Adobe Flash Professional CS3 User Guide En

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USER GUIDE
PROFESSIONAL
ADOBE® FLASH® CS3
Copyright
© 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.
Using Adobe® Flash® CS3 Professional for Windows® and Macintosh
If this guide is distributed with software that includes an end user agreement, this guide, as well as the software described in it, is furnished under license and may be used or
copied only in accordance with the terms of such license. Except as permitted by any such license, no part of this guide may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or trans-
mitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Adobe Systems Incorporated. Please note that the
content in this guide is protected under copyright law even if it is not distributed with software that includes an end user license agreement.
The content of this guide is furnished for informational use only, is subject to change without notice, and should not be construed as a commitment by Adobe Systems Incorpo-
rated. Adobe Systems Incorporated assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in the informational content contained in this guide.
Please remember that existing artwork or images that you may want to include in your project may be protected under copyright law. The unauthorized incorporation of such
material into your new work could be a violation of the rights of the copyright owner. Please be sure to obtain any permission required from the copyright owner.
Any references to company names in sample templates are for demonstration purposes only and are not intended to refer to any actual organization.
Adobe, the Adobe logo, Adobe Premiere, ActionScript, ColdFusion, Director, Fireworks, Flash, Flash Lite, FreeHand, Illustrator, and Photoshop are either registered trademarks
or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries.
Microsoft and Windows are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Macintosh is a trademark of Apple
Inc. registered in the U.S. and other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
This product includes software developed by the Apache Software Foundation (www.apache.org). MPEG Layer-3 audio compression technology licensed by Fraunhofer IIS and
Thomson Multimedia (http://www.iis.fhg.de/amm/). You cannot use the mp3 compressed audio within the Software for real time or live broadcasts. If you require an mp3
decoder for real time or live broadcasts, you are responsible for obtaining this mp3 technology license. Speech compression and decompression technology licensed from Nelly-
moser, Inc. (www.nellymoser.com) Flash CS3 video is powered by On2 TrueMotion video technology. © 1992-2005 On2 Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.on2.com. This product includes software developed by the OpenSymphony Group (http://www.opensymphony.com/)
Sorenson Spark™ video compression and decompression technology licensed from Sorenson Media, Inc.
Adobe Systems Incorporated, 345 Park Avenue, San Jose, California 95110, USA.
Notice to U.S. Government End Users: The Software and Documentation are “Commercial Items,” as that term is defined at 48 C.F.R. §2.101, consisting of “Commercial
Computer Software” and “Commercial Computer Software Documentation,” as such terms are used in 48 C.F.R. §12.212 or 48 C.F.R. §227.7202, as applicable. Consistent with
48 C.F.R. §12.212 or 48 C.F.R. §§227.7202-1 through 227.7202-4, as applicable, the Commercial Computer Software and Commercial Computer Software Documentation are
being licensed to U.S. Government end users (a) only as Commercial Items and (b) with only those rights as are granted to all other end users pursuant to the terms and conditions
herein. Unpublished-rights reserved under the copyright laws of the United States. Adobe agrees to comply with all applicable equal opportunity laws including, if appropriate,
the provisions of Executive Order 11246, as amended, Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974 (38 USC 4212), and Section 503 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the regulations at 41 CFR Parts 60-1 through 60-60, 60-250, and 60-741. The affirmative action clause and regulations contained in
the preceding sentence shall be incorporated by reference.
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Contents
Chapter 1: Getting started
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Using Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
What’s new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Chapter 2: Workspace
Flash workflow and workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Using the Stage and Tools panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
The Timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Using Flash authoring panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Accessibility in the Flash workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Undo, redo, and history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Automating tasks with the Commands menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Chapter 3: Creating and managing documents
Working with Flash documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Creating and previewing mobile content with Adobe Device Central . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Working with projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Adding media to the library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Working with timelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Working with scenes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Find and Replace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Chapter 4: Adobe Version Cue
Working with Adobe Version Cue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Working with the Version Cue Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Working with Version Cue projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Working with files in Version Cue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Version Cue versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Editing and synchronizing offline files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Version Cue Server Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Version Cue PDF reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Chapter 5: Using imported artwork
Placing artwork into Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Working with Illustrator AI files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Working with Photoshop PSD files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Imported bitmaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
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Chapter 6: Drawing
Drawing Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Using Flash drawing and painting tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Drawing with the Pen tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Reshaping lines and shape outlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Snapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Chapter 7: Working with color, strokes, and fills
Working with color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Modifying color palettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Strokes, fills, and gradients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Chapter 8: Working with graphic objects
About graphic objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Selecting objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Moving, copying, and deleting objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Arranging objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Transforming objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Chapter 9: Using symbols, instances, and library assets
Working with symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Working with symbol instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Library assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Using shared library assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Working with button symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Scaling and caching symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Symbols and ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Chapter 10: Creating animation
Animation basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Using Timeline effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Tweened animation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Chapter 11: Special effects
About filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
About blend modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Chapter 12: Working with text
Text and fonts in Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Creating text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Setting text attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Chapter 13: Creating multilanguage text
Creating multilanguage text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
Encoding text formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Authoring multilanguage text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
XML file format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Multilanguage text and ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
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Chapter 14: Working with sound
Using sounds in Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Exporting Sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Sound and ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
Chapter 15: Working with video
Creating and publishing Flash Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Importing and modifying Flash Video files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
About digital video and Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Encoding video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312
Working with Premier Pro and After Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Using ActionScript to play external Flash Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Chapter 16: Creating e-learning content
Getting started with Flash e-learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
Including a Flash learning interaction in a document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
Adding, naming, and registering assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
Configuring learning interactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Changing the appearance of a learning interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
Tracking to AICC- or SCORM-compliant learning management systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347
Extending learning interaction scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
Chapter 17: Creating accessible content
About accessible content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Using Flash to enter accessibility information for screen readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Specifying advanced accessibility options for screen readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360
Creating accessibility with ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362
Chapter 18: Working with screens
Screen-based documents and the screen authoring environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
Working with screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
Adding content to screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
Chapter 19: ActionScript
Working with ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380
Script Assist mode and behaviors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386
Writing and managing scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Debugging ActionScript 1.0 and 2.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400
Debugging ActionScript 3.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
ActionScript publish settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
Chapter 20: Publishing Flash content
Publishing Flash documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418
Using Flash Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419
Developing applications for mobile devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431
Configuring a web server for Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432
Flash security features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433
Using publish profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434
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HTML publishing templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435
Editing Flash HTML settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439
Chapter 21: Exporting from Flash
About exporting from Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447
Exporting Flash content, images, and video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447
Chapter 22: Printing with Flash
Printing from the Flash authoring tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455
Chapter 23: Best practices
Structuring FLA files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
Organizing ActionScript in an application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 466
Behaviors conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467
Video conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469
Projects and version control guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472
Flash application authoring guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473
Accessibility guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478
Advertising with Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482
Optimizing FLA files for SWF output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484
Tips for creating content for mobile devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501
1
Chapter 1: Getting started
If you haven’t installed your new software, begin by reading some information on installation and other prelimi-
naries. Before you begin working with your software, take a few moments to read an overview of Adobe® Help and
of the many resources available to users. You have access to instructional videos, plug-ins, templates, user commu-
nities, seminars, tutorials, RSS feeds, and much more.
Installation
Requirements
To review complete system requirements and recommendations for your Adobe® software, see the Read Me file
on the installation DVD.
Install the software
1 Close any other Adobe applications open on your computer.
2 Insert the installation disc into your DVD drive, and follow the on-screen instructions.
Note: For more information, see the Read Me file on the installation DVD.
Activate the software
If you have a single-user retail license for your Adobe software, you will be asked to activate your software; this is a
simple, anonymous process that you must complete within 30 days of starting the software.
For more information on product activation, see the Read Me file on your installation DVD, or visit the Adobe
website at www.adobe.com/go/activation.
1 If the Activation dialog box isnt already open, choose Help > Activate.
2 Follow the on-screen instructions.
Note: If you want to install the software on a different computer, you must first deactivate it on your computer. Choose
Help > Deactivate.
Register
Register your product to receive complimentary installation support, notifications of updates, and other services.
To register, follow the on-screen instructions in the Registration dialog box, which appears after you install and
activate the software.
If you postpone registration, you can register at any time by choosing Help > Registration.
Change or reinstall Flash Player
1 Close your browser.
2 Remove any currently installed version of the player.
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For instructions, see TechNote 14157 on the Adobe® Flash® Support Center at www.adobe.com/go/tn_14157.
3 To begin installation, run one of the following in your Players folder:
For the ActiveX control for Windows® (Internet Explorer or AOL), run the Install Flash Player 9 AX.exe file.
For the plug-in for Windows (CompuServe, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape, or Opera), run the Install Flash Player
9.exe file.
For the plug-in for Macintosh® (AOL, CompuServe, Firefox, Internet Explorer for Macintosh, Netscape, Opera, or
Safari), run Install Flash Player 9 (Mac OS 9.x) or Install Flash Player 9 OS X (Mac OS X.x).
Note: To verify installation in Netscape, select Help > About Plug-ins from within the browser.
Using Help
About Flash Help
The Flash Help panel (Help > Flash Help) contains the full set of user-assistance information provided with Flash.
To view a Help topic, click its title in the table of contents. Above the topic, you can see its relative location in the
hierarchy of topics.
You can hide the table of contents. To display it again, click the Table of Contents button . When you search Help,
the returned topics take the place of the table of contents. To redisplay the table of contents, click Clear.
The Help panel also displays context-sensitive reference information that you access from the Actions panel.
Adobe Help resources
Documentation for your Adobe software is available in a variety of formats.
In-product and LiveDocs Help
In-product Help provides access to all documentation and instructional content available at the time the software
ships. It is available through the Help menu in your Adobe software.
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LiveDocs Help includes all the content from in-product Help, plus updates and links to additional instructional
content available on the web. For some products, you can also add comments to the topics in LiveDocs Help. Find
LiveDocs Help for your product in the Adobe Help Resource Center, at www.adobe.com/go/documentation.
Most versions of in-product and LiveDocs Help let you search across the Help systems of multiple products. Topics
may also contain links to relevant content on the web or to topics in the Help of another product.
Think of Help, both in the product and on the web, as a hub for accessing additional content and communities of
users. The most complete and up-to-date version of Help is always on the web.
PDF documentation
The in-product Help is also available as a PDF that is optimized for printing. Other documents, such as installation
guides and white papers, may also be provided as PDFs.
All PDF documentation is available through the Adobe Help Resource Center, at www.adobe.com/go/documen-
tation. To see the PDF documentation included with your software, look in the Documents folder on the installation
or content DVD.
Printed documentation
Printed editions of the in-product Help are available for purchase in the Adobe Store, at www.adobe.com/go/store.
You can also find books published by Adobe publishing partners in the Adobe Store.
A printed workflow guide is included with all Adobe Creative Suite® 3 products, and stand-alone Adobe products
may include a printed getting started guide.
Searching Flash Help
Flash can search all Flash Help systems or a single Help system (such as Using Flash).
You can also search the text of a single topic: Click in the topic to give it focus and press Ctrl+F (Windows) or
Command+F (Macintosh).
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You can search Flash Help for a combination of words and phrases:
Single-word searches Return a list of help pages that contain the specified word. For example, if you type timeline
in the search text field, Flash returns a list of help pages that contain the word timeline or Timeline.
Multiple-word searches Return a list of help pages that each contain all of the search terms you enter. In this case,
the word and is implicit in the search. For example, if you type movie clip in the search text field, Flash returns a
list of pages that contain both movie and clip—that is, clip movie, movie clip,movie...clip, and so on.
Explicit AND/OR searches Use the words and or or to refine the search results. For example, if you type timeline
and keyframe or tween in the search text field, Flash returns a list of help pages that contain timeline and keyframe
and help pages that contain timeline and tween.
