in question 943.
•

Inactivity timer
You can specify the time limit after which, if no activity occurs on the
connection, the SVC will be cleared. This option prevents unnecessary X.25
charges. Note that the token ring link is kept active. The 3174 gateway will
reactivate the SVC (disruptively) when the user attempts to use the
Token-Ring device.

•

Automatic bring-up (retries)
Whenever the 3174 gateway link to the X.25 network is established or reset,
the 3174 gateway tries to start each Default Connection. If a connection
cannot be started, either because the Token-Ring device is not active or the
X.25 call fails, the 3174 gateway may retry the connection.
If the call fails because of one of the following reasons, the call will be
retried:
−

The number is busy.

−

The network is congested.

−

The remote DTE is not available.

Other call failures indicate errors that cannot be recovered without user
intervention; therefore, the call will not be retried.
The 3174 gateway will retry the connection according to the customized retry
options. You can specify:
−

No retries

−

A specific number of retries with specified time frequency

−

Infinite retries with specified time frequency

For each retry, the 3174 gateway ensures the token-ring device is available
before placing the X.25 call.

6.13.2 Demand Connection
This type of connection is desirable for operator-driven connections, such as
from a PC, or those of relatively short duration, such as for file transfer or
database inquiry/update. Demand connections share the remaining SVCs in the
pool which are not used for Default Connections.
There are really two types of Demand Connections:
•

206

3174 Installation Guide

Demand Connection is the term used to refer to a “secured” connection on
demand.

•

Open Connection is the term used to refer to an “unsecured” connection on
demand (described in the next section).

For Demand Connections (that is, secured demand connections) all X.25 and
Token-Ring devices must be explicitly defined to the 3174 gateway. This allows
you to specifically define which of your users can gain access to the X.25
network.

6.13.3 Open Connection
An Open Connection is a Demand Connection with one of the devices in a
possible connection, either the X.25 device or the Token-Ring device, not defined
in the 3174 gateway. An X.25 device or a token-ring device may be defined for
Open Connection:
•

If an X.25 device is defined for Open Connection, any undefined Token-Ring
device may connect to it on demand.

•

If a Token-Ring device is defined for Open Connection, any undefined X.25
device may connect to it on demand.

Using Open Connections minimizes the amount of information you must provide
when customizing the 3174 gateway. It also allows you to add devices to your
network without having to re-customize the 3174 gateway.
Security is maintained, in this case, by host security functions. There could be a
small overhead in X.25 costs caused by users trying to access hosts without
authority.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

207

6.14 3174 Customization
This section describes the questions and responses required to customize the
3174 gateway, using the Utility and Control diskettes supplied with the RPQ.

6.14.1 Configure Panel Flow
┌──────────────────────────────────┐
┌────────────┐
│ Multi-Host Definition
│
│Model/Attach│ 101=M
│ 1A
Primary Host
│
│ 101=?
├────────────│ 2A
CCA-1 Host
│
└────┬───────┘
│ 3A
CCA-2 Host
│
│ 101=1-7
│ 1B-1H Secondary Hosts
│
│
│ 2B-2D Secondary Hosts, CCA-1 │
│
│ 3B-3D Secondary Hosts, CCA-2 │
│ ┌──────────────────┤ Select===> ___
│
│ │
Select 1A
└─┬──────────────┬──────────────┬──┘
 
 2A,3A
 1B-1H
 2B-2D, 3B-3D
┌────────────┐
┌────────────┐ ┌────────────┐ ┌────────────┐
│ Host panel │
│ Host panel │ │ Host panel │ │ Host panel │
│ 150=2
│
│ 150=2
│ │ 150=2
│ │ 150=2
│
└─────┬──────┘
└──────┬─────┘ └──────┬─────┘ └──────┬─────┘


│
│
┌────────────┐
┌────────────┐
│
│
│See X.25 TRN│
│See X.25 TRN│
│
│
│ GW panels │
│ GW panels │
│
│
└─────┬──────┘
└──────┬─────┘
│
│

│
│
│
┌────────────┐
│
│
│
│ Common SNA │
│
│
│
│ panel
│
│
│
│
└─────┬──────┘
│
│
│




┌────────────┐
┌────────────┐ ┌────────────┐ ┌────────────┐
│ Port Assign│
│ Port Assign│ │ Port Assign│ │ Port Assign│
│ panel
│
│ panel
│ │ panel
│ │ panel
│
└─────┬──────┘
└──────┬─────┘ └──────┬─────┘ └──────┬─────┘




┌────────────┐
┌────────────┐ ┌────────────┐ ┌────────────┐
│
RTM
│
│
RTM
│ │
RTM
│ │
RTM
│
│ panel
│
│ panel
│ │ panel
│ │ panel
│
└─────┬──────┘
└──────┬─────┘ └──────┬─────┘ └──────┬─────┘




┌────────────┐
┌────────────┐ ┌────────────┐ ┌────────────┐
│X.25 Options│
│X.25 Options│ │X.25 Options│ │X.25 Options│
│ panel
│
│ panel
│ │ panel
│ │ panel
│
└─────┬──────┘
└──────┬─────┘ └──────┬─────┘ └──────┬─────┘

│

│
┌────────────┐
│
┌────────────┐
│
│ Configure │
└───────│ Configure │────────┘
│ Complete │
│ Complete │
└─────┬──────┘
└─────┬──────┘


Return to
Return to Multi-Host
Customize Control
Definition
Disk Menu

208

3174 Installation Guide

6.14.2 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway Panel Flow
To access the X.25 TRN Gateway panels:
│
* Host Attachment=3 (X.25) on PRI or SEC link
│
* Question 150=2

┌────────────┐
Token-Ring Gateway
│ 900 TRN GW │
900=Token-Ring Address (3174)
│
│
905=Ring Error Monitor
└─────┬──────┘
908=Link Subsystem Name
│
911=Ring Speed

┌────────────┐
TRN Devices Address Assignment
│942 TRN Addr│
SID
│ Assignment │
Ring Address
└─────┬──────┘
SAP
│
I-Frame size
│
Window size

┌────────────┐
X.25 Devices Address Assignment
│943 X.25 Add│
Destination X.25 SID
│ Assignment │
Destination X.25 Ring Address
└─────┬──────┘
Host ID
│
DTE Number
│
Retry Count
│
Retry Delay
│
Inactivity Timeout

┌────────────┐
X.25 Gateway Default/Open Connections
│944 X.25 Def│
TRN Devices SID
│ /Open Conn │
X.25 Devices SID
└─────┬──────┘
X.25 Gateway Protocol

┌────────────┐
X.25 Gateway Bridge Information
│945 X.25 GW │
946=Bridge Number
│Bridge Info │
947=Token-Ring Segment Number
└─────┬──────┘
948=3174-X.25 Segment Number
│
949=TRN Address for Internal Use


Question 101: Host Attachment
When customizing for 3174 gateway functions, the response to this question must
be 3 (for X.25 attachment).

Question 150: X.25 Token-Ring Network Gateway Controller
There are only two valid responses for this question:
•

0=This 3174 does not act as a gateway to the host.

•

2=This 3174 does act as an X.25 Token-Ring Gateway.

Note that 1 is not a valid response.
When customizing for 3174 gateway functions, the response must be 2.

Question 215: Physical Unit Identification
This is required for all switched connections, including the X.25 connection. It
should match the IDNUM in the switched major node definition for the 3174
gateway.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

209

Question 401: Circuit Type
Specify one of the responses for an SVC; that is, either 2, 3, or 4.

Question 423: Host DTE address (HNAD)
This is the host DTE address. Your X.25 administrator will give you this number.
This number can be changed on the Dial screen HNAD field.
If you are using two 3174s separated by an X.25 network, then question 423 will
contain the other 3174′s DTE address.

Question 424: 3174 DTE address
This is the 3174 DTE address. Your X.25 administrator will give you this number.
If you are using two 3174s separated by an X.25 network, then question 424 will
contain the DTE address of the 3174 you are customizing.

Question 467: X.25 Options for Primary Host on any Link
Response:
xxxx = value from 001 to 200 (use leading zeros).
The Default response is 0000.
Your response determines the number of SVCs dedicated to the gateway. This
number must be within the range of the maximum number of SVCs which have
been subscribed for the link.
If several gateways (X.25, Remote, Local) are configured in the same 3174, the
total number of physical gateway connections allowed by the token-ring adapter
remains limited to 250.

Question 900: TRN Address for the Gateway
Find out from your LAN administrator what unique locally administered address
should be given to the 3174 you are customizing. (You cannot use a universally
administered address.) It should be in the following format:
4000cddddddd ss
Where 4000 is the fixed part of the address
c
must not be greater than X′7′
d
can be any value from X′0′ to X′F′
ss is the SAP address and defaults to X′04′
Note the following differences in the use of this Token-Ring address:
•

When the 3174 is acting as a local or remote Token-Ring Gateway, this
address is used as the destination for the DSPUs on the token-ring.

•

When the 3174 is acting as an X.25 Token-Ring Gateway, this address is no
longer the destination for the DSPUs on the token-ring. The 3174 gateway
now performs as a bridge between the Token-Ring DSPUs and the X.25
hosts. Therefore, the destination for the DSPUs on the Token-Ring is the ring
address assigned to the X.25 hosts via question 943.

If you are customizing the 3174 as a multiple gateway, then the LAA address is
the same; only the SAPs are different.

210

3174 Installation Guide

Question 942: Token-Ring Devices Address Assignment
Question 942 allows you to relate the address of a Token-Ring device to a short
ID (SID). When the 3174 gateway receives a call for a device on the token-ring, it
uses the destination SID contained in the Call Request packet CID field to map to
the Token-Ring address of the device.
For Open Connections from Token-Ring devices, you need not enter their
addresses in this panel.



SID
00
02
04
06
08
0A
0C
0E
10
12
14
16
18
1A
1C





_________942: T-R Devices Address Assignment __________

Ring Address
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx

xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx

xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx

PF: 3=Quit 4=Default

SAP F W
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx

7=Back

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

8=Fwd

SID

X.25
Entry 001 of 256
Ring Address
SAP F W

01
03
05
07
09
0B
0D
0F
11
13
15
17
19
1B
1D

xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx

9=RtnH

xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx

xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx

xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx
xx

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

(10=PageBack) (11=PageFwd)



Figure 77. Token-Ring Devices Address Assignment Panel
•

SID
The SID (short ID) field is displayed automatically and cannot be modified.
The SID values range from 00 to FF.
Entries need not be filled in sequence; you may select only the SIDs you
wish to use when assigning token-ring devices.

•

Ring Address
Your response is the 12-character hexadecimal address of the token-ring
device. It can be either a locally administered address or a universal
address.
The format of a locally administered address is:

4000cddddddd
Where 4000 is the fixed part of the address
c
must not be greater than X′7′
d
can be any value from X′0′ to X′F′
The format of a universal address is:

mmmmmmuuuuuu
Where mmmmmmm is the manufacturer ID assigned by IEEE (10005A for IBM)
uuuuuu is the unique portion for each adapter card

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

211

•

SAP
Your response is the two-character hexadecimal service access point of the
Token-Ring device. It must be a multiple of 4 in the range of X′04′ to X′EC′.
Some attaching products, including a 3174 that is configured for Single Link
Multi-Host support, may appear as multiple SNA PUs. Each of this PU will
have a common Token-Ring address (since there is only one token-ring
adapter) but will be uniquely identified by its SAP.

•

F
The F field allows you to specify the maximum size I-frame, including
additional bytes for the SNA header, on the token-ring. The valid responses
are:
−

0=265 bytes

−

1=521 bytes

−

2=1033 bytes (default response)

See “Question 941: LAN Transmission Definition” on page 94 for further
information.
•

W
The W field allows you to specify the maximum out (transmit window size);
that is, the number of transmits before waiting to receive an
acknowledgement.
The valid response ranges from 1 to 7. See “Question 941: LAN
Transmission Definition” on page 94 for further information. The default
response is 2.

Question 943: X.25 Devices Address Assignment
Question 943 allows you to assign a locally administered token-ring address to
each X.25 device to be contacted by the 3174 gateway and map each address to
a short ID. You can also specify the parameters to be used to establish the
connection to the device.
Each X.25 device addressable by the 3174 gateway has a separate entry in this
panel. An X.25 device may be represented more than once to allow a choice of
connection parameters.
Entries need not be filled in sequence; you may select only the SIDs you wish to
use when assigning X.25 devices.

212

3174 Installation Guide



Dest X.25
SID Ring Address
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D





______ 943: X.25 Devices Address Assignment ________

xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx

xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx

xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx

PF: 3=Quit 4=Default

Host
ID
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

7=Back

X.25
Entry 001 of 256
RC RD Inac
Time

DTE Number

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

8=Fwd

9=RtnH

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

(10=PageBack) (11=PageFwd)



Figure 78. X.25 Devices Address Assignment
•

Dest SID
The Dest SID (destination short ID) field is displayed automatically and
cannot be modified. The SID values range from 00 to FF.

•

X.25 Ring Address
Your response is the 12-character hexadecimal Token-Ring address to be
associated with the X.25 device. When establishing a connection to the X.25
device, a device on this Token-Ring will use the address you specify here as
the destination (and not the Token-Ring address of the 3174 gateway you are
customizing).

•

Host ID
The host ID is a two-digit response as follows:
−

The first digit is a number that indicates the link.

−

The second is a letter that indicates the host.

For example, host ID 1A is the primary host on the primary link. Valid host
IDs are:
−

Primary link: 1A through 1H

−

Secondary link (CCA 1): 2A through 2D

−

Secondary link (CCA 2): 3A through 3D

You should use the host ID of the X.25 host you are customizing. The virtual
circuit characteristics customized for this host will be used when the
associated token-ring address is the destination 2.
•

DTE Number
The response is a maximum of 15 digits.

2

With this RPQ, the ″host″ is only a X.25 device which may in fact be a PU 2.0 or another 3174 gateway.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

213

This field will override the response you may have given in question 423:
Host DTE Address, thus allowing you to call other X.25 hosts, using the
virtual circuit characteristics for the given host ID.
•

Retry Count (RC)
The Retry Count allows you to specify how many times the 3174 gateway will
try to establish the connection.
Valid responses are:
0
1
2
3
4
5-8
9

=No retry (default response)
=1 retry
=2 retries
=5 retries
=10 retries
=Reserved (not used)
=Infinite retries (only active with Default Connections)

For a QLLC secondary gateway, you should select 0 (no retry) because the
host and the Token-Ring devices will perform the retry themselves.
For a QLLC primary gateway, your selected type of connection should be
considered:
−

Default Connections
If you select 9 (infinite retries), the link establishment is initiated by the
3174.
If you select 0 (no retry), the link establishment is initiated by the
device(s).

−

Demand Connections
As the device shares the remaining pool of SVCs, you should select 0 (no
retry).

−

Open Connections
You should select 0 (no retry) as the connection is mainly user driven.

•

Retry Delay (RD)
The Retry Delay allows you to specify how long the 3174 gateway should wait
between retry attempts.
Valid responses are:
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8-9

•

=Reserved
=1-2 minutes
=2-3 minutes (default response)
=5-6 minutes
=10-11 minutes
=20-21 minutes
=30-31 minutes
=60 minutes
=Reserved (not used)

Inac Time
The Inac Time allows you to specify an inactivity timer value. When this
timer expires without activity on the X.25 connection, the 3174 gateway will
clear the SVC but will maintain the link to the Token-Ring device. In this

214

3174 Installation Guide

condition, the 3174 gateway does not issue X.25 calls until a user attempts to
use the token-ring device. This option prevents unnecessary X.25 expenses.
Valid responses are:
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7-9

=None (default response)
=5-6 minutes
=15-16 minutes
=30-31 minutes
=60 minutes
=2 hours
=4 hours
=Reserved

The X.25 inactivity timeout value must be set to 0 for Default Connections since
by definition they are permanent connections.

Question 944: X.25 Gateway Default/Open Connections
Using this panel, you can specify the Default Connections or the Open
Connections that are allowed through the 3174 gateway.
With Default Connections, the devices at both ends of the connection are “tied
together” by entering their respective SIDs on the the same entry line. In the
first entry line shown in Figure 79 on page 216, the token-ring device with a SID
22 will establish a connection with the X.25 device with a SID 10 by default
whenever it is active. Such a connection may be used for a token-ring attached
3174-13R to access an S/370 host via a 3174-11R gateway.
With Open Connections, only the device at one end of the connection is
specified; that is, its SID is entered on an entry line in the appropriate column.
The other end is left “open” by specifying a SID XX. In the second entry line
shown in Figure 79 on page 216, any token-ring device is allowed to establish a
connection with the X.25 device with a SID 10 when desired (that is, a
connection on demand). Such a connection may be used for a token-ring
attached PS/2 to access an S/370 host via a 3174-11R gateway. Like a
“wildcard,” the SID XX allows any token-ring attached device that specifies the
token-ring address corresponding to SID 10 as the destination to establish a
connection with the SID 10 device.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

215



________944: X.25 Gateway Default / Open Connections_____
Entry 001 of 250
Token Ring
X.25
X.25 Gateway
X.25 PVC
Devices SID
Devices SID
Protocol
LCID
22
XX
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__



10
10
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

PF: 3=Quit 4=Default

__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

7=Back

8=Fwd



__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

9=RtnH

(10=PageBack) (11=PageFwd)



Figure 79. X.25 Gateway Default/Open Connections Panel
•

Token-Ring Devices SID
The response is the SID you have specified for a token-ring device in
question 942 that will use either a Default Connection or an Open Connection
to communicate with an X.25 device.
Refer to Table 12 on page 217 for further description.

•

X.25 Devices SID
The response is the SID you have specified for an X.25 device in question
943 that will use either a Default Connection or an Open Connection to
communicate with a token-ring device.
Refer to Table 12 on page 217 for further description.

•

X.25 Gateway Protocol
The valid responses are:
04 If the target X.25 device must be accessed with the 3174 gateway acting
as the QLLC secondary station.
08 If the target X.25 device must be accessed with the 3174 gateway acting
as the QLLC primary station.

•

X.25 PVC LCID
Response:0000-4095
This decimal value is the channel identifier for the PVC circuit to be used for
Default Connection between the T-R and the X.25 devices specified for this
944 panel entry.

216

3174 Installation Guide

Table 12. Default/Open Connection
T-R
Devices
SID

X.25
Devices
SID

X.25
Gateway
Protocol

Description

′bb′

′aa′

′04′ o r
′08′

Default Connection between token-ring device ′bb′ defined
in question 942 and X.25 device ′aa′ defined in question
943. If the Default Connection must be done trough a PVC,
the LCID of this PVC must be specified.

′XX′

′aa′

Not
Required

1Any token-ring device is allowed to connect with an
X.25 device ′aa′ defined in question 943 with SID ′aa′.
•

For QLLC secondary, any token-ring device, whether
or not it is defined in question 942, can call a specific
X.25 host ′aa′ defined in question 943. For example,
any campus token-ring device can call a central X.25
host.

•

For QLLC primary, any token-ring host, whether or not
it is defined in question 942, can call a X.25 device ′aa′
(such as a remote printer) defined in question 943.
Not supported for connections through PVCs.

′bb′

′XX′

Not
Required

2Any X.25 device is allowed to connect with Token-Ring
device ′bb′ defined in question 942.
This is specified so that you can accept calls from any
unrecognized X.25 origin SID (not defined in question 943)
or from an X.25 origin SID with a value of ′XX′ in the Call
User Data field of the Call Request packet.
In this case, the host address characteristics will be used.
•

For QLLC secondary, any X.25 host, whether or not it
is defined in question 943, can call a specific
Token-Ring device ′bb′ defined in question 942.

•

For QLLC primary, any X.25 device, whether or not it
is defined in question 943, can call a specific
Token-Ring host ′bb′ defined in question 942 3
Not supported for connections through PVCs.

3Only one connection is allowed by Token-Ring protocols between a specific
pair of token-ring addresses (including SAPs). In order to allow a ring-attached
host (for example, via a 3174 channel or SDLC gateway) to support multiple
simultaneous connections with X.25 terminals that have not been explicitly
customized in question 943, a unique ring address is assigned for each
simultaneous connection to the specified host ring address. These unique
addresses start at the value specified by question 949.
For each new connection, the lowest unused address for that host is chosen and
the source SAP value is the value of the gateway protocol (04 or 08).
If eight simultaneous connections are the desired maximum for the 3174 channel
or SDLC gateway, it should be customized to recognize the first eight addresses
indicated by question 949.

1By specifying ′XX′ for a token-ring device SID, you do not have to uniquely
specify every token-ring device in question 942.

2By specifying ′XX′ for an X.25 device SID, you do not have to uniquely specify
every X.25 device in question 943.
For each XX entry, the X.25 Gateway Protocol field is not required:

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

217

•

For a connection requested from a token-ring device the frame includes the
correct destination SAP (DSAP), either 04 or 08. A DSAP 04 will select the
QLLC secondary gateway function and a DSAP 08 will select the QLLC
primary gateway function in the 3174. Any other values will be rejected.

•

For a connection requested from an X.25 device, the Call Packet includes the
correct QLLC ID, either F4 or F8. A QLLC ID 04 will select the QLLC
secondary gateway function and a QLLC ID 08 will select the QLLC primary
gateway function in the 3174. Any other values will be rejected.

Question 945: X.25 Gateway Bridge Information
When the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ is customized, the 3174 forms a bridge
that attaches one X.25 segment to a Token-Ring LAN segment. The token-ring
devices see the X.25 devices as if they were on a bridged ring.
Figure 80 shows the bridge and the 3174-X.25 segment within the 3174 gateway,
the Token-Ring and X.25 networks and devices, and their associated parameters.

Q.948
Q.946
Q.947
*******
┌─────────┬──────────┐
┌─────────┐
Q.943 *
*
│
│ Bridge │
│
│ Q.942
┌──┐
* X.25 *
│ X.25
│ Number │
│ TRN
│ ┌──┐
│ ├────*Network*──────┤ Segment │
├──────┤ Segment ├───┤ │
└──┘
*
*
│ Number │ Internal │
│ Number │ └──┘
X.25
*
*
│
│ LAA
│
│
│ TRN
Device *******
└─────────┴──────────┘
└─────────┘
Q.949
3174 X.25 TOKEN-RING GATEWAY
Figure 80. X.25 Gateway Bridge Parameters

When the 3174-Peer Bridge function is also customized, the bridge is used by
both the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ and the 3174-Peer; the Peer and X.25
devices share the same segment. So, the bridge profile which is entered during
two different phases of the customization is checked according to the following
rules:
•

Answers to questions 670 and 946 (Bridge number) must be equal

•

Answers to questions 671 and 947 (Token-Ring Segment number) must be
equal

•

Answers to question 672 (3174-Peer Segment number) and questions 948
(3174-X.25 Segment number) must be equal

See Chapter 19, “Peer Communication” on page 557 for more information on
3174 Peer Communication feature.
Note:
The Peer devices which need to access the X.25 Gateway must use a ring
address in the range defined through the question 660. That means that this
address must not be overriden by the package used in the Peer device.
When the 3174-Peer Bridge function is customized in any other 3174 token-ring
device (not in the 3174 running X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ), for example, the
3174-13R of Figure 83 on page 221, the X.25 Gateway Bridge Information

218

3174 Installation Guide

responses (questions 94xs) entered in the 3174 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway and the
3174-Peer Bridge Profile responses (questions 67x) entered in 3174 Token-Ring
Device during the customization is checked according to the following rules:
•

answers to questions 670 and 946 (Bridge number) must not be equal

•

answers to questions 671 and 947 (Token-Ring Segment number) may be
equal or not equal and depends on the physical Token-Ring segments of the
3174s.

•

answers to question 672 (3174-Peer Segment number) and questions 948
(3174-X.25 Segment number) must not be equal

See Chapter 19, “Peer Communication” on page 557 for more information on
3174 Peer Communication feature.
Figure 81 shows a 3174 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway with Peer Communication
feature customized.

******
Q.660 *
*
┌──┐ * 3174 *
│ ├───* Peer *──┐
└──┘ *
* │
Q.672
Q.670
Q.671
****** │
Q.948
Q.946
Q.947
│
┌─────────┬──────────┐
┌─────────┐
│
│3174-Peer│ Bridge │
│
│ Q.942
└────┤or X.25 │ Number │
│ TRN
│ ┌──┐
│Segment │
├──────┤ Segment ├───┤ │
┌────┤Number │ Internal │
│ Number │ └──┘
│
│
│ LAA
│
│
│ TRN
│
└─────────┴──────────┘
└─────────┘ Device
Q.943
****** │ 3174 X.25 TRG with Peer
┌──┐ *
* │
│ ├───* X.25 *──┘
└──┘ *
*
X.25 *
*
Device ******
Figure 81. X.25 Gateway Bridge Parameters for 3174 X.25 TRG with Peer

The bridge function of the 3174 gateway is customized using the panel shown in
Figure 82 on page 220.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

219





__________945: X.25 Gateway Bridge Information ____________

946 - 1

Bridge Number (0-F)

947 - xxx

Token-Ring Segment Number (001-FFF)

948 - xxx

3174-X.25 Segment Number (001-FFF)

949 - xxxx xx

T-R Address for Internal Use (000000 - 7FFFFE)
4000 xxxx xx --

PF: 3=Quit

7=Back

4=Default

8=Fwd

9=Rtnh





Figure 82. X.25 Gateway Bridge Information Panel

Question 946: Bridge Number
The response is the number you assigned to the internal bridge within the 3174
gateway. Valid bridge numbers are 0 through F, with a default value 1.
If the 3174-Peer bridge function is requested (question 651=Y), the answer must
be equal to question 670.

Question 947: Token-Ring Segment Number
The response is the number you assigned to the real Token-Ring to which the
3174 gateway and other devices are attached. Valid segment numbers are 000
through FFF, with no default response. You should ask your network
administrator for this number.
If the 3174-Peer bridge function is requested (question 651=Y), the answer must
be equal to question 671.

Question 948: 3174-X.25 Segment Number
The response is the number you assigned to the internal ring within the 3174
gateway. Valid segment numbers are 000 through FFF, with no default response.
You should ask your network administrator for this number.
If the 3174-Peer bridge function is requested (question 651=Y), the answer must
be equal to question 672.

Question 949: T-R Address for Internal Use
The response is a six-digit number that will be the starting address of a range of
512 consecutive locally administered addresses for internal use. These
addresses should be within the range X′000000′ through X′7FFFFFE′. You should
ask your network administrator for 512 consecutive LAAs starting from your
response to question 949.
Example, if your response is 3174 02 , the range of addresses reserved for the
internal use of the gateway will be 4000 3174 0200 to 4000 3174 03FF.

220

3174 Installation Guide

These addresses must be exclusively reserved for the gateway RPQ and cannot
be used by any other ring device accessing the gateway. Also, the ring address
defined in question 900 must be defined with a value out of this range.

6.14.3 Microcode Upgrade
The Microcode Upgrade facility is not fully supported by the RPQ. All the panels
which are specific to the X.25 Gateway (panels 942, 943, 944 and 945) have to be
reentered manually.

6.14.4 Central Site Change Management
The Central Site Change Management (CSCM) facility is supported by the X.25
Token-Ring Gateway RPQ.

6.15 Scenario 1: Open Connection (from Token-Ring Device Only)

Figure 83. Scenario 1: Open Connection (from Token-Ring Device Only)

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

221

6.15.1 Description
Scenario 1 is an example of an Open Connection from a token-ring device. In
this scenario, any device on the token-ring is allowed to access a specific X.25
device via a 3174-11R X.25 Token-Ring Gateway. The connection is initiated from
the Token-Ring device only.
For Scenario 1:
•

A PS/2 (D) is coax attached to a 3174-13R. The PS/2 will start Personal
Communications/3270 emulation to access the host; that is, the PS/2 is the
token-ring device that will initiate the Open Connection to the X.25 device.

•

The 3174-13R has Configuration Support-C Release 1 with Peer
Communication enabled. It does not have X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ
installed.
For now, it has IMLed successfully and will bridge the PS/2 to the real
Token-Ring (see Chapter 19, “Peer Communication” on page 557 for this
bridging function) but does not take part in the X.25 networking.

•

A 3174-11R has the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ installed and customized
as an X.25 Token-Ring Gateway attached to the X.25 network.

•

A 3745/NPSI is also attached to the X.25 network and acts as a front-end to
the 3090 host.
The 3745/NPSI is the X.25 device for the connection.

Notes:
1. The destination for the PS/2 for host access is the Token-Ring address
assigned to the 3745 during 3174-11R gateway customization (question 943)
and not the address of the 3174-11R gateway.
2. VTAM in the host sees the 3174-11R gateway and the PS/2 as switched major
nodes.
Figure 84 on page 223 shows an overview of the definitions required for
Scenario 1.

222

3174 Installation Guide

6.15.2 Definitions Overview
┌────────┐
VTAM Definitions
│ Host │
3174-11R:
PC/3270:
└───┬────┘
IDBLK=017
IDBLK=061
│
IDNUM=31742
IDNUM=44992
┌───┴────┐
│ 3745 │
└───┬────┘
│
┌─┴──┐
│Host│
│DTE │
└─┬──┘
│201000300 3174-11R Customization
****************
Q100: 11R
Q101: 3
* X.25 Network *
Q150: 2
****************
Q215: 31742
│201000600 Q900: 400031740002 04
┌─┴──┐
Q942: No entries required for Open Connection
│3174│
Q943: SID=10 X25addr=400037450001 HostID=1A
│DTE │
DTE Number=201000300
└─┬──┘
Q944: TRNSID=XX X25SID=10 X25GWProt=Not reqd
│
Q401: 4
┌───┴────┐
Q420: 00000000
Q421: 00000000
│X.25 Seg│
Q423: 201000300
Q424: 201000600
├────────┤
Q452: ________
Q463: 1 Q464: 8 Q467: 4
│ Bridge │
└───┬────┘
Q946: 1
│3174-11R
Q947: BB3
┌──────┴───────┐
Q948: 001
│ TRN Network │
Q949: 222299
└───┬──────┬───┘
│
│
┌───┴────┐ │
│3174-13R│ │
└────────┘ │
│
┌────┴───┐ PC/3270 Configuration
│ PC/3270│
Destination Address=400037450001
└────────┘
Remote SAP=04
PUID=44992
Block ID=061
CONFIG.SYS
device=C:\WPCSP\DXML1MOD.SYS 400031744992

Figure 84. Scenario 1: Definitions Overview

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

223

6.15.3 3174-11R Gateway Customization





______________ Model / Attach ______________

•

Question 99 is a user comment.

•

Question 100 is the 3174 model number.

•

Question 101 is the host attachment type
(3=X.25, M=Multihost).

098 099 - 11R GATEWAY WITH 8Q0743 RPQ

Only one upstream link will be used for
Scenario 1.

100 - 11R
101 - 3

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

8=Fwd



12=Test Menu




___________________ X.25 ___________________

104 - C1

108 - 0000000

110 - 0

116 - 2_ __

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 0 0 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0
166 - A

141 - A

150 - 2

165 - 1

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 31742

220 - 0

370 - 0

372 - 0 0

•

Question 150=2 means the 3174 will be an
X.25 Token-Ring Gateway.

•

Question 215 is the PUID of the 3174-11R
gateway. It must match the PU IDNUM
parameter in the switched major node
definition for the 3174-11R gateway.

•

Question 900 is where you enter the locally
administered address of the 3174-11R
gateway.

127 - 0 0

365 - 0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit



7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________

900 - 4000 3174 0002 04

905 - 0



908 - IBMLAN

This is not the destination address for PS/2
D.

911 - 0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

224

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

3174 Installation Guide







____942: T-R Devices Address Assignment_____

SID

Ring Address

00
02
04
06
08
0A
0C
0E
10
12
14
16
18
1A
1C

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

SAP

F

W

SID

Ring Address

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

01
03
05
07
09
0B
0D
0F
11
13
15
17
19
1B
1D

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

SAP

F

W

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Scenario 1 is an example of an Open
Connection.
•

Therefore, no entries are required for PS/2
D.

•

In fact, since there are no entries for any
Token-Ring device, any token-ring device
can start an Open Connection if the
“wildcard” SID XX for Token-Ring devices is
mapped to an X.25 device in question 944.
This flexibility allows you to add devices to
the Token-Ring as desired.

•

Preceding screens are not shown.

•

This screen shows that the highest SID entry
number is FF (if needed).

•

Enter the locally administered address of the
X.25 device (the 3745 in our scenario). While
the 3745 is not actually on a ring, the 3174
gateway performs a bridge function to the
3745 as if it were on a ring. So we have
assigned a unique LAA for the 3745.

•

The host ID is 1A because we are accessing
it through the primary link and it is the only
host.

•

Retry Count (RC) defaults to 0 (no retry). We
have used this default as recommended for
QLLC secondary access. This means that
the response for Retry Delay (RD) has no
meaning.

•

The inactivity timer (Inac Time) defaults to 2.
This means that after the connection is
inactive for 15-16 minutes, the SVC will be
cleared but the link between the 3174-11R
gateway and PS/2 will be maintained.

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back



8=Fwd

12=Test Menu




____942: T-R Devices Address Assignment_____

SID

Ring Address

F0
F2
F4
F6
F8
FA
FC
FE

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

SAP

F

W

SID

Ring Address

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

F1
F3
F5
F7
F9
FB
FD
FF

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

SAP

F

W

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back



8=Fwd

12=Test Menu




____943: X.25 Devices Address Assignment_____

Dest
SID
00
01
02
03

X.25
Ring Address

Host
ID

DTE Number

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
:
(other entries deleted to save paper)
:
4000 3745 0001
1A
201000300______
XXXX XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
XXXX XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
:
(other entries deleted to save paper)
:
XXXX XXXX XXXX
__
_______________

10
11
12

FF

RC

RD

Inac
Time

0
0
0
0

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2

0
0
0

0

2
2
2

2

2
2
2

2

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

225



_944: X.25 Gateway Default/Open Connections__

Token Ring
Devices SID

X.25
Devices SID

XX
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

10
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__



X.25 Gateway
Protocol
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back



8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

•

The first entry shows that any token-ring
device (SID XX) will be allowed to connect to
the X.25 device with SID 10.

•

The X.25 Gateway Protocol field is not
required when either the Token-Ring Devices
SID or the X.25 Devices SID is an XX.

•

PS/2 D will specify a destination address of
400037450001 and a remote SAP 04.

•

The 3174-11R gateway maps the destination
address to SID 10, the host ID and DTE
number via question 943.

•

The 3174-11R gateway uses the remote SAP
04 to select the QLLC secondary function
within itself for the connection.

•

For a discussion of these parameters, see
the appropriate description of individual
questions in earlier sections.

•

The Common SNA panel and other panels
not shown are not significant to our scenario.



____945: X.25 Gateway Bridge Information_____

946 - 1

Bridge Number (0-F)

947 - BB3

Token-Ring Segment Number (001-FFF)

948 - 001

3174-X.25 Segment Number (001-FFF)

949 - 2222 99

T-R Address for Internal Use (000000-7FFFFE)
4000 XXXX XX --



Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back



8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

____________ 332:



X.25 Options ____________

400 - 00 1 0

401 - 4

409 - 10100100

420 - 00000000



402 - ____
421 - 00000000

423 - 201000300______

424 - 201000600______

430 - 1

431 - 0

432 - 07

434 - 1

435 - 07

440 - A

441 - __

433 - 7

442 - ____

450 - 0300

451 - 10

452 - ________

453 - 10000000

461 -

462 - ____

463 - 0001

464 - 0008

465 - ____

466 - ____

467 - 0004

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

226

3=Quit

7=Back

12=Test Menu

3174 Installation Guide



6.15.4 VTAM Definition for 3174-11R Gateway
**********************************************************************
*
VTAM SWITCHED MAJOR NODE FOR 3174-11R THRU X25NET
*
**********************************************************************
VBUILD MAXGRP=5,
REQUIRED
MAXNO=12,
REQUIRED
TYPE=SWNET
REQUIRED
PU11R
PU
ADDR=C1,
COULD BE ANYTHING (NOT USED)
IDBLK=017,
3174/3274 BURNED IN
IDNUM=31742,
3174-11R PUID
DISCNT=NO,
MAXOUT=1,
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
MAXPATH=2,
VPACING=0,
PACING=0,
PUTYPE=2,
DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,
USSTAB=US327X
LU11R2
LU
LOCADDR=2
LU11R3
LU
LOCADDR=3
:
LU11R9
LU
LOCADDR=9

Note matching parameters in 3174-11R
customization.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

•

IDBLK for a 3174 (or 3274) is always 017.

•

IDNUM matches your response to question
215 (PUID).

6.15.5 VTAM Definition for PS/2 (PC/3270)
**********************************************************************
*
VTAM SWITCHED MAJOR NODE FOR PS/2 THRU X25NET
*
**********************************************************************
VBUILD MAXGRP=5,
REQUIRED
MAXNO=12,
REQUIRED
TYPE=SWNET
REQUIRED
PUPS2
PU
ADDR=C1,
COULD BE ANYTHING (NOT USED)
IDBLK=061,
PS/2 BLOCK ID
IDNUM=44992,
PS/2 PHYSICAL UNIT ID
DISCNT=NO,
MAXDATA=265,
MAXOUT=7,
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
MAXPATH=2,
VPACING=0,
PACING=0,
PUTYPE=2,
DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,
USSTAB=US327X
LUPS22
LU
LOCADDR=2
:
LUPS29
LU
LOCADDR=9

Note matching parameters in PC/3270 Advanced
Options configuration screen.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

•

IDBLK matches the Block ID.

•

IDNUM matches the Physical Unit ID.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

227

6.15.6 NCP/NPSI Definition for 3745
OPTIONS NEWDEFN=(YES,ECHO,NOSUPP),USERGEN=(X25NPSI,FNMNDFGN)
PCCU CUADDR=E1F,
SA20 WTCOS MVS/ESA VM ADDR
X
:
BUILD BFRS=(240),
NCP BUFFER SIZE
X
:
VERSION=V5R4,
NDF VERSION INDICATOR
X
X25.PREFIX=X,
ALL NAMES START WITH X
X
X25.IDNUMH=2,
MUST MATCH WITH SWITCH MAJ.
X
X25.SNAP=NO,
SNAP TRACE NOT INCLUDED
X
X25.MCHCNT=1,
NUMBER OF PHYSICAL LINKS
X
X25.MAXPIU=17K,
LESS THAN 255 TIMES BFRS
X
X25.USGTIER=4
NPSI USAGE TIER
SYSCNTRL OPTIONS=(BHSASSC,ENDCALL,MODE,RCNTRL,RCOND,RECMD,RIMMX
,NAKLIM,SESSION,SSPAUSE,XMTLMT,STORDSP,DLRID,RDEVQ)
HOST INBFRS=10,
NCP BUFFERS ALLOCATION
X
:
**********************************************************************
* NPSI V3R3 CONNECTION TO X25NET
*
**********************************************************************
X25.NET DM=YES,
X
CPHINDX=3,
X
NETTYPE=1,
X
OUHINDX=3
X25.VCCPT INDEX=1,
X
MAXPKTL=128,
X
VWINDOW=7,
PACKET LEVEL WINDOW 7
X
INSLOW=(100,50)
X25.VCCPT INDEX=2,
X
MAXPKTL=512,
X
VWINDOW=7,
PACKET LEVEL WINDOW 7
X
INSLOW=(100,50)
X25.VCCPT INDEX=3,
ON DCE/DTE LINKS TO IMPROVE THRUPUT
X
MAXPKTL=1024,
MAX. PACKET SIZE = 4096
X
VWINDOW=7,
MAX. WINDOW SIZE = 7
X
INSLOW=(100,50)
X25.OUFT INDEX=1
X25.OUFT INDEX=2,OPTFACL=20AA
***********************************************************************
*
MCH TO X25NET
*
***********************************************************************
L05000 X25.MCH ADDRESS=000, CONTROLLER LINE ADDRESS
X
ANS=CONT,
X
CUD0=(NULL),
X
CONNECT=NO,
X
CTCP=(00),
X
DBIT=NO,
X
DIRECT=YES,
X
FRMLGTH=131,
128 + 3 (PACKET HEADER)
X
FTPI=NO,
X
GATE=GENERAL,
X
IDBLKG=064,
LLC4:
IDBLK=064
X
IDBLKP=065,
PAD :
IDBLK=065
X
ITRACE=YES,
X
LCGDEF=(0,20), 20 VC′ S
X
LCN0=NOTUSED,
X
LLCLIST=(LLC0,LLC2,LLC3,LLC4,LLC5),
X
LSPRI=NO,
X
LUNAME=(L05000A1),
X
MACB=(X05000X,X05000R),
X
MBITCHN=NO,
X
MWINDOW=7,
FRAME WINDOW
X

Figure 85 (Part 1 of 2). Scenario 1: NCP/NPSI Definition for 3745

228

3174 Installation Guide

NCPGRP=G05X1,
X
NDRETRY=1,
X
NPRETRY=7,
X
OWNER=M20,
X
PAD=INTEG,
X
PKTMODL=8,
X
PLPIGGYB=YES,
X
PUNAME=P05000A,
X
PWPROT=NO,
X
SPEED=9600,
X
SPNQLLC=NO,
X
STATION=DTE,
X
SUBADDR=NO,
X
SVCINN=0,
X
TDTIMER=1,
X
TPTIMER=3,
X
T1TIMER=1
X25.LCG LCGN=0
LOGICAL CHANNEL GROUP 0
***********************************************************************
*
SVC′ S 3 - 20 X25NET
*
***********************************************************************
X25.VC LCN=(3,20),
18 SWITCHED VC′ S
X
ANS=CONT,
SESSION CONTINUATION
X
CALL=INOUT,
X
IDNUMT=3600,
IDNUM DEFINED EXPLICITELY
X
NCPGRP=G05X3,
X
OUFINDX=1,
X
TYPE=S,
SWITCHED
X
VCCINDX=1
X25.END
***********************************************************************
* GENERATED BY X25NPSI
G05X2
GROUP DIAL=NO,
X
:
* GENERATED BY X25NPSI
G05X3
GROUP DIAL=YES,
X
LEVEL2=BALNAVL2,
X
LEVEL3=BALNAVL3,
X
LEVEL5=NCP,
X
LINEADD=NONE,
X
COMPTAD=NO,
X
COMPOWN=YES,
X
COMPSWP=NO,
X
COMPACB=NO,
X
LINEAUT=YES,
X
LNCTL=SDLC,
X
NPACOLL=NO,
X
TIMER=(BALNATER,,BALNATST,BALNATLS),
X
TYPE=NCP,
X
USERID=(5688035,BALSBDT,NORECMS),
X
XIO=(BALNAVXL,BALNAVXS,BALNAVXI,BALNAVXK)
:
* GENERATED BY X25NPSI
XL000004 LINE CALL=INOUT,
<======= Used by PS/2 D in the test
X
UACB=XA000004
* GENERATED BY X25NPSI
XP000004 PU ANS=CONT,
X
PUTYPE=(1,2)
* GENERATED BY X25NPSI
XL000003 LINE CALL=INOUT,
<======= Used by 3174-11R in test
X
UACB=XA000003
* GENERATED BY X25NPSI
XP000003 PU ANS=CONT,
X
PUTYPE=(1,2)
:
GENEND INIT=BALINIMD,
X
UGLOBAL=BALNMGOP

Figure 85 (Part 2 of 2). Scenario 1: NCP/NPSI Definition for 3745

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

229

6.15.7 PS/2 PC/3270 Configuration
There are two options for Peer support available:
•

Workstation Peer Communication Support Program

•

IBMXLN Peer NDIS drivers

Using Workstation Peer Communication Support Program
CONFIG.SYS File

REM *
Workstation Peer Communication Support Program
DEVICE=C:\DOS50\HIMEM.SYS
DOS=HIGH
DEVICE=C:\DOS50\ANSI.SYS
DEVICE=C:\DOS50\SMARTDRV.SYS 512 128
DEVICE=C:\WPCSP\DXMA0MOD.SYS
DEVICE=C:\WPCSP\DXMA1MOD.SYS
DEVICE=C:\WPCSP\DXML1MOD.SYS 400031744992
DEVICE=C:\WPCSP\DXMT0MOD.SYS O=Y ES=1 EST=1
SHELL=C:\DOS\COMMAND.COM /P /E:2000
COUNTRY=001,437,C:\DOS50\COUNTRY.SYS
LASTDRIVE=E
BUFFERS=10
FILES=32
FCBS=16,8

*

Figure 86. Scenario 1: CONFIG.SYS File for PS/2 Using Peer Communication

Using IBMXLN.DOS
The IBMXLN.DOS driver is available with new 3270 Connection Cards or via
Bulletin Board.

PROTOCOL.INI

′ PROTMAN_MOD′
DRIVERNAME = PROTMAN$
′ DXMAIDXCFG′
DXME0_NIF = DXME0.NIF
DXMJ0MOD_NIF = DXMJ0MOD.NIF
SMCDOSJP_NIF = SMCDOSJP.NIF
SMCDOSJP2_NIF = SMCDOSJP.NIF
SMCDOSAT_NIF = SMCDOSAT.NIF
SMCDOSAT2_NIF = SMCDOSAT.NIF
SMCDOSMC_NIF = SMCDOSMC.NIF
SMCDOSMC2_NIF = SMCDOSMC.NIF
′ DXME0_NIF′
DRIVERNAME = DXME0$
BINDINGS = IBMXLN_MOD
′ IBMXLN_MOD′
DRIVERNAME = IBMXLN$
MAXTRANSMITS = 6
NETADDRESS = ″400031744992″

Figure 87. Scenario 1: PROTOCOL.INI File for PS/2 Using Peer Communication

230

3174 Installation Guide

CONFIG.SYS File

REM *-------------------------------------------------*
REM * IBMXLN NDIS DEVICE DRIVER SUPPORT
*
REM *-------------------------------------------------*
DEVICE=C:\WIN\HIMEM.SYS
DOS=HIGH
DEVICE=C:\DOS61\SETVER.EXE
DEVICE=C:\WIN\EMM386.EXE NOEMS
FILES=50
BUFFERS=30
LASTDRIVE=Z
DEVICE=C:\WIN\SMARTDRV.EXE /DOUBLE_BUFFER
STACKS=9,256
DEVICE=C:\LSP\PROTMAN.DOS /I C:\LSP
DEVICE=C:\IBLXLN\IBMXLN.DOS
DEVICE=C:\LSP\DXMA0MOD.SYS 001
DEVICE=C:\LSP\DXME0MOD.SYS N ,10,0,0,0
DEVICE=C:\LSP\DXMT0MOD.SYS E ES=2 EST=2 O=N

Figure 88. Scenario 1: CONFIG.SYS File for PS/2 Using Peer Communication

Attachment Types Screen



Attachment Types
More: -+
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Enter the required information.



Total number of sessions for:



Distributed Function Terminal (DFT) . . . . . . . . .

[0]

LAN via 802.2 protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0]

LAN via NETBIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0]

3174 Peer Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[2]

Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) . . . . . . . .

[0]

Asynchronous Data Link Control (ASYNCH) . . . . . . .
(for attachment to a Series/1 SNA gateway only)

[0]

CCITT X.25 Network (X.25) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0]

F1=Help F3=Exit F7=Backward F8=Forward



Figure 89. Scenario 1: Attachment Types Screen

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

231

Advanced Options for 3174 Peer Communication Screen



Advanced Options for 3174 Peer Communication
More: -+
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Enter the required information.
Total number of LAN sessions . . . . . .

2

Link name

lan1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Destination address

. . . . . . . . . .

Number of sessions for this gateway



. .



[400037450001]
[2]

Physical Unit ID . . . . . . . . . . . .

[44992]

Adapter number . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0]

Remote SAP/Local SAP . . . . . . . . . .

