Zyxel Nsa325 Users Manual Book

2014-12-11

: Zyxel Zyxel-Nsa325-Users-Manual-121987 zyxel-nsa325-users-manual-121987 zyxel pdf

Open the PDF directly: View PDF PDF.
Page Count: 535 [warning: Documents this large are best viewed by clicking the View PDF Link!]

www.zyxel.com
www.zyxel.com
Media Server
NSA325
Copyright © 2011
ZyXEL Communications Corporation
Firmware Version 4.3
Edition 1, 08/2011
Default Login Details
Web Address nsa325
User Name admin
Password 1234
About This User's Guide
Media Server User’s Guide 3
About This User's Guide
Intended Audience
This manual is intended for people who want to configure the NSA using the Web Configurator.
Note: This guide is a reference for a series of products. Therefore some features or
options in this guide may not be available in your product.
Tips for Reading Users Guides On-Screen
When reading a ZyXEL User’s Guide On-Screen, keep the following in mind:
If you don’t already have the latest version of Adobe Reader, you can download it from http://
www.adobe.com.
Use the PDF’s bookmarks to quickly navigate to the areas that interest you. Adobe Reader’s
bookmarks pane opens by default in all ZyXEL User’s Guide PDFs.
If you know the page number or know vaguely which page-range you want to view, you can
enter a number in the toolbar in Reader, then press [ENTER] to jump directly to that page.
Type [CTRL]+[F] to open the Adobe Reader search utility and enter a word or phrase. This can
help you quickly pinpoint the information you require. You can also enter text directly into the
toolbar in Reader.
To quickly move around within a page, press the [SPACE] bar. This turns your cursor into a
“hand” with which you can grab the page and move it around freely on your screen.
Embedded hyperlinks are actually cross-references to related text. Click them to jump to the
corresponding section of the Users Guide PDF.
Related Documentation
•Quick Start Guide
The Quick Start Guide is designed to help you get your NSA up and running right away. It
contains information on setting up your network and configuring for Internet access.
Web Configurator Online Help
The embedded Web Help contains descriptions of individual screens and supplementary
information.
Note: It is recommended you use the web configurator to configure the NSA.
•Support Disc
Refer to the included CD for support documents.
Document Conventions
Media Server User’s Guide
4
Document Conventions
Warnings and Notes
These are how warnings and notes are shown in this User’s Guide.
Warnings tell you about things that could harm you or your device.
Note: Notes tell you other important information (for example, other things you may
need to configure or helpful tips) or recommendations.
Syntax Conventions
The NSA may be referred to as the “NSA”, the “device” or the “system” in this User’s Guide.
Product labels, screen names, field labels and field choices are all in bold font.
A key stroke is denoted by square brackets and uppercase text, for example, [ENTER] means the
“enter” or “return” key on your keyboard.
“Enter” means for you to type one or more characters and then press the [ENTER] key. “Select
or “choose” means for you to use one of the predefined choices.
A right angle bracket ( > ) within a screen name denotes a mouse click. For example,
Maintenance > Log > Log Setting means you first click Maintenance in the navigation panel,
then the Log sub menu and finally the Log Setting tab to get to that screen.
Units of measurement may denote the “metric” value or the “scientific” value. For example, “k”
for kilo may denote “1000” or “1024, “M” for mega may denote “1000000” or “1048576” and so
on.
“e.g.,” is a shorthand for “for instance”, and “i.e.,” means “that is” or “in other words”.
Icons Used in Figures
Figures in this User’s Guide may use the following generic icons. The NSA icon is not an exact
representation of your device.
Document Conventions
Media Server User’s Guide 5
Graphics in this book may differ slightly from the product due to differences in operating systems,
operating system versions, or if you installed updated firmware/software for your device. Every
effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate.
NSA Computer Notebook computer
Server Television Firewall
Router Switch Wireless Access Point
Internet
Safety Warnings
Media Server User’s Guide
6
Safety Warnings
Do NOT use this product near water, for example, in a wet basement or near a swimming pool.
Do NOT expose your device to dampness, dust or corrosive liquids.
Do NOT store things on the device.
Do NOT install, use, or service this device during a thunderstorm. There is a remote risk of electric shock
from lightning.
Connect ONLY suitable accessories to the device.
Do NOT open the device or unit. Opening or removing covers can expose you to dangerous high voltage
points or other risks. ONLY qualified service personnel should service or disassemble this device. Please
contact your vendor for further information.
ONLY qualified service personnel should service or disassemble this device.
Make sure to connect the cables to the correct ports.
Place connecting cables carefully so that no one will step on them or stumble over them.
Always disconnect all cables from this device before servicing or disassembling.
Use ONLY an appropriate power adaptor or cord for your device.
Connect the power adaptor or cord to the right supply voltage (for example, 110V AC in North America or
230V AC in Europe).
Do NOT allow anything to rest on the power adaptor or cord and do NOT place the product where anyone can
walk on the power adaptor or cord.
Do NOT use the device if the power adaptor or cord is damaged as it might cause electrocution.
If the power adaptor or cord is damaged, remove it from the power outlet.
Do NOT attempt to repair the power adaptor or cord. Contact your local vendor to order a new one.
Do not use the device outside, and make sure all the connections are indoors. There is a remote risk of
electric shock from lightning.
CAUTION: RISK OF EXPLOSION IF BATTERY (on the motherboard) IS REPLACED BY AN INCORRECT TYPE.
DISPOSE OF USED BATTERIES ACCORDING TO THE INSTRUCTIONS. Dispose them at the applicable
collection point for the recycling of electrical and electronic equipment. For detailed information about
recycling of this product, please contact your local city office, your household waste disposal service or the
store where you purchased the product.
Do NOT obstruct the device ventilation slots, as insufficient airflow may harm your device.
Your product is marked with this symbol, which is known as the WEEE mark. WEEE stands for Waste
Electronics and Electrical Equipment. It means that used electrical and electronic products should not be
mixed with general waste. Used electrical and electronic equipment should be treated separately.
Contents Overview
Media Server User’s Guide 7
Contents Overview
Users Guide ...........................................................................................................................19
Getting to Know Your NSA .........................................................................................................21
zMedia App ................................................................................................................................25
NAS Starter Utility ......................................................................................................................35
Web Configurator Basics ...........................................................................................................43
Tutorials .....................................................................................................................................63
Technical Reference ............................................................................................................147
Status Screen ...........................................................................................................................149
System Setting .........................................................................................................................153
Storage .....................................................................................................................................157
Network ...................................................................................................................................171
Applications ..............................................................................................................................181
Package Management .............................................................................................................225
Auto Upload .............................................................................................................................275
Dropbox ....................................................................................................................................289
Users ........................................................................................................................................293
Groups .....................................................................................................................................299
Shares ......................................................................................................................................303
Maintenance Screens ..............................................................................................................311
Protecting Your Data ................................................................................................................331
Using Time Machine with the NSA ...........................................................................................337
Troubleshooting .......................................................................................................................347
Product Specifications ..............................................................................................................365
Open Source Licences ........................................................................................................447
Contents Overview
Media Server User’s Guide
8
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide 9
Table of Contents
About This User's Guide..........................................................................................................3
Document Conventions ...........................................................................................................4
Safety Warnings........................................................................................................................6
Contents Overview .................................................................................................................. 7
Table of Contents .....................................................................................................................9
Part I: Users Guide ................................................................................19
Chapter 1
Getting to Know Your NSA.....................................................................................................21
1.1 Overview ..............................................................................................................................21
1.1.1 Smartphone App .........................................................................................................22
1.1.2 Hard Disks for 2-Bay Models ......................................................................................22
1.1.3 Hard Disks for 1-Bay Models ......................................................................................22
1.1.4 COPY/SYNC Button ...................................................................................................23
1.1.5 RESET Button ............................................................................................................23
1.1.6 Removing a Hard Disk ................................................................................................23
Chapter 2
zMedia App..............................................................................................................................25
2.1 Overview ..............................................................................................................................25
2.2 Log into zMedia ....................................................................................................................25
2.3 File Browser .........................................................................................................................26
2.4 System .................................................................................................................................29
2.4.1 Settings .......................................................................................................................29
2.4.2 Status ..........................................................................................................................29
2.4.3 Shutdown ....................................................................................................................32
2.4.4 Applications ................................................................................................................33
2.4.5 Power .........................................................................................................................34
Chapter 3
NAS Starter Utility................................................................................................................... 35
3.1 Overview ..............................................................................................................................35
3.2 Starting the NAS Starter Utility .............................................................................................35
3.3 NAS Seeker Screen .............................................................................................................35
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide
10
3.4 Main NAS Starter Utility Screen ...........................................................................................37
3.4.1 Directory of the NAS ...................................................................................................38
3.5 Import Files or Folders with zPilot ........................................................................................39
3.6 Network Drive .......................................................................................................................40
3.7 Manage the Device ..............................................................................................................41
3.8 Configure System Settings ...................................................................................................41
Chapter 4
Web Configurator Basics.......................................................................................................43
4.1 Overview ..............................................................................................................................43
4.2 Accessing the NSA Web Configurator .................................................................................43
4.2.1 Access the NSA Via NAS Starter Utility ......................................................................44
4.2.2 Web Browser Access ..................................................................................................44
4.3 Login ....................................................................................................................................45
4.4 Home Screens ....................................................................................................................46
4.4.1 Now Playing (Music) ...................................................................................................49
4.4.2 Exif and Google Maps (Photos) ..................................................................................50
4.4.3 Slideshow and CoolIris (Photos) ................................................................................50
4.4.4 Favorite .......................................................................................................................51
4.4.5 File Browser ...............................................................................................................52
4.4.6 Share and Folder Names ...........................................................................................55
4.4.7 Application Zone .........................................................................................................56
4.4.8 System Settings .........................................................................................................57
4.5 Administration Screens .......................................................................................................58
4.5.1 Global Administration Icons .......................................................................................59
4.5.2 Navigation Panel .......................................................................................................60
4.5.3 Main Window .............................................................................................................61
4.5.4 Status Messages .......................................................................................................61
4.5.5 Common Screen Icons ..............................................................................................61
4.5.6 Session Example (Windows) ......................................................................................62
Chapter 5
Tutorials................................................................................................................................... 63
5.1 Overview ..............................................................................................................................63
5.2 Windows 7 Network .............................................................................................................63
5.2.1 If the NSA Icon Does Not Display ...............................................................................65
5.2.2 NSA Icon Right-click Options .....................................................................................66
5.3 Windows 7 Network Map .....................................................................................................67
5.4 Playing Media Files in Windows 7 ........................................................................................70
5.5 Windows 7 Devices and Printers .........................................................................................70
5.5.1 Windows 7 Desktop Shortcut .....................................................................................72
5.6 Creating a Volume in a 2-Bay NSA ......................................................................................73
5.6.1 Creating a RAID 1 Volume .........................................................................................73
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide 11
5.6.2 Migrate Button ............................................................................................................74
5.6.3 Create an Internal Volume Button ..............................................................................74
5.7 Creating a Volume in a 1-Bay NSA ......................................................................................75
5.7.1 Creating a RAID 1 Volume .........................................................................................76
5.7.2 Migrate Button ............................................................................................................76
5.7.3 Create a SATA Volume Button ....................................................................................77
5.7.4 Creating a PC Compatible Volume .............................................................................79
5.8 Deleting a Volume ................................................................................................................82
5.9 File Sharing Tutorials ...........................................................................................................83
5.9.1 Creating a User Account ............................................................................................83
5.9.2 Creating a Share ........................................................................................................85
5.9.3 Creating a Group ........................................................................................................87
5.9.4 Accessing a Share From Windows Explorer ..............................................................88
5.9.5 Accessing a Share Using FTP ....................................................................................90
5.9.6 Accessing a Share Through the Web Configurator ....................................................91
5.10 Download Service Tutorial .................................................................................................92
5.10.1 Copying/Pasting a Download Link ............................................................................92
5.10.2 Installing the Link Capture Browser Plugin ...............................................................95
5.10.3 Using the Link Capture Browser Plugin ..................................................................100
5.10.4 Configuring the Download Service Preferences .....................................................102
5.10.5 Using Download Service Notification ......................................................................104
5.11 Broadcatching Tutorial ......................................................................................................107
5.12 Printer Server Tutorial ...................................................................................................... 111
5.13 Copy and Flickr Auto Upload Tutorial .............................................................................. 113
5.14 FTP Uploadr Tutorial ........................................................................................................114
5.15 Web Configurator’s Security Sessions ............................................................................. 117
5.15.1 Customizing the NSA’s Certificate .......................................................................... 118
5.15.2 Downloading and Installing Customized Certificate ................................................ 119
5.15.3 Turn on the NSA’s Web Security ............................................................................123
5.16 Using FTPES to Connect to the NSA ...............................................................................130
5.17 Using a Mac to Access the NSA ......................................................................................131
5.17.1 Finder .....................................................................................................................132
5.17.2 Go Menu .................................................................................................................133
5.18 How to Use the BackupPlanner .......................................................................................134
5.18.1 Creating an Archive Backup ...................................................................................134
5.18.2 Creating a Synchronization Backup .......................................................................137
5.18.3 Restoring Archived Files by Backup Job ................................................................140
5.18.4 Restoring by Backup Files ......................................................................................143
Part II: Technical Reference.................................................................147
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide
12
Chapter 6
Status Screen........................................................................................................................149
6.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................149
6.2 The Status Screen .............................................................................................................149
Chapter 7
System Setting...................................................................................................................... 153
7.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................153
7.2 What You Can Do ..............................................................................................................153
7.3 What You Need to Know ....................................................................................................153
7.4 The Server Name Screen .................................................................................................154
7.5 The Date/Time Screen .......................................................................................................154
Chapter 8
Storage ..................................................................................................................................157
8.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................157
8.1.1 What You Need to Know About Storage ...................................................................157
8.2 The Storage Screen ...........................................................................................................158
8.2.1 Disk Replacement Restrictions .................................................................................158
8.2.2 Storage Screen .........................................................................................................159
8.2.3 Volume Status ...........................................................................................................160
8.3 Creating an Internal (SATA) Volume ..................................................................................161
8.4 Editing a Volume ................................................................................................................163
8.4.1 Scanning a Volume ...................................................................................................164
8.5 Creating an External (USB) Volume ...................................................................................164
8.5.1 External Disks ...........................................................................................................165
8.6 Storage Technical Reference .............................................................................................166
8.6.1 Volumes and RAID ...................................................................................................166
8.6.2 Choosing a Storage Method for a Volume ................................................................166
8.6.3 Storage Methods ......................................................................................................167
Chapter 9
Network .................................................................................................................................171
9.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................171
9.2 What You Can Do ..............................................................................................................171
9.3 What You Need to Know ....................................................................................................171
9.4 The TCP/IP Screen ............................................................................................................173
9.5 UPnP Port Mapping Screen ...............................................................................................175
9.5.1 UPnP and the NSA’s IP Address ..............................................................................176
9.5.2 UPnP and Security ...................................................................................................176
9.5.3 The NSA’s Services and UPnP .................................................................................177
9.5.4 Configuring UPnP Port Mapping ..............................................................................177
9.6 The PPPoE Screen ...........................................................................................................179
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide 13
Chapter 10
Applications ..........................................................................................................................181
10.1 Overview ..........................................................................................................................181
10.2 What You Can Do ............................................................................................................181
10.3 What You Need to Know ..................................................................................................181
10.4 FTP Server .......................................................................................................................184
10.5 The Media Server Screens ............................................................................................185
10.5.1 The Media Server Share Publish Screen .............................................................187
10.5.2 The Media Server ID3 Tag Decoding Screen .......................................................188
10.5.3 The Media Server iTunes Server Screen .............................................................189
10.5.4 The Media Server SqueezeCenter Screen ...........................................................189
10.6 The Download Service Screen .........................................................................................190
10.6.1 Adding a Download Task ........................................................................................193
10.6.2 Configuring General Settings .................................................................................195
10.6.3 Configuring the BitTorrent Settings .........................................................................197
10.6.4 Edit IP Filter ...........................................................................................................199
10.6.5 Selecting Files to Download ...................................................................................200
10.6.6 Displaying the Task Information .............................................................................201
10.7 The Web Publishing Screen .............................................................................................202
10.8 The Broadcatching Screen ...............................................................................................203
10.8.1 Adding a Broadcatching Channel ...........................................................................205
10.8.2 Editing a Broadcatching Channel ..........................................................................208
10.9 The Print Server Screen ..................................................................................................209
10.9.1 Print Server Rename .............................................................................................210
10.10 The Copy/Sync Button Screen ....................................................................................... 211
10.11 Technical Reference .......................................................................................................212
10.11.1 Sharing Media Files on Your Network ...................................................................212
10.11.2 Download Service .................................................................................................213
10.11.3 Link Capture Browser Plugin ................................................................................214
10.11.4 Download Service Notification ..............................................................................214
10.11.5 BitTorrent Security .................................................................................................215
10.11.6 Web Publishing Example ......................................................................................217
10.11.7 Web Publishing .....................................................................................................218
10.11.8 Channel Guides for Broadcatching .......................................................................219
10.11.9 Printer Sharing ......................................................................................................220
10.11.10 Copying Files ......................................................................................................220
10.11.11 Synchronizing Files .............................................................................................221
Chapter 11
Package Management ..........................................................................................................225
11.1 Overview ..........................................................................................................................225
11.2 What You Can Do .............................................................................................................225
11.3 What You Need to Know ..................................................................................................225