Exact phrase searches Use quotation marks to return only pages that contain the specific phrase you enter. For
example, if you type “motion tween” in the search text field, Flash returns a list of help pages that contain the phrase
motion tween, but not pages that contain separate instances of motion and tween.
Exact phrase with explicit AND/OR searches Use a combination of quotation marks and the words and or or to
further refine your searches. For example, if you type “motion tween” and “ActionScript” in the search field,
Flash returns a list of pages that contain both the phrase motion tween and the word ActionScript.
Access context-sensitive Help from the Actions panel
1 To select an item for reference, do any of the following:
Select an item in the Actions panel toolbox pane (on the left side of the Actions panel).
Select an ActionScript term in the Actions panel in the Script pane.
Place the insertion point before an ActionScript term in the Actions panel in the Script pane.
2 To open the Help panel reference page for the selected item, do one of the following:
Press F1.
Right-click the item and select View Help.
Click Help above the Script pane.
Choosing the right Help documents
Flash Help contains many documents. The following list describes each documents purpose and contents:
Using Flash contains an introduction to what Flash is, what you can do with it, and how the Flash user interface
works. It also contains detailed information about using all of the tools and features in the Flash authoring tool.
Programming ActionScript 3.0 provides a detailed description of the ActionScript 3.0 language, intended for
beginning and experienced scripters. Programming ActionScript 3.0 explains the basic concepts of writing code,
including how to use logic to write code that makes decisions, how to make your Flash projects respond to user
actions, and how to write code to perform the most common tasks in Flash. ActionScript 3.0 is faster and more
appropriate for computationally intensive applications than ActionScript 2.0, and is somewhat more complex than
ActionScript 2.0.
The ActionScript 3.0 Language and Components Reference includes dictionary-style entries for all of the actions,
methods, and properties in the ActionScript 3.0 application programming interface (API), as well as the APIs for
the ActionScript 3.0 components included with Flash. This reference is a fast way to find specific ActionScript
terms to accomplish specific tasks. Each entry includes details of the terms syntax and functionality, and code
examples.
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Using ActionScript 3.0 Components contains information on using and configuring ActionScript 3.0 components
in a Flash document. Components are reusable user interface elements such as buttons, menus, and so on, that you
can use in your own projects without having to create and script them yourself. Some components do not have a
visual presence, but instead help you store and manage data for your application. This document also contains
information about creating your own reusable components with ActionScript 3.0.
Learning ActionScript 2.0 in Adobe Flash provides a detailed description of the ActionScript 2.0 language, intended
for both new and more experienced scripters. Learning ActionScript 2.0 in Adobe Flash describes the basic
concepts of writing code, including which scripts you can use in Flash, when to use each type, how to use logic to
write code that makes decisions, how to make your Flash projects respond to user actions, and how to write
specific code to perform the most common tasks in Flash.
The ActionScript 2.0 Language Reference includes dictionary-style entries for all of the actions, methods, and
properties in the ActionScript 2.0 application programming interface (API). This reference is a fast way to find
specific ActionScript terms to accomplish specific tasks. Each entry includes details of the terms syntax and
functionality, as well as code examples.
Using ActionScript 2.0 Components contains information on using and configuring components in a Flash
document. Components are reusable user interface elements such as buttons, menus, and so on, that you can use
in your own projects without having to create and script them yourself. Some components do not have a visual
presence, but instead help you store and manage data for your application. These documents also contain infor-
mation about creating your own reusable components with ActionScript.
ActionScript 2.0 Components Language Reference includes dictionary-style entries for all of the methods and
properties that are available to each component included with Flash. You control the behavior of components with
these APIs. After you understand the basics of how to use components, this reference is a fast way to find specific
APIs that can help you accomplish specific tasks.
Extending Flash describes how to add functionality and automation to the Flash authoring tool with custom
JavaScript APIs created for that purpose.
Getting Started with Flash Lite 2.x provides an introduction to the process of developing content with Adobe®
Flash® Lite™ 2.x for delivery on mobile phones and devices. Flash Lite 2.x supports a subset of ActionScript 2.0.
Developing Flash Lite 2.x Applications provides techniques and guidelines for creating content and applications for
Flash Lite 2.x, the most current version of Adobe® Flash® Player designed for mobile phones and other devices.
Because Flash Lite 2.x supports different features than the desktop version of Flash Player, techniques for creating
content for Flash Lite are different from techniques for creating Flash desktop content.
Introduction to Flash Lite 2.x ActionScript describes in detail the ActionScript features available in Flash Lite 2.x
and explains how to accomplish common scripting tasks when using Flash Lite 2.x.
Flash Lite 2.x ActionScript Language Reference provides dictionary-style entries for all of the actions, methods, and
properties available in Flash Lite 2.x. Each entry includes the details of the terms syntax and functionality, as well
as sample code.
Getting Started with Flash Lite 1.x provides an introduction to the process of developing content with Flash Lite
1.x for delivery on mobile phones and devices. Flash Lite 1.x supports a subset of ActionScript 1.0.
Developing Flash Lite 1.x Applications provides techniques and guidelines for creating content and applications for
Flash Lite 1.x, the first version of Flash Player designed for mobile phones and other devices. Because Flash Lite
1.x supports different features than the desktop version of Flash Player, techniques for creating content for Flash
Lite 1.x are different from techniques for creating Flash desktop content.
Learning Flash Lite 1.x ActionScript describes in detail the ActionScript features available in Flash Lite 1.0 and 1.1
and explains how to perform common scripting tasks when using Flash Lite 1.x.
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Flash Lite 1.x ActionScript Language Reference provides dictionary-style entries for all of the actions, methods, and
properties available in Flash Lite 1.0 and 1.1. Each entry includes the details of the terms syntax and functionality,
as well as sample code.
Resources
Adobe Video Workshop
The Adobe Creative Suite 3 Video Workshop offers over 200 training videos covering a wide range of subjects for
print, web, and video professionals.
You can use the Adobe Video Workshop to learn about any Creative Suite 3 product. Many videos show you how to
use Adobe applications together.
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When you start the Adobe Video Workshop, you choose the products you want to learn and the subjects you want
to view. You can see details about each video to focus and direct your learning.
Community of presenters
With this release, Adobe Systems invited the community of its users to share their expertise and insights. Adobe and
lynda.com present tutorials, tips, and tricks from leading designers and developers such as Joseph Lowery, Katrin
Eismann, and Chris Georgenes. You can see and hear Adobe experts such as Lynn Grillo, Greg Rewis, and Russell
Brown. In all, over 30 product experts share their knowledge.
Tutorials and source files
The Adobe Video Workshop includes training for novices and experienced users. You’ll also find videos on new
features and key techniques. Each video covers a single subject and typically runs about 3-5 minutes. Most videos
come with an illustrated tutorial and source files, so you can print detailed steps and try the tutorial on your own.
Using Adobe Video Workshop
You can access Adobe Video Workshop using the DVD included with your Creative Suite 3 product. Its also available
online at www.adobe.com/go/learn_videotutorials. Adobe will regularly add new videos to the online Video
Workshop, so check in to see whats new.
Flash CS3 Professional videos
Adobe Video Workshop covers a wide range of subjects for Adobe Flash® CS3 Professional, including these:
Drawing with the Pen tool
Creating animations using motion tweens
Creating and animating masks
Getting started with ActionScript 3.0
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Using the Flash Video Encoder
Videos also show you how to use Flash CS3 with other Adobe components:
Using symbols effectively between Illustrator® and Flash
Understanding the Fireworks® and Flash workflow
Designing websites with Flash and Photoshop
Creating mobile content in Flash
To access Adobe Creative Suite 3 video tutorials, visit Adobe Video Workshop at
www.adobe.com/go/learn_videotutorials.
Extras
You have access to a wide variety of resources that will help you make the most of your Adobe software. Some of
these resources are installed on your computer during the setup process; additional helpful samples and documents
are included on the installation or content DVD. Unique extras are also offered online by the Adobe Exchange
community, at www.adobe.com/go/exchange.
Installed resources
During software installation, a number of resources are placed in your application folder. To view those files, navigate
to the application folder on your computer.
Windows®: [startup drive]/Program files/Adobe/Adobe [application]
Mac OS®: [startup drive]/Applications/Adobe [application]
The application folder may contain the following resources:
Plug-ins Plug-in modules are small software programs that extend or add features to your software. Once installed,
plug-in modules appear as options in the Import or Export menu; as file formats in the Open, Save As, and Export
Original dialog boxes; or as filters in the Filter submenus. For example, a number of special effects plug-ins are
automatically installed in the Plug-ins folder inside the Photoshop CS3 folder.
Presets Presets include a wide variety of useful tools, preferences, effects, and images. Product presets include
brushes, swatches, color groups, symbols, custom shapes, graphic and layer styles, patterns, textures, actions,
workspaces, and more. Preset content can be found throughout the user interface. Some presets (for example,
Photoshop Brush libraries) become available only when you select the corresponding tool. If you dont want to create
an effect or image from scratch, go to the preset libraries for inspiration.
Templates Template files can be opened and viewed from Adobe Bridge, opened from the Welcome Screen, or
opened directly from the File menu. Depending on the product, template files range from letterheads, newsletters,
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and websites to DVD menus and video buttons. Each template file is professionally constructed and represents a
best-use example of product features. Templates can be a valuable resource when you need to jump-start a project.
Samples Sample files include more complicated designs and are a great way to see new features in action. These files
demonstrate the range of creative possibilities available to you.
Fonts Several OpenType® fonts and font families are included with your Creative Suite product. Fonts are copied to
your computer during installation:
Windows: [startup drive]/Program Files/Common Files/Adobe/Fonts
Mac OS X: [startup drive]/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Fonts
For information about installing fonts, see the Read Me file on the installation DVD.
DVD content
The installation or content DVD included with your product contains additional resources for use with your
software. The Goodies folder contains product-specific files such as templates, images, presets, actions, plug-ins, and
effects, along with subfolders for Fonts and Stock Photography. The Documentation folder contains a PDF version
of the Help, technical information, and other documents such as specimen sheets, reference guides, and specialized
feature information.
Adobe Exchange
For more free content, visit www.adobe.com/go/exchange, an online community where users download and share
thousands of free actions, extensions, plug-ins, and other content for use with Adobe products.
Bridge Home
Bridge Home, a new destination in Adobe Bridge CS3, provides up-to-date information on all your Adobe Creative
Suite
3 software in one convenient location. Start Adobe Bridge, then click the Bridge Home icon at the top of the
Favorites panel to access the latest tips, news, and resources for your Creative Suite tools.
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Note: Bridge Home may not be available in all languages.
Adobe Design Center
Adobe Design Center offers articles, inspiration, and instruction from industry experts, top designers and Adobe
publishing partners. New content is added monthly.
You can find hundreds of tutorials for design products and learn tips and techniques through videos, HTML
tutorials, and sample book chapters.
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New ideas are the heart of Think Tank, Dialog Box, and Gallery:
Think Tank articles consider how today’s designers engage with technology and what their experiences mean for
design, design tools, and society.
In Dialog Box, experts share new ideas in motion graphics and digital design.
The Gallery showcases how artists communicate design in motion.
Visit Adobe Design Center at www.adobe.com/designcenter.
Adobe Developer Center
Adobe Developer Center provides samples, tutorials, articles, and community resources for developers who build
rich Internet applications, websites, mobile content, and other projects using Adobe products. The Developer Center
also contains resources for developers who develop plug-ins for Adobe products.
In addition to sample code and tutorials, you'll find RSS feeds, online seminars, SDKs, scripting guides, and other
technical resources.
Visit Adobe Developer Center at www.adobe.com/go/developer.
Customer support
Visit the Adobe Support website, at www.adobe.com/support, to find troubleshooting information for your product
and to learn about free and paid technical support options. Follow the Training link for access to Adobe Press books,
a variety of training resources, Adobe software certification programs, and more.