[04]/[04]

Block ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[061]

PIU size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0256]

F1=Help F3=Exit F7=Backward F8=Forward



Figure 90. Scenario 1: Advanced Options for 3174 Peer Communication Screen

6.15.8 Connection Initiation (from Token-Ring Device Only)
The connection to the host can only be initiated from the PS/2. The following
sequence of events occur:
1. User starts PC/3270 emulation.
2. PS/2 generates a frame with:
•

X′ 04′ as SSAP, X ′ 04′ as DSAP

•

X′ 400031744992′ as the source address

•

X′ 400037450001′ as the destination address.

3. 3174 gateway maps:
•

Source address to SID XX (no entry) via question 942

•

Destination address to SID 10, DTE Number 201000300 and host ID 1A via
question 943

•

Origin TRN SID XX to destination X.25 SID 10 via question 944.

4. 3174 gateway generates a Call Request packet with:
•

Packet Type Identifier: 00001011

•

Calling Address: 201000600

•

Called Address: 201000300

•

Called User Data CID:

Cx 01 0000 C5 F8 F1F0 E7E7 4040 (Cx=C3 or CB)

232

3174 Installation Guide

┌───────┐
│ NPSI │
└───┬───┘
DTE
┌┴┐
201000300 └┬┘
│
*****************
*
X.25
*
*****************
DTE
┌┴┐
201000600 └┬┘
│
┌───────┼───────┐
│ 3174 └────┐ │
│┌────┐ ┌──┴─┐│
││QLLC│ │QLLC││
││Pri │ │Sec ││
│└────┘ └──┬─┘│
│ ′ 0 4 ′ ┌────┘ │
└───────┼───────┘
│
=====================
(
TRN
)
=====================
│
│
┌──┴──┐
│ PS/2│
└─────┘

│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│

Call Packet:
Calling DTE Address
Called DTE Address
Connection ID:
X.25 Gateway ID
QLLC ID
Destination SID
Origin SID

│
│
│
│
│

DSAP = 04 (Secondary)
SSAP = 04
Destination Address = 400037450001
Source Address
= 400031744992

= 201000600
= 201000300
=
=
=
=

C5
F8 (Primary)
F1F0 (10)
E7E7 (XX)

Figure 91. Scenario 1: Connection Initiation (from Token-Ring Device Only)

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

233

6.16 Scenario 2: Default Connection

Figure 92. Scenario 2: Default Connection

6.16.1 Description
Scenario 2 is an example of a Default Connection. In this scenario, a specific
device on the token ring will access a specific X.25 device via a 3174-11R X.25
Token-Ring Gateway. The connection can be initiated from either device.
Scenario 2 adds to Scenario 1 with the following highlighted:
•

We will customize the 3174-13R from Scenario 1 as the token-ring device that
will establish a connection to the X.25 device by default; that is, whenever it
has IMLed successfully.
Remember that the 3174-13R has Configuration Support-C Release 1 with
Peer Communication enabled but does not have the X.25 Token-Ring
Gateway RPQ installed.

234

3174 Installation Guide

After it has IMLed successfully, it will continue to bridge the PS/2 to the real
token ring.
•

The 3174-11R has the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ installed and
customized as an X.25 Token-Ring Gateway attached to the X.25 network, for
both the PS/2 (D) and the 3174-13R.

•

The 3745/NPSI is attached to the X.25 network and acts as a front end to the
3090 host.
The 3745/NPSI is the X.25 device for the connection.

Notes:
1. The destination for the 3174-13R for host access is the token-ring address
assigned to the 3745 during 3174-11R gateway customization (question 943)
and not the address of the 3174-11R gateway.
2. The 3174-13R SID (the token-ring device) is “ t i e d ” to the 3745 SID (the X.25
device) through an entry in question 944.
3. VTAM in the host sees the 3174-11R gateway, the PS/2 and the 3174-13R as
switched major nodes.
Figure 93 on page 236 shows an overview of the definitions required for
Scenario 2.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

235

6.16.2 Definitions Overview
┌────────┐
│ Host │
└───┬────┘
│
┌───┴────┐
│ 3745 │
└───┬────┘
│
┌─┴──┐
│Host│
│DTE │
└─┬──┘
│201000300
****************
* X.25 Network *
****************
│201000600
┌─┴──┐
│3174│
│DTE │
└─┬──┘
│
┌───┴────┐
│X.25 Seg│
├────────┤
│ Bridge │
└───┬────┘
│ 3174-11R
┌──────┴───────┐
│ TRN Network │
└───┬──────┬───┘
│
│
┌───┴────┐ │
│3174-13R│ │
└────────┘ │
│
┌────┴───┐
│ PC/3270│
└────────┘

VTAM Definitions
3174-11R:
IDBLK=017
IDNUM=31742

PC/3270:
IDBLK=061
IDNUM=44992

3174-13R:
IDBLK=017
IDNUM=31743

3174-11R Customization
Q100: 11R
Q101: 3
Q150: 2
Q215: 31742
Q900: 400031740002 04
Q942: SID=22 TRNaddr=400031740003 SAP=04
Q943: SID=10 X25addr=400037450001 HostID=1A
DTE Number=201000300
Q944: TRNSID=XX X25SID=10 X25GWProt=Not reqd
TRNSID=22 X25SID=10 X25GWProt=04
Q401: 4
Q420: 00000000
Q421: 00000000
Q423: 201000300
Q424: 201000600
Q452: ________
Q463: 1 Q464: 8 Q467: 4
Q946:
Q947:
Q948:
Q949:

1
BB3
001
222299

3174-13R Customization
Q100: 13R
Q101: 7
Q106: 400031740003 04
Q215: 31743

Q107: 400037450001 04

PC/3270 Configuration
Destination Address=400037450001
Remote SAP=04
PUID=44992
Block ID=061
CONFIG.SYS
device=C:\WPCSP\DXML1MOD.SYS 400031744992

Figure 93. Scenario 2: Definitions Overview

236

3174 Installation Guide

6.16.3 3174-11R Gateway Customization





______________ Model / Attach ______________

098 -

Responses remain the same as in Scenario 1.
•

Question 99 is user comment.

•

Question 100 is the 3174 model number.

•

Question 101 is the host attachment type
(3=X.25, M=Multihost).

099 - 11R GATEWAY WITH 8Q0743 RPQ
100 - 11R

Only one upstream link will be used for
Scenario 2 (as in Scenario 1).

101 - 3

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

8=Fwd



12=Test Menu




___________________ X.25 ___________________

104 - C1

108 - 0000000

110 - 0

116 - 2_ __

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 0 0 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0
166 - A

141 - A

150 - 2

165 - 1

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 31742

220 - 0

370 - 0

372 - 0 0

127 - 0 0

Responses remain the same as in Scenario 1.
•

Question 150=2 means the 3174 will be an
X.25 Token-Ring Gateway.

•

Question 215 is the PUID of the 3174-11R
gateway. It must match the IDNUM
parameter in the switched major node PU
definition for the 3174-11R gateway.

365 - 0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit



7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________



Responses remain the same as in Scenario 1.
•

900 - 4000 3174 0002 04

905 - 0

908 - IBMLAN

911 - 0

Question 900 is where you enter the locally
administered address of the 3174-11R
gateway.
This is not the destination address for PS/2
D.

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

237





____942: T-R Devices Address Assignment_____

SID

Ring Address

00
02
04
06
08
0A
0C

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

SAP

F

W

XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2
XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2
XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2
XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2
XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2
XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2
XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2
:
(other entries deleted to save
:
4000 3174 0003
04
2
2
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2
:
(other entries deleted to save
:
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XX
2
2

22
24
26

FE

SID

Ring Address

SAP

F

W

01
03
05
07
09
0B
0D

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2

XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

X
XX
XX

2
2

2
2

XXXX XXXX XXXX

XX

2

2

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

Scenario 2 is an example of a Default
Connection.
•

An entry is required for the token-ring device
3174-13R.

•

Since there are no entries for other
token-ring devices, any other token-ring
device can start an Open Connection if the
“wildcard” SID XX for token-ring devices is
mapped to an X.25 device in question 944.
This flexibility allows you to add other
devices to the token ring as desired.

paper)
23
25
27
paper)
FF

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back



8=Fwd

12=Test Menu




____943: X.25 Devices Address Assignment_____

Dest
SID

X.25
Ring Address

00
01
02
03

Host
ID

DTE Number

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
:
(other entries deleted to save paper)
:
4000 3745 0001
1A
201000300______
XXXX XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
XXXX XXXX XXXX
__
_______________
:
(other entries deleted to save paper)
:
XXXX XXXX XXXX
__
_______________

10
11
12

FF

Responses remain the same as in Scenario 1.
•

Enter the locally administered address of the
X.25 device (the 3745 in our scenario). While
the 3745 is not actually on a ring, the 3174
gateway performs a bridge function to the
3745 as if it were on a ring. So we have
assigned a unique LAA for the 3745.

2
2
2

•

The host ID is 1A because we are accessing
it through the primary link and it is the only
host.

2

•

Retry Count (RC) defaults to 0 (no retry). We
have used this default as recommended for
QLLC secondary access. This means that
the response for Retry Delay (RD) has no
meaning.

•

The inactivity timer (Inac Time) defaults to 2.
This means that after the connection is
inactive for 15-16 minutes, the SVC will be
cleared but the link between the 3174-11R
gateway and PS/2 will be maintained.

RC

RD

Inac
Time

0
0
0
0

2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2

0
0
0

2
2
2

0

2

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

238

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

3174 Installation Guide





_944: X.25 Gateway Default/Open Connections__



The first entry is for Scenario 1.
•

Token Ring
Devices SID

X.25
Devices SID

XX
22
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

10
10
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

X.25 Gateway
Protocol
__
04
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

The first entry shows that any token-ring
device (SID XX) will be allowed to connect to
the X.25 device with SID 10. For further
description, see 6.15, “Scenario 1: Open
Connection (from Token-Ring Device Only)”
on page 221.

The second entry is added for Scenario 2.
•

The second entry shows that the token-ring
device SID 22 (3174-13R) is “tied” to the X.25
SID 10 (3745/NPSI).

•

The 3174-13R will be customized for a
destination address 400037450001 SAP 04 in
question 107.

•

The 3174-11R gateway maps the destination
address to a destination SID 10, host ID and
DTE number via question 943.

•

The 3174-11R gateway uses the DSAP 04 to
select the QLLC secondary function within
itself for the connection.

•

The X.25 Gateway Protocol field is 04
because the 3174-11R gateway must use
QLLC secondary protocol to communicate
with the target X.25 device (3745/NPSI),
which is the QLLC primary.

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back



8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

____945: X.25 Gateway Bridge Information_____





Response remain the same as in Scenario 1.
•

946 - 1

Bridge Number (0-F)

947 - BB3

Token-Ring Segment Number (001-FFF)

948 - 001

3174-X.25 Segment Number (001-FFF)

949 - 2222 99

T-R Address for Internal Use (000000-7FFFFE)
4000 XXXX XX --

For a discussion of these parameters, see
the appropriate description of individual
questions in earlier sections.

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

239



____________ 332:

X.25 Options ____________

400 - 00 1 0

401 - 4

409 - 10100100

420 - 00000000



•

The Common SNA panel and other panels
not shown are not significant to our scenario.

402 - ____
421 - 00000000

423 - 201000300______

424 - 201000600______

430 - 1

431 - 0

432 - 07

434 - 1

435 - 07

440 - A

441 - __

433 - 7

442 - ____

450 - 0300

451 - 10

452 - ________

453 - 10000000

461 -

462 - ____

463 - 0001

464 - 0008

465 - ____

466 - ____

467 - 0004

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

12=Test Menu



6.16.4 3174-13R Customization



______________ Model / Attach ______________



098 099 - 3174 THROUGH X25 GATEWAY
100 - 13R
101 - 7

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

240

3=Quit

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

3174 Installation Guide



Customizing the 3174-13R to access the host
through a 3174 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway is no
different from customizing it to access the host
through an ordinary 3174 Token-Ring Gateway,
except for the destination address.




____________ Token-Ring Network ____________

106 - 4000 3174 0003 04

107 - 4000 3745 0001 04

110 - 1 0000

116 - 2_ __

121 - 01

123 - 0

132 - 0 0 0 0

The destination address is specified in question
107.
•

With a 3174 Token-Ring Gateway (either
local or remote), question 107 specifies the
3174 gateway address as the destination.

•

With a 3174 X.25 Token-Ring Gateway,
question 107 specifies the X.25 device
address as the destination.

108 - 0000000

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

127 - 0 0

136 - 1 0 0 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0
168 - 0

141 - A

165 - 0

166 - A

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 31743

220 - 0

382 - 0521

383 - 2

384 - 0

In Scenario 2, the destination is the
3745/NPSI address specified in question 943.

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



6.16.5 VTAM Definition For 3174-13R
**********************************************************************
*
VTAM SWITCHED MAJOR NODE FOR 3174-13R THRU X25NET
*
**********************************************************************
VBUILD MAXGRP=5,
REQUIRED
MAXNO=12,
REQUIRED
TYPE=SWNET
REQUIRED
PU13R
PU
ADDR=C1,
COULD BE ANYTHING (NOT USED)
IDBLK=017,
3174/3274 BURNED IN
IDNUM=31743,
3174-13R PUID
DISCNT=NO,
MAXOUT=1,
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
MAXPATH=2,
VPACING=0,
PACING=0,
PUTYPE=2,
DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,
USSTAB=US327X
LU13R2
LU
LOCADDR=2
LU13R3
LU
LOCADDR=3
:
LU13R9
LU
LOCADDR=9

Note matching parameters in 3174-13R
customization.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

•

IDBLK for a 3174 (or 3274) is always 017.

•

IDNUM matches your response to question
215 (PUID).

Figure 94. Scenario 2: VTAM Definition for 3174-13R

6.16.6 Other Definitions
The following remain the same as in Scenario 1:
•

VTAM definition for the 3174-11R gateway

•

VTAM definition for the PS/2 (PC/3270)

•

NCP/NPSI definition for the 3745

•

PS/2 CONFIG.SYS file and PC/3270 configuration

6.16.7 Connection Initiation from Token-Ring Device
1. User IMLs 3174-13R.
2. 3174-13R generates a frame with:
•

X′ 04′ as SSAP, X ′ 04′ as DSAP

•

X′ 400031740003′ as the source address

•

X′ 400037450001′ as the destination address

3. 3174 gateway maps:

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

241

•

Source address to SID 22 via question 942

•

Destination address to SID 10, DTE Number 201000300 and Host ID 1A via
question 943

•

Origin TRN SID 22 to destination X.25 SID 10 via question 944

4. 3174 gateway generates a Call Request packet with:
•

Packet Type Identifier: 00001011

•

Calling Address: 201000600

•

Called Address: 201000300

•

Called User Data CID:

Cx 01 0000 C5 F8 F1F0 F2F2 4040 (Cx=C3 or CB)
┌───────┐
│ NPSI │
└───┬───┘
DTE
┌┴┐
201000300 └┬┘
│
*****************
*
X.25
*
*****************
│
DTE
┌┴┐
201000600 └┬┘
┌───────┼───────┐
│ 3174 │ ′ C5F8′ │
│
└────┐ │
│┌────┐ ┌──┴─┐│
││QLLC│ │QLLC││
││Pri │ │Sec ││
│└────┘ └──┬─┘│
│ ′ 0 4 ′ ┌────┘ │
└───────┼───────┘
│
=====================
(
TRN
)
=====================
│
┌───┴────┐
│3174-13R│
└────────┘

│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│

Call Packet:
Calling DTE Address
Called DTE Address
X.25 Gateway ID
QLLC ID
Destination SID
Origin SID

│
│
│
│

DSAP = 04 (Secondary)
SSAP = 04
Destination Address = 400037450001
Source Address
= 400031740003

=
=
=
=
=
=

201000600
201000300
C5
F8 (Primary)
F1F0 (10)
F2F2 (22)

Figure 95. Scenario 2: Connection Initiation from QLLC Secondary Gateway

6.16.8 Connection Initiation from X.25 Device
1. NPSI generates a Call Request packet with:
•

Packet Type Identifier: 00001011

•

Calling Address: 201000300

•

Called Address: 201000600

•

Called User Data CID:

Cx 01 0000 C5 F4 F2F2 F1F0 4040 (Cx=C3 or CB)
2. 3174 gateway maps:

242

3174 Installation Guide

•

Origin X.25 SID 10 to destination TRN SID 22 via question 944

•

Origin SID 10 to source address 400037450001 via question 943

•

Destination SID 22 to destination address 400031740003 via question 942.

3. 3174 gateway generates a frame with:
•

X′ 04′ as SSAP

•

X′ 04′ as DSAP

•

X′ 400037450001′ as the source address

•

X′ 400031740003′ as the destination address

┌───────┐
│ NPSI │
└───┬───┘
DTE
┌┴┐
201000300 └┬┘
│
│
│
*****************
│
*
X.25
* │
*****************
│
│
│
DTE
┌┴┐
│
201000600 └┬┘
│
┌───────┼───────┐

│ 3174 │′ C5F4′ │
│
└────┐ │
│┌────┐ ┌──┴─┐│
││QLLC│ │QLLC││
││Pri │ │Sec ││
│└────┘ └──┬─┘│
│ ′ 0 4 ′ ┌────┘ │
└───────┼───────┘
│
=====================
(
TRN
)
=====================
│
│
┌───┴────┐
│3174-13R│
└────────┘

Call Packet:
Calling DTE Address
Called DTE Address
X.25 Gateway ID
QLLC ID
Destination SID
Origin SID

│
│
│
│
│


=
=
=
=
=
=

201000300
201000600
C5
F4 (Secondary)
F2F2 (22)
F1F0 (10)

SSAP = 04 (Secondary)
DSAP = 04
Destination Address = 400031740003
Source Address
= 400037450001

Figure 96. Scenario 2: Connection Initiation from NPSI

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

243

6.17 Scenario 3: Open Connection (from X.25 Device Only)

Figure 97. Scenario 3: Open Connection (From X.25 Device Only)

6.17.1 Description
Scenario 3 is an example of an Open Connection from an X.25 device. In this
scenario, any device on the X.25 network is allowed to access a specific
Token-Ring host via a 3174-11L X.25 Token-Ring Gateway. The connection is
initiated from the X.25 device only.
For Scenario 3:
•

A 3174-11R is connected to the X.25 network as the X.25 device that will
initiate the Open Connection. For now, it does not have the X.25 Token-Ring
Gateway RPQ installed.
Note that it is a PU 2.0 device for its attached terminals; that is, the terminal
LUs are using the 3174 local PU function.

244

•

A 3174-11L is attached to the 3090 host channel via its primary adapter and
to a token ring via its token-ring adapter.

•

The 3174-11L also has the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ installed and
customized as an X.25 Token-Ring Gateway attached to the X.25 network via
a Concurrent Communication Adapter. Like a 3745/NPSI, it acts as a front
end to the 3090 host and is the token-ring device for this connection.

3174 Installation Guide

Notes:
1. The 3174-11R is customized as for normal access to the X.25 network.
2. VTAM in the host sees the 3174-11L gateway and the 3174-11R device as
local SNA major nodes.
3. The 3174-11L gateway sees the 3174-11R as a DSPU, as if it were attached to
its token ring.
Figure 98 shows an overview of the definitions required for Scenario 3.

6.17.2 Definitions Overview
┌────────┐
│ Host │
└───┬────┘
1A │
┌───┴────┐
│3174-11L│
└───┬────┘
│
┌──────┴───────┐
│ TRN Network │
└──────────────┘
.
..........
.3174-11L.
..........
2A .
┌────┐
│Host│
│DTE │
└─┬──┘
│
****************
* X.25 Network *
****************
│
┌─┴──┐
│3174│
│DTE │
└─┬──┘
│
┌───┴────┐
│3174-11R│
└───┬────┘
│
┌──┴────┐
│Display│
└───────┘

VTAM Definitions
3174-11L:
PU CUADDR=E40...
LU LOCADDR=02...

3174-11R:
PU CUADDR=E41...
LU LOCADRR=02...

3174-11L Customization
Q100: 11L
Q101: M
1A Host
Q104: 40
Q105: 46
Q150: 1
Q900: 400031740001 08
Q940: 40=400031740001 08
41=400070000000 08
42=400070000001 08
2A Host
Q104: C1
Q150: 2
Q900: 400031740001 04
Q942: SID=10 TRNaddr=400031740001 SAP=08
Q943: No entries required for Open Connection
Q944: TRNSID=10 X25SID=XX X25GWProt=Not reqd
Q946: 1
Q947: BB3
Q948: 001
Q949: 700000
Q420: 00000000
Q421: 00000000
Q423: 201000600
Q424: 201000300
Q452: ________
3174-11R Customization
Q100: 11R
Q101: 3
Q104: C1
Q150: 0
Q215:
Q401: 4
Q420: 00000000
Q421:
Q423: 201000300
Q424:
Q452: E810XX
Q463:

00000
00000100
201000600
1 Q464: 8

Figure 98. Scenario 3: Definitions Overview

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

245

6.17.3 3174-11L Gateway Customization




______________ Model / Attach ______________

In Scenario 3, we need to customize the
3174-11L for multi-host connectivity.

098 099 - 11L RPQ 8Q0743 GATEWAY THROUGH CCA
100 - 11L
101 - M

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






__________ Multi-Host Definition ___________

•

The 1A link is via the SNA channel.

•

The 2A link (CCA) is to the X.25 network.

Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID
1A
2A
3A
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

Adapter
Type
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Host
Attach
5
3
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Hardware
Group
00
51
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

Include
in IML
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

We will now proceed with customizing the 1A
attachment.

Host Descriptor
RPQ_CHANNEL_________
RPQ_X25_____________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________

Select Test; press ENTER ===> 1A



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






_______________ Local (SNA) ________________
1A = RPQ CHANNEL
104 - 40

105 - 46

108 - 0000000

110 - 1

116 - 2_ __

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

127 - 0 0

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 0 0 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0

141 - A

150 - 1

165 - 0

166 - A

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

222 - 0

223 - 10

224 - 2

168 - 0

225 - 4

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

246

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

3174 Installation Guide



•

Note question 150=1 as it is the gateway for
the token-ring devices, such as DSPU A, on
the real token-ring network.





•

Question 900 is the token-ring address of the
3174-11L. Note that the SAP for this address
is 08.

•

The token-ring addresses 400070000000
through 400070000002 are mapped to host
addresses. These token-ring addresses are
assigned to the devices calling in from the
X.25 network, just as if they were on the
token-ring network.

•

The frame and window sizes for DSPUs can
be changed on this panel if desired.

____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________
1A = RPQ CHANNEL
900 - 4000 3174 0001 08

905 - 0

908 - IBMLAN

911 - 0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






_______ 940: Ring Address Assignment _______
1A = RPQ CHANNEL
S
40
41
43
45

Ring Address
4000 3174 0001
4000 7000 0000
4000 7000 0002
XXXX XXXX XXXX

SAP
08
08
08

T

S

Ring Address

SAP

T

1
1

42
44
46

4000 7000 0001
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

08

0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






____ 941: Ring Transmission Definition _____
1A = RPQ CHANNEL
S
40
41
43
45

Ring Address
4000 3174 0001
4000 7000 0000
4000 7000 0002

SAP
08
08
08

F

W

S

Ring Address

SAP

F

W

3
3

2
2

42
44
46

4000 7000 0001

08

0

2

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

247





•

The Common SNA panel and other panels
not shown are not significant to our scenario.

•

We will now customize the attachment to the
X.25 network.

•

Question 150=2 to enable the X.25
Token-Ring Gateway function for the 2A
attachment.

________________ Common SNA ________________
1A = RPQ CHANNEL
500 - 0

501 - ________

502 - ________

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






__________ Multi-Host Definition ___________
Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID
1A
2A
3A
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

Adapter
Type
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Host
Attach
5
3
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Hardware
Group
00
51
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

Include
in IML
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Host Descriptor
RPQ_CHANNEL_________
RPQ_X25_____________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________

Select Test; press ENTER ===> 2A



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






___________________ X.25 ___________________
2A = RPQ X25
104 - C1

110 - 1
125 - 00*****0

116 - 0_ __
127 - 0 0
139 - 00

150 - 2

165 - 1
179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

370 - 0

372 - 0 0

220 - 0

365 - 0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

248

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

3174 Installation Guide







•

Question 900 is the token-ring address of the
3174-11L. Note that the SAP for this address
is 04.

•

The 3174-11L address SAP 08 is assigned to
SID 10.

•

No entries are required on this panel for an
Open Connection from X.25 devices.

____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________
2A = RPQ X25
900 - 4000 3174 0001 04

905 - 0

908 - IBMLAN

911 - 0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






____942: T-R Devices Address Assignment_____
2A = RPQ X25
SID

Ring Address

00
02
04
06
08
0A
0C
0E
10
12
14
16
18
1A
1C

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
4000
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
3174
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
0001
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

SAP

F

W

SID

Ring Address

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
08
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

01
03
05
07
09
0B
0D
0F
11
13
15
17
19
1B
1D

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

SAP

F

W

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






____943: X.25 Devices Address Assignment_____
2A = RPQ X25
Dest
SID
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D

X.25
Ring Address
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

Host
ID

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

DTE Number

RC

RD

Inac
Time

_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

249





•

Token-ring device SID 10 is mapped to any
device calling in from the X.25 network.

•

Question 949 provides the middle six digits
of the DSPU token-ring addresses. In this
case, it is 700000.

•

The first X.25 device calling in is assigned
the token-ring address 400070000000, the
second X.25 device calling in is assigned the
token-ring address 400070000001, and so on.

•

By assigning token-ring addresses to the
X.25 devices, the X.25 Token-Ring Gateway
allows mapping of the token-ring addresses
to host addresses and, hence, allows access
to the host.

•

Various X.25 options are specified on this
panel.

_944: X.25 Gateway Default/Open Connections__
2A = RPQ X25
Token Ring
Devices SID

X25
Devices SID

10

XX

X25 Gateway
Protocol
__

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






____945: X.25 Gateway Bridge Information_____
2A = RPQ X25
946 - 1

Bridge Number (0-F)

947 - BB3

Token-Ring Segment Number (001-FFF)

948 - 001

3174-X25 Segment Number (001-FFF)

949 - 7000 00

T-R Address for Internal Use (000000-7FFFFE)
4000 XXXX XX --

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






____________ 332:
2A = RPQ X25

X.25 Options ____________

400 - 00 1 0

401 - 4

409 - 10100100

420 - 00000000

423 - 201000600

402 - ____
421 - 00000000
424 - 201000300______

430 - 1

431 - 0

434 - 1

435 - 07

440 - A

441 - __

432 - 07

433 - 7

442 - ____

450 - 0300

451 - 10

452 - ________

453 - 10000000

461 - ____

462 - ____

463 - 0001

464 - 0008

465 - ____

466 - ____

467 - 0004

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

250

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

3174 Installation Guide



6.17.4 3174-11R Customization





______________ Model / Attach ______________

•

Finally, we customize the 3174-11R as the
X.25 PU 2.0 device calling in to the 3174-11L
X.25 Token-Ring Gateway.

•

The primary attachment of the 3174-11R is to
the X.25 network.

•

The 3174-11R is customized for X.25
attachment.

•

Question 150=0 as we are using the
3174-11R as a standalone PU 2.0 device with
no gateway functions.

•

The Common SNA panel and other panels
not shown are not significant to our scenario.

098 099 - 11R TO X25 NETWORK AS PU2 DEVICE
100 - 11R
101 - 3

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






___________________ X.25 ___________________

104 - C1

108 - 0000000

110 - 0

116 - 2_ __

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 0 0 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0

141 - A

150 - 0

165 - 1

166 - A

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

370 - 0

372 - 0 0

127 - 0 0

168 - 0

365 - 0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






________________ Common SNA ________________

500 - 0

501 - ________

502 - ________

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

251




____________ 332:

X.25 Options ____________

400 - 00 1 0

401 - 4

409 - 10100100

420 - 00000000

•

Various X.25 options are specified on this
panel.

402 421 - 00000100

423 - 201000300______

424 - 201000600______

430 - 1

431 - 0

432 - 07

434 - 1

435 - 07

440 - A

441 - __

433 - 7

442 - ____

450 - 0300

451 - 10

452 - E810XX__

453 - 10000000

461 -

462 - ____

463 - 0001

464 - 0008

465 - ____

466 - ____

467 - 0004

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

12=Test Menu



6.17.5 VTAM Definitions for 3174-11L Gateway And 3174-11R
***********************************************************************
* DEFINITIONS FOR LOCAL 3174-11L
*
***********************************************************************
RABQ40Y VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
RABP40 PU
CUADDR=E40,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,MAXBFRU=10,
MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,USSTAB=US327X,
VPACING=0
*
RABT4002 LU
LOCADDR=2
RABT4003 LU
LOCADDR=3
***********************************************************************
* DEFINITIONS FOR 3174-11R - SEEN AS A DSPU BY 3174-11L
*
***********************************************************************
RABP41 PU
CUADDR=E41,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,MAXBFRU=10,
MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,USSTAB=US327X,
VPACING=0,SECNET=YES
*
RABT4102 LU
LOCADDR=2
RABT4103 LU
LOCADDR=3

Figure 99. Scenario 3: VTAM Definitions for 3174-11L Gateway and 3174-11R

252

3174 Installation Guide

6.17.6 Connection Initiation (from X.25 Device Only)
Call Packet:
Calling DTE Address = DTE-1 or DTE-2 address
Called DTE Address = 201000300
X.25 Gateway ID
= C5
QLLC ID
= F8 (Primary)
Destination SID
= F1F0 (10)
Origin SID
= E7E7 (XX)
───────────────────────

┌─────────┐
│ Host │
│
│
└───┬┬────┘
││
││Channel
3174 ││
┌───────┼┼─┬───────┐
********
┌┐ ┌─────┐
│Primary││ │ CCA │
* X.25 ┌─*──┤├───┤ X.25│
│Link ││ │
│ ┌┐ *
│ * └┘ │ dev.│ 01
│
││ │ ┌────┼───┤│──*──────┘ * DTE-1 └─────┘
│Local ││ │X.25 ┌─┼───┤│──*──────┐ *
│Gateway││ │GW QLLC│ └┘ *
│ *
│
││ │Primary│ DTE *
│ * ┌┐ ┌─────┐
├───────┼┼─┴──┼──┼─┤
*
└─*──┤├───┤ X.25│
│ TRN Adapter │ │ │
*
* └┘ │ dev.│ 02
└───────┼┼────┼──┼─┘
******** DTE-2 └─────┘
││
│ │
 
│ SSAP=08
││
│ │
│ DSAP = 08
=====================
│ Dest Addr = 400031740001
( TRN
│└────┘ │
) │ Source Addr = 400070000000
(
└────────┘
) │
or 400070000001
=====================


Figure 100. Scenario 3: Connection Initiation (from X.25 Device Only)

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

253

6.18 Scenario 4: Open Connection (from Token-Ring and X.25 Devices)

Figure 101. Scenario 4: Open Connection (from Token-Ring and X.25 Devices)

6.18.1 Description
Scenario 4 adds to Scenario 3 by making the 3174-11R, which is just a PU 2.0
device in Scenario 3, into a QLLC secondary gateway as well. It is an example
of an Open Connection from both Token-Ring devices and X.25 devices. In this
scenario, any token-ring device attached to the 3174-11R gateway is allowed to
access a specific X.25 device, and any X.25 device coming in through the
3174-11L gateway is allowed to access a specific token-ring host.
For Scenario 4:
•

The 3174-11R from Scenario 3 is now installed with the X.25 Token-Ring
Gateway RPQ and customized as an X.25 Token-Ring Gateway.
Note that it is still a PU 2.0 device for its attached terminals; that is, the
terminal LUs are using the 3174 local PU function.

254

3174 Installation Guide

•

A PS/2 (A) is attached to the token ring to access the 3090 host via the
3174-11R gateway.

•

The 3174-11L from Scenario 3 operates, as in that scenario, as an X.25
Token-Ring Gateway via its CCA.

Notes:
1. The 3174-11R is now a PU 2.0 device and X.25 Token-Ring Gateway.
2. VTAM in the host sees the 3174-11L gateway, the 3174-11R gateway, and the
PS/2 as local SNA major nodes.
3. The 3174-11L gateway sees the 3174-11R and the PS/2 as DSPUs, as if they
were attached to its token ring.
Figure 102 on page 256 shows an overview of the definitions required for
Scenario 4.

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

255

6.18.2 Definitions Overview
┌────────┐
│ Host │
└───┬────┘
│
┌───┴────┐
│3174-11L│
└───┬────┘
│
┌──────┴───────┐
│ TRN Network │
└──────┬───────┘
│
....│.....
.3174-11L.
..........
│
┌─┴──┐
│Host│
│DTE │
└─┬──┘
│
****************
* X.25 Network *
****************
│
┌─┴──┐
│3174│
│DTE │
└─┬──┘
│
│
│
┌───┴────┐
│X.25 Seg│
├────────┤
│ Bridge │
└───┬────┘
│
│ 3174-11R
┌──────┴───────┐
│ TRN Network │
└──────┬───────┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌────┴───┐
│ PC/3270│
└────────┘

VTAM Definitions
3174-11L:
3174-11R:
PC/3270:
PU CUADDR=E40.. PU CUADDR=E41.. PU CUADDR=E42..
LU LOCADDR=02.. LU LOCADRR=02.. LU LOCADDR=02..
3174-11L Customization
Q100: 11L
Q101: M
1A Host
Q104: 40 Q105: 46
Q150: 1
Q215: 00000
Q900: 400031740001 08
Q940: 40=400031740001 08
41=400070000000 08
42=400070000001 08
2A Host
Q104: C1
Q150: 2
Q215: 00000
Q900: 400031740001 04
Q942: SID=10 TRNaddr=400031740001 SAP=08
Q943: No entries required for Open Connection
Q944: TRNSID=10 X25SID=XX X25GWProt=Not reqd
Q946: 1
Q947: BB3
Q948: 001
Q949: 700000
Q423: 201000600
Q424: 201000300
Q452: ________
Q463: 0001
Q464: 0008
Q467: 0008
3174-11R Customization
Q100: 11R
Q101: 3
Q150: 2
Q215: 00000
Q900: 400070000000 08
Q942: SID=02 TRNaddr=400070000001 SAP=08
Q943: SID=10 X25addr=400031740001 HostID=1A
DTE Number=201000300
Q944: TRNSID=XX X25SID=10 X25GWProt=Not reqd

Q401:
Q420:
Q423:
Q452:

4
00000100
201000300
E810XX

Q946:
Q947:
Q948:
Q949:

1
BB2
001
222299

Q421: 00000100
Q424: 201000600
Q463: 1 Q464: 8

Q467: 4

PC/3270 Configuration
Destination Address=400031740001
Remote SAP=04
PUID=00000
BlockID=061
CONFIG.SYS
device=C:\LSP\DXMC0MOD.SYS 400070000001

Figure 102. Scenario 4: Definitions Overview

256

3174 Installation Guide

6.18.3 3174-11L Gateway Customization
See customization panels in Scenario 3 (nothing has changed).

6.18.4 3174-11R Gateway Customization





______________ Model / Attach ______________

•

We will now customize the 3174-11R used in
Scenario 3 as a stand-alone PU 2.0 X.25
device, and turn it into an X.25 Token-Ring
Gateway.

•

Question 150 response is changed to 2.

•

Question 900 is the token-ring address of the
3174-11R gateway.

098 099 - 11R GATEWAY WITH RPQ 8Q0743
100 - 11R
101 - 3

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






___________________ X.25 ___________________

104 - C1

108 - 0000000

110 - 0

116 - 2_ __

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 0 0 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0

141 - A

150 - 2

165 - 1

166 - A

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

370 - 0

372 - 0 0

127 - 0 0

168 - 0

365 - 0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________

900 - 4000 7000 0000 08

905 - 0

908 - IBMLAN

911 - 0

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu



Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

257





•

The PS/2, with token-ring address
400070000001 (see its CONFIG.SYS file
address parameter) is mapped to SID 02.
(This mapping, however, is not used as we
will allow an Open Connection from any
Token-Ring device to access the 3174-11L
through the 3174-11R gateway.

•

The 3174-11L on the other end of the X.25
network connection is assigned as the
destination SID 10.

•

In this mapping, any token-ring device is
allowed to access the X.25 device SID 10.

____942: T-R Devices Address Assignment_____

SID

Ring Address

00
02
04
06
08
0A
0C
0E
10
12
14
16
18
1A
1C

XXXX
4000
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
7000
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
0001
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

SAP

F

W

SID

Ring Address

XX
04
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

01
03
05
07
09
0B
0D
0F
11
13
15
17
19
1B
1D

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

SAP

F

W

XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX
XX

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






____943: X25 Devices Address Assignment_____

Dest
SID

X25
Ring Address

0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B

XXXX
XXXX
4000
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

XXXX
XXXX
3174
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

Host
ID

XXXX
XXXX
0001
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX
XXXX

__
__
1A
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

DTE Number

RC

RD

Inac
Time

_______________
_______________
201000300______
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






_944: X.25 Gateway Default/Open Connections__

Token Ring
Devices SID

X25
Devices SID

XX
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

10
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

X25 Gateway
Protocol
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

258

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu

3174 Installation Guide







•

In this scenario, question 949 is not
significant.

•

The Common SNA panel and other panels
not shown are not significant to our scenario.

•

Various X.25 options are specified on this
panel.

____945: X.25 Gateway Bridge Information_____

946 - 1

Bridge Number (0-F)

947 - BB2

Token-Ring Segment Number (001-FFF)

948 - 001

3174-X25 Segment Number (001-FFF)

949 - 2222 99

T-R Address for Internal Use (000000-7FFFFE)
4000 XXXX XX --

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






________________ Common SNA ________________

500 - 0

501 - ________

502 - ________

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

8=Fwd

12=Test Menu






____________ 332:

X.25 Options ____________

400 - 00 1 0

401 - 4

409 - 10100100

420 - 00000100

402 421 - 00000100

423 - 201000300______

424 - 201000600______

430 - 1

431 - 0

432 - 07

434 - 1

435 - 07

440 - A

441 - __

433 - 7

442 - ____

450 - 0300

451 - 10

452 - E810XX__

453 - 10000000

461 -

462 - ____

463 - 0001

464 - 0008

465 - ____

466 - ____

467 - 0004

Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF:

3=Quit

7=Back

12=Test Menu



Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

259

6.18.5 PS/2 (PC/3270) Configuration
Attachment Types Screen



Attachment Types
More: -+
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Enter the required information.



Total number of sessions for:



Distributed Function Terminal (DFT) . . . . . . . . .

[0]

LAN via 802.2 protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[1]

LAN via NETBIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0]

3174 Peer Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0]

Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) . . . . . . . .

[0]

Asynchronous Data Link Control (ASYNCH) . . . . . . .
(for attachment to a Series/1 SNA gateway only)

[0]

CCITT X.25 Network (X.25) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[0]

F1=Help F3=Exit F7=Backward F8=Forward



Figure 103. Scenario 4: Attachment Types Screen

Adv. Options for LAN Attachment via 802.2 Protocol Screen



Advanced Options for LAN Attachment via 802.2 Protocol
More: -+
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Enter the required information.
Total number of LAN sessions . . . . . .

1

Link name

lan1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Destination address



. . . . . . . . . . [400031740001]

Number of sessions for this gateway

. . [1]

Physical Unit ID . . . . . . . . . . . . [00000]
Adapter number . . . . . . . . . . . . . [0]
Remote SAP/Local SAP . . . . . . . . . . [08]/[04]
Block ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [061]
PIU size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [0265]



F1=Help F3=Exit F7=Backward F8=Forward

Figure 104. Scenario 4: Advanced Options for LAN Attachment Screen

260

3174 Installation Guide



CONFIG.SYS File
REM *----------------------------------------------------------------*
REM *
LAN Support Program
*
REM *----------------------------------------------------------------*
DEVICE=C:\DOS50\HIMEM.SYS
DOS=HIGH
DEVICE=C:\DOS50\ANSI.SYS
DEVICE=C:\DOS50\SMARTDRV.SYS 512 128
DEVICE=C:\LSP\DXMA0MOD.SYS
DEVICE=C:\LSP\DXMC0MOD.SYS 400070000001
SHELL=C:\DOS\COMMAND.COM /P /E:256
LASTDRIVE=E
BUFFERS=10
FILES=20
FCBS=16,8

Figure 105. Scenario 4: CONFIG.SYS for PS/2 Using 802.2 Protocol

6.18.6 VTAM Definitions for 3174-11L Gateway, 3174-11R Gateway And PS/2
***********************************************************************
* DEFINITIONS FOR LOCAL 3174-11L
*
***********************************************************************
RABQ40Y VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
RABP40 PU
CUADDR=E40,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,MAXBFRU=10,
MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,USSTAB=US327X,
VPACING=0
RABT4002 LU
LOCADDR=2
RABT4003 LU
LOCADDR=3
***********************************************************************
* DEFINITIONS FOR 3174-11R GATEWAY - SEEN AS A DSPU BY 3174-11L
*
***********************************************************************
RABP41 PU
CUADDR=E41,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,MAXBFRU=10,
MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,USSTAB=US327X,
VPACING=0,SECNET=YES
RABT4102 LU
LOCADDR=2
RABT4103 LU
LOCADDR=3
***********************************************************************
* DEFINITIONS FOR PS/2 - SEEN AS A DSPU BY 3174-11L
*
***********************************************************************
RABP42 PU
CUADDR=E42,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,MAXBFRU=10,
MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,USSTAB=US327X,
VPACING=0,SECNET=YES
RABT4102 LU
LOCADDR=2
RABT4103 LU
LOCADDR=3

Figure 106. Scenario 4: VTAM Definitions for 3174 Gateways and PS/2

Chapter 6. X.25 Token-Ring Gateway RPQ

261

262

3174 Installation Guide

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)
This chapter describes the 3174 Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA). It
provides an overview of the AEA functions and a summary of the major
functional enhancements introduced in Configuration Support-B Release 2, and
other enhancements introduced in Configuration Support-C Release 2 and
Release 5 Licensed Internal Code. An example AEA configuration, including
customization panel responses and an explanation of the customization process,
is also provided. This configuration example was tested at ITSO Raleigh Center.

7.1 Introduction
Many customers have ASCII terminals (displays and printers) which they wish to
integrate into their existing 3270 network for access to both 3270 and ASCII
hosts. At the same time, they also wish to use their 3270 terminals to access
both 3270 and ASCII hosts. The protocols and datastreams used for
asynchronous communication between ASCII hosts and terminals (collectively
known as ASCII devices), however, are quite different from those used between
3270 hosts and terminals.
To satisfy the demand for integration of ASCII devices into 3270 networks, IBM
announced 3174 support for ASCII communication in 1987. This support consists
of a hardware adapter, the Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA), and
microcode functions in the 3174.
In 1990, significant enhancements to the original AEA support were introduced
with Configuration Support-B Release 2. AEA support was further enhanced in
Configuration Support-C Release 2 (1992) and Release 5 (1994).

7.2 Description
The AEA feature allows you to attach ASCII hosts and terminals to the 3174,
using either a direct attachment cable or via a switched or non-switched line.
Each adapter card contains the microprocessor, storage, control logic, and an
I/O panel with eight RS-232C interface connectors for attaching ASCII devices.
An additional diskette containing microcode to support the adapter is also
required.
Three major functions are provided by the AEA:
•

3270 Terminal Emulation, which allows ASCII displays and printers (including
PCs or PS/2s emulating ASCII terminals) to emulate 3270 terminals and
communicate with 3270 hosts.

•

ASCII Terminal Emulation, which allows 3270 displays and printers to
emulate certain ASCII terminals and communicate with ASCII hosts.

•

ASCII Pass-Through, which allows ASCII terminals to communicate with
ASCII hosts through the 3174.

In addition, there are a number of functions provided to manage this
environment such as:
•

Destination switching

•

Switched line management

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

263

•

Support for “smart” modems

•

Network management support

•

Local copy facilities

•

Customization support

The AEA can be ordered as feature #3020, which provides the adapter card, a
downstream load diskette for the AEA microcode, and a wrap plug for testing.
The number of adapters that can be installed in a 3174 depends on the model
number and the available slots. Each of the large-sized 3174 floor-standing
Models 1xx and the rack-mounted Models 2xx can have up to three adapters
installed. Note, however, that each Model 2xx machine only has a maximum of
five card slots. You should, therefore, plan for the configuration of these models
carefully. For example, if you wish to have 32 coax ports and 24 asynchronous
ports, you would have to use 3299 Terminal Multiplexers instead of Terminal
Multiplexer Adapter cards so as to minimize the number of slots used.
Each of the medium-sized 3174 Models 5xR and 6xR (except the Model 53R
which does not support the AEA feature) can have only one adapter installed.
Because of storage constraints the Model 52R cannot support either
Configuration Support-B or Configuration Support-C and, therefore, will not
benefit from the enhancements introduced in Configuration Support-B Release 2
and later releases.
The 3174 WNM Models 41R and 43R as well as the small-sized 3174 Models 8xR
and 9xR do not support the AEA feature.

7.3 Storage Requirements
Additional controller storage is required when the AEA is configured for base
functions. If you wish to use large-screen support or MLT, additional storage is
required for these also. See Appendix E, “3174 Storage Requirements” on
page 755 for details on calculating the amount of storage you need.

7.4 Disk Requirements
The AEA requires either a second diskette drive or a fixed disk to accommodate
the additional microcode required for the adapter. This AEA microcode is
supplied on a 1.2MB DSL diskette.
Before Configuration Support-C Release 1, the AEA microcode can be merged
with microcode to support other DSL devices (such as the 3472-G) onto one
1.2MB DSL diskette.
With Configuration Support-C Release 1 and later releases, the AEA microcode
is merged with microcode to support other DSL devices onto the 2.4MB Control
Extension diskette.

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3174 Installation Guide

7.5 Adapter Installation
To install the AEA, you should use the Asynchronous Emulation Adapter
Customer Set Up Instructions , which is supplied with the feature.
After installing the AEA(s), you should perform a Card Verification Test. The
wrap plug included with the AEA package is required for this test, which is
described in detail in the AEA set up instructions manual. After a successful
completion of the Card Verification Test, the 3174 is ready for customization.
When customization is completed, the AEA code should be installed in one of the
following:
•

A single DSL diskette in drive 2, containing only the AEA microcode

•

A merged DSL diskette in drive 2, containing the AEA microcode and
microcode used for other DSL devices

•

Merged onto the fixed disk, if a fixed disk is used

The AEA microcode is loaded into the AEA adapter at each 3174 IML.