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide
14
11.4 Package Management Screen ........................................................................................226
11.4.1 Displaying the Package Information ......................................................................229
11.5 DyDNS Screen ...............................................................................................................229
11.6 NFS Screen ....................................................................................................................230
11.6.1 Add/Edit NFS Share ...............................................................................................232
11.6.2 NFS Session ..........................................................................................................233
11.7 SMART Screen ..............................................................................................................233
11.7.1 SMART Brief Summary ..........................................................................................235
11.7.2 SMART Full Summary ...........................................................................................236
11.8 Protect Screens ..............................................................................................................237
11.9 Backup Screens ..............................................................................................................237
11.9.1 Backup: Step 1 .......................................................................................................238
11.9.2 Backup: Step 2 .......................................................................................................240
11.9.3 Backup: Step 3 .......................................................................................................242
11.9.4 Backup: Step 4 .......................................................................................................243
11.9.5 Edit Job Screen .......................................................................................................244
11.9.6 Edit Job: Step 1 ......................................................................................................245
11.9.7 Edit Job: Step 2 ......................................................................................................246
11.9.8 Restore Archive Screen ..........................................................................................247
11.9.9 Restore Archive: Step 1 .....................................................................................247
11.9.10 Restore Archive: Step 2 .......................................................................................248
11.9.11 Restore Archive: Step 3 .......................................................................................249
11.10 Restore Screen .............................................................................................................249
11.10.1 Restore: Step 1 ....................................................................................................250
11.10.2 Restore: Step 2 ....................................................................................................251
11.10.3 Restore: Step 3 ....................................................................................................252
11.10.4 Restore: Step 4 ....................................................................................................253
11.11 Syslog Server Screen ...................................................................................................253
11.12 TFTP Server Screen ....................................................................................................255
11.13 eMule Screens ............................................................................................................256
11.13.1 eMule Server Screen ...........................................................................................256
11.13.2 Add Server ...........................................................................................................258
11.13.3 Edit Server ...........................................................................................................258
11.13.4 My Info .................................................................................................................259
11.13.5 eMule Task Screen .............................................................................................260
11.13.6 Add Task ..............................................................................................................262
11.13.7 Preferences ..........................................................................................................263
11.13.8 Edit IP Filter .........................................................................................................266
11.13.9 Share Browsing ....................................................................................................266
11.13.10 Task Info .............................................................................................................268
11.13.11 eMule Search Screen ........................................................................................269
11.14 pyLoad Screen ...............................................................................................................271
11.15 Technical Reference .......................................................................................................271
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide 15
11.15.1 S.M.A.R.T Attributes .............................................................................................272
Chapter 12
Auto Upload ..........................................................................................................................275
12.1 Overview ..........................................................................................................................275
12.2 What You Can Do ............................................................................................................275
12.3 What You Need to Know ..................................................................................................275
12.4 The Flickr/YouTube Screen .............................................................................................275
12.4.1 Configuring the Flickr Settings ...............................................................................276
12.4.2 Configuring the YouTube Settings .........................................................................281
12.5 The FTP Uploadr Screen ................................................................................................284
12.5.1 Adding or Editing an FTP Server Entry .................................................................285
12.5.2 The FTP Uploadr Preferences Screen ..................................................................286
Chapter 13
Dropbox.................................................................................................................................289
13.1 Overview ..........................................................................................................................289
13.2 Dropbox Screen ...............................................................................................................289
13.3 How to Use Dropbox with the NSA ..................................................................................291
Chapter 14
Users...................................................................................................................................... 293
14.1 Overview ..........................................................................................................................293
14.2 What You Can Do ............................................................................................................293
14.3 The Users Screen ...........................................................................................................293
14.3.1 User Icons ..............................................................................................................295
14.3.2 Adding or Editing an Account ................................................................................295
14.3.3 Usernames .............................................................................................................297
14.4 Displaying User Info .........................................................................................................297
Chapter 15
Groups ...................................................................................................................................299
15.1 Overview ..........................................................................................................................299
15.2 What You Can Do ............................................................................................................299
15.3 The Groups Screen .........................................................................................................299
15.3.1 Adding or Editing a Group ......................................................................................300
15.3.2 Group Names .........................................................................................................301
Chapter 16
Shares.................................................................................................................................... 303
16.1 Overview ..........................................................................................................................303
16.2 What You Can Do ............................................................................................................303
16.3 The Shares Screen .........................................................................................................303
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide
16
16.3.1 Adding or Editing Share .........................................................................................305
16.3.2 Configuring Advanced Share Access ....................................................................306
16.3.3 Public and ANONYMOUS Share Access Rights ....................................................307
16.4 The Recycle Bin Configuration Screen ...........................................................................307
16.4.1 Recycle Bins ...........................................................................................................307
16.4.2 Configuring Recycle Bins .......................................................................................308
16.5 The Share Browser Screen .............................................................................................308
16.5.1 Moving or Copying Files ........................................................................................310
Chapter 17
Maintenance Screens........................................................................................................... 311
17.1 Overview .......................................................................................................................... 311
17.2 What You Can Do ............................................................................................................ 311
17.3 The Power Screen .......................................................................................................... 311
17.3.1 Editing the Power Control Schedule Screen .........................................................313
17.4 The Log Screen ...............................................................................................................315
17.4.1 Report Config Screen .............................................................................................315
17.4.2 Email Setting .........................................................................................................316
17.4.3 Report Setting ........................................................................................................317
17.4.4 Syslog Server Setting ............................................................................................317
17.5 The Configuration Screen ...............................................................................................318
17.6 SSL Certification .............................................................................................................319
17.6.1 Modifying or Creating a Certificate ........................................................................320
17.7 The Firmware Upgrade Screen ........................................................................................321
17.8 The Shutdown Screen .....................................................................................................322
17.9 Technical Reference .........................................................................................................323
17.9.1 Log Classes ............................................................................................................323
17.9.2 Log Severity Levels ................................................................................................324
17.9.3 Log Messages ........................................................................................................324
Chapter 18
Protecting Your Data ............................................................................................................331
18.1 Overview ..........................................................................................................................331
18.2 Protection Methods ..........................................................................................................331
18.3 Configuration File Backup and Restoration ......................................................................331
18.4 Memeo Autobackup .........................................................................................................332
18.4.1 Memeo Autobackup Installation and Setup ............................................................332
18.4.2 Using Memeo Autobackup After the Initial Setup ...................................................334
Chapter 19
Using Time Machine with the NSA......................................................................................337
19.1 Overview ..........................................................................................................................337
19.2 Create an Account and a Share on the NSA ...................................................................337
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide 17
19.3 Set Time Machine to Support Network Volume ...............................................................339
19.4 Mounting the NSA on the Mac .........................................................................................340
19.5 Creating a Sparse Bundle File for the NSA ......................................................................341
19.5.1 Finding out Computer Name and MAC Address ....................................................341
19.5.2 Creating a Sparse Bundle File ................................................................................342
19.5.3 Mounting the Sparse Bundle to the NSA ................................................................344
19.6 Using Time Machine ........................................................................................................345
Chapter 20
Troubleshooting....................................................................................................................347
20.1 Troubleshooting Overview ...............................................................................................347
20.2 Power, Hardware, Connections, and LEDs ......................................................................347
20.3 NAS Starter Utility ............................................................................................................349
20.4 NSA Login and Access ....................................................................................................350
20.4.1 Enabling Scripting of Safe ActiveX Controls ...........................................................352
20.5 I Cannot Access The NSA ...............................................................................................354
20.6 Users Cannot Access the NSA ........................................................................................354
20.7 External USB Drives ........................................................................................................356
20.8 Firmware ..........................................................................................................................356
20.9 File Transfer .....................................................................................................................356
20.10 Networking .....................................................................................................................357
20.11 Some Features’ Screens Do Not Display .......................................................................357
20.12 Media Server Functions .................................................................................................358
20.13 Download Service and Broadcatching Functions ...........................................................360
20.14 Web Publishing ..............................................................................................................361
20.15 Auto Upload ...................................................................................................................362
20.16 Package Management ...................................................................................................362
20.17 Backups .........................................................................................................................363
Chapter 21
Product Specifications.........................................................................................................365
21.1 LEDs ................................................................................................................................365
21.2 Supported Media Server Content Formats ......................................................................366
21.3 Supported iTunes Server Content Formats ......................................................................367
Appendix A Setting Up Your Computer’s IP Address ..........................................................369
Appendix B Pop-up Windows, JavaScripts and Java Permissions...................................... 397
Appendix C Common Services............................................................................................407
Appendix D Importing Certificates ....................................................................................... 411
Appendix E Legal Information..............................................................................................437
Table of Contents
Media Server User’s Guide
18
Index ......................................................................................................................................439
Part III: Open Source Licences............................................................447
19
PART I
Users Guide
20
Media Server User’s Guide 21
CHAPTER 1
Getting to Know Your NSA
1.1 Overview
This chapter covers the main features and applications of the NSA. Use the NSA to do the following.
Back up and share files on your network.
•Use the COPY/SYNC button to copy or synchronize files between the NSA and USB devices like
card readers, MP3 players, mass storage devices, and digital cameras without using a computer.
Have the NSA handle large file downloads.
Automatically download files from website feeds for convenient viewing.
Use the included media client software or a media client device like the DMA-2501 to play the
video, music and photo files on the NSA.
Use the NSA’s website to share files with remote users.
Use iTunes on your computer to play video and music files stored on the NSA.
Share printers.
Automatically upload photo and video files to your FTP server, Flickr, and YouTube accounts.
Figure 1 Example of the NSA in a Home Network
Above is the NSA in a home network. Users back up and share data on the NSA. The DMA-2501
plays the NSA’s media files on the TV. A USB hard drive provides extra storage space and files are
copied directly from the USB mass storage device to the NSA.
NSA
Chapter 1 Getting to Know Your NSA
Media Server User’s Guide
22
Place the NSA behind a firewall and/or IDP (Intrusion Detection and Prevention) device to protect it
from attacks from the Internet.
Note: See Chapter 21 on page 365 for a more detailed list of NSA features.
Refer to the Quick Start Guide for hardware connections and how to install hard drives.
Note: Turn off and disconnect the NSA before you install or remove the internal hard disk
or disks.
The NSA325 is a 2-bay model.
At the time of writing no 1-bay models support the firmware version documented in this User’s
Guide.
1.1.1 Smartphone App
Use ZyXEL’s zMedia app to play files and manage the NSA from your iOS version 3 or later device or
Android version 2.1 or later smartphone.
1.1.2 Hard Disks for 2-Bay Models
The 2-bay NSA models have two internal hard disk bays. Install one or two SATA (Serial Advanced
Technology Attachment) hard disks. Note that both SATA hard disks are treated as internal or SATA
volumes in the Storage > Volume screen (Section 8.3 on page 161). Any hard disk connected to
the USB port(s) is considered an external or USB volume.
1.1.3 Hard Disks for 1-Bay Models
The 1-bay NSA models have one internal hard disk bay and one external SATA (eSATA) port. This
allows you to connect one internal SATA (Serial Advanced Technology Attachment) hard disk and
one eSATA hard disk (optional).
Initializing the internal hard disk configures it as a JBOD volume by default. JBOD stands for Just a
Bunch Of Disk and in this storage method, all disk space is used for your data - none is used for
backup. If you are not using an eSATA hard disk, JBOD is the only storage method you can use.
If you attach an eSATA (external SATA) hard disk, you can create a RAID 1 volume. RAID 1 allows
data recovery in case your hard disk fails. To create a RAID 1 volume on the NSA, you must delete
the JBOD volume created by the firmware. Refer to Section 8.3 on page 161 for the Storage screen
where you can create the RAID 1 volume.
The eSATA hard disk can also be configured as a JBOD or a PC Compatible Volume. See Section
8.1.1 on page 157 for more information on these storage methods.
Note that both SATA and eSATA hard disks are treated as internal or SATA volumes in the Storage
screen (Section 8.3 on page 161). Any hard disk connected to the USB port(s) is considered an
external or USB volume.
Chapter 1 Getting to Know Your NSA
Media Server User’s Guide 23
1.1.4 COPY/SYNC Button
Use the COPY/SYNC button on the front panel to copy or synchronize files between a connected
USB device and the NSA. See Section 10.10 on page 211 for more details on how to configure the
copy/sync settings.
1.1.5 RESET Button
Use the RESET button on the rear panel to restore the NSA’s default settings.
Figure 2 The RESET Button
Press the RESET button until you hear one beep (after about two seconds), then release it. You
will hear one more beep after you release the button.
This resets the NSA’s IP address and password to the default values.
Press the RESET button until you hear two beeps. After the second beep, continue pressing the
button for five more seconds, then release it. You will hear three quick beeps after you release
the button.
This resets the NSA to the factory default configuration. All settings you have configured on the
NSA, including IP address, password, user accounts, groups, and so on will be reset to the
factory defaults.
The reset process does NOT affect the volume settings, nor data stored on the NSA.
You should periodically back up your configuration file to your computer (see Section 17.5 on page
318 for details about managing the NSA’s configuration file). You could then restore your
configuration in the event that you or someone else reset the NSA to the factory defaults.
Note: You should keep the NSA in a secure location in order to prevent unauthorized reset
of the device.
You may need to close and re-open the NAS Starter Utility to discover the NSA. This is because the
NSA automatically re-acquires IP address information, so its IP address may change. If no IP
address information is assigned, the NSA uses Auto-IP to assign itself an IP address and subnet
mask. For example, you could connect the NSA directly to your computer. If the computer is also
set to get an IP address automatically, the computer and the NSA will choose addresses for
themselves and be able to communicate.
1.1.6 Removing a Hard Disk
Turn off and disconnect the NSA before you remove an internal hard
disk.
Press 1 Beep 2 Beeps
IP Address
Password Clear All Settings
5 more seconds
Release to
Release to Reset
Chapter 1 Getting to Know Your NSA
Media Server User’s Guide
24
If you need to remove a hard drive, use the hard disk removal handle included inside the front lid.
Figure 3 Removing a Hard Disk
Media Server User’s Guide 25
CHAPTER 2
zMedia App
2.1 Overview
Install ZyXEL’s zMedia app from the Apple App Store, Android Market, or www.zyxel.com to play
files and manage the NSA from your iOS device or Android smartphone.
2.2 Log into zMedia
1Tap the zMedia icon to open the app and automatically search for NSAs on your network.
Figure 4 zMedia App Icon
2Select an NSA if you have more than one.
Figure 5 zMedia Automatic Discovery
Chapter 2 zMedia App
Media Server User’s Guide
26
3Use the admin user name and password to log in.
Figure 6 zMedia Login
2.3 File Browser
Tap File Browser to look through and play files on the NSA.
Figure 7 zMedia File Browser
Chapter 2 zMedia App
Media Server User’s Guide 27
Tap a share to view its contents.
Figure 8 zMedia Shares
Chapter 2 zMedia App
Media Server User’s Guide
28
Tap a file to play or open it using your device’s browser. Here are some examples.
Figure 9 zMedia File Playback
Music
Video
Photo
Document
Chapter 2 zMedia App
Media Server User’s Guide 29
2.4 System
Tap System to view configure the admin account password, view system status, shutdown (or
restart), manage applications, or configure power schedule and management settings.
Figure 10 zMedia System
2.4.1 Settings
Set the admin account password.
Figure 11 zMedia Settings
2.4.2 Status
•Tap System Information to see general NSA system information.
•Tap Volume Status to view information about the internal and external volumes.
•Tap S.M.A.R.T (this appears if the SMART package is installed) for hard disk health and
performance details.
Chapter 2 zMedia App
Media Server User’s Guide
30
•Tap Active Sessions to see which users are connected to the NSA.
Figure 12 zMedia Status
2.4.2.1 System Information
An arrow indicates a newer firmware version is available. Tap the arrow to upgrade the firmware.
Do not turn off the NSA while it is upgrading the firmware or you may
render it unusable.
Figure 13 zMedia System Information and Firmware Upgrade
Chapter 2 zMedia App
Media Server User’s Guide 31
2.4.2.2 Volume Status
See Section 8.2.1 on page 158 for details on replacing a disk in a degraded or down RAID volume
and resynchronizing or recovering a RAID 1 Volume.
Figure 14 zMedia Volume Status
2.4.2.3 S.M.A.R.T.
Self Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology (S.M.A.R.T) detects and reports the reliability
of hard disks to help you anticipate possible disk failures.
Figure 15 zMedia S.M.A.R.T.
Chapter 2 zMedia App
Media Server User’s Guide
32
2.4.2.4 Active Sessions
This shows the users connected to the NSA, whether it’s a Windows/CIFS, web (web configurator),
or FTP connection, when they last connected, and the IP address of the user’s computer or device.
Figure 16 zMedia Active Sessions
2.4.3 Shutdown
Tap the Restart button to reboot the NSA or the Shutdown button to turn it off.
Figure 17 zMedia Shutdown
Chapter 2 zMedia App
Media Server User’s Guide 33
2.4.4 Applications
Enable or disable individual applications. Some applications only appear if the corresponding
package is installed (see Chapter 11 on page 225). Tap the arrow next to Download Service or
eMule to see task status details.
Figure 18 zMedia Applications
2.4.4.1 Download Service and eMule
Tap the arrow next to a category of download tasks to see the related tasks.
Figure 19 zMedia Download Service and eMule
Chapter 2 zMedia App
Media Server User’s Guide
34
Tap the arrow next to a download task for details. Tap a button to remove, pause, or resume the
task. Download Service screens are shown here as an example. eMule screens are similar.
Figure 20 zMedia Download Service Active
2.4.5 Power
Turn the power control schedule on or off and set how long to let the hard disks remain idle before
putting them to sleep. Use the Web Configurator to configure the power control schedule (Section
17.3 on page 311).
Figure 21 zMedia Shutdown
Media Server User’s Guide 35
CHAPTER 3
NAS Starter Utility
3.1 Overview
This chapter describes the NAS Starter Utility. Use the NAS Starter Utility to find, set up, and
manage the NSA as well as copy files to it and access the files on it.
Make sure you have a backup of any existing data in the hard disk before
installing it in the NSA. Using the initialization wizard formats the hard
disk and deletes all data in the process.
There is a NAS Starter Utility available for Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7. Click Help to
open a web help page about the NAS Starter Utility screens. NAS Starter Utility screens are shown
here as they display with the Windows platform.
Note: Refer to the Quick Start Guide for your NSA’s hardware connections and the steps
for installing the NAS Starter Utility.
3.2 Starting the NAS Starter Utility
The NAS Starter Utility broadcasts a request packet when you first run it. Each NSA has an NAS
Starter Utility Agent that always listens and responds to requests from the NAS Starter Utility.
The NAS Starter Utility receives the response packet that contains information, such as host
name, IP, and so on.
If you plan to use more than one NSA in your network, configure them with unique server
names. This enables you to identify each NSA in the NAS Starter Utility screens.
3.3 NAS Seeker Screen
Use this screen to view the NSAs in your network. The NSA’s Server Name. The default is ‘nsa’
followed by the number of your model (‘nsa325’ for example). See Section 3.8 on page 41 for how
to change it to a more recognizable one in your network.
Chapter 3 NAS Starter Utility
Media Server User’s Guide
36
Start the NAS Starter Utility (click the icon in your Desktop or in Start > Programs > ZyXEL >
NAS Starter Utility). The first time you open the NAS Starter Utility the discovery screen appears
as follows.
Figure 22 NAS Seeker
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 1 NAS Seeker
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Connect Select a NSA and click this to connect to it.
Refresh Click this to refresh the screen. The NAS Starter Utility does not automatically refresh.
Status This shows whether the NSA is Online, Unreachable, Configuring, or Config Failed.
Server Name This is the server name you configured for the NSA. If you have more than one NSA in
your network, it is recommended that you give each one a unique name for identification
purposes.
IP Address This is the current IP address of the NSA.
Chapter 3 NAS Starter Utility
Media Server User’s Guide 37
3.4 Main NAS Starter Utility Screen
The main NAS Starter Utility screen displays after you select an NSA in the NSA Seeker screen.
Figure 23 NAS Starter Utility Main Screen
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 2 NAS Starter Utility Main Screen
LABEL DESCRIPTION
? Click this to display the utility help.
Configuration Click this to run the initialization wizard (see the utility help for details), configure system
settings (see Section 3.8 on page 41), or go to the NSA’s Web Configurator login screen
(see Section 4.3 on page 45).
NAS Seeker Click this to use the NSA Seeker screen (Section 3.3 on page 35) to find and connect to a
different NSA on your network.
Server Name This is the server name you configured for the NSA. If you have more than one NSA in
your network, it is recommended that you give each one a unique name for identification
purposes.
IP Address This is the current IP address of the NSA.
MAC Address This is the NSA’s unique physical hardware address (MAC).
Firmware Version This shows the version of firmware the NSA is currently using.
Status This shows whether the NSA is Online, Uninitialized, Unreachable, Configuring, or
Config Failed.
Run Initialization
Wizard This button displays if the NSA detects an installed hard disk that the NSA has not yet
configured. Click the button to run the initialization wizard (see the utility help for
details).
Chapter 3 NAS Starter Utility
Media Server User’s Guide
38
3.4.1 Directory of the NAS
Click Shared Folder to log into the NSA’s file directory in Windows Explorer. Enter the
administrator user name and password and click Login.
Figure 24 Login
Capacity This shows the NSA’s total, in-use, and remaining storage capacity.