Downloads
Visit www.adobe.com/go/downloads to find free updates, tryouts, and other useful software. In addition, the Adobe
Store (at www.adobe.com/go/store) provides access to thousands of plug-ins from third-party developers, helping
you to automate tasks, customize workflows, create specialized professional effects, and more.
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Adobe Labs
Adobe Labs gives you the opportunity to experience and evaluate new and emerging technologies and products from
Adobe.
At Adobe Labs, you have access to resources such as these:
Prerelease software and technologies
Code samples and best practices to accelerate your learning
Early versions of product and technical documentation
Forums, wiki-based content, and other collaborative resources to help you interact with like-minded developers
Adobe Labs fosters a collaborative software development process. In this environment, customers quickly become
productive with new products and technologies. Adobe Labs is also a forum for early feedback, which the Adobe
development teams use to create software that meets the needs and expectations of the community.
Visit Adobe Labs at www.adobe.com/go/labs.
User communities
User communities feature forums, blogs, and other avenues for users to share technologies, tools, and information.
Users can ask questions and find out how others are getting the most out of their software. User-to-user forums are
available in English, French, German, and Japanese; blogs are posted in a wide range of languages.
To participate in forums or blogs, visit www.adobe.com/communities.
Whats new
New features
The following features are new to Adobe® Flash® CS3 Professional.
CS3 Interface
The Flash user interface is updated to share a common interface with other Adobe Creative Suite CS3 components.
A consistent appearance across all Adobe software helps users work more easily with multiple applications. See
“Workspace” on page 15.
Adobe Bridge and Version Cue
Organize and browse Flash and other creative assets using Adobe Bridge, an independent file-management system
that you can launch from within Flash. Through Adobe Bridge, you can automate workflows across Adobe Creative
Suite components, apply consistent color settings across Adobe software, and access version control features and
online stock photo purchase services. A Welcome screen provides centralized control of settings, as well as ongoing
access to tips and tutorials in Adobe Design Center. See Adobe Version Cue” on page 82.
Bitmap Symbol Library Item dialog box
The Bitmap Symbol Library Item dialog box has been enlarged to provide a larger preview of the bitmap. See “Using
symbols, instances, and library assets” on page 207.
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Multicolored bounding boxes
You can change the selection color of specific types of elements to identify each element easily. See “Get information
about instances on the Stage” on page 215.
Adobe Device Central
A new way to test content created with Adobe products on emulated mobile devices, Device Central lets you select
a target device from the beginning of the development process, and gives you a clear idea of what a devices limita-
tions are. See “Developing applications for mobile devices” on page 431.
Active content detections
To eliminate the need to first activate Flash Player so that users can interact with Flash content, Flash publishes
HTML templates that you can use to embed Flash SWF files. Using these templates, embedded SWF files are
activated seamlessly without the need for an additional mouse click or other user activation. See “Publishing Flash
documents” on page 418.
9-slice onstage preview
Because 9-slice scaling now provides onstage preview, you can see changes and adjustments to 9-slice scaled movie
clips on stage. See About 9-slice scaling and movie clip symbols” on page 222.
Filter copy and paste
You can now copy and paste graphic filter settings from one instance to another. See “Apply filters” on page 250.
Copy and paste motion
Copy and paste motion lets you copy a motion tween and paste (or apply) the frames, tween, and symbol information
to another object. When pasting the motion tween to another object, you can choose to paste all properties
associated with the motion tween, or choose specific properties to apply to the other object. See Copy and paste a
motion tween” on page 232.
Copy motion as ActionScript 3.0
In addition to copying the properties of one motion tween and applying those properties to another object, you can
copy the properties that define a motion tween in the Timeline as ActionScript 3.0 and apply that motion to another
symbol, either in the Actions panel or in the source files (such as class files) for a Flash document that uses Action-
Script 3.0. See “Copy motion as ActionScript” on page 233.
Pen tool enhancements
The Pen tool has been improved.
The Pen tool now behaves similarly to the Illustrator Pen tool to provide a more consistent user experience across
Adobe software
The cubic-to-quadratic conversion is now more efficient, resulting in better accuracy and fewer points.
See “Drawing with the Pen tool” on page 172.
Adobe Photoshop import
You can now import Adobe Photoshop PSD files directly into Flash documents. Most Photoshop data types are
supported, and several import options are provided so that you can find the best balance of image fidelity and
editability within Flash. See “Import Photoshop PSD files” on page 149.
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Adobe Illustrator import
You can now import Adobe Illustrator AI files directly into Flash documents. Most Illustrator data types are
supported, and several import options are provided so that you can find the best balance of image fidelity and
editability within Flash. See “Import Adobe Illustrator files” on page 140.
Primitive Rectangle and Oval drawing tools
New Rectangle and Oval drawing tools let you create rectangles and ovals whose properties (such as stroke or corner
radius) you can edit at any time in the Property inspector. See “Draw rectangles and ovals” on page 166.
Enhanced Quicktime video support
QuickTime export is intended for users who want to distribute Flash content, such as animation, in the QuickTime
video format. This release improves the quality of the exported QuickTime video file, which you can distribute as
streaming video or on a DVD, or import into a video-editing application such as Adobe® Premiere®. See “Exporting
QuickTime” on page 453.
Save and load cue points for Flash video
Save and load functionality has been added to the Cue Points tab to allow you to save the cue points added to one
file and apply them to another. You can generate a cue points XML file based on known time codes and import it
into the encoder before encoding, eliminating the need to manually add each cue point through the Flash Video
Encoder user interface. See Flash Video Encoder Help.
Script Assist mode for ActionScript 3.0
Script Assist mode has been updated to include support for ActionScript 3.0. See “Script Assist mode and behaviors
on page 386.
Improvements in ActionScript
Flash has a new, improved version of ActionScript. ActionScript 3.0 offers a robust programming model familiar to
developers with a basic knowledge of object-oriented programming. ActionScript 3.0 facilitates the creation of
highly complex applications with large data sets and object-oriented, reusable code bases. While ActionScript 3.0 is
not required for content that runs in Adobe Flash Player 9, it allows performance improvements that are available
only with the new ActionScript Virtual Machine (AVM2). ActionScript 3.0 code can execute up to ten times faster
than legacy ActionScript code.
The older version of ActionScript Virtual Machine, AVM1, executes ActionScript 1.0 and ActionScript 2.0 code.
Flash Player 9 supports AVM1 for backward compatibility with existing and legacy content.
To learn about ActionScript 3.0, see Programming ActionScript 3.0.
15
Chapter 2: Workspace
The Adobe® Flash® CS3 Professional workspace includes tools and panels that help you create and navigate your
documents. Understanding these tools will help you maximize the applications capabilities.
Flash workflow and workspace
General Flash workflow
To build a Flash application, you typically perform the following basic steps:
Plan the application.
Decide which basic tasks the application will perform.
Add media elements.
Create and import media elements, such as images, video, sound, text.
Arrange the elements.
Arrange the media elements on the Stage and in the Timeline to define when and how they appear in your appli-
cation.
Apply special effects.
Apply graphic filters (such as blurs, glows, and bevels), blends, and other special effects as you see fit.
Use ActionScript to control behavior.
Write ActionScript code to control how the media elements behave, including how the elements respond to user
interactions.
Test and publish your application.
Test to verify that your application is working as you intended, and find and fix any bugs you encounter. You should
test the application throughout the creation process. Publish your FLA file as a SWF file that can be displayed in a
web page and played back with Flash Player.
Depending on your project and your working style, you might use these steps in a different order.
For video tutorials about the Flash workflow, see the following:
Flash workflow: www.adobe.com/go/vid0132
Creating your first interactive Flash file: www.adobe.com/go/vid0118
For a text tutorial about creating an application, see Create an Application on the Flash Tutorials page at
www.adobe.com/go/learn_fl_tutorials.
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Workspace overview
You create and manipulate your documents and files using various elements such as panels, bars, and windows. Any
arrangement of these elements is called a workspace. When you first start an Adobe Creative Suite component, you
see the default workspace, which you can customize for the tasks you perform there. For instance, you can create one
workspace for editing and another for viewing, save them, and switch between them as you work.
You can restore the default workspace at any time by choosing the default option on the Window > Workspace menu.
Although default workspaces vary across Flash, Illustrator, InCopy, InDesign, and Photoshop, you manipulate the
elements much the same way in all of them. The Photoshop default workspace is typical:
The menu bar across the top organizes commands under menus.
The Tools panel (called the Tools palette in Photoshop) contains tools for creating and editing images, artwork,
page elements, and so on. Related tools are grouped together.
The Control panel (called the options bar in Photoshop) displays options for the currently selected tool. (Flash has
no Control panel.)
The Document window (called the Stage in Flash) displays the file youre working on.
Panels (called palettes in Photoshop) help you monitor and modify your work. Examples include the Timeline in
Flash and the Layers palette in Photoshop. Certain panels are displayed by default, but you can add any panel by
selecting it from the Window menu. Many panels have menus with panel-specific options. Panels can be grouped,
stacked, or docked.
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Default Photoshop workspace
A. Document window B. Dock of panels collapsed to icons C. Panel title bar D. Menu bar E. Options bar F. Tools palette G. Collapse To
Icons button H. Three palette (panel) groups in vertical dock
For a video on understanding the workspace, see www.adobe.com/go/vid0187.
Hide or show all panels
(Illustrator, InCopy, InDesign, Photoshop) To hide or show all panels, including the Tools panel and options bar
or Control panel, press Tab.
(Illustrator, InCopy, InDesign, Photoshop) To hide or show all panels except the Tools panel and options bar or
Control panel, press Shift+Tab.
You can temporarily display panels hidden by these techniques by moving the pointer to the edge of the application
window (Windows) or to the edge of the monitor (Mac OS) and hovering over the strip that appears.
(Flash) To hide or show all panels, press F4.
Display panel menu options
Position the pointer on the panel menu icon in the upper-right corner of the panel, and press the mouse
button.
(Illustrator) Adjust panel brightness
In User Interface preferences, move the Brightness slider. This control affects all panels, including the Control
panel.
D
E
FH
G
A B C
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Reconfigure the Tools panel
You can display the tools in the Tools panel in a single column, or side by side in two columns.
In InDesign, you also can switch from single-column to double-column display by setting an option in Interface
preferences.
Click the double arrow at the top of the Tools panel.
Customize the workspace
To create a custom workspace, move and manipulate panels (called palettes in Photoshop and in Adobe Creative
Suite 2 components).
Narrow blue drop zone indicates Color panel will be docked on its own above Layers panel group.
A. Title bar B. Tab C. Drop zone
You can save custom workspaces and switch among them.
In Photoshop, you can change the font size of the text in the options bar, palettes, and tool tips. Choose a size from
the UI Font Size menu in General preferences.
Note: For a video on customizing the workspace in Illustrator, see www.adobe.com/go/vid0032. For a video on custom-
izing the workspace in InDesign, see www.adobe.com/go/vid0065.
Dock and undock panels
A dock is a collection of panels or panel groups displayed together, generally in a vertical orientation. You dock and
undock panels by moving them into and out of a dock.
Note: Docking is not the same as stacking. A stack is a collection of free-floating panels or panel groups, joined top to
bottom.
To dock a panel, drag it by its tab into the dock, at the top, bottom, or in between other panels.
To dock a panel group, drag it by its title bar (the solid empty bar above the tabs) into the dock.
To remove a panel or panel group, drag it out of the dock by its tab or title bar. You can drag it into another dock
or make it free-floating.
A
B
C
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Navigator panel being dragged out to new dock, indicated by blue vertical highlight
Navigator panel now in its own dock
To prevent panels from filling all space in a dock, drag the bottom edge of the dock up so it no longer meets the edge
of the workspace.
Move panels
As you move panels, you see blue highlighted drop zones, areas where you can move the panel. For example, you can
move a panel up or down in a dock by dragging it to the narrow blue drop zone above or below another panel. If you
drag to an area that is not a drop zone, the panel floats freely in the workspace.
To move a panel, drag it by its tab.