7.6 Network Management
ASCII terminals attached to the AEA are supported by most 3174 network
management functions. Specific AEA tests are available from option 12 of the
Test Menu. Some of the functions include:
•

Test ports

•

Connect to smart modem

•

Transmit and receive test data

•

Display device status and errors

Error Log and Alerts: The 3174 logs errors and generate alerts to the primary
host for conditions including:
•

Permanent link outages

•

Permanent calling outages

•

Station outages

•

Temporary error counts exceeded

Response Time Monitor: The AEA supports the full set of RTM functions. An
ASCII device can be used in test mode to display the RTM logs and to display
the LTTI (Last Transaction Time Indicator) in the Operator Information Area.
Vital Product Data: There is currently no support available in ASCII terminals
for Vital Product Data or VPD; however, you can enter and store the data
manually in the 3174 just as you would for the “pre-VPD” terminals. See 13.2.1,
“Vital Product Data” on page 439 for details on VPD.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

265

7.7 Configuration Support-B Release 2 AEA Enhancements
AEA support in the 3174 was significantly enhanced with the introduction of
Configuration Support-B Release 2 and a new level of AEA DSL microcode. To
get these enhancements, you must upgrade to at least Configuration Support-B
Release 2.
If you are upgrading from Configuration Support-A, you may also require to
upgrade your diskette drive in order to handle the 2.4 MB diskette format that
Configuration Support-B uses. You will also require more controller storage to
run Configuration Support-B.
The enhancements to the AEA support are implemented entirely in the Licensed
Internal Code with Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases. These
enhancements are:
•

•

Additional support for 3270 CUT terminals in ASCII emulation mode:
−

Data General Dasher D210

−

DEC VT220 (7-bit and 8-bit)

−

Extended Attribute Buffer support (uses the 3270 terminal EAB to provide
enhanced mapping of ASCII character attributes)

Improved support for ASCII terminals in 3270 emulation mode:
−

MLT access to the primary host on the primary link

−

ROLM** Cypress, Cedar, Juniper

−

DEC VT220 (7-bit or 8-bit)

−

Tektronix 4205**

−

Wyse 50/60**

•

User-Defined Translate Table (UDX) for ASCII terminals

•

User-Defined Terminal Table (UDT) and keyboard mapping for ASCII
terminals

•

Miscellaneous 3287 printer support for ASCII printers

•

Additional per-port password capability

•

A new device type (for example, ASCII plotter) for use only as a system
printer

•

IBM GDDM* graphics for ASCII devices

•

National Language Support (NLS) for IBM and OEM ASCII terminals

•

Support for large format ASCII screens (30x80 and 32x80)

7.8 Configuration Support-C Release 2 AEA Enhancements
Configuration Support-C Release 2 offers the following new functions and
enhancements for ASCII workstations :
•

132 column support via AEA
132 column support via AEA allows both ASCII terminal emulation (3270
device emulating an ASCII terminal) and 3270 terminal emulation (ASCII
device emulating a 3270 device) to display up to 132 columns of data on a

266

3174 Installation Guide

single line (for terminals that are able to display 132 columns). See 14.2.8,
“132-Column Support via AEA” on page 472 for further information.
•

Entry Assist support for ASCII devices
Entry Assist support for ASCII devices extends 3174 Entry Assist capabilities
to ASCII devices. Entry Assist provides tab, word wrap, margin, and audible
End of Line (EOL) signal to terminal operators using applications that involve
entry and editing of text material. See 14.2.9, “Entry Assist Support for
ASCII” on page 475 for further information.

•

HAP sharing for local copy
An ASCII printer attached to an ASCII workstation that is, in turn, attached to
a 3174 AEA, can receive local copy data from any workstation attached to the
same 3174. (This function is also available to a printer attached to a 3270
workstation.) See 14.2.3, “HAP Sharing for Local Copy” on page 459 for
further information.

•

Dynamically Defined Dependent Logical Units
VTAM dynamically defines a dependent LU definition for an ASCII
workstation attached to a 3174 capable of supporting the dynamic definition
of dependent LUs. (This function is also available to 3270 displays and
printers attached to the same 3174. The function is also provided by
Configuration Support-B Release 4.1.) See Chapter 11, “Dynamic Definition
of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)” on page 393 for further information.

7.9 Configuration Support-C Release 5 AEA Enhancements
Configuration Support-C Release 5 offers the following new enhancements for
ASCII workstations:
•

ASCII Multiple Host Support
This support allows ASCII terminals and printers attached to the 3174 via
AEA to access hosts that are attached via the 3174 Single Link Multiple Host
Support (SLMH) or via the Concurrent Communication Adapter (CCA).
Note:
This function was previously provided for Configuration Support-C only via
RPQ 8Q0933.

7.10 AEA Connectivity
The following sections describe the connectivity supported by the AEA for
various devices (displays, printers, modems) and hosts.

7.10.1 ASCII Host Support
The AEA is designed to be compatible with a wide range of ASCII hosts; at the
ITSO, we tested an asynchronous connection to the IBM Information Network and
a dial up connection to a DEC host.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

267

7.10.2 3270 Host Support
The AEA allows ASCII devices to have 3270 host sessions using the following
upstream protocols:
•

Local channel (SNA and non-SNA)

•

ESCON

•

SDLC

•

BSC

•

Token ring

•

Ethernet

•

Frame Relay

•

X.25

AEA with MLT and Multi-Host Support
The Multiple Logical Terminal (MLT) function allows an ASCII display or printer
to act as multiple logical terminals. Each logical terminal has its own 3270 host
address and can interact independently with its own host application in 3270
emulation mode. By using the Change Screen key sequence, an ASCII display
can access any host attached via the primary host link, any of the other hosts
attached via the secondary host link(s) or any ASCII host attached via an AEA.
Access to the host is made through either the connection menu or the default
destination procedure.
Therefore with Configuration Support-C Release 5, using AEA configured for
MLT, you can access up to five 3270 host sessions, ASCII hosts sessions or a
mix of 3270 and ASCII host sessions.
Connection menus can be defined as the default display for the terminal at
power up time, or else the terminal can be connected to a default destination.
The connection menu can then be invoked at a later time by a special key
sequence. See 7.12.5, “AEA Default Destination Panel” on page 307.

7.10.3 AEA Downstream Support
The AEA downstream connectivity is summarized in the following diagram.

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3174 Installation Guide

┌─────────┐
┌───────────────┬───────┐
│3270 HOST│
│
3174
│ AEA 1│
│
...................1.......................ASCII display
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
....................ASCII display
│
│
│
2 : │
│
│
│
│
:...................ASCII host
│
│
│
│
│
│
...................3.......................ASCII display
│
│
│ :
│
│
with printer
│
...............:
....................ASCII host
│
│
│
: │
│
│
│
│
4 : ├───────┤
│
│
│
: │ TA │
│
│
│
:...................3270 display
│
│
│
│
│
│
...................5.......................3270 display
│
│
│
│
│
│
...................6.......................3270 printer
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
....................3270 printer
│
│
│
: │
│
│
│
│
7 : ├───────┤
│
│
│
: │ AEA 2│
│
│
│
:...................ASCII host
│
│
│
│
│
│
...................8.......................ASCII printer
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
....................ASCII printer
│
│
│
9 : │
│
│
│
│
:...................ASCII host
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
....................ASCII host
│
│
│
10 : │
│
│
│
│
:...................ASCII display
│
│
│
│
│
with printer
│
│
│
│
│
└─────────┘
└───────────────┴───────┘

Figure 107. Connectivity Summary for Asynchronous Emulation Adapter

Notes:

1The ASCII display is mapped to appear to the 3270 host as a 3270
terminal in CUT mode. This can be monochrome or color.

2An ASCII display is connected to an ASCII host in pass-through mode.
The ASCII display and the ASCII host need not be on the same adapter. For
example, the ASCII display on AEA 1 could be connected to an ASCII host on
AEA 2.

3An ASCII display with an attached printer is mapped to the 3270 host as a
3270 display and a 3270 printer.

4A 3270 display in CUT mode emulating an ASCII terminal can connect to
an ASCII host.

5A 3270 display session is not affected by the AEA. In addition, a menu
can be added for the display operator to select an alternate connection to an
ASCII host.

6A 3270 printer session is not affected by the AEA. However, printer
definitions are static and, unlike display sessions, cannot be switched by the
operator. The printer is currently attach to a port defined for a 3270 host
session. If you wish to print from an ASCII host, you will have to re-attach
the printer to another port with the ASCII host defined (for example, to the
printer port in 7).

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

269

7A 3270 printer (excluding 4250 image printers and SOEMI devices) can be
mapped to an ASCII host as a generic ASCII printer.

8An ASCII printer can be mapped to appear as a 3287 printer to the 3270
host.

9Pass-through from an ASCII printer to an ASCII host is supported.
10Pass-through from an ASCII display with a printer attached to an ASCII
host.

7.10.4 Supported 3270 Displays
Using the AEA, all CUT mode displays with US English Typewriter keyboards and
at least 1920 characters per screen are capable of emulating ASCII terminal
types:
•

IBM 3101

•

DEC VT100

•

DEC VT220 (Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases)

•

Dasher 210 (Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases)

The ASCII terminal emulation capability is in addition to the base 3270 display
ability to perform in a 3270 environment.
CUT mode terminals include 3278, 3279, 3178, 3179 (not G models) 3180, 3191,
3192 (not G models), 3471 and 3472 (see note below). Also a PC or PS/2 running
a 3270 CUT mode emulator is supported.
Note: DFT terminals are not supported on the 3174 AEA feature but DFT/E
terminals, such as the 3472-G, can have a CUT mode session and, therefore, can
have an ASCII session.

7.10.5 Supported 3270 Printers
The following 3270 US English printers are supported by the AEA either for local
copy from ASCII terminals emulating 3270 displays or as mapped ASCII printers.

270

•

3287 Models 1 and 2

•

3289 Models 1 and 2

•

3230 Model 2

•

3262 Models 3 and 13

•

3268 Model 2

•

4224

•

4214

•

4234

•

4245

3174 Installation Guide

7.10.6 Supported ASCII Displays
The following ASCII displays emulate monochrome 3270 devices to a 3270 host
when attached to the AEA:
•

ADDS Viewpoint A-2**

•

ADDS Viewpoint 78**

•

ANSI 3.64 terminals**

•

DEC VT100

•

DEC VT220 (Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases)

•

DEC VT52

•

Hazeltine 1500**

•

Esprit Executive 10/78**

•

Hewlett-Packard 2621B**

•

IBM 3101

•

IBM 3161

•

IBM 3163

•

IBM 3164

•

IBM FTTERM (monochrome)

•

ROLM Cedar, Cypress and Juniper

•

Lear Siegler ADM 3A**

•

Lear Siegler ADM 5**

•

Lear Siegler ADM 11**

•

Lear Siegler ADM 12**

•

Lear Siegler ADM 1178**

•

Televideo 912**

•

Televideo 970**

•

Minitel 1B**

•

Wyse 50/60**

The following ASCII displays emulate four-color 3270 devices to a 3270 host when
attached to the AEA:
•

DEC VT241**

•

Tektronix 4205** two color only (Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later
releases)

•

IBM 3164

•

IBM FTTERM (color)

There are many other displays which work, for example, most PCs, and PS/2s if
they are emulating an ASCII terminal. It is, however, the customers
responsibility to test terminals other than those listed above.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

271

It is also possible with Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases to
modify the supplied UDTs to support a similar or related terminal. 3174 AEA
Description and Reference provides examples of UDTs for:
•

DEC VT240**

•

Tektronix 4207/8/9**

•

Tektronix 4105**

ASCII devices used to emulate a 3270 device on the AEA must be capable of:
•

Supporting one of the speeds provided by the AEA (300, 600, 1200, 2400,
4800, 9600 and 19200 bps) on a RS-232 interface. Transmit and receive
speeds must be equal.

•

Operating in full duplex character mode.

•

Supporting the 7-bit code defined by ANSI 3.4 (before Configuration
Support-B Release 2).

•

Supporting the 7-bit or 8-bit code defined by ANSI 3.4 (with Configuration
Support-B Release 2 and later releases).

•

Supporting one of the flow control procedures that the AEA supports.

•

Displaying at least a 24 row x 80 column screen.

If using a device not listed above, then consider that it should match one of the
displays from the list in the following respects:
•

The control sequences used for 3270 emulation:
−

Cursor Position

−

Line Erase

−

Screen Erase

−

Highlighting (if available)

−

Status Line Control (if available)

−

Printer Port Sharing (if available)

−

Terminal Setup and Reset.

•

Control codes and graphic characters must preserve the same codes and
characters on both 3270 displays and ASCII displays.

•

The keyboard layout must send the same codes and controls sequences to
the AEA.

•

The terminal must handle the End-Of-Line and End-Of-Screen condition in the
same manner as 3270 displays.

7.10.7 Supported ASCII Printers
ASCII printers, when attached to the AEA, emulate a 3287 with a 2 KB print
buffer. If they are attached to an SNA 3174, SNA Character String (SCS)
datastream is supported as well. With the graphics support in Configuration
Support-B Release 2 and later releases, structured field processing is also
supported.
The basic AEA requires printers capable of:

272

3174 Installation Guide

•

Supporting one of the speeds provided by the 3174 AEA (300, 600, 1200, 2400,
4800, 9600 and 19200 bps) on a RS-232 interface. Transmit and receive
speeds must be equal.

•

Operating in full duplex character mode.

•

Supporting the 7-bit code defined by ANSI 3.4 (before Configuration
Support-B Release 2).

•

Supporting the 7-bit or 8-bit code defined by ANSI 3.4 (with Configuration
Support-B Release 2 and later releases).

•

Supporting one of the flow control procedures that the AEA supports or is
capable of printing at the full line speed.

•

Supporting either ASCII upper and lower case or folding lower case to upper
case.

•

Supporting Carriage Return (CR) and Line Feed (LF); CR should not perform
LF automatically.

•

Not requiring delay characters to allow for mechanical motion.

With UDT and UDX support the connectivity options available are better but you
need to define the characteristics yourself.
The printer should support one of the following character sets:
•

US ASCII

•

ISO 8859-1.2

•

DEC MCS

•

PC Code Page 850

Otherwise, with Configuration Support-B Release 2 or later releases, you may
specify a User-Defined Translate (UDX) table.
IBM ASCII printers supported include:
•

4201 Proprinter and Proprinter II

•

4202 Proprinter XL

•

4207 Proprinter X24

•

4208 Proprinter XL24

•

4224 Printer Models 301, 302, and 3E3

ASCII plotters are also supported (see 7.17, “ASCII Plotter Support” on
page 319).

7.10.8 Supported Modems
Modems used to connect ASCII hosts and devices to the AEA can use leased
line, limited distance or switched lines. They should be asynchronous, provide
equal transmit and receive speeds and conform to EIA RS-232 or CCITT V.24/V.28
specifications.
Table 13 on page 274 lists the signals and pins used by the AEA.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

273

Table 13. AEA M o d e m Pin Assignment
Pin N u m b e r

Signal Name

1

GND (Frame Ground)

2

TD (Transmit Data)

3

RD (Receive Data)

4

RTS (Request To Send)

5

CTS (Clear To Send - optional)

6

DSR (Data Set Ready)

7

SG (Signal Ground)

8

CD (Carrier Detect) or RLSD (Receive Line Signal Detect)

20

DTR (Data Terminal Ready)

22

RI (Ring Indicator)

25

BSY (Busy Out - optional, not RS-232C)

The following “smart modems” are also supported for PABXs and public
switched networks:
•

Hayes 300, 1200 and 1200B **

•

IBM 5841

•

MICOM 3012+ and 3024+ **

7.10.9 ASCII Attachment Cabling
Be very careful about the wiring in RS-232 cables. Incorrectly wired cables may
cause such signals as Data Terminal Ready (DTR) or Data Set Ready (DSR) to
be in the wrong state at the wrong time, and the result usually is that absolutely
nothing happens. RS-232 cables come in many varieties with anywhere from
three to 25 wires in the cable. The wires may pass straight through, or almost
any number may be crossed in the cable. Pin 6 at one end of the cable may be
Pin 20 at the other end, or Pin 5 may be jumpered to Pin 8 at one end and a
single wire then goes to Pin 4 at the other end. The RS-232 cable currently in
use for attaching an asynchronous ASCII terminal to an OEM host
communication port is, in many cases, not the proper cable for attaching the
same device to the AEA RS-232 port. The key is to understand which connection
is being made (modem, null modem, or direct) and then follow the cable
diagrams in 3174 Site Planning , or the 3174 AEA Description and Reference .

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3174 Installation Guide

7.11 AEA Example Configuration
The following section describes a sample configuration of the 3174 with the AEA
feature installed. Figure 108 illustrates the configuration set up at our test site.
This was customized using Configuration Support-B Release 3 and the
responses are shown in 7.12, “3174 Customization” on page 276. In this
example, all displays are configured with three LTs and are able to connect to
any of the hosts.

┌──────────────┐
┌──────┐
┌──────┐ ┌──────┐
│
│
│ASCII │
│ASCII │ │ASCII │
│ 3270 Host │
│Host │
│Host │ │Host │
│ WTCXAA
│
│DALLAS│
│IIN │ │DEC │
└────┬─────────┘
└───┬──┘
└──┬───┘ └┬───┬─┘
│
│
│
│ │
│
┌──┴──┐
┌──┴──┐
│ │
│
│modem│
│modem│
│ │
│
└──┬──┘
└──┬──┘
│ │
┌────┴─────────┬────┬─────────┐
│
│
│ │
│Primary host │
│AEA ports│
┌──┴──┐
┌──┴──┐
│ │
│Adapter
│
│
7 ├────┤modem│
│modem│
│ │
├──────────────┘
│
│
└─────┘
└──┬──┘
│ │
│
│
6 ├──────────────────┘
│ │
│
3174
│
│
│ │
│
│
5 ├───────────────────────────┘ │
│
│
│
│
├───────────────────┤
4 ├───────────────────────────────┘
│
│
│
│ Terminal
│
3 ├──────────────── 4201 Printer
│ Multiplexor
│
│
│ Adapter
│
2 ├──────────────── VT100 terminal
│
│
│
│
│
1 ├──────────────── 3164 terminal
│
│
│
│
ports
│
0 ├──────────────── 3164 terminal
│ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 │
│
└─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬───┴─────────┘
│ │ │ │ │ │ │ └─────────────────────────────── 3270 Printer
│ │ │ │ │ │ └───────────────────────────────── 3270 Display
│ │ │ │ │ └───────────────────────────────────
│ │ │ │ └─────────────────────────────────────
│
│ │ │ └───────────────────────────────────────
│
│ │ └─────────────────────────────────────────
│
│ └───────────────────────────────────────────

└───────────────────────────────────────────── 3270 Display

Figure 108. AEA Physical View

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

275

7.12 3174 Customization
The ASCII world deals with many different types of terminals with a wide variety
of features and operating parameters. Customizing the AEA to support an ASCII
environment can be a complex procedure. A successfully configured 3174 is
dependent largely on the care taken to prepare and plan for the customization.
Therefore, it is important to follow the steps outlined in the 3174 Planning Guide
and to use the planning worksheets provided. These worksheets are a great
help because many of the parameters need to be determined before going into
the actual customizing process. This process is designed around having the
worksheets completed in sequence. If you have performed AEA customization
several times before, you may feel comfortable in taking some short cuts but if it
is your first time use the worksheets.
To begin customizing, you need the following:
•

3174 Control and Utility diskettes

•

3174 Planning Guide

•

Copies of the planning worksheets

•

Characteristics of the ASCII devices and hosts you are connecting

Although AEA operation requires the AEA code to be loaded into the 3174,
customizing does not. The actual AEA code is loaded during IML.
In the following sections, we describe AEA customization and work through an
example where the configuration shown in Figure 108 on page 275 is
customized. But first, a look at some of the AEA terminology.

7.12.1 AEA Customizing Terminology
During AEA customizing, you will encounter some unique terms including the
following:
•

Connection Menu
A menu list of all the available host connections for a given terminal. The
menu appears on the terminal′s screen according to customizing definitions.

•

Default Destination
A host to which the terminal is connected when it is initially turned on. If a
host is not defined as the default destination, the Connection Menu is
displayed.

•

ASCII Terminal Emulation
A 3270 terminal emulating an ASCII terminal.

•

3270 Terminal Emulation
An ASCII terminal emulating a 3270 terminal.

•

AEA Station
Any facility supported by the AEA, either ASCII or 3270, host or terminal,
printer or display.

•

AEA Station Set
One or more AEA stations with the same attributes.

•

276

3174 Installation Guide

AEA Port

Any 3174 port, either coax or ASCII, which uses the AEA functions.
•

AEA Port Set
One or more AEA ports having the same physical characteristics. If more
than one station set is defined for a port set, then a display using that port
set is presented with a menu prompting for the desired station set.

•

AEA Port Set panel
The AEA Port Set panel is used by both AEA and MLT functions. The AEA
function uses it to define the port type (that is, direct, switched, non-switched,
or 3270 coax) and the modem type for each station set. MLT is defined in
the AEA port set by specifying a session limit for every device.
Note: Before Configuration Support-B Release 2, ASCII devices could only
have a single session and the session limit for ASCII devices was forced to a
blank.

•

AEA Port to Port Set Map panel
This is a customizing panel used to associate the AEA port sets with the
physical 3174 ports. There is an entry for each 3174 port to which a port set
is assigned.

•

AEA Station Set panel
This is the customizing panel which describes the characteristics of the
stations which participate in the AEA operation and maps them to a port set.
The AEA Station Set definitions comprise many options of which you need to
define a subset depending on the station type you are defining.

•

Port Assignment
If the AEA feature is used on a 3174 with the MLT feature, the Port
Assignment panel must be completed. The Port Assignment panel defines
which physical 3174 port supports which logical terminal.

7.12.2 AEA Customizing Worksheets
Worksheet numbers are dependent on the microcode release level.
With Configuration Support-B Release 3, which is used in our example
configuration, the worksheets used for customizing the AEA are:
•

Worksheet 15 - 3270 Attachment Diagram
On this sheet, you group each 3270 port into a port set. You use this sheet
to plan for the attachment of 3270 terminals to an ASCII host.

•

Worksheet 16 - ASCII Attachment Diagram
This sheet is used to group the ASCII ports into port sets.

•

Worksheet 17 - AEA Configure

•

Worksheet 18 - AEA Port Set

•

Worksheet 19 - AEA Port-to-Port Set Map

•

Worksheet 20 - AEA Station Set

•

Worksheet 21 - AEA Default Destination

In addition there are other worksheets to fill out if you are modifying or creating
UDTs or UDXs.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

277

Worksheets 17 to 21 are in the same format as the actual screens you use to
customize. The first two planning worksheets, 15 and 16, are not like any screen
but they are probably the key to getting it right because this is where you decide
all the names and groups you will use.

7.12.3 AEA Customizing Flowchart
The following chart is a guide to the AEA customization process.
┌────────────────┐
┌──────────────────┐
│ Start
│
│ Fill out the
│
│ Configure AEA ├────────── worksheets
│
└────────────────┘
└────────┬─────────┘
│
┌─────────────────┐ ┌──────────────────┐
Note: This step ensures that
│ Will ASCII
│ │Customize the
│
you will be able to
│ devices emulate │y │Port Assignment │
address ASCII terminals
│ 3270 devices ? ├───for AEA host
│
from the 3270 host.
│
│ │addresses
│
└────────┬─────────┘ └─────────┬────────┘
n│
┌──────────────────┘
┌────────────────┐
1│Select Define/
│
│Configure AEA and │
│TCP/IP from menu │
└────────┬─────────┘
│
┌─────────────────┐
│Complete
│
│AEA Configure
│
│using
│
│Worksheet 17
│
└────────┬─────────┘
│
┌─────────────────┐
Note: Get the port set names
│Complete
│
from your completed
│AEA Port Set
│
Worksheets 15 and 16.
│using
│
│Worksheet 18
│
└────────┬─────────┘
│
┌─────────────────┐
│Complete
│
│AEA Port to Port │
│Set Map using
│
│Worksheet 19
│
└────────┬─────────┘
│
┌─────────────────┐
Note: Allocate a port set to
│Complete one
│
each station set you
│AEA Station Set │
define. Different
│entry for each
│
station sets may use the │Station Set type │
same port set.
│using Worksheet 20│
└────────┬─────────┘
│
┌─────────────────┐
┌──────────────────┐
│Complete
│
│AEA customization │
│AEA Default
│
│is now complete │
│Destination
├─────
│
│using
│
│Update PAM if
│
│Worksheet 21
│
│ required.
│
└──────────────────┘
└──────────────────┘

Figure 109. AEA Customizing Overview

Note:

1With Configuration Support-C Release 3 and later, the customization
panels for AEA and TCP/IP has to be selected by taking the option 5
(Define AEA and TCP/IP) from the 3174 Customize Control Disk menu and

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3174 Installation Guide

then choosing option 1 (Configure AEA and TCP/IP) from the AEA and
TCP/IP menu.
see Chapter 21, “TCP/IP” on page 605 for the TCP/IP definitions.

1With Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases up to
Configuration Support-C Release 2, the customization panels for AEA is
selected by taking the option 5 (Configure AEA) from the 3174 Customize
Control Disk menu and then choosing option 1 (Configure AEA) from the
AEA menu.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

279

7.12.4 AEA Customizing Questions
The questions asked during AEA customization are briefly described in this
section.

Question 110: MLT Configuration Level
Before configuring the AEA, make sure that you have this question answered in
your host(s) definition. If the answer for this question is non-zero (0=No MLT),
you need a response to question 116 as well. This sets up the host addresses
used by both 3270 and ASCII terminals when they are connected to a 3270 host.
The AEA Connection Menu, if used, lists the session under the host name you
specify in the station set definition.
If you specify ASCII MLT in question 703 (Configuration Support-B Release 2 and
later) then you must also specify MLT support for question 110. See 9.1,
“Multiple Logical Terminal” on page 331 for more information on MLT.

AEA Configure Panel
This panel is different for microcode levels before Configuration Support-B
Release 2. Figure 110 shows the panel for Configuration Support-B Release 2
and later releases up to Configuration Support-C Release 2. The main
differences are:
•

Addition of two new questions: 702 and 703

•

Deletion of the prompt for the AEA password (question 701)
Password is now specified at the port set level.




____________AEA Configure____________

700 - 1
702 - 1
703 - 1
710 - 00000000



711 - 00000000

712 - 00000000

713 - 00000000



Figure 110. AEA Configure Panel (Configuration Support-B Release 2 and Later Releases
up to Configuration Support-C Release 2)

Figure 111 on page 281 shows the panel for Configuration Support-C Release 3
and later. The major difference is that the question 700 requires a double-digit
response since it combines the AEA and TCP/IP features.

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3174 Installation Guide




__________AEA and TCP/IP Configure__________

700 - 1 0
702 - 1
703 - 1
710 - 00000000

711 - 00000000

712 - 00000000

713 - 00000000





Figure 111. AEA Configure Panel (Configuration Support-C Release 3 and Later)

Question 700: Configure the AEA Feature
This question applies to Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases up
to Configuration Support-C Release 2 and requires a single-digit response.

Response:
•

0=Turns off the AEA feature and maintains any AEA configuration data
previously stored (default response).

•

1=Initiates configuration procedure for the AEA feature, or use previously
configured data, and turns on the AEA.

Question 700: Configure the AEA and TCP/IP Feature
This question applies to Configuration Support-C Release 3 and later and
requires a double-digit response. The first digit is for the AEA feature and the
second digit is for the TCP/IP feature. See Chapter 21, “TCP/IP” on page 605
for the appropriate responses.

Digit 1 Response:
•

0=Turns off the AEA feature and maintains any AEA configuration data
previously stored (default response).

•

1=Initiates configuration procedure for the AEA feature, or use previously
configured data, and turns on the AEA.

Question 701: Password for ASCII Displays on Switched Lines
Question 701 has been removed with Configuration Support-B Release 2 and
later releases. See port set definition for entering passwords.
You may enter up to eight alphanumeric characters (no blank or space allowed)
as the password for all ASCII display stations which operates on switched lines.
If there is no response for this question, the user is not prompted for a
password.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

281

Question 702: Control Key Assignment
This question applies to Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases
only and allows you to specify the control key when using ASCII emulation.

Response:
•

0=Use the Alt key (same as before Configuration Support-B Release 2)

•

1=Use the Ctrl key (default response)

Question 703: Request MLT for AEA
This question applies to Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases
only and allows you to specify if you are using MLT on ASCII terminals.

Response:
•

0=No AEA MLT support (default response)

•

1=Request AEA MLT support

Question 710: Miscellaneous ASCII Feature Options (A)
Eight digits (0=No or 1=Yes). The default response is 00000000.

Response:
•

Digit 1 - Reverse Video Blanks-to-Hyphen Option
The response is valid with Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later
releases.
For 3270 displays without EABs, specifying this bit as 1 results in reverse
video blanks displaying as hyphens.

•

Digit 2 - Automatic New Line After End of Print
The response is valid with Configuration Support-B Release 4 and later
releases.
Specifying this bit as 1 results in an automatic new line only if the column
pointer is in a position other than column 1.
Specifying this bit as a 0 results in an automatic new line regardless of
where the column pointer is located.

•

Digit 3 - DSR Timing for Activating Connections
The response is valid with Configuration Support-B Release 4 and later
releases.
Specifying this bit as a 1 results in the AEA recognizing that a connection
has been established on switched or direct ports if DSR remains high for 500
milliseconds in response to the AEA raising DTR and RTS. This allows for
faster connections on lines where the leads are stable.
When this bit is specified as a 0, DSR must remain high for two seconds in
response to the AEA raising DTR and RTS.

•

Digit 4 - DSR Timing for Deactivating Connections
The response is valid with Configuration Support-B Release 4 and later
releases.
When this bit is specified as a 1, the AEA will not immediately deactivate a
connection for a direct or switched port when DSR drops. Instead, it will
time how long DSR remains low. If it is low for less than two seconds, the

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connection will remain active. If it is low for more than two seconds, the
connection will be deactivated.
When this bit is specified as a 0, the AEA will deactivate a connection for
direct and switched ports as soon as DSR drops.
•

Digit 5 - Printer Keyboard Option
The response is valid with Configuration Support-B Release 4 and later
releases.
When this bit is set to 1, it causes the AEA to ignore all inputs from the ASCII
printer except the pacing data.

•

Digit 6 - Status Line Update Option
The response is valid with Configuration Support-B Release 4 and later
releases.
When this bit is set to 1, it causes the AEA to update the status line after it
finishes updating the data portion of the screen. If you are using FTHLLAPI
programs that expect the status line to be updated after the entire screen is
written, you must set this bit.

•

Digit 7 - Ignore Dim On/Dim Off Sequence
The response is valid with Configuration Support-C Release 1 and later
releases.
For ASCII emulation of the Data General D210, specifying this digit as 1
results in the sequences for turning the dim attribute on and off being
ignored.

•

Digit 8 - Reserved

Question 711: Miscellaneous ASCII Feature Options (B)
Eight digits (0=No or 1=Yes). The default response is 00000000.

Response:
•

Digit 1 - Send TERMSELF when Device Disconnects
The response is valid with Configuration Support-B Release 4 and later
releases.
Specifying this bit as a 1 results in TERMSELF being sent when a device in
session with a 3270 SNA host application disconnects.
Specifying this bit as a 0 results in an UNBIND being sent when a device in
session with a 3270 SNA host application disconnects.

•

Digit 2 - SLU Capability of Power Off Request
The response is valid with Configuration Support-B Release 4 and later
releases.
Specifying this bit as a 1 results in a value of X′00′ for the Secondary LU
capability byte of control vector X′0C′ for Power Off Notify requests. This
prevents a SNA host application from retaining data between sessions.
Specifying this bit as a 0 results in a value of X′10′ for the Secondary LU
Capability byte of control vector X′0C′ for a Power Off Notify Request.

•

Digit 3 - Disconnect on UNBIND
The response is valid with Configuration Support-C Release 1 and later
releases.
Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

283

For ASCII devices in 3270 emulation mode, the device will be disconnected
upon receipt of an UNBIND other than types 2 or 3.
When the AEA port is defined with multiple sessions, an UNBIND on any of
the sessions causes the line connection to be broken. This function allows a
host application to not only terminate the LU-LU session but also to
terminate the switched line connection as well.
•

Digits 4 through 8 - Reserved.

Question 712: Miscellaneous ASCII Feature Options (C)
Eight digits (0=No or 1=Yes). The default response is 00000000. All digits are
reserved, even with Configuration Support-C Release 5.

Response:
•

Digits 1 through 8 - Reserved.

Question 713: Miscellaneous ASCII Feature Options (D)
Eight digits (0=No or 1=Yes). The default response is 00000000. All digits are
reserved, even with Configuration Support-C Release 5.

Response:
•

Digits 1 through 8 - Reserved.

Port Set Definitions
Following are examples of AEA Port Set panels:
•

Figure 112 on page 285 shows the panel used with Configuration Support-B
Release 1 and earlier releases. A password for all ASCII display stations on
switched lines can be specified in question 701. For ASCII devices, the
session limit is 1.

•

Figure 113 on page 285 shows the panel used with Configuration Support-B
Release 2 and later releases. A password can be specified for each port set.
The session limit for ASCII devices can be greater than 1 because they
support MLT with these releases.

When the screen is first displayed, the entry fields are blank. The entries shown
in Figure 113 on page 285 are for our example configuration.

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3174 Installation Guide





__________AEA Port Set_________

Name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

3270DSP_
3270PRT_
3164DSP_
VT100D__
4201PRT_
DECHOST_
IBMIN___
DALLAS__
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________

Session
Limit
3
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Port
Type
1
1
3
2
3
3
2
2
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Modem
Type
_
_
1
_
_
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_





Figure 112. AEA Port Set Panel with Configuration Support-B Release 1 and Earlier
Releases





__________AEA Port Set_________

Name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

3270DSP_
3270PRT_
3164DSP_
VT100D__
4201PRT_
DECHOST_
IBMIN___
DALLAS__
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________

Session
Limit
3
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_



Port
Type
1
1
3
2
3
3
2
2
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Modem
Type
_
_
1
_
_
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Password
________
________
________
IBMITSC_
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________



Figure 113. AEA Port Set Panel for Configuration Support-B Release 2 and Later
Releases

Response Field
Name

Description
Is the name you assign to each set of ports. A maximum of
16 port set names is allowed. In our example, entry number 1
is a 3270 display with three MLT sessions, entry number 2 is a
3270 printer, and so on. We suggest that you assign
meaningful names so that you can easily recognize the port
sets they refer to.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

285

Session Limit

Is the maximum number of sessions permitted for a device
within a port set. All devices belonging to the same port set
will have the same session limit.
The session limit for 3270 devices should match the number of
host addresses assigned in the Port Assignment table
(question 117):
•

If the number of host addresses is less than the session
limit, sessions without host addresses cannot access 3270
host.
For example, if a 3270 display attached to port 26-00 has a
session limit of three and the number of host addresses
assigned is two, then the 3270 display can only have two
3270 host sessions.

•

If the number of host addresses is more than the session
limit, the excess addresses will not be used.
For example, if the 3270 display attached to port 26-00 has
a session limit of three and the number of host addresses
assigned is four, then the 3270 display can only have three
3270 host sessions and one host address will be unused.

Port Type

Modem Type

Specifies the type of port for each port set; that is, how the
ASCII devices are connected to the AEA port:
•

1=3270 devices

•

2=Switched (for ASCII devices connected via modems
and switched lines)

•

3=Direct (for ASCII devices connected via null modems)

•

4=Non-Switched (for ASCII devices connected via
modems and non-switched lines).

Specifies the type of modem used for the port:
•

1=Hayes (or Hayes-compatible)

•

2=MICOM (or MICOM-compatible)

•

3=IBM

•

4=Other (modems that meet the AEA specifications).

For 3270 port sets, do not respond (leave blank).
Password

Can be up to eight characters and is used to verify ASCII
device users. If nothing is entered, then a password is not
requested. If entered, then a password is requested when the
ASCII terminal connects to the 3174.

Port to Port Set Map
The next AEA customization panel is the Port to Port Set Map. This panel is
used to assign AEA ports (the definition of an AEA port being a 3174 port, either
coax or ASCII, which uses the AEA functions) to the port sets defined in the
previous panel.
Figure 114 on page 287 shows the panel used with Configuration Support-B
Release 3 and earlier releases. It includes the responses used for our example
configuration.

286

3174 Installation Guide

Figure 115 on page 288 shows the panel used with Configuration Support-B
Release 4 and later releases; that is, after the introduction of the 3270 Port
Expansion Feature (hardware group 27).
For our example using Configuration Support-B Release 3,the panel is divided
into three sections:
•

The first section is for 3270 ports belonging to hardware group 26, divided
into four groups of eight.

•

The second section is for the three AEAs which may be installed, hardware
groups 21, 22 and 23.

•

The third section is a list of the valid port sets that you have specified
previously in the AEA Port Set panel.

To customize this panel, enter the port set number (from the list at the bottom of
the panel) in the appropriate position for each 3174 port that you wish to use as
an AEA port. This information should be on Worksheet 15 for 3270 ports and
Worksheet 16 for ASCII ports.





_________ AEA Port to Port Set Map _________
Type the port set number to group the 3174 ports
3270 Ports
26-00 to 26-07
26-08 to 26-15
26-16 to 26-23
26-24 to 26-31

0
1_
__
__
__

AEA
21-00
22-00
23-00

3_ 3_ 4_ 5_ 6_ 6_ 7_ 8_
__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

Ports
to 21-07
to 22-07
to 23-07

Port Sets
1 = 3270DSP
5 = 4201PRT
9 =
13 =



2
6
10
14

1
1_
__
__
__

2
1_
__
__
__

3
1_
__
__
__

= 3270PRT
= DECHOST
=
=

4
1_
__
__
__

5
1_
__
__
__

3
7
11
15

6
1_
__
__
__

7
2_
__
__
__

= 3164DSP
= IBMIN
=
=

4
8
12
16

= VT100D
= DALLAS
=
=



Figure 114. AEA Port to Port Set Map Panel (Configuration Support-B Release 3 and
Earlier Releases)

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

287





_________ AEA Port to Port Set Map _________
Type the port set number to group the 3174 ports
3270 Ports
26-00 to 26-07
26-08 to 26-15
26-16 to 26-23
26-24 to 26-31

Port Sets
1 = 3270DSP
5 = 4201PRT
9 =
13 =

0
1_
__
__
__

2
6
10
14

1
1_
__
__
__

2
1_
__
__
__

3
1_
__
__
__

4
1_
__
__
__

= 3270PRT
= DECHOST
=
=

5
1_
__
__
__

3
7
11
15

6
1_
__
__
__

7
2_
__
__
__

= 3164DSP
= IBMIN
=
=

4
8
12
16

= VT100D
= DALLAS
=
=





Figure 115 (Part 1 of 3). AEA Port to Port Set Map Panel (Configuration Support-B
Release 4 and Later Releases)





_________ AEA Port to Port Set Map _________
Type the port set number to group the 3174 ports
3270 Ports
27-00 to 27-07
27-08 to 27-15
27-16 to 27-23
27-24 to 27-31

Port Sets
1 = 3270DSP
5 = 4201PRT
9 =
13 =



0
__
__
__
__

2
6
10
14

1
__
__
__
__

2
__
__
__
__

3
__
__
__
__

= 3270PRT
= DECHOST
=
=

4
__
__
__
__

5
__
__
__
__

3
7
11
15

6
__
__
__
__

7
__
__
__
__

= 3164DSP
= IBMIN
=
=

4
8
12
16

= VT100D
= DALLAS
=
=



Figure 115 (Part 2 of 3). AEA Port to Port Set Map Panel (Configuration Support-B
Release 4 and Later Releases)

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3174 Installation Guide





_________ AEA Port to Port Set Map _________
Type the port set number to group the 3174 ports
AEA
21-00
22-00
23-00

Ports
to 21-07
to 22-07
to 23-07

Port Sets
1 = 3270DSP
5 = 4201PRT
9 =
13 =

0
3_
__
__

2
6
10
14

1
3_
__
__

2
4_
__
__

3
5_
__
__

= 3270PRT
= DECHOST
=
=

4
6_
__
__

5
6_
__
__

3
7
11
15

6
7_
__
__

7
8_
__
__

= 3164DSP
= IBMIN
=
=



4
8
12
16

= VT100D
= DALLAS
=
=



Figure 115 (Part 3 of 3). AEA Port to Port Set Map Panel (Configuration Support-B
Release 4 and Later Releases)

Station Set Definition (Questions 721-787)
The AEA Station Set panel is used to define the characteristics of the displays,
printers, hosts, datastreams, lines, and others, used with the AEA.
You can define up to 30 station sets, using the PF11 key to advance to more
definition panels. Use PF8 when you have finished. Two station sets are defined
on each panel. Each station set number, station set name, station set type and
associated port set you enter are assigned on Worksheets 15 and 16. Station set
types are listed in Table 14 on page 295 for reference. The remaining questions
depend on the station type.
For ASCII displays you may define the same port set name to several station
sets. A user of an ASCII display belonging to this port set will be prompted to
select the terminal type being used, from a list of terminal types presented with
the prompt. The station set name entered on this panel will also appear on the
prompt screen.
Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases include several additional
questions for the AEA Station Set panel. Compare Figure 116 on page 290 and
Figure 117 on page 290, where the additional questions are shown highlighted.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

289



__________AEA Station Set__________

1 721
725
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

________________________ 722 - __ 723 - ________
1
1
732 - 1
733 - 0 734 - _ 735 - 0 736 - 1 737 - _
000 742 - 015 743 - 1
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1
0
782 - 0
783 - 066

2 721
725
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

________________________ 722 - __ 723 - _______
1
1
732 - 1
733 - 0 734 - _ 735 - 0 736 - 1 737 - _
000 742 - 015 743 - 1
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 0 764 - 1
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1
0
782 - 0
783 - 066







Figure 116. AEA Station Set Panel (Configuration Support-B Release 1 and Earlier
Releases)





_____________ AEA Station Set ______________

1 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

________________________ 722 - __ 723 - ________
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 0 734 - _ 735 - 0 736 - 1 737 - _
000 742 - 015 743 - 1 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0

2 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

________________________ 722 - __ 723 - ________
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 0 734 - _ 735 - 0 736 - 1 737 - _
000 742 - 015 743 - 1 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0





Figure 117. AEA Station Set Panel (Configuration Support-B Release 2 and Later
Releases)

The station set definitions used in our example are shown in the following
panels.

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_______________AEA Station Set______________

1 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

WTCXAA ITSC MVS4________ 722 - 3H 723 - ________
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 0 734 - _ 735 - 0 736 - 1 737 - _
001 742 - 015 743 - 1 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0

2 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

DEC HOST________________ 722 - AH 723 - DECHOST_
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 3 734 - 7 735 - 4 736 - 1 737 - 7
000 742 - 015 743 - 0 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
1
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 0 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0







Figure 118. AEA Station Set Panel (Part 1 of 5)

Station Set 1 - WTCXAA ITSC MVS4: This station set defines the IBM host
(question 722 = 3H). Most of the other questions are disregarded for an IBM
host. Question 721 is the Station Set Name. This name appears, as entered
here, on the Connection Menu. The Connection Menu appears on an AEA
terminal′s screen if a default host destination is not defined for it. The Station
Set Name should, therefore, be a meaningful one for the user.
Station Set 2 - DEC HOST: This is set up as a directly attached ASCII host. An
ASCII host requires many options to be defined to the AEA; these options are
explained later in this section.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

291



_____________ AEA Station Set ______________

3 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

IBM INFORMATION NETWORK_ 722 - AH 723 - IBMIN___
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 3 734 - 6 735 - 2 736 - 1 737 - 6
000 742 - 002 743 - 0 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
1
752 - T9W5559960______________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 0 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0

4 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

3270 DISPLAYS___________ 722 - 3D 723 - 3270DSP_
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 0 734 - _ 735 - 0 736 - 1 737 - _
000 742 - 015 743 - 1 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
2
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0







Figure 119. AEA Station Set Panel (Part 2 of 5)

Station Set 3 - IBM INFORMATION NETWORK: This station set is defined for an
autodial feature. It defines what appears to the 3174 as an ASCII host. Actually,
it defines a 3708 protocol converter whose local telephone number is 9-555-9960.
As a result, this station set allows any display attached to the 3174, including
3270 displays, to dial out to the remote IBM host, using ASCII protocol for the
dial link.
Note the syntax of question 752 (phone number). When autodial is used, a
modified Hayes command set is used. In this example, the user is not allowed
to enter the Hayes ATDT command. The user should use Ws instead of commas
for pause characters.

Station Set 4 - 3270 DISPLAYS: There are only four relevant questions to
respond to for 3270 displays. They are the station set name, the station set type
(3D), the port set name it will use and the Connection Menu option.

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_____________ AEA Station Set ______________

5 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

3270 PRINTERS___________ 722 - 3P 723 - 3270PRT_
725 - 0
1
732 - 1
733 - 0 734 - _ 735 - 0 736 - 1 737 - _
000 742 - 015 743 - 1 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0

6 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

3164 DISPLAYS___________ 722 - I3 723 - 3164DSP_
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 7 734 - _ 735 - 3 736 - 1 737 - _
000 742 - 015 743 - 0 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0







Figure 120. AEA Station Set Panel (Part 3 of 5)

Station Set 5 - 3270 PRINTERS: There are only three relevant questions to
respond to for 3270 printers. They are the station set name, the station set type
(3P) and the port set name.
Station Set 6 - 3164 DISPLAYS: This station set defines a direct-attached 3164
running at 19.2 Kbps. We use one of the standard station types of I3. Baud rate
is set to 19200 bps and parity to none. Obviously, the display must be set up to
match these parameters.
In our tests we actually used a 3151 terminal. If we had defined it as such using
I2 or I3 station types, we would not get the operator information on the status
line. We would have to toggle it on and off using the Esc ? keystroke sequence
(see Terminal User ′ s Reference for Expanded Functions ). We found, however,
this did not highlight data because a 3164 is a color display and does not use
highlighting.
If you are using Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases, you can
create a new UDT definition for a monochrome 3164 and the highlighting should
work then.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

293



_____________ AEA Station Set ______________

7 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

VT100 DISPLAYS__________ 722 - V1 723 - VT100D__
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 0 734 - _ 735 - 0 736 - 1 737 - 6
000 742 - 015 743 - 1 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0

8 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

4201 PRINTERS___________ 722 - AP 723 - 4201____
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 7 734 - _ 735 - 3 736 - 1 737 - _
000 742 - 015 743 - 1 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0







Figure 121. AEA Station Set Panel (Part 4 of 5)

Station Set 7 - VT100 DISPLAYS: This station set defines a dial up port with
autobaud/autoparity set. This means that the terminal may be set at any desired
parity and baud rate and the control unit adjusts itself based upon the CR.CR
(Carriage Return, period, Carriage Return) sequence typed at the terminal.
Station Set 8 - 4201 PRINTERS: This station set is for an ASCII printer for
attachment to the 3270 host.

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_______________AEA Station Set______________

9 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

DALLAS DEC
1
732 001 742 1
752 1
762 1
772 0 782 - 0

10 721
731
741
751
761
771
781

-

________________________ 722 - __ 723 - ________
725 - 1
1
732 - 1
733 - 0 734 - _ 735 - 0 736 - 1 737 - _
000 742 - 015 743 - 1 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
_
752 - ________________________________________________
1
762 - 1
763 - 1 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
772 - 1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
0 782 - 0 783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0



SYSTEM VT100_ 722 - AH 723 - DALLAS__
725 - 1
1
733 - 3 734 - 4 735 - 4 736 - 1 737 - 4
015 743 - 0 744 - 0 745 - 0 746 - 0 0
T9W12145555555__________________________________
1
763 - 0 764 - 1 765 - 0
1
773 - 1 774 - 1 775 - 1 776 - 1
783 - 066 784 - 1 785 - 11111000 786 - 132 787 - 0





Figure 122. AEA Station Set Panel (Part 5 of 5)

Station Set 9 - DALLAS DEC SYSTEM VT100: The last station set is for another
dial up ASCII host using VT100 emulation.
The following sections provide brief descriptions of each station set customizing
question.

Question 721: Station Set Name
This name identifies the station set. Use a unique and meaningful name
because it will be appear on the terminal menus (see the note on ASCII displays
on 289).