Media Player Click this to go to the Home screens where you can play media files. See Section 4.4 on
page 46 for details on the Home screen.
zPilot Click this to launch the zPilot to drag and drop files onto the NSA.
Network Drive Click this to add the NSA as a network drive in your computer’s Windows Explorer.
Shared Folder Click this to log into the NSA’s file directory in Windows Explorer.
BT Download Click this to use the NSA to manage file downloads, including BitTorrent downloads.
Dropbox Click this to use your Dropbox account to move files to the NSA and have the NSA
download *.torrent files.
SMART This displays when the NSA has the SMART package installed. Click this to view hard disk
health and performance details.
WordPress This displays when the NSA has the WordPress package installed. Click this to create and
manage a blog or website. Use the NSA administrator credentials to log in. The
administrator can then create accounts for other users.
eMule This displays when the NSA has the eMule package installed. Click this to use the NSA’s
eMule peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing console to download and share files from the
Internet. See Section 11.13 on page 256 for details.
Gallery This displays when the NSA has the Gallery package installed. Click this to use your NSA
to host pictures. You can upload images in your local computer or shares to this
application. Use the NSA administrator account to log in to the Gallery console.
pyLoad This displays when the NSA has the pyLoad package installed. Click this to use pyLoad to
have the NSA manage your downloads, including those from one-click hosting sites. See
Section 11.14 on page 271 for details.
Table 2 NAS Starter Utility Main Screen
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Chapter 3 NAS Starter Utility
Media Server User’s Guide 39
The utility opens the NSA’s directory in Windows Explorer.
Figure 25 Directory
3.5 Import Files or Folders with zPilot
In the main NAS Starter Utility screen click zPilot to be able to drag and drop files from your
computer to the NSA.
Enter the administrator user name and password and click Login.
Figure 26 Login
The zPilot icon displays.
Figure 27 zPilot
Drag files onto the zPilot icon to move them to the NSA. zPilot automatically sorts music, photo, and
video files into the Music, Photo, and Video folders. zPilot automatically sorts the types of media
files listed in Table 125 on page 366 (except for the subtitles). Other types of files go to the Public
Chapter 3 NAS Starter Utility
Media Server User’s Guide
40
folder. For folders of files you are prompted to choose the target destination. The zPilot icon shows
the transfer rate.
Figure 28 zPilot Showing Transfer Rate
Double-click the zPilot icon to display status details about the file transfers. Select an entry and
click Pause, Resume, or Remove to control the transfer. After the transfer finishes you can select
the entry and click Open Destination Folder to see the file on the NSA. Click Clear Completed to
clear completed transfers from the list.
Figure 29 zPilot Transfer Details
3.6 Network Drive
In the main NAS Starter Utility screen click Network Drive to add the NSA as a network drive in
your computer’s Windows Explorer.
Enter your user name and password and click Login to be able to add the NSA’s shares to which
you have access as network drives. Otherwise select Guest and click Login to be able to add the
NSA’s public shares as network drives.
Figure 30 Login
Select a share on the NSA and the drive letter on your computer to which you want to map it. The
shares that each user can select to map depends on the user’s permissions. For example, if share1
is private to user1, then only user1 is allowed to map share1. The table displays the NSA shares
that are already mapped to drive letters on your computer. After you click Apply you can see the
Chapter 3 NAS Starter Utility
Media Server User’s Guide 41
new drive in Windows Explorer (My Computer) where you can access and use it like your
computer’s other drives.
Figure 31 Network Drive
3.7 Manage the Device
In the main NAS Starter Utility screen click Configuration > Manage the Device to log into the
NSA’s administration screens where you can manage the NSA.
Enter the administrator user name and password and click Login.
Figure 32 Login
See Section 4.5 on page 58 for more on the administration screens.
3.8 Configure System Settings
Use these screens to be able to change the NSA’s server name, time zone, PPPoE, IP address,
subnet mask, default gateway, or DNS settings.
Chapter 3 NAS Starter Utility
Media Server User’s Guide
42
Click Configuration > System Setting in the main utility screen to display the following screen.
Figure 33 NAS Starter Utility > Configuration > System Setting
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 3 NAS Starter Utility > Config
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Server Name Specify a name to uniquely identify the NSA on your network. You can enter up to 15
alphanumeric characters with minus signs allowed but not as the last character. The
name must begin with an alphabetic character (a-z) and is case sensitive.
Time Zone Choose the time zone of your location. This will set the time difference between your
time zone and Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).
Enable PPPoE
Connection Click this if your Internet connection requires you to enter a user name and password to
connect to the Internet. Enter your user name and password
Automatically get
IP address Select this if the NSA is automatically assigned an IP address from the ISP or a DHCP
server in your network.
Manually assign IP
address Select this if you want to assign the NSA a fixed IP address, subnet mask and default
gateway.
Note: Do not configure an IP address that is already in use in your network. This results to
a network IP address conflict and makes the NSA inaccessible.
Use from DHCP
server Domain Name System (DNS) is for mapping a domain name to its corresponding IP
address and vice versa. Select this if the NSA is automatically given DNS information
from the ISP or a DHCP server in your network.
DNS Domain Name System (DNS) is for mapping a domain name to its corresponding IP
address and vice versa.
Select Use from DHCP server if the NSA is automatically given DNS information from
the ISP or a DHCP server in your network.
Select Manually assign DNS server if you were given specific IP address(es) of the
DNS server(s). Enter the primary and secondary DNS in the corresponding fields.
Media Server User’s Guide 43
CHAPTER 4
Web Configurator Basics
4.1 Overview
This chapter describes how to access the NSA web configurator and provides an overview of its
screens.
The web configurator is an HTML-based management interface that allows easy NSA setup and
management using an Internet browser.
Use Internet Explorer 7.0, Mozilla Firefox 3.6, Safari 5, Google Chrome 10, or later versions of
these browsers. The recommended screen resolution is 1024 by 768 pixels or higher.
In order to use the web configurator you need to allow:
Web browser pop-up windows from your device. Web pop-up blocking is enabled by default in
Windows XP SP (Service Pack) 2.
JavaScript (enabled by default).
4.2 Accessing the NSA Web Configurator
Make sure your NSA is properly connected and that your computer is in the same subnet as the
NSA (refer to the Quick Start Guide or the appendices).
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
44
4.2.1 Access the NSA Via NAS Starter Utility
If you don’t know the IP address of the NSA, use the NAS Starter Utility to find it. Refer to the Quick
Start Guide for how to install and run the NAS Starter Utility. See Chapter 3 on page 35 for more
information on the NAS Starter Utility.
Figure 34 NAS Starter Utility Main Screen
4.2.2 Web Browser Access
Configure the server name of your NSA using the Network Configuration screen (Section 3.8 on
page 41) of the NAS Starter Utility. Open your browser and type in the server name of the NSA. The
default is ‘nsa’ followed by the number of your model (‘nsa325’ for example).
Figure 35 NSA URL
nsa325
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide 45
4.3 Login
The default username and password are ‘admin’ and ‘1234’ respectively. Enter your username and
password. See Chapter 14 on page 293 for how to create other user accounts. If you use the option
to stay logged in for two weeks (assuming you do not log out), make sure you keep your computer
secure from unauthorized access. Click User Login to go to the Home screens where you can play
media files. Click Administrator Login to go to the advanced administration screens.
Figure 36 NSA Login Screen
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
46
If you have not done so yet, you should see a screen asking you to change your password (highly
recommended) as shown next. Type a new password (and retype it to confirm) and click Apply or
click Ignore.
Figure 37 Change Password Screen
4.4 Home Screens
The Home screen after you log in using User Login.
Figure 38 Home
Note: If you did not select the option to stay logged in for two weeks when you logged in,
the web configurator management session automatically times out if it is left idle
for 15 minutes. Simply log back into the NSA if this happens to you.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide 47
The main Home screen displays icons for the various features you can access.
Note: Your browser may need Windows Media Player and VLC plugins installed to play
music and video files. To get the VLC plugins, you have to download and install VLC
(use the .exe file). To install a VLC plugin for Firefox, when you install VLC, you
have to select the Mozilla plugin option. To display your photos as a 3-D wall for
quick browsing, install the CoolIris plugin.
Current VLC plugins may not support srt file format subtitles when playing videos.
The icons at the top-right of the screen are visible from most screens. Use them to navigate
between the screens and menus. The following table describes the icons.
Table 4 Main Home Screen Icons
ICON DESCRIPTION
Use Music, Photo, and Video to play and organize your music, picture, and video files.
Use Favorite to create and edit playlists.
Use File Browser to see your files in a tree-folder structure.
Administrators can use Application Zone to install, access, and manage the NSA’s
applications.
Use System to edit general system settings or log into the administrator advanced
configuration screens.
Table 5 Global Home Labels and Icons
LABEL/ICON DESCRIPTION
Home Click this to return to the Home screen.
Help Click this to open a web help page specific to the screen you are currently configuring.
Logout Click this at any time to exit the web configurator.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
48
Here are some Home screen descriptions. A music screen is shown here as an example. Other
screens work in a similar way.
Figure 39 Music Screen
This table describes common labels in the Home media screens. Not every item displays in every
screen.
A
B
D
C
Table 6 Home Media Screens
LABEL DESCRIPTION
A Click a letter to go to the first item starting with that letter.
B View files. Double-click an item to play it.
C Shows which page is displaying and the total number of pages of entries. Click an arrow or
type a number to go to another page of entries.
D Select the sorting criteria:
Artist - Sort music by artist.
All - All of the menu’s files display here.
Genre - Sort music by category.
Folder - List the folders containing music files.
Album - List the identified music albums.
Current Playlist - Show the playing and queued songs.
The NSA categorizes files into genres and albums according to the information stored in
your files. Files may not appear in the proper folders if they have missing, incorrect or
incomplete information.
Thumbnail Click this to view the files as thumbnails.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide 49
4.4.1 Now Playing (Music)
A Now Playing link displays when a song is playing. Click it to display a panel like the following.
This screen displays the name of the current song and it’s play progress and lets you control the
playback.
Figure 40 Now Playing
List Click this to view the files as a list.
Play Click this to play the currently selected file. You can also double-click a file to play it.
Delete Select an item and click Delete to remove it.
Rename Select an item and click Rename to change its name.
Note: When you change a file name, make sure you keep the file extension unchanged.
Add to Current
Playlist Click this to add the selected music file to the currently playing playlist.
Add to Playlist Click this to add the selected music file to a playlist.
Search Click this to look for a file or folder by name.
Refresh Click this to update the display in the screen.
Now Playing This link is available when a song is playing. Click it to see details about the song that is
currently playing.
Table 6 Home Media Screens
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
50
4.4.2 Exif and Google Maps (Photos)
Click a photo’s EXIF button to display or hide the photo’s Exchangeable image file format (Exif)
data.
Figure 41 Exif Information
If a photo’s Exif data includes GPS location data, click the latitude or longitude link to display the
location in Google Maps. Click Clear to delete the markers of other photos and only display the
current photo’s marker.
Figure 42 Google Maps
4.4.3 Slideshow and CoolIris (Photos)
In a Photo menu click the SlideShow button to display the menu’s files as a slideshow. Move your
cursor over the slideshow’s screen to display full screen, previous, pause, and next buttons for
controlling the slideshow.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide 51
Note: Your browser must have the Flash Player plug-in installed to view slideshows.
Figure 43 Slideshow
When the CoolIris plugin is installed in your browser, click the Launch CoolIris button to display
your photos as a 3-D wall for quick browsing.
4.4.4 Favorite
Use the Favorite menu to manage your playlists.
4.4.4.1 Shared Playlist
Use Favorite > Shared Playlist to view and play playlists that you created externally (in iTunes,
Windows Media Player, VLC media player, or Winamp for example) and saved to the NSA. When
using zPilot to move files to the NSA, playlists are automatically put into the music share.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
52
4.4.4.2 My Favorite
Use Favorite > My Favorite to create, edit, and play playlists. These playlists are specific to the
NSA and cannot be used in external music players.
Figure 44 Favorite > My Favorite
This table describes labels in this menu.
4.4.5 File Browser
Click File Browser to open the following screen. Use the file browsing screens to play, open,
upload, and download files. A share is a set of user access permissions for a specific folder on a
volume (gives someone access to a folder). It is equivalent to the Windows concept of a shared
folder, but the access rights are independent of the folder (you configure the share and the folder
separately). You can map a share to a network drive for easy and familiar file transfer for Windows
users.
A folder icon with a hand indicates a share.
Table 7 Favorite > My Favorite
LABEL DESCRIPTION
New Click this to create a new playlist.
Edit Double-click a playlist or select it and click Edit to go to a screen where you can remove
songs from the playlist.
Delete All Within a playlist click Delete All to remove all of the playlist’s songs.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide 53
The administrator owns and manages the public shares.
Double-click a media file to open it. Double-click other types of files to be able to save them.
Click to the right of a file or folder name to select it.
Use the [SHIFT] key to select a range of entries. Hold down the [CTRL] key to select multiple
individual entries.
Drag and drop files to open a screen that lets you choose whether to copy or move them.
You can upload files of up to 2 GB in size.
You can download individual files of up to 4 GB in size with Mozilla Firefox and Internet Explorer 7
and later or up to 2 GB in size with Internet Explorer 6.
Figure 45 File Browser
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 8 File Browser
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Up Click this to go to the next higher layer in the share’s folder tree.
Name This column identifies the names of folders and files in the share. Click a file’s file name to
open the file or save it to your computer. Click a folder’s name to display the folder’s contents.
Size This column displays a file’s size in bytes.
Last Modified This column displays the last time the file or folder was changed (in year-month-day
hour:minute:second format).
Create New
Folder Click this to open a screen where you can create a new folder within the share.
Specify a name to identify the folder. See Section 4.4.6 on page 55 for more information on
folder names. Click Apply to create a folder or click Cancel to exit this screen.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
54
4.4.5.1 Configure Share Screen
In the File Browser screen, select a share and click Configure Share to open the following screen
where you can see and configure share management details.
Figure 46 File Browser > Configure Share
Configure
Share Select a share and click this link to open a screen where you can see and configure share
management details.
Upload Click this to open the following screen where you can add files to the share.
Use the Browse button to locate your file/s and click Apply to upload the file. Click Cancel to
close this screen.
Note: Do not refresh the screen while an upload is going on.
Download Select a file and click this to save the file to your computer.
Note: Do not refresh the screen while a download is going on.
Restore When you are in a recycle bin folder, select a folder or file and click this to restore it.
Table 8 File Browser (continued)
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide 55
The following table describes the labels in the this screen.
4.4.6 Share and Folder Names
The name can only contain the following characters:
Alphanumeric (A-z, 0-9) and Unicode.
The NSA allows FTP access to shares, folders or files with names encoded in the UTF-8 (8-bit
UCS/Unicode Transformation Format) format. So your FTP client must support UTF-8 in order to
access shares, folders or files on the NSA with Unicode names.
•Spaces
_ [underscores]
•. [periods]
•- [dashes]
Other limitations include:
All leading and trailing spaces are removed automatically.
Table 9 File Browser > Configure Share
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Share Name Configure a name to identify this share. Type a share name from 1 to 239 single-byte (no
Chinese characters allowed for example) ASCII characters. The name cannot be the
same as another existing local share. See Section 4.4.6 on page 55 for more information
on share names. This is not configurable for the NSA’s default admin, music, photo,
public, and video shares.
Volume This shows the volume the share is on. It is read-only.
Make this share
owned by Select the administrator or user account that is to own (manage) this share. The share
owner controls access rights to the share. This is not configurable for the NSA’s default
admin and public shares.
Enable This Share Select this option to allow users to access this share. When this option is not selected,
you cannot see and access this share.
Enable Recycle Bin Select this option to keep deleted items in a recycle bin. When you delete an item, a
recycle folder is created within the share, and the deleted item is stored in the recycle
bin. Later if you want to retrieve a deleted item, you can select the item from the recycle
folder and move/copy the item to another share.
Publish this share
to Media Server Select this option to make the share’s files available to media clients.
Publish this share
to Web Select this option to let people use a web browser to access this share’s files without
logging into the Home screens.
Share Access Select who can access the files in the share and how much access they are to be given. If
you publish the share to the media server or the web, all users will have at least read-
only access to the share, regardless of what you configure here.
Select Keep it private to owner to allow only the share owner to read files in the share,
delete files in the share and save files to the share.
Select Make it public to allow anyone (with or without a user account on the NSA) to
read files in the share, delete files in the share and save files to the share.
Select Advanced to select which individual users can read the share’s files, which users
can delete the share’s files, and which users are blocked from doing either.
Apply Click this to save your changes.
Cancel Click this to return to the previous screen without saving.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
56
Multiple spaces within names are converted to a single space.
Share names must be unique (they cannot be the same as other share names).
The NSA creates automatic volume names for external (USB) disk volumes. These are a type of
share, so the share name you configure cannot conflict with the external (USB) disk volume
names. “ExtVol1” or “ExtVol2” are examples of external (USB) disk volume names.
Folder names must be unique (they cannot be the same as other folder names).
The minimum character length of a name is one character, that is a name cannot be blank.
The maximum character length of share name is 239 characters.
Unicode is supported for share names, although your FTP client must support UTF-8. Full support
should be available in all Windows versions after Windows 2000.
4.4.7 Application Zone
Administrators can click Application Zone to go to a screen where you can enable or disable
various applications for file sharing and downloading.
Figure 47 Application Zone
The following table describes the labels in the this screen.
Table 10 Application Zone
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Name This is the name of the application.
Description This is a brief description of the application. See Chapter 10 on page 181 for more
information.
Management
Page Click this link to go the application’s management page where you can configure settings for
it. See Chapter 10 on page 181 for more information.
Enable Select a disabled application and click this to turn on the application. Some applications are
always enabled and cannot be disabled.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide 57
4.4.8 System Settings
Click System > Settings to open the following screen. Use this screen to change general settings
and an account password.
Figure 48 System > Settings
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Disable Select an enabled application and click this to turn off the application. Select the Flickr or
Youtube Uploadr entry and click this to cancel all uploading. Some applications are always
enabled and cannot be disabled.
Pause Select the Flickr or Youtube Uploadr entry and click this to pause current uploading. Resume
will resume current uploading.
Resume Select the Flickr or Youtube Uploadr entry and click this to resume current uploading.
Table 10 Application Zone (continued)
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Table 11 System > Settings
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Double Click Behavior
Setting Select Replace current playlist and start to play to have double clicking a song
cause the NSA to immediately stop any currently playing song and start playing the
double-clicked song.
Select Append to current playlist to have double clicking a song add a song to the
end of the current playlist.
Slide Effect Enable the Ken Burns effect to have the NSA automatically pan and zoom photos in
slideshows. Disable it to display photos in slideshows normally.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
58
4.5 Administration Screens
The System > Administration link displays when you log in as the administrator. Click System >
Administration in the Home screen to open the advanced administration screens.
Slide Interval Select how long to display each image in a slideshow before changing to the next.
Video Playback Select Play Next to play the rest of the video files in a folder. So for example, a folder
has video files 1~10 and you play video 3. When video 3 finishes the device continues
playing the rest of the videos in the folder (4~10). It does not loop back and play
videos 1 and 2.
Account Name Type the user name of the account for which you want to change the password.
Old Password Type the user’s current password.
New Password Create a new password for the user. You can type from one to 14 single-byte (no
Chinese characters allowed for example) ASCII characters.