To move a panel group or a stack of free-floating panels, drag the title bar.
Press Ctrl (Windows) or Control (Mac OS) while moving a panel to prevent it from docking.
Add and remove docks and panels
If you remove all panels from a dock, the dock disappears. You can create new docks by moving panels to drop zones
next to existing docks or at the edges of the workspace.
To remove a panel, click its close icon (the X at the upper-right corner of the tab), or deselect it from the Window menu.
To add a panel, select it from the Window menu and dock it wherever you wish.
Manipulate panel groups
To move a panel into a group, drag the panels tab to the highlighted drop zone at the top of the group.
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Adding a panel to a panel group
To rearrange panels in a group, drag a panels tab to a new location in the group.
To remove a panel from a group so that it floats freely, drag the panel by its tab outside the group.
To make a panel appear at the front of its group, click its tab.
To move grouped panels together, drag their title bar (above the tabs).
Stack free-floating panels
When you drag a panel out of its dock but not into a drop zone, the panel floats freely, allowing you to position it
anywhere in the workspace. Panels may also float in the workspace when first selected from the Window menu. You
can stack free-floating panels or panel groups together so that they move as a unit when you drag the topmost title
bar. (Panels that are part of a dock cannot be stacked or moved as a unit in this way.)
Free-floating stacked panels
To stack free-floating panels, drag a panel by its tab to the drop zone at the bottom of another panel.
To change the stacking order, drag a panel up or down by its tab.
Note: Be sure to release the tab over the narrow drop zone between panels, rather than the broad drop zone in a title bar.
To remove a panel or panel group from the stack, so that it floats by itself, drag it out by its tab or title bar.
Resize or minimize panels
To resize a panel, drag any side of the panel or drag the size box at its lower-right corner. Some panels, such as the
Color panel in Photoshop, cannot be resized by dragging.
To change the width of all the panels in a dock, drag the gripper at the top left of the dock.
To minimize a panel, panel group, or stack of panels, click the Minimize button in its title bar.
You can open a panel menu even when the panel is minimized.
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Minimize button
Manipulate panels collapsed to icons
Collapse panels to icons to reduce clutter on the workspace. (In some cases, panels are collapsed to icons in the
default workspace.) Click a panel icon to expand the panel. You can expand only one panel or panel group at a time.
Panels collapsed to icons
Panels expanded from icons
To collapse or expand all panels in a dock, click the double arrow at the top of the dock.
To resize panel icons so that you see only the icons (and not the labels), drag the gripper at the top of the dock
toward the icons until the text disappears. (To display the icon text again, drag the gripper away from the panels.)
To expand a single panel icon, click it.
To collapse an expanded panel back to its icon, click its tab, its icon, or the double arrow in the panel’s title bar.
If you select Auto-Collapse Icon Panels from the Interface or User Interface Options preferences, an expanded panel
icon will collapse automatically when you click away from it.
To add a panel or panel group to an icon dock, drag it in by its tab or title bar. (Panels are automatically collapsed
to icons when added to an icon dock.)
To move a panel icon (or panel icon group), drag the bar that appears above the icon. You can drag panel icons up
and down in the dock, into other docks (where they appear in the panel style of that dock), or outside the dock
(where they appear as free-floating, expanded panels).
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Save, delete, and switch between workspaces
By saving the current size and position of panels as a named workspace, you can restore that workspace even if you
move or close a panel. The names of saved workspaces appear in the Window
> Workspace menu.
In Photoshop, the saved workspace can include a specific keyboard shortcut set and menu set.
Save a custom workspace
1
With the workspace in the configuration you want to save, do one of the following:
(Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign) Choose Window > Workspace > Save Workspace.
(Flash) Choose Window > Workspace > Save Current, or choose Save Current from the Workspace menu in the
Edit bar.
(Photoshop) Choose Save Workspace from the Workspace menu in the options bar.
2 Type a name for the workspace.
3 (Photoshop) Under Capture, select one or more options:
Palette Locations Saves the current palette locations.
Keyboard Shortcuts Saves the current set of keyboard shortcuts.
Menus Saves the current set of menus.
4 Click OK.
Display or switch between workspaces
Flash, Illustrator, InDesign, and Photoshop include preset workspaces designed to make certain tasks easier.
Choose Window > Workspace, and select a workspace.
(Photoshop) Select a workspace from the Workspace menu in the options bar.
(Flash) Select a workspace from the Workspace menu in the Edit bar.
(InDesign and Photoshop) Assign keyboard shortcuts to each workspace to navigate among them quickly.
Delete a custom workspace
(Illustrator) Choose Window > Workspace > Manage Workspaces, select the workspace, and then click the Delete icon.
(InDesign) Choose Window > Workspace > Delete Workspace, select the workspace, and then click Delete.
(Flash) Choose Manage from the Workspace menu in the Edit bar, select the workspace, and then click Delete.
Alternatively, choose Window > Workspace > Manage, select the workspace, and then click Delete.
(Photoshop) Choose Delete Workspace from the Workspace menu in the options bar. Alternatively, choose
Window > Workspace > Delete Workspace, select the workspace, and then click Delete.
(Photoshop) Start with the last or default palette locations
When you start Photoshop, palettes can either appear in their original default locations, or appear as you last used them.
In Interface preferences:
To display palettes in their last locations on startup, select Remember Palette Locations.
To display palettes in their default locations on startup, deselect Remember Palette Locations.
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Using the Stage and Tools panel
Welcome screen overview
When Flash is running with no documents open, the Welcome screen appears. The Welcome screen contains the
following four areas:
Open a Recent Item Lets you open your most recent documents (click the Open icon).
Create New Lists Flash file types, such as Flash documents and ActionScript™ files.
Create from Template Lists the templates most commonly used to create Flash documents.
Extend Links to the Flash Exchange website, where you can download helper applications, extensions, and related
information.
The Welcome screen also offers quick access to Help resources. You can take a tour of Flash, learn about documen-
tation resources, and find Adobe Authorized Training facilities.
To hide the Welcome screen, select Dont Show Again.
To show the Welcome screen, select Edit > Preferences (Windows) or select Flash > Preferences (Macintosh), and
select Show Welcome screen in the General category.
Using the Stage
The Stage is the rectangular area where you place graphic content when creating Flash documents. The Stage in the
authoring environment represents the rectangular space in Flash Player or in a web browser window where your
document appears during playback. To change the view of the Stage as you work, zoom in and out. To help you
position items on the Stage, you can use the grid, guides, and rulers.
The Timeline and Stage with content
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For a video tutorial about the Flash interface, see www.adobe.com/go/vid0116.
Zoom the Stage
To view the entire Stage on the screen, or to view a particular area of your drawing at high magnification, change the
magnification level. The maximum magnification depends on the resolution of your monitor and the document size.
The minimum value for zooming out on the Stage is 8%. The maximum value for zooming in on the Stage is 2000%.
To zoom in on an element, select the Zoom tool in the Tools panel, and click the element. To switch the Zoom
tool between zooming in or out, use the Enlarge or Reduce modifiers (in the options area of the Tools panel
when the Zoom tool is selected) or Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Macintosh).
To zoom in so that a specific area of your drawing fills the window, drag a rectangular selection on the Stage with
the Zoom tool.
To zoom in on or out of the entire Stage, select View > Zoom In or View > Zoom Out.
To zoom in or out by a specified percentage, select View > Magnification, and select a percentage from the
submenu or select a percentage from the Zoom control at the upper-right corner of the Timeline.
To scale the Stage so that it fits completely in the application window, select View > Magnification > Fit in
Window.
To show the contents of the current frame, select View > Magnification > Show All, or select Show All from the
Zoom control at the upper-right side of the application window. If the scene is empty, the entire Stage appears.
To show the entire Stage, select View > Magnification > Show Frame or select Show Frame from the Zoom control
at the upper-right corner of the Timeline.
To show the workspace surrounding the Stage, or to view elements in a scene that are partly or completely outside
of the Stage area, select View > Pasteboard. The pasteboard appears in light gray. For example, to have a bird fly
into a frame, initially position the bird outside of the Stage in the pasteboard and animate it into the Stage area.
Move the view of the Stage
When the Stage is magnified, you may not be able to see all of it. To change the view without having to change the
magnification, use the Hand tool to move the Stage.
In the Tools panel, select the Hand tool and drag the Stage. To temporarily switch between another tool and the
Hand tool, hold down the Spacebar and click the tool in the Tools panel.
Use rulers
When rulers show, they appear along the top and left sides of the document. You can change the unit of measure used
in the rulers from the default of pixels to another unit. When you move an element on the Stage with the rulers
displayed, lines indicating the elements dimensions appear on the rulers.
To show or hide rulers, select View > Rulers.
To specify the rulers’ unit of measure for a document, select Modify > Document, and select a unit from the Ruler
Units menu.
See also
“Snapping” on page 180
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Use guides
When rulers show (View > Rulers), you can drag horizontal and vertical guides from the rulers onto the Stage.
When you create nested timelines, draggable guides appear on the Stage only when the Timeline in which they were
created is active.
To create custom guides or irregular guides, use guide layers.
To display or hide the drawing guides, select View > Guides > Show Guides.
Note: If the grid is visible and Snap to Grid is turned on when you create guides, guides snap to the grid.
To turn snapping to guides on or off, select View > Snapping > Snap to Guides.
Note: Snapping to guides takes precedence over snapping to the grid in places where guides fall between grid lines.
To move a guide, click anywhere on the ruler with the Selection tool and drag the guide to the desired place on the
Stage.
To remove a guide, use the Selection tool with guides unlocked to drag the guide to the horizontal or vertical ruler.
To lock guides, select View > Guides > Lock Guides or use the Lock Guides option in the Edit Guides (View >
Guides > Edit Guides) dialog box.
To clear guides, select View > Guides > Clear Guides. If you are in document-editing mode, all guides in the
document are cleared. If you are in symbol-editing mode, only guides used in symbols are cleared.
See also
“Use guide layers” on page 39
Set guide preferences
1
Select View > Guides > Edit Guides and do any of the following:
To set Color, click the triangle in the color box and select a guide line color from the palette. The default guide
color is green.
To display or hide guides, select or deselect Show Guides.
To turn snapping to guides on or off, select or deselect Snap To Guides.
Select or deselect Lock Guides.
To set Snap Accuracy, select an option from the pop-up menu.
To remove all guides, click Clear All. Clear All removes all guides from the current scene.
To save the current settings as the default, click Save Default.
2 Click OK.
Use the grid
The grid appears in a document as a set of lines behind the artwork in all scenes.
Display or hide the drawing grid
Do one of the following:
Select View > Grid > Show Grid.
Press Control+'' (quote) (Windows) or Command+'' (quote) (Macintosh).
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Turn snapping to grid lines on or off
Select View > Snapping > Snap to Grid.
Set grid preferences
1
Select View > Grid > Edit Grid and select from the options.
2 To save the current settings as the default, click Save Default.
About the main toolbar and edit bar
The menu bar at the top of the application window contains menus with commands for controlling functionality.
The edit bar, at the top of the Stage, contains controls and information for editing scenes and symbols, and for
changing the magnification level of the Stage.
See also
“Using symbols, instances, and library assets” on page 207
“Working with scenes” on page 74
Tools panel overview
The tools in the Tools panel let you draw, paint, select, and modify artwork, as well as change the view of the Stage.
The Tools panel is divided into four sections:
The tools area contains drawing, painting, and selection tools.
The view area contains tools for zooming and panning in the application window.
The colors area contains modifiers for stroke and fill colors.
The options area contains modifiers for the currently selected tool. Modifiers affect the tools painting or editing
operations.
To specify which tools to display in the authoring environment, use the Customize Tools Panel dialog box.
See also
“Using Flash drawing and painting tools” on page 164
Selecting objects” on page 196
Use the Tools panel
To show or hide the Tools panel, select Window > Tools.
Select tools
Do one of the following:
Click the tool in the Tools panel. Depending on the tool you select, a set of modifiers might appear in the options
area at the bottom of the Tools panel.