Question 722: Station Type
Table 14 lists the station types supported and the corresponding responses
required. New station types supported by Configuration Support-C Release 2
and later are shown highlighted.
Table 14 (Page 1 of 2). AEA Station Types
Station Set Type

Response

3270 Host

3H

3270 Display

3D

3270 Printer

3P

ASCII Host

AH

ASCII Plotter

AL

ASCII Printer

AP

TCP/IP Host

TH

ADDS View Point A1 and A2

A2

ADDS View Point/78

A7

Hazeltine 1500

E1

Esprit Executive 10/78

E7

FTTERM Color

FC

FTTERM Monochrome

FM

Hewlett Packard 2621B

H2

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

295

Table 14 (Page 2 of 2). AEA Station Types
Station Set Type

Response

I B M 3101

I1

I B M 3151/3161/3162/3163

I2

I B M 3151/3161/3162/3163

I3

I B M 3164

I4

IBM 3151/3161/3162/3163 with 3708 cartridge

I5

IBM 3151 Model 31, 41, 51, 61 (see Note 1)

I6

IBM 3162 (27x132) (see Note 2)

I7

Lear Siegler ADM 11 or 12

L1

Lear Siegler ADM 3A or 5

L3

Lear Siegler ADM 11/78

L7

Minitel 1B

M1

IBM 3162 Model 870

R0

ROLM Cypress, Cedar and Juniper

R1

ANSI 3.64 Terminal

S1

Televideo 912

T1

Televideo 970

T7

DEC VT100

V1

DEC VT241 (see Note 1)

V2

DEC VT52

V5

DEC VT220 (see Note 1 )

V6

DEC VT100 (43x80)

V7

Wyse 50/60

W1

Tektronix 4205

X4

User Defined Table 1

U1

User Defined Table 2

U2

User Defined Table 3

U3

User Defined Table 4

U4

User Defined Table 5

U5

User Defined Table 6

U6

Notes:
1. These terminal types support 24x80 and 24x132 screen sizes.
2. This terminal type also supports 24x80 screen size.
3. Station types shown highlighted are additionally supported with Configuration
Support-C Release 2 and later.

Question 723: Port Set Name
The response for this question is up to eight alphanumeric characters (blanks
permitted). The port set name identifies the port set which has been assigned to
this station set. These names should correlate with your entries in the AEA Port
Set panel.

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3174 Installation Guide

Question 725: Host Connection Menu Option
The response specifies whether display station users in this station set are able
to select a host connection from a Connection Menu which appears on the
screen after IML.
•

0=Not allowed to select alternative host connections from the Connection
Menu.
With this option, the user can only access the host connection defined as the
default destination (see 7.12.5, “AEA Default Destination Panel” on
page 307).

•

1=Allowed to select alternative host connections from the Connection Menu
(default response).

Question 731: Flow Control Type
The response specifies the type of flow control to be used between the 3174 and
the ASCII host, display station or printer. The correct flow control must be
specified otherwise overrun errors will result.
Valid responses are:
•

0=No flow control
The AEA will not recognize or apply any type of flow control.

•

1=XON/XOFF (default response)
The AEA will transmit and receive XON and XOFF to control data flow.
If XON/XOFF is selected for an ASCII host using D210 datastream, it is
effective in one direction only. The AEA will send XON/XOFF to the ASCII
host to control data flow. The AEA will treat any XON/XOFF received from
the ASCII host as a normal character and not use it for flow control.

•

2=DTR (applies only to non-switched port types)
When the AEA detects a drop in DSR, it will stop transmission to the
attached device.
When the AEA wants the attached device to stop transmission, it will drop
the DTR lead, which is cabled to the attached device′s DSR lead.

•

3=RFS, also known as CTS (applies only to direct port types).

Question 732: XON/XOFF Transmission Resumption
If XON/XOFF is used, the response indicates the signal which the 3174 must
receive to resume transmitting after it has received an XOFF:
•

1=Resume after any character is received (default response)

•

2=Resume only after XON is received.

You should use the default as this precludes display station ″hang-ups″ caused
by an accidental transmission of XOFF.

Question 733: Line Speed
This response specifies the line speed of the connection:
•

0=Autobaud/Autoparity (default response)

•

1=300 bps

•

2=600 bps

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297

•

3 = 1 2 0 0 bps

•

4 = 2 4 0 0 bps

•

5 = 4 8 0 0 bps

•

6 = 9 6 0 0 bps

•

7=19200 bps

For a host or a printer, autobaud is not valid; for these devices, a line speed
must be specified. (The first response should only mean “autobaud” and not
“autobaud/autoparity,” as used in the 3174 Planning Guide , although they are
closely related. After all, parity is specified in a separate question 735.)
For a display, use this response to specify either autobaud or a specific line
speed. Autobaud indicates the AEA will determine the speed of the connecting
display when it receives the first three characters from the display. The display
user must type in CR.CR (Carriage Return, period, Carriage Return).
Notes:
1. If question 733=autobaud, then question 735 must be autoparity.
2. If autobaud is not specified, all terminals assigned to the same port set must
be set at the same speed.
3. If the line speed specified is incorrect, response to transmissions may be
absent or garbled.
4. For an ASCII host that supports a range of line speeds, specify the lowest
speed here and specify the highest speed in question 734.
5. For an ASCII host that supports only one line speed, specify the speed here
and skip question 734.

Question 734: Line Speed (ASCII Host Upper Limit)
This question is used in conjunction with question 733 to specify the range of
speeds supported by an ASCII host:
•

Question 733=lower speed limit

•

Question 734=upper speed limit

Valid responses are:
•

2=600 bps

•

3=1200 bps

•

4=2400 bps

•

5=4800 bps

•

6=9600 bps

•

7=19200 bps.

There is no default for question 734. A response is required only if a range of
speeds needs to be specified.
Note:
The speed specified here must be less than the speed specified in question 737,
otherwise dialing out is not possible.

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3174 Installation Guide

Question 735: Parity
The response specifies the type of the parity bit for a given station set (displays,
hosts and printers):
•

0=Autobaud/Autoparity (default response)

•

1=Odd

•

2=Even

•

3=None

•

4=Space

•

5=Mark

For a host or a printer, autoparity is not valid. (The first response should only
mean “autoparity” and not “autobaud/autoparity,” as used in the 3174 Planning
Guide , although they are closely related. After all, speed is specified in a
separate question 733.)
For a display, use this response to specify either autoparity or a specific parity
bit type (if any). Autoparity indicates the AEA will determine the parity bit type of
the connecting display when it receives the first three characters from the
display. The display user must type in CR.CR (Carriage Return, period, Carriage
Return).
Notes:
1. If question 733=autobaud, then question 735 must be autoparity.
2. If the parity specified is incorrect, the response to transmissions may be
absent or garbled.
3. Because of hardware limitations, 8-bit Mark and Space parity is not
supported.
4. Some ASCII hosts may specify the use of 8-bit, no parity but experience has
shown that the 3174 will work on these systems using 7-bit space parity.

Question 736: Stop Bits
The response is the number of stop bits required per character:
•

1=One stop bit (default response)

•

2=Two stop bits

If incorrectly specified, response to transmissions may be absent or garbled.

Question 737: Maximum Modem Line Speed
The response determines the speed at which commands are sent to your
modem:
•

1=300 bps

•

2=600 bps

•

3=1200 bps

•

4=2400 bps

•

5=4800 bps

•

6=9600 bps

•

7=19200 bps.
Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

299

There is no default response to this question.
Notes:
1. You must respond to this question if you have an IBM or Hayes modem on
switched lines and question 733=autobaud.
2. The speed specified here must be greater than the speed specified in
question 734, otherwise dialing out is not possible.

Question 741: Switched Disconnect Timeout (3270 Host Only)
The question applies only to 3270 hosts using BSC or local non-SNA protocols. It
provides additional security when an ASCII terminal on a switched line
disconnects. The response specifies how long (in minutes), after the
disconnection, the AEA port associated with this station should be held
unavailable to take advantage of a host session timeout security feature. The
response must match the system definitions for the host session timeout security
feature and should be provided by the system programmer.
The response is a three-digit number of minutes, ranging from 000 (default
response) to 254. Use leading zeros if required.

Question 742: Inactivity Timeout
The response specifies the time an AEA port may remain idle before the
connection is broken and the port made available to other users. The timer is
reset when data is received from ASCII display stations or hosts. For printer
connections, the timer is reset when data is sent to the printer.
You should take the following into account when setting a value:
•

Line (phone) cost

•

Importance of access of this station set

•

Port value (importance of access of other display stations to this port).

The response is a three-digit number of minutes, ranging from 000 to 254 (default
response 015). Use leading zeros if required. If 000 is specified, it means
indefinite timeout (do not break the connection no matter how long it remains
idle).

Question 743: Prompt for Universal/Specific Keyboard Map
The response specifies whether the terminal user will be prompted to select a
specific keyboard map for the terminal type being used or a universal keyboard
map for all the terminal types supported by the AEA. The valid responses are:
•

0=Do not display prompt

•

1=Display prompt (default response).

A specific keyboard map makes use of the keyboard nomenclature. For
example, to do a 3270 BACKTAB function on a DEC VT100 keyboard, you would
use the BACKSPACE key. However, to perform the same 3270 function on a DEC
VT241 keyboard, you would use the FIND key. Therefore, specific keyboard
mapping is recommended if only a few terminal types are used since the user
needs to know the specific keystroke sequence for each keyboard type.
A universal keyboard map uses the same keystroke sequence to perform the
same 3270 function on every keyboard type supported. For example, the

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3174 Installation Guide

keystroke sequence for the BACKTAB function is the same (Ctrl B) on a DEC
VT100 or VT241 keyboard.
If you decide not to display the prompt, the keyboard will have a specific
mapping.
For more information on keyboard mappings, see Terminal User ′ s Reference for
Expanded Functions .

Question 744: Number of Bits per Character
The valid responses are:
•

0=7 bits per character (default response)

•

1=8 bits per character

The response must be the same for all stations in a port set.

Question 745: ASCII Display Character Set
This question applies only to ASCII displays. The valid responses are:
•

0=US ASCII (default response)

•

1=IBM 3101 CS1

•

2=IBM 316X CS1 and CS2

•

3=ISO 8859/1.2

•

4=DEC MCS (requires 8-bit to be specified in question 744)

•

5=DEC NRC

Question 746: Translate Option
The two-digit response specifies the translate tables to be used for transmitting
data (leftmost digit) and receiving data (rightmost digit). Valid responses for the
two digits are:
•

0=Default table (US ASCII, CS1, CS1/2, ISO 8859, MCS, NRC)

•

1=User-Defined Translate table 1

•

2=User-Defined Translate table 2

•

3=User-Defined Translate table 3

If you select the default table response, then question 745 will determine which
one of the six default tables will actually be used.

Question 751: Data Stream Supported by the ASCII Host
A response is required for ASCII hosts and specifies the datastream supported:
•

1=Host uses VT100 datastream

•

2=Host uses 3101 datastream

•

3=Host uses Data General D210 datastream (US English only)

•

4=Host uses VT220 7-bit datastream

•

5=Host uses VT220 8-bit datastream

There is no default response for this question.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

301

Question 752: ASCII Host Phone Number
The response is the phone number of the ASCII host. It is required if this host is
the default destination of a printer and the port type is switched. It is sent to an
autodial modem when a connection to this host is requested.
The phone number can include control characters which the modem uses to
perform certain operations, for example, ″wait for second dial tone″.
The 3174 customization procedures allow a limited character set. Therefore,
certain modem control characters that may not be entered have substitutes
provided. Table 15 shows the substitute characters for IBM and Hayes modems.
Table 15. IBM and Hayes M o d e m Control Character Substitutes
Function

Modem Character

3174 Substitute

,

W

Pause (wait for second dial tone)
Switch to pulse dialing

P

P

Switch to tone dialing

T

T

Numbers supported

0 thru 9

0 thru 9

Table 16 shows the substitute characters for MICOM modems.
Table 16. MICOM M o d e m Control Characters
Function

Modem Character

3174 Substitute

Pause (wait for second dial
tone)

K

K

Switch to pulse dialing

$

P

Switch to tone dialing

&

T

Numbers supported

0 thru 9

0 thru 9

You can embed a control character into the phone number string even if it does
not have a 3174 substitute. This is possible by using the prefix Xnn where
X=hexadecimal designator and nn=hexadecimal character value. For example,
the response entered in question 752 for a Hayes modem is:
T9WWP1234567X52
This means that WW is the substitute control character for two commas, and X52
is the hexadecimal number for letter R. The dial string sent to the Hayes modem
will look like this:
T9,,P1234567R
If you have a modem type of Other, the phone number can be any character A
through Z or 0 through 9. The 3174 sends the ASCII hexadecimal equivalents for
each character to the modems. To generate characters other than A through Z
or 0 through 9, use the hexadecimal X to indicate that the two characters
following it are ASCII data and are not to be translated. For example, the
response entered in question 752 for an Other modem is:
ATDT1X2BX2B8005551212

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3174 Installation Guide

The dial string sent to the Other modem will look like this: ATDT1,,8005551212

Question 761: Auto XON/XOFF (DEC VT100/VT220 Data Stream)
Note: Questions 761 through 765 apply to ASCII hosts that use a DEC
VT100/VT220 datastream. These questions define the options setup in the
VT100/VT220 terminals.
Question 761 specifies whether Auto XON/XOFF is active:
•

0=Auto XON/XOFF disabled

•

1=Auto XON/XOFF enabled (default response)

Question 762: Wraparound Option (DEC VT100/VT220 Data Stream)
Wraparound results in a new line being generated when a character is typed
after the cursor has reached the right margin. The response specifies whether
wraparound is operational:
•

0=Wraparound is disabled

•

1=Wraparound is enabled (default response)

Question 763: New Line Option (DEC VT100/VT220 Data Stream)
The response specifies whether a line feed will occur:
•

0=New line is disabled
Pressing the Return key will result in a carriage return only.

•

1=New line is enabled (default response)
Pressing the Return key or receipt of a line feed will result in a carriage
return and line feed.

Question 764: Margin Bell (DEC VT100/VT220 Data Stream)
The response specifies whether the margin bell is operational:
•

0=Margin bell is disabled

•

1=Margin bell is enabled (default response)
An audible alarm will be sounded when the cursor reaches the 72nd
position.

Question 765: DEC Host ASCII Character Set (DEC VT100/VT220
Data Stream)
The response specifies the character set used by the ASCII host using DEC
VT100 or DEC VT220 datastream:
•

0=DEC NRC (default response)

•

1=DEC MCS

Question 771: Automatic Line Feed for Cursor Control (IBM 3101
Data Stream)
Note: Questions 771 through 776 apply to ASCII hosts that use the IBM 3101
datastream. These questions define the options setup in the IBM 3101 terminals.
Question 771 specifies whether the automatic line feed is operational:
•

0=Automatic line feed is disabled

•

1=Automatic line feed is enabled (default response)
Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

303

Receipt of a carriage return will result in a carriage return and line feed.

Question 772: Carriage Return/Carriage Return-Line Feed Selection
(IBM 3101 Data Stream)
The response specifies whether a line feed will occur:
•

0=Carriage return only

•

1=Carriage return and line feed (default response)

Question 773: Automatic New Line for Cursor Control (IBM 3101
Data Stream)
The response specifies whether the cursor will automatically move to the first
character position on the next line after it reaches the 80th cursor position:
•

0=Automatic new line is disabled

•

1=Automatic new line is enabled (default response)

Question 774: Scrolling (IBM 3101 Data Stream)
The response specifies whether scrolling will be supported for the display
stations:
•

0=Scrolling is disabled

•

1=Scrolling is enabled (default response)

Question 775: Line Turnaround Character (IBM 3101 Data Stream)
The response specifies the line turnaround character:
•

0=EOT (End Of Transmission)

•

1=CR (Carriage Return) (default response)

•

2=XOFF (Transmitter OFF)

•

3=ETX (End Of Text)

Question 776: IBM ASCII Host Character Set
The response specifies the character set used by the ASCII host using IBM 3101
datastream:
•

1=ISO 8859/1.2 (default response)

•

2=IBM 3101 CS1

•

3=IBM 316X CS1 and CS2

Question 781: Attached Printer Prompt
Note: Questions 781 through 787 apply to ASCII printers. These questions
define the printer attributes.
The AEA supports an ASCII display and a printer attached to the display′ s
auxiliary port over a single communication link. The display and its attached
printer appear as distinct LUs to the host. Printing can be accomplished from
the ASCII display or initiated from the host.
Question 781 specifies whether you wish to prompt the user regarding any
attached printer:

304

•

0=No (do not prompt the user) (default response)

•

1=Yes (prompt the user)

3174 Installation Guide

•

2=Assumed (do not prompt the user but assume a printer is attached).

The following prompt will be displayed at connection time:
DO YOU HAVE A PRINTER ATTACHED TO THIS TERMINAL?
(1=YES, 0=NO) ======> _
The user can then decide whether or not to let the AEA manage the attached
printer. If the response is 1, host printing is allowed on the attached printer if
the port has been assigned two host addresses (one for the display and one for
the printer).
Note: If you have printers attached to ASCII displays, you must indicate an MLT
level greater than zero in question 110.

Question 782: Use Of Form Feed
The response specifies whether a printer can perform a form feed:
•

0=Printer does not support form feed (default response)

•

1=Printer supports form feed

Question 783: Page Length
The response specifies the page length for an attached printer. If the printer
does not support form feed, this count is used to emulate form feeds in the 3270
datastreams.
A valid response is 001 through 255 (use leading zeros). The default page length
is 066.

Question 784: Printer Character Set
The response specifies which translate table (AEA-supplied or user-defined) will
be used:
•

1=US ASCII (default response)

•

2=ISO 8859/1.2

•

3=DEC MCS

•

4=PC Code Page 850

•

5=User-Defined Translate table 1

•

6=User-Defined Translate table 2

•

7=User-Defined Translate table 3

Question 785: ASCII Printer Options
The response consists of eight digits for specifying printer options (0=No,
1 = Y e s ) . The default is 11111000.
Note:
These options apply to LU3 (DSC/DSE) datastream and local copies. The
3174 treats a local copy as if it were an LU3 (DSC/DSE) print.
Abbreviations used:
•

CR=Carriage Return

•

EM=End Of Message

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

305

•

F F = F o r m Feed

•

MPP=Maximum Print Position

•

NL=New Line

Digit 1 - Carriage Return
0= A CR at MPP + 1 performs an NL operation.
1= A CR at MPP + 1 performs a CR. The NL operation is suppressed.
Digit 2 - New Line
0= A NL at MPP + 1 performs two NL operations.
1= A NL at MPP + 1 performs one NL operation.
Digit 3 - Form Feed options:
0= An FF followed by data takes up a print position.
The printer will form feed to a new page and print a space in the first print
position of the first print line. The print element will then move to the second
print position, ready for printing.
1= An FF followed by data does not take up a print position.
The printer will form feed to a new page. The print element will move to the
first print position of the first print line, ready for printing.
Digit 4 - Print Element Positioning
Digit 4 is affected by digit 7 as follows:
•

If digit 7=1, then digit 4 is overridden.

•

If digit 7=0, then digit 4 response is used as described below.

0= When an FF is in the last buffer position of the print buffer, one print position
is used by the FF character. The printer will form feed to a new page and
the printer element will move to the second print position of the first line;
execution of the FF ends the print.
Because digit 7=0, an automatic NL operation moves the print element to
the first print position of the second line. The result is a blank line at the top
of the new page.
1= When an FF is in the last buffer position, no print position is used by the FF
character. The printer will form feed to a new page and the the print
element moves to the first print position of the first line. The automatic NL
is suppressed and there is no blank line at the top of the new page.
Digit 5 - Null Lines
Digit 5 options are only valid for LU3 (DSC/DSE) formatted prints.
0= Lines that contain only non-printable fields or nulls are suppressed.
Attributes, CR, NL and EM are treated as nulls.
1= Null lines are printed as blanks. CR, NL and EM are honored.
Digit 6 - Valid FF
0= The FF is valid only in column 1 or at MPP + 1; otherwise it is printed as a
space.
1= An FF is valid in any buffer position.

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3174 Installation Guide

Digit 7 - Automatic NL/FF
0= At the completion of a print operation, an automatic NL is executed.
1= At the completion of a print operation, an automatic FF is executed.
If digit 7=1, then digit 4 is overridden.
If you would like an FF after local copy, digit 7 must be configured as a 1.
However, you should be aware that this will cause an FF after LU3 (DSC/DSE)
print as well.
Assume the FF is at the end of the print and valid because it meets one or the
other of the conditions for validity stated in digit 6:
•

If digit 4=0 and digit 7=0, then the FF results in the print element being
moved to the first print position of the second line of the new page.

•

If digit 4=1 and digit 7=1, then the FF results in the print element being
moved to the first print position of the first line of the new page.

Assume the FF is at the end of the print and invalid because digit 6=0 and the
FF is not in column 1 or at MPP + 1:
•

Digit 4 is ignored.

•

If digit 7=0, then an automatic NL is executed at the completion of the print
operation.

•

If digit 7=1, then an automatic FF is executed at the completion of the print
operation.

Digit 8: Reserved.

Question 786: Page Width
The response specifies the page width for an attached printer.
A valid response is 001 through 255 (use leading zeros). The default page width
is 132.

Question 787: LU 1 SCS Transparency Translation
The response determines how the printer LU 1 SCS transparency data is to be
translated:
•

0=LU 1 transparent data is not translated (default response)
Transparent data is passed through to the ASCII printer and should be in a
format that is compatible with the printer.

•

1=LU 1 transparent data is translated.
Transparent data is translated according to the printer translate table
selected in question 784.

7.12.5 AEA Default Destination Panel
This panel is used to indicate the initial default connection and to define (for MLT
devices) how many sessions are allowed. The station set number in the LT
column determines, for that MLT, what initial connection (default destination) is
established. Blanks in any column means that the default destination is the
Connection Menu.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

307




__________AEA Default Destination__________

Station
Set
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Station Set
Name

Session
Limit

WTCXAA ITSC MVS4
DEC HOST
IBM INFORMATION NETWORK
3270 DISPLAYS
3270 PRINTERS
3164 DISPLAYS
VT100 DISPLAYS
4201 PRINTERS
DALLAS DEC SYSTEM VT100

0
1
1
3
1
3
3
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0



Session
LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
___
___
___
1__
1__
___
___
2__
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
1__
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___



Figure 123. AEA Default Destination Panel

Field Name

Description

Station Set

Is the station set number to the left of question 721 in the AEA
Station Set panel. It is a protected field.

Station Set Name Is the station set name you specify in question 721 in the AEA
Station Set panel. It is a protected field.
Session Limit

Is the session limit you specify in the AEA Port Set panel. It is
a protected field.

Session

The LTx columns allow you to specify the station set number
which is to be the default destination for each logical terminal.
If no default destination is specified for an LT (blank), then that
LT will display the Connection Menu. The number of
destinations cannot exceed the session limit.
In our example:

308

3174 Installation Guide

•

A 3270 DISPLAYS station set will have its first and third
sessions automatically connect to the WTCXAA ITSC MVS4
station set by default. The second session will display the
Connection Menu.

•

A 3270 PRINTERS station set will automatically connect to
the WTCXAA ITSC MVS 4 station set by default.

•

A 4201 PRINTERS station set will automatically connect to
DEC HOST station set by default.

•

All other display station sets will initially display the
Connection Menu.

7.13 User-Defined Tables
With Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases, you can define your
own terminal and translate tables, using options on the Configure AEA menu.
These tables provide a means to interpret data from any ASCII display or printer,
and sending data that can be understood by an ASCII display or printer. These
tables are referred to as:
•

UDT - User-Defined Terminal table

•

UDX - User-Defined Translate table

They are only used for 3270 Terminal Emulation; that is, an ASCII terminal
communicating with a 3270 host via the AEA. They are not used for ASCII
Terminal Emulation mode.

7.13.1 User-Defined Terminal Table (UDT)
A UDT allows you to construct ASCII terminal definitions to be used to attach
terminals that are not in the list of AEA-supported standard terminals or that
require unique definitions not found in the AEA-provided terminal tables.
You can create and store up to six UDTs, using station types U1 to U6, either by
building them from scratch or using the AEA-provided terminal tables as models.
To use the UDT created, you would then specify the station type, for example U3,
in question 722 when customizing for the unique terminal station set.

Defining UDT
When defining a UDT, you are prompted for the following:
•

UDT Number
You specify a number (U1, U2, U3, U4, U5 or U6) to identify the table.

•

Name
The name is optional and helps to identify a UDT table during customizing.

•

Model
A list of AEA-provided terminal tables is displayed during customizing. You
can select a table by its number and use it as a model to build your
definitions instead of building from scratch.

UDT Attributes
Attributes which can be defined in a UDT include:
•

Last Line Reserved For Status
To specify whether a display terminal can use the 25th line for displaying the
status.

•

Status Line Character Set
To specify whether special characters can be displayed on the status line.

•

Status Line Clear Option
To specify the options for clearing the status line.

•

Use Cursor Sequence on Status Line
To specify whether the Set Cursor command can be used on the status line.

•

Scrolling On
Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

309

To specify whether the screen will scroll if a character is sent to the last
cursor position.
•

Cursor Wraps at End of Line
To specify whether the cursor will move automatically from column 80 of one
line to column 1 of the next line.

•

Color Supported
To specify whether color is supported on the display.

•

Cursor Class
To specify how the Set Cursor command is formatted.

•

Cursor Sequence
To specify, in hexadecimal, the actual character sequence to perform a Set
Cursor command.

•

Alternate Screen Size
To specify the alternate screen size that may be displayed.

•

Graphics Query Reply
To specify that the terminal will send a Character Set Query Reply, indicating
graphics support, in response to a host Read Partition Query.

•

Graphics Input Wait Time
To specify the amount of time the terminal will wait between transmissions
to the 3174.

•

Graphics Input Ending Sequence
To specify, in hexadecimal, the actual character sequence that will indicate
the end of a Graphics Input mode.

•

Graphics Input Length
To specify the maximum number of characters that can be received during
Graphics Input mode before data is sent to the host.

•

ASCII Inbound Sequences
A panel that relates each 3270 function to the ASCII command sequences the
terminal sends to the AEA to invoke that function.
Each 3270 function can be invoked using one of two ASCII sequences; the
panel allows you to specify a primary and an alternate sequence. The
primary sequence is the one normally used. The alternate sequence
provides a second method to invoke the same function. You may wish, for
example, to have two different terminal keys perform the same 3270 function.

•

ASCII Outbound Sequences
A panel to map each terminal command/order to the ASCII command
sequences the AEA sends to the terminal to invoke that command or order.

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3174 Installation Guide

7.13.2 User-Defined Translate Table (UDX)
When 3270 Terminal Emulation is used, ASCII characters are translated to
EBCDIC for transmission to the host, and EBCDIC characters are translated to
ASCII for transmission to the terminal. The AEA supports six standard
translation tables:
•

US ASCII

•

IBM 3101 CS1

•

IBM 316x CS1 and CS2

•

ISO 8859/1.2

•

DEC MCS

•

DEC NRC.

You can create an additional three translate tables. To use the UDX created,
you would specify the translate table to be used in question 746 when
customizing for the terminal station set.

Defining UDX
When defining a UDX, you are prompted for the following:
•

UDX Number
You specify a number (1, 2 or 3) to identify the table.

•

Name
The name is optional and helps to identify a UDX table during customizing.

•

Language
You specify the keyboard language code used. You should use the same
response as in question 121, otherwise unpredictable results may occur.

•

CECP
You specify whether CECP is supported. You should use the same response
as in question 123, otherwise unpredictable results may occur.

•

Model.
A list of AEA-provided translate tables is displayed during customizing. You
can select a table by its number and use it as a model to build your
definitions instead of building from scratch.

After entering these values, the outbound and inbound translate tables are
displayed, based on the model selected. These tables can then be modified and
saved:
•

EBCDIC Outbound Sequences
A table that translates each EBCDIC character received from a 3270 host to
an ASCII character before being sent to the ASCII terminal.

•

ASCII Inbound Sequences
A table that translates each ASCII character received from the ASCII terminal
to an EBCDIC character before it is sent to the 3270 host.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

311

7.14 Operation
In this section, we will look at some aspects of using the AEA. For a detailed
description on the use of the AEA terminals, see Terminal User ′ s Reference for
Expanded Functions .

7.14.1 Keyboards
The ASCII keyboard is different from the 3270 keyboard; many of the keys
required to perform 3270 functions do not exist. To emulate a 3270 display
correctly it is necessary to simulate these keys. The same is true for 3270
terminals emulating ASCII terminals. Some of the special keystrokes required
are covered in the following text.

3270 Special Keys
Table 17 shows the key sequences used by some 3270 keyboards to access the
Connection Menu.
Table 17. Key Sequence to Access Connection M e n u
Keyboard Type

Key Sequence

Base 87 key (3278 type)

Alt + EOF + M

Converged 122/4 keys in 3278 emulation 1

Alt + EOF + M

Converged 122/4 keys in native mode

ExSel + M

Enhanced 102/103 keys 2

ExSel + M

Note:

1 The Converged keyboard is recognized by the cross-shape of the
cursor movement (arrow) keys.

2 The Enhanced keyboard is recognized by the upside down T-shape of
the cursor movement (arrow) keys.

Special Control Sequences for 3270 Emulation
When using an ASCII display station to emulate a 3270 terminal, the ASCII
display user may need a number of 3270 functions, such as:
•

Return to Connection Menu

•

Keyboard Reset

•

Operator Information Area Toggle

•

Test Request

•

Response Time Monitor (LTTI)

•

Clear Screen

Figure 124 on page 313 lists the key sequences required for these functions on
the more common ASCII terminals.

312

3174 Installation Guide

┌────────┬──────────┬───────┬───────┬────────┬─────────┬────────┐
│ ASCII │Connection│ 3270 │ OIA │ TEST │ RTM
│ Clear │
│Terminal│ Menu │ Reset │Toggle │Request │ LTTI │ Screen │
├────────┼──────────┼───────┼───────┼────────┼─────────┼────────┤
│ADDS VP │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- A2
│Esc B M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Esc T │Esc B ─ │Ctrl C │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- 78
│Alt Erase │ Reset │ Esc ? │ Test │Alt Erase│Clear │
│
│EOF M
│
│
│
│EOF ─
│
│
├────────┼──────────┼───────┼───────┼────────┼─────────┼────────┤
│DEC VT │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- 52
│ Ctrl B M │Ctrl R │Ctrl ? │ Esc T │Ctrl L ─ │ Ctrl C │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- 100 │ Ctrl B M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Esc T │Ctrl L ─ │ Ctrl C │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- 241 │ Ctrl B M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Esc T │Ctrl L ─ │ Ctrl C │
├────────┼──────────┼───────┼───────┼────────┼─────────┼────────┤
│ESPRIT │ Ctrl L M │ Reset │ Esc ? │ TEST │Ctrl L ─ │ Clear │
│- 10/78 │
│
│
│
│
│
│
├────────┼──────────┼───────┼───────┼────────┼─────────┼────────┤
│HZ 1500 │Esc B M │Ctrl R │Ctrl ? │ Esc T │Esc B ─ │ Clear │
├────────┼──────────┼───────┼───────┼────────┼─────────┼────────┤
│HP 2621 │Ctrl B M │Ctrl R │Ctrl ? │ Esc T │Ctrl B ─ │ Ctrl C │
├────────┼──────────┼───────┼───────┼────────┼─────────┼────────┤
│IBM
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- 3101 │ Alt L M │ Alt R │ Alt W │ Alt T │ Alt L ─ │ Clear │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- 3151 │ Ctrl L M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Ctrl T │Ctrl L ─ │ Clear │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- 3161/3│ Ctrl L M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Ctrl T │Ctrl L ─ │ Clear │
├────────┼──────────┼───────┼───────┼────────┼─────────┼────────┤
│LEAR SGL│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- ADM3A │ Esc B M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Esc T │ Esc B ─ │ Ctrl C │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- ADM5A │ Esc B M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Esc T │ Esc B ─ │ Ctrl C │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- ADM11 │ Esc B M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Ctrl T │ Esc B ─ │ Clear │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- ADM11 │ Esc B M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Ctrl T │ Esc B ─ │ Clear │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│- 11/78 │Alt Erase │ Reset │ Esc ? │ Test │Alt Erase│ Clear │
│
│ EOF M
│
│
│
│EOF ─
│
│
├────────┼──────────┼───────┼───────┼────────┼─────────┼────────┤
│TVI 912 │ Ctrl B M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Ctrl T │Ctrl B ─ │ Ctrl C │
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│TVI 970 │ Ctrl B M │Ctrl R │ Esc ? │ Esc T │Ctrl B ─ │ Clear │
└────────┴──────────┴───────┴───────┴────────┴─────────┴────────┘

Figure 124. Special Keys for 3270 Emulation on ASCII Keyboards

7.14.2 ASCII Operator Information Area
Some ASCII terminals have an Indicator Line similar to a 3270′s OIA line. Some
of these terminals use symbols that are essentially the same as 3270 symbols.
For these terminals, Indicator Line mapping is easy.
The problem appears with those ASCII displays which have only ASCII-typical
graphics or do not allow the use of the 25th line. The AEA maps an ASCII
graphical symbol as closely as possible to the required 3270 indicator and uses
it for user notification. In addition, the AEA provides a Status Inquiry key
sequence that causes an emulated OIA line to appear on the ASCII display′ s
24th line. The Status Inquiry key sequence is usually Esc ?. VT52 is the only
display known that uses Ctrl ? keystrokes as the Status Inquiry sequence.
When the Indicator Line uses the 24th line, normal keyboard operation is allowed
except for keying on the 24th line. To remove or refresh the Indicator Line, the
user toggles the Status Inquiry key sequence.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

313

Status Inquiry is not available or needed on displays which have the Indicator
Line.
The Print Ident function which allows local copy printer address reassignment is
the only function which can be keyed into the Indicator Line.
In 3270 Terminal Emulation, changing the local copy printer ID works a little
differently. When Print Ident is pressed, the cursor does not move to the printer
ID field in the Indicator Line. Instead, it remains where it is and the new ID
keyed in will appear in the ID field.
For more information, see Terminal User ′ s Reference for Expanded Functions .

7.15 Printing in an AEA Environment
7.15.1 3270 Printer Emulation
The AEA allows certain ASCII printers to appear as if they were 3287 printers
with a 2 KB buffer. SCS support is also assumed. When the 3270 host supports
these emulated printers, the following 3287 functions are not supported:
•

Extended Character Set Adapter (ECSA)

•

Programmed Symbols (PS)

•

SNA Character String (SCS) support for Structure Fields and Attribute
Processing (SFAP)

•

Data Analysis - APL

•

Extended Print Buffer (EPB)

•

Screen Image Print Operation of 480, 960, 2560 and 3564 bytes

•

Character Sets - ASCII-B, Data Analysis - APL/Text or Katakana

•

World Trade languages

Printer Operating Functions
When an ASCII printer emulates a 3287 printer, the following functions are
supported:

314

•

Maximum Print Position (MPP) is always 132 and cannot be changed.

•

Lines Per Inch (LPI) is the ASCII printer default at power on. If the ASCII
printer provides line spacing control, it might be used. Page Length for the
appropriate printer station set is specified during station set customization
(question 783).

•

The ASCII printer must be capable of receiving dual case data or be able to
fold upper case characters into lower case, and vice versa.

•

If the ASCII printer does not support form feed, the AEA sends line feeds
until the number of lines per page (page length) is reached.

3174 Installation Guide

Host Datastream Printer Controls
The following DSC/DSE (LU3) orders are supported:
•

CR - Carriage Return

•

EM - End of Message

•

FF - Form Feed

•

NL - New Line

The following SCS (LU1) orders are supported:
•

BEL - Sound Bell

•

BS - Back Space (if the ASCII printer supports the BS order natively)

•

CR - Carriage Return

•

ENP - Enable Presentation

•

FF - Form Feed

•

HT - Horizontal Tab

•

INP - Inhibit Presentation

•

IRS - Inter-record Separator (always as New Line)

•

NL - New Line

•

SHF - Set Horizontal Format

•

SVF - Set Vertical Format

•

TRN - Transparent Mode

•

VCS - Vertical Channel Select

•

VT - Vertical Tab

7.15.2 ASCII Printer Emulation
The AEA allows the 3287 type of printers to emulate ASCII printers. All ASCII
character sets can be printed by these emulated ASCII printers. In addition, the
AEA supports a very basic set of ASCII controls; controls supported are shown in
Table 18.
Table 18. ASCII Control Codes Supported by 3287 Printers - ASCII Emulation
Control Character

Hex Code

Action Taken

BEL

X′07′

Sound audible alarm

CR

X′0 D

Carriage return

FF

X′0 C′

F o r m feed

HT

X′09′

Tab-skip to next multiple of 8

LF

X′0 A′

Carriage return, line feed

US

X′1 F′

Carriage return, line feed

VT

X′0 B′

Carriage return, line feed

XON (DC1)

X′11′

Request the host to resume transmission

XOFF (DC3)

X′13′

Request the host to stop transmission

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

315

ASCII Printer Advanced Characteristics
Advanced ASCII printer capabilities not supported by a 3287 (for example,
underscoring and programmable fonts) are not supported on the ASCII emulated
printers.

ASCII Printer Status Indication
Some ASCII printers send status indication to their hosts. These status
indications announce events such as Out-Of-Paper condition, Buffer Full, etc. If
the ASCII emulated printer buffer is full, or any other unready condition occurs,
the AEA initiates a flow control indication (XOFF or DTR drop) but does not send
the status to the ASCII host.

7.15.3 Local Copying
The use of ASCII and 3270 printers as copy printers for 3270 and ASCII displays
(in any combination) is supported except for ASCII plotters. Use the Printer
Authorization Matrix to set this up.
With Configuration Support-C Release 2 and later releases, it is now possible to
perform local copy functions from a display station (ASCII or 3270) to a printer
that is attached to a another display station (ASCII or 3270). See also 14.2.3,
“HAP Sharing for Local Copy” on page 459 for further description and
customization.

Printer Authorization Matrix (PAM)
With Configuration Support-A, the user selects the Define PAM option on the
Customize Control Disk Menu to access the PAM definition panels. With
Configuration Support-B Release 1 and later releases, the PAM panels are
accessed via the Define Devices option on the same menu.


1

______________ PAM Definition
Printer
Mode
Class
Port
7
01234 56789
26 - 07
1
..X.. .....

2

26 - 15

1

..X.. ..... ......

3

26 - 23

2

..X.. ..... ......

Entry

Entry
HG
1 26
27
2 26
27
3 26
27

01234
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....

3270 Display Ports
1
2
56789 01234 56789 01234
...X. ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... .....
...X. ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... .....
...X. ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... .....

56789
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....
.....



______________
8
012345
......

3
01
..
..
..
..
..
..

ASCII
HG 21
01234567
........

Display Ports
HG 22
HG 23
01234567 01234567
........ ........

........ ........ ........
........ ........ ........

Select ===>
PF: 3=Quit

4=Default

7=Back

8=Fwd

10=Page Back



11=Page Fwd



Figure 125. Printer Authorization Matrix Panel

PAM Description: The PAM panel is divided into two halves. The upper half
defines the printer, its mode of operation and the class to which it belongs. The
lower half identifies the displays which will use those printers.

316

3174 Installation Guide

The following describes each field on the PAM panel:
Field

Description

Entry

The entry number is used to identify the printer assigned. The
same entry number is used in the lower half to point to the
printer. The maximum number of printer assignments (entries)
is 47.

Printer Port

You enter the hardware group (first two digits) and port number
(second two digits) to which the printer is attached.
Valid hardware groups are:
•

26 for the base port attachment

•

27 for the 3270 Port Expansion Feature attachment

•

21, 22 and 23 for AEA attachment

Valid port numbers are:
•

01 to 31 for 3270 ports on hardware group 26
You cannot assign a printer to port 26-00 regardless of the
mode of operation. This makes sense as a display is
required at port 26-00 for customization and other
operational control functions.

Mode

•

00 to 31 for 3270 ports on hardware group 27

•

00 to 07 for AEA ports on hardware groups 21, 22 and 23

Defines the mode of printer operation:
•

0=Host mode only

•

1=Local mode only

•

2=Shared mode (both host and local printing)

Host mode means that a printer operates under 3270 host
control. Host control is the default mode for each printer that is
not assigned in the PAM. Therefore, a printer that is used for
host printing only need not be assigned in the PAM (you can if
you want to but it is unnecessary). A printer in host mode is
protected from local copy, unless it is operating with BSC
protocols. (With BSC, the BSC Copy command does not use the
PAM; it is directed to the to device and specifies the from device
as a command parameter.)
Local mode means that a printer is used for local copying only,
regardless of the host attachment or communication protocol.
The display user initiates a local copy by pressing the Print key.
The host can also initiate a local copy from the display buffer if
the display is under SNA. However, the host cannot use the
printer for host directed printing.
Shared mode means that a printer can be used for both host
directed printing and local copy. The efficiency of local copy
operations in shared mode depends on the communication
protocol.
In SNA, the shared printer may perform a local copy if:
•

The printer is not in session with a primary LU in the host.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

317

•

Between Bracket Printer Sharing is allowed (question
213=1) and the printer is not in an in-bracket state with the
PLU in the host.

In non-SNA, shared mode is a less efficient choice for local
copy. Host application sessions are longer so that there are
fewer opportunities for a local copy between host
communications.
Class

You may group printers into classes based, for example, on
their physical characteristics (type font, character set, type of
forms mounted), location, or security. The PAM panel allows
you to assign a printer to a class, or several classes, or none at
all. Class numbers range from 70 to 85.
To assign a printer, enter an X under the class or classes to
which the printer will belong. For example, you may group
several printers into class 72 (see upper half of Figure 125 on
page 316) and authorize the display on port 26-08 to use any of
them (see lower half of Figure 125 on page 316). If the user
does a local copy, the local copy will be sent to an available
printer in that class.
The user may also select a particular printer by its class ID by
first pressing the Ident key and entering the class number next
to the printer symbol in the OIA.

Display Port

You enter an X under the display port for each display
authorized to use a particular printer identified by that entry.
Several displays may be authorized on a given printer; a display
may also be assigned to use several printers for local copying.

The Select prompt may be used to locate a particular entry number without
having to scroll forward or backward through several panels. If, for instance, the
user is searching for entry number 21, he should enter L21 in the Select field and
press Enter. Entry 21 will be displayed.

7.16 ASCII Graphics Support
The ASCII graphics support in Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later
releases allows 3270 host programs, such as GDDM, to control specific AEA
attached terminals in graphics mode. The AEA allows host-generated graphics
data to pass through to the display, and allows terminal-generated graphics
input to pass through to the host application. These terminals are also
supported for 3270 emulation and the 3174 maintains the terminal′s display
image independent of the graphic presentation space. The host application and
the terminal are responsible for the graphic display space; graphics data is
simply passed through the 3174 to the device. Graphics data requires the 8-bit
character support of Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases.
Supported devices include:
•

DEC VT240/241

•

Tektronix 4205

Other devices are supported through a UDT.

318

3174 Installation Guide

7.17 ASCII Plotter Support
The AEA supports many ASCII plotters. They are treated the same way as ASCII
printers except that you cannot do a local print. Specify a station type of AL in
question 722 to get ASCII plotter support.
To support the ASCII plotter, the host application should use the LU1 datastream
and must send all data using the transparent-mode order. You should also
customize question 787 not to translate the LU1 SCS transparent data, which will
then be passed unchanged to the ASCII plotter. Because the data is not
modified by the 3174, your host application must format the datastream that is
required by the ASCII plotter.

7.18 AEA Security
The main security concern with the AEA is that a user can access 3270
applications from ASCII terminals through the public switched telephone
network. The AEA, however, does provide several security features to minimize
or prevent unauthorized access:
•

The user can specify an access password as follows:
−

Question 701, for all ASCII display stations on switched lines
(Configuration Support-B Release 1 and earlier releases).

−

AEA Port Set Panel, for each port set (Configuration Support-B Release 2
and later releases).

The ASCII terminal user is prompted to enter the password when he initiates
the connection to the AEA port. The AEA breaks the connection if the
incorrect password is supplied three times. results in terminal
disconnection.
•

Question 725: Host Connection Menu Option, which can allow users to
access the host defined as the default destination but not be able to select
alternative host connection. This feature provides some security by reducing
the connection flexibility of a sensitive port.

•

Question 741: Switched Disconnect Timeout, which prevents unauthorized
access to an IBM host session.

•

Question 742: Inactivity Timeout, which allows the AEA to terminate sessions
that have been idle for a specified period. This prevents an unauthorized
user from taking over an authorized connection that was not properly
terminated (for example, by line faults) or unattended.

•

The AEA supports session outage notification:
−

On all 3174s, the 3270 host is notified of a session interruption by an
unexpected session start indication (device end status for non-SNA,
NOTIFY for SNA).

−

An SNA 3174 will also send an UNBIND or TERMSELF, depending on your
response to question 711 digit 1, when the connection breaks.

−

To prevent an SNA host application from retaining data between
sessions (the host application may expect the same authorized user is
using the second session), you can customize question 711 digit 2.

Chapter 7. Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)

319

−

320

3174 Installation Guide

To allow the host application to terminate the LU-LU session as well as
terminate the switched line connection upon receiving an UNBIND, you
can customize question 711 digit 3.

Chapter 8. ESCON Connection
Previously, communication between IBM hosts and the channel attached 3174 is
carried out in parallel across bus (data transmission) and tag (control signal)
copper cables. These cables are bulky and have distance and speed limitations.
In most cases, the 3174 can only be a few hundred feet from the CPU. This
restricts the placement of the 3174.
Each parallel cable consists of eight wires. Each bit in a byte is transmitted over
one wire. Because of differences in quality of the individual wires, all the eight
bits do not arrive at the destination at the same time. The longer the bits have
to travel, the greater they get out of synchronization. Parallel cables are,
therefore, limited in distance to a maximum of 122 meters (400 feet).
A new approach to the interconnection of channels and devices is known as the
Enterprise Systems Connection (ESCON) Architecture*, which uses fiber optic
cables instead of bus and tag copper cables for channel connection. Fiber optic
cables carry the transmission of control and data signals, encoded as light
pulses, over much greater distances and at greater speeds than the copper
cables allow. Because the light pulses are transmitted in one direction only,
each channel cable requires two fibers: one for transmit and one for receive.
Unlike parallel channel cables, the eight bits in a byte are transmitted one after
another through the fiber. Hence, these cables are also known as serial optical
channel cables.
With the announcement of the ESCON architecture, new host processors, control
units and devices are introduced. The 3174s that support this architecture are
the Model 12L (floor-standing) and the Model 22L (rack-mounted). The
microcode that support these 3174 ESCON models are Configuration Support-B
Release 3 and later releases. Although both 3174 ESCON models (Model x2L)
can be attached directly to a host ESCON channel using fiber optic cabling, there
are advantages to be gained by attaching through an ESCON Director.

8.1 ESCON Director
An ESCON Director is a switching box that attaches to a 3174 Model x2L (and
other I/O devices) on one side and to one or more host systems (or another
ESCON Director) on the other. Figure 126 on page 322 shows the physical
connectivity possible.