Password (Confirm) You must type the exact same password that you just typed in the above field.
Language Select the web configurator language from the drop-down list box.
Go to system
administration page This link appears when you are logged in as the administrator. Click it to open the
advanced administration screens. See Section 4.5 on page 58 for more on the
advanced administration screens.
Apply Click this to save your changes.
Reset Click this to refresh the screen.
Cancel Click this to exit the screen without saving your changes.
Table 11 System > Settings (continued)
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide 59
The Status screen is the first advanced administration screen that displays.
Figure 49 Status
4.5.1 Global Administration Icons
The icons and language label at the top-right of the screen ( ) are visible from most of the
administration screens. The following table describes the ‘global’ icons and labels.
3
4
1
2
Table 12 Global Labels and Icons
LABEL/ICON DESCRIPTION
Language Select the web configurator language from the drop-down list box.
Help Click this to open web help specific to the screen you are in.
About Click this to view the model name, firmware version and copyright.
Home Click this to return to the Home screens.
Logout Click this at any time to exit the web configurator. This is the same as clicking the Logout link
at the bottom of the navigation panel.
1
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
60
4.5.2 Navigation Panel
The navigation panel on the left of the Web Configurator screen ( ) contains screen links. Click a
link to display sub-links. There are no sub-links for the Status screen. Certain screens also contain
hyper links that allow you to jump to another screen.
The following table describes the navigation panel screens.
Table 13 Screens Summary
LINK SCREEN FUNCTION
Status This screen shows system information, the status of the volumes, and the
users who are currently using the NSA.
System
Setting Server Name Specify the NSA’s server name and workgroup name.
Date & Time Chose a time zone and/or allow the NSA to synchronize with a time server.
Storage Volume View volume and disk information and create and edit volumes. A volume is a
storage area that can span one or more internal disks or a single external
(USB) disk.
Network TCP/IP Assign the NSA a dynamic or static IP address and DNS information.
UPnP Port
Mapping Configure your Internet gateway to allow access from the WAN (Internet) to
services on the NSA.
PPPoE Configure PPPoE settings for a direct Internet connection.
Applications FTP Server Enable FTP file transfer to/from the NSA, set the number of FTP connections
allowed, an FTP idle timeout, and the character set.
Media Server Enable or disable the sharing of media files and select which shares to share.
Download
Service Have the NSA handle large file downloads.
Web
Publishing Let people use a web browser to access files in shares without logging into the
Home screens.
Broadcatching Subscribe the NSA to feeds to download frequently updated digital content like
TV programs, radio talk shows, Podcasts (audio files), YouTube videos, or even
BitTorrents.
Print Server View and manage the NSA’s list of printers and print jobs.
Copy/Sync
Button Copy or synchronize files between a USB device and the NSA.
Package Set up more useful applications in your NSA. The NSA can download multiple
packages/files at once and automatically goes through all the installation
steps.
Auto Upload -
Flickr/YouTube Upload files in selected shares to your Flickr and/or YouTube accounts.
Auto Upload -
FTP Uploadr Upload files in selected shares to FTP servers.
Dropbox Use your Dropbox account to move files to the NSA and have the NSA
download *.torrent files.
Syslog Server Use this to configure the NSA to accept syslog logs from syslog clients.
TFTP Server Use this to configure the NSA to accept log files from TFTP clients.
eMule Use this to use the NSA’s eMule peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing console to
download and share files from the Internet.
2
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide 61
4.5.3 Main Window
The main window () shows the screen you select in the navigation panel. It is discussed in the
rest of this document.
The Status screen is the first administration screen to display. See Chapter 6 on page 149 for more
information about the Status screen.
4.5.4 Status Messages
The message text box at the bottom of the screen () displays status messages as you configure
the NSA.
4.5.5 Common Screen Icons
The following table explains some icons that appear in several configuration screens.
Sharing Users View, create and edit administrator and user accounts to let people use the
NSA.
Groups View, create and edit groups. Groups allow you to organize users into specific
groups. You can create shares accessible only by the group members.
Shares View, create and edit shares. Shares are shared folders to which you can allow
specific users read/write access rights.
Maintenance Power Configure power saving settings for the NSA and have the NSA turn itself off
and on or reboot according to the schedules you configure.
Log View the NSA’s logs and configure how you want to receive the log reports.
Configuration Back up and/or restore the NSA configuration file.
SSL Configure HTTPS and the NSA’s SSL certificate.
FW Upgrade Upload/upgrade new firmware to your NSA.
Shutdown Restart the NSA or shut it down.
Logout Click this to exit the web configurator. This is recommended to prevent
unauthorized administrator access to the NSA.
Table 13 Screens Summary (continued)
LINK SCREEN FUNCTION
3
4
Table 14 Common Configuration Screen Icons
ICON DESCRIPTION
Edit
Click this to go to a screen where you can change the configuration settings of an entry.
Delete
Click this to delete an entry from the list.
Edit
Click this to jump to related item’s configuration screen.
Refresh
Click this to refresh the data for the field or value with which it is associated.
Chapter 4 Web Configurator Basics
Media Server User’s Guide
62
4.5.6 Session Example (Windows)
Open Windows Explorer and type two back slashes followed by the NSA name or IP address.
Initially you can only read and write to the Public, Video, Music, and Photo folders until you
create other shares on the NSA. This session is then displayed as shown in the following figure.
Session Example (Windows)
User
See the chapter on user accounts for detailed information on variants of this icon.
Share
See the chapter on shares for detailed information on variants of this icon.
Healthy
This represents a healthy volume.
Degraded
This represents a degraded RAID 1 volume. Replace the faulty disk. If the replacement disk
does not contain any partition, the NSA automatically restores the volume. If the replacement
disk already contains a volume, you need to delete the volume and then click the Repair icon
to fix the degraded RAID volume.
Down
This represents a down volume.
Scan Disk
Click this to scan a hard disk for file system errors.
Eject
Click this before you remove an external hard drive so that you do not lose data that is being
transferred to or from that hard drive.
Locate
Click this to cause the LED on the external storage device to blink.
Repair
If you replace a faulty disk with a disk that contains a volume, you need to delete the volume
and then click this to fix the degraded RAID volume.
Table 14 Common Configuration Screen Icons (continued)
ICON DESCRIPTION
Media Server User’s Guide 63
CHAPTER 5
Tutorials
5.1 Overview
This chapter provides tutorials that show how to use the NSA.
Windows 7 Network, see page 63
Windows 7 Network Map, see page 67
Playing Media Files in Windows 7, see page 70
Windows 7 Devices and Printers, see page 70
Creating a Volume in a 2-Bay NSA, see page 73
Creating a Volume in a 1-Bay NSA, see page 75
Deleting a Volume, see page 82
File Sharing Tutorials, see page 83
Download Service Tutorial, see page 92
Broadcatching Tutorial, see page 107
Copy and Flickr Auto Upload Tutorial, see page 113
FTP Uploadr Tutorial, see page 114
Web Configurator’s Security Sessions, see page 117
Using FTPES to Connect to the NSA, see page 130
Using a Mac to Access the NSA, see page 131
How to Use the BackupPlanner, see page 134
5.2 Windows 7 Network
To see your NSA in a Windows 7 home or work network:
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
64
1Click Start > Control Panel. Set View by to Category and click Network and Internet.
2Click View network computers and devices.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 65
3The NSA icon displays twice because the NSA is both a media server and a storage device. Double-
click either NSA icon to open the Web Configurator login screen.
5.2.1 If the NSA Icon Does Not Display
The network containing the NSA must be set as a home or work network in order for the NSA icons
to display. If the network containing the NSA displays as “Public”:
1Click Network and Sharing Center and then the network’s link (circled in the figure).
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
66
2Use the Set Network Location screen to set the network’s location to home or work.
5.2.2 NSA Icon Right-click Options
Right-click the NSA’s icon to see these options:
Install/Uninstall: Click Install to add the NSA as a device in your computer. After you install
the NSA you can see it in the computer’s list of devices (see Section 5.5 on page 70. Click
Uninstall to remove the NSA from the list of devices installed in your computer.
View device web page opens the Web Configurator login screen.
Create shortcut adds a desktop shortcut to the Web Configurator login screen.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 67
Properties opens a window of NSA details and troubleshooting information.
Manufacturer identifies the company that produced the NSA.
Model identifies the NSA model.
Model number identifies the NSA model number.
Device webpage shows the IP address for accessing the Web Configurator.
Serial number is unavailable because the NSA does not have one.
MAC address is the NSA’s unique physical hardware address (MAC). You need the MAC
address to register the product at myZyXEL.com. Customer support may also request it for
troubleshooting purposes.
Unique identifier is a unique UPnP ID that the NSA generated.
IP address is the NSA’s IP address. It is also the IP address for accessing the Web
Configurator.
5.3 Windows 7 Network Map
To see your NSA in a Windows 7 home or work network map:
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
68
1Click Start > Control Panel > View network status and tasks (or Network and Sharing
Center if you view the Control Panel by icons).
2Click See full map (1 in the figure).
The network containing the NSA must be set as a home or work network in order to use the full
map feature. If the network containing the NSA displays as “Public”, click the network’s link (2 in
the figure, although it is already set to home here) and use the Set Network Location screen to
set the network’s location to home or work (see page 66).
2
1
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 69
3Double-click the NSA’s icon to open the Web Configurator login screen. See Section 5.2.2 on page
66 for the NSA icon’s right-click options.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
70
5.4 Playing Media Files in Windows 7
In Windows 7, the NSA automatically displays as a library in Windows Media Player.
Figure 50 NSA in Windows Media Player
5.5 Windows 7 Devices and Printers
After you use the NSA’s network icon’s install option you can manage the NSA from the Windows 7
Devices and Printers folder.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 71
Click Start > Control Panel > Hardware and Sound > Devices and Printers. Select the NSA
icon to display information about the NSA. Double-click the NSA icon to open a properties window
(see page 67). Right-click the icon to display these options:
Download NAS Starter Utility downloads the NSA’s Starter Utility. It lets you find, set up, and
manage the NSA as well as copy files to it and access the files on it. See Chapter 3 on page 35 for
details.
Create shortcut has Windows make a desktop shortcut to this screen.
Troubleshoot opens Windows’ device troubleshooting wizard.
Remove device removes the NSA from the Windows 7 Devices and Printers folder.
Properties opens a window of NSA details and troubleshooting information (see page 67).
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
72
5.5.1 Windows 7 Desktop Shortcut
This is the NSA’s desktop shortcut. Double-click it to open a properties window (see page 67).
1Right-click the NSA’s desktop shortcut icon to see these options:
Open file location takes you to the Windows 7 Devices and Printers folder.
Download NAS Starter Utility downloads the NSA’s Starter Utility. It lets you find, set up, and
manage the NSA as well as copy files to it and access the files on it. See Chapter 3 on page 35 for
details.
Restore previous versions is the Windows 7 option for restoring a file or folder. It does not
apply to this shortcut.
Send to give you options for copying the shortcut to another location.
Cut removes this shortcut so you can paste it somewhere else.
Copy copies the shortcut so you can paste it somewhere else.
Create shortcut has Windows make a desktop shortcut to this icon.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 73
Delete sends the shortcut to the recycle bin.
Rename lets you change the name of the shortcut.
Troubleshoot opens Windows’ device troubleshooting wizard.
Remove device removes the NSA from the Windows 7 Devices and Printers folder.
Properties opens a window of details about the shortcut.
5.6 Creating a Volume in a 2-Bay NSA
This section shows you how to create a volume in your 2-bay NSA.
Creating a volume deletes all existing data in the hard disk. Make sure
you have a backup of your existing data before following the steps in this
section.
Your NSA has two bays for Serial Advanced Technology Attachment (SATA) hard disks. The JBOD
storage method is used if you are using a single hard disk for your NSA.
This JBOD volume shows up in the Storage > Volume screen (Section 8.3 on page 161) as
follows.
5.6.1 Creating a RAID 1 Volume
This storage method allows recovery of data if your hard disk fails. To create a RAID 1 volume, you
must install two SATA hard disks in your NSA. There are two ways to create a RAID 1 volume:
Click the Migrate button - If you already have a SATA hard disk with a volume and you later
install a second SATA hard disk in your NSA, use the Migrate button to convert the existing JBOD
volume to a RAID 1 volume.
Click the Create an internal volume button - Use this if there are no existing volumes in your
NSA.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
74
5.6.2 Migrate Button
Do the following steps to create a RAID 1 volume.
1Once you install a second SATA hard disk in the NSA, the Storage > Volume screen shows the
Migrate button.
2Click the Migrate button and you can see the following progress bar. Wait for the RAID 1 volume to
be created. This may take quite a while depending on how much data you have in the original
volume.
5.6.3 Create an Internal Volume Button
If you do not have an existing volume in the Storage > Volume screen, do the following steps to
create a RAID 1 volume.
1In the Storage > Volume screen, click Create an Internal Volume.
2In the Disk Configuration screen, you can select the storage method.
•Type in the Volume Name for your RAID 1 volume. The volume name can be 1 to 31 characters
(a-z, 0-9, " " [spaces], "_", and ".").
Choose RAID 1 and click Apply.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 75
This deletes all existing data in the SATA hard disk. Make sure you have
a backup of any existing data in the hard disk.
The NSA starts creating the volume and you can see the following progress bar. Wait for the RAID 1
volume to be created.
3The Storage > Volume screen displays with your RAID 1 volume.
5.7 Creating a Volume in a 1-Bay NSA
This section shows you how to create a volume on your 1-bay NSA.
Creating a volume deletes all existing data in the SATA or eSATA hard
disk. Make sure you have a backup of your existing data before following
the steps in this section.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
76
Your NSA has a single bay for a SATA (Serial Advanced Technology Attachment) hard disk. The
firmware installed during hard disk initialization (Chapter 3 on page 35) automatically creates a
JBOD volume on your SATA hard disk. JBOD is the default storage method if you are using a single
hard disk for your NSA.
This JBOD volume shows up in the Storage > Volume screen (Section 8.2 on page 158) as
follows.
When you attach an eSATA hard disk to your NSA, you can configure this volume as: 1) a backup to
your SATA hard disk (RAID 1); or 2) as a separate storage drive (either another JBOD or a PC
Compatible Volume).
5.7.1 Creating a RAID 1 Volume
This storage method allows recovery of data if your hard disk fails. To create a RAID 1 volume, you
must connect an eSATA hard disk to your NSA. There are two ways to create a RAID 1 volume:
Click the Migrate button - This is a quick way to create a RAID 1 volume. Use this to
automatically synchronize data in the internal hard disk to the eSATA hard disk.
Click the Create a SATA volume button - Use this if there are no existing volumes in your NSA.
5.7.2 Migrate Button
Do the following steps to create a RAID 1 volume.
1Once you attach the eSATA hard disk to the NSA, the Storage > Volume screen shows the
Migrate button.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 77
2Click the Migrate button and you can see the following progress bar. Wait for up to 10 minutes for
the RAID 1 volume to be created.
5.7.3 Create a SATA Volume Button
If you do not have an existing volume in the Storage > Volume screen, do the following steps to
create a RAID 1 volume.
1In the Storage > Volume screen, click Create a SATA Volume.
2In the Disk Configuration screen, you can select the storage method.
•Type in the Volume Name for your RAID 1 volume. The volume name can be 1 to 31 characters
(a-z, 0-9, " " [spaces], "_", and ".").
Choose RAID 1 and click Apply.
This deletes all existing data in the eSATA hard disk. Make sure you have
a backup of any existing data in the hard disk.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
78
The NSA starts creating the volume and you can see the following progress bar. Wait for 2 minutes
for the RAID 1 volume to be created.
3The Storage > Volume screen displays with your RAID 1 volume.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 79
5.7.4 Creating a PC Compatible Volume
You can use your eSATA hard disk as a separate storage volume. The following section shows you
how to create a PC Compatible Volume. Use this storage method if you have an eSATA hard disk
that will be connected to a Windows computer when it is not connected to the NSA. However, the
computer’s platform (for example, Windows XP SP2) should support the file system you selected for
the eSATA hard disk.
1Connect the eSATA hard disk to your NSA and go to the Storage > Volume screen. Click Create a
SATA Volume.
2In the Disk Configuration screen, you can select the storage method.
•Type in the Volume Name for your PC Compatible volume. The volume name can be 1 to 31
characters (a-z, 0-9, " " [spaces], "_", and ".").
Choose PC Compatible Volume.
Select the File System you want to use (NTFS in this example). Make sure this file system is
supported by the Windows platform you are using in your computer. Refer to Table 23 on page
165 for file systems supported by your NSA. Click Apply.
This deletes all existing data in the eSATA hard disk. Make sure you have
a backup of any existing data in the hard disk.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
80
The NSA starts creating the volume and you can see the following progress bar. Wait for 2 minutes
for the volume to be created.
3The Storage > Volume screen displays with your PC Compatible Volume.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 81
5.7.4.1 Checking Your PC Compatible Volume
The files in the eSATA hard disk that you configured as a PC Compatible Volume should be
accessible when you connect the eSATA hard disk to your computer.
You can configure the features of your NSA to save files to your eSATA hard disk. For example, you
can refer to Section 5.11 on page 107 to use the Broadcatching feature of your NSA to download
files to your eSATA disk.
1When asked for the Location of Downloaded Files, make sure you save the completed files to
the eSATA hard disk (Volume 2 in this example).
2The files downloaded by the NSA should be in the Volume 2 folder. You can check this when you
access the Volume 2 folder from My NSA > Share Browser screen as follows.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
82
3Disconnect the eSATA hard disk from the NSA. Connect the eSATA hard disk to your computer. On
some systems, you can see the following notification.
4The computer assigns a letter to the eSATA hard disk (drive F in this example) that is accessible
from the My Computer screen. Double click the eSATA drive and check your files. They should be
the same files that are in the My NSA > Share Browser screen.
5.8 Deleting a Volume
Delete an existing volume in your NSA by doing the following steps.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 83
1 In the Storage > Volume screen, select the volume you want to delete and click the delete icon.
2A confirmation window appears as follows. Click Yes.
This deletes all existing data in the volume. Make sure you have a
backup of any existing data in the hard disk.
5.9 File Sharing Tutorials
The following sections cover using the NSA for file sharing. This chapter assumes you have already
followed the Quick Start Guide instructions to perform initial setup and configuration (so you have a
working volume). See the rest of this User’s Guide for details on configuring the NSA’s various
screens.
5.9.1 Creating a User Account
Bob wants to create accounts for his sons Jimmy and Kevin. This is how he would do it.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
84
1At the NSA web configurator login screen enter the administrator account and password and click
Administrator Login to go to the advanced administration screens.
2Click Sharing > Users to open the Users screen. Then click Add User.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 85
3Configure the screen as follows and write down the username and password to give to Jimmy. If the
username and password are the same as Jimmy’s Windows login, Jimmy will not need to enter a
username and password when he logs into his share from his computer. Set the Account Type to
User so Jimmy doesn’t get to configure the whole NSA. Click Apply to create the account.
4The account now displays in the Users screen.
Now that Bob has created Jimmy’s account, he can go through the steps again to create another
account for Kevin. After both accounts are created, he can go to Section 5.9.2 on page 85 to create
shares for Jimmy and Kevin.
5.9.2 Creating a Share
Suppose Bob has already created separate accounts for his sons Jimmy and Kevin. Now Bob wants
to create a share for each son. He also wants to make sure that each son can only access his own
share (to keep them from deleting each other’s files). This is how he would do it.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
86
1In the NSA’s administration web configurator screens, click Shares > Add Share. Click Add Share
to create a new share.