Press the tool’s keyboard shortcut. To view the keyboard shortcuts, select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows)
or Flash > Keyboard Shortcuts (Macintosh). On the Macintosh, you might need to move the mouse to see the new
pointer appear.
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To select a tool located in the pop-up menu for a visible tool such as the Rectangle tool, press the icon of the visible
tool and select another tool from the pop-up menu.
Customize the Tools panel
To specify which tools appear in the authoring environment, use the Customize Tools Panel dialog box to add or
remove tools from the Tools panel.
When more than one tool appears in a location, the top tool in the group (the most recently used) appears with an
arrow in the lower-right corner of its icon. This arrow indicates that additional tools are present in a pop-up menu.
The same keyboard shortcut functions for all tools in the pop-up menu. When you press and hold the mouse button
on the icon, the other tools in the group appear in a pop-up menu.
1 To show the Customize Tools Panel dialog box, do one of the following:
(Windows) Select Edit > Customize Tools panel.
(Macintosh) Select Flash > Customize Tools panel.
The Available Tools menu indicates the tools that are currently available. The Current Selection menu indicates the
tools currently assigned to the selected location in the Tools panel.
2 To browse through the tools to specify the location to assign to another tool, click a tool in the Tools panel image
or use the arrows.
3 To add a tool to the selected location, select the tool in the Available Tools list and click Add. You can assign a tool
to more than one location.
4 To remove a tool from the selected location, select the tool in the Current Selection scroll list and click Remove.
5 To restore the default Tools Panel layout, click Restore Default in the Customize Tools Panel dialog box.
6 Click OK to apply your changes and close the Customize Tools Panel dialog box.
Use context menus
Context menus contain commands relevant to the current selection. For example, when you select a frame in the
Timeline window, the context menu contains commands for creating, deleting, and modifying frames and
keyframes. Context menus exist for many items and controls in many locations, including on the Stage, in the
Timeline, in the Library panel, and in the Actions panel.
Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) an item.
Set preferences in Flash
You can set preferences for general application operations, editing operations, and clipboard operations.
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The General category in the Preferences dialog box
See also
Specify drawing preferences” on page 163
Change the display of frames in the Timeline” on page 35
About the Timeline” on page 33
Creating and managing documents on page 51
Substituting missing fonts” on page 263
Set Pen tool preferences” on page 173
AI File Importer preferences” on page 143
“PSD file import preferences” on page 150
Set preferences
1
Select Edit > Preferences (Windows) or Flash > Preferences (Macintosh).
2 Make a selection in the Category list and select from the respective options.
Set AutoFormat preferences for ActionScript
Select any of the options. To see the effect of each selection, look in the Preview pane.
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Set text preferences
For Font Mapping Default, select a font to use when substituting missing fonts in documents you open in Flash.
For Vertical Text options, select Default Text Orientation (deselected by default).
To reverse the default text display direction, select Right To Left Text Flow (deselected by default).
To turn off kerning for vertical text, select No Kerning (deselected by default). Turning off kerning is useful to
improve spacing for some fonts that use kerning tables.
For Input Method, select the appropriate language.
Set warning preferences
To receive a warning when you try to save documents with content that is specific to the Adobe® Flash® CS3 Profes-
sional authoring tool as a Flash 8 file, select Warn On Save For Adobe Flash 8 Compatibility (default).
To receive a warning when you open a Flash document that uses fonts that are not installed on your computer,
select Warn On Missing Fonts (default).
To receive a warning if the URL for a document changed since the last time you opened and edited it, select Warn
On URL Changes In Launch And Edit.
To place a red X over any Generator objects as a reminder that Generator objects are not supported in Flash 8,
select Warn On Reading Generator Content.
To receive an alert when Flash inserts frames in your document to accommodate audio or video files that you
import, select Warn On Inserting Frames When Importing Content.
To receive an alert when selecting Default Encoding could potentially lead to data loss or character corruption,
select Warn On Encoding Conflicts When Exporting .as Files. (For example, if you create a file with English,
Japanese, and Korean characters and select Default Encoding on an English system, the Japanese and Korean
characters are corrupted.)
To receive a warning when you attempt to edit a symbol with timeline effects applied to it, select Warn On
Conversion Of Effect Graphic Objects.
To receive a warning when you export a document to this earlier version of Flash Player, select Warn On Exporting
To Flash Player 6 r65.
To receive a warning when you create a site in which the local root folder overlaps with another site, select Warn
On Sites With Overlapped Root Folder.
To receive a warning when you convert a symbol with a behavior attached to a symbol of a different type—for
example, when you convert a movie clip to a button—select Warn On Behavior Symbol Conversion.
To receive a warning when you convert a symbol to a symbol of a different type, select Warn On Symbol
Conversion.
To receive a warning when Flash converts a graphic object drawn in Object Drawing mode to a group, select Warn
On Automatically Converting From Drawing Object To Group.
To display warnings on controls for features not supported by the Flash Player version that the current FLA file is
targeting in its Publish settings, select Show Incompatibility Warnings On Feature Controls.
Set General preferences
On Launch Specify which document opens when you start the application.
Undo To set the number of undo or redo levels, enter a value from 2 to 300. Undo levels require memory; the more
undo levels you use, the more system memory is consumed. The default is 100.
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Document- or Object-level undo Document-level undo maintains a single list of all your actions for the entire Flash
document. Object-level undo maintains separate lists of your actions for each object in your document. Object-level
lets you undo an action on one object without having to also undo actions on other objects that might have been
modified more recently than the target object.
Printing (Windows only) To disable PostScript output when printing to a PostScript printer, select Disable
PostScript. By default, this option is deselected. Select this option if you have problems printing to a PostScript
printer; however, this option slows down printing.
Test Movie To open a new document tab in the application window when you select Control > Test Movie, select
Open Test Movie In Tabs. The default is to open the test movie in its own window.
Selection To control how multiple elements are selected, select or deselect Shift Select. When Shift Select is off,
clicking additional elements adds them to the current selection. When Shift Select is on, clicking additional elements
deselects other elements unless you hold down Shift.
Show Tooltips Shows tooltips when the pointer pauses over a control. To hide the tooltips, deselect this option.
Contact Sensitive Select objects when any part of them is included in the marquee rectangle when dragging with the
Selection or Lasso tools. The default is that objects are only selected when the tools marquee rectangle completely
surrounds the object.
Timeline To use span-based selection in the Timeline, rather than the default frame-based selection, select Span
Based Selection.
Named Anchor On Scene Make the first frame of each scene in a document a named anchor. Named anchors let you
use the Forward and Back buttons in a browser to jump from scene to scene.
Highlight Color To use the current layer’s outline color, select a color from the panel, or select Use Layer Color.
Project To have all files in a project close when the project file is closed, select Close Files With Project.
Save Files On Test Or Publish Project Save each file in a project whenever the project is tested or published.
Clipboard preferences
Bitmaps (Windows only)
To specify Color Depth and Resolution parameters for bitmaps copied to the clipboard, select their respective
options.
To apply anti-aliasing, select Smooth.
To specify the amount of RAM that is used when placing a bitmap image on the Clipboard, enter a value in the Size
Limit text field. Increase this value when working with large or high-resolution bitmap images.
Gradient Quality (Windows only) To specify the quality of gradient fills placed in the Windows metafile, select an
option. Choosing a higher quality increases the time required to copy artwork. To specify gradient quality when
pasting items to a location outside of Flash, use this setting. When you are pasting in Flash, the full gradient quality
of the copied data is preserved regardless of the Gradients setting on the Clipboard.
PICT Settings (Macintosh only) Type To preserve data copied to the Clipboard as vector artwork, select Objects. To
convert the copied artwork to a bitmap, select one of the bitmap formats.
Resolution Enter a value.
Include PostScript Select to include PostScript data.
Gradients To specify gradient quality in the PICT file, select an option. Choosing a higher quality increases the
time required to copy artwork. To specify gradient quality when pasting items to a location outside of Flash, use the
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Gradients setting. When you are pasting in Flash, the full gradient quality of the copied data is preserved regardless
of the Gradient setting.
FreeHand Text To keep text editable in a pasted FreeHand file, select Maintain Text As Blocks.
Customize keyboard shortcuts
To match the shortcuts you use in other applications, or to streamline your workflow, select keyboard shortcuts. By
default, Flash uses built-in keyboard shortcuts designed for the application. You can also select a built-in keyboard
shortcut set from one of several graphics applications.
View or print the current set of keyboard shortcuts
1
Select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows) or Flash > Keyboard Shortcuts (Macintosh).
2 In the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box, select the shortcut set to view from the Current Set pop-up menu.
3 Click the Export Set As HTML button .
4 Select a name and location for the exported HTML file. The default file name is the name of the selected shortcut set.
5 Click Save.
6 Find the exported file in the folder you selected and open the file in a web browser.
7 To print the file, use the browsers Print command.
Select a keyboard shortcut set
1
Select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows) or Flash > Keyboard Shortcuts (Macintosh).
2 In the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box, select a shortcut set from the Current Set pop-up menu.
Create a keyboard shortcut set
1
Select a keyboard shortcut set and click the Duplicate Set button.
2 Enter a name for the new shortcut set and click OK.
Rename a custom keyboard shortcut set
1
In the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box, select a shortcut set from the Current Set pop-up menu.
2 Click the Rename Set button, enter a new name, and click OK.
Add or remove a keyboard shortcut
1
Select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows) or Flash > Keyboard Shortcuts (Macintosh) and select the set to
modify.
2 From the Commands pop-up menu, select a category to view shortcuts for the selected category.
3 In the Commands list, select the command for which you want to add or remove a shortcut. An explanation of
the selected command appears in the description area in the dialog box.
4 Do one of the following:
To add a shortcut, click the Add Shortcut (+) button.
To remove a shortcut, click the Remove Shortcut (-) button and proceed to step 6.
5 If you are adding a shortcut, enter the new shortcut key combination in the Press Key box.
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Note: To enter the key combination, press the keys on the keyboard. You do not need to spell out key names, such as
Control, Option, and so on.
6 Click Change.
7 Repeat this procedure to add or remove additional shortcuts, and click OK.
Delete a keyboard shortcut set
1
Select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows) or Flash > Keyboard Shortcuts (Macintosh). In the Keyboard
Shortcuts dialog box, click Delete Set.
2 In the Delete Set dialog box, select a shortcut set and click Delete.
Note: You cannot delete the keyboard shortcut sets built into Flash.
Create custom keyboard shortcuts
You can create and modify keyboard shortcuts.
Customize keyboard shortcuts
1
Select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts (Windows) or Flash > Keyboard Shortcuts (Macintosh).
The Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box appears.
2 Use the following options to add, delete, or edit keyboard shortcuts:
Current Set Lets you choose a set of predetermined shortcuts (listed at the top of the menu), or any custom set youve
defined.
Commands Lets you select a category of commands to edit (for example, menu commands). The command list
displays the commands associated with the category you selected from the Commands pop-up menu, along with the
assigned shortcuts. The Menu Commands category displays this list as a tree view that replicates the structure of the
menus. The other categories list the commands by name (such as Quit Application), in a flat list.
Shortcuts Displays all shortcuts assigned to the selected command.
Add Item Adds a new shortcut to the current command. To add a new blank line to the Shortcuts box, click this
button. To add a new keyboard shortcut for this command, enter a new key combination and click Change. Each
command can have two different keyboard shortcuts; if two shortcuts are already assigned to a command, the Add
Item button does nothing.
Remove Item Removes the selected shortcut from the list of shortcuts.
Press Key Displays the key combination you enter when youre adding or changing a shortcut.
Change Adds the key combination shown in the Press Key box to the list of shortcuts, or changes the selected
shortcut to the specified key combination.
Duplicate Duplicates the current set. Give the new set a name; the default name is the current sets name with
the word copy appended to it.
Rename Renames the current set.
Export Set As HTML Saves the current set in an HTML table format for easy viewing and printing. Open the
HTML file in your browser and print the shortcuts for easy reference.