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

321

┌───────────┬──┐
┌────────┐
│
│A ├────────┤3174-x2L│ Shows each 3174 that
│
├──┤
└────────┘ is directly attached
│
├──┤
┌────────┐ needs one host channel.
│
│B ├────────┤3174-x2L│
│
├──┤
└────────┘
│
│ │
┌────────┐
┌────────┐
│
│ │
│
├────────┤3174-x2L│
│
├──┤
│ ESCON │
└────────┘
│
│E ├────────┤Director│
:
│ ESCON
├──┤
│ A
│
┌────────┐
│ Host 1
│ │
│
├────────┤3174-x2L│
│ Processor │ │
└────────┘
└────────┘
│
│ │
Shows many 3174s can be
│
│ │
attached to one host channel
│
│ │
using an ESCON Director.
│
│ │
│
├──┤
┌────────┐
┌────────┐
┌────────┐
│
│L ├────────┤
│
│
├───────┤3174-x2L│
│
├──┤
│ ESCON │
│ ESCON │
└────────┘
│
│M ├────────┤Director├─────────┤Director│
:
│
├──┤
│ B
│
│ C
│
┌────────┐
│
│ │
┌───┤
│
│
├───────┤3174-x2L│
└───────────┴──┘
│ └────────┘
└────────┘
└────────┘
┌───────────┬──┐
│
│ ESCON
├──┤
│
│ Host 2
│ ├────┘
│ Processor ├──┤
└───────────┴──┘

Figure 126. 3174 ESCON Connectivity

Using ESCON Directors provide the following advantages:
•

Multi-Access
When an ESCON Director is installed between processor channels and I/O
controllers, each channel can connect, dynamically, to multiple controllers
and other channels. For example, if a 60-port ESCON Director Model 2 is
attached to four channels, those four channels can access up to 56 control
units. If a 3174 is attached it can be accessed by all four hosts.
The multi-access capability also reduces the need for manual switches,
allowing control units that have a single ESCON adapter interface to access
multiple ESCON channels on one or several systems without manual
operation.

•

Simplified connectivity and sharing
An ESCON Director greatly reduces the number of channel adapters and
physical cable connections required to share devices among multiple
systems. One control unit connection to the ESCON Director can provide all
of the required connectivity for a multi-image configuration.

•

Multiple concurrent operations
An ESCON Director can handle multiple concurrent data transfers. If the
director is configured with 60 ports, 30 pairs of ports can actively transfer
data at channel speeds.

•

Less disruptive installation and reconfiguration
An ESCON Director may be configured to allow new processors or I/O to be
added to or deleted from the configuration, dynamically, without loss of
system availability. Fiber optic cables may be plugged into the ESCON
Director while the systems are running.

322

3174 Installation Guide

Additional configuration capabilities include partitioning the directors for
isolating I/O devices or system images, dedicating paths through an ESCON
Director, and storing alternate configurations.

8.2 3174 ESCON Models
The models of the 3174 that support the ESCON Adapter are:
•

Model 12L: ESA/390 SNA and non-SNA (floor-standing)

•

Model 22L: ESA/390 SNA and non-SNA (rack mounted)

Both ESCON models support:
•

Eight host connections (via the ESCON Director)

•

64 coax attached devices (with the 3270 Port Expansion Feature)

•

Single Link Multiple-Host

•

Multi-host gateway

•

8KB RU size.

These features are discussed in detail later.
Note: It is not possible to upgrade any 3174 to an ESCON model. For example,
a 3174 Model 11L or Model 13R cannot be upgraded to a Model 12L.
New 3174s shipped with the ESCON Adapter, unlike parallel channel attached
units, are customer installed. The new ESCON Adapter uses the same slot as
the parallel channel adapter and they appear as logical equivalents. The cabling
from the ESCON Adapter is 62.5/125 micron multi-mode fiber. Both models will
also support trunk cabling that includes 50/125 micron fiber optic cabling.

8.3 Hardware/Software Requirements
The following are required to support 3174 ESCON models.
System Software:
•

MVS/SP SP Version 3 Release 1.0E (MVS/ESA*) with appropriate PTFs

•

VM/ESA Version 1 Release 1 (ESA Feature)

•

ACF/VTAM Version 3 Release 3 for MVS/ESA with appropriate PTFs

•

ACF/VTAM Version 3 Release 3 for VM/ESA

Microcode Level:
•

Configuration Support-B Release 3 or later releases

•

Configuration Support-C

Hardware:
•

ES/9000 processors with ESCON channels for direct attachment

•

ESCON Director Model 1 and Model 2 for indirect attachment

•

Fiber optic cabling
The 3174 Models 12L and 22L supports fiber optic links that include 62.5/125
micron, 800 MHz-km bandwidth trunk cable up to 3 km, and 50/125 micron,
Chapter 8. ESCON Connection

323

800 MHz-km bandwidth trunk cable up to 2 km. The use of 50/125 micron
cables requires the use of additional jumpers and connectors. A duplex to
duplex 62.5/125 micron cable is supplied with the 3174. The manual Planning
for Enterprise Systems Connection Links should always be consulted when
customer requirements include fiber optic trunk facilities.
Cables should be ordered with the 3174. They come in standard lengths
between 4 meters (12 feet) and 122 meters (400 feet).

8.4 APPN/APPC for ESCON
Configuration Support-C with the APPN LIC feature allows the 3174 to behave as
an APPN network node. It also provides the T2.1 connectivity to the host.
However, the 3174 ESCON models do not support APPN over ESCON channels.
APPN support for ESCON channel connections will be provided in Configuration
Support-C Release 6 3 and, with the ESCON Director, the 3174 can have T2.1 link
capability for up to 8 host connections, improving the connectivity to S/390 and
POWER parallel processors.

8.5 Peer Communication for ESCON Models
The Peer Communication LIC feature allows coax attached workstations running
the appropriate software to work together as if they were on a LAN. The 3174
ESCON models do support Peer Communication.
See 19.11, “Peer Workstation Requirements” on page 577 for more information.

8.6 Connectivity Options
The ESCON channel architecture uses a point-to-point switching device, the
ESCON Director. The ESCON Director enables the 3174 ESCON models to
access up to eight hosts. It also acts as a repeater to further increase the
maximum distance between the host processor and the 3174 ESCON models.
With two ESCON Directors in the path, the 3174 ESCON models can be located
up to nine km. from the host processor. Using two ESCON Directors with ESCON
XDF* Channels, the 3174 ESCON models can be located up to 43 km. from the
host processor.
One important point with ESCON architecture is that each I/O device is logically
attached point-to-point to the host, whether the physical attachment is direct or
via one or more ESCON Directors.
With direct attachment, each I/O device (including the 3174 ESCON models) uses
one host channel. Unlike parallel channel attachment, daisy-chaining multiple
I/O devices off one ESCON channel is not supported. Instead, multiple I/O
devices are attached to individual ports on an ESCON Director which, in turn, is
attached to one ESCON channel on the host.

3

The Planned Availability Date for Configuration Support-C Release 6 is 1Q/95.

324

3174 Installation Guide

Single Link Multi-Host
Utilizing an ESCON Director, it is possible to connect a 3174 ESCON model to
eight different hosts.

┌────┐ ┌────┐ ┌────┐ ┌────┐
┌────┐
┌────┐
┌────┐
┌────┐
│HOST│ │HOST│ │HOST│ │HOST│
│HOST│
│HOST│
│HOST│
│HOST│
│ 1 │ │ 2 │ │ 3 │ │ 4 │
│ 5 │
│ 6 │
│ 7 │
│ 8 │
└─┬──┘ └─┬──┘ └─┬──┘ └──┬─┘
└─┬──┘
└─┬──┘
└─┬──┘
└─┬──┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌┴────────┴┐
│
│
│
│
│
└────────┤ ESCON ├────────┘
│
│
│
└─────────────────┤ Director ├──────────────────┘
│
└──────────────────────────┤
├────────────────────────────┘
└─────┬────┘
│
┌─────────────────────────┴────────────────────────┐
Host ID: │ 1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
1G
1H │
│ ┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐ │
│ │VCU ││VCU ││VCU ││VCU ││VCU ││VCU ││VCU ││VCU │ │
│ │ 1 ││ 2 ││ 3 ││ 4 ││ 5 ││ 6 ││ 7 ││ 8 │ │
│ └────┘└────┘└────┘└────┘└────┘└────┘└────┘└────┘ │
└──────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
3174 ESCON Model

Figure 127. ESCON Single Link Multi-Host

Given the SNA architecture, the 3174 can only ever be connected to one host.
The ESCON Single Link Multi-Host support is provided by introducing the concept
of multiple virtual control units within one physical control unit .
The virtual control unit, VCU, is functionally a 3174 connected to one and only
one host through an ESCON Director over an ESCON channel. There can be up
to eight VCUs inside one 3174, which means there can be up to eight logically
connected hosts at any one time.
The physical control unit is the physical 3174 itself, as well as the microcode that
controls all its functions.
A display user attached to one of the 3174 ports can, by using the MLT support,
hot-key between any five of the eight possible ESCON connected hosts.
The 3174 ESCON model customized as a non-SNA control unit can hold only one
logical path. Question 240 allows you to specify the controller logical address;
this question applies only to SNA channel attachment. Therefore, multi-host
support for master console functions is not available with non-SNA 3174-x2L.
The non-SNA support for a single host requires Configuration Support-B Release
4 and MVS/ESA V4.2 + APARs OY43246, OY43282, and OY45143.

Multi-Host Gateway
Figure 128 on page 326 shows an example of using the 3174 ESCON model as a
gateway to multiple (two) hosts.

Chapter 8. ESCON Connection

325

┌────┐
┌────┐
│Host│
│Host│
│ A │
│ B │
└─┬──┘
└─┬──┘
link │
│link
addr1 │ ┌─────────┐ │addr2
└───┤ ESCON ├───┘
│ Director│
└────┬────┘
│
┌────────┴─────────┐
│ 3174-x2L Gateway │
│ ┌──────┐┌──────┐ │
│ │VGATE ││VGATE │ │
│ │SAP 04││SAP 08│ │
│ └──────┘└──────┘ │
└────────┬─────────┘
│ address ′400000000001′
┌─────────────┴──────────────┐
│
LAN
│
└─────────────┬──────────────┘
│ address ′400000000002 04′
┌────────┴───────────┐
│
3174-13R/14R │
│ ┌───────┐┌───────┐ │
│ │ DSPU ││ DSPU │ │
│ │ #1 ││ #2 │ │
│ └───────┘└───────┘ │
└────────────────────┘

Figure 128. Single Link Multi-Host Gateway

Using the above diagram and the following table we can see that we are able to
define multiple link addresses with a single sub-channel. Each link is associated
with a different host in the ESCON environment, and the subchannel under that
link address is associated with a PU defined for a given host.

Link address│ Sub/chan│ LAN address
─────────────────┼─────────┼──────────────────────────────
Local PU
01 │
C0 │ locally attached terminals
│
│
DSPU 1
01 │
C1 │ 400000000002 04 (gtwy SAP 04)
─────────────────┼─────────┼──────────────────────────────
Local PU
02 │
C0 │ locally attached terminals
│
│
DSPU 2
02 │
C1 │ 400000000002 04 (gtwy SAP 08)

Figure 129. Addressing Example

8.7 MVS MCS Console Support
The following APARs allow display stations supported by MVS/ESA V4.2 and
attached to the 3174 Models 12L and 22L to be used as MVS MCS consoles:
•

OY43282

•

OY43246

The following APAR allows a display station attached to an 3174 Model 12L or
22L to be used as a console by the MVS Stand-Alone Dump program:
•

326

3174 Installation Guide

OY45143

Notes:
1. The 3174 ESCON model must be customized to operate in non-SNA mode.
2. The support provided by these three APARs is available in MVS/ESA SP V4.2
only. Support is not available for prior releases of MVS/ESA.
3. Use of the 3174 ESCON models in non-SNA mode as MVS consoles is limited
to a single link to a single host.

8.8 8 KB RU Size
8 KB RU size capability is supported by the 3174 Models 12L and 22L only. This
capability is supported in various configurations, depending on the type of
devices supported through, or attached to, the 3174. Following is a summary
chart showing the level of 8 KB RU size support.

Configuration

CUT/DFT Devices
(transmit/receive)

Base ESCON SNA (x2L)
Base ESCON SLMH
Base LAN DSPU (x3R/x4R)
ESCON LAN gateway
ESCON SLMH LAN gateway

Token-Ring Devices
(transmit/receive)

2048/8192
2048/8192
2048/8192
2048/8192
2048/8192

N/A
N/A
N/A
8192/8192
8192/8192

N/A
Not Applicable
ESCON Enterprise Systems Connection
SLMH Single Link Multi-Host

The following restrictions apply when configuring a LAN Gateway. with respect
to 8 KB RU support:
•

If you configure any DSPU with 8 KB RU support then the maximum number
of DSPUs through the gateway is limited to 100, regardless of what the other
DSPUs have been configured for. This is a restriction on the 16/4 Mbps
Token-Ring LAN Adapter.

•

8 KB RU capability is only supported when a 16/4 Mbps Token-Ring LAN
Adapter is installed, otherwise the configuration will be downgraded. This
applies to the DSPUs as well as the gateway configurations.

8.9 3174 Customization
Prior to customization you should note that the panel on the front of the 3174 has
been changed and the Channel Online/Offline switch is no longer present. You
now key in a sequence on the front panel to achieve the same function.
On the 3174 Operator Panel key in:

17XX

where XX = 00 to switch offline
and XX = 01 to switch online

When the offline sequence is entered, communication with all hosts is terminated
until either:
•

The 3174 is IMLed

Chapter 8. ESCON Connection

327

•

The 3174 is IMLed remotely by NetView

•

The online sequence is entered on the keypad

Question 100: 3174 Model Designation
You specify 12L or 22L for a 3174 ESCON model. By coding one of these values
you change the options in question 101.

Question 101: Host Attachment
Question 101 is where you specify the host connection type. By coding either
12L or 22L in question 100, the following responses are valid:
•

4=Non-SNA channel attachment

•

5=SNA channel attachment

When questions 100 and 101 are customized to support the ESCON attachment,
the following questions are not displayed during customization:
•

Question 222: Support of Command Retry

•

Question 223: Attention Delay Value

•

Question 224: Mode of Data Transfer

•

Question 225: Channel Burst Speed

Question 105: Upper Limit Address
This is a two character address to specify the address range.
If you are going to use 8 KB RU sizes, specified in question 241, then there is a
limit of 100 DSPUs definable for the 3174 gateway you are customizing. This
limit means that the difference between question 104 and question 105 cannot be
greater than x′64′.

Question 240: Controller Logical Address
Question 240 applies to 3174 Models 12L and 22L only.
The response is a single character that is used to identify a logical control unit to
its upstream host. The response can be in the range 0 through 9 and A through
F. The default response is 0 on the 1A host; on other hosts, the default response
is X.
Note: Your response must correspond to the CUADDR parameter of the
CNTLUNIT macro in the IOCP.

Question 241: RU Maximum Size
Question 241 applies to 3174 Models 12L and 22L only.
The response is the maximum RU size you will allow. Valid responses are:

328

•

0=4KB RU maximum (default response)

•

1=8KB RU maximum

3174 Installation Guide

Question 940: LAN Address Assignment
The device type (T field) allows you to specify DSPU devices that will use the 8
KB RU support. Valid responses are:
•

0=Workstation (default response)

•

1=3174 Establishment Controller

•

2=8KB RU devices. (not applicable for Ethernet networks)

Response 2 is valid only if question 241=1 (8 KB RU support). Your response
will determine the default values for I-frame size and maximum out (transmit
window size) on the LAN Transmission Definition panel.

Question 941: LAN Transmission Definition
The transmit I-frame size (F field) allows you to specify the maximum frame size
supported by the 8KB RU devices. Valid responses are:
•

0=256 bytes

•

1=521 bytes

•

2=1033 bytes

•

3=2042 bytes (for Token-Ring) or 1493 bytes (for Ethernet)

•

4=4105 bytes (not applicable for Ethernet networks)

•

5=8201 bytes (not applicable for Ethernet networks)

The default depends on the your response to the device type (T field) in question
940.

8.10 Customization Example
For an example of an ESCON SLMH LAN gateway, please see 10.6, “Example 6:
SLMH Gateway with ESCON” on page 372. This example includes the
customization options for the 3174, VTAM, the ESCON Director, and the IOCP
definitions.

Chapter 8. ESCON Connection

329

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3174 Installation Guide

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity
This chapter discusses the options available to achieve multi-host connectivity,
using 3174 features and functions such as the Multiple Logical Terminal,
Concurrent Communication Adapter, Single Link Multi-Host support, ESCON
Director, AEA, X.25, and Frame Relay. Configuration Support-B or later
microcode and additional controller storage are required to support multi-host
connectivity. Details on 3174 customization are provided in Chapter 10,
“Connectivity Customization Examples” on page 351.

9.1 Multiple Logical Terminal
The Multiple Logical Terminal function enables a 3270 Control Unit Terminal
(CUT), or an ASCII terminal in 3270 emulation, to interact with as many as five
host sessions using one physical display. Each session can be connected to a
3270 host or an ASCII host. The display screen and keyboard are owned by a
single session at a time. This session is the active or foreground session . The
other sessions are maintained by the 3174 and are called background sessions .
A background session becomes active when the user jumps to it from another
session in a round-robin fashion, using the Change Screen key sequence. (The
Change Screen key sequence varies depending on the terminal type.)
Each session that is connected to a 3270 host requires that the the host address
be customized in the 3174. The number of host sessions is limited by the type of
host connection (SNA or non-SNA) and by controller storage. A session that is
connected to an ASCII host does not require a 3270 host address be assigned to
it. A connection to an ASCII host requires an Asynchronous Emulation Adapter
(AEA) be installed in the 3174. Access to the ASCII host is defined through the
3174 customizing procedure.

9.1.1 Supported 3270 Hosts via Primary Adapter
The connection between a 3174 and a 3270 host can be established across the
following links:
•

SNA channel

•

SNA SDLC

•

Non-SNA channel

•

Non-SNA BSC

•

X.21/X.25

•

Frame Relay

•

Token ring

•

Ethernet

9.1.2 Supported 3270 Hosts via CCA
In addition to the primary connection, if you have installed one of the Concurrent
Communication Adapters (V.24, V.35, and X.21), you can have multiple sessions
over:
•

SNA SDLC

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

331

•

Non-SNA BSC

•

X.21/X.25

9.1.3 Supported ASCII Hosts
The connection between a 3174 and an ASCII host requires the Asynchronous
Emulation Adapter (AEA) feature #3020 to be installed in the 3174. Access to the
ASCII host can be on a session basis via a Connection Menu or the default
destination customized during AEA customizing procedures. Each ASCII host
connection uses one AEA port.

9.1.4 Supported Devices
The following CUT displays are supported by MLT:
•

3278 (excluding Model 1)

•

3179 (excluding Model G)

•

3279

•

3180

•

3191

•

3192 (excluding Model G)

•

3194 (operating in CUT mode)

•

3471

•

3472 (excluding Model G)

•

3481

•

3482

This includes all model types. Any other coax attached terminal which fully
emulates one of the supported displays above can also take advantage of the
MLT capability.
DFT terminals are not affected by the MLT function. These devices cannot use
the Change Screen key sequence to switch between MLT sessions; DFT
terminals provide multiple sessions through their own microcode.
With Configuration Support-B Release 1 and earlier releases, MLT was not
supported on ASCII terminals although you did have a Connection Menu which
allowed you to select the desired host connection.
With Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases, ASCII terminals now
support MLT sessions.
With Configuration Support-C Release 5, 3174 coax-attached printers can support
up to five host sessions.

9.1.5 MLT Prerequisites
To implement MLT, you you should be aware of the additional storage
requirements, weighting factors and MLT levels. See Appendix E, “3174 Storage
Requirements” on page 755 for information on determining the additional
storage required.

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3174 Installation Guide

9.1.6 Programmed Symbols (PS) Considerations
A Programmed Symbols screen should be assigned to the primary session only.
While the primary session is in background, Programmed Symbols Set update
can occur.

9.1.7 3174 Customization
The MLT function does not require special hardware (other than the additional
controller storage required). You will, however, have to customize the 3174 to
provide this function.

Question 110: MLT Storage Support
Question 110 refers to the required MLT configuration level (Configuration
Support-A and S, and Configuration Support-B Releases 1, 2 and 3), or the
amount of storage allocated to support MLT (Configuration Support-B Release 4
and Configuration Support-C).
For Configuration Support-B Release 3 and earlier releases, question 110
requires a one-digit response. A non-zero response is required for MLT. Valid
responses are:
•

0=No MLT (default response)

•

1=MLT Level 1

•

2=MLT Level 2

•

3=MLT Level 3

•

4=MLT Level 4

•

5=MLT Level 5

•

5=MLT Level 6 (added for Configuration Support-B Releases 2 and 3)

For Configuration Support-B Release 4 and Configuration Support-C, question
110 consists of a two-part response. A non-zero response to either part is
required for MLT. If you respond to one part with a non-zero value, you must
respond to the other part with zero(s).

First-part (one-digit) response: A non-zero response specifies the MLT level
required and results in a preset amount of controller storage being allocated to
support MLT. Valid responses are:

Host ID

Valid
Non-zero
Response

Models 01L through 24R

1A

1 to 8

Models 41R, 43R, 51R, 53R, 61R, 62R, 63R, 64R

1A

1 to 8

Concurrent Communication Adapters

2x and 3x

1 or 2

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity

333

The preset amount of storage allocated is as follows:
MLT Level

Storage Allocated

1

64KB

2

128KB

3

512KB

4

896KB

5

1152KB

6

1536KB

7

2048KB

8

2688KB

Second-part (four-digit) response: A non-zero response specifies the amount of
storage in kilobytes to support MLT. Valid responses are:

Host ID

Minimum
Response

Maximum
Response

Models 1L through 24R

1A

0001KB

2784KB

Models 41R, 43R, 51R, 53R, 61R, 62R,
63R, 64R

1A

0001KB

2784KB

Concurrent Communication Adapters

2x and 3x

0001KB

0128KB

See Appendix E, “3174 Storage Requirements” on page 755 for information on
determining the additional storage required.

Question 125: Miscellaneous Feature Options (A)
Question 125 digit 7 specifies the alarm function for background sessions in an
MLT environment. Valid responses are:
•

0=Background alarm is enabled (default response)

•

1=Background alarm is disabled for background sessions

This option has effect only when question 110 is customized with a non-zero
response and digit 6=0 (File Transfer Aid). A response 1 enables the alarm to
be sounded when a update occurs to a screen in the background session.

Question 116: Individual Port Assignment
Question 116 allows you to specify how the host addresses are to be assigned to
the 3174 ports (both 3270 and AEA); that is, whether addresses are to be
assigned automatically or individually. The response required depends on the
microcode release level. See 3.3.13, “Planning for Port Assignment” on page 57
for further information.

Question 117: Port Assignment
Question 117 allows you to assign the host addresses to the 3174 ports (both
3270 and AEA), using the Port Assignment panel.

Port Assignment Panel: The Port Assignment Panel is used to assign host LU
addresses (LOCADDRs) to the 3174 physical ports. This panel is divided into two
sections; one for the 3270 ports provided by hardware groups 26 and 27, and the
other for the AEA ports provided by hardware groups 21, 22 and 23.

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3174 Installation Guide

When assigning LOCADDRs to a 3174 port, you should take into account the
display model attached to that port. If an LU (LOCADDR) defined for a Model 3,
4 or 5 display is assigned to a port with a 3278 Model 2 display attached, then
every attempt to access an LU (LT) that is bigger than the 3278 Model 2
capability results in a program check. On the other hand, if a display attached to
a port is set up for a screen size (or model) larger than the LUs that are
assigned to that port, an automatic model change will occur whenever a Change
Screen key is pressed and another session to a LT is invoked.





___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________

Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30

Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
3 002 003 004 ___
3 011 012 013 ___
3 017 018 019 ___
3 023 024 025 ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___

5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

Port
26-01
26-03
26-05
26-07
26-09
26-11
26-13
26-15
26-17
26-19
26-21
26-23
26-25
26-27
26-29
26-31

Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
3 008 009 010 ___
3 014 015 016 ___
3 020 021 022 ___
1 026 ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___



5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

Port
21-00
21-02
21-04
21-06
22-00
22-02
22-04
22-06
23-00
23-02
23-04
23-06





Figure 130. Port Assignment Panel (3270 Ports)



___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
3 005 006 007 ___
3 030 031 032 ___
1 036 ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___

5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

Port
21-01
21-03
21-05
21-07
22-01
22-03
22-05
22-07
23-01
23-03
23-05
23-07

Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
3 027 028 029 ___
3 033 034 035 ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___

5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___





Figure 131. Port Assignment Panel (AEA Ports)

Following is a description of each of the Port Assignment Panels fields:
Field

Description

Port

This column lists the port numbers beginning with 26-00,
that is, hardware group 26 port 00.
•

Hardware group 26 indicates the base 3270 ports.

•

Hardware group 27 indicates the 3270 Port Expansion
Feature ports.

•

Hardware groups 21, 22 and 23 indicate the AEA ports.

#IS

This column indicates the number of 3270 host sessions
assigned to each port.

LT1 through 5

These fields are the host addresses (LOCADDRs) assigned
to that port.

Note: AEA requires additional customizing questions to be answered and some
additional panels to be defined.

Question 118: Port Address
Question 118 is really a panel displaying the host addresses you have assigned
in the Port Assignment panel previously. The addresses are shown in
hexadecimal and cannot be modified (protected fields). If you need to change an
address, press PF7 to return to the Port Assignment in question 117.

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity

335

Question 168: Additional Extension Mode Key
Question 168 is needed for PCs attached to the 3174 that use 3270 CUT mode
emulation programs to access MLT. (It is also required for PCs in ASCII
Terminal Emulation.) Valid responses are:
•

0=No additional Extension mode key is defined (default response)

•

1=The Home key is an additional Extension mode key.

•

2=The Print ID key is an additional Extension mode key

The need to define an additional key is because many (older) 3270 emulation
programs do not completely emulate the keystrokes provided by a 3278/79 CUT
display. For example, key sequences that require an Alt shift are ignored by the
emulation program and are not sent to the 3174. One such key sequence, Alt
Insert, is required to Change Screen when using MLT.
To provide the Change Screen function, question 168 allows you to define an
Extension mode key (to substitute for the Alt key which is ignored). You can
choose to use either the Home key or the Print ID key as the substitute Alt key.

Response 0: If your CUT emulation program ignores the Alt Insert key
sequence, you cannot Change Screen and, therefore, MLT cannot be used.
Response 1: The Home key generates the required Alt sequence. To Change
Screen, press and release the Home key and then press the Insert key.
Response 2: The Print ID key generates the required Alt sequence. To Change
Screen, press and release the Print ID key and then press the Insert key.
To invoke the Print ID function, press the Print ID key twice.

9.1.8 Change Screen Key
You will find the Change Screen key (sometimes called the Hot Key or Jump
Key ) located at different positions on different keyboard layouts. The location of
this key depends on the keyboard type, the terminal mode of operation (whether
3278 Emulation mode or Native mode) and your response to question 168.
Figure 132 on page 337 shows the expected Change Screen key sequence for
the different keyboard types.

336

3174 Installation Guide

┌──────────────────────────────────────┬──────────────────────┐
│
Keyboard Type
│ Key Location
│
├──────────────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────┤
│ Base (87-key) keyboard (non-text) │ Alt + Insert
│
│
│
│
│ Base (87-key) keyboard (text)
│ Alt + PA2
│
├──────────────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────┤
│ Converged (122/124-key) keyboard * │
│
│
│
│
│ ─ 3278 Emulation Mode
│ Alt + Insert
│
│
│
│
│ ─ Native Mode
│ Alt + PA2
│
├──────────────────────────────────────┼──────────────────────┤
│ Enhanced (102/103-key) keyboard ** │ Alt + Home
│
├──────────────────────────────────────┴──────────────────────┤
│Notes:
│
│
│
│ * The Converged keyboard is recognized by the CROSS shape of│
│ the Cursor Move Keys (arrows).
│
│
│
│** The Enhanced keyboard is recognized by the UPSIDE DOWN T │
│ shape of the Cursor Move Keys (arrows).
│
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
Figure 132. Change Screen Key Location

See Appendix I, “Keyboard Layouts” on page 803 for further information.

9.1.9 Display Model ID
When you set the model ID for the display (for example, 3192, 3180, etc.), it is
essential that the selected screen size matches the largest session for this
display. For example, if one of the sessions on this display is equal to a Model 4
screen size (80x43), you should set the display model ID to 4.
If one of the sessions has the Create Partition capability which enables it to work
in Extended - Explicit Partition mode, you should select the appropriate model ID
for Explicit Partition. Figure 133 on page 338 shows the model IDs required for
3180 and 3192.

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity

337

┌────────┬───────────────┬────────────┬──────────────────────────────┐
│ Display│
Model ID │ Model ID │ Screen Size
│
│
│
Implicit │ Explicit │
│
├────────┼───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│ 3180 │
2
│
6
│
24 x 80
│
│
├───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│
│
3
│
7
│
32 x 80
│
│
├───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│
│
4
│
8
│
43 x 80
│
│
├───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│
│
5
│
9
│
27 x 132 or 24 x 80
│
├────────┼───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│ 3192/D │
2
│
2+
│
24 x 80
│
│
├───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│
│
3
│
3+
│
32 x 80
│
│
├───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│
│
4
│
4+
│
43 x 80
│
│
├───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│
│
5
│
5+
│
27 x 132 or 24 x 80
│
├────────┼───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│ 3192/C │
2
│
2+
│
24 x 80
│
│
├───────────────┼────────────┼──────────────────────────────┤
│
│
3
│
3+
│
32 x 80
│
└────────┴───────────────┴────────────┴──────────────────────────────┘
Figure 133. Display Model ID

9.1.10 Session Integration
Programmed Symbols (PS) Display
The first MLT session on each 3174 port is defined as the primary session (LT-1).
If a PS screen is attached to this port, it must always be assigned to the primary
session only. When the primary session is in the background, a PSS screen
update can occur.
During the Load PS operation, the active session′s display will either go blank or
flash momentarily. The active session is not affected except for the brief visual
disruption which occurs during the Load PS operation.

Session Presentation Delay
When changing between sessions which are defined as different screen sizes,
there will be a slight delay while the display switches to the new screen size.

Shift Lock, Caps Lock and APL On
Shift Lock, Caps Lock and APL On status are preserved for each session.

Entry Assist (DOC Mode)
Each session preserves its own Entry Assist format definitions. The user must
set up each session that needs Entry Assist.

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3174 Installation Guide

9.1.11 Local Copy Considerations
When local copy is invoked and the printer is printing, you are able to Change
Screen. You do not have to wait for print completion to change the session. As
a matter of fact, it is possible to invoke a local copy on one session, change to
the second session, invoke a local copy from there (it will wait in the queue until
the first local copy is completed) and change to the third session while session
one is still printing and session two is waiting in the queue.
When local copy is invoked in one session and you jump to another session
(while the printer is still printing the previous session′s invocation), the Printer
Printing indicator does not indicate that the printer is still printing. You have to
be aware that the printer may still be busy with a task from a previous session.
The Printer Busy indicator will be displayed when you try to invoke local copy.

CCA Local Copy
If a display has a session through a CCA, you can local copy to a printer that is
also assigned to a host via the CCA. local copy will not work if the display is on
a CCA session and the printer is defined through the primary link.

Printer Authorization Matrix (PAM)
The Printer Authorization Matrix (PAM) is defined during customization. PAM
definitions are for a physical port; therefore, all secondary sessions will have
access to the printer that is defined for the primary session.
If a Print ID is changed during a session, it affects all sessions on this port until
the next Print ID change.

9.2 Concurrent Communication Adapter (CCA)
The Concurrent Communication Adapter provides a host attachment that is
additional to that provided by the primary communication adapter. Each CCA
allows the 3174 to be attached to a host via a separate teleprocessing link.
Each CCA appears to the host to be a separate 3174, with its own
microprocessor, controller storage and teleprocessing interface. The CCA
communicates independently with different hosts using different network
protocols. With SDLC and X.25 it can handle transmission speeds of up to 256
Kbps, and with BSC network protocol up to 19.2 Kbps.
There are two types of CCA: Type 1 and Type 2.
•

The Type 1 CCA has a V.24 or V.35 interface for remote attachment using
BSC, SNA/SDLC and X.25 network protocols.

•

The Type 2 CCA has an X.21 interface for remote attachment using
SNA/SDLC and X.25 network protocols.

Up to two CCAs may be installed per 3174, depending on the model (see
“Concurrent Communication Adapter (CCA)” on page 16 for details).
Displays attached to a 3174 with the CCA are able to concurrently access 3270
applications in multiple hosts. Control Unit Terminals (CUTs), which are
configured as Multiple Logical Terminals (MLTs) during customization, and
Distributed Function Terminals (DFTs) can have this multi-host access.

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity

339

With the Configuration Support-C Release 5, AEA-attached ASCII displays that
are configured as MLTs can also access multiple hosts attached via the CCA.
Direct-attached 3270 displays can access 3270 applications via the primary host
link or the secondary host link(s) through the CCA. ASCII displays with MLT
support can access ASCII host applications via the AEA or 3270 applications via
the primary link or the secondary host link(s) through the CCA.

┌───────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
3270
│
│
3270
│
│
HOST A
│
│
HOST B
│
└─────┬─────────┘
└──┬────────────┘
│
│
Local│
│Remote
Channel│
│TP
Attached│
│Link
│
│
┌─────┴──────────────────────────┬───┴───┬─────────┐
│
│
│
│
│
3174─11L
│ CCA │ AEA │
│
│
│
│
└────┬───────────────────┬───────┴───────┴────┬────┘
│
│
│
┌────┴────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
┌────┴────┐
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ DFT │
│
CUT
│
│ ASCII │
│
│
│
│
│
│
└─────────┘
└───────────┘
└─────────┘

Figure 134. 3174 Multi-Host with Concurrent Communication Adapter

Figure 134 shows a 3174 channel attached to a primary host (A) and TP attached
to a secondary host (B) via a CCA. CUT and DFT displays are coax attached and
ASCII displays are AEA attached to the the 3174. Both the CUT displays and the
ASCII displays are customized for MLT. The CUT, DFT and ASCII displays can
access up to five sessions distributed over the two hosts.
Session alerts are sent to the host where the session is bound; hardware alerts
are sent to the primary host. It is therefore recommended that the primary host
be SNA since these alerts are only sent on SNA. 3174 SNA alerts are
high-priority events requiring immediate attention. The 3174 SNA alert function
sends problem determination information, collected by the 3174 or entered by an
operator, to the NetView hardware monitor.

9.2.1 Supported Devices
The following devices are supported and enhanced by using the Concurrent
Communication Adapter:

CUT Displays: Supported CUT displays include:

340

•

3178

•

3179 (except G models)

•

3180

•

3191

•

3192 (except G models)

•

3471, 3742

•

3481, 3482

3174 Installation Guide

The Multiple Logical Terminal (MLT) function allows a CUT display to act as
multiple logical terminals. Each logical terminal has its own host address and
can interact independently with its own host application. (For more information
on MLT, see 9.1, “Multiple Logical Terminal” on page 331.) By using the
Change Screen key, a CUT display can access the primary host attached via the
primary host link, any of the other hosts attached via the secondary host link(s),
and any ASCII host attached via an AEA.

DFT Displays: Supported DFT displays include:
•

3192-G

•

3193

two host sessions

•

3194

four host sessions

•

3290

four host sessions

•

3472-G

one host session and one printer session

five host sessions

The multiple interactive sessions (MIS) capability allows a DFT display to act as
multiple logical terminals. Each logical terminal has its own address and can
interact independently with its own host application.
When assigning addresses to ports supporting DFTs, you should check the DFT
device documentation for the number and type of sessions supported for that
DFT. For example, some DFT displays may support only three host sessions and
one printer session.
Displays with multiple session capabilities provide for limited switching
capability and the level of switching depends on the primary host link protocol.
When the primary link is SNA, DFTs have access to sessions on the primary link
and any secondary link; when the primary link is non-SNA, DFTs have access
only to sessions on the primary link.

ASCII Displays: Supported ASCII displays include:
•

DEC VT100, VT220

•

IBM 3101, 3161, 3163, 3164

The Multiple Logical Terminal (MLT) function allows an ASCII display to act as
multiple logical terminals. Each logical terminal has its own host address and
can interact independently with its own host application in 3270 emulation mode.
(For more information on MLT, see 9.1, “Multiple Logical Terminal” on
page 331.) By using the Change Screen key sequence, an ASCII display can
access any host attached via the primary host link, any of the other hosts
attached via the secondary host link(s) or any ASCII host attached via an AEA.
Access to host is made through either the connection menu or the default
destination procedure. Refer to the 3174 Terminal User ′ s Reference for Expanded
Functions for more information on MLT operation.

3270 Printers: With Configuration Support-C Release 5, 3174 coax-attached
printers can participate up to five host sessions.
ASCII Printers: With Configuration Support-C Release 5, 3174 AEA-attached
ASCII printers can also participate up to five host sessions similar to
coax-attached printers.

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity

341

9.3 Single Link Multi-Host Support
Single Link Multi-Host (SLMH) support is a microcode function for 3174s attached
to the IBM LAN as DSPUs, an ESCON channel, a X.25 network or Frame Relay
network. To support SLMH, Configuration Support-B or later microcode and
additional controller storage is required (see Appendix E, “3174 Storage
Requirements” on page 755).

9.3.1 SLMH Via LAN
┌───────────────┐
┌────────────────┐
┌─────────────┐
│
3270
│
│
3270
│ . . . . . │ 3270
│
│
HOST 1
│
│
HOST 2
│
│ HOST 8
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬───────┘
└──────┬──────┘
│
│
│
┌───────┴───────┐
┌────────┴────────┐
┌───────┴──────┐
│ 3174/37xx │
│
3174/37xx
│
│ 3174/37xx │
│
Gateway
│
│
Gateway
│ . . . . │ Gateway
│
└──────────┬────┘
└─────┬───────────┘
└───────┬──────┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌──────┴───────────────────────┴───────┐
│
│
LAN
├─────────────────────┘
└────────────────┬─────────────────────┘
│
┌────────┴────────┐
│
│
│ 3174-x3R/x4R │
│
│
└──┬───────────┬──┘
│
│
┌────┴──┐
┌──┴────┐
│ CUT │
│ DFT │
└───────┘
└───────┘

Figure 135. SLMH DSPU via LAN

In this example, the single link to the multiple hosts is provided by the primary
communication adapter − the token-ring adapter in the case of 3174-x3R or
Ethernet adapter in the case of 3174-x4R. Communication with each 3270 host is
via an appropriate gateway. Access to eight 3270 hosts can be configured.
However, each display can have sessions with only five of those 3270 hosts.
Note that SLMH support is a microcode-only function that is provided by
Configuration Support-B and later releases. It does not require the use of any
CCA, although the CCA can be used in conjunction with SLMH (see Figure 136
on page 343).
For 3174 customization details, see 10.3, “Example 3: SLMH via Token-Ring” on
page 360. This example is valid in a similar manner for an Ethernet network.

342

3174 Installation Guide

9.3.2 SLMH With CCA
┌───────────────┐
┌────────────────┐
│
3270
│ . . . . . . . │
3270
│
│
HOST 1
│
│
HOST 8
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬───────┘
│
│
│
│
┌───────┴───────┐
┌────────┴────────┐
│ 3174/37xx │
│
3174/37xx
│
│
Gateway
│ . . . . . . . │
Gateway
│
└──────────┬────┘
└─────┬───────────┘
│
│
│
│
┌──────┴──────────────────────────┴───────┐
│
LAN
│
└──────────────────┬──────────────────────┘
│
┌──────────┴─────┬────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
│
│
│
│
│
│CCA ├────────┤ 3270 HOST │
│ 3174-x3R/x4R └────┤
│
│
│
│
└───────────────┘
└────┬───────────┬────┘
│
│
┌────┴──┐
┌──┴────┐
│ CUT │
│ DFT │
└───────┘
└───────┘

Figure 136. SLMH with CCA

In this example, SLMH is used in conjunction with the CCA. The CUT and DFT
displays have access to hosts 1 through 8. In addition, the terminals can also
access the 3270 host via the CCA. As before, each display is limited to a
maximum of five sessions or LTs.
For 3174 customization details, see 10.4, “Example 4: SLMH with CCA” on
page 365.

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity

343

9.3.3 SLMH with AEA
┌───────────────┐
┌────────────────┐
│
3270
│
│
3270
│
│
HOST 1
│ . . . . . . . │
HOST 8
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬───────┘
│
│
│
│
┌───────┴───────┐
┌────────┴────────┐
│ 3174/37xx │
│
3174/37xx
│
│
Gateway
│ . . . . . . . │
Gateway
│
└──────────┬────┘
└─────┬───────────┘
│
│
│
│
┌──────┴──────────────────────────┴───────┐
│
LAN
│
└──────────────────┬──────────────────────┘
│
┌───────────────┐
┌──────────────────┴─────┬────┐
│
│
│
│CCA ├────────┤ 3270 HOST
│
│
3174-x3R/x4R
├────┤
│
│
│
│AEA ├───┐
└───────────────┘
└──┬───────────┬─────────┴─┬──┘ │
┌───────────────┐
│
│
│
│
│
│
┌──┴──┐
┌──┴──┐
┌──┴──┐ └────┤ ASCII HOST │
│ CUT │
│ DFT │
│ASCII│
│
│
└─────┘
└─────┘
└─────┘
└───────────────┘

Figure 137. SLMH with AEA

In this example, an AEA has been added for the attachment of ASCII hosts and
terminals. The host connectivity supported are as follows:
•

A CUT display can have one or more of its five sessions with an ASCII host.

•

A DFT display cannot access an ASCII host; the CUT side of a DFT/E display
(such as a 3472-G Graphics Display) can access an ASCII host.

•

An ASCII display can access ASCII hosts or 3270 hosts attached via the
primary link and secondary (CCA) link(s).

Note: The installation of more than one communication adapter in the same
3174 could affect performance and end-user response times. Also, care should
be taken when planning for storage requirements. If sufficient storage is not
installed in the 3174, some functions will be deconfigured (function will not
operate or will operate at a lower level) when the 3174 is IMLed.

344

3174 Installation Guide

9.3.4 SLMH LAN Gateway
┌───────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
HOST 1
│
│
HOST 2
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬──────┘
│
│
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
│ 3174─11L │
│
│
├─────┬─────┤
│
37xx │
│#304x│ CCA ├──────────────────┤
│
└──┬──┴─────┘
└───────────┘
│
┌──────┴────────────────────────────────────────┐
│
LAN
│
└───────────────────────┬───────────────────────┘
│
┌─────┴─────┐
│
│
│3174-x3R/ │
│
x4R │
└┬─────────┬┘
│
│
┌────┴──┐ ┌──┴────┐
│ CUT │ │ DFT │
└───────┘ └───────┘

Figure 138. SLMH Gateway via LAN

With Configuration Support-B Release 3and later, connectivity options have been
further enhanced by allowing a DSPU to access the CCA installed in a 3174
gateway. For example, a terminal on the 3174-x3R/x4R can now access host 1
via the Token-Ring Adapter/Ethernet Adapter and the primary link; it can also
access host 2 via the Token-Ring Adapter/Ethernet Adapter and the secondary
link provided by the CCA. In effect, the 3174-11L now acts as two Token-Ring
Gateways/Ethernet Gateways: one gateway via the primary link and one gateway
via the CCA.
The maximum number of DSPUs that can access a SNA host through each
Concurrent Communication Adapter is 50.
For 3174 customization details, see 10.5, “Example 5: SLMH Token-Ring
Gateway” on page 367.

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity

345

9.3.5 SLMH with ESCON
┌───────────────┐ ┌───────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
3270
│ │
3270
│
│
3270
│
│
HOST 1
│ │
HOST 2
│ . . . . │
HOST 8
│
└───────┬───────┘ └─────┬─────────┘
└───────┬───────┘
│
│
│
│
┌────┴────┐
│
│
│
│
│
└───────────┤ ESCON ├──────────────────────┘
│ DIRECTOR│
│
│
└────┬────┘
┌────────────┼──────────────────┐
│
│
3174 │
│
┌───┴────┐
│
│
│3174
│
│
│
│ VCU #1├─┐
│
│
└─┬──────┘ │
│
│
│ VCU #2│
│
│
└────────┘
│
│
....
│
│
....
│
│
┌────────┐
│
│
│3174
│
│
│
│ VCU #8│
│
│
└────────┘
│
└─────────┬─────────┬───────────┘
│
│
┌────┴──┐ ┌──┴────┐
│ CUT │ │ DFT │
└───────┘ └───────┘

Figure 139. SLMH with ESCON

Using an ESCON Director, you can connect a 3174 ESCON model to eight hosts.
In this example, each ESCON host is connected to the one 3174-x2L. From each
host′s perspective, the 3174 appears as individual controller (a “virtual control
unit”). Using MLT, a terminal can access up to five of the eight hosts connected.

346

3174 Installation Guide

9.3.6 SLMH Gateway with ESCON
┌───────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
3270
│
│
3270
│
│
HOST 1
│
│
HOST 2
│
└───────┬───────┘
└───────┬───────┘
│
│
│
┌─────────┐
│
└──────────────┤ ESCON ├──────────────┘
│ DIRECTOR│
└────┬────┘
│
┌────────┴─────────┐
│ 3174 Gateway │
│ ┌──────┐┌──────┐ │
┌───────┐
│ │VGATE ││VGATE │ │
┌───────┐
│ CUT ├────┤ │ #1 ││ #2 │ ├────┤ DFT │
└───────┘
│ └──────┘└──────┘ │
└───────┘
└────────┬─────────┘
│
┌─────────────┴──────────────┐
│
LAN
│
└─────────────┬──────────────┘
│
┌────────┴───────────┐
│
3174-x3R/x4R
│
│ ┌───────┐┌───────┐ │
│ │ DSPU ││ DSPU │ │
│ │ #1 ││ #2 │ │
│ └───────┘└───────┘ │
│
│
└─────┬─────────┬────┘
│
│
┌────┴──┐ ┌──┴────┐
│ CUT │ │ DFT │
└───────┘ └───────┘

Figure 140. SLMH Gateway with ESCON

In this example, the 3174-x3R/x4R has two host connections, both via the same
physical gateway (the 3174-x2L). The 3174-x2L appears as two logical gateways.
Host A uses gateway #1 to talk to DSPU #1, and is totally independent of host B
communication. The ESCON Director performs the routing to the appropriate
host.
For 3174 customization details, see 10.6, “Example 6: SLMH Gateway with
ESCON” on page 372.

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity

347

9.3.7 SLMH with X.25 or Frame Relay
┌────────┐ ┌────────┐
┌────────┐
│ 3270 │ │ 3270 │
│ 3270 │
│ HOST 1 │ │ HOST 2 │ . . .│ HOST 8 │
└─────┬──┘ └───┬────┘
└───┬────┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ *******
│
│ *********
***** │
**** X.25 / FRAME ********
***
PSDN / RELAY
**
**
*****
****
******* │***
*******
│ *********
│/│
│
┌─────────────┼─────────────────┐
│
│
3174 │
│
┌────┴───┐
│
│
│3174
│
│
│
│ PU #1├─┐
│
│
└─┬──────┘ │
│
│
│ PU #2│
│
│
└────────┘
│
│
....
│
│
....
│
│
┌────────┐
│
│
│3174
│
│
│
│ PU #8│
│
│
└────────┘
│
└──────┬───────────────────┬────┘
│
│
│
│
┌────┴──┐
┌────┴──┐
│ CUT │
│ DFT │
└───────┘
└───────┘

Figure 141. SLMH with X.25 or Frame Relay

With Configuration Support-B Release 3, SLMH connectivity is extended to X.25
network attachments. You can access up to eight X.25 hosts via the primary
communication adapter and up to four X.25 hosts via each CCA, giving a total of
16 X.25 hosts for each 3174.
For more information on X.25 refer to Chapter 5, “X.25 Support” on page 157.
For 3174 customization details, see 10.7, “Example 7: SLMH with X.25” on
page 380.
With Configuration Support-C Release 5, SLMH connectivity is extended to Frame
Relay network attachments and it is possible to access up to eight Frame Relay
hosts via the primary communication adapter.
Note: Frame Relay via CCA is not supported.
For more information on Frame Relay refer to Chapter 20, “Frame Relay
Support” on page 589.