2Specify a name for the share and select which volume it should be on. Configure the screen as
follows. Then click Edit.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 87
3Configure the screen as follows to give Jimmy full access right to the share. Then click Apply to
create the share.
Now that Bob has created Jimmy’s share, he can go through the steps again to create another
share for Kevin.
5.9.3 Creating a Group
After creating user accounts for Jimmy and Kevin, Bob wants to create a group for his sons and
another one for the parents. Bob can assign access rights to his sons’ group for certain shares such
as a cartoons share and allow only the parents’ group to access the scary movie share. This is how
he would create the group.
1In the NSA’s administration web configurator screen, click Groups > Add Group.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
88
2Specify a name for the group. Select the user(s) you want to add to the group from the Available
User(s) list and click Add Selected User(s). Configure the screen as follows. Then click Apply to
create the group.
Now that Bob has created a group for Jimmy and Kevin, he can go through the steps again to
create another group for the parents. Then he can see the rest of the tutorials for how to use the
groups in assigning access rights to shares.
5.9.4 Accessing a Share From Windows Explorer
If you map a NSA share (where data is stored) to a Windows network drive, you can use Windows
Explorer to transfer files to and from the NSA as if it was another folder on your computer. Here he
maps Jimmy’s share to Jimmy’s computer.
1Start Windows Explorer and go to the NSA’s server name. The default is ‘nsa’ followed by the
number of your model (‘nsa325’ for example).
2Click Tools > Map Network Drive.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 89
3Select the network drive that you want to map the NSA to from the Drive list box. This example
uses I. Then browse to and select the share on the NSA. Click Finish.
4Enter the username and password for Jimmy’s account and click OK. You do not need to do this if
the username and password are the same as Jimmy’s Windows login.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
90
5After the mapping is done, you can then simply copy and paste or drag and drop files from/to your
local computer’s drives to or from this network folder. Just like the NSA’s share was another folder
on your computer.
Now that Bob has mapped Jimmy’s share to Jimmy’s computer, he can go through the steps again
to map Kevin’s share to Kevin’s computer.
5.9.5 Accessing a Share Using FTP
You can also use FTP to access the NSA. Suppose Jimmy is temporarily using a different computer
and wants to access his share without mapping it to the computer. This is how he would do it.
1Open the FTP client (Windows Explorer is used here) and type “ftp://username@server” where
“username” is the account’s username and “server” is the NSA’s IP address or server name.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 91
2Enter your password and click Login.
3Now you can access files and copy files from/to your local computer’s drives to or from this network
folder.
5.9.6 Accessing a Share Through the Web Configurator
You can browse and access files through the web configurator.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
92
1Log into the NSA web configurator (see Section 4.3 on page 45) using the appropriate user name
and password (this example uses Jimmy’s) and click File Browser. Click a share (the Jimmy share
in this example) to see the top level of the share’s contents.
2Click a folder’s file name to browse the folder. You can open files or copy them to your computer.
You can also create new folders and upload additional files to the share.
3Click the logout icon when your are done.
5.10 Download Service Tutorial
This tutorial covers using the NSA to download a file from the Internet. Use this same procedure for
BitTorrent downloads as well as regular HTTP (web) and FTP downloads. See Section 10.11.2 on
page 213 for more on the download service.
5.10.1 Copying/Pasting a Download Link
1Open your Internet browser (this example uses Internet Explorer).
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 93
2Find a download link for the file you want. In this example, www.zyxel.com has a Download Now
link for downloading a datasheet for ZyXEL’s GS-2024 (a device for making phone calls over the
Internet).
Note: Make sure the link opens either the file you want or a pop-up window about how to
handle the file.
Note: It is also OK for the link to open a .torrent file. If you are redirected to a screen that
says the download should start in a few seconds, there may be a link to click if the
download does not start automatically. See if that link opens the file or the pop-up
window.
3Right-click the download link and select Copy Shortcut in Internet Explorer (or Copy Link
Location in Firefox).
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
94
4Log into the NSA web configurator (see Section 4.3 on page 45) using the administrator account
and click Application Zone and the Application Zone > Download Service link.
5Click Add.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 95
6Right-click the URL field and select Paste.
7The URL displays in the URL field. Click Apply.
8After a few moments, the download task appears in the Download Service screen’s Active tab.
The download appears in the Completed tab when it is done. By default the NSA stores all
downloads in the admin share’s download folder. See Section 5.9.4 on page 88, Section 5.9.5 on
page 90, or Section 5.9.6 on page 91 for how to access a share.
5.10.2 Installing the Link Capture Browser Plugin
In addition to copying and pasting a download link to the Download Service screen, you can also
install a link capture browser plugin in your web browser. Use the plugin to easily add a download
link to the NSA’s download service. See Section 10.11.3 on page 214 for more on the link capture
browser plugin.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
96
Note: At the time of writing the plugin supports Internet Explorer 6.0/7.0 and Mozilla
Firefox 2.0/3.0; it does not support Windows 7.
Internet Explorer
1Open the folder containing the link capture browser plugin.
2Double-click on the plugin to display the following screen. Click I Agree to begin installation.
3Select a location to save the plugin and click Install. Close the screen once the installation is
complete.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 97
4Open Internet Explorer and locate a download link. In this example, www.zyxel.com has a
Download Now link for downloading a user’s guide for ZyXEL’s NBG410W3G (a 3G wireless
router). Right-click on the download link and select NSA Setting.
5Enter the NSA’s web address. The default is ‘nsa’ followed by the number of your model (‘nsa325
for example). Then click Apply. A warning message displays asking for confirmation. Click OK to
apply the setting.
Firefox
1Open Firefox.
2Open the folder containing the link capture browser plugin.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
98
3To install the plugin, drag and drop the plugin to Firefox.
4The following screen displays. Click Install Now.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 99
5You need to restart Firefox after the installation.
6When Firefox restarts, a message displays to show the installation succeeded. The plugin is
installed as an extension in Add-ons. Click Options to configure the NSA’s web address.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
100
7Enter the NSA’s web address. The default is ‘nsa’ followed by the number of your model (‘nsa325
for example). Then click OK.
5.10.3 Using the Link Capture Browser Plugin
Once you install the plugin, you may begin sending download links to the NSA from your web
browser. This example shows how to send a download link to the NSA’s download service using the
link capture browser plugin.
1Open your Internet browser (this example uses Firefox).
2Find a download link for the file you want. In this example, www.zyxel.com has a Download Now
link for downloading a user’s guide for ZyXELs P-660W-T1 (an ADSL router).
3Right-click on the download link and select Send to NSA.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 101
4The login screen shows up. Enter your NSA’s login information and click Login to send the link to
the download service. A confirmation message displays.
5Log into the NSA web configurator (see Section 4.3 on page 45) using the administrator account
and click Application Zone and the Application Zone > Download Service link.
6The download task appears in the Download Service screen’s Active or Queue tab. It may
appear in the Completed tab if the NSA already finished downloading the file or it may appear in
the Error tab if the NSA failed to download the file.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
102
By default the NSA stores all downloads in the admin share’s download folder. See Section 5.9.4
on page 88, Section 5.9.5 on page 90, or Section 5.9.6 on page 91 for how to access a share.
5.10.4 Configuring the Download Service Preferences
Once you added a list of download tasks to the NSA (see Section 5.10.1 on page 92 and Section
5.10.3 on page 100), you can have the NSA download files during a specific time period of the day.
You can also configure the BitTorrent settings to control bandwidth and optimize download
efficiency.
Say you have the NSA turned on all the time, but you only want the NSA download files at night.
Here is how you use the download period control feature to set the time range.
1Click Applications > Download Service > Preferences to open the General Settings screen.
2Select Enable Download Period Control and use the arrows to adjust the time period from 23:30
to 09:00. Click Apply to save your changes. The NSA only downloads files within this 9.5-hour
period every day.
Note: If you configure the Power On/Off Schedule feature in the Power Management
screen, make sure your active download period does not conflict with the power-off
period.
Note: If power failure occurs during the active download period, the NSA will verify
whether the downloaded files were damaged. If a file is corrupted, the NSA will
download the file again. If the file is intact but not completely downloaded, the NSA
will resume the download task after it restarts.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 103
3When it is not the download time, you see a message in the Download Service screen, indicating
the active download period.
Click Applications > Download Service > Preferences > BitTorrent to open the following
screen. Enter the information below and then click Apply.
Here is a list of BitTorrent settings you want to configure for your NSA:
Limit the maximum upload rate to 20 KB/s.
Enter this value in the Max. upload rate field.
Actively download three torrent files but only upload one at a time.
Enter 3 in the Maximum Number of Active Torrents field and enter 1 in the Maximum
Number of Seeding Jobs field.
Keep sharing until the NSA has shared equal or greater amount of the downloaded files.
Select the check box and enter 100 in the Upload/Download Ratio field.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
104
Click Edit IP Filter. Use an online IP filter table from http://www.bluetack.co.uk/config/level1.gz
for example to protect BitTorrent downloads.
Enter the URL in the Update IP Filter from the Internet Every Week field.
5.10.5 Using Download Service Notification
Use an RSS feed reader on your computer to keep track of files the NSA has downloaded. The
following examples show how to subscribe to the NSA’s download service notifications. See Section
10.11.4 on page 214 for more on download service notifications.
Some RSS readers may not support the NSA’s download service notifications. For example, Google
Reader cannot support this feature if the NSA has a private IP address.
Note: It is recommended to subscribe to the download service notifications using the
built-in reader in Internet Explorer 7 or higher, or Firefox.
You have to activate this feature in the Download Service screen. Click Applications >
Download Service to open the following screen. Select Enable Download Notify and click
Apply.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 105
Internet Explorer 7 Example
1After you activate download service notification, click the RSS feed icon.
2The following screen displays. Select Subscribe to this feed.
3The following screen displays. Click Subscribe.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
106
4Click the Favorite icon on your browser and select the Feeds tab to check the updates of your
NSA’s download list.
Firefox Example
1After you activate download service notification, click the RSS feed icon.
2The following screen displays. Select Live Bookmarks from the drop-down list and click
Subscribe Now.
3The following screen displays. Select Bookmarks Menu and click Add.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 107
4From the Firefox’s Bookmarks Menu, select Download Notify to check the updates of your NSA’s
download list.
5.11 Broadcatching Tutorial
Use broadcatching to have the NSA download frequently updated digital content like TV programs,
radio talk shows, Podcasts (audio files), and blogs. This example shows how to subscribe the NSA
to the CNET TV Internet television channel. See Section 10.8 on page 203 for more on the
broadcatching service.
1Open your Internet browser (this example uses Firefox).
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
108
2Find the link for the RSS feed containing the channel you want to add. In this example, http://
reviews.cnet.com/4520-11455_7-6333605-1.html has an RSS link for subscribing to the CNET Live
podcast. However this is not the link for the actual RSS feed. Click the link to go to another screen
that has RSS feed links.
Note: Make sure the link goes to the actual RSS feed instead of to another list of links or
information about the channel.
One way to test this is by clicking the link. Clicking an actual RSS feed link opens a screen of XML
code (in browsers without an RSS feed aggregator) or a window where you can add the RSS feed
(in browsers with an RSS feed aggregator).
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 109
3Right-click the download link and select Copy Link Location in Firefox (or Copy Shortcut in
Internet Explorer).
4Log into the NSA web configurator (see Section 4.3 on page 45) using the administrator account
and click Administration > Applications > Broadcatching.
5Click Add Channel.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
110
6Right-click the URL field and select Paste.
7The URL displays in the URL field.
8Select a policy for what items to download. This example uses Manually Choose Items for
Download so you will be able to select individual items to download later.
9Select a policy for what items to delete. This example keeps the most recent 10 items.
10 Click Apply.
11 After a few moments, the channel appears in the Broadcatching screen where you can select
items you want to download. The NSA saves the items you download in a folder named after the
channel. By default, the channel folders are created in the admin share’s download folder. The
NSA’s media server feature makes it easy for users on your network to play the broadcatching files
you download. See Section 10.11.1 on page 212 for more on the media server.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 111
5.12 Printer Server Tutorial
Do the following to have the NSA let computers on your network share a printer. See
www.zyxel.com for a list of compatible printers.
1Make sure the NSA is on and the SYS light is on steady (not blinking).
2Use a USB cable to connect the printer’s USB port to one of the NSA’s USB ports. Make sure the
printer is also connected to an appropriate power source.
3Turn on the printer.
4The NSA detects the printer after a few moments.
5On your computer, open your CIFS file sharing program (Windows Explorer for example) and
browse to the NSA. Double-click the printer’s icon.
NSA
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
112
6If you get a warning screen, click the option that lets you continue (Yes in this example).
7If your computer does not already have the printer’s driver installed, you will need to install it. In
this example, click OK.
8Use the wizard screens to install the printer driver on the computer. You may need to get the file
from the printer’s CD or the printer manufacturer’s website (the driver is not installed on the NSA).
Note: You must install the printer driver on each computer that will use the printer.
After the driver installation finishes, the computer is ready to use the printer. Select the printer in
an application to use it to print. Browse to the NSA using a CIFS program (like Windows Explorer)
and double-click the printer’s icon to open the printer’s queue of print jobs.
Note: Repeat steps 5 to 8 on your other computers so they can also use the printer.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 113
5.13 Copy and Flickr Auto Upload Tutorial
Amy received some photos taken during her best friend’s wedding and saved the files on a USB
disk. She wants to save a copy of the photos in the NSA and upload the photos to her Flickr
account.
Amy has to activate the NSA’s auto upload feature. See Section 12.4 on page 275 for more details
on setting up a Flickr account for auto upload. In this example Amy select the NSA’s photo share for
auto upload.
This is how Amy would transfer the files from her USB disk to the NSA.
1Click Applications > Copy/Sync Button in the navigation panel to open the screen.
2Configure the copy settings as shown and click Apply.
3Press and release the COPY/SYNC button on the NSA’s front panel to start copying files.
4The copied files can be found in a new folder in the photo share. The name of this folder is the date
(yyyy-mm-dd) and time (hh-mm-ss) when the folder is created.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
114
5The NSA also automatically uploads the copied files to Flickr.
r
5.14 FTP Uploadr Tutorial
FTP Uploadr can automatically upload files saved on the NSA to a remote FTP server. Amy wants to
share files on her NSA with Susan. They each have an NSA at home, so Susan has to set her NSA as
an FTP server for Amy to automatically send files using FTP Uploadr.
l
To set the NSA as an FTP server, click Applications > FTP to open the FTP screen. Select Enable
FTP and click Apply.
Amy’s NSA Susan’s NSA
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 115
Susan also has to create a user account and share on her NSA for Amy to upload files. The share is
used for files uploaded from Amy’s NSA. Amy will then use the following information to configure
FTP Uploadr on her NSA.
This is how Amy would set up the NSA’s FTP Uploadr.
1Click Applications > Auto Upload > FTP Uploadr to open the FTP Uploadr screen. Select
Enable FTP Uploadr and click Apply to turn on FTP Uploadr.
2Click Add Server.
3Enter the information as describe in Table 15 on page 115. Click Apply to add the server.
Table 15 FTP Uploadr Tutorial: FTP Server Information
FTP Domain Name or IP Address example2.com
FTP User Name Amy
FTP Password xxxxx
Share (Remote Path) Amy
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
116
4In the FTP Uploadr screen, click Preferences to configure the auto upload settings.
5Amy wants to share video files with Susan. In the Preferences screen, click the Add button and
select video from the Shares drop-down list box, enter a forward slash in the Path field and click
Apply to add the share to the Folder Watch List.
t
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 117
6Amy also set the Bandwidth Limit to 20KB/s so that the upload doesn’t slow down her Internet
connection.
Now Amy has set up FTP Uploadr to send files to Susan’s NSA. Every time Amy adds new files or
renames files in the video share, these new or modified files will be uploaded automatically to the
Amy share on Susan’s NSA.
Similarly, Susan can go through the steps described above to configure FTP Uploadr on her NSA.
Once Susan completes the setup, Amy can also receive files from Susan’s NSA.
5.15 Web Configurators Security Sessions
These tutorials show you how to configure security for the NSA’s Web Configurator sessions. You
will customize the NSA’s self-signed SSL certificate and distribute it to your users.
Amy’s NSA Susan’s NSA
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
118
5.15.1 Customizing the NSA’s Certificate
1Click Maintenance > SSL and then select Edit a self-signed CA certificate and click Edit.
2Next, let’s modify the certificate by changing the Common Name to this NSA’s host name of “nsa”,
the Organization to “ZyXEL” and the Key Length to 2048.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 119
3The NSA restarts its network services and returns you to the login screen.
5.15.2 Downloading and Installing Customized Certificate
1Log in and return to Maintenance > SSL. Under Modify the Existing Certificate, click
Download.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
120
2Save the file to your computer.
3Find the certificate file on your computer and double-click it.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 121
4Install the certificate. The rest of the steps in this section are an example of installing a certificate
in Windows. See Appendix D on page 411 for other examples. In the Certificate dialog box, click
Install Certificate.
5In the Certificate Import Wizard, click Next.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
122
6Leave Automatically select certificate store based on the type of certificate selected and
click Next.
7In the Completing the Certificate Import Wizard screen, click Finish.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 123
8If you are presented with another Security Warning, click Yes.
9Finally, click OK when presented with the successful certificate installation message.
5.15.3 Turn on the NSA’s Web Security
Now that you have customized the NSA’s certificate and installed it in your computer, you can turn
on security for your Web Configurator sessions. This example uses Firefox 3.0. See Appendix D on
page 411 for more information on browsers and certificates.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
124
1Close your web browser and open it again to reset its session with the NSA. Log in and click
Maintenance > SSL. Select Force HTTPS and click Apply.
2A warning screen pops up if applying your change may disconnect some users. Click Apply to
continue.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 125
3The NSA logs you out and automatically redirects your formerly non-secure (HTTP) connection to a
secure (HTTPS) connection. Your browser may give you a warning about the device’s public key
certificate. Add an exception to allow your browser to bypass the warning.
4Click Add Exception.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
126
5Click Get Certificate.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 127
6Before you add an exception, verify that the device to which you are trying to connect is providing
the correct certificate. Click View.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
128
7The SHA1 fingerprint must match the NSA’s certificate you downloaded from the NSA to your
computer. (Double-click the NSA’s certificate file and then click Details and look at the
Thumbprint). Click Close.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 129
8If the certificate fingerprints match, click Confirm Security Exception, otherwise click Cancel.
9The login screen displays.
Now, anyone who connects to the NSA’s Web Configurator screens will automatically do so by
HTTPs. Use a secure method to let your users know the correct fingerprint for the NSA’s certificate
so they can check it before adding a security exception (as in steps 6 to 7 on pages 127 to 128).
See the next section for how to use FTPES with the NSA for secure FTP transfers.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
130
5.16 Using FTPES to Connect to the NSA
This section covers how to use FTP over Explicit TLS/SSL with the NSA for secure FTP transfers.
Before you go through this section, read Section 5.15 on page 117 to configure HTTPS. This
example uses FileZilla.
1Open FileZilla and click File > Site Manager > New Site.
Configure the Host field with the NSA’s address.
•Set the Servertype to FTPES - FTP over explicit TLS/SSL.
Configure the account name and password.