Delete Deletes a set. You cannot delete the active set.
3 Click OK.
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Remove a shortcut from a command
1
From the Commands pop-up menu, select a command category, select a command from the Commands list, and
select a shortcut.
2 Click Remove Item (-).
Add a shortcut to a command
1
From the Commands pop-up menu, select a command category and select a command.
2 Prepare to add a shortcut by doing one of the following:
If fewer than two shortcuts are already assigned to the command, click Add Item . A new blank line appears in
the Shortcuts box, and the insertion point moves to the Press Key box.
If two shortcuts are already assigned to the command, select one of them to be replaced by the new shortcut, and
click in the Press Key box.
3 Press a key combination.
Note: If a problem occurs with the key combination (for example, if the key combination is already assigned to another
command), an explanatory message appears just below the Shortcuts box and you may be unable to add or edit the
shortcut.
4 Click Change.
Edit an existing shortcut
1
From the Commands pop-up menu, select a command category, select a command from the Commands list, and
select a shortcut to change.
2 Click in the Press Key box, enter a new key combination, and click Change.
Note: If a problem occurs with the key combination (for example, if the key combination is already assigned to another
command), an explanatory message appears just below the Shortcuts box and you may be unable to add or edit the
shortcut.
The Timeline
About the Timeline
The Timeline organizes and controls a documents content over time in layers and frames. Like films, Flash
documents divide lengths of time into frames. Layers are like multiple film strips stacked on top of one another, each
containing a different image that appears on the Stage. The major components of the Timeline are layers, frames, and
the playhead.
Layers in a document are listed in a column on the left side of the Timeline. Frames contained in each layer appear
in a row to the right of the layer name. The Timeline header at the top of the Timeline indicates frame numbers. The
playhead indicates the current frame displayed on the Stage. As a document plays, the playhead moves from left to
right through the Timeline.
The Timeline status displayed at the bottom of the Timeline indicates the selected frame number, the current frame
rate, and the elapsed time to the current frame.
Note: When an animation is played, the actual frame rate is displayed; this may differ from the document’s frame rate
setting if the computer cant calculate and display the animation quickly enough.
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Parts of the Timeline
A. Playhead B. Empty keyframe C. Timeline header D. Guide layer icon E. Frame View pop-up menu F. Frame-by-frame animation
G. Tweened animation H. Scroll To Playhead button I. Onion-skinning buttons J. Current Frame indicator K. Frame Rate indicator
L. Elapsed Time indicator
The Timeline shows where animation occurs in a document, including frame-by-frame animation, tweened
animation, and motion paths.
Controls in the layers section of the Timeline let you hide, show, lock, or unlock layers, as well as display layer
contents as outlines. You can drag frames to a new location on the same layer or to a different layer.
For a video tutorial about the Timeline, keyframes, and frame rates, see www.adobe.com/go/vid0123.
See also
“Manage frames and keyframes in the Timeline” on page 69
Creating motion” on page 228
Change the appearance of the Timeline
By default, the Timeline appears at the top of the main application window, above the Stage. To change its position,
detach the Timeline from the Stage and float it in its own window or dock it to any other panel you choose. You can
also hide the Timeline.
To change the number of layers and frames that are visible, resize the Timeline. To view additional layers when the
Timeline contains more layers than can be displayed, use the scroll bars on the right side of the Timeline.
Dragging the Timeline
To move the Timeline when it is docked to the application window, drag the gripper (2 dotted vertical bars) at the
upper-left corner of the Timeline.
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To dock an undocked Timeline to the application window, drag the gripper (2 dotted vertical bars) to the top of
the application window.
To dock an undocked Timeline to other panels, drag the Timeline title bar tab to the location you choose. To
prevent the Timeline from docking to other panels, press Control while you drag. A blue bar appears to indicate
where the Timeline will dock.
To lengthen or shorten layer name fields in the Timeline panel, drag the bar separating the layer names and the
frames portions of the Timeline.
Resize the Timeline
If the Timeline is docked to the main application window, drag the bar separating the Timeline from the Stage
area.
If the Timeline is not docked to the main application window, drag the lower-right corner (Windows) or the size
box in the lower-right corner (Macintosh).
Move the playhead
The playhead moves through the timeline as a document plays to indicate the current frame displayed on the Stage.
The Timeline header shows the frame numbers of the animation. To display a frame on the Stage, move the playhead
to the frame in the Timeline.
To display a specific frame when youre working with a large number of frames that can’t all be displayed in the
Timeline at once, move the playhead along the Timeline.
To go to a frame, click the frames location in the Timeline header, or drag the playhead to the desired position.
To center the Timeline on the current frame, click the Scroll To Playhead button at the bottom of the Timeline.
Moving the playhead
Change the display of frames in the Timeline
1 To display the Frame View pop-up menu, click Frame View in the upper-right corner of the Timeline.
Frame View pop-up menu
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2 Select from the following options:
To change the width of frame cells, select Tiny, Small, Normal, Medium, or Large. (The Large frame-width setting
is useful for viewing the details of sound waveforms.)
To decrease the height of frame cell rows, select Short.
Short and Normal frame view options
To turn the tinting of frame sequences on or off, select Tinted Frames.
To display thumbnails of the content of each frame scaled to fit the Timeline frames, select Preview. This can cause
the apparent content size to vary and requires extra screen space.
To display thumbnails of each full frame (including empty space), select Preview In Context. This is useful for
viewing the way elements move in their frames over the course of the animation, but previews are generally
smaller than with the Preview option.
About layers
Layers help you organize the artwork in your document. You can draw and edit objects on one layer without affecting
objects on another layer. In areas of the Stage with nothing on a layer, you can see through it to the layers below.
To draw, paint, or otherwise modify a layer or folder, select the layer in the Timeline to make it active. A pencil icon
next to a layer or folder name in the Timeline indicates that the layer or folder is active. Only one layer can be active
at a time (although more than one layer can be selected at a time).
When you create a Flash document, it contains only one layer. To organize the artwork, animation, and other
elements in your document, add more layers. You can also hide, lock, or rearrange layers. The number of layers you
can create is limited only by your computer’s memory, and layers do not increase the file size of your published SWF
file. Only the objects you place into layers add to the file size.
To organize and manage layers, create layer folders and place layers in them. You can expand or collapse layer folders
in the Timeline without affecting what you see on the Stage. Use separate layers or folders for sound files, Action-
Script, frame labels, and frame comments. This helps you find these items quickly to edit them.
To help create sophisticated effects, use special guide layers to make drawing and editing easier, and mask layers.
Create layers and layer folders
When you create a layer or folder, it appears above the selected layer. The newly added layer becomes the active layer.
Create a layer
Do one of the following:
Click the Insert Layer button at the bottom of the Timeline.
Select Insert > Timeline > Layer.
Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) a layer name in the Timeline and select Insert Layer from the
context menu.
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Create a layer folder
Do one of the following:
Select a layer or folder in the Timeline and select Insert > Timeline > Layer Folder.
Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) a layer name in the Timeline and select Insert Folder from
the context menu. The new folder appears above the layer or folder you selected.
View layers and layer folders
A red X next to the name of a layer or folder in the Timeline indicates that a layer or folder is hidden. In the Publish
Settings, you can choose whether hidden layers are included when you publish a SWF file.
To distinguish which layer an object belongs to, display all objects on a layer as colored outlines.
Show or hide a layer or folder
Do one of the following:
To hide a layer or folder, click in the Eye column to the right of the layer or folder name in the Timeline. To show
the layer or folder, click in it again.
To hide all the layers and folders in the Timeline, click the Eye icon. To show all layers and folders, click it again.
To show or hide multiple layers or folders, drag through the Eye column.
To hide all layers and folders other than the current layer or folder, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click
(Macintosh) in the Eye column to the right of a layer or folder name. To show all layers and folders, Alt-click or
Option-click it again.
View the contents of a layer as outlines
Do one of the following:
To display all objects on that layer as outlines, click in the Outline column to the right of the layer’s name. To turn
off outline display, click in it again.
To display objects on all layers as outlines, click the outline icon. To turn off outline display on all layers, click it
again.
To display objects on all layers other than the current layer as outlines, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click
(Macintosh) in the Outline column to the right of a layer’s name. To turn off the outline display for all layers,
Alt-click or Option-click in it again.
Change a layers outline color
1
Do one of the following:
Double-click the layer’s icon (the icon to the left of the layer name) in the Timeline.
Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) the layer name and select Properties from the context menu.
Select the layer in the Timeline and select Modify > Timeline > Layer Properties.
2 In the Layer Properties dialog box, click the Outline Color box, select a new color, and click OK.
Change layer height in the Timeline
1
Do one of the following:
Double-click the layer’s icon (the icon to the left of the layer name) in the Timeline.
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Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) the layer name and select Properties from the context menu.
Select the layer in the Timeline and select Modify > Timeline > Layer Properties.
2 In the Layer Properties dialog box, select an option for Layer Height and click OK.
Change the number of layers displayed in the Timeline
Drag the bar that separates the Timeline from the Stage area.
Edit layers and layer folders
By default, new layers are named by the order in which they are created: Layer 1, Layer 2, and so on. To better reflect
their contents, rename layers.
Select a layer or folder
Do one of the following:
Click the name of a layer or folder in the Timeline.
Click any frame in the Timeline of the layer to select.
Select an object on the Stage that is located in the layer to select.
To select contiguous layers or folders, Shift-click their names in the Timeline.
To select discontiguous layers or folders, Control-click (Windows) or Command-click (Macintosh) their names
in the Timeline.
Rename a layer or folder
Do one of the following:
Double-click the name of the layer or folder in the Timeline and enter a new name.
Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) the name of the layer or folder and select Properties from the
context menu. Enter the new name in the Name box and click OK.
Select the layer or folder in the Timeline and select Modify > Timeline > Layer Properties. Enter the new name in
the Name box and click OK.
Lock or unlock one or more layers or folders
Do one of the following:
To lock a layer or folder, click in the Lock column to the right of the name. To unlock the layer or folder, click in
the Lock column again.
To lock all layers and folders, click the padlock icon. To unlock all layers and folders, click it again.
To lock or unlock multiple layers or folders, drag through the Lock column.
To lock all other layers or folders, Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Macintosh) in the Lock column to the
right of a layer or folder name. To unlock all layers or folders, Alt-click or Option-click in the Lock column again.
Copy a layer
1
To select the entire layer, click the layer name in the Timeline.
2 To create a layer, click the Insert Layer button.
3 Select Edit > Timeline > Copy Frames.
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4 Click the new layer and select Edit > Timeline > Paste Frames.
Copy the contents of a layer folder
1
Collapse the folder (click the triangle to the left of the folder name in the Timeline) and click the folder name to
select the entire folder.
2 Select Edit > Timeline > Copy Frames.
3 To create a folder, select Insert > Timeline > Layer Folder.
4 Click the new folder and select Edit > Timeline > Paste Frames.
Delete a layer or folder
1
To select the layer or folder, click its name in the Timeline or any frame in the layer.
2 Do one of the following:
Click the Delete Layer button in the Timeline.
Drag the layer or folder to the Delete Layer button.
Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) the layer or folder name and select Delete Layer from the
context menu.
Note: When you delete a layer folder, all the enclosed layers and all their contents are also deleted.
Organize layers and layer folders
To organize your document, rearrange layers and folders in the Timeline.
Layer folders help organize your workflow by letting you place layers in a tree structure. To see the layers a folder
contains without affecting which layers are visible on the Stage, expand or collapse the folder. Folders can contain
both layers and other folders, allowing you to organize layers in much the same way you organize files on your
computer.
The layer controls in the Timeline affect all layers within a folder. For example, locking a layer folder locks all layers
within that folder.
To move a layer or layer folder into a layer folder, drag the layer or layer folder name to the destination layer folder name.
To change the order of layers or folders, drag one or more layers or folders in the Timeline to the desired position.