348

3174 Installation Guide

9.3.8 Multiple Connectivity

┌──────────┐ ┌─────────┐
┌──────────┐
│ 3270
│ ├───┐
│
│ 3270
│
│ HOST 1 │ │ICA│ 9370│
│ HOST 2 │
└────┬┬────┘ └─┬─┴─────┘
└─────┬────┘
││
│
*********
│
┌─┴┴─┐
│
*****
*****
│
│3745│
│
****
X.25
****──┘
└─┬──┘
│
**
***─────┐
│
│
****
*****
│
│
│
***********
│
│/│
│\│
│
┌─────┴────┐
│
│
│
│ 3270
│
│
│ ┌─────────┘
│ HOST 3 │
│
│ │
└──────────┘
┌───┴────┬─┴┬─┴┐
│
│C │C │
│ 3174 │C │C │
│
│A │A │
│
│1 │2 │
└┬─────┬─┴──┴──┘
│
│
┌─────┴─┐ ┌─┴─────┐
│ CUT │ │ DFT │
└───────┘ └───────┘

Figure 142. Multiple Connectivity Example

In this example, a 3174 is shown with multiple upstream physical connections:
•

The primary communication adapter is attached to host A via an SDLC line.

•

The first CCA is attached to host B via an ICA.

•

The second CCA is attached to host C and host D via the X.25 network.

Using MLT, you can Change Screen from a session with host A to a session with
host B, to another session with host C, and then using SLMH over the X.25
connection, to another session with host D.

Chapter 9. Multi-Host Connectivity

349

9.4 3174 Customization
All the examples shown use the multi-host capability of the 3174; this capability
has to be selected at the start of the 3174 customization.



______________ Model / Attach ______________

Online Test Password



098 - 3174

Product Assistance Data
099 - DSPU WITH SLMH AND CCA
3174 Model

100 - 13R

Host Attachment

101 - M

1-BSC
2-SDLC
3-X.25
4-Non-SNA Channel
5-SNA Channel

LAN adapter type

102 - 1

NSO selection

103 - 0000000000000000

6-SDLC, X.21 Switched
7-Token-Ring
8-Ethernet
9-Frame Relay
M-Multi-host

0-none
1-Token Ring
2-Ethernet

This panel is presented when you select the
Configure option from the Customize Control
Disk Menu.
•

Question 099 allows you to enter comments,
for example, reference information about the
3174.

•

Question 100 specifies the 3174 model
number.

•

Question 101 is where you specify the host
attachment. For the multi-host examples
described previously, your response must be
M to customize for multi-host support.
When you specify M as the host attachment,
then the Multi-Host Definition panel will be
presented.

CMD===>







_________ Multi-Host Definition ___________



Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID
1A
2A
3A
1B
1C
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

Adapter
Type

1
_

Host
Attach
7
2
_

Hardware
Group

Include
in IML

51
__

1
_
1
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

In this example Multi-Host Definition panel:
•

Host ID 1A is the primary host on the
primary link. We specify host attachment 7
to define this as a physical link to a
Token-Ring Network.

•

Host ID 2A is the primary host on the first
secondary (CCA) link. We specify host
attachment 2 to define this as a physical link
to an a SDLC line. Since the adapter type is
Type 1 CCA, a 1 is specified under ″Adapter
Type″ and a 51 is entered to indicate the
hardware group.

Host Descriptor

GATEWAY_LINK_1______
CCA_HOST_LINK_2_____
____________________
GATEWAY_LINK_3______
GATEWAY_LINK_4______
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________

CMD===>



•

Host ID 1B and 1C are SLMH (logical)
connections; they are secondary hosts via
the primary link. As such, they assume the
physical attributes of host ID 1A.
The Host Descriptor field is where you enter a description of each host session
that is meaningful for your users. As you customize each host in turn, by
selecting the host ID in the command line, the description for the selected host is
displayed in subsequent panels to identify the host you are customizing. This
description is also displayed in the OIA after the 3174 is IMLed.



Once a host has been selected, the customization process and panels are the
same as if just coding a normal single link 3174.

350

3174 Installation Guide

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples
The following examples were set up in the ITSO, Raleigh Center.
For a detailed account of a specific function you should consult the relevant
chapter in this document and the 3174 Planning Guide .

┌──────────┐ ┌─────────┐
│ 3270
│ ├───┐
│
│ HOST A │ │ICA│ 9370│
└────┬┬────┘ └─┬─┴─────┘
││
│
*********
┌─┴┴─┐
│
*****
*****
│3745│
│
****
X.25
****
└─┬──┘
│
**
***
│
│
****
*****
│
│
***********
│/│
│\│
│
│
│
│
│
│ ┌─────────┘
│
│ │
┌───┴────┬─┴┬─┴┐
┌──┐ │
│C │C │
│T ├─┤ 3174 │C │C │
└──┘ │
│A │A │
└────────┴──┴──┘

The format of all the examples is:
•

A diagram and a brief description of the scenario

•

3174 customization panels that are significant to the example

•

NCP and VTAM definitions

In the examples of this chapter the Token-ring networks can be replaced by
Ethernet networks and the x3R models by x14R models without greatly affecting
3174 customization panels. SLMH support is the same for both Token-ring and
Ethernet networks.

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

351

10.1 Example 1: Remote 3174

┌─────────────┐
│
│
│ 3270 HOST │
│
│
└──────┬──────┘
│
┌──────┴──────┐
│
37xx
│
└──────┬──────┘
│
│ SDLC line
│\│
│
│
┌───────────┴──────────────┐
│
│
│
3174-11R
│
│
│
└─────┬─────────────┬──────┘
│
│
┌────┴────┐ ┌────┴────┐
│
│ │
│
│ DFT │ │ CUT │
│
│ │
│
└─────────┘ └─────────┘

Figure 143. Remote 3174

This is an example of a remote 3174 connected over an SDLC line (line #08),
attached to a 3725 running NCP V4.3.1.

Remote 3174 Customization



______________ Model / Attach ______________
Online Test Password



•

Question 099 is user comments or useful
information.

•

Question 100 specifies the 3174 model
number.

•

Question 101 specifies the host attachment
type (2=SDLC).

098 -

Product Assistance Data
099 - 11R REMOTE 3174
3174 Model

100 - 11R

Host Attachment

101 - 2

1-BSC
2-SDLC
3-X.25
4-Non-SNA Channel
5-SNA Channel

LAN adapter type

102 - 0

0-none
1-Token Ring
2-Ethernet

NSO selection

103 - 0000000000000000

6-SDLC, X.21 Switched
7-Token-Ring
8-Ethernet
9-Frame Relay
M-Multi-host

CMD===>



352



3174 Installation Guide





___________________ SDLC ___________________

104 - C1

105 - 00

108 - 23N6503

110 - 1

116 - 1_ _

•

Question 104 is the PU polling address. 1

121 - 01

123 - 1

125 - 00100100

126 - 00000000

127 - 5 3

•

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 1 1 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0
166 - A

168 - 0

Question 116 specifies individual port
address assignment (see 3.3.13, “Planning
for Port Assignment” on page 57).

318 - 0

340 - 0

141 - A

150 - 0

165 - 1

173 - 10100101

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

310 - 0

313 - 1

317 - 0

365 - 0

370 - 1









___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________

Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30

Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
2 002 010 ___ ___
2 004 012 ___ ___
2 006 014 ___ ___
2 008 016 ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___

5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

Port
26-01
26-03
26-05
26-07
26-09
26-11
26-13
26-15
26-17
26-19
26-21
26-23
26-25
26-27
26-29
26-31

Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
2 003 011 ___ ___
2 005 013 ___ ___
2 007 015 ___ ___
2 009 017 ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___

5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___



Here we specify that two sessions be allocated
to each terminal on ports 26-00 through 26-07.
The host addresses that you enter here are
related to the LOCADDRs in the LU
definitions. 2







_______ Logical Terminal Assignment ________
801=2
Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28



This is where you define the SDLC attachment to
the host.

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1A2
1A2
1A2
1A2
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-01
26-03
26-05
26-07
26-09
26-11
26-13
26-15
26-17
26-19
26-21
26-23
26-25
26-27
26-29

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1A2
1A2
1A2
1A2
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

The Logical Terminal Assignment panel allows
you to assign host sessions to each coax
attached devices. All the terminals in this
example have two sessions, 1A1 and 1A2, to the
host. 1A1 will be the first active session when
the terminal is powered on.



Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

353

NCP Line Definitions
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
L13008 LINE ADDRESS=(08,HALF),ANS=CONTINUE,CLOCKNG=EXT,DUPLEX=(HALF),X
ETRATIO=30,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,LPDATS=LPDA2,MAXPU=10,
X
NPACOLL=YES,PAUSE=.5,SERVLIM=10,SPEED=9600,
X
SRT=(,64)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
*
SERVICE MACRO SPECIFICATION FOR SDLC (LINE 008)
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
SERVICE MAXLIST=10,ORDER=(P13008A,RADP08B,P13008C,P13008D,P130X
08E,P13008F)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
P13008A PU ADDR=C11,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=521,
X
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,
X
PACING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=YES,PUTYPE=2,RETRIES=(,4,5),
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,USSTAB=US327X,VPACING=0
T13008A1 LU LOCADDR=22
T13008A2 LU LOCADDR=3
T13008A3 LU LOCADDR=4
T13008A4 LU LOCADDR=5
T13008A5 LU LOCADDR=6
T13008A6 LU LOCADDR=7
T13008A7 LU LOCADDR=8
T13008A8 LU LOCADDR=9
T13008A9 LU LOCADDR=10
T13008AA LU LOCADDR=11
T13008AB LU LOCADDR=12
T13008AC LU LOCADDR=13
T13008AD LU LOCADDR=14
T13008AE LU LOCADDR=15
T13008AF LU LOCADDR=16
T13008B0 LU LOCADDR=17
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
Notes:

1 Question 104 should match the value of the PU ADDR.
2 The addresses defined in the 3174 panel should match the LU
LOCADDR values specified.

354

3174 Installation Guide

10.2 Example 2: Local 3174 with CCA
┌────────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
│
│
│
│
HOST A
│
│
HOST B
│
│
│
│
│
└─────────┬┬─────┘
└──────┬────────┘
││
│
Local ││
│Remote
Channel ││
│TP
Attached ││
│Link
││
│
┌─────┴┴─────────────────────────┬───┴───┐
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
3174-11L
│ CCA │
│
│
│
│
│
│
└─────┬────────────────────┬─────┴───────┘
│
│
│
│
┌────┴────┐
┌────┴────┐
│
│
│
│
│ DFT │
│ CUT │
│
│
│
│
└─────────┘
└─────────┘

Figure 144. Local 3174 with CCA

This is an example of a 3174 channel attached to host A. It also has a CCA
installed and attached to a SDLC line to host B; this line could, in fact, be to host
A with the CCA being used as an alternate route. Terminals attached to the 3174
will be allowed to access both hosts.

Local 3174 Customization



______________ Model / Attach ______________

Online Test Password



In this example, we will customize for multi-host
support.
•

098 - 3174

Product Assistance Data
099 - 11L LOCAL 3174 WITH CCA
3174 Model

100 - 11L

Host Attachment

101 - M

1-BSC
2-SDLC
3-X.25
4-Non-SNA Channel
5-SNA Channel

LAN adapter type

102 - 0

0-none
1-Token Ring
2-Ethernet

NSO selection

103 - 0000000000000000

Question 101 response is M for multi-host
attachment.

6-SDLC, X.21 Switched
7-Token-Ring
8-Ethernet
9-Frame Relay
M-Multi-host

CMD===>





Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

355





_________ Multi-Host Definition ___________

•

Host ID 1A is defined for SNA channel
attachment.

•

Host ID 2A is defined for SDLC attachment
(the CCA link).

Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID

Adapter
Type

1A
2A
3A
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

1
_

Host
Attach

Hardware
Group

Include
in IML

51
__

1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

5
2
_

Host Descriptor

LOCAL_HOST_LINK_____
CCA_HOST_LINK_______
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________









_______________ Local (SNA) ________________
1A = LOCAL HOST LINK
104 - 40

105 - 00

108 - 23N6233

110 - 1

116 - 1_ __

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

127 - 0 0

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 1 1 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0

141 - A

150 - 0

165 - 0

166 - A

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

222 - 1

223 - 10

224 - 3

•

168 - 0

225 - 4






Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30

___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
1A = LOCAL HOST LINK
Host addresses
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
5
Port IS 1
2
3
4
2 002 010 ___ ___ ___
26-01 2 003 011 ___ ___
2 004 012 ___ ___ ___
26-03 2 005 013 ___ ___
2 006 014 ___ ___ ___
26-05 2 007 015 ___ ___
2 008 016 ___ ___ ___
26-07 2 009 017 ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-09 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-11 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-13 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-15 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-17 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-19 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-21 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-23 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-25 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-27 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-29 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-31 0 ___ ___ ___ ___



356


5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___



3174 Installation Guide

After entering 1A on the command line you are
presented with the standard host panel for
channel definitions. Your responses are related
to the parameters coded in the local SNA major
node defined for the 3174 in host A.
Question 104 matches the CUADDR value. 1

Note: You know which host you are customizing
by referring to the line below the panel heading.
The description you entered in the Host
Descriptor field on the Multi-Host Definition
panel is displayed.

The host addresses specified are the LU
LOCADDR values defined for the 3174 in host
A. 2

VTAM Definitions (Local 3174)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
*
LOCAL 3174-11L DEFINITIONS FOR A0C
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
HSNA040 VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
RAPP40 PU
CUADDR=E401,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,MAXBFRU=10,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,USSTAB=US327X,
X
VPACING=0
RAPT400 LU
LOCADDR=22
RAPT401 LU
LOCADDR=3
RAPT402 LU
LOCADDR=4
RAPT403 LU
LOCADDR=5
RAPT404 LU
LOCADDR=6
RAPT405 LU
LOCADDR=7
RAPT406 LU
LOCADDR=8
RAPT407 LU
LOCADDR=9
RAPT408 LU
LOCADDR=10
RAPT409 LU
LOCADDR=11
RAPT4010 LU
LOCADDR=12
RAPT4011 LU
LOCADDR=13
RAPT4012 LU
LOCADDR=14
RAPT4013 LU
LOCADDR=15
RAPT4014 LU
LOCADDR=16
RAPT4015 LU
LOCADDR=17
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
Notes:

1 Question 104 should match the CUADDR value.
2 The host addresses assigned to the ports should match the
LOCADDR values.

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

357





___________________ SDLC ___________________
2A = CCA HOST LINK
104 - C1

105 - 00

110 - 1

116 - 1_ __

125 - 00*****0

•

127 - 0 0
139 - 00

150 - 0

215 - 00000

220 - 0

310 - 0

313 - 1

317 - 0

365 - 0

370 - 1

Question 104 matches the ADDR value in the
PU definition. 3

Note: The host descriptor ID is now showing
“2A = CCA HOST LINK,” the same description
you entered in the Multi-Host Definition panel.

165 - 1
179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

On this panel, we define the secondary (CCA)
host link. In this example, it is an SDLC V.24
link.

318 - 0

340 - 0






Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30

___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
2A = CCA HOST LINK
Host addresses
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
5
Port IS 1
2
3
4
2 002 010 ___ ___ ___
26-01 2 003 011 ___ ___
2 004 012 ___ ___ ___
26-03 2 005 013 ___ ___
2 006 014 ___ ___ ___
26-05 2 007 015 ___ ___
2 008 016 ___ ___ ___
26-07 2 009 017 ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-09 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-11 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-13 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-15 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-17 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-19 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-21 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-23 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-25 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-27 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-29 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-31 0 ___ ___ ___ ___


5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___



This panel assigns the number of sessions and
the host addresses to the 3270 ports for the
secondary (CCA) link.
We have assigned 16 host addresses to only
eight coaxial ports, 26-00 through 26-07. 4







_______ Logical Terminal Assignment ________
801=2
Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1A2
1A2
1A2
1A2
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

2A2
2A2
2A2
2A2
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___



358

Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-01
26-03
26-05
26-07
26-09
26-11
26-13
26-15
26-17
26-19
26-21
26-23
26-25
26-27
26-29

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1A2
1A2
1A2
1A2
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

2A2
2A2
2A2
2A2
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

In this example, all the ports are assigned
identically. Each terminal has four sessions (or
four LTs); the first two sessions will attach to
host A via the primary link, the next two
sessions will attach to host B via the CCA link.

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___



3174 Installation Guide

On this panel, we assign the host sessions to
each 3270 port.

NCP Line Definitions
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
L1300A LINE ADDRESS=(0A,HALF),ANS=CONTINUE,CLOCKNG=EXT,DUPLEX=(HALF),X
ETRATIO=30,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,LPDATS=LPDA2,MAXPU=10,
X
NPACOLL=YES,PAUSE=.5,SERVLIM=10,SPEED=9600,SRT=(,64)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
*
SERVICE MACRO SPECIFICATION FOR SDLC (LINE 00A)
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
SERVICE MAXLIST=10,ORDER=(P1300AA,RADP0AB,P1300AC,P1300AD,P130X
0AE,P1300AF)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
P13008A PU ADDR=C1,3DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=521,
X
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,MAXOUT=7,
X
PACING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=YES,PUTYPE=2,RETRIES=(,4,5),
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,USSTAB=US327X,VPACING=0
T13008A1 LU LOCADDR=24
T1300AA2 LU LOCADDR=3
T1300AA3 LU LOCADDR=4
T1300AA4 LU LOCADDR=5
T1300AA5 LU LOCADDR=6
T1300AA6 LU LOCADDR=7
T1300AA7 LU LOCADDR=8
T1300AA8 LU LOCADDR=9
T1300AA9 LU LOCADDR=10
T1300AAA LU LOCADDR=11
T1300AAB LU LOCADDR=12
T1300AAC LU LOCADDR=13
T1300AAD LU LOCADDR=14
T1300AAE LU LOCADDR=15
T1300AAF LU LOCADDR=16
T1300AB0 LU LOCADDR=17
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
Notes:

3 As in the channel definitions, question 104 is the host address for the
3174. For the CCA, question 104 should match the ADDR value in the PU
definition.

4 The host addresses in the Port Assignment panel should match the
LU LOCADDR values.

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

359

10.3 Example 3: SLMH via Token-Ring
┌───────────────┐
┌────────────────┐
│
3270
│
│
3270
│
│
HOST A
│
│
HOST B
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬───────┘
│
│
┌───────┴───────┐
┌────────┴────────┐
│ 3174 local │
│
3174 remote │
│
Gateway
│
│
Gateway
│
└──────────┬────┘
└─────┬───────────┘
│
│
│
│
┌──────┴───────────────────────┴───────┐
│
Token─ Ring
│
└────────────────┬─────────────────────┘
│
┌──────────┴───────┐
│
│
│
3174-13R
│
│
│
└──┬─────────────┬─┘
│
│
┌────┴────┐ ┌────┴────┐
│
│ │
│
│ CUT │ │ DFT │
│
│ │
│
└─────────┘ └─────────┘

Figure 145. Single Link Multi-Host Connectivity

In this example we have a 3174-13R as a DSPU with two host attachments over
the Token-Ring. Each terminal on the 3174 has one session via the local 3174
gateway and another session via the remote 3174 gateway. For details on how
to customize a 3174 LAN Gateway see 4.5, “3174 Gateways” on page 77.
Note: The customization panels that are showed in this example assume a
Token Ring Network. The same level of support is provided for an Ethernet
Network with minor customization panel changes. (E.g., Question 100= 14R,
instead of 13R).

DSPU 3174 Customization



______________ Model / Attach ______________
Online Test Password



098 - 3174

Product Assistance Data
099 - DSPU WITH SLMH
3174 Model

100 - 13R

Host Attachment

101 - M

1-BSC
2-SDLC
3-X.25
4-Non-SNA Channel
5-SNA Channel

LAN adapter type

102 - 0

0-none
1-Token Ring
2-Ethernet

NSO selection

103 - 0000000000000000

6-SDLC, X.21 Switched
7-Token-Ring
8-Ethernet
9-Frame Relay
M-Multi-host

CMD===>



360



3174 Installation Guide

•

For multi-host attachment, respond to
question 101 with M.





_________ Multi-Host Definition ___________
Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID

Adapter
Type

1A
2A
3A
1B
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

_
_

Host
Attach

Hardware
Group

Include
in IML

__
__

_
_
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

7
_
_

Host Descriptor

LOCAL_GATEWAY_LINK__
____________________
____________________
REMOTE_GATEWAY_LINK_
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________



Here we specify the multi-host definitions.
Unlike Example 2, where we use host IDs 1A and
2A, we are now customizing for SLMH and will
use the same physical link (the primary
communication adapter link). The second host
on this single link is identified by the host ID 1B.


Host 1A Customization





____________ Token-Ring Network ____________
1A = LOCAL GATEWAY LINK
106 - 4000 3174 9999 04

107 - 4000 0000 3174 04

110 - 1

116 - 2_ __

121 - 01

123 - 1

125 - 00000000

108 - 23V2645

126 - 00000000

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 1 1 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0

141 - A

165 - 0

166 - A

168 - 0

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 1

382 - 2057

383 - 2

384 - 2



•

Question 106 is the address of the
3174-13R.1

•

Question 107 is the address of the 3174 local
gateway. 2




Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30



127 - 5 3

This panel is displayed after we enter 1A on the
command line on the Multi-Host Definition panel.
Here we define the primary link to the primary
host via the 3174 local gateway.

___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
1A = LOCAL GATEWAY LINK
Host addresses
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
5
Port IS 1
2
3
4
1 002 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-01 1 003 ___ ___ ___
1 004 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-03 1 005 ___ ___ ___
1 006 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-05 1 007 ___ ___ ___
1 008 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-07 1 009 ___ ___ ___
1 010 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-09 1 011 ___ ___ ___
1 012 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-11 1 013 ___ ___ ___
1 014 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-13 1 015 ___ ___ ___
1 016 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-15 1 017 ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-17 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-19 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-21 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-23 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-25 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-27 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-29 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-31 0 ___ ___ ___ ___


5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

Here we assign one host address for each each
of the 16 ports. The host addresses match the
LU LOCADDR values. 3


3174 Local Gateway Customization

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

361





_______________ Local (SNA) ________________

104 - 40

105 - 46

108 - 23N6233

110 - 0

116 - 0
127 - 5 3

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 1 1 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0
166 - A

141 - A

150 - 1

165 - 0

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 1

222 - 1

223 - 10

224 - 3

_

In this 3174 local gateway panel, we see that
Questions 104 and 105 specify the range of
addresses through the gateway. These host
addresses are defined in the local SNA major
node definition for the 3174 local gateway.

168 - 0

225 - 4









_______ 940: Ring Address Assignment _______

S
40
41
43
45

Ring Address
4000 0000 3174
4000 3174 9999
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

SAP
04
04
04
04

T

S

Ring Address

SAP

T

1
0
0

42
44
46

XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

04
04
04

1
0
0

•

Host address 40 is, in turn, defined as PU
RAPP40 (CUADDR=E40) in the VTAM
definitions.
•



The 3174 local gateway (Token-Ring address
400000003174) is assigned to host address
40.



The 3174-13R DSPU (Token-Ring address
400031749999) is assigned to host address
41.
Host address 41 is, in turn, defined as PU
RAPP41 (CUADDR=E41) in the VTAM
definitions.

VTAM Definitions (Local 3174)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
HSNA040 VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
RAPP40 PU
CUADDR=E402,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,
X
MAXBFRU=10,MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,
X
USSTAB=US327X,VPACING=0
RAPT400 LU
LOCADDR=2
RAPT401 LU
LOCADDR=3
:
:
RAPT40E LU
LOCADDR=17
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
RAPP41 PU
CUADDR=E411,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,
X
MAXBFRU=10,MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,
X
USSTAB=US327X,VPACING=0,SECNET=YES
RAPT410 LU
LOCADDR=2
RAPT411 LU
LOCADDR=3
:
:
RAPT41E LU
LOCADDR=173
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
Notes:

1 Question 106 is the 3174-13R Token-Ring address, mapped to host
address CUADDR=E41.

2 Question 107 is the 3174 local gateway Token-Ring address, mapped
to host address CUADDR=E40.

3 LU definitions for the 3174-13R in host A.

362

3174 Installation Guide

Host 1B Customization





____________ Token-Ring Network ____________
1B = REMOTE GATEWAY
106 - 4000 3174 9999 04

107 - 4000 1111 3174 04

Here we define our attachment to the second
host via the remote gateway.
•

Question 106 is again the 3174-13R
Token-Ring address. 4

•

Question 107 is the 3174 remote gateway
Token-Ring address. 5

116 - 1_ __
125 - 00*****0

127 - 0 0

165 - 0
179 - 0 0 0
215 - 00000
382 - 2057

220 - 0

221 - 0

383 - 2






Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30

___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
1B = REMOTE GATEWAY
Host addresses
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
5
Port IS 1
2
3
4
1 002 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-01 1 003 ___ ___ ___
1 004 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-03 1 005 ___ ___ ___
1 006 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-05 1 007 ___ ___ ___
1 008 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-07 1 009 ___ ___ ___
1 010 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-09 1 011 ___ ___ ___
1 012 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-11 1 013 ___ ___ ___
1 014 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-13 1 015 ___ ___ ___
1 016 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-15 1 017 ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-17 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-19 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-21 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-23 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-25 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-27 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-29 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-31 0 ___ ___ ___ ___


5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___









_______ Logical Terminal Assignment ________
801=2
Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28



We assign one host address for each of the 16
ports for attachment to the second host. The
host addresses match the LU LOCADDR values
in the NCP definition for the 3174-13R (PU
RADP08B). 6

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-01
26-03
26-05
26-07
26-09
26-11
26-13
26-15
26-17
26-19
26-21
26-23
26-25
26-27
26-29

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

Using the LTA panel we now assign two host
sessions to each coax port.
•

1A1 maps the first session to host A.

•

1B1 maps the second session to host B.

Thus, each terminal has two sessions or LTs;
LT-1 to host A and LT-2 to host B.



Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

363

3174 Remote Gateway Customization





____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________

900 - 4000 1111 3174 04

905 - 1

911 - 2

912 - 00

•

Question 900 is the 3174 remote gateway
Token-Ring address. 5

•

The 3174 remote gateway (Token-Ring
address 400011113174) is assigned to host
address C1.

908 - IBMLAN









_______ 940: Ring Address Assignment _______

S
C1
C2
C4
C6

Ring Address
4000 1111 3174
4000 3174 9999
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

SAP
04
04
04
04

T

S

Ring Address

SAP

T

0
0
0

C3
C5

XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

04
04

0
0



Host address C1 is, in turn, defined as PU
P13008A (ADDR=C1) in the NCP definitions.



•

The 3174-13R DSPU (Token-Ring address
400031749999) is assigned to host address
C2.
Host address C2 is, in turn, defined as PU
RADP08B (ADDR=C2) in the NCP
definitions.

NCP Line Definitions
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
L13008 LINE ADDRESS=(08,FULL),ANS=CONTINUE,CLOCKNG=EXT,DUPLEX=(FULL),X
ETRATIO=30,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,LPDATS=LPDA2,MAXPU=10,NPACOLL=X
YES,PAUSE=.5,SERVLIM=10,SPEED=9600,SRT=(,64)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
P13008A PU ADDR=C15,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=521,MAXOUT=7,
X
PACING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=YES,PUTYPE=2,RETRIES=(,4,5),
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,USSTAB=US327X,VPACING=0,GP3174=AE
T13008A0 LU LOCADDR=2
T13008A1 LU LOCADDR=3
:
:
T13008AE LU LOCADDR=17
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
RADP08B PU ADDR=C24,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=265,MAXOUT=7,
X
PACING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=YES,PUTYPE=2,RETRIES=(,4,5),
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,USSTAB=US327X,VPACING=0,GP3174=AE
RADT08B0 LU LOCADDR=2
RADT08B1 LU LOCADDR=3
:
:
RADT08BE LU LOCADDR=176
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
Notes:

4 Question 106 is the Token-Ring address of the 3174-13R DSPU,
mapped to host address ADDR=C2.

5 Question 107 is the Token-Ring address of the 3174 remote gateway,
mapped to host address ADDR=C1.

6 LU definitions for the 3174-13R DSPU.

364

3174 Installation Guide

10.4 Example 4: SLMH with CCA
┌───────────────┐
┌────────────────┐
│
│
│
│
│
HOST A
│
│
HOST B
│
│
│
│
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬───────┘
│
│
┌───────┴───────┐
┌────────┴────────┐
│ 3174 local │
│
3174 remote │
│
Gateway
│
│
Gateway
│
└──────────┬────┘
└─────┬───────────┘
│
│
│
│
┌──────┴──────────────────────────┴───────┐
│
Token-Ring
│
└──────────────────┬──────────────────────┘
│
┌──────────┴─────┬────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
│
│
│
│
│
│CCA ├────────┤
HOST C
│
│
3174─X3R └────┤
│
│
│
│
└───────────────┘
└────┬───────────┬────┘
│
│
┌────┴──┐
┌──┴────┐
│ CUT │
│ DFT │
└───────┘
└───────┘

Figure 146. SLMH with CCA

This example is the same as Example 3, except with the addition of a CCA in the
3174-13R for a third host connection. This CCA attached via an SDLC V.24 line to
an NCP. The 3174-13R will be re-customized to add this third host connection.

DSPU 3174 Customization



______________ Model / Attach ______________
Online Test Password



•

For multi-host attachment, respond to
question 101 with M.

098 - 3174

Product Assistance Data
099 - DSPU WITH SLMH AND CCA
3174 Model

100 - 13R

Host Attachment

101 - M

1-BSC
2-SDLC
3-X.25
4-Non-SNA Channel
5-SNA Channel

LAN adapter type

102 - 0

0-none
1-Token Ring
2-Ethernet

NSO selection

103 - 0000000000000000

6-SDLC, X.21 Switched
7-Token-Ring
8-Ethernet
9-Frame Relay
M-Multi-host

CMD===>





Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

365





_________ Multi-Host Definition ___________
Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID

Adapter
Type

1A
2A
3A
1B
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

Host
Attach
7
2
_

1
_

Hardware
Group

Include
in IML

51
__

1
_
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Host Descriptor

LOCAL_GATEWAY_LINK__
CCA LINK____________
____________________
REMOTE_GATEWAY_LINK_
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________



After specifying M for question 101, we are
presented with this panel. Here we code the
SLMH definitions (1A and 1B), and the CCA host
(2A).
The 1A and 1B host definitions are as shown in
Example 3 and will not be repeated here.


Host 2A Customization





___________________ SDLC ___________________
2A = CCA LINK
104 - C1

105 - 00

110 - 1

116 - 1_ __

125 - 00*****0

127 - 0 0
139 - 00

150 - 0

After entering 2A on the command line in the
Multi-Host Definition panel, we can customize
the link from the CCA to host C. The
customizing responses and the NCP definitions
for the CCA are the same as in 10.2, “Example 2:
Local 3174 with CCA” on page 355.

165 - 1
179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

310 - 0

313 - 1

317 - 0

365 - 0

370 - 1

318 - 0

340 - 0









_______ Logical Terminal Assignment ________
801=2
Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___



366

Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-01
26-03
26-05
26-07
26-09
26-11
26-13
26-15
26-17
26-19
26-21
26-23
26-25
26-27
26-29

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
2A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

•

The first LT is assigned to the first host on
the primary link (host ID 1A1).
The second LT is assigned to the second
host on the primary link (host ID 1B1).
Both these LTs use SLMH to access host A
and host B.



3174 Installation Guide

After the CCA connection has been defined, you
need to add a third LT to each port to allow
access to host C. As shown in this LTA panel,
the sessions are assigned as follows:

•

The third LT is assigned to the first host on
the secondary link (host ID 2A1).

10.5 Example 5: SLMH Token-Ring Gateway

┌───────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
HOST A
│
│
HOST B
│
└───────┬───────┘
└────────┬──────┘
│
│
┌─────┴─────┐
┌─────┴─────┐
│ 3174-11L │
│
│
├─────┬─────┤
│
37xx │
│#3044│ CCA ├──────────────────┤
│
└──┬──┴─────┘
└───────────┘
│
┌──────┴────────────────────────────────────────┐
│
Token─Ring
│
└───────────────────────┬───────────────────────┘
│
┌─────┴─────┐
│
│
│ 3174-13R │
│
│
└┬─────────┬┘
│
│
┌────┴──┐ ┌──┴────┐
│ CUT │ │ DFT │
└───────┘ └───────┘

Figure 147. SLMH Token-Ring Gateway

In this example, the 3174-13R provides multi-host connectivity by using SLMH to
reach hosts A and B via the 3174-11L Token-Ring Gateway. The 3174-11L also
provides multi-host connectivity by providing multiple upstream physical
attachments. The 3174-11L, in effect, acts as two gateways, with one gateway
allowing access to host A via the channel attachment and the other gateway
allowing access to host B via the CCA attachment.

3174 Local Gateway Customization



______________ Model / Attach ______________

Online Test Password



098 - 3174

The 3174-11L gateway will be customized for
multi-host support. Question 101 response is,
therefore, an M.

Product Assistance Data
099 - 3174 11L MULTIPLE UPSTREAM PHYSICAL
3174 Model

100 - 11L

Host Attachment

101 - M

1-BSC
2-SDLC
3-X.25
4-Non-SNA Channel
5-SNA Channel

LAN adapter type

102 - 0

0-none
1-Token Ring
2-Ethernet

NSO selection

103 - 0000000000000000

6-SDLC, X.21 Switched
7-Token-Ring
8-Ethernet
9-Frame Relay
M-Multi-host

CMD===>





Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

367





_________ Multi-Host Definition ___________

Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID

Adapter
Type

1A
2A
3A
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

1
_

Host
Attach

Hardware
Group

Include
in IML

51
__

1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

5
2
_

On this panel, we define host ID 1A as channel
attached, and host ID 2A as an SDLC attachment
via the CCA.

Host Descriptor

LOCAL_HOST_LINK_____
CCA_HOST_LINK_______
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________








_______________ Local (SNA) ________________

For the host ID 1A (the channel attachment):
•

Question 104 is the controller address in
VTAM. 1

•

Question 105 is the upper limit address. 2

•

Question 150 has the Token-Ring Gateway
function enabled. 3

1A = LOCAL HOST LINK
104 - 40

105 - 46

108 - 23N6233

110 - 1

116 - 1_

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

127 - 0 0

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 1 1 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0
166 - A

141 - A

150 - 1

165 - 0

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

222 - 1

223 - 10

224 - 3

168 - 0

225 - 4








___________________ SDLC ___________________

For the host ID 2A (the CCA attachment):
•

Question 104 is the controller address in
NCP. 4

•

Question 105 is the upper limit address. 2

•

Question 150 has the Token-Ring Gateway
function enabled. 3

2A = CCA HOST LINK
104 - C1

105 - C6

110 - 1
125 - 00*****0

116 - 1_ _
127 - 0 0
139 - 00

150 - 1

165 - 1
179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

310 - 0

313 - 1

317 - 0

365 - 0

370 - 1



368

318 - 0

340 - 0



3174 Installation Guide





•

Question 900 is the channel gateway
Token-Ring address.

•

Question 940 assigns the Token-Ring
addresses for the channel gateway and the
3174-13R DSPU to host addresses as follows:

____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________
1A = LOCAL HOST LINK

900 - 4000 0000 3174 04

905 - 1

908 - IBMLAN

911 - 1







−

Host address 40 to Token-Ring address
400000003174 SAP 04 for the channel
gateway. 6

−

Host address 41 to Token-Ring address
400031749999 SAP 04 for the 3174-13R
DSPU. 8

_______ 940: Ring Address Assignment _______
1A = LOCAL HOST LINK

S
40
41
43
45

Ring Address
4000 0000 3174
4000 3174 9999
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

SAP
04
04
04
04

T

S

Ring Address

SAP

T

1
1
0

42
44
46

XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

04
04
04

1
0
0









•

Question 900 is the CCA gateway Token-Ring
address.

•

Question 940 assigns the Token-Ring
addresses for the CCA gateway and the
3174-13R DSPU to host addresses as follows:

____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________
2A = CCA HOST LINK

900 - 4000 0000 3174 08

905 - 1

911 - 1

912 - 00

908 - IBMLAN






_______ 940: Ring Address Assignment _______
2A = CCA HOST LINK

S
C1
C2
C4
C6



Ring Address
4000 0000 3174
4000 3174 9999
XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

SAP
08
04
04
04

T

S

Ring Address

SAP

T

0
0
0

C3
C5

XXXX XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX XXXX

04
04

0
0

−

Host address C1 to Token-Ring address
400000003174 SAP 08 for the CCA
gateway. 7

−

Host address C2 to Token-Ring address
400031749999 SAP 04 for the 3174-13R
DSPU. 8



Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

369

VTAM Definitions (Local 3174)
HSNA040 VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
RAPP40 PU
CUADDR=E401,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,MAXBFRU=10,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,USSTAB=US327X,
X
VPACING=0
RAPT400 LU
LOCADDR=2
RAPT401 LU
LOCADDR=3
:
:
RAPT40E LU
LOCADDR=17
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
RAPP41 PU
CUADDR=E415,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,MAXBFRU=10,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,USSTAB=US327X,
X
VPACING=0,SECNET=YES
RAPT410 LU
LOCADDR=2
RAPT411 LU
LOCADDR=3
:
:
RAPT41E LU
LOCADDR=17
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*

NCP Definitions (CCA)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
L13008 LINE ADDRESS=(08,FULL),ANS=CONTINUE,CLOCKNG=EXT,DUPLEX=(FULL),X
ETRATIO=30,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,LPDATS=LPDA2,MAXPU=10,NPACOLL=X
YES,PAUSE=.5,SERVLIM=10,SPEED=9600,SRT=(,64)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
P13008A PU ADDR=C14,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=521,MAXOUT=7,
X
PACING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=YES,PUTYPE=2,RETRIES=(,4,5),
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,USSTAB=US327X,VPACING=0,GP3174=AE
T13008A0 LU LOCADDR=2
T13008A1 LU LOCADDR=3
:
:
T13008AE LU LOCADDR=17
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
RADP08B PU ADDR=C25,DISCNT=(NO),MAXDATA=265,MAXOUT=7,
X
PACING=0,PASSLIM=8,PUDR=YES,PUTYPE=2,RETRIES=(,4,5),
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,USSTAB=US327X,VPACING=0,GP3174=AE
RADT08B0 LU LOCADDR=2
RADT08B1 LU LOCADDR=3
:
:
RADT08BE LU LOCADDR=17
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
Notes:

1 and 4 Question 104 is the polling address for each host.
2 Question 105 specifies the address range using the gateway.
3 Question 150 must be specified as 1 to allow the 3174-11L to act as
gateways to hosts A and B.

5 Is the 3174 DSPU polling address.
6 and 7 The Token-Ring address is the same for both the channel
and CCA gateway since it is the same physical Token-Ring Adapter. The
SAP is used, in combination with the Token-Ring address, to distinguish
one gateway from the other:

370

3174 Installation Guide

•

SAP 04 for the channel gateway.

•

SAP 08 for the CCA gateway.

8 The 3174-13R DSPU is defined in both gateways with the same
Token-Ring address and SAP.

DSPU 3174 Customization





_________ Multi-Host Definition ___________

Here we customize the SLMH function for the
3174-13R:

Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID

Adapter
Type

1A
2A
3A
1B
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

_
_

Host
Attach

Hardware
Group

Include
in IML

__
__

_
_
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

7
_
_

Host Descriptor

CHANNEL_HOST________
____________________
____________________
CCA_HOST____________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________



•

Host ID 1A is specified for a token-ring
Network host attachment (Host Attach=7).

•

Host ID 1B is specified as the secondary
host.







____________ Token-Ring Network ____________
1A = CHANNEL HOST
106 - 4000 3174 9999 04

107 - 4000 0000 3174 04

110 - 1

116 - 1_ __

121 - 01

123 - 1

132 - 0 0 0 0

For host ID 1A:
•

Question 106 is the 3174-13R token-ring
address. 8

•

Question 107 is the destination 3174-11L
channel gateway address (note: SAP 04). 6

108 - 23V2645

125 - 00100100

126 - 00000000

127 - 0

136 - 1 1 1 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0
168 - 0

141 - A

165 - 0

166 - A

173 - 10100101

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

382 - 2057

383 - 2

384 - 2









____________ Token-Ring Network ____________
1B = CCA HOST
106 - 4000 3174 9999 04

For host ID 1B:
•

Question 106 is the 3174-13R token-ring
address. 8

•

Question 107 is the destination 3174-11L CCA
gateway address (note: SAP 08). 7

107 - 4000 0000 3174 08
116 - 1_ __
125 - 00*****0

127 - 0 0

165 - 0
179 - 0 0 0
215 - 00000
382 - 2057



220 - 0

221 - 0

383 - 2



Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

371

10.6 Example 6: SLMH Gateway with ESCON
┌───────────────┐
┌───────────────┐
│
3270
│
│
3270
│
│
HOST A
│
│
HOST B
│
└───────┬───────┘
└───────┬───────┘
│
│
│
┌─────────┐
│
└──────────────┤ ESCON ├──────────────┘
│ DIRECTOR│
└────┬────┘
│
┌────────┴─────────┐
│ 3174 Gateway │
│ ┌──────┐┌──────┐ │
┌───────┐
│ │VGATE ││VGATE │ │
┌───────┐
│ CUT ├────┤ │ #1 ││ #2 │ ├────┤ DFT │
└───────┘
│ └──────┘└──────┘ │
└───────┘
└────────┬─────────┘
│
┌─────────────┴──────────────┐
│
Token─Ring
│
└─────────────┬──────────────┘
│
┌────────┴───────────┐
│
3174-x3R
│
│ ┌───────┐┌───────┐ │
│ │ DSPU ││ DSPU │ │
│ │ #1 ││ #2 │ │
│ └───────┘└───────┘ │
│
│
└─────┬─────────┬────┘
│
│
┌────┴──┐ ┌──┴────┐
│ CUT │ │ DFT │
└───────┘ └───────┘

Figure 148. SLMH Gateway with ESCON

In this example, a 3174-12L (ESCON model) is connected via an ESCON Director
to two hosts. The gateway has two logical gateways defined, one to each host.

ESCON 3174 Customization



______________ Model / Attach ______________

Online Test Password



As with the other SLMH examples, we
respond with an M for question 101 to define
multi-host attachments.

•

By specifying the model number as 12L,
default values for an ESCON connection are
displayed as responses.

098 -

Product Assistance Data
099 - ESCON 3174 MULTIPLE GATEWAY
3174 Model

100 - 12L

Host Attachment

101 - M

1-BSC
2-SDLC
3-X.25
4-Non-SNA Channel
5-SNA Channel

LAN adapter type

102 - 0

0-none
1-Token Ring
2-Ethernet

NSO selection

103 - 0000000000000000

6-SDLC, X.21 Switched
7-Token-Ring
8-Ethernet
9-Frame Relay
M-Multi-host

CMD===>



372

•



3174 Installation Guide





_________ Multi-Host Definition ___________

•

On this panel we define the primary host
(1A) attachment as SNA channel (Host
A t t a c h = 5 ) . In this example, the attachment
is to the ESCON Director.

•

Host ID 1B will default to the same as host
ID 1A.

Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID

Adapter
Type

1A
__
__
1B
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

_
_

Host
Attach

Hardware
Group

Include
in IML

__
__

_
_
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

5
_
_

Host Descriptor

PRIMARY_SNA_CH30____
____________________
____________________
VCU2_1B_CH37________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________









_______________ Local (SNA) ________________
1A = PRIMARY SNA CH30
104 - 60

105 - 6F

108 - 1234567

110 - 1

116 - 1_ _

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000100

126 - 00000000

127 - 0 0

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 1 1 1 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0
166 - A

141 - A

150 - 1

165 - 0

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 1 0 1

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 3

240 - 0

241 - 1



For host ID 1A:
•

Question 104 is the controller address. 1

•

Question 105 is the upper limit address. 2

•

Question 150 indicates the Token-Ring
Gateway function is enabled.

•

Question 240 is the controller logical
address. 3

•

Question 241 is the maximum RU size. 4

168 - 1




Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30

___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
1A = PRIMARY SNA CH30
Host addresses
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
5
Port IS 1
2
3
4
5
1 002 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-01 1 003 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 004 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-03 1 005 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-05 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-07 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-09 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-11 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-13 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-15 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-17 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-19 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-21 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-23 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-25 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-27 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-29 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-31 0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___





Here we code a sample of four terminals for the
primary host.





____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________
1A = PRIMARY SNA CH30
900 - 4000 0000 0000 04

905 - 1



•

Question 900 is the token-ring address of the
gateway; SAP 04 for host A.

908 - IBMLAN

911 - 2





Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

373





_______ 940: Ring Address Assignment _______
1A = PRIMARY SNA CH30
S
60
61
63
65

Ring Address
4000 0000 0000
4000 0000 0001
4000 0000 0003
XXXX XXXX XXXX

SAP
04
04
04
04

T

S

Ring Address

SAP

T

0
0
0

62
64
66

4000 0000 0002
4000 0000 0004
XXXX XXXX XXXX

04
04
04

0
0
0



•

The Token-Ring Gateway address is
assigned to host address 60. 1

•

The Token-Ring address for the 3174-13R
DSPU is assigned to host address 64.







____ 941: Ring Transmission Definition _____
1A = PRIMARY SNA CH30
S
60
61
63
65

Ring Address
4000 0000 0000
4000 0000 0000
4000 0000 0003
XXXX XXXX XXXX

SAP
04
04
04
04

F

W

S

Ring Address

SAP

F

W

5
5
5

2
2
2

62
64
66

4000 0000 0002
4000 0000 0004
XXXX XXXX XXXX

04
04
04

5
5
5

2
2
2



Note the response that can be specified in the F
field (the transmit I-frame size). A response of 5
indicates an 8 KB RU size; this response can
only be specified if question 241 is set to 1. 4


VTAM Definitions (Local 3174) For Primary Host
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
LSE00
VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
CSE60
PU
CUADDR=E601,DISCNT=NO,ENCR=OPT,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
PACING=0,PUTYPE=2,SSCPFM=FSS,VPACING=0,
X
MODETAB=LMT3270
SE0601 LU
LOCADDR=2,ISTATUS=ACTIVE
SE0602 LU
LOCADDR=3,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
SE0603 LU
LOCADDR=4,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
SE0604 LU
LOCADDR=5,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
:
:
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
CSE6F
PU
CUADDR=E6F2,DISCNT=NO,ENCR=OPT,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
PACING=0,PUTYPE=2,SSCPFM=FSS,VPACING=0,
X
MODETAB=LMT3270
SE06F1 LU
LOCADDR=2,ISTATUS=ACTIVE
SE06F2 LU
LOCADDR=3,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
SE06F3 LU
LOCADDR=4,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
SE06F4 LU
LOCADDR=5,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
Notes:

1 This is the CUADDR value from VTAM.
2 Matches the upper range of devices defined through the gateway for
the primary host.

3 The controller logical address is used by the ESCON Director and
can range from 0 through 9 and A through F. The 15 possible addresses
are used to switch between the hosts connected to the ESCON Director.
For the primary host, we are on CHIPID 30 and in the CNTLUNIT macro
CUADD=0 in the IOCP definitions. So we set question 240 to 0.
VTAM CUADDR 60 through 6F are set on CHIPID 30 for host A.

4 This sets the maximum RU size.

374

3174 Installation Guide

Host 1B Customization





_______________ Local (SNA) ________________
1B = VCU2 1B CH37
104 - 80

105 - 8F

For host ID 1B:
•

Question 104 is the controller address for
host B. 5

•

Question 105 is the upper limit address. 6

•

Question 150 indicates the Token-Ring
Gateway function is enabled.