Click Connect.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 131
2A security warning screen displays. The SHA1 fingerprint must match the NSA’s certificate you
downloaded from the NSA to your computer. (Double-click the NSA’s certificate file and then click
Details and look at the Thumbprint). If they match, click OK.
The shares and folders to which Gonzo has access display. Now you can use FTP to securely transfer
files to or from the NSA. Use a secure method to let your users know the correct fingerprint for the
NSA’s certificate so they can check it before adding a security exception.
5.17 Using a Mac to Access the NSA
This tutorial shows you how to find the NSA on Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard).
You can access the NSA in two ways:
•Use the Finder to browse for the NSA, or
•Use the Finder > Go option to connect to the NSA.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
132
5.17.1 Finder
1Open a new Finder window.
2Select All under the SHARED sidebar. Look for the NSA from the Network list.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 133
3Expand the NSA to display the shares you may access.
5.17.2 Go Menu
4In the Finder, click Go > Connect to Server.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
134
5When the Connect to Server dialog box opens, enter smb:// and the NSA’s IP address in the
Server Address field. You may also click Browse to have the Mac search for the NSA. Click
Connect.
6Once you establish the connection, you can access the NSA from the Finder or directly from the
desktop.
5.18 How to Use the BackupPlanner
Note: The screens and links in this section appear only after you have installed and
enabled BackupPlanner. BackupPlanner is an application that you can install using
Package Management (see Chapter 11 on page 225.)
Use the NSA’s BackupPlanner to have a backup of your files and folders.
Schedule backups for times when the network is not busy (like at night or on weekends). For
example, you might do daily backups of important individual files or folders and a weekly general
archive. You can save backups to another location so your files can survive even if the original RAID
or NSA fails.
5.18.1 Creating an Archive Backup
To backup the NSA every week to a remote NSA:
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 135
1Click Protect > Backup > Add Job.
Figure 51 Protect > Backup
2Identify the backup job and select Archive.
New files are often added to the shares that you need to back up and existing files are not
frequently changed so select Incremental. The NSA does a full backup first and later only copies
source files that are new and/or modified since the last backup. This example sets the NSA to do
another full backup after every four incremental backups.
Figure 52 Protect > Backup > Add Job: Step 1
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
136
3Select the volume1 check box to select all the folders and files.
Select Remote and enter the other NSA’s address, username, password, and share name.
If you want to make sure the remote NSA is reachable, click Test Connection.
Figure 53 Protect > Backup > Add Job: Step 2
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 137
4In this example, the target NSA is on the LAN so leave the compression off.
Security is already configured on the target NSA so you can leave the encryption off, too.
Have the NSA keep 3 backups.
Figure 54 Protect > Backup > Add Job: Step 3
5Set the frequency to Weekly. Schedule the backup for 5:00 every Saturday morning.
Protect > Backup > Add Job: Step 4
5.18.2 Creating a Synchronization Backup
To create a synchronization backup:
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
138
1Click Protect > Backup > Add Job.
Figure 55 Protect > Backup
Name the backup job and select Synchronization.
You want only your current set of files in the remote NSA’s folder, so you select Mirror to make the
target folder identical to the source folder. The NSA deletes any other files in the target folder.
Figure 56 Protect > Backup > Add Job: Step 1
2Select the folder that needs to be mirrored (your Private folder in this example) and Remote.
Enter the other NSA’s address and administrator password.
Click Show target content to display the remote NSA’s contents.
Select the destination on the remote NSA (Backups in this example).
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 139
• Click Next.
Figure 57 Protect > Backup > Add Job: Step 2
3Click OK in the warning dialog box.
Figure 58 Protect > Backup > Add Job: Step 3
4For this example, assume the connection to the German branch office is a good one and not many
files need to be backed up so leave the compression off.
Turn on the encryption to protect these sensitive files during the transfer. The final files stored
on the remote NSA will be unencrypted (usable).
Restrict the bandwidth usage to 256 KB/s to stop the archives from using all of your network
connection’s available bandwidth.
You don’t have to configure a purge policy for a synchronization backup.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
140
Click Next.
Figure 59 Protect > Backup > Add Job: Step 3
5Schedule the backup to occur every morning at 3:00 and click Done.
Figure 60 Protect > Backup > Add Job: Step 4
You do not need to use a special restore process to use the files a synchronization backup creates.
The copy of files that the NSA creates on the other NSA’s Backups share can be used directly by
anyone with access to that share.
5.18.3 Restoring Archived Files by Backup Job
If you have backup jobs for which the NSA has already performed backups, you can restore the files
based on the backup job. Do the following:
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 141
1Click Protect > Backup screen, select a backup job and click Restore Archive.
Figure 61 Protect > Backup
2Select which backup to use and click Next.
Figure 62 Protect > Backup > Restore Archive: Step 1
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
142
3Select the files and folders you want to restore and click Next.
Figure 63 Protect > Backup > Restore Archive: Step 2
4Select the original location and click Done.
Figure 64 Protect > Backup > Restore Archive: Step 3
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 143
5The NSA restores the files into the share. When it finishes you can access the files.
Figure 65 Protect > Backup > Restore Archive: Progress
5.18.4 Restoring by Backup Files
If you deleted an archive backup job or the NSA or the RAID array containing the backup job failed
you cannot restore archived files by the backup job. In this example, the NSA’s RAID array failed.
You’ve replaced the hard drives and re-configured the RAID. To restore by backup files:
1Click Protect > Restore. Specify where the archive files are located. In this example, enter
“192.168.3.2” as the IP address, “admin” as the account name, “1234” as the password, and
“Backups” as the share name. Click Test Connection. Click Next.
Figure 66 Protect > Restore: Step 1
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
144
2Select the backup job and backup time and click Next.
Figure 67 Protect > Restore: Step 2
3Select everything in the share except the recycle folder. Click Next.
Figure 68 Protect > Restore: Step 3
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide 145
4Browse to the folder where you want to put the files. Click Done.
Figure 69 Protect > Restore: Step 4
5The NSA restores the files and you can use them again.
Chapter 5 Tutorials
Media Server User’s Guide
146
147
PART II
Technical Reference
148
Media Server User’s Guide 149
CHAPTER 6
Status Screen
6.1 Overview
This chapter describes the Status screen, which is the first advanced administration screen that
displays.
6.2 The Status Screen
Click Administration in the Home screens (Section 4.5 on page 58) to open the Web Configurator.
You can also view the status screen, by clicking Status on the top-left of the navigation panel.
Figure 70 Status
Chapter 6 Status Screen
Media Server User’s Guide
150
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 16 Status
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Status Click this to refresh the status screen statistics.
System Information
Server Name This displays the name which helps you find the NSA on the network. Click the
Edit icon to go to the screen where you can configure this.
Model Name This displays which model this NSA device is.
Firmware Version This is the NSA firmware version. Click the Edit icon to go to the Maintenance >
FW Upgrade screen from which you can upload/upgrade new firmware.
MAC Address This displays the NSA’s unique physical hardware address (MAC). You need the
MAC address to register the product at myZyXEL.com. Customer support may also
request it for troubleshooting purposes.
Media Server Status This shows whether the media server function is enabled or disabled. It must be
enabled for media clients to play content files stored on the NSA. Click the Edit
icon to go to the screen where you can configure this.
FTP Server Status This shows whether the FTP server function is enabled or disabled. It must be
enabled to use FTP file transfer to/from the NSA. Click the edit icon to go to the
screen where you can configure this.
Web Publishing Status This shows whether the Web server function is enabled or disabled. It must be
enabled to use HTTP to access shares on the NSA. Click the Edit icon to go to the
screen where you can configure this.
UPS This shows the Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) capacity. Click the Edit icon to
go to the screen where you can configure this.
CPU Usage This displays a summary of CPU usage by all current processes.
Click the Refresh icon to update this display. It also automatically updates itself
every 10 seconds.
Note: If too many users are using the NSA then the NSA may appear sluggish.
CPU Temperature This displays the current temperature near the NSA’s CPU. The NSA generates an
emergency log if the temperature goes out of the normal operating range. If the
temperature goes even higher, the NSA shuts down automatically to avoid
damage from overheating. If the NSA overheats, make sure the fans are working
and it is in a well ventilated place.
Click the Refresh icon to update this display. It also automatically updates itself
every 60 seconds.
Fan Speed This is the RPM (Rotations Per Minute) of the NSA’s fans.
Click the Refresh icon to update this display. It also automatically updates itself
every 60 seconds.
Memory Usage This shows how much of the NSA's total memory is being used.
Click the Refresh icon to update this display. It also automatically updates itself
every 10 seconds.
Volume Status A volume is a storage area on a single disk or spread across a number of disks
within a single file system.
Internal Volume (or SATA
Volume) This displays the volumes created on the hard drives installed in the NSA.
Click the Edit icon to open the Storage screen. You can create and edit the NSA’s
internal volume. See Chapter 8 on page 157 for more details.
Chapter 6 Status Screen
Media Server User’s Guide 151
External Volume (or USB
Volume) This displays the volumes created on USB hard drives connected to the NSA. USB
disks are numbered in the order that you insert USB devices.
Click the Edit icon to open the Storage screen. You can create and edit the
external volume. See Chapter 8 on page 157 for more details.
Status This icon indicates whether the volume is healthy, degraded, or down.
Name This field shows the name for the volume.
Configuration This field (also known as Type) shows what type of data storage system (a RAID
type or JBOD) an internal volume is using.
File System This field shows what file system an external (USB) volume is using.
Disk(s) For internal drives, this shows which hard drive bays are included in the volume.
For external drives, this field shows front USB for the front USB port and rear
USB1 and rear USB2 for the rear USB ports.
Disk Usage This field shows total disk size, the percentage of the disk being used and the
percentage that is available.
Active Sessions This shows how many users are currently connected to the NSA.
Type This shows whether it’s a Windows/CIFS, web (web configurator), or FTP
connection to the NSA.
Share Name This displays the shared folder name on the NSA that the user is connected to for
CIFS sessions and is blank for FTP and web sessions.
Username This displays the name of the user connected to the NSA if one is defined.
ANONYMOUS FTP displays if a username is not defined for the user’s connection.
Connected At This displays the date and time the user last connected to the NSA in year, month,
day, hour, minute, second format.
IP Address This displays the IP address of the computer connected to the NSA.
Table 16 Status (continued)
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Chapter 6 Status Screen
Media Server User’s Guide
152
Media Server User’s Guide 153
CHAPTER 7
System Setting
7.1 Overview
This chapter gives an overview of the various features included in the system setting screens. You
can identify your NSA on the network and set the time that the NSA follows for its scheduled tasks/
logs.
7.2 What You Can Do
•Use the Server Name screen (Section 7.4 on page 154) to specify the NSA’s server and
workgroup names.
•Use the Date/Time screen (Section 7.5 on page 154) to set up date/time and choose a time
zone for the NSA.
7.3 What You Need to Know
Windows/CIFS
Common Internet File System (CIFS) is a standard protocol supported by most operating systems
in order to share files across the network.
CIFS is included by default in Windows operating systems.
You can use Samba with Linux to use CIFS.
CIFS transfers use security.
Time Lag
Time lag occurs when the time on the NSA falls behind the time on the time server. This may
happen if:
the time server is no longer reachable
if the NSA is shut down often (the NSA internal battery keeps time when the NSA is shut down
and this may cause possible variance)
power surges occur.
The NSA gives no warning if time lag occurs. You should resynchronize the time after a power surge
or after you have shut down the NSA several times.
Chapter 7 System Setting
Media Server User’s Guide
154
7.4 The Server Name Screen
Click System Setting > Server Name to open the following screen. Use this screen to configure
your CIFS settings. In this screen you can set your server name and specify if your NSA is a part of
a workgroup.
Note: CIFS cannot be disabled on the NSA.
Figure 71 System Setting > Server Name
The following table describes the labels in these screens.
7.5 The Date/Time Screen
Use this screen to select a time zone and a time server from which your NSA can get the time and
date. This time is then used in NSA logs and alerts.
Table 17 System Setting > Server Name
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Server Name Enter a name to identify your NSA on the network in this field.
You can enter up to 15 alphanumeric characters with minus signs allowed but not as the
last character. The name must begin with an alphabet (a-z) and is NOT case sensitive.
Description Add text here to describe the NSA if the Server Name field is not enough. Use up to 61
characters. You can use all characters except the following: /\:|[]<>+;,?=*"~.
Workgroup Name Type your workgroup name in this field. A workgroup is a group of computers on a
network that can share files.These user accounts are maintained on the NSA.
You can enter up to 15 alphanumeric characters with minus signs allowed but not as the
last character. The name must begin with an alphabet (a-z) and is NOT case sensitive.
Prevent NSA From
Being Master
Browser
Select this option if computers in your workgroup are named with non-English characters
(such as Chinese and Russian). When you perform a search in the workgroup, this option
allows you to locate computers named with non-English characters.
Apply Click this to save your changes.
Reset Click this to restore previously saved settings.
Chapter 7 System Setting
Media Server User’s Guide 155
Click the System Setting link in the navigation panel and then click the Date/Time link to access
the Date/Time screen.
Figure 72 System Setting > Date/Time
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 18 System Setting > Date/Time
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Current System Date Time Setting
Current Time This field displays the time used by your NSA for its logs and alerts.
Current Date This field displays the date used by your NSA for its logs and alerts.
Date Time Setup
Manual Select this radio button to enter the time and date manually.
When you enter the time settings manually, the NSA uses the new setting once you click
Apply.
Note: If you enter time settings manually, they revert to their defaults when power is lost.
New Date
(yyyy-mm-dd) This field displays the last updated date from the time server or the last date configured
manually.
When you set Time and Date Setup to Manual, enter the new date in this field and
then click Apply.
New Time
(hh:mm:ss) This field displays the last updated time from the time server or the last time configured
manually.
When you set Time and Date Setup to Manual, enter the new time in this field and
then click Apply.
Get from Time
Server Select this check box to have the NSA get the time and date from the time server you
select in the Time Server Address field.
Time Server
Address Select a time server from the drop-down list box or select Specify my own time server
and enter the time server you wish to use in the field below. Check with your ISP/network
administrator if you are unsure of this information.
Chapter 7 System Setting
Media Server User’s Guide
156
Synchronize
Now Click this for the NSA to retrieve the correct time from the configured time server right
away.
Time Zone
Time Zone Choose the time zone of your location. This will set the time difference between your time
zone and Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).
Manual Daylight
Saving Daylight saving is a period from late spring to fall when many countries set their clocks
ahead of normal local time by one hour to give more daytime light in the evening.
Select this option to manually enter Daylight Saving Time settings. Clear this option to
have the NSA automatically retrieve Daylight Saving Time settings from the Internet. The
NSA will download a new daylight saving resource file from the Internet every month.
Start Date Configure the day and time when Daylight Saving Time starts if you selected Enable
Daylight Saving. The hour field uses the 24 hour format. Here are a couple of
examples:
Daylight Saving Time starts in most parts of the United States on the second Sunday of
March. Each time zone in the United States starts using Daylight Saving Time at 2 A.M.
local time. So in the United States you would use March, Second, Sunday, at 2:00.
Daylight Saving Time starts in the European Union on the last Sunday of March. All of the
time zones in the European Union start using Daylight Saving Time at the same moment
(1 A.M. GMT or UTC). So in the European Union you would select March, Last, Sunday.
The time you specify depends on your time zone. In Germany for instance, you would
type 2 because Germany's time zone is one hour ahead of GMT or UTC (GMT+1).
End Date Configure the day and time when Daylight Saving Time ends if you selected Enable
Daylight Saving. The o'clock field uses the 24 hour format. Here are a couple of
examples:
Daylight Saving Time ends in the United States on the first Sunday of November. Each
time zone in the United States stops using Daylight Saving Time at 2 A.M. local time. So
in the United States you would select November, First, Sunday, at 2:00.
Daylight Saving Time ends in the European Union on the last Sunday of October. All of the
time zones in the European Union stop using Daylight Saving Time at the same moment
(1 A.M. GMT or UTC). So in the European Union you would select October, Last,
Sunday. The time you specify depends on your time zone. In Germany for instance, you
would type 2 because Germany's time zone is one hour ahead of GMT or UTC (GMT+1).
Offset Specify by how many hours to change the time for Daylight Saving Time.
Apply Click this to save your changes. If you configured a new time and date, Time Zone and
Daylight Saving at the same time, all of the settings take affect.
Cancel Click this to restore your previously saved settings.
Table 18 System Setting > Date/Time (continued)
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Media Server User’s Guide 157
CHAPTER 8
Storage
8.1 Overview
Several NSA features require a valid internal volume. This chapter covers the management of
volumes and disks (both internal and external).
Use the Storage screen (Section 8.2 on page 158) to display information on all volumes, create
internal and external volumes, and configure the volume’s properties.
8.1.1 What You Need to Know About Storage
Disk
SATA or Serial ATA (Advanced Technology Attachment) is a computer bus technology that allows
high-speed data transfer to and from hard disks.
1-bay NSA models include an eSATA port. An eSATA (external SATA) hard disk has the same
specifications as a SATA hard disk but is attached to the NSA using a cable. It can be used either to
expand storage or backup data. The eSATA hard disk is optional. You can attach one SATA and one
eSATA to the NSA hard disk tray. Both SATA and eSATA hard disks are treated as internal disks/
volumes (refer to Section 8.3 on page 161).
USB-attached storage disks are treated as external disks/volumes.
Volume
A volume is a storage area on a disk or disks. You can create volumes on the internal disks and
external disks attached to the USB port(s). You can spread a volume across internal disks but not
between internal and external disks.
Storage Methods
The NSA uses the following storage methods:
RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks)
PC Compatible Volume (1-bay models)
JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disks)
The storage method you use depends on how many disks you have and how many volumes you
want to create. It’s important that you consider this carefully as all data is deleted when you re-
create a volume. See Figure 8.6.2 on page 166 for details on choosing a storage method.
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide
158
Note: 1-bay models configure the internal hard disk (SATA) as JBOD by default. You can
modify it if you attach a second internal hard disk (an eSATA hard disk).
Finding Out More
See Section 8.6 on page 166 for more technical background information on storage.
8.2 The Storage Screen
The Storage screen allows you to create and edit volumes in the NSA.
8.2.1 Disk Replacement Restrictions
See the Quick Start Guide for information on replacing disks in the NSA. When replacing a disk in a
degraded or down RAID volume, the new disk must be at least the same size or bigger than the
other disks that are already in the RAID volume, so as all data in the volume can be restored.
For example, if you have RAID with 250 GB disks, you must put in a 250 GB or bigger disk as a
replacement in order to restore all original data in that volume. If the replacement disk is of a
higher capacity, the extra space on the disk will not be used except if it is for a RAID 1 volume and
you follow the Expanding a RAID 1 Volume procedure.
Note: The NSA automatically repairs a degraded RAID volume if you insert an empty disk
without an existing file system. Otherwise, when you replace a disk you must go to
the Storage > Internal Volume > RAID screen, select the degraded array, and
click Repair.
Resynchronizing or Recovering a RAID 1 Volume
Resynchronizing or recovering a RAID 1 volume that was down is done block-by-block, so the time
it takes depends more on the size of your hard drive(s) than the amount of data you have on them.
Note: Do not restart the NSA while the NSA is resynchronizing or recovering a volume as
this will cause the synchronization to begin again after the NSA fully reboots.
Note: You can access data on a RAID volume while it is resynchronizing or recovering, but
it is not recommended.