To expand or collapse a folder, click the triangle to the left of the folder name.
To expand or collapse all folders, Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) and select Expand All
Folders or Collapse All Folders.
Use guide layers
For help in aligning objects when drawing, create guide layers and align objects on other layers to the objects you
create on the guide layers. Guide layers are not exported and do not appear in a published SWF file. Any layer can
be a guide layer. Guide layers are indicated by a guide icon to the left of the layer name.
To control the movement of objects in a motion tweened animation, create a motion guide layer.
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Note: Dragging a normal layer onto a guide layer converts the guide layer to a motion guide layer. To prevent acciden-
tally converting a guide layer, place all guide layers at the bottom of the layer order.
Select the layer and Right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) and select Guide from the context menu.
To change the layer back to a normal layer, select Guide again.
See also
“Tween motion along a path” on page 244
Using Flash authoring panels
About the Property inspector
The Property inspector provides easy access to the most commonly used attributes of the current selection, either on
the Stage or in the Timeline. You can make changes to the object or document attributes in the Property inspector
without accessing the menus or panels that also control these attributes.
Depending on what is currently selected, the Property inspector displays information and settings for the current
document, text, symbol, shape, bitmap, video, group, frame, or tool. When two or more different types of objects are
selected, the Property inspector displays the total number of objects selected.
The Property inspector showing the properties for the Text tool
To display the Property inspector, Select Window > Properties > Properties, or press Control+F3 (Windows) or
Command+F3 (Macintosh).
About the Library panel
The Library panel is where you store and organize symbols created in Flash, as well as imported files, including
bitmap graphics, sound files, and video clips. The Library panel lets you organize library items in folders, see how
often an item is used in a document, and sort items by type.
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The Library panel showing a movie clip symbol
To display the Library panel, select Window > Library, or press Control+L (Windows) or Command+L (Macintosh).
See also
“Managing media assets with the Flash document library” on page 64
About the Actions panel
The Actions panel lets you create and edit ActionScript code for an object or frame. Selecting a frame, button, or
movie clip instance makes the Actions panel active. The Actions panel title changes to Button Actions, Movie Clip
Actions, or Frame Actions, depending on what is selected.
The Actions panel showing a stop() action in a frame
To display the Actions panel, select Window > Actions or press F9.
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See also
Actions panel overview” on page 382
Script window overview” on page 383
Use the Movie Explorer
The Movie Explorer lets you view and organize the contents of a document and select elements in the document for
modification. It contains a display list of currently used elements, arranged in a navigable hierarchical tree.
Use the Movie Explorer to perform the following actions:
Filter which categories of items in the document appear in the Movie Explorer.
Display the selected categories as scenes, symbol definitions, or both.
Expand and collapse the navigation tree.
Search for an element in a document by name.
Familiarize yourself with the structure of a Flash document that another developer created.
Find all the instances of a particular symbol or action.
Print the navigable display list that appears in the Movie Explorer.
The Movie Explorer has a Panel menu and a context menu with options for performing operations on selected items
or modifying the Movie Explorer display. A check mark with a triangle below it in the Movie Explorer panel indicates
the Panel menu.
Note: The Movie Explorer has slightly different functionality when you are working with screens.
See also
“Working with screens” on page 366
View the Movie Explorer
Select Window > Movie Explorer.
Filter the categories of items that appear in the Movie Explorer
To show text, symbols, ActionScript, imported files, or frames and layers, click one or more of the filtering buttons
to the right of the Show option. To customize which items to show, click the Customize button. Select options in
the Show area of the Movie Explorer Settings dialog box to view those elements.
To show items in scenes, select Show Movie Elements from the Movie Explorer Panel menu.
To show information about symbols, select Show Symbol Definitions from the Movie Explorer Panel menu.
Note: The Movie Elements option and the Symbol Definitions option can be active at the same time.
Search for an item using the Find box
In the Find box, enter the item name, font name, ActionScript string, or frame number. The Find feature searches
all items that appear in the Movie Explorer.
Select an item in the Movie Explorer
Click the item in the navigation tree. Shift-click to select more than one item.
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The full path for the selected item appears at the bottom of the Movie Explorer. Selecting a scene in the Movie
Explorer shows the first frame of that scene on the Stage. Selecting an element in the Movie Explorer selects that
element on the Stage if the layer containing the element is not locked.
Use the Movie Explorer Panel menu or context menu commands
1
Do one of the following:
To view the Panel menu, click the Panel menu control in the Movie Explorer panel.
To view the context menu, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Macintosh) an item in the Movie Explorer
navigation tree.
2 Select an option from the menu:
Go To Location Jumps to the selected layer, scene, or frame in the document.
Go To Symbol Definition Jumps to the symbol definition for a symbol that is selected in the Movie Elements area of
the Movie Explorer. The symbol definition lists all the files associated with the symbol. (The Show Symbol Defini-
tions option must be selected. See its definition in this list.)
Select Symbol Instances Jumps to the scene containing instances of a symbol that is selected in the Symbol Defini-
tions area of the Movie Explorer. (The Show Movie Elements option must be selected.)
Find In Library Highlights the selected symbol in the documents library. (Flash opens the Library panel if it is not
already visible.)
Rename Lets you enter a new name for a selected element.
Edit In Place Lets you edit a selected symbol on the Stage.
Edit In New Window Lets you edit a selected symbol in a new window.
Show Movie Elements Shows the elements in your document organized into scenes.
Show Symbol Definitions Shows all the elements associated with a symbol.
Copy All Text To Clipboard Copies selected text to the clipboard. For spell checking or other editing, paste the text
into an external text editor.
Cut, Copy, Paste, And Clear Performs these common functions on a selected element. Modifying an item in the
display list modifies the corresponding item in the document.
Expand Branch Expands the navigation tree at the selected element.
Collapse Branch Collapses the navigation tree at the selected element.
Collapse Others Collapses the branches in the navigation tree that do not contain the selected element.
Print Prints the hierarchical display list that appears in the Movie Explorer.
About the Web Services panel
You can view a list of web services, refresh web services, and add or remove web services in the Web Services panel
(Window > Other Panels > Web Services). When you add a web service to the Web Services panel, the web service
is then available to any application you create.
You can use the Web Services panel to refresh all your web services at once by clicking the Refresh Web Services
button. If you are not using the Stage but instead are writing ActionScript code for the connectivity layer of your
application, you can use the Web Services panel to manage your web services.
For detailed information about using the web services panel, see www.adobe.com/go/learn_fl_web_services.
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Accessibility in the Flash workspace
About accessibility support
Accessibility support in the authoring environment provides keyboard shortcuts for navigating and using interface
controls, including panels, the Property inspector, dialog boxes, the Stage, and objects on the Stage, so that you can
work with these interface elements without using the mouse.
Note: Certain keyboard controls and authoring environment accessibility features are available only in Windows.
To customize the keyboard shortcuts for accessibility in the authoring environment, use the Workspace Accessibility
Commands section of the Keyboard Shortcuts dialog box.
See also
Customize keyboard shortcuts” on page 31
About Flash authoring accessibility on the Macintosh
Accessibility for the authoring environment on the Macintosh has the following limitations:
The Panel Focus keyboard shortcut (Command+Option+Tab) is not supported for the Property inspector.
The Panel Control Focus keyboard shortcut (Tab) is supported only for the Timeline, not for other panels or the
Property inspector.
Select panels or the Property inspector with keyboard shortcuts
To select a panel or the Property inspector (also referred to as applying focus to the panel or Property inspector), use
the keyboard shortcut Control+F6 (Windows) or Command+F6 (Macintosh).
Apply focus to a panel or the Property inspector only when the panel or Property inspector is visible in the appli-
cation window. The panel can be expanded or collapsed.
When you use the keyboard shortcut to select panels, focus is applied to panels using the following criteria:
Docked panels are given focus first.
If the Timeline is showing and docked, the Timeline is given focus the first time you press Control+F6 (Windows)
or Command+F6 (Macintosh).
If the Timeline is not showing and docked, or if you press the keyboard shortcut again, focus moves to the
rightmost and highest docked panel. Pressing the keyboard shortcut repeatedly then moves the focus through the
other docked panels, from right to left and from top to bottom of the workspace.
If you move the focus through all the docked panels, or if no docked panels are showing, focus moves to the
rightmost and highest floating panel. Pressing the keyboard shortcut repeatedly then moves the focus through the
other floating panels, from right to left and from top to bottom of the workspace.
Use keyboard shortcuts to select or deselect, expand, or collapse panels or the Property inspector
To move the focus through the panels currently displayed in the workspace, press Control+F6 (Windows) or
Command+F6 (Macintosh). A dotted line appears around the title of the currently focused panel.
To move the focus to the previously selected panel, press Control+Shift+F6 (Windows) or Command+Shift+F6
(Macintosh).
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To deselect a panel, press Escape, or move, dock, or undock the panel.
To move the focus to the panel above or below the current panel in a panel group, press Up Arrow or Down Arrow.
To hide all panels and the Property inspector, press F4. To display all panels and the Property inspector, press F4
again.
Use keyboard shortcuts to expand or collapse panels or the Property inspector
1
Press Control+F6 (Windows) or Command+F6 (Macintosh) until the panel to expand or collapse has focus. A
dotted line appears around the title of the currently focused panel.
2 To expand or collapse the currently selected panel, press the Spacebar.
Select controls in a panel or the Property inspector using keyboard shortcuts
To move the focus through the panel controls when a panel or the Property inspector has the current focus, use the
Tab key. To activate the control that has the current focus, use the Spacebar (that is, pressing Spacebar is equivalent
to clicking a control in the panel).
When you use the keyboard shortcut for panel controls, focus is applied to a control and the control is activated using
the following criteria:
To select a control in the panel with the Tab key, the panel with the current focus must be expanded. If the panel
is collapsed, pressing Tab has no effect.
When the panel with the current focus is expanded, pressing Tab the first time moves the focus to the panel’s Panel
menu.
To move the focus between the Panel menu and the panel title bar, use Right Arrow and Left Arrow.
If the focus is on the Panel menu, press Tab again to move the focus through the other controls in the panel.
Pressing Tab again does not return the focus to the Panel menu.
To display the Panel menu items when the Panel menu has the focus, press Enter (Windows only).
To move the focus between the Panel menus of the panels in the group in panels that are grouped, use Up Arrow
and Down Arrow.
You can move the focus to a panel control only if the control is active. If a control is dimmed (inactive), you cannot
apply focus to the control.
Move the focus from a panel title bar to a panel options menu
Do one of the following:
Press Tab.
Press Right Arrow. To return the focus to the panel title bar, press Left Arrow or Shift+Tab.
To move the focus to the Panel menu of the panel immediately above the panel with the current focus if the panel
is in a group, press Up Arrow. To move the focus to the Panel menu of the panel immediately below the panel with
the current focus, press Down Arrow.
Move the focus through the items in the Panel menu of a panel
1
To display the Panel menu items with the focus currently applied to the Panel menu, press the Spacebar.
2 To move through the items in the Panel menu, press Down Arrow.
3 To activate the currently selected Panel menu item, press Enter (Windows) or Return (Macintosh).
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Move the focus through the controls in a panel
1
Press Tab when the focus is currently applied to the Panel menu. To move the focus through the controls in the
panel, press Tab repeatedly.
2 To activate the currently selected panel control, press Enter (Windows only).
Navigate dialog box controls using keyboard shortcuts (Windows only)
To move through the controls in the dialog box, press Tab.
To move through the controls within one section of a dialog box, press Up Arrow and Down Arrow.
To activate the button (equivalent to clicking the button), when the focus is applied to a dialog box control button,
press Enter.
To apply the current settings and close the dialog box (equivalent to clicking OK), when the focus is not applied
to any dialog box control button, press Enter.
To close the dialog box without applying the changes (equivalent to clicking Cancel), press Escape.
To view the Help content for the dialog box (equivalent to clicking Help), when the focus is applied to the Help
button, press Enter or Spacebar.