•

Question 240 is the controller logical
address. 7

116 - 1_ _
125 - 00*****0

150 - 1

127 - 0 0

165 - 0
179 - 1 0 1

215 - 00000

220 - 3

221 - 0

240 - 7








____________ Token-Ring Gateway ____________
1B = VCU2 1B CH37
900 - 4000 0000 0000 08

905 - 1

For host B we use the same Token-Ring address
as host A but with a SAP ID 08.

908 - IBMLAN

911 - 2









•

The Token-Ring Gateway address is
assigned to host address 80.

•

The Token-Ring address for the 3174-13R
DSPU is assigned to host address 84.

_______ 940: Ring Address Assignment _______
1B = VCU2 1B CH37
S
80
81
83
85

Ring Address
4000 0000 0000
4000 0000 0001
4000 0000 0003
XXXX XXXX XXXX

SAP
08
04
04
04

T

S

Ring Address

SAP

T

0
0
0

82
84
86

4000 0000 0002
4000 0000 0004
XXXX XXXX XXXX

04
04
04

0
0
0








____ 941: Ring Transmission Definition _____
1B = VCU2 1B CH37
S
80
81
83
85



Ring Address
4000 0000 0000
4000 0000 0001
4000 0000 0003
XXXX XXXX XXXX

SAP
08
04
04
04

F

W

S

Ring Address

SAP

F

W

5
5
5

2
2
2

82
84
86

4000 0000 0002
4000 0000 0004
XXXX XXXX XXXX

04
04
04

5
5
5

2
2
2

The ring transmission parameters are the same
as those for host A.



Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

375




Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30

___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
1B = VCU2 1B CH37
Host addresses
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
5
Port IS 1
2
3
4
1 002 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-01 1 003 ___ ___ ___
1 004 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-03 1 005 ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-05 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-07 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-09 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-11 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-13 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-15 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-17 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-19 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-21 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-23 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-25 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-27 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-29 0 ___ ___ ___ ___
0 ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
26-31 0 ___ ___ ___ ___

Again as with host A, just four local terminals
are assigned.

5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___









_______ Logical Terminal Assignment ________
801=2
Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28

1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1B1
1B1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

26-01
26-03
26-05
26-07
26-09
26-11
26-13
26-15
26-17
26-19
26-21
26-23
26-25
26-27
26-29



1A1
1A1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

1B1
1B1
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___

We now assign host sessions to the terminals
attached to the 3174-12L. Each terminal will
have two sessions, one to each host.

___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___


VTAM Definitions (Local 3174) For Host 1B
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
LSE01
VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
CSE80
PU
CUADDR=E805,DISCNT=NO,ENCR=OPT,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
PACING=0,PUTYPE=2,SSCPFM=FSS,VPACING=0,
X
MODETAB=LMT3270
SE0801 LU
LOCADDR=2,ISTATUS=ACTIVE
SE0802 LU
LOCADDR=3,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
SE0803 LU
LOCADDR=4,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
SE0804 LU
LOCADDR=5,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
:
:
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
CSE8F
PU
CUADDR=E8F6,DISCNT=NO,ENCR=OPT,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
PACING=0,PUTYPE=2,SSCPFM=FSS,VPACING=0,
X
MODETAB=LMT3270
SE08F1 LU
LOCADDR=2,ISTATUS=ACTIVE
SE08F2 LU
LOCADDR=3,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
SE08F3 LU
LOCADDR=4,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
SE08F4 LU
LOCADDR=5,ISTATUS=INACTIVE
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*

376

3174 Installation Guide

Notes:

5 This is the CUADDR value from VTAM.
6 Matches the upper range of devices defined through the gateway for
host 1B.

7 This is the CUADD value defined in the IOCP for the 3174-12L in host
1B. It is on CHIPID 37 and CUADD=7, so question 240 is set to 7.
CUADDR 80 through 8F are set on CHIPID 37 for host B.

9032 ESCON Director Matrix



-1.0------------------9032 ACTIVE MATRIX------------------------------==>





9032 Name: 3174 Development

Addr
Address Name
-E0 VM_SYSA_CH2001______
-E1 ____________________
-E2 PRINTER07___________
-E3 ____________________
-E4 ____________________
-E5 ____________________
-E6 ____________________
-E7 ____________________
-E8 ____________________
-E9 ____________________
-EA ____________________
-EB ____________________
-EC ____________________
-ED ____________________
-EE SNA_60-80(Q240=0-7)_
-EF ____________________
F1=Help
F7=Backward



F3=End
F8=Forward

H
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

B
_
_
B
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

==>

C E0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F
__ a a a P a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a

F6= Process
F10=Left

F11=Right

9032 Name: 3174 Development

Addr
Address Name
-F0 ____________________
-F1 ____________________
-F2 ____________________
-F3 ____________________
-F4 CHIPID 30_(Q240=0)__
-F5 CHIPID_31_(Q240=1)__
-F6 ____________________
-F7 ____________________
-F8 CHIPID_37_(Q240=7)__
-F9 ____________________
-FA ____________________
-FB ____________________
-FC ____________________
-FD ____________________
-FE ____________________
-FF ____________________







-1.0------------------9032 ACTIVE MATRIX-------------------------------

F1=Help
F7=Backward

F3=End
F8=Forward

H
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

B
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

C F0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F
__ \ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a \ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a \ a a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a \ a a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a \ a a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a \ a a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a \ a a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a \ a a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a \ a a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a \ a a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a \ a a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a \ a a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a \ a a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a \ a a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a \ a
__ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a \

F6= Process
F10=Left

F11=Right



From the two screens shown above, extracted from the ESCON Director control
console, we can see the attachments for our setup.
•

On port EE (physical port) into the ESCON Director, we have a fiber channel
from our 3174-12L gateway.

•

On port F4, we have a fiber channel from host A on CHIPID 30.

•

On port F8, we have a fiber channel from host B on CHIPID 37.

Notes:

3 and 7 This value matches that in question 240 for each logical
device (VCU) associated with the one physical device.

8 Defines which physical port on the ESCON Director the 3174
definitions are associated with.

9 Define the lower address range.
10 Define the upper address range.

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

377

IOCP Definitions
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
CHPID PATH=((30)),TYPE=S,SWITCH=00
CHPID PATH=((37)),TYPE=S,SWITCH=00
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
* CHPID 30 CHANNEL 30 CONTROL UNITS
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=3000,
3174 SNA
ADDRESS=3000
+
UNIT=3705,
+
PATH=30,
+
LINK=(F1),
+
CUADD=0,
+
UNITADD=((00,1))
:
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=3003,
3174 SNA
ADDRESS=3060-306F+
UNIT=3705,
+
PATH=30,
+
LINK=(EE),8
+
CUADD=0,3
+
UNITADD=((60,16))910
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
* CHPID 37 CHANNEL 37 CONTROL UNITS
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=3700,
3174 SNA
ADDRESS=3700
+
UNIT=3705,
+
PATH=37,
+
LINK=(F1),
+
CUADD=7,
+
UNITADD=((00,1))
:
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=3703,
3174 SNA
ADDRESS=3780-308F+
UNIT=3705,
+
PATH=37,
+
LINK=(EE),8
+
CUADD=7,7
+
UNITADD=((80,16))910
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*

378

3174 Installation Guide

DSPU 3174 Customization





_________ Multi-Host Definition ___________
Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID

Adapter
Type

1A
2A
3A
1B
__
__
__
__
__
__
__
__

_
_

Host
Attach

Hardware
Group

Include
in IML

__
__

_
_
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

7
_
_

Host Descriptor

HOST__A_____________
____________________
____________________
HOST__B_____________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________



Here we define the SLMH function for the
3174-13R. The attachment to host ID 1A is
defined as Token-Ring Network (Host Attach=7).
The attachment to host ID 1B will be the same
as host ID 1A.







____________ Token-Ring Network ____________
1A = HOST A
106 - 4000 0000 0004 04

107 - 4000 0000 0000 04

110 - 1

116 - 1_ __

121 - 01

123 - 1

132 - 0 0 0 0

For host ID 1A:
•

Question 106 is the 3174-13R Token-Ring
address.

•

Question 107 is the destination gateway
address to host A (note: SAP 04).

108 - 23V2645

125 - 00100100

126 - 00000000

127 - 0

136 - 1 1 1 1

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0
168 - 0

141 - A

165 - 0

166 - A

173 - 10100101

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

382 - 2057

383 - 2

384 - 2









____________ Token-Ring Network ____________
1B = HOST B
106 - 4000 0000 0004 04

For host ID 1B:
•

Question 106 is the 3174-13R Token-Ring
address (same as for host ID 1A).

•

Question 107 is the destination gateway
address to host B (note; SAP 08).

107 - 4000 0000 0000 08
116 - 1_ __
125 - 00*****0

127 - 0 0

165 - 0
179 - 0 0 0
215 - 00000
382 - 2057



220 - 0

221 - 0

383 - 2



Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

379

10.7 Example 7: SLMH with X.25

┌────────┐ ┌────────┐
┌────────┐
│ 3270 │ │ 3270 │
│ 3270 │
│ HOST A │ │ HOST B │
│ HOST C │
└─────┬──┘ └───┬────┘
└───┬────┘
│
│
│
│
│
│
│
│ *******
│
│ *********
***** │
****
X.25
********
***
PSDN
**
**
*****
****
******* │***
*******
│ *********
│/│
│
┌─────────────┼─────────────────┐
│
│
3174 │
│
┌────┴───┐
│
│
│3174
│
│
│
│ PU #1├─┐
│
│
└─┬──────┘ │
│
│
│ PU #2│
│
│
└────────┘
│
│
....
│
│
....
│
│
┌────────┐
│
│
│3174
│
│
│
│ PU #8│
│
│
└────────┘
│
└──────┬───────────────────┬────┘
│
│
│
│
┌────┴──┐
┌────┴──┐
│ CUT │
│ DFT │
└───────┘
└───────┘

Figure 149. X.25 Single Link Multi-Host

In this example, we configured the 3174 to have five host connections, with four
connections defined as PVCs and one connection as an SVC. In our test
environment, we had to define all of the PVCs over one MCH. In a normal
situation, you would code one PVC in each NPSI for the individual hosts.

X.25 3174 Customization



______________ Model / Attach ______________



098 099 - X25 SLMH
100 - 11R
101 - M



380



3174 Installation Guide

For SLMH, respond to question 101 with an M.





_________ Multi-Host Definition ___________
Select a Host ID and press ENTER
Host
ID

Adapter
Type

1A
2A
3A
1B
1C
1D
1E
__
__
__
__
__

_
_

Host
Attach

Hardware
Group

Include
in IML

__
__

_
_
1
1
1
1
_
_
_
_
_

3
_
_

Host Descriptor

X25_PRIMARY_HOST_A__
____________________
____________________
X25_HOST_B__________
X25_HOST_C__________
X25_HOST_D__________
SWITCHED X25 _______
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________



Here we name the X.25 hosts we wish to access
from the 3174. Since this is a SLMH
configuration, we have only one physical link,
defined as the 1A attachment. The secondary
hosts are defined as 1B, 1C, 1D and 1E. Ensure
that you include these host definitions in the
IML, otherwise they will not be available for
access.
For host ID 1A, specify Host Attach=3 for X.25
attachment; host ID 1B, 1C, 1D and 1E will
assume the same attachment as host ID 1A.


Host 1A Customization (First PVC)


104 - C1

108 - 23N6503

110 - 6

116 - S1 __

121 - 01

123 - 0

125 - 00000000

126 - 00000000

132 - 0 0 0 0

136 - 0 0 0 0

137 - 0 0 0 0

138 - 0

141 - A

165 - 1

166 - A

168 - 0

173 - 00000000

175 -

179 - 0 0 0

213 - 1

215 - 00000

220 - 0

370 - 0

372 - 0 0

For host ID 1A, customize the 3174 to match the
NCP definition for this 3174 in host A.
•

Question 104 is the controller address. 1

127 - 0 0

365 - 0






Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
f6-28
26-30





___________________ X.25 ___________________
1A = X25 PRIMARY HOST A

___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
1A = X25 PRIMARY HOST A
Host addresses
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
5
Port IS 1
2
3
4
5
1 002 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-01 1 003 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 004 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-03 1 005 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 006 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-05 1 007 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 008 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-07 1 009 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 010 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-09 1 011 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 012 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-11 1 013 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 014 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-13 1 015 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 016 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-15 1 017 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 018 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-17 1 019 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 020 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-19 1 021 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 022 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-21 1 023 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 024 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-23 1 025 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 026 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-25 1 027 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 028 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-27 1 029 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 030 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-29 1 031 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 032 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-31 1 033 ___ ___ ___ ___



For host A, we assign one host address to each
of the 32 ports on the 3174. These host
addresses match the LU LOCADDR values in the
NCP definition. 2



Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

381



____________ 332: X.25 Options ____________
1A = X25 PRIMARY HOST A
400 - 00 0 0

401 - 1

409 - 10101010

420 - 00000000

423 -



402 - 0001

X.25 parameters for host ID 1A:
•

Question 401 is the circuit type (1=PVC).

•

Question 402 is the Logical Channel
Identifier. 3

421 - 00000000
424 -

430 - 1

431 - 0

434 - 1

435 - 02

440 - 9

441 - __

432 - 02

In this example, it is logical channel 0001.

433 - 2

•

Questions 461 to 466 are the channel
definitions.

•

Question 461 specifies the lowest incoming
channel.

442 - ____

450 - 0010

451 - 05

452 - ________

453 - 10000000

461 - 0005

462 - 0010

463 - 0011

464 - 0020

465 - 0021

466 - 0030




NCP Definition (First PVC)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XL13008A X25.LINE LCN=1,3 FIRST PVC
X
DSTNODE=BNN,
X
LLC=LLC3,
X
TYPE=P,
X
VCCINDX=1
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XP13008A X25.PU PUTYPE=2,
X
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
ADDR=C1,1
X
MAXDATA=265,
X
MAXOUT=7,
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
X
USSTAB=US327X
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
T13008A1 X25.LU LOCADDR=22,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008A2 X25.LU LOCADDR=3,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
:
:
T1308A32 X25.LU LOCADDR=33,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
Notes:
PU XP13008A is the definition for the 3174 in host A.

1 Question 104 relates to the polling address specified in the PU
definition.

2 In the Port Assignment panel, the host addresses match the LU
LOCADDR values.

3 Question 402 defines the virtual circuit number used for this host.

382

3174 Installation Guide

Host 1B Customization (Second PVC)





___________________ X.25 ___________________
1B = X25 HOST B
104 - C1

For host ID 1B:
•

Question 104 is the controller address. 4

116 - S1 __
125 - 00*****0

This value should match that of the NCP
ADDR parameter for this PU.

127 - 0 0

165 - 1
179 - 0 0 0
215 - 00000
370 - 0

220 - 0

221 - 0

372 - 0 0






Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30

___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
1B = X25 HOST B
Host addresses
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
5
Port IS 1
2
3
4
5
1 002 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-01 1 003 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 004 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-03 1 005 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 006 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-05 1 007 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 008 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-07 1 009 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 010 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-09 1 011 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 012 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-11 1 013 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 014 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-13 1 015 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 016 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-15 1 017 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 018 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-17 1 019 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 020 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-19 1 021 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 022 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-21 1 023 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 024 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-23 1 025 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 026 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-25 1 027 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 028 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-27 1 029 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 030 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-29 1 031 ___ ___ ___ ___
1 032 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-31 1 033 ___ ___ ___ ___





As with the primary host, we assign one host
address to each of the 32 ports automatically. 5
Note: The customization panels for host ID 1C
and 1D are not shown; they are the same as
those for host ID 1B.





____________ 332: X.25 Options ____________
1B = X25 HOST B
401 - 1
409 - 10101010



X.25 options for host ID 1B:
•

Question 401 is the circuit type (1=PVC).

•

Question 402 is the Logical Channel
Identifier.

402 - 0002

420 - 00000000

421 - 00000000

423 430 - 1

440 - 9

441 - __

442 - ____
452 - ________



In this example, it is logical channel 0002.

432 - 02

453 - 00000000



Note: X.25 option screens for host ID 1C and 1D
are not shown. Additional PVC connections
configured will use logical channels 0003 for host
1C and 0004 for host 1D.

NCP Definition (Second PVC)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XL13008B X25.LINE LCN=2,6 SECOND PVC
X
DSTNODE=BNN,
X
LLC=LLC3,
X
TYPE=P,
X
VCCINDX=1

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

383

*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XP13008B X25.PU PUTYPE=2,
X
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
ADDR=C1,4
X
MAXDATA=265,
X
MAXOUT=7,
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
X
USSTAB=US327X
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
T13008B1 X25.LU LOCADDR=2,5DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008B2 X25.LU LOCADDR=3,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
:
:
T1308B32 X25.LU LOCADDR=33,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
Notes:
PU XP13008B is the definition for this 3174 in host B.

4 Question 104 relates to the polling address specified in the PU
definition.

5 The host addresses in the Port Assignment panel match the LU
LOCADDR values.

6 Question 402 defines the virtual circuit number used for this host.

Host 1E Customization (SVC)





___________________ X.25 ___________________
1E = SWITCHED X25
104 - C1

•

116 - S1 __
125 - 00*****0

127 - 0 0

179 - 0 0 0

215 - 00000




Port
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28
26-30

220 - 0

384

221 - 0

372 - 0 0

___________ 117: Port Assignment ___________
1E = SWITCHED X25
Host addresses
Host addresses
IS 1
2
3
4
5
Port IS 1
2
3
4
1 002 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-01 1 003 ___ ___ ___
1 004 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-03 1 005 ___ ___ ___
1 006 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-05 1 007 ___ ___ ___
1 008 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-07 1 009 ___ ___ ___
1 010 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-09 1 011 ___ ___ ___
1 012 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-11 1 013 ___ ___ ___
1 014 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-13 1 015 ___ ___ ___
1 016 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-15 1 017 ___ ___ ___
1 018 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-17 1 019 ___ ___ ___
1 020 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-19 1 021 ___ ___ ___
1 022 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-21 1 023 ___ ___ ___
1 024 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-23 1 025 ___ ___ ___
1 026 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-25 1 027 ___ ___ ___
1 028 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-27 1 029 ___ ___ ___
1 030 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-29 1 031 ___ ___ ___
1 032 ___ ___ ___ ___
26-31 1 033 ___ ___ ___





5
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___
___



3174 Installation Guide

Question 104 is the controller address. 7
For X.25, this is the secondary station
address.

165 - 1

370 - 0

We now customize the switched connection to
host E.

As with the other hosts, we have assigned one
host address to each of the 32 ports
automatically (by responding to question 116
with S1). 8





____________ 332: X.25 Options ____________
1E = SWITCHED X25
401 - 4
409 - 10101010

•

Question 401 is the circuit type (4=two-way
SVC).

•

Question 402 is the Logical Channel
Identifier.

402 -

420 - 00000000

421 - 00000000

423 - 3174___________
430 - 1

X.25 options for host ID 1E:

432 - 02

440 - 9

441 - __

The LCN used for this session will be taken
from the pool we defined in questions 461
through 466, depending on the type of call.

442 - ____
452 - ________

453 - 00000000









_______ Logical Terminal Assignment ________
801=1
Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-00
26-02
26-04
26-06
26-08
26-10
26-12
26-14
26-16
26-18
26-20
26-22
26-24
26-26
26-28

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1

1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1

1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1

1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1

1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1

Port LT1 LT2 LT3 LT4 LT5
26-01
26-03
26-05
26-07
26-09
26-11
26-13
26-15
26-17
26-19
26-21
26-23
26-25
26-27
26-29

1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1
1A1

1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1
1B1

1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1
1C1

1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1
1D1

1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1
1E1



Finally, having defined five X.25 hosts (1A
through 1E), we allocate one host session to
each of the five logical terminals at each
port. 10


NCP Definition (SVC)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
X25.VC LCN=(5,10),11
6 SVC′ S
X
VCCINDX=1,
X
NCPGRP=X2508P1,
X
OUFINDX=1,
X
CALL=OUT,
NPSI INITIATES CALL
X
TYPE=S
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
X25.VC LCN=(11,15),
5 SVC′ S
X
VCCINDX=1,
X
NCPGRP=X2508P2,
X
OUFINDX=1,
X
CALL=INOUT,
CALLS BOTH WAYS
X
TYPE=S
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
X25.VC LCN=(16,20),
5 SVC′ S
X
VCCINDX=1,
X
NCPGRP=X2508P3,
X
OUFINDX=1,
X
CALL=IN,
REMOTE DTE INITIATES CALL
X
TYPE=S
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

385

VTAM Definitions (SVC)
SWX25TES VBUILD MAXGRP=15,
REQUIRED NUMBER OF PATH GROUPS X
MAXNO=15,
REQUIRED NUMBER OF DIALNO
X
TYPE=SWNET
REQUIRED
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
X25PUE PU
ADDR=C1, 7
X
IDBLK=017,
X
IDNUM=00000,
X
DISCNT=YES,
X
MAXOUT=7,
X
MAXDATA=255,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
X
MAXPATH=20,
X
VPACING=0,
X
PUTYPE=2,
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
X
DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,
X
USSTAB=US327X
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
PATHX251 PATH DIALNO=2222222222*317411111130101,9
X
GRPNM=X2508P1,
X
GID=1,
X
PID=1
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
PATHX252 PATH DIALNO=2222222222*317411111130101,
X
GRPNM=X2508P2,
X
GID=1,
X
PID=2
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
PATHX253 PATH DIALNO=2222222222*317411111130101,
X
GRPNM=X2508P3,
X
GID=1,
X
PID=3
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
T13008E1 LU
LOCADDR=28
T13008E2 LU
LOCADDR=3
T13008E3 LU
LOCADDR=4
:
:
T1308E32 LU
LOCADDR=33
Notes:

7 The address parameter should match on question 104 in the NCP PU
definition.

8 The host addresses should match the LU LOCADDR values.
9 For an explanation of the dial parameter, see X.25 NPSI Planning and
Installation .
10 This panel shows the sequence of LTs accessed when you use the
Change Screen key.

11 We will have four PVCs and one SVC connection. Therefore, we
begin numbering the SVCs in question 461 starting at 0005 to ensure that
the numbering will be in the correct sequence.
It should be noted that the switched definitions shown here are included as an
example only and were not tested.

386

3174 Installation Guide

NCP Definition Listing
The is the complete NCP definitions used to test X.25 SLMH. It is not a
true-to-life scenario because all the hosts are physically the same host but it
illustrates how to customize the 3174.
In reality, if there were separate hosts using NPSI, then you would code one PU
definition in the NCP/NPSI definition in each host (you can use the PU definition
in this listing).
Extracts from this listing are used in the previous pages.

*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
*
NCP/NPSI DEFINITIONS FOR X.25 MULTI-HOST TESTING
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
* NCPBUILD BUILD - ADD THE FOLLOWING STATEMENTS
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
X25.PREFIX=X,
ALL NAMES START WITH X
X
X25.IDNUMH=02,
MUST MATCH WITH SWITCH MAJOR NODE IDX
X25.SNAP=YES,
SNAP TRACE INCLUDED
X
X25.MCHCNT=1,
NUMBER OF PHYSICAL LINKS
X
X25.MAXPIU=5K
LESS THAN MAXBFRU TIMES UNITSZ
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
*
X.25 NETWORK
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
X3174
X25.NET CPHINDX=1,
X
NETTYPE=1,
X
OUHINDX=1,
X
DM=YES
X25.VCCPT INDEX=1,
X
MAXPKTL=128,
X
VWINDOW=3,
PACKET LEVEL WINDOW 3
X
INSLOW=(100,50)
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
*
FIRST MCH
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
MCH01
X25.MCH ADDRESS=08,
CONTROLLER LINE ADDRESS
X
ANS=STOP,
X
LCGDEF=(0,4),
4 PVC
X
FRMLGTH=259,
256 + 3 (PACKET HEADER)
X
MWINDOW=7,
FRAME WINDOW SIZE
X
STATION=DCE,
USED TO SIMULATE X.25 NETWORK
X
ENABLTO=3,
X
DSABLTO=3,
X
TDTIMER=1,
X
TPTIMER=3,
X
NPRETRY=10,
X
NDRETRY=1,
CODED TO MATCH STATION=DCE
X
SUBADDR=NO,
X
LLCLIST=(LLC3),
X
LCN0=NOTUSED,
X
DBIT=NO,
X
PAD=NO,
X
PKTMODL=8,
X
GATE=NO,
X
ITRACE=YES,
X
SPEED=9600,
DEFAULT
X
T1TIMER=1

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

387

*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
X25.LCG LCGN=0
LOGICAL CHANNEL GROUP ZERO
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
*
X.25 LINE / PU / LU MACROS
(LINE 008)
*
*
EACH LINE DEFINES A PVC
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XL13008A X25.LINE LCN=1,
FIRST PVC
X
DSTNODE=BNN,
X
LLC=LLC3,
X
TYPE=P,
X
VCCINDX=1
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XP13008A X25.PU PUTYPE=2,
X
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
ADDR=C1,
X
MAXDATA=265,
X
MAXOUT=7,
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
X
USSTAB=US327X
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
T13008A1 X25.LU LOCADDR=2,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008A2 X25.LU LOCADDR=3,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008A3 X25.LU LOCADDR=4,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008A4 X25.LU LOCADDR=5,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008A5 X25.LU LOCADDR=6,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008A6 X25.LU LOCADDR=7,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008A7 X25.LU LOCADDR=8,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008A8 X25.LU LOCADDR=9,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008A9 X25.LU LOCADDR=10,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XL13008B X25.LINE LCN=2,
SECOND PVC
X
DSTNODE=BNN,
X
LLC=LLC3,
X
TYPE=P,
X
VCCINDX=1
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XP13008B X25.PU PUTYPE=2,
X
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
ADDR=C1,
X
MAXDATA=265,
X
MAXOUT=7,
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
X
USSTAB=US327X
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
T13008B1 X25.LU LOCADDR=34,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008B2 X25.LU LOCADDR=38,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008B3 X25.LU LOCADDR=42,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008B4 X25.LU LOCADDR=46,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008B5 X25.LU LOCADDR=50,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008B6 X25.LU LOCADDR=54,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008B7 X25.LU LOCADDR=58,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008B8 X25.LU LOCADDR=62,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008B9 X25.LU LOCADDR=66,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ

388

3174 Installation Guide

*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XL13008C X25.LINE LCN=3,
THIRD PVC
X
DSTNODE=BNN,
X
LLC=LLC3,
X
TYPE=P,
X
VCCINDX=1
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XP13008C X25.PU PUTYPE=2,
X
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
ADDR=C1,
X
MAXDATA=265,
X
MAXOUT=7,
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
X
USSTAB=US327X
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
T13008C1 X25.LU LOCADDR=35,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008C2 X25.LU LOCADDR=39,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008C3 X25.LU LOCADDR=43,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008C4 X25.LU LOCADDR=47,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008C5 X25.LU LOCADDR=51,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008C6 X25.LU LOCADDR=55,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008C7 X25.LU LOCADDR=59,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008C8 X25.LU LOCADDR=63,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008C9 X25.LU LOCADDR=67,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XL13008D X25.LINE LCN=4,
FOURTH PVC
X
DSTNODE=BNN,
X
LLC=LLC3,
X
TYPE=P,
X
VCCINDX=1
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
XP13008D X25.PU PUTYPE=2,
X
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
X
ADDR=C1,
X
MAXDATA=265,
X
MAXOUT=7,
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
X
MODETAB=AMODETAB,
X
USSTAB=US327X
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
T13008D1 X25.LU LOCADDR=36,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008D2 X25.LU LOCADDR=40,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008D3 X25.LU LOCADDR=44,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008D4 X25.LU LOCADDR=48,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008D5 X25.LU LOCADDR=52,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008D6 X25.LU LOCADDR=56,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008D7 X25.LU LOCADDR=60,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008D8 X25.LU LOCADDR=64,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
T13008D9 X25.LU LOCADDR=68,DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
X25.END
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

389

10.8 Example 8: 3174 with AEA

┌─────────┐ ┌──────────┐
│ 3270 │ │ ASCII │
│ HOST │ │ HOST │
└────┬────┘ └───┬──────┘
│
│
│
│
│\│
│\│
│
│
┌───────┴────────┬─┴──┐
│
│ A │ ┌──────┐
│
3174─11R │ E ├─┤ 3151 │
│
│ A │ └──────┘
└────┬─────────┬─┴────┘
│
│
┌────┴──┐ ┌──┴────┐
│ CUT │ │ DFT/E │
└───────┘ └───────┘

Figure 150. Remote 3174 with an AEA

Due to the nature of AEA connections and the complexity of the required
parameters of the OEM hosts, the connectivity example is discussed in
Chapter 7, “Asynchronous Emulation Adapter (AEA)” on page 263.

10.9 Example 9: SLNM with Frame Relay
The Multi-Host Support Type for Frame Relay is Single-Link Multi-Host Support
and can be defined on the Communication Adapter (CA) only. The Concurrent
Communication Adapter (CCA) is not supported as link to a Frame Relay
Network, but can be used concurrently as secondary Host-Link via SDLC.
In the example shown in Figure 151 on page 391, we will cover practically all
customization questions introduced with the Frame Relay feature, regarding
Single-Link Multi-Host for PU2.0 Host-Link, APPN and Gateway definitions.

390

3174 Installation Guide

Figure 151. Example Scenario

See Chapter 20, “Frame Relay Support” on page 589 and the new ITSO
document 3174 in Higher Speed WAN and Multiprotocol Networks , GG24-4376 for
further information. This book provides guidance in implementing 3174 Frame
Relay support in various scenarios and, native Frame Relay support for native
SNA, APPN and, TCP/IP protocols are examined in common scenarios that
mostly reflect real world configurations.

Chapter 10. Connectivity Customization Examples

391

392

3174 Installation Guide

Chapter 11. Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)
Dynamic Definition of Dependent Logical Units (DDDLU) provides the ability to
dynamically create VTAM definitions for dependent LUs at power-on time. With
the appropriate levels of software and microcode, VTAM builds the LU definitions
using model LU statements defined in VTAM and product information supplied by
the 3174, without operator intervention. DDDLU, therefore, provides the following
benefits:
•

You do not need to code an LU definition for each logical terminal. This is a
great saving in time and effort, especially when using Multiple Logical
Terminal (MLT) support in a large network environment.

•

With DDDLU, definitions are created only when needed. Therefore, you do
not need to reserve LU definitions in anticipation of future use. This can be
a great saving in storage (control blocks) on the host.

•

Terminal devices can be added, replaced and moved without pre-definition.
There is no need to shutdown the network or parts of the network during
these changes. This increased flexibility is especially important to users
with fairly large and/or dynamic networks.

11.1 Host Requirements
The following host software are required to support DDDLU:
•

ACF/VTAM V3.4.1 for MVS/ESA

•

ACF/VTAM V3.4 for VM/SP and VM/ESA

•

ACF/VTAM V3.4 for VSE/ESA*

•

ACF/NCP V5.4 if the 3174 is attached through an NCP

11.2 3174 Requirements
The following lists the 3174 models supported and the microcode release level
required.

11.2.1 3174 Models Supported
The following 3174 models support DDDLU:
•

Models 01L, 01R, 02R, 03R, 51R, 53R

•

Models 11L, 11R, 12R, 13R, 14R, 61R, 62R, 63R, 64R, 90R, 91R, 92R

•

Models 21L, 21R, 22R, 23R, 24R

•

Models 12L, 22L

•

Models 41R, 43R

 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

393

11.2.2 3174 Microcode Requirements
The minimum level of 3174 microcode required is one of the following:
•

Configuration Support-B Release 4.1

•

Configuration Support-C Release 1.1 or later

Note that Configuration Support-C Release 1 does not support DDDLU.
References to 3174 support for DDDLU are mentioned in the program
announcements for the different releases of ACF/VTAM mentioned previously.
The introduction of Configuration Support-C Release 2 provided the first
opportunity to announce this 3174 enhancement.

11.3 Functional Description
With the newer levels of VTAM, IBM supplies a new exit with the product tapes:
the Selection of Definitions for Dependent Logical Units (SDDLU). This SDDLU
exit supports the Dynamic Definition of Dependent LU (DDDLU) function, which
defines LUs to VTAM when a 3174 or its attached device (display or printer)
powers on, rather than during major node activation.
The device must be attached to a 3174 capable of supporting DDDLU (that is,
with the right level of microcode) and the 3174 PU must be defined with the
appropriate parameters (LUGROUP and LUSEED).
Given the correct levels of VTAM and 3174 microcode, and appropriate PU
definition:
•

VTAM is able to send an ACTPU Format 1 to the 3174.

•

The 3174 checks that the ACTPU Format 1 contains the correct control vector
and bit setting indicating VTAM supports unsolicited Reply Product Set ID
(PSID) NMVTs from the 3174.

•

The 3174 then loops through its Port Assignment table and sends in a Reply
PSID NMVT for each device that is powered on and needs to communicate
with that host.
Contained in the Reply PSID NMVT are information such as the device (or
machine) type, model number and assigned local address (or addresses,
when Multiple Logical Terminal is customized).
For devices that support Vital Product Data (VPD), the machine type and
model number are supplied at manufacture. For devices that do not support
VPD, user-defined data can be used for DDDLU.

394

•

VTAM passes the PSID information to the SDDLU exit.

•

The SDDLU exit concatenates the machine type and model number together
to form a seven-character LU acronym. The exit then uses the LU acronym
to select a model LU definition from a set of model LU definitions in an
LUGROUP major node.

•

The SDDLU exit next constructs the LU name using the LUSEED name
defined in the 3174 PU and the PSID local address.

•

The SDDLU exit passes the model LU definition and constructed LU name to
VTAM.

•

VTAM builds the LU definition for each logical terminal and activates the LU.

3174 Installation Guide

For each device that powers on after the initial ACTPU processing, the 3174 will
send an unsolicited Reply PSID to VTAM, resulting in the dynamic definition
process being executed once again.
DDDLU support extends to devices communicating with both the primary or
secondary hosts, with the LUs dynamically defined in the corresponding hosts.
DDDLU support is also available for ASCII devices attached via the
Asynchronous Emulation Adapter.

11.4 VTAM Major Node Types
DDDLU is supported by the following major node types:
•

Channel attached major nodes

•

NCP major nodes

•

Local SNA major nodes

•

Switched major nodes

•

Packet major nodes (VM and VSE only)

11.5 DDDLU Supported Devices
Some of the newer devices supply their own Vital Product Data. This VPD is
known as device-defined data and includes the device (or machine) type, model
number and plant of manufacture (see Figure 152). The machine type and
model number are sent in the Reply PSID to VTAM and are used by the SDDLU
exit to support DDDLU.



BKBCP231

______ Port Vital Data - PN 00, HG 26 ______

Device-defined
Device type:
Model number:
Plant of manufacture:
Serial number:
Release level:
Engineering change data:

3472
F00
23
00F0678



User-defined
____
___
__
_______

09F4604 09F4605

B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 B9 B10
Device characteristics (hexadecimal): 01 11 C1 04 43 00 10 A9
* = data not supplied by device
Location: __________________________________________________

To go directly to other tests, enter: /Test,Option
Select Test; press ENTER ===>



PF: 3=Quit 7=Back 8=Fwd 12=Test Menu



Figure 152. Display Vital Product Data

For devices that do not supply device-defined VPD, you can specify user-defined
VPD, including the machine type and model number, via Online Test 5 Option 4
(Update Port VPD). The user-defined machine type and model number will then
be sent in the Reply PSID to VTAM support DDDLU.

Chapter 11. Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)

395

If both device-defined and user-defined data are present for a device, only the
device-defined data is sent in the Reply PSID. The device-defined data overrides
the user-defined data.
If the 3174 is IMLed, the device-defined VPD stored in the controller storage is
lost. The user-defined data, however, is saved because it is stored on the
Control diskette (or fixed disk).

11.5.1 3270 Devices
The following 3270 devices provide device-defined VPD.

┌───────┬─────────────────────┬─────────────────────────────┐
│MACHINE│
│PRODUCT SET ID (PSID) SUPPORT│
│ TYPE │
├───┬─────┬───────────────────┤
│ (M/T) │
MODEL NUMBER
│M/T│MODEL│ COMMENTS
│
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│3179 │ 1
│ Y │ N │ No user data
│
│3179 │ G
│ Y │ Y │ No user data
│
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│3180 │ 1
│ Y │ N │ No user data
│
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│3191(1)│ A, B
│ Y │ N │ No user data
│
│3191(1)│ D, E, L
│ Y │ Y │ No user data
│
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│3192(1)│ C, D, F, L, W
│ Y │ Y │ No user data
│
│3192(1)│ G
│ Y │ Y │ No user data
│
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│3193 │ 10,20
│ Y │ Y │ No user data
│
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│3194 │ C,D,H (EX. H50)
│ Y │ Y │ No user data
│
│3194 │ H50
│ Y │ Y │ No user data
│
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│3290 │
│ Y │ N │ No user data
│
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│3471 │
│ Y │ Y │ No user data
│
│3472 │ FC, FD, FA, FG, CG5 │ Y │ Y │ Support user data │
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│3481 │
│ Y │ Y │ No user data
│
│3482 │
│ Y │ Y │ Support user data │
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│8530(3)│ E21, E31
│ N │ Y │ PS/2 Model 30-286 │
│8550(2)│ 021, 031, 061
│ N │ Y │ PS/2 Model 50
│
│8555SX │ 031, 061
│ N │ Y │ PS/2 Model 55
│
│8560(2)│ 041, 071
│ N │ Y │ PS/2 Model 60
│
│8565SX │ 061, 121
│ N │ Y │ PS/2 Model 65
│
│8570(2)│ A21, E61, 121
│ N │ Y │ PS/2 Model 70
│
│8580(2)│ 041, 071, 111, 311 │ N │ Y │ PS/2 Model 80
│
├───────┼─────────────────────┼───┼─────┼───────────────────┤
│5162(3)│ 286
│ N │ Y │ PC XT
│
│5170(3)│ 099, 239, 319, 339 │ N │ Y │ PC AT
│
│5170(3)│ 068 with fixed disk │ N │ Y │ PC AT
│
└───────┴─────────────────────┴───┴─────┴───────────────────┘
Figure 153. 3270 Devices Supporting PSID Information

396

3174 Installation Guide

Notes:
(1) The following 3270 devices have an associated VPD model number:
3270 Device
----------3191 A/B
3191 D/E/L
3192 C/L
3192 D
3192 F
3192 W
3471 B10
3472 FC
3472 FD
3472 FA
3472 FG
3472 CG5

VPD Model Number
---------------3191 000
3191 015
3192 030
3192 020
3192 035
3192 025
3471 xxx
3472 xxx
3472 xxx
3472 xxx
3472 xxx
3472 xxx

(2) Requires OS/2 Extended Edition and FC 2000.
(3) Requires OS/2 Extended Edition and FC 2507 or FC 5050.

11.5.2 Personal Communications/3270 Support
DDDLU is supported for PS/2 workstations coax attached to the 3174 and running
in CUT or DFT modes, for both single and multiple session support. You can
specify user-provided VPD using the PCSUTIL utility.

11.6 DDDLU Process
Figure 154 on page 398 shows an overview of the DDDLU process of building an
LU definition for a 3472 display attached to a 3174.

Chapter 11. Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)

397

┌────┐
(1)│3174│
└─┬──┘
(2)
│

PSID Information:
Local address = 002 ───────────────────────────────(6)───────────┐
Machine type = 3472 ───┐
│
Machine model = G00 ───┤
│
│
│
┌────────────────(4)───────┘ LUGROUP Major Node Definitions:
│
│
LUGRP
VBUILD TYPE=LUGROUP
│
│
GROUP1 ── LUGROUP ─────(3)─────────┐ │
│ LU acronym
│ 3472F00
LU
...DLOGMOD=AAA,... │ │
└─ 3472G00 ───────────── (5)│ 3472@
LU
...DLOGMOD=BBB,... │ │
│ 3471B10
LU
...DLOGMOD=CCC,... │ │
SDDLU searches GROUP1 only,
 @
LU
...DLOGMOD=DDD,... │ │
sequentially from top to bottom GROUP2
LUGROUP
│ │
for the closest model LU name
:
:
│ │
that matches the LU acronym.
│ │
PU Definitions:
│ │
LOC11PU
PU
CUADDR=E40,
│ │
LUGROUP=GROUP1,─┘ │
LUSEED=LOC11###──┘
: ││││││││
││││││││
┌┬┬┬┬────────(7)─────────┴┴┴┴┘└┴┴───┐

│
Dynamically defined LU name = LOC11002
│
│
└┴┴─────(8)────────────────────┘

Resulting LU definition for 3472-G00 display at local address 002:
(9)

LOC11002 LU LOCADDR=002,DLOGMOD=BBB,...

Figure 154. DDDLU Overview

The following describes an example process of building a dynamic definition for
a display attached to a 3174:
(1) The 3174 is IMLed, the display is powered on and the PU major node is
activated.
(2) The 3174 sends in a Reply Product Set ID (PSID) NMVT containing the
machine type, model number and local address (or addresses) customized
for all devices powered on to VTAM
(3) VTAM checks the PU definition for an LU at the address passed in the
PSID. If an LU definition does not exist, VTAM checks if the PU has an
LUGROUP coded to support DDDLU. In this example, the LUGROUP
parameter points to the set of model LU definitions to be used (GROUP1).
(4) VTAM calls and passes the PSID information to the SDDLU exit. The
SDDLU exit concatenates PSID machine type and model number to form an
LU acronym.

398

3174 Installation Guide

(5) The SDDLU exit compares the LU acronym with each model LU name,
character by character, for a match. The search proceeds sequentially from
the top to the bottom of the group.
In this example, there is no perfect match for the LU acronym 3472G00. The
SDDLU exit, however, will find a match with the second entry 3472@ (the @
character represents any character). If no match had been found, the last
entry @ would have been used.
(6) The SDDLU exit uses the PSID local address to replace the # characters
in the LUSEED name. With three # characters specified, it will use the
decimal form of the local address. If two # characters had been specified, it
would have used the hexadecimal form.
(7) The SDDLU exit uses the specific characters of the LUSEED name to form
the first part of the LU name.
(8) The SDDLU exit uses the local address to form the second part of the LU
name.
(9) The SDDLU exit passes the LU name created and model definitions to
VTAM. VTAM builds the LU definition for the display and activates the
display LU.
The dynamic definition is rebuilt if the device powers off and a new device
powers on at the same local address. The dynamic definition is also rebuilt if
the device powers off and powers back on after its LUGROUP major node has
been recycled.

LU Acronym
During power-on processing, the 3174 will send a device′s machine type and
model number to VTAM, which will concatenate the two fields together (in that
ordering sequence) to form an LU acronym. The LU acronym is used to identify
a matching model LU name within a set of model LU definitions.
For example, if a device machine type is 3472 and its model number is 003, then
the resulting LU acronym is 3472003. This LU acronym is then used to search
the set of model LU definitions pointed to by the 3174 PU definition LUGROUP
parameter for a matching model LU name.

11.7 3174 PU Definition
To enable DDDLU, two additional parameters must be added to the 3174 PU
definition: LUGROUP and LUSEED.

Local PU Example Definition
Figure 155 shows an example of a PU definition for a channel attached 3174
which supports DDDLU.

*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
* 3174-11L LOCAL PU DEFINITION FOR DDDLU
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
LOC11 VBUILD TYPE=LOCAL
LOC11PU PU
CUADDR=E40,ISTATUS=ACTIVE,PUTYPE=2,MAXBFRU=10,
X
LUGROUP=GROUP1,LUSEED=LOC11###,
X
VPACING=0
LOC11PRT LU LOCADDR=05,MODETAB=MTJS328X,DLOGMOD=SCS3262

Figure 155. Example Local PU Definition for DDDLU
Chapter 11. Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)

399

Note that you can specify static LU definitions as well. In this example, the LU
with LOCADDR=05 is statically defined. You may wish to have static definitions,
for example, for certain devices which require unique logmode parameters.
Note also that the parameters for a dynamically defined LU comes from the
model LU definition. Any parameters coded on the PU statement will sift down
to the statically defined LUs but not the dynamically defined LUs.

Remote PU Example Definition
Figure 156 shows the PU definition for an NCP attached 3174 before being
modified for DDDLU.

:
P06143A PU ADDR=C1,
CLUSTER ADDRESS = 01
MAXDATA=265,
MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF DATA
MAXOUT=7,
MAX SDLC FRAMES BEFORE RESPONSE
PACING=0,
PACING SET BY BIND IMAGE
PASSLIM=8,
PUDR=YES,
PUTYPE=2,
RETRIES=(,4,5),
7 RETRY PER SECOND FOR 5 TIMES
DISCNT=(NO),
(V) VTAM
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
(V) VTAM
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
(V) VTAM
USSTAB=US327X,
(V) VTAM
VPACING=0
(V) VTAM
*
STATOPT=(′3174′,NOACTY)
T06143A1 LU LOCADDR=2,
FIRST LU MUST BE LOCADDR=2
MODETAB=MODEVR,DLOGMOD=VR03270,
ISTATUS=ACTIVE
(V) VTAM
T06143A2 LU LOCADDR=3,
MODETAB=MODEVR,DLOGMOD=VR03270,
ISTATUS=ACTIVE
(V) VTAM
T06143A3 LU LOCADDR=4,
MODETAB=MODEVR,DLOGMOD=VR03270,
ISTATUS=ACTIVE
(V) VTAM
T06143A4 LU LOCADDR=5,
MODETAB=MODEVR,DLOGMOD=VR03270,
ISTATUS=ACTIVE
(V) VTAM
:

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

Figure 156. NCP PU and LU Definitions before DDDLU Support

Figure 157 on page 401 shows the PU definition for the same 3174 required to
support DDDLU. In this example, the VTAM dynamic reconfiguration capability is
used to activate the new PU definition.

400

3174 Installation Guide

*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
* SDLC 3174-11R CONTROL UNIT
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
VBUILD TYPE=DR
DELETE FROM=L06143
P06143A PU
ADD TO=L06143
P06143A PU ADDR=C1,
CLUSTER ADDRESS = 01
LUGROUP=GROUP1,
DDDLU GROUP
X
LUSEED=CCA###,
DDDLU LU NAME SEED
X
MAXDATA=521,
MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF DATA
X
MAXOUT=7,
MAX SDLC FRAMES BEFORE RESPONSE
X
PACING=0,
PACING SET BY BIND IMAGE
X
PASSLIM=8,
X
PUDR=YES,
X
PUTYPE=2,
X
RETRIES=(,4,5),
7 RETRY PER SECOND FOR 5 TIMES
X
DISCNT=(NO),
(V) VTAM
X
ISTATUS=ACTIVE,
(V) VTAM
X
SSCPFM=USSSCS,
(V) VTAM
X
USSTAB=US327X,
(V) VTAM
X
VPACING=0
(V) VTAM

Figure 157. NCP PU Definitions Modified to Support DDDLU

The additional parameters are used as described in the following sections.

PU LUGROUP Parameter
L U G R O U P = name points to a group (or set) of model
an LUGROUP major node that will be searched for a
Note that the name specified here is the name of the
within an LUGROUP major node and not the name of

LU definitions contained in
matching LU acronym.
set of model LU definitions
the LUGROUP major node.

PU LUSEED Parameter
LUSEED= pattern name is used as a pattern or seed to build unique LU names
during dynamic definition. The following rules must be followed in specifying an
LUSEED name:
•

Two or three hash characters must be specified within the name.

•

The hash characters must be contiguous.

•

The name must not start with the hash character

Examples of valid LUSEED names are:
•

LOC11### (three hash characters at the end)

•

REM13## (two hash characters at the end)

•

CCA##LU (two hash characters imbedded)

In building an LU name, the hash characters are replaced by the device local
address:
•

If two hash characters are specified, the hexadecimal form of the local
address is used.

•

If three has characters are specified, the decimal form of the local address is
used.