Expanding a RAID 1 Volume
Replace a RAID 1 volume’s hard disks with higher capacity hard disks to be able to increase the
RAID 1 volume’s capacity. For example, you have two 500 GB hard disks. You replace one 500 GB
hard disk with a 1 TB hard disk and repair the volume. After the NSA finishes resynchronizing the
volume, you replace the second 500 GB hard disk with another 1 TB hard disk and repair the
volume again. After the NSA finishes the second repair, use the Expand icon to have the RAID1
volume use the rest of the hard disk capacity.
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide 159
8.2.2 Storage Screen
Click Storage > Volume in the navigation panel to display the following screen. Use this screen to
display internal and external volumes on the NSA.
Note: It is recommended to scan the volume every three months or 32 reboots.
Figure 73 Storage > Volume
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 19 Storage > Volume
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Internal/External
Volume (2-bay models) These tables display information on all internal volumes (created on NSA
internal disk drives) and external volumes (created on external disk drives attached to
the NSA USB ports).
Create an Internal
Volume (2-bay models) Click this to format internal hard drives and create a new volume. All
data on the disk(s) will be lost.
Create an External
Volume (2-bay models) Click this to format an external hard drive and create a new volume. All
data on the disk will be lost.
SATA/USB Volume (1-bay models) These tables display information on all internal SATA volumes (created
on NSA internal disk drives) and external volumes (created on external disk drives
attached to the NSA USB ports).
Create a SATA
Volume (1-bay models) Click this to format internal hard drives and create a new volume. All
data on the disk(s) will be lost.
Create a USB
Volume (1-bay models) Click this to format an external hard drive and create a new volume. All
data on the disk will be lost.
Status This field shows whether the volume is Healthy, Resync, Recovering, Degraded, or
Down.
Volume The NSA creates the volume name automatically. You can edit it.
Disk Configuration This field shows which disks and data storage system the volume is using.
File System This field displays the file system that an external (USB) volume is using.
Disk(s) Click or roll your mouse over a link in this column to display the following details about
the hard drive located in the corresponding hard drive bay.
Type: Whether it is an internal or external (USB) hard drive.
Model Name: This is the hard disk number that identifies the disk.
File System: The file system that an external volume is using
Capacity: The total storage space on the disk.
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide
160
You see a warning screen before you delete a volume.
Figure 74 Delete a Volume Warning Screen
8.2.3 Volume Status
You (the administrator) can see the status of a volume in the Status or Storage screens.
The NSA has the following classifications for the status of a volume:
Healthy if all disks in the volume are OK and the file system is functioning properly.
OK means the USB connected device is functioning properly.
Resync when you create a RAID volume.
Recovering appears when repairing a RAID 1 volume. (A RAID1 volume was once degraded, but
you have installed a new disk and the NSA is restoring the RAID1 volume to a healthy state.)
Degraded when a volume is currently down, but can be fixed. Data access may be slower from a
degraded volume, so it’s recommended that you replace the faulty disk and repair the volume as
soon as you can.
Inactive when a disk is missing from a RAID 0 volume or a two-disk JBOD volume. The volume
is unusable. If you removed one of the disks you should be able to re-install it and use the
volume again (as long as you did not change anything on the disk). If a disk has failed, you need
to replace it and re-create the whole volume. All data will be lost. See page 348 for how to install
or replace a hard drive.
Down when a volume is down and can not be fixed.
A down RAID volume cannot be used until you repair or replace the faulty disk(s) in the volume.
Degraded means one of the disks in the RAID volume is not available but the volume can still be
used. For a degraded volume, you should replace the faulty disk as soon as possible to obtain
previous performance. See your Quick Start Guide for more information on replacing a disk.
Capacity This field shows total disk size, the percentage of the volume being used and the
percentage that is available.
Actions This field displays icons allowing you to edit, scan, repair, expand, migrate, or delete a
volume. You can also locate or eject an external volume.
Note: If you delete a volume, all data in the volume disk(s) is erased.
Table 19 Storage > Volume (continued)
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide 161
If it’s down, then the only indication is that you can no longer transfer files to/from the shares in
the down volume. If it’s degraded, then file transfer to/from the shares in the degraded volume will
be slower.
Note: There is no explicit message from CIFS that tells users their volume is degraded or
down.
8.3 Creating an Internal (SATA) Volume
In the Storage screen (Figure 73 on page 159), click the Create an Internal Volume or Create
a SATA Volume button (depending on your model) to open the following screen. Use this screen to
create a new NSA internal disk drive volume.
Note: Creating a volume formats the hard drive. All data on the disk will be lost.
Figure 75 Storage > Create an Internal Volume
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide
162
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 20 Storage > Create an Internal Volume
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Volume Name Type a volume name from 1 to 31 characters. To avoid confusion, it is highly recommended
that each volume use a unique name.
Acceptable characters are all alphanumeric characters, " " [spaces], "_" [underscores], and
"." [periods].
The first character must be alphanumeric (A-Z 0-9).
The last character cannot be a space " ".
For an external volume, type a volume name from 1 to 32 single-byte (no Chinese characters
allowed for example) ASCII characters. The name cannot be the same as another existing
external volume.
JBOD Use this if you want maximum storage capacity and/or you have other means of protecting
your data. JBOD is the only option if you only have one disk installed. With two disks, you can
choose to create a JBOD volume on one of the disks or both.
Select which disks should make up this volume. A disk can only belong to one volume. You do
not need to select anything if only one hard disk is installed.
Internal Disk - Is the hard disk inside a 1-bay NSA.
External Disk - Is the eSATA hard disk connected to a 1-bay NSA.
PC Compatible
Volume (1-bay models only)
This type is only available if you have attached an eSATA hard disk to your NSA.
A primary partition is created on the eSATA hard disk.
Use this to make your eSATA hard disk readable by other computer systems. However, the
computer’s platform (for example, Windows XP SP2) should support the file system you
selected for the eSATA hard disk.
External Disk - This is checked automatically. It refers to the eSATA hard disk that you
can attach as a second drive to your NSA.
File System - Select the file system you want the new volume to use.
Windows file systems include:
NTFS: Recommended for volumes greater than 40 GB.
FAT32: Newer, and more efficient than FAT16. Supports a volume size of up to 32 GB
(Giga Bytes) and individual file sizes of up to 4 GB.
FAT16: Compatible with older Windows operating systems. Supports volume and file
sizes of up to 2 GB.
Linux file systems include:
EXT2: Most commonly used on Linux platforms.
EXT3: The same as EXT2, but adds a journaled file system and is more robust.
ReiserFS: Offers better performance for small files.
XFS: Allows expansion for mounted volumes.
RAID 0 (2-bay models only)
Use this if you want maximum speed for your disks, and/or you have other means of
protecting your data. This is only available when you have two hard disks installed.
RAID 1 Use this if you want to mirror all data on one disk to the other disk. This is only available
when you have two hard disks installed.
Volume will be
created on This field lists all hard disks installed inside the NSA. Select which disks should make up this
volume. A disk can only belong to one volume. You do not need to select anything if only one
hard disk is installed.
Apply Click this to save your changes and create the volume.
Cancel Click this to exit this screen without saving your changes or creating a volume.
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide 163
Note: Once you create the first volume on the NSA, it is recommended to restart the NSA
for better performance.
8.4 Editing a Volume
Click an internal volume’s Edit icon in the Storage screen as shown in Figure 73 on page 159 to
open the following screen. Use this screen to change the volume’s name.
Figure 76 Storage > Edit
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 21 Storage > Edit
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Volume Name For an internal volume, type a volume name from 1 to 31 characters. To avoid confusion, it is
highly recommended that each volume use a unique name.
Acceptable characters are all alphanumeric characters and " " [spaces], "_" [underscores],
and "." [periods].
The first character must be alphanumeric (A-Z 0-9).
The last character cannot be a space " ".
For an external volume, type a volume name from 1 to 32 single-byte (no Chinese
characters allowed for example) ASCII characters. The name cannot be the same as another
existing external volume.
Apply Click this to save your changes and rename the volume.
Cancel Click this to close this screen without saving your changes.
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide
164
8.4.1 Scanning a Volume
Select a volume in the Storage > Volume screen (Section 8.2 on page 158) and click Scan to
open the following screen. Use this screen to scan the volume for errors and select whether or not
to have the NSA automatically repair them.
Figure 77 Storage > Volume > Scan
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
8.5 Creating an External (USB) Volume
Click the Create a New External Volume button (or the Create a USB Volume button
depending on your model) in the Storage screen as shown in Figure 73 on page 159 to open the
following screen. Use this screen to create a new NSA external disk drive volume.
Table 22 Storage > Volume > Scan
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Auto File Repair Select this to have the NSA automatically attempt to repair any errored files it detects
during the scan. This may also result in the NSA finding some files and placing them in the
Lost and Found share.
The rest of the screen shows which users are currently connected to the NSA. They will be
disconnected if you perform the scan.
Type This shows whether it’s a Windows/CIFS, web (Web Configurator), or FTP connection to the
NSA.
Share Name This displays the shared folder name on the NSA that the user is connected to for CIFS
sessions and is blank for FTP and web sessions.
Username This displays the name of the user connected to the NSA if one is defined. ANONYMOUS
FTP displays if a username is not defined for the user’s connection.
IP Address This displays the IP address of the computer connected to the NSA.
Apply Click this to have the NSA scan the volume.
Cancel Click this to close this screen without scanning the volume.
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide 165
Note: Creating a volume formats the drive. All data on the disk will be lost.
Figure 78 Storage > Create an External Volume
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
8.5.1 External Disks
You may connect USB storage devices that support the following file systems to the NSA.
Windows File Systems: NTFS, FAT32 and FAT16.
Linux File Systems: ReiserFS, EXT2, EXT3, and XFS.
Table 23 Storage > Create an External Volume
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Volume Name Type a volume name from 1 to 31 characters. The name cannot be the same as another
existing external volume.
Acceptable characters are all alphanumeric characters and " " [spaces], "_" [underscores],
and "." [periods].
The first character must be alphanumeric (A-Z 0-9).
The last character cannot be a space " ".
Available Disk(s) Select the external (USB) device upon which you want to create the volume.
File System Select the file system you want the new volume to use.
Windows file systems
NTFS: Recommended.
FAT32: Newer, and more efficient than FAT16. Supports a volume size of up to 2 TB
(Tera Bytes) and individual file sizes of up to 4 GB.
FAT16: Compatible with older Windows operating systems. Supports volume and file
sizes of up to 2 GB.
Linux file systems
EXT2: Older file system.
EXT3: The same as EXT2, but adds a journaled file system and is more robust.
ReiserFS: Offers better performance for small files.
XFS: Allows expansion for mounted volumes.
Apply Click this to save your changes and create the volume.
Cancel Click this to exit this screen without saving changes.
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide
166
8.6 Storage Technical Reference
This section provides some background information about the topics covered in this chapter.
8.6.1 Volumes and RAID
A volume is a storage area on a disk or disks. You can create volumes on the internal disks and
external disks attached to the USB port(s). You can spread a volume across internal disks but not
between internal and external disks.
RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) or JBOD is the storage method that the NSA uses.
The storage method you use depends on how many disks you have and how many volumes you
want to create. It’s important that you consider this carefully as all data is deleted when you re-
create a volume.
Note: Back up your data before deleting or re-creating a volume!
For example if you originally have one disk configured as JBOD, and you then install another disk
and want to configure the two disks to use RAID 1, you should first back up all your data on the two
disks (see the Memeo Autobackup utility on the included CD) and then restore your data later after
you create the new volume type.
Below is a table that summarizes some attributes of the various RAID levels as supported on the
NSA. For capacity and storage efficiency, “S” is the size of the smallest drive in the array, and “N” is
the number of drives in the array.
Storage efficiency assumes all drives are of identical size.
Performance rankings are approximations.
8.6.2 Choosing a Storage Method for a Volume
The following is a guide to help you choose a storage method for the various number of disks
supported on the NSA. See Section 8.6.3 on page 167 for theoretical background on JBOD and the
RAID levels used on the NSA. Typical applications for each method are also shown there.
One Disk
If you only have one disk, you must use JBOD. All disk space is used for your data - none is used for
backup. If the disk fails, then you lose all the data on that volume (disk). You can add another disk
Table 24 RAID Quick Comparison
RAID Level 0 1
Number of Disks 2 2
Capacity S*N S*N/2
Storage Efficiency 100% 50%
Fault Tolerance None YYYY
Availability Y YYYY
Read Performance YYYY YYY
Write Performance YYYY YYY
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide 167
to your one-disk JBOD volume later without having to re-create shares, access rights, and so on.
Alternatively, you could create a different JBOD volume if you install a second disk. (and create new
shares, access rights and so on).
Two Disks:
You may choose JBOD, RAID 0 or RAID 1. With two disks you could create:
up to two JBOD volumes
one RAID 0 or RAID 1 volume
Choose JBOD for flexibility and maximum usage of disk space for data.
If you have a 2-bay model, you can choose RAID 0 if performance matters more than data
security. RAID 0 has the fastest read and write performance but if one disk fails you lose all
your data on the volume. It has fast performance as it can read and write to two disks
simultaneously. Performance may matter more than data security to gamers for example. This
method may also be acceptable for data that is already backed up somewhere else.
Choose RAID 1 if data security is more important than performance. Since RAID 1 mirrors data
onto a second disk, you can recover all data even if one disk fails, but the performance is slower
than RAID 0.
8.6.3 Storage Methods
This section contains theoretical background on JBOD and the RAID levels used on the NSA.
Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) is a method of storing data on multiple disks to
provide a combination of greater capacity, reliability, and/or speed. JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks) is
not a RAID storage method but it is included in this discussion.
These are some terms that you need to know in order to understand storage systems.
• Mirroring
In a RAID system using mirroring, all data in the system is written simultaneously to two hard
disks instead of one. This provides 100% data redundancy as if one disk fails the other has the
duplicated data. Mirroring setups always require an even number of drives.
•Duplexing
Like in mirroring, all data is duplicated onto two distinct physical hard drives but in addition it
also duplicates the hardware that controls the two hard drives (one of the drives would be
connected to one adapter and the other to a second adapter).
• Striping
Striping is the breaking up of data and storing different data pieces on each of the drives in an
array. This allows faster reading and writing as it can be done simultaneously across disks.
Striping can be done at the byte level, or in blocks. Byte-level striping means that the first byte
of the file is sent to the first drive, then the second to the second drive, and so on. Block-level
striping means that each file is split into blocks of a certain size and those are distributed to the
various drives. The size of the blocks used is also called the stripe size (or block size).
•Parity
In mirroring 50% of the drives in the array are reserved for duplicate data. Parity is another way
to allow data recovery in the event of disk failure using calculations rather than duplicating the
data. If you have ‘n’ pieces of data, parity computes an extra piece of data. The’n+1’ pieces of
data are stored on ‘n+1’drives. If you lose any one of the ‘n+1’ pieces of data, you can recreate
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide
168
it from the ‘n’ that remain, regardless of which piece is lost. Parity protection is used with
striping, and the “n” pieces of data are typically the blocks or bytes distributed across the drives
in the array. The parity information can either be stored on a separate, dedicated drive, or be
mixed with the data across all the drives in the array.
Note: In the following figures, A1, A2, A3 and so on are blocks of data from the A file.
Similarly, B1, B2, B3 and C1, C2, C3 ar blocks of data from the B and C files.
JBOD
JBOD allows you to combine multiple physical disk drives into a single virtual one, so they appear
as a single large disk. JBOD can be used to turn multiple different-sized drives into one big drive.
For example, JBOD could convert 80 GB and 100 GB drives into one large logical drive of 180 GB. If
you have two JBOD volumes (with one disk in each), a failure of one disk (volume) should not affect
the other volume (disk). JBOD read performance is not as good as RAID as only one disk can be
read at a time and they must be read sequentially. The following figure shows disks in a single
JBOD volume. Data is not written across disks but written sequentially to each disk until it’s full.
RAID 0
RAID 0 spreads data evenly across two or more disks (data striping) with no mirroring nor parity for
data redundancy, so if one disk fails the entire volume will be lost. The major benefit of RAID 0 is
performance. The following figure shows two disks in a single RAID 0 volume. Data can be written
and read across disks simultaneously for faster performance.
RAID 0 capacity is the size of the smallest disk multiplied by the number of disks you have
configured at RAID 0 on the NSA. For example, if you have two disks of sizes 100 GB and 200 GB
respectively in a RAID 0 volume, then the maximum capacity is 200 GB (2 * 100 GB, the smallest
disk size) and the remaining space (100 GB) is unused.
Table 25 JBOD
A1 B1
A2 B2
A3 B3
A4 B4
DISK 1 DISK 2
Table 26 RAID 0
A1 A2
A3 A4
A5 A6
A7 A8
DISK 1 DISK 2
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide 169
Typical applications for RAID 0 are non-critical data (or data that changes infrequently and is
backed up regularly) requiring high write speed such as audio, video, graphics, games and so on.
RAID 1
RAID 1 creates an exact copy (or mirror) of a set of data on another disk. This is useful when data
backup is more important than data capacity. The following figure shows two disks in a single RAID
1 volume with mirrored data. Data is duplicated across two disks, so if one disk fails, there is still a
copy of the data.
As RAID 1 uses mirroring and duplexing, a RAID 1 volume needs an even number of disks (two or
four for the NSA).
RAID 1 capacity is limited to the size of the smallest disk in the RAID array. For example, if you
have two disks of sizes 150 GB and 200 GB respectively in one RAID 1 volume, then the maximum
capacity is 150 GB and the remaining space (50 GB) is unused.
Typical applications for RAID 1 are those requiring high fault tolerance without need of large
amounts of storage capacity or top performance, for example, accounting and financial data, small
database systems, and enterprise servers.
RAID and Data Protection
If a hard disk fails and you’re using a RAID 1 volume, then your data will still be available (but at
degraded speeds until you replace the hard disk that failed and resynchronize the volume).
However, RAID cannot protect against file corruption, virus attacks, files incorrectly deleted or
modified, or the NSA malfunctioning. Here are some suggestions for helping to protect your data.
Place the NSA behind a hardware-based firewall. It should have stateful packet inspection, IDP
(Intrusion Detection and Prevention), and anti-virus (like ZyXEL’s ZyWALL UTM products for
example).
Use anti-virus software on your computer to scan files from others before saving the files on the
NSA.
Keep another copy of important files (preferably in another location).
Table 27 RAID 1
A1 A1
A2 A2
A3 A3
A4 A4
DISK 1 DISK 2
Chapter 8 Storage
Media Server User’s Guide
170
Media Server User’s Guide 171
CHAPTER 9
Network
9.1 Overview
This chapter discusses the network configuration screens. The Network screens allow you to
configure TCP/IP and PPPoE settings for the NSA.
9.2 What You Can Do
•Use the TCP/IP screen (Section 9.4 on page 173) to assign the NSA a dynamic or static IP
address and DNS information.
Use UPnP port mapping (Section 9.5 on page 175) to automatically configure your Internet
gateway’s firewall and Network Address Translation (NAT) to allow access to the NSA from the
Internet.
•Use the PPPoE screen (Section 9.6 on page 179) to configure PPPoE settings for a direct Internet
connection.
9.3 What You Need to Know
IP Address
The NSA needs an IP address to communicate with other devices on your network. The NSA can get
an IP address automatically if you have a device on your network that gives them out. Or you can
assign the NSA a static (fixed) IP address.
IPv6
IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6), is designed to increase IP address space and enhance features.