Select the Stage or objects on the Stage using keyboard shortcuts
Selecting the Stage with a keyboard shortcut is equivalent to clicking on the Stage. Any other element currently
selected becomes deselected when the Stage is selected.
After the Stage is selected, use the Tab key to navigate through all objects on all layers, one at a time. You can select
instances (including graphic symbols, buttons, movie clips, bitmaps, videos, or sounds), groups, or boxes. You cannot
select shapes (such as rectangles) unless those shapes are instances of symbols. You cannot select more than one
object at a time using keyboard shortcuts.
To select Objects on the Stage, use the following criteria:
To select the previous object when an object is currently selected, press Shift+Tab.
To select the first object that was created on the active frame in the active layer, press Tab. When the last object on
the top layer is selected, press Tab to move to the next layer beneath it and select the first object there, and so on.
When the last object on the last layer is selected, press Tab to move to the next frame and select the first object on
the top layer there.
Objects on layers that are hidden or locked cannot be selected with the Tab key.
To select the Stage, press Control+Alt+Home (Windows) or Command+Option+Home (Macintosh).
To select an object on the Stage, with the Stage selected, press Tab.
Note: If you are currently typing text in a box, you cannot select an object using the keyboard focus. You must first change
the focus to the Stage and then select an object.
Navigate tree structures using keyboard shortcuts
To navigate tree structures, the hierarchical displays of file structures in certain Flash panels, use keyboard shortcuts.
To expand a collapsed folder, select the folder and press Right Arrow.
To collapse an expanded folder, select the folder and press Left Arrow.
To move to the parent folder of an expanded folder, press Left Arrow.
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To move to the child folder of an expanded folder, press Right Arrow.
Work with library items using keyboard shortcuts
1 To copy or paste a selected library item, press Control+X (Windows) or Command+X (Macintosh) to cut the item,
or press Control+C (Windows) or Command+C (Macintosh) to copy the item.
2 To paste a cut or copied item, click the Stage or in another library to set the insertion point, and press Control+V
(Windows) or Command+V (Macintosh) to paste in the center of the Stage; or press Control+Shift+C (Windows)
or Command+Shift+C (Macintosh) to paste in place (in the same location as the original).
To cut, copy, and paste items, use the following criteria:
Cut or copy one item or multiple items.
Cut or copy an item from the Library panel and paste it onto the Stage or into another library, or paste a folder
into another library.
You cannot paste a shape from the Stage into the library.
You cannot paste a library item into a common library, because common libraries cannot be modified. However,
you can create a common library.
When you paste a library item onto the Stage, the item is centered.
If you paste a folder, each item in the folder is included.
To paste a library item into a folder in the destination library, click the folder before pasting.
You can paste a library item into a different location in the same library where it originated.
If you attempt to paste a library item into a location containing another item by the same name, select whether to
replace the existing item.
See also
“Work with common libraries” on page 68
Undo, redo, and history
Undo, Redo, and Repeat commands
To undo or redo actions on individual objects, or all objects within the current document, specify either object-level
or document-level Undo and Redo commands (Edit
> Undo or Edit Redo). The default behavior is document-level
Undo and Redo.
You cannot undo some actions when using object-level Undo. Among these are entering and exiting Edit mode;
selecting, editing, and moving library items; and creating, deleting, and moving scenes.
To remove deleted items from a document after using the Undo command, use the Save And Compact command.
To reapply a step to the same object or to a different object, use the Repeat command. For example, if you move a
shape named shape_A, select Edit
> Repeat to move the shape again, or select another shape, shape_B, and select
Edit
> Repeat to move the second shape by the same amount.
By default, Flash supports 100 levels of undo for the Undo menu command. Select the number of undo and redo
levels, from 2 to 9999, in Flash Preferences.
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See also
Set preferences in Flash” on page 27
Automating tasks with the Commands menu” on page 49
Permanently remove items deleted with Undo
By default, when you undo a step using Edit > Undo or the History panel, the file size of the document does not
change, even if you delete an item in the document. For example, if you import a video file into a document, and
undo the import, the file size of the document still includes the size of the video file. Any items that you delete from
a document when performing an Undo command are preserved to restore the items with a Redo command. To
permanently remove the deleted items from the document, and reduce the document file size, select File
> Save And
Compact.
Using the History panel
The History panel (Window > Other Panels > History) shows a list of the steps you’ve performed in the active
document since you created or opened that document, up to a specified maximum number of steps. (The History
panel doesnt show steps you’ve performed in other documents.) The slider in the History panel initially points to
the last step that you performed.
To undo or redo individual steps or multiple steps at once, use the History panel. Apply steps from the History panel
to the same object or to a different object in the document. However, you cannot rearrange the order of steps in the
History panel. The History panel is a record of steps in the order in which they are performed.
Note: If you undo a step or a series of steps and then do something new in the document, you can no longer redo the steps
in the History panel; they disappear from the panel.
To remove deleted items from a document after you undo a step in the History panel, use the Save And Compact
command.
By default, Flash supports 100 levels of undo for the History panel. Select the number of undo and redo levels, from
2 to 9999, in Flash Preferences.
To erase the history list for the current document, clear the History panel. After clearing the history list, you cannot
undo the steps that are cleared. Clearing the history list does not undo steps; it removes the record of those steps from
the current documents memory.
Closing a document clears its history. To use steps from a document after that document is closed, copy the steps
with the Copy Steps command or save the steps as a command.
See also
Set preferences in Flash” on page 27
Automating tasks with the Commands menu” on page 49
Undo steps with the History panel
When you undo a step, the step is dimmed in the History panel.
To undo the last step performed, drag the History panel slider up one step in the list.
To undo multiple steps at once, drag the slider to point to any step, or click to the left of a step along the path of
the slider. The slider scrolls automatically to that step, undoing all subsequent steps as it scrolls.
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Note: Scrolling to a step (and selecting the subsequent steps) is different from selecting an individual step. To scroll to a
step, click to the left of the step.
Replay steps with the History panel
When you replay steps with the History panel, the steps that play are the steps that are selected (highlighted) in the
History panel, not necessarily the step currently indicated by the slider.
Apply steps in the History panel to any selected object in the document.
Replay one step
In the History panel, select a step and click the Replay button.
Replay a series of adjacent steps
1
Select steps in the History panel by doing one of the following:
Drag from one step to another. (Dont drag the slider; drag from the text label of one step to the text label of
another step.)
Select the first step, then Shift-click the last step; or select the last step and Shift-click the first step.
2 Click Replay. The steps replay in order, and a new step, labeled Replay Steps, appears in the History panel.
Replay nonadjacent steps
1
Select a step in the History panel, and Control-click (Windows) or Command-click (Macintosh) other steps. To
deselect a selected step, Control-click or Command-click.
2 Click Replay.
Copy and paste steps between documents
Each open document has its own history of steps. To copy steps from one document and paste them into another,
use the Copy Steps command in the History panel options menu. If you copy steps into a text editor, the steps are
pasted as JavaScript code.
1 In the document containing the steps to reuse, select the steps in the History panel.
2 In the History panel options menu, select Copy Steps.
3 Open the document to paste the steps into.
4 Select an object to apply the steps to.
5 Select Edit > Paste to paste the steps. The steps play back as they’re pasted into the documents History panel. The
History panel shows them as only one step, called Paste Steps.
Automating tasks with the Commands menu
Create and manage commands
To repeat the same task, create a command in the Commands menu from steps in the History panel and reuse the
command. Steps replay exactly as they were originally performed. You cant modify the steps as you replay them.
To use steps the next time you start Flash, create and save a command. Saved commands are retained permanently,
unless you delete them. Steps that you copy using the History panel Copy Steps command are discarded when you
copy something else.
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Create a command from selected steps in the History panel. Rename or delete commands in the Manage Saved
Commands dialog box.
See also
Copy and paste steps between documents” on page 49
Create a command
1
Select a step or set of steps in the History panel.
2 Select Save As Command from the History panel options menu.
3 Enter a name for the command and click OK. The command appears in the Commands menu.
Note: The command is saved as a JavaScript file (with the extension .jsfl) in your Commands folder. This folder is in the
following locations: Windows 2000 or Windows XP: boot drive\Documents and Settings\<user>\Local Settings\Appli-
cation Data\Adobe\Flash CS3\<language>\Configuration\Commands; Mac OS X: Macintosh
HD/Users/<username>/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Flash CS3/<language>/Configuration/Commands.
Edit the names of commands in the Commands menu
1
Select Commands > Manage Saved Commands.
2 Select a command to rename. enter a new name for it, and click Close.
Delete a name from the Commands menu
1
Select Commands > Manage Saved Commands, and select a command.
2 Click Delete, and click Close.
Run commands
To use a saved command, select the command from the Commands menu.
To run a JavaScript or Flash JavaScript command, select Commands > Run Command, navigate to the script to
run, and click Open.
Get more commands
Use the Get More Commands option in the Commands menu to link to the Flash Exchange website at
www.adobe.com/go/flash_exchange and download commands that other Flash users have posted. For more infor-
mation on the commands posted there, see the Flash Exchange website.
1 Make sure you are connected to the Internet.
2 Select Commands > Get More Commands.
Steps that can’t be used in commands
Some tasks cant be saved as commands or repeated using the Edit > Repeat menu item. These commands can be
undone and redone, but they cannot be repeated.
Examples of actions that cant be saved as commands or repeated include selecting a frame or modifying a document
size. If you attempt to save an unrepeatable action as a command, the command is not saved.
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Chapter 3: Creating and managing
documents
When you create and save Adobe® Flash® CS3 Professional documents within the Flash authoring environment, the
documents are in FLA file format. To display a document in Adobe® Flash® Player, you must publish or export the
document as a SWF file.
You can add media assets to a Flash document and manage the assets in the library, and you can use the Movie
Explorer to view and organize all the elements in a Flash document. The Undo and Redo commands, the History
panel, and the Commands menu let you automate tasks in a document.
Working with Flash documents
About Flash files
In Flash you can work with a variety of file types, each of which has a separate purpose:
FLA files, the primary files you work with in Flash, contain the basic media, timeline, and script information for
a Flash document. Media objects are the graphic, text, sound, and video objects that comprise the content of your
Flash document. The Timeline is where you tell Flash when specific media objects should appear on the Stage. You
can add ActionScript™ code to Flash documents to more finely control their behavior and to make them respond
to user interactions.
SWF files, the compiled versions of FLA files, are the files you display in a web page. When you publish your FLA
file, Flash creates a SWF file.
AS files are ActionScript files—you can use these to keep some or all of your ActionScript code outside of your
FLA files, which is helpful for code organization and for projects that have multiple people working on different
parts of the Flash content.
SWC files contain the reusable Flash components. Each SWC file contains a compiled movie clip, ActionScript
code, and any other assets that the component requires.
ASC files are files used to store ActionScript that will be executed on a computer running Flash Media Server.
These files provide the ability to implement server-side logic that works in conjunction with ActionScript in a
SWF file.
JSFL files are JavaScript files that you can use to add new functionality to the Flash authoring tool.
FLP files are Flash project files. You can use Flash projects to manage multiple document files in a single project.
Flash projects allow you to group multiple, related files together to create complex applications.
For video tutorials about working with Flash files, see the following:
www.adobe.com/go/vid0117
www.adobe.com/go/vid0118
See also
About the Timeline” on page 33
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Create or open a document and set its properties
You can create a new document or open a previously saved document in Flash, and you can open a new window as
you work. You can set properties for new or existing documents.
For a text tutorial about creating your first Flash file, see Create your First File on the Flash Tutorials page at
www.adobe.com/go/learn_fl_tutorials.
For video tutorials, see:
Working with Flash files: www.adobe.com/go/vid0117
See also
Set preferences in Flash” on page 27
“Publishing Flash content” on page 418
Create a new document
1
Select File > New.
2 On the General tab, select Flash Document.
Create a new document of the same type as the last document created (Windows only)
Click the New File button in the main toolbar.
Create a new document from a template
1
Select File >