Chapter 11. Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)

401

11.8 LUGROUP Major Node
The model LU definitions, as previously mentioned, are contained in an
LUGROUP major node. Figure 158 shows an example LUGROUP major node
that is used by a 3174. The LUGROUP macro on the VBUILD statement tells
VTAM that this major node contains model LU definitions.

*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
* AN LUGROUP MAJOR NODE CONTAINS MODEL LU DEFINITIONS
*
*---------------------------------------------------------------------*
VBUILD TYPE=LUGROUP
GROUP1 LUGROUP
317@
LU DLOGMOD=M23278I,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
3278002 LU DLOGMOD=M23278I,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
3279SG3 LU DLOGMOD=D6327802,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=AUSSTAB,
X
LOGAPPL=CICS3
3471B10 LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
3471@
LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCNQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
3472F00 LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
3472@
LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCNQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
3192002 LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
3270PC LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
4224@
LU DLOGMOD=SCS3262,MODETAB=MTJS328X
8560071 LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
8560@
LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
85@
LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
@
LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=AMODETAB,USSTAB=US327X
GROUP2 LUGROUP
3471B10 LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=MODETAB2,USSTAB=US327X
..
.
@
LU DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ,MODETAB=MODETAB2,USSTAB=US327X
Figure 158. Example LUGROUP Major Node

Model LU Definitions
In this example, there are two sets of model LU definitions:

402

•

The group name (in this example, GROUP1 or GROUP2) identifies a set of
model LU definitions. This name is specified in the LUGROUP operand of
the 3174 PU macro.

•

The LUGROUP macro to the right of the group name marks the beginning of
the set of model LU definitions. Note that no operands are allowed for this
macro.

•

The maximum number of model LU definitions per set is 255.

•

Multiple sets of model LU definitions can exist in the same major node (as
shown in this example), or they can be separated into several major nodes
for flexibility.

•

Multiple sets of model LU definitions can be active at the same time.

•

You can VARY ACT and VARY INACT an LUGROUP major node (like other
major node types). However, you cannot VARY ACT and VARY INACT
individual sets within the LUGROUP major node.

3174 Installation Guide

Model LU Name
The model LU name identifies the model LU definition that will be used for
dynamically creating a device definition. The following rules apply to model LU
names:
•

The model LU name is required and must be unique within an LUGROUP.
However, the same model LU name can be used in different LUGROUPs.

•

A model LU name can be eight characters long. Note that the IBM-supplied
SDDLU exit supports only seven-character model LU names.

•

A model LU name can begin with:

•

−

An alphabetic character: A through Z

−

A numeric character: 0 through 9

−

A special character: @ # $

The @ character has special meanings in a model LU name. It is used to
substitute for characters in an LU acronym as follows:
−

Between other characters in a name, @ substitutes for a single unknown
character.

−

If it is the last character in a name, @ substitutes for any number, up to
seven, of unknown characters.

−

If it is the only character in a name, @ will substitute for any LU
acronym.

Model LU Name Search Considerations
When defining the LUGROUP major node, you should be aware of the following
considerations:
•

When the SDDLU exit attempts to find a match for an LU acronym, it
searches sequentially down the list of model LU names within the LUGROUP.
This means that you should place the definitions that are likely to be used by
the majority of the devices (displays and printers) in your network at the top
of the list for better performance.

•

The @ character in the model LU name, as we have described previously, is
used to substitute any character in the LU acronym. You should, therefore,
be careful about where you place model LU names with the @ character
within an LUGROUP.
For example, if you place the the model LU name 3472@ before the model
LU name 3472F00, the first name will always be used for any LU acronym
beginning with the four characters 3472. This may result in the incorrect LU
parameters being used, with unintended consequences.

Valid Model LU Parameters
The following shows some of the parameters that can be used in a model LU
definition statement. For descriptions of these parameters, see VTAM Resource
Definition Reference .

Chapter 11. Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)

403

Name

Definition
Statements

name

LU

Operands

[ ,ASLENT=associated LU table entry name ]
[ ,ASLTAB=associated LU table name ]
[ ,DLOGMOD=default logmode entry name ]
[ ,ENCR=REQD|SEL|OPT|NONE ]
[ ,LOGAPPL=controlling primary LU ]
[ ,LOGTAB=interpret table name ]
[ ,MDLENT=model table entry name ]
[ ,MDLTAB=model table name ]
[ ,MODETAB=logon mode table name ]
[ ,PACING=n|0|1 ]
[ ,SSCPFM=FSS|USSSCS|USS3270|USS3275 ]
[ ,USSTAB=USS definition table name ]
[ ,VPACING=n|0|2 ]

11.9 SDDLU Exit Routine
To support the dynamic definition of dependent LUs, IBM supplies the Selection
of Definitions for Dependent LUs (SDDLU) exit routine is supplied with the VTAM
product tapes. There is no need for you to code your own exit to support
DDDLU. By default, VTAM will call the SDDLU exit for processing during VTAM
initialization.
There are, however, certain requirements when using this exit:
•

Must be named ISTEXCSD

•

Must reside in SYS1.VTAMLIB

•

Must be link-edited with MODE=31,RMODE=24

•

Runs under a VTAM subtask, allowing it to perform I/O

•

Resides in pageable storage and receives control in supervisor state in
VTAM′s storage key(6)

You should also note that the SDDLU exit uses a seven-character LU acronym
(concatenation of the device machine type and model number) to select the
model LU definition to be used.
The MODIFY command has been enhanced to allow you to activate, inactivate or
replace the exit routine with a new copy without interrupting VTAM. The format
of the enhanced MODIFY command is:
MODIFY | F procname ,EXIT,ID=ISTEXCSD,
O P T I O N = {ACT | INACT | REPL}

11.10 Operation
LUGROUP major nodes can be activated with the normal VARY ACT command,
and deactivated with the VARY INACT command (like any other major node).
To support DDDLU, the LUGROUP major node must be active. When it is active,
all the sets of model LU definitions within that node can be used for DDDLU.
Each set or individual model LU definition, however, cannot be selectively
activated or deactivated.

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11.10.1 Display LUGROUP Major Node
Once activated, the DISPLAY command can be used to show the model LU
names supported by the LUGROUP major node. Figure 159 shows an example
display of an active LUGROUP major node.




==> DISPLAY NET,ID=LUGRP,SCOPE=ALL
IST097I DISPLAY ACCEPTED
LUGROUP MAJOR NODE
NAME = GROUP1
LOGICAL UNITS:
3192002
3472F00
4224@
85@
END

= LUGRP
, TYPE = MODEL LU GROUP
3471B10
3472@
8560071
@

3471@
3270PC
8560@





Figure 159. Display LUGROUP Major Node

11.10.2 Display PU Major Node
The display of a PU with dynamically defined LUs is no different from the display
of a PU with statically defined LUs. Figure 160 shows an example display of a
PU with one LU which has been dynamically defined.




==> DISPLAY NET,ID=LOC11,SCOPE=ALL
IST097I DISPLAY ACCEPTED
NAME = LOC11
, TYPE = LCL SNA MAJ NODE
STATUS= ACTIV
, DESIRED STATE= ACTIV
NETWORK NODES:
LOC11PU TYPE = PHYSICAL UNIT
, ACTIV
,CUA=E40
LOC11002
TYPE = LOGICAL UNIT
, ACT/S
END





Figure 160. Display PU with Dynamically Defined LU

Chapter 11. Dynamic Definition of Dependent LUs (DDDLU)

405

11.10.3 Display Dynamically Defined LU
A dynamically defined LU can also be displayed, just like a statically defined LU.
The difference is that the display shows the name of the model LU definition
used (the MODEL NAME field) for the dynamically defined LU. Figure 161 shows
an example of such a display.




==> DISPLAY NET,ID=LOC11002,SCOPE=ALL
IST097I DISPLAY ACCEPTED



NAME = LOC11002 , TYPE = LOGICAL UNIT
STATUS= ACT/S
, DESIRED STATE= ACTIV
MDLTAB=***NA*** ASLTAB=***NA***
MODETAB=AMODETAB USSTAB=US327X LOGTAB=***NA***
DLOGMOD=M2SDLCQ USS LANGTAB=***NA***
MODEL NAME = 3472@
CAPABILITY-PLU INHIBITED,SLU ENABLED ,SESSION LIMIT 00000001
LOCAL SNA MAJOR NODE = LOC11
PHYSICAL UNIT = LOC11PU , CUA = E40
DEVTYPE =
LU
I/O TRACE = OFF, BUFFER TRACE = OFF
ENCRYPTION = NONE
ACTIVE SESSIONS = 0000000001, SESSION REQUESTS = 0000000000
SESSIONS:
NAME
STATUS
SID
SEND RECV VR TP NETID
RAIAT05 ACTIV-P
F86FE164228484F0 0000 0002 0 0 USIBMRA
END



Figure 161. Display Dynamically Defined Dependent LU

11.11 Performance
Tests have shown that, using the IBM-supplied SDDLU exit, there is negligible
difference between the time required for the dynamic definition and activation of
dependent LUs compared with the time required for the activation of statically
defined dependent LUs.

11.12 3174 Customization
During 3174 customization, be aware that the local addresses you specify in
question 117 will be used to replace the hash characters specified in the LUSEED
name. Other than that, there are no other customizing questions you need to
answer that are specific to DDDLU.

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Chapter 12. Local Format Storage
Local Format Storage (LFS) is a function offered by the 3174 that allows
applications running under CICS* to preload frequently used screen images
(screen formats) into controller storage and recall these formats via the format
name as they are required. Using this function, substantial reductions in
communication line traffic and response time can be achieved.
LFS was available as an RPQ 8X0024 with Configuration Support-A and S. With
Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases (including Configuration
Support-C), LFS is integrated into the base microcode. To use LFS with all these
3174 microcode levels, the user must code a transaction program for format
distribution (loading).
With Configuration Support-C Release 2 announcement, IBM also announced the
UltraOpt/VTAM** product from BMC Software Inc., an IBM Business Partner
(Application Specialist). UltraOpt/VTAM is a VTAM application that provides 3270
datastream optimization and fully exploits LFS functions for format creation,
distribution and storage management for CICS as well as TSO, IMS and other
VTAM applications. UltraOpt/VTAM will operate with Configuration Support-A, S,
B and C. With the addition of UltraOpt/VTAM, the user no longer needs to code
a transaction program for format distribution (loading).
Hence, LFS functions can be used as follows:
•

Without UltraOpt/VTAM, for CICS only, using CICS Outboard Formatting
facility and a user-coded screen format loading program

•

With UltraOpt/VTAM, for CICS, IMS and TSO, with datastream optimization
and without the need for a user-coded screen format loading program

This chapter describes both uses.

12.1 LFS without UltraOpt/VTAM
The Local Format Storage function provides for the host-controlled loading of
presentation screen formats (maps), into the 3174 storage. These maps can be
presented on any CUT terminal or emulated CUT device, including AEA attached
terminals. DFT devices are not supported unless they have a CUT mode session
available (like the 3472-G).
In environments where remote terminals, lines and communication controllers
are heavily utilized and/or response times are unacceptably slow, the solution is
usually to upgrade the line speed and/or install more lines and communication
hardware. These solutions add significantly to the network cost. In such
situations, LFS may potentially be used instead.
Using LFS, the amount of data sent down the line is reduced because the most
commonly used screen formats are stored at the 3174. This traffic reduction not
only improves line and communication controller utilization (thus overcoming the
need to upgrade line speed and/or hardware) but also results in improved
response times.
LFS uses new and existing 3270 datastream structured fields to control the
loading and host-initiated presentation of stored maps. LFS supports the 3270
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1986, 1994

407

datastream architecture for format presentation as implemented by CICS, but a
user can provide his own format presentation support using 3270 datastream
architecture.
Map loading is controlled by a host-initiated utility session that is invoked when
the host detects that a 3174 IML has occurred. Formats can be added, replaced,
or deleted. Formats groups may be deleted, and format storage may be reset at
any time under the control of the host utility session. The host utility can reside
in the primary or secondary host.
Presentation of any stored format can be initiated by host command, and
presentation of selected local formats can be initiated by a user without host
intervention, provided that local formats have been defined in the Load Format
structured field and local format selection has been enabled through 3174
customization.

12.1.1 Implementing LFS
There are three main phases of implementation in CICS:
1. Creating the formats to be downloaded
2. Distributing the formats to the 3174
3. Presenting the formats
This section discusses each of these stages.

12.1.2 Creating Formats
The customer is responsible for creating the formats to be downloaded. How the
formats are created depends on the transaction management system and
mapping service used. LFS requires that all stored formats contain the exact
3270 datastream to be sent to the display. LFS will not modify stored format to
suit characteristics that are unique or specific to a display. If multiple versions
of the same format exist, LFS will not attempt to decide which version of a
format to present (except in the case of a secondary host that is customized to
override formats loaded by the primary host).
To date, without UltraOpt/VTAM, CICS has the only existing 370 host support for
LFS. CICS, with standard Basic Mapping Support (BMS) commands, allows the
user to create the exact 3270 datastream version of BMS formats needed by LFS.
•

The ROUTE command in BMS allows the user to generate a list of displays
to which BMS directs format requests.

•

The SEND MAP command with the SET operand builds the 3270 datastream
for a format and then returns the data to the host instead of sending it to the
display.

Using this method, the customer can generate the 3270 datastream needed for
each different type of terminal that supports format storage. These formats can
be stored on disk in the host and retrieved when it is necessary to distribute
them to the 3174. Alternatively, the creation and distribution of the format
datastreams can be performed each time the formats are to be sent to the 3174.

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3174 Installation Guide

12.1.3 Distributing Formats
The user is responsible for distributing the formats to the 3174. This function is
not automatically provided by any host support. With CICS, the user can code a
CICS transaction (loader program) to the CICS interface for format distribution.
Because formats are stored only in the controller storage, the transaction must
reload the formats each time the 3174 is re-IMLed.
LFS receives the formats on the SNA LU address 1 (LOCADDR=1). This is not a
valid terminal address; it is used for Central Site Change Management and LFS.
For LFS, this address supports a LU type 2 session and uses a subset of the 3270
datastream structured fields and commands required to support format
distribution.

LOCADDR=1 Considerations
LOCADDR=1 is also used by 3174 Central Site Change Management (CSCM), in
conjunction with NetView Distribution Manager (NetView DM). NetView DM will
BIND the LU LOCADDR=1 when a CSCM session is initiated and UNBIND the LU
when the CSCM session ends.
Because LFS supports a format distribution session on the same local address,
CSCM functions cannot be performed if the format distribution session is active.
It is, therefore, important that the user-written transaction issues an UNBIND
after a format distribution session is completed so that CSCM activities can be
initiated with that address.

Host Support
For format distribution, the transaction is responsible for initiating itself. CICS
provides a facility for Automatic Transaction Initiation (ATI), which the
transaction can use. The user must define the LU for format distribution
(LOCADDR=1) as a display terminal to NCP, VTAM, and CICS.
With this approach, VTAM starts the LU when the 3174 powers on. CICS then
simulates a logon from this LU address to the transaction.

Format Distribution Transaction
The transaction is responsible for starting the format distribution. The 3174
replies to each format load request.

Setup: Following is a typical setup to initiate the transaction:
•

Customize the 3174 to support LFS

•

Define to VTAM an LU with address 1

•

Define to CICS an LU with address 1

•

Define to CICS the transaction for ATI with LU address 1

Data Flow: The sequence expected during format loading is:
1. The host issues an ACTLU for LU address 1.
If LFS or other LU address 1 service is present, the 3174 replies with a
positive response. Otherwise, it rejects the ACTLU, preventing erroneous
activation of the transaction.
2. The host sends a LU type 2 BIND request to LU address 1.

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

409

The 3174 accepts the BIND request if LFS or other LU address 1 service is
present and not already bound. Otherwise, it rejects it.
3. The host sends Start Data Traffic (SDT) and the 3174 replies.
4. The transaction may send an optional query.
If queried, LFS returns the following replies in addition to those currently
applicable:
•
•
•
•

Auxiliary Device (for LU address 1 only)
Format Storage Auxiliary Device (for LU address 1 only)
Format Presentation (for all CUT mode terminal addresses)
Partition Characteristics

5. The transaction then begins distribution as follows:
•

•

The host sends formats with:
−

Destination/Origin structured field specifying the Format Storage
Auxiliary Device

−

Load Format Storage structured field

LFS replies to each Load Format Storage structured field with:
−

Destination/Origin ID structured field identifying the Format Storage
Auxiliary Device

−

Exception/Status structured field, with self-defining parameters set, to
indicate the results of the operation

This sequence is repeated until all the formats are distributed or the 3174
replies with an insufficient storage exception.
A Load Format Storage structured field must be sent for each format. After
sending each format, the transaction must wait for a reply from the 3174. In
SNA, this means that only one Load Format Storage structured field can be sent
in a chain, and the chain must contain the Change Direction (CD) indicator. The
transaction can cause this SNA sequence to be generated by issuing a
“write-read” type of request rather than a “write” type of request.
The success or failure of the format load is reported as normal data to the
transaction through the Exception/Status structured field rather than as an SNA
positive or negative response. This is done to provide the user-written
transaction with maximum control over error recovery.
The format distribution session must be terminated when downloading is
completed so that other system activity directed to LU address 1 (for example,
CSCM) can be performed.

12.1.4 Presenting Formats
CICS supports format presentation without any modification required. Because
CICS is the only host application to support LFS, this section describes format
presentation from a CICS standpoint. However, the structured fields and
protocol sequences are standard 3270 datastream architecture and can be used
by any product that supports 3270 devices.

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3174 Installation Guide

Host Dependencies
The customer is responsible for defining:
•

To CICS, the terminals supporting LFS

•

To BMS, the formats that are outboarded

CICS support allows the user to define each terminal (not each 3174) that is to
be supported by LFS. It also allows each format to be defined as outboarded or
not. However, CICS does not support the grouping of formats so that different
terminals can be defined as having different groups of formats outboarded. If a
format is outboarded, CICS expects the format is outboarded in every terminal
that is supporting LFS.

Invoking Format Presentation
Format presentation is automatically invoked by CICS when both a transaction
calls a format that is outboarded and the terminal to which the transaction is
attached is also defined as supporting LFS. If both of these requirements are not
met, CICS goes through its normal format and terminal processing.
Each format is identified by its name. During format distribution, formats are
loaded in 3174 storage in groups, with each group identified by its group name,
using a directory structure. A group name, therefore, identifies a directory
(group) containing all the formats stored under the same group name.
To select a format for presentation, the host must specify the the name of the
format required and the group to be searched. The user must, therefore, ensure
that formats are stored with the correct name in the correct directory. If a format
name or group name requested is non-existent, LFS returns an exception status
to the host.
LFS uses the following sequence for format presentation:
•

Host sends Select Format Group structured field
The Select Format Group is the first structured field sent by the host. It
specifies a group name (directory) to be searched for required formats when
subsequent Present Absolute Format or Present Relative Format structured
fields are received.
The host can select another directory to be searched by issuing the Select
Format Group structured field specifying a different group name.
If the group name specified does not exist, an exception indication is
returned and no group is selected. With no group selected (no default
group), format presentation is not possible until a valid group is re-selected.

•

Host sends Present Absolute/Relative Format
These two structured fields are used to select the name of the format to be
presented. The difference between the two is that the Present Relative
Format structured field contains an offset value that is added to each
address-dependent order in the format datastream. This structured field is
used predominantly by CICS to support BMS floating formats.
Both the Present Absolute Format and Present Relative Format structured
fields include a format presentation command which specifies either a Write,
Erase/Write, or Erase/Write Alternate command. Both structured fields also
contain a Write Control Character (WCC) byte. The presentation command
and the WCC are used to display the format on the screen.

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

411

Because formats are processed as 3270 datastream outbound structured
fields, screen size is not changed for the Erase/Write or Erase/Write
Alternate commands that accompany the Present Absolute or Present
Relative Format structured field. The host application can select an alternate
screen size by sending an Erase/Write Alternate command prior to the
Present Absolute or Present Relative Format structured field.
Using the format name specified, LFS searches the currently selected group
(directory) for the requested format.
When LFS finds the requested format, the format presentation command
(Write, Erase/Write, or Erase/Write Alternate) and WCC are extracted from
the Present Format structured field and applied to the format. They are then
passed to outbound datastream processing. The only modification LFS
makes is to add the specified offset to each address-dependent order in the
datastream for a Present Relative Format structured filed.
If this sequence is violated, or if a required format group or format is not found,
LFS returns an exception status to the host.

12.1.5 Other LFS Functions
LFS supports functions other than storage and presentation of screen formats.

Dynamic Format Building
The 3270 datastream may contain multiple Present Format structured fields, and
each one is processed in its turn. The resultant format is passed to outbound
datastream processing for each iteration of the Present Format structured field in
the datastream. By issuing Present Relative Format requests with different offset
values, the user can cause recurring portions of a format to be presented in
different locations on the screen.

Appending Application Variable Data
The host can send additional 3270 data to a terminal following the Present
Absolute Format and Present Relative Format structured fields. This is
supported by the host concatenating a 3270 datastream structured field to the
Present Absolute Format or Present Relative Format structured field. When this
occurs, the 3174 sends the data, unaltered, to normal outboard datastream
processing after presenting the specified format.

12.1.6 Operator-Selected Formats
We have seen the host selection of screen formats using the Select Format
Group and Present Absolute/Relative Format structured fields. LFS also
supports the selection of screen formats by a display operator (or user).
By allowing the user to select formats stored in 3174 storage to be presented,
performance can be significantly improved. This eliminates the transmission of
format requests to the host and the transmission of the Present Absolute Format
structured field from the host.

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Host Application Support
Not all host applications, however, are capable of supporting operator-selected
formats. The host application must ensure that the keyboard is restored
following a Clear AID to allow the user to enter local format requests. The host
application also must be able to detect and identify an operator-selected format,
and accept input from that format, when it is read. The user must determine if
operator-selected formats are supported by his host applications.

Enabling Operator-Selected Formats
Operator-selected formats can be enabled in one of two ways:
•

Through the 3270 datastream
The Set Partition Characteristics structured field enables the function and
must be used for each host application or logical session. Once the
operator-selected formats function has been enabled by the datastream, it
remains enabled until one of the following occurs:

•

−

A Set Partition Characteristics structured field is received that resets it.

−

An Erase Write or Erase Write Alternate command is received with
WCC=Reset.

−

A BIND command is received.

−

An Erase/Reset structured field is received.

Through 3174 customizing question 179
This option enables the function for all logical sessions on this host.
Individual sessions cannot be selected using this option. Even though the
function has been enabled through customizing, it can be disabled through
the datastream and the Set Partition Characteristics structured field.

Invoking Operator-Selected Formats
Because each format is stored under a format name within a group name, and
frequently contains an embedded suffix, the user does not necessarily know the
stored format name. To allow users to select formats, the Load Format Storage
structured field provides an optional field to specify a local name (up to eight
characters) for each format.
When operator-selected formats is enabled, the local name is treated as one of
the following:
•

A pseudonym for a group name and format name (that is the default)

•

A local format name qualified by the currently selected group name

To select a format, the user enters the local name on a clear unformatted
screen, starting at the top left corner. If operator-selected formats have been
enabled, the name is considered to be an operator request for a local format
presentation. No validations or translations are performed on the name entered.
A search is then made for a format with the local name, or for a format with the
local name that is within the currently selected format group (depending on the
parameters of the Set Partition Characteristics structured field). If the format is
found, it is sent to the display as though a Present Absolute Format structured
field had been received from the host. (If the format requested is not found, the
name is sent to the host in the normal fashion.)

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

413

While the local format is being searched and displayed, the SNA remains in the
send state, causing normal outbound requests from the host to be rejected with
sense code X ′ 081B ′ (Receiver in Transmit Mode).
The 3174 uses the default WCC (X ′ 02′ − Keyboard Restore) with either the
Erase/Write or the Erase/Write Alternate as its format presentation command;
however, neither of the commands will alter the screen size. Which command is
used is determined by the screen size flag in the Load Format Storage
structured field that distributed the format to the 3174.
The user should be aware that LFS does not modify formats to suit specific
device characteristics and, therefore, must ensure that the requested format can
be displayed on the screen used.
After the format is displayed, the SNA and keyboard states are the same as
before the local format request was entered.

12.1.7 Multi-Host Support
With Configuration Support-B Release 2 and later releases, LFS is supported in a
multi-host environment. LFS functions can be enabled for the primary host 1A,
and any secondary host, provided the host is SNA. Thus, LFS is supported on
secondary hosts using Single Link Multi-Host support (host IDs 1B through 1H) or
attached via Concurrent Communication Adapters (host IDs 2A through 2D, and
3A through 3D).
For LFS to be enabled on the secondary hosts, LFS must enabled on the primary
host.
Depending on 3174 customization, secondary hosts may be allowed to present
formats that are managed by the primary host, or they may be allowed to load
and present formats of their own.
•

If the 3174 is customized so the primary host manages all LFS formats, a
format requested by a secondary host is fetched from the primary host LFS
buffer. If the requested format is not present in the primary host LFS buffer,
a ‘format not found’ condition is reported by the 3174.
A reply to a Format Storage Auxiliary Device query sent from the secondary
host indicates that formats are managed by another host and that no format
storage space has been allocated to the secondary host.

•

If the 3174 is customized so the secondary host can present formats
managed by the primary host with an option to load overriding formats,
buffer space is allocated for the secondary host formats separate from that of
the primary host. A format requested by a secondary host is then fetched
from the secondary host LFS buffer. If the requested format is not present in
the secondary host LFS buffer, the format is then fetched from the primary
host LFS buffer. If the format is not found in either buffer, a ‘format not
found’ condition is reported by the 3174.
A reply to a Format Storage Auxiliary Device query from the secondary host
indicates the amount of storage space allocated for secondary host LFS
formats.

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12.1.8 3174 Customization
LFS is customized in question 179: Local Format Storage.

Question 179: Local Format Storage
The response consists of three digits:
Digit 1 - Enable/Disable LFS:
0 = LFS is disabled (default response).
1 = LFS is enabled. Formats can be loaded to an LFS storage buffer, which is
reserved for this host.
2 = LFS is enabled for this secondary host. It can present formats managed by
the 1A host.
3 = LFS is enabled for this secondary host. It can present formats and load
them into its own storage buffer, or it can just present formats that are
managed by host 1A.
Note: If LFS is enabled for a secondary host, then LFS must also be enabled on
the 1A host.
Digit 2 - Enable/Disable Operator-Selected Formats:
0 = Operator-selected formats is disabled for this host (default response).
1 = Operator-selected formats is enabled for this host.
Note: If LFS is disabled, then operator-selected formats cannot be enabled.
Digit 3 - Amount of storage to be allocated for LFS on each host connection:
0
1
2
3
4
5
6

=
=
=
=
=
=
=

No storage allocated (default response)
64KB
128KB
256KB
512KB
1024KB
1536KB

The response for this digit must:
•

Be 0 if digit 1 is 0 or 2

•

Not be 0 if digit 1 is 1 or 3

12.1.9 Storage Considerations
LFS formats are stored in the controller storage. When planning for controller
storage, the user must add the the total amount required for LFS to that required
for other features.
During customizing, the amount required for formats and format directories for
each host connection is then allocated in question 179 digit 3. The maximum
allowed for all host connections is 1535 KB.
See also Appendix E, “3174 Storage Requirements” on page 755 for further
information.

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

415

Estimating Storage Requirements
Controller storage is required for loading format data as well as control blocks
required to manage the formats and directories. To estimate storage
requirements, use the following formula:

Total Storage Required (bytes) =
(Number of Group Names x 88)
+ (Number of Format Names x (50+Format Storage Space))
+ (Number of Local Names x 32)
+ 86
The average size of each format is approximately 500 bytes (amount for Format
Storage Space). Of course, each user must calculate the storage required for
format data for his own unique environment.
The following details the storage requirements:
Group Directory Entry: 88 bytes
The 16-byte group name is included in this amount. A group directory entry
is allocated each time a new group name is specified in a Load Format
Storage structured field (bytes 15-30) requesting an add format operation.
Whenever the last format in a given group directory is deleted, the group
directory entry is also deleted.
Format Storage Block: 50 bytes + format storage space
The 16-byte format name is included in this amount. A format storage block
is allocated each time a new format name is specified within a group in the
Load Format Storage structured field (bytes 31-46) requesting an add format
operation. In addition to the figure shown, space for the format data is
allocated as part of this block.
Note: The format storage block is allocated in 4-byte increments.
Local Name Entry: 32 bytes
The 8-byte local name is included in this amount. A local name entry is
allocated when both a local name is specified in the Load Format Storage
structured field (bytes 7-14) requesting an add format operation, and the
local format selection flag (byte 4, bit 2) is set. If the local format selection
flag is not set, the data in the local name field is ignored and no local name
entry is allocated. Whenever a format is deleted, its associated local name
entry, if one exists, is also deleted.
General Directory Block: 86 bytes
Each host customized for format storage space requires 86 bytes of storage
in addition to the space allocated for blocks and entries defined above. This
space is allocated as control blocks and directories to be used in managing
the storage reserved for this host.

12.1.10 Exception/Status Reporting
Exceptions are reported either as a sense code or an Exception/Status
structured field, depending on where the error is detected. Errors caused by
processing of format presentation structured field are reported by sense codes.
Errors caused by processing of the Load Format Storage structured field:
•

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Checks at the datastream level are reported by sense codes.

•

Checks past the datastream level are reported Exception/Status structured
fields.

Exception/Status Codes
Codes used by the Exception/Status structured field to report exception
conditions are:
X′0801′

- Invalid or unregconized destination/origin ID in the
Destination/Origin structured field.

X′0805′

- Insufficient storage to complete load.

X′0806′

- Format/Group name not specified

X′0807′

- Data error

12.1.11 SNA Sense Codes
Some of the SNA sense codes used to report exception conditions are:
X′0868′

- No formats loaded

X′0869′

- Format not found

X′087A′

- Format processing error

X′1001′

- Data stream error

X′1003′

- Function not supported

X′1005′

- Parameter error

X′1009′

- Format group not selected

For more information on sense codes you should refer to the VTAM Messages
and Codes manual.

12.1.12 Response Times
The Local Format Storage feature should improve the overall display response
time as the most common screens can be kept down at the 3174 controller, and
hence reduce the amount of transmitted data over a communications link.
Points to consider when evaluating the Local Format Storage feature might be
listed as the example below:
•

One 3174 IML per month

•

70 formats stored at a time

•

Average format size is 500 to 800 bytes

•

30 terminals per controller

•

One format per terminal, presented every 45 seconds (eight-hour shift)

If you assume the above transaction rates, and a screen size of 1920 bytes, you
can start to make “pencil” calculations that will show a line utilization saving
around the 20% range. This will obviously vary greatly from location to location,
and be dependent on the installation′s application environment.

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

417

12.2 LFS with UltraOpt/VTAM
Local Format Storage (LFS) is a function offered by the 3174 that allows
applications running under CICS to preload frequently used screen images
(screen formats) into controller storage and recall these formats via the format
name as they are required. Using this function, substantial reductions in
communication line traffic and response time can be achieved.
With Configuration Support-C Release 2 announcement, IBM also announced the
UltraOpt/VTAM product from BMC Software Inc., an IBM Business Partner
(Application Specialist). UltraOpt/VTAM is a VTAM application that provides 3270
datastream optimization and exploits LFS functions for format creation,
distribution and management for CICS as well as TSO, IMS and other VTAM
applications.
UltraOpt/VTAM and LFS are recommended for environments where remote
terminals, lines and communication controllers are heavily utilized and potential
bottlenecks exist. This situation may result, for example, from implementation of
new applications, terminal devices, or image products, especially where the
applications make extensive use of screen formats. By using LFS together with
UltraOpt/VTAM, you should be able to achieve even greater reduction of traffic
on the host to controller transmission facilities than using either of them alone.
The benefits you gain are not only dramatically improved response response
times but also significantly reduced network costs at the same time.
This section uses material from the following BMC Software publications:
•

UltraOpt/VTAM Reference

•

UltraOpt/VTAM Implementation Guide

12.2.1 Performance Examples
Working in conjunction with LFS, UltraOpt/VTAM intercepts VTAM datastreams
and uses a number of optimization techniques to reduce the amount of data
transmitted between the host application and the 3174 end user. The result, as
documented in customer tests, can be reductions in the length of outbound 3270
datastreams from 40 to as much as 90 percent, with 30 to 90 percent reductions
in corresponding inbound data transmissions.
Figure 162 on page 419 and Figure 163 on page 420 show example differences
in performance (response times and stress points) in environments with and
without UltraOpt/VTAM and LFS. The performance charts and data are
published in the generally available specification sheet, 3174 Establishment
Controller With Local Format Storage .

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3174 Installation Guide

Figure 162. Performance without UltraOpt/VTAM and Local Format Storage

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

419

Figure 163. Performance with UltraOpt/VTAM and Local Format Storage

Both examples assume the following:
•

A one-second host processing time

•

Inbound message size of 1000 bytes, reduced to 200 bytes after optimization

•

Outbound message size of 1920 bytes, reduced to 384 bytes after
optimization

•

A 9600 bps multi-drop line with six controllers

If rates were to remain constant at 21 transactions per minute (tpm), the
“reclaimed” line capacity would allow you to re-design the network using lower
speed lines with resulting savings in lower line costs.
By acting on the largest single component of network transit time for messages,
the datastream optimization directly (and measurably) reduces response times.
For example, optimizing a data steam 30 percent, on a line with 40 percent line

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utilization, can cut response times by 50 percent. On the same line, 80 percent
data steam optimization will produce a response time improvement of 90
percent. Of course, actual measured results will vary in each customer
environment but the combination or UltraOpt/VTAM and 3174 LFS can give
virtually any user significantly better system performance.
CPU overhead for UltraOpt/VTAM is minimal. As an example, it takes
approximately one to two milliseconds of elapsed time to optimize a datastream
on an IBM 3090 Model 300J. The time it takes for optimization varies according
to the original datastream length, the complexity, and the degree of optimization
achieved. The larger the amount of reduction, the shorter the CPU time.

12.2.2 Benefits
Using LFS with UltraOpt/VTAM optimization can result in the following benefits:
•

Improved response times, leading to user productivity gains and/or customer
satisfaction

•

Reduced network costs as a result of reducing line utilization,
communication equipment costs, NCP and VTAM workloads.
As a result, you can reduce/contain network costs in several ways:

•

−

Existing lines can accommodate new applications or growth in the
number of transactions processed, without having to upgrade to
higher-speed lines.

−

Existing lines can be re-designed to accommodate more locations or
“drops,” without having to install more lines.

−

Existing communication controllers and modems can accommodate
application growth or more 3174s without being upgraded.

Reduced operator fatigue
Changing some information on a screen requires erasing and refreshing the
entire screen. The resultant blinking effect causes operator fatigue.
Using LFS and UltraOpt/VTAM optimization eliminates this blinking because
the changed data is displayed within the full screen without the need for a
screen erase and refresh.

The following sections show some quantifiable benefits.

Example 1: Improved Response Times
The benefits resulting from improved response times include:
•

Increased customer satisfaction

•

Faster processing of customer requests

•

Improved terminal user productivity

•

Increased amount of work processed

The following shows an example of translating these into quantifiable benefits:

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

421

25,000 trans/day x 2 secs saved/trans
50,000 secs/day divide by 3,600 secs
13.9 hours/day x $10 per operator hour
$139 saved/day x 21 days per month
$2919 saved/month x 12 months

=
=
=
=
=

50,000 secs saved per day
13.9 hours saved per day
$139 saved per day
$2,919 saved per month
$35,028 saved per year

Example 2: Delayed Hardware Upgrades/Purchases
Reduction in datastream lengths through optimization affects 3174 controllers,
telecommunication lines, modems and 37xx communication controllers. The
benefits resulting from this include:
•

Increased reserve capacity for current needs or future growth, allowing you
to add more terminals to existing telecommunication lines, and delay (or
even cancel) upgrades and additions to lines, modems and 37xx controllers.

•

Increased multi-dropping on existing lines to avoid adding new line(s).

The following shows an example of translating these into quantifiable benefits:

Assume the following:
Cost to upgrade from 4800 bps to 9600 bps line =
Time required to manage line change
=
Cost of managing line change at $25/hour
=
No personnel time required for second year
Modem and line installation charges not added to
Number of
Lines Upgraded
-------------1
10

Cost for
First Year
---------$ 1,700
$17,000

$100 per month
20 hours
$500
costs

Cost for
Second Year
----------$ 1,200
$12,000

Total
Costs
------$ 2,900
$29,000

Example 3: Reduced Cost of Hardware
Reduction in datastream lengths through optimization results in:
•

Reduced number of lines by multi-dropping

•

Reduced speed of lines and modems

•

Reduced size of 37xx communication controller

The following shows an example of translating these into quantifiable benefits:

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3174 Installation Guide

Assume the following:
Saving from changing 9600 bps to 4800 bps line =
Time required to manage line change
=
Cost of managing line change at $25/hour
=
No personnel time required for second year
Modem and line installation charges not deducted
Number of
Lines Changed
------------1
10

Savings for
First Year
---------$ 700
$ 7,000

$100 per month
20 hours
$500
from savings

Savings for
Second Year
----------$ 1,200
$12,000

Total
Savings
------$ 1,900
$19,000

12.2.3 Functional Description
LFS uses 3270 datastream structured fields to distribute, identify and present
formats stored at the 3174. UltraOpt/VTAM supports the display of LFS formats
on user terminals without requiring modifications to VTAM or other application
programs.
During normal activities of an application, UltraOpt/VTAM intercepts
user-selected VTAM SENDs. Outbound 3270 datastream images of each
presentation screen generated by an application are constructed for display on
user terminals connected to an LFS-enabled 3174.
UltraOpt/VTAM uses structured fields to convey instructions to the 3174,
transparent to the terminal user. These instructions route the formats to the LFS
function, control their storage at the 3174, and control their retrieval and
presentation. UltraOpt/VTAM uses LFS to determine the number of formats
loaded on a 3174, the number of format names used, and the amount of storage
currently available (out of the total allocated to LFS).

Loading Formats
UltraOpt/VTAM creates and dynamically loads formats in tandem with the
generation of datastreams by the host application. As datastreams are
generated by the application, UltraOpt/VTAM generates structured fields to
download format-specific data to the storage allocated to LFS on the 3174.
As host application activities increase and new formats are generated.
UltraOpt/VTAM continues to load each new format into the 3174 until the storage
allocated to LFS is depleted. When this happens, UltraOpt/VTAM analyzes the
format usage and deletes the least-used formats. The freed storage is then used
to load other formats needed but not found in LFS storage.
Allocating a greater amount of storage to LFS will allow a greater number of
formats to be stored in the 3174. This will reduce the number of format reloads
required.
Only new formats are loaded into LFS storage. If the terminal user requires a
format that is already loaded in LFS storage, UltraOpt/VTAM retrieves the
format, provides any variable data, and displays the format on the terminal.

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

423

Retrieving/Presenting Formats
Once LFS storage is loaded with one or more formats, they are immediately
available for display on user terminals.
UltraOpt/VTAM analyzes outbound 3270 datastreams and compares their
contents with formats already stored in LFS storage. If the format used by a
datastream is not identical but closely matches a format already stored in LFS
storage, UltraOpt/VTAM commands LFS to retrieve the similar format from the
3174. UltraOpt/VTAM then sends all the non-matching data from the original
datastream to the 3174, together with a structured field referencing the format.
LFS receives the structured field, updates the format where necessary, and
sends the resulting screen to the terminal for display. Thus, UltraOpt/VTAM only
sends the information necessary to transform an existing screen to a required
new screen.

12.2.4 The Optimizer
UltraOpt/VTAM has two components: the Optimizer and the Monitor. This
section describes the Optimizer; the next section describes the Monitor.
The UltraOpt/VTAM Optimizer performs the following:
•

Reduces datastream lengths

•

Analyzes datastreams for both application and hardware errors

•

Traces VTAM datastreams according to user-specified criteria

•

Saves statistics on the percentage of optimization achieved

The Optimizer itself consists of two components:
•

BMC Primary Subsystem
This subsystem is only used during startup. After startup is completed, it is
no longer active and no CPU cycles are used. It can be cancelled and
removed from the system.

•

UltraOpt/VTAM Subsystem
This subsystem contains the program modules that perform optimization

The actions of UltraOpt/VTAM are transparent so that no changes are required,
either to VTAM or its applications. The Optimizer is designed to:
•

Dynamically adjust to the VTAM release you are using

•

Dynamically adjust to any changes to optimization options and features
selected from the Monitor component.

•

Execute its code above the 16MB line and acquire storage above the 16MB
line (less than 8KB of storage is used below this line).

•

Capture datastreams for user analysis.

When the Optimizer receives control of a datastream, it uses several
optimization techniques, all of which are controlled from the Monitor.
•

Conventional Optimization
This optimization technique focuses on the:
−

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3174 Installation Guide

Elimination of:
- Repeating strings of characters

−

- Unnecessary or redundant user data
- Unnecessary 3270 control characters.
Sorting of datastreams.

Conventional Optimization is used whenever UltraOpt/VTAM is installed but
imaging techniques cannot be used or imaging is turned off (via the Monitor).
•

SCS Printer Optimization
The SCS Printer Optimization technique optimizes outbound datastreams for
SCS printers. The effect is that the SCS printers print faster because they
have less to print.

•

SCS Horizontal Tabs Optimization
This is another technique that reduces the length of SCS printer
datastreams. SCS Horizontal Tabs Optimization uses the horizontal
formatting codes: Set Horizontal Format and Horizontal Tab. If you have SCS
printers that do not support these codes, this technique cannot be used.

•

Imaging** Stage One Optimization
This technology remembers what is displayed on each terminal screen. It
transmits only the data necessary to make the appropriate changes to the
screen.
Imaging optimization supports partitioned terminals (for example, 3179, 3180,
3193, 3290, and 3775).

•

Imaging Stage Two 4 Optimization
This technique uses Imaging Stage One as a base and provides further
optimization by as much as an additional eight to sixteen percent.

•

Input Suppression** Optimization
Using this technique, the Optimizer can reduce the length of inbound
datastreams. Input Suppression Optimization:
−

Uses Imaging optimization technique to remove all unnecessary data and
control characters from the datastream transmitted from a terminal to
your host application. This is accomplished with the Optimizer software.
No hardware changes are needed.

−

Allows additional adjustments to outbound datastreams to further reduce
their lengths.

−

Reduces the number of characters transmitted and, therefore, the
number of line-turnarounds.

Note: The Input Suppression Optimization technique should not be used
with the Erase Input key but can be used with the Erase EOF key.
•

Erase Input Key Allowed Optimization
This technique is a partial implementation of Input Suppression Optimization.
It is provided for those installations with terminal operators using the Erase
Input key.

•

SNA Data Compression
This technique compresses outbound datastreams but is not applicable to
3174 environments.

4

U.S. Pat. No. 5,046,025

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

425

12.2.5 The Monitor
The Monitor is an online facility that allows you to control UltraOpt/VTAM
operation. It can be accessed from any 3270 display Model 2 or above terminal
under TSO and provides you with the ability to:
•

Dynamically control optimization techniques and features

•

Control, through the use of passwords, who can change options displayed by
the Monitor

•

Display summary statistics

•

Display statistics by VTAM application or LU name

•

Print Monitor panels and statistics

•

An online help facility

•

An online trace facility to capture, display and print any inbound or outbound
VTAM datastream

•

Analyze application and hardware datastream errors

Using the Monitor, you can turn LFS optimization on and off, create and edit a
list of LUs for LFS optimization, and include or exclude individual LUs (or a list of
LUs) from LFS optimization.
You can also display LFS statistics for an individual 3174 or a list of 3174s,
including information such as:
•

Whether a 3174 provides multi-host support

•

Amount of controller storage allocated for LFS

•

Amount of controller storage actually used for LFS

•

Number of unique formats loaded in a 3174

•

Number of times formats loaded in a 3174 were reset

•

Number of terminals using LFS

Using this information, you can fine-tune, for example, the allocation of controller
storage for LFS use.

12.2.6 Converting from CICS-based to UltraOpt/VTAM-based LFS
There are several reasons why a user would wish to convert from a CICS-based
LFS environment to UltraOpt/VTAM:

426

•

The person who wrote the CICS transaction for format distribution has left
the organization and no one is available to maintain it. With UltraOpt/VTAM,
you do not need such a transaction program.

•

Many of the existing LFS programs have been written using CICS macro
level programs. With CICS/ESA Version 3, macro level programs will no
longer run. Some of the functions in existing loader programs cannot be
duplicated in CICS command level language. UltraOpt/VTAM avoids this
problem because it is a VTAM application.

•

CICS-based LFS does not offer datastream optimization which greatly
reduces the traffic between the host application and the 3174, resulting in
faster response times and reduced network costs.

3174 Installation Guide

•

CICS-based LFS does not support other applications. UltraOpt/VTAM
supports CICS as well as IMS, TSO and other VTAM applications.

•

CICS-based LFS does not provide dynamic format storage management,
datastream analysis, statistics capture and reporting capabilities.
UltraOpt/VTAM does, and through its online Monitor, allows you to maximize
datastream optimization and fine-tune LFS storage allocation as required.

If you wish to convert from CICS-based LFS to UltraOpt/VTAM, or even if you will
use UltraOpt/VTAM for the first time, you should be able to do so quite easily.
For the CICS-based user, there are two changes that you need to make:
1. You no longer to create and download formats.
2. You need to turn off outboard formatting in CICS.
One way to turn off outboard formatting is to modify your terminal definitions
to specify OBFORMAT=NO. If you are using an autoinstall program, this
should be simple. If a map (format) defined as OBFMT=YES is sent to a
terminal with OBFORMAT=NO, BMS will ignore the OBFMT operand on the
BMS map.
Another way to turn off outboard formatting is to change the BMS mapset to
specify OBFMT=NO. Depending on how many maps have been outboarded,
this might be easier, especially if your TCT is maintained with Resource
Definition Online.
UltraOpt/VTAM does not share LFS storage between the primary and secondary
hosts. In customizing the 3174, your response to question 179 digit 1 must,
therefore, be 1.
UltraOpt/VTAM also does not support Operator-Selected Formats.
Operator-Selected Formats allows a user to clear the screen and enter the local
name of a format stored in LFS storage that he wants displayed. With
UltraOpt/VTAM′s format storage management techniques, formats are stored as
required and least-used formats are deleted to regain LFS storage for other
formats. In this dynamic environment, Operator-Selected Formats is neither
possible because desired formats may not exist nor is it needed because of
datastream optimization. In customizing the 3174, your response to question 179
digit 2 must, therefore, be 0.

12.2.7 Implementing UltraOpt/VTAM
Implementing UltraOpt/VTAM for LFS is very much easier that it was using CICS.
You do not have to decide which screens to store in the 3174s. You do not have
to write the format distribution (loader) program. You have much more
flexibility. All that is required on the host end is to install and customize
UltraOpt/VTAM and to add an LU to each 3174 definition in NCP or VTAM.

Host Environment Required
The operating system environment required for UltraOpt/VTAM is as follows:
•

MVS/XA, ESA/370 or ESA/390

•

VTAM Version 3.1 or later

•

12 KB CSA storage

•

ECSA storage

Chapter 12. Local Format Storage

427

To calculate the minimum amount of ECSA storage required by
UltraOpt/VTAM, use the following formula:

Minimum ECSA Storage (KB) =
982
+ (Number of terminals using extended attributes x 13)
+(Number of terminals not using extended attributes x 7)
+(Number of open ACBs x 14)
Note: In the above ECSA formula, you should multiply the result by a 1.25
factor to add an additional 25 percent to the amount required. This will
ensure that UltraOpt/VTAM has enough ECSA to continue intercepting and
optimizing datastreams.
•

DASD storag