You can connect the NSA to both IPv4 and IPv6 networks.
DNS Server Address
A DNS (Domain Name System) server maps domain names (like www.zyxel.com) to their
corresponding numerical IP addresses. This lets you use domain names to access web sites without
having to know their IP addresses. The NSA can receive the IP address of a DNS server
automatically (along with the NSA’s own IP address). You can also manually enter a DNS server IP
address in the NSA.
Chapter 9 Network
Media Server User’s Guide
172
PPPoE
Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) allows the NSA to establish a direct Internet
connection if you do not have a router. PPPoE is a dial-up connection. You need a username and
password from your Internet Service Provider (ISP) to set up the connection.
Jumbo Frames
Jumbo frames are Ethernet frames larger than 1500 bytes. They enable data transfer with less
overhead. The bigger the frame, the better the network performance. Your network equipment
such as computers, switches and routers must be capable of supporting jumbo frames. You also
need to enable jumbo frames in all related network devices.
To use jumbo frames, your LAN must support 1 Gbps transmissions (Gigabit Ethernet). All of your
network devices (computer Ethernet cards and switches, hubs, or routers) must also support the
same size of jumbo frames that you specify in the NSA.
Note: If you enable jumbo frames on the NSA in a network that does not support them,
you will lose access to the NSA. If this occurs, you will have to restore the factory
default configuration. Push the RESET button on the NSA’s rear panel and release it
after you hear a beep.
In the following example, the NSA has jumbo frames enabled and set to 8KB frames. This means
the computer, notebook computer, and switch must also have jumbo frames enabled and be
capable of supporting 8KB frames.
Figure 79 Jumbo Frames
Chapter 9 Network
Media Server User’s Guide 173
9.4 The TCP/IP Screen
Use the TCP/IP screen to have the NSA use a dynamic or static IP address, subnet mask, default
gateway and DNS servers.
Click Network > TCP/IP in the navigation panel to open the following screen.
Note: If you change the NSA’s IP address, you need to log in again after you apply
changes.
Figure 80 Network > TCP/IP
Chapter 9 Network
Media Server User’s Guide
174
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 28 Network > TCP/IP
LABEL DESCRIPTION
IP Address
Dynamic Select this option to have the NSA get IP address information automatically.
If no IP address information is assigned, the NSA uses Auto-IP to assign itself an IP
address and subnet mask. For example, you could connect the NSA directly to your
computer. If the computer is also set to get an IP address automatically, the computer
and the NSA will choose addresses for themselves and be able to communicate.
Static Select this option for the NSA to use fixed TCP/IP information. You must fill in the
following fields.
IP Address Type an IP address in this field.
IP Subnet Mask Type an IP subnet mask in this field.
Default Gateway Type a default gateway address in this field.
IPv6 Settings Click this to open a screen where you can configure IPv6 address settings.
Mode: Select Auto to have the NSA use the IPv6 prefix from the connected router’s
Router Advertisement (RA) to generate an IPv6 address. Select Static to manually
enter a fixed IPv6 address. Select Disable to have the NSA not use IPv6.
Address: For static mode, enter the fixed IPv6 address here.
Subnet prefix length: For static mode, enter the IPv6 prefix length here.
Default Gateway: For static mode, enter the IPv6 address of the default gateway
here.
Click Apply to save and apply your settings or click Cancel to close this screen without
saving changes.
DNS DNS (Domain Name System) is for mapping a domain name to its corresponding IP
address and vice versa. If you have the IP address(es) of the DNS server(s), enter
them.
Dynamic Select the option to have the NSA get a DNS server address automatically.
Static Select this option to choose a static DNS server address. Type the DNS server IP
address(es) into the fields below.
Primary DNS
Server Type a primary DNS server IP address.
Secondary DNS
Server Type a secondary DNS server IP address.
HTTP (Web Configurator)
Enable Another Web
Configuration Port Select this to configure an additional HTTP port for accessing the web configurator.
Specify a number in the Port Number field.
Chapter 9 Network
Media Server User’s Guide 175
9.5 UPnP Port Mapping Screen
Use UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) port mapping to allow access from the WAN to services you
select on the NSA. It is recommended that you place the NSA behind an Internet gateway firewall
device to protect the NSA from attacks from the Internet (see RAID and Data Protection on page
169 for firewall type suggestions). Many such Internet gateways use UPnP to simplify peer-to-peer
network connectivity between devices. UPnP can automatically configure the Internet gateway’s
firewall and Network Address Translation (NAT) to allow access to the NSA from the Internet.
Figure 81 UPnP for FTP Access
In the above example, UPnP creates a firewall rule and NAT port forwarding mapping to send FTP
traffic (using TCP port number 21) from the public IP address a.b.c.d to the NSA’s private IP
address of 192.168.1.20.
Use the NSA’s UPnP Port Mapping screen to configure the UPnP settings your Internet gateway
uses to allow access from the WAN (Internet) to services you select on the NSA. You can also set
which port Internet users need to use in order to access a specific service on the NSA.
Note: To use UPnP port mapping, your Internet gateway must have UPnP enabled.
Jumbo Frames Jumbo frames improve network performance. You must have a 1 Gbps (Gigabit
Ethernet) network that supports jumbo frames. Select the largest size of frame that all
of your network devices (including computer Ethernet cards and switches, hubs, or
routers) support.
When enabled, you can choose between 4 KB, 8 KB, and 9 KB frame sizes.
Note: If you enable jumbo frames on the NSA in a network that does not support them,
you will lose access to the NSA. If this occurs, you will have to restore the factory
default configuration. Push the RESET button on the NSA’s rear panel and
release it after you hear a beep.
Network Diagnostic
Tool Use this section to test the network connection to a particular IP address or domain
name. Select an address or type it into the field. Then click Ping to have the NSA send
a packet to test the network connection.
Successfully pinged host - The NSA is able to “ping” the host, the network
connection is OK.
Unable to ping host - The NSA is able to “ping” the selected host.
Apply Click this to save your TCP/IP configurations. After you click Apply, the NSA restarts.
Wait until you see the Login screen or until the NSA fully boots and then use the NAS
Starter Utility to rediscover it.
Reset Click this to restore your previously saved settings.
Table 28 Network > TCP/IP (continued)
LABEL DESCRIPTION
TCP: 21
TCP: 21
192.168.1.20
a.b.c.d
Chapter 9 Network
Media Server User’s Guide
176
If your Internet gateway supports Port Address Translation (PAT is sometimes included with a port
forwarding feature), you can have the Internet users use a different TCP port number from the one
the NSA uses for the service.
Figure 82 UPnP Port Address Translation for FTP Example
In the above example, the Internet gateway uses PAT to accept Internet user FTP sessions on port
2100, translate them to port 21, and forward them to the NSA.
9.5.1 UPnP and the NSA’s IP Address
It is recommended that the NSA use a static IP address (or a static DHCP IP address) if you will
allow access to the NSA from the Internet. The UPnP-created NAT mappings keep the IP address
the NSA had when you applied your settings in the UPnP Port Mapping screen. They do not
automatically update if the NSA’s IP address changes.
Note: WAN access stops working if the NSA’s IP address changes.
For example, if the NSA’s IP address was 192.168.1.33 when you applied the UPnP Port Mapping
screen’s settings and the NSA later gets a new IP address of 192.168.1.34 through DHCP, WAN
access stops working because the Internet gateway still tries to forward traffic to IP address
192.168.1.33. Since you can no longer access the NSA from the WAN, you would have to access
the NSA from the LAN and re-apply your UPnP Port Mapping screen settings to update the
Internet gateway’s UPnP port mappings.
Figure 83 UPnP Using the Wrong IP Address
9.5.2 UPnP and Security
UPnP’s automated nature makes it easier to use than manually configuring firewall and NAT rules,
but it is also less secure. Using UPnP may make your network more susceptible to snooping and
hacking attacks.
TCP: 2100
TCP: 21
192.168.1.20
a.b.c.d
192.168.1.34
a.b.c.d
192.168.1.33
Chapter 9 Network
Media Server User’s Guide 177
9.5.3 The NSA’s Services and UPnP
This section introduces the NSA’s services which an Internet gateway can use UPnP to allow access
to from the Internet.
BitTorrent
BitTorrent is a distributed peer-to-peer file-sharing protocol that the NSA’s download service can
use. Using UPnP port mapping for BitTorrent lets BitTorrent work faster.
CIFS (Windows File Sharing)
Common Internet File System (CIFS) is a standard protocol supported by most operating systems
in order to share files across the network. Using UPnP port mapping for CIFS allows users to
connect from the Internet and use programs like Windows Explorer to access the NSA’s shares to
copy files from the NSA, delete files on the NSA, or upload files to the NSA from the Internet.
If you configure UPnP port mapping to allow CIFS access from the WAN but cannot get it to work,
you may also have to configure the Internet gateway to also allow NetBIOS traffic. See Section 7.3
on page 153 for more on CIFS.
FTP
File Transfer Protocol is a standard file transfer service used on the Internet. Using UPnP port
mapping for FTP allows remote users to use FTP from the Internet to access the NSA’s shares. A
user with read and write access to a share can copy files from the share, delete files from the share,
or upload files to the share. See Section 10.4 on page 184 for more on FTP. If you use UPnP to allow
FTP access from the WAN, you may want to use a different WAN port number (instead of the default
of port 21) to make it more secure. Remember to tell the remote users to use the custom port
number when using FTP to access the NSA.
HTTP (Web Configurator)
You can use UPnP port mapping to allow access to the NSA’s management screens. If you use UPnP
to allow web configurator access from the WAN, you may want to use a different WAN port number
(instead of the default of port 80) to make it more secure. Remember to use the custom port
number when accessing the NSA’s web configurator from the Internet.
HTTP (Web Published Shares)
This is the NSA’s web publishing feature that lets people access files using a web browser without
having to log into the Home screens. Use UPnP port mapping to allow access to these files from the
Internet without having to enter a user name or password. See Section 10.7 on page 202 for more
on web publishing.
9.5.4 Configuring UPnP Port Mapping
Click Network > UPnP > Port Mapping to display the UPnP Port Mapping screen.
Use this screen to set how the Internet gateway’s UPnP feature configure’s the Internet gateway’s
NAT IP address mapping and port mapping settings. These settings allow Internet users connected
Chapter 9 Network
Media Server User’s Guide
178
to the Internet gateway’s WAN interface to access services on the NSA. You can set which port
Internet users need to use to access a specific service on the NSA.
Note: Some Internet gateways will delete all UPnP mappings after reboot. So if the
Internet gateway reboots, you may need to use this screen again to re-apply the
UPnP port mapping.
Figure 84 Network > UPnP > Port Mapping
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 29 Network > UPnP > Port Mapping
LABEL DESCRIPTION
LAN Use these fields to specify what port the Internet gateway uses to connect from its LAN
port to the service on the NSA.
Service Name This read-only field identifies a service on the NSA.
LAN Port Specify the port number (1~65,536) the Internet gateway needs to use to connect from
its LAN port to the service on the NSA. This is the NSA’s internal port number for the
service. Changing a service’s port number in this screen also changes it in other NSA
screens that display it. Similarly, changing a service’s port number in another NSA screen
also changes it here.
The number below this icon is your Internet gateway’s WAN IP address (the IP address
your Internet gateway uses for connecting to the Internet).
WAN Use these fields to specify what port Internet users must use to connect to the Internet
gateway’s WAN port in order to connect to the service on the NSA.
Service Name This read-only field identifies a service on the NSA.
Enable WAN
Access Select this check box to have UPnP configure your Internet gateway to allow access from
the Internet to the NSA’s service.
If you clear this check box, people will not be able to access the NSA’s service from the
Internet unless you manually configure the Internet gateway’s firewall and NAT rules to
allow access.
Chapter 9 Network
Media Server User’s Guide 179
9.6 The PPPoE Screen
Use this screen to configure PPPoE settings for a direct Internet connection.
Click Network > PPPoE in the navigation panel to open the following screen.
Figure 85 Network > PPPoE
WAN Port When you enable WAN access for one of the NSA’s services, specify the port number
(1~65,536) Internet uses need to use to connect to the Internet gateway’s WAN port in
order to access the service on the NSA. Whoever wants to access a service on the NSA
from the Internet must use this port number.
BitTorrent’s WAN port must be the same as the LAN port.
Make sure there is not another service using TCP protocol with the same port number. See
Appendix C on page 407 for a list of common services and their associated protocols and
port numbers.
If another device is using the same port (the Internet gateway has the same port number
mapped to another LAN IP address), the NSA overwrites it when you apply the setting and
WAN users can no longer access the other device.
This icon means the service’s LAN and WAN port numbers must be the same.
This icon means another service is using the same port number as this service. Change
the port number of one of the services so they use different port numbers.
This icon means another service is using the listed port, but the port the other service is
using will be replaced if you apply the setting. The other service will no longer be
accessible from the listed port.
Apply Click Apply to save your changes back to the NSA.
Reset Click Reset to begin configuring this screen afresh.
Table 29 Network > UPnP > Port Mapping (continued)
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Chapter 9 Network
Media Server User’s Guide
180
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 30 Network > PPPoE
LABEL DESCRIPTION
Status
Status This field displays the status of PPPoE connection.
IP Address This field displays the IP address of your PPPoE connection.
IP Subnet Mask This field displays the IP subnet mask of your PPPoE connection.
Configuration
Enable PPPoE
Connection Select this option to establish a direct Internet connection for the NSA. You need to enter
the username and password as given by your ISP.
Username Enter the username exactly as your ISP assigned. If assigned a name in the form
user@domain where domain identifies a service name, then enter both components
exactly as given.
Password Enter the password associated with the username above.
Password
(Confirm) Retype the password for confirmation.
Apply Click this to save your changes.
Reset Click this to restore previously saved settings.
Media Server User’s Guide 181
CHAPTER 10
Applications
10.1 Overview
This chapter discusses the features in the Application screens. The NSA contains various
applications for file sharing and downloading.
10.2 What You Can Do
•Use the FTP Server screen (Section 10.4 on page 184) to configure settings for FTP file transfers
to/from the NSA.
•Use the Media Server screen (Section 10.5 on page 185) to share files with media clients.
•Use the Download Service screen (Section 10.6 on page 190) to download files from the
Internet.
•Use the Web Publishing screen (Section 10.7 on page 202) to publish shares for people to
access files using a web browser.
•Use the Broadcatching screen (Section 10.8 on page 203) to download frequently updated
digital content like TV programs, radio talk shows, Podcasts (audio files), and blogs.
•Use the Print Server screen (Section 10.9 on page 209) to share a printer.
•Use the Copy/Sync Button screen (Section 10.10 on page 211) to transfer files between a USB
device and the NSA.
•Use the Package screen (Chapter 11 on page 225) to set up additional applications in your NSA.
The NSA can download multiple packages/files at once and automatically goes through all the
installation steps.
•Use the Auto Upload screens (Chapter 12 on page 275) to upload files in selected shares to
your Flickr and/or YouTube accounts.
•Use the Dropbox screen (Chapter 13 on page 289) to synchronize and back up your Dropbox
account.
10.3 What You Need to Know
FTP
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a file transfer service that operates on the Internet. A system running
the FTP server accepts commands from a system running an FTP client. FTP is not a secure
protocol. Your file transfers could be subject to snooping.
Chapter 10 Applications
Media Server User’s Guide
182
FTPES (File Transfer Protocol over Explicit TLS/SSL)
File Transfer Protocol over Explicit TLS/SSL (FTPES) is a file transfer service that uses either TLS
(Transport Layer Security) or SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) for secure transfers across the Internet.
It requests for a mutual method of encryption from the FTP server for its file transfer sessions. Your
FTP client must be set to use FTPES as in the following example.
Figure 86 FTP Client Example
DLNA Media Server
The media server feature lets anyone on your network play video, music, and photos from the NSA
(without having to copy them to another computer). The NSA can function as a DLNA-compliant
media server. The NSA streams files to DLNA-compliant media clients such as gaming consoles,
networked TVs, DVD players, stereos, home theaters, satellite boxes, set-top-boxes, mobile
phones, portable music players, and multimedia tablets. The Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA)
is a group of personal computer and electronics companies that works to make products compatible
in a home network.
iTunes Server
The NSA iTunes server feature lets you use Apple’s iTunes software on a computer to play music
and video files stored on the NSA. You can download iTunes from www.apple.com.
Download Service
The NSA’s download service downloads files from the Internet directly to the NSA. You do not have
to download to your computer and then copy to the NSA. This can free up your computer’s system
resources.
The NSA can download using these protocols.
HTTP: The standard protocol for web pages.
FTP: A standard Internet file transfer service.
BitTorrent: A popular distributed peer-to-peer files sharing protocol.
Chapter 10 Applications
Media Server User’s Guide 183
BitTorrent
The NSA includes a BitTorrent client for fast downloading and sharing of large files (such as
educational public domain videos). With BitTorrent, you share while you’re downloading the file.
BitTorrent breaks up the file and distributes it in hundreds of chunks. You start sharing the file as
soon as you have downloaded a single chunk.
Web Publishing
Web publishing lets you “publish” shares (containing folders and files) on the NSA so people can
access the files using a web browser without having to log into the Home screens. This way you can
share files with others without them having to know and enter a username and password.
For example, if you want to share photos in a FamilyPhotos share, you could “web publish” it and
others could use a web browser to access the photos at http://my-NSA’s-IP-Address/MyWeb/
FamilyPhotos.
Broadcatching
Broadcatching is the downloading of digital content from Internet feeds. Use broadcatching to have
the NSA download frequently updated digital content like TV programs, radio shows, podcasts
(audio files), and blogs.
RSS
RSS (Really Simple Syndication) is a format for delivering frequently updated digital content. A
channel uses a feed to deliver its contents (items). Subscribe the NSA to a feed to be able to
download the contents.
Chapter 10 Applications
Media Server User’s Guide
184
10.4 FTP Server
Use FTP or FTPES (FTP over Explicit TTL/SSL) to upload files to the NSA and download files from the
NSA. Click Applications > FTP to open the following screen.
Figure 87 Applications > FTP
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 31 Applications > FTP
LABEL DESCRIPTION
FTP
Enable FTP You can use FTP to send files to the NSA or get files from the NSA. Select this check box
to allow users to connect to the NSA via FTP; otherwise clear the check box.
Connection Limit Enter the maximum number of concurrent FTP connections allowed on the NSA in this
field. See your screen for your model’s connection limit.
Idle Timeout Enter the length of time that an FTP connection can be idle before timing out. The
timeout limit is 300 minutes.
Port Number This is the port number used by the NSA for FTP traffic.
Enable Anonymous
FTP Access Select this check box to allow any user to log into the NSA using ‘FTP’ or ‘anonymous’
as a username and no password. Any other name is considered a username, so must be
valid and have a corresponding correct password.
Chapter 10 Applications
Media Server User’s Guide 185
10.5 The Media Server Screens
The media server application allows you to share media files with media clients.
Customize the port
range for data
transfer
Select this check box to assign a port range for FTP clients to use when downloading
files from the NSA using passive mode.
The connection limit is restricted to half of the port numbers within the range if this
value is smaller than the one configured in the Connection Limit field. For example,
you specified a port range from 1024 to 1029 and configured 10 in the Connection
Limit field. The FTP connection limit will only be 3 (6 ports in the range divided by 2)
because it is the smaller value.
Starting Port Enter the first port number in the range. Choose from 1024 to 65535.
Ending Port Enter the last port number in the range. Choose from 1024 to 65535.