Da Vinci Resolve 14 Reference Manual

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Reference Manual

DaVinci
Resolve 14.3
January 2018

Welcome
Welcome to DaVinci Resolve 14 for Mac, Linux and Windows!
DaVinci is the world’s most trusted name in color and has been used to grade more
Hollywood films, TV shows, and commercials than anything else. Now, with DaVinci Resolve 14,
you get a complete set of editing, advanced color correction and professional audio
post production tools combined in one application so you can edit, grade, mix and master
deliverables from start to finish, all in a single tool!
DaVinci Resolve 14 has the features professional editors, colorists and audio engineers
need, and is built on completely modern technology with advanced audio, color and image
processing that goes far beyond what any other system can do. With this release, we hope
to inspire creativity by letting you work in a comfortable, familiar way, while also giving you
an entirely new creative toolset that will help you cut and finish projects at higher quality than
ever before!
We hope you enjoy reading this manual. With its customizable interface and keyboard
shortcuts, DaVinci Resolve 14 is easy to learn, especially if you’re switching from another editor,
and has all of the tools you need to create breathtaking, high end work!
The DaVinci Resolve Engineering Team

Grant Petty
CEO Blackmagic Design

PART 1
1

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

9

2

Managing Projects and Databases

45

3

Project Settings and Preferences

63

4

Camera Raw Settings

100

5

Improving Performance, Proxies, and the Render Cache

118

6

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

134

PART 2
7

Using the Media Page

167

8

Adding and Organizing Media

183

9

Using Clip Metadata

207

10 Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

218

11

232

Using Scene Detection

12 Ingesting From Tape

241

13 Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

250

PART 3
14 Using the Edit Page

269

15 Creating and Working with Timelines

303

16 Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

313

17 Editing Basics

329

18 Modifying Clips in the Timeline

352

19 Three and Four Point Editing

365

20 Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

390

21 Multicam Editing

406

22 Take Selectors, Compound Clips, and Nested Timelines

417

23 Trimming

425

Contents

3

24 Using Transitions

457

25 Working with Audio in the Edit Page

471

26 Media Management

496

PART 4
27 Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

505

28 Titles, Generators, and Stills

516

29 Compositing and Transforms in the Timeline

524

30 Edit Page Effects

537

31 Keyframing Effects in the Edit Page

549

32 Fusion Connect

561

PART 5
33 Preparing Timelines for DaVinci Resolve Import

571

34 Conforming and Relinking Clips

584

35 Creating Digital Dailies for Round Trip Workflows

610

36 Conforming XML Files

618

37 Conforming AAF Files

624

38 Conforming EDL Files

635

PART 6
39 Introduction to Color Grading

643

40 Using the Color Page

657

41 Automated Grading Commands and Imported Grades

700

42 Primary Grading Controls

715

43 Curves

741

44 Secondary Qualifiers

765

Contents

4

45 Secondary Windows and Tracking

790

46 Motion Tracking Windows

808

47 Using the Gallery

835

48 Grade Management

847

49 Node Editing Basics

883

50 Serial, Parallel, and Layer Nodes

902

51 Combining Keys and Using Mattes

911

52 Channel Splitting and Image Compositing

933

53 Keyframing in the Color Page

949

54 Copying and Importing Grades Using ColorTrace

963

55 DaVinci Resolve Control Panels

974

PART 7
56 Using OpenFX and ResolveFX

1000

57 ResolveFX

1011

58 Sizing and Image Stabilization

1052

59 The Motion Effects and Blur Palettes

1075

60 Dust Removal

1087

61 Data Burn

1091

PART 8
62 Using the Fairlight Page

1099

63 Setting Up Tracks, Buses, and Patching

1122

64 Transport Controls, Timeline Navigation, and Markers

1135

65 Recording

1142

66 Editing Basics in the Fairlight Page

1147

67 Clip Levels, Crossfades, Equalization, and Gating

1168

68 Mixing in the Fairlight Page

1174

Contents

5

69 Automation Recording

1192

70 Audio Effects

1199

71 Audio Meters and Audio Monitoring

1206

72 Signal Flow Diagrams

1214

PART 9
73 Using the Deliver Page

1219

74 Delivery Effects Processing

1226

75 Rendering Media

1232

76 Delivering Using EasyDCP

1253

77 Delivering to Tape

1259

78 Exporting Timelines and Metadata

1268

PART 10
79 Resolve Live

1280

80 Stereoscopic Workflows

1287

81 Using Variables and Keywords

1307

82 Creating DTCL LUTs

1313

83 TCP Protocol for DaVinci Resolve Transport Control

1319

PART 11
84 Managing Databases and Project Servers

1324

85 Collaborative Workflow

1332

86 Remote Grading

1342

87 Regulatory Notices and Safety Information

1345

88 Warranty

1346

Contents

6

PART 1

Part 1 – 1

Introduction to
DaVinci Resolve
Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Chapter 1
8

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Additionally, dedicated tools available for on-set workflows integrate tasks such as media
duplication, shot and metadata organization, and on-location look management into a complete
tool set that lets you smoothly segue from the camera-original media being acquired in the field
to the organization and use of that media in a wide variety of postproduction workflows that use
DaVinci Resolve at their heart.
The tight integration in DaVinci Resolve of on-set media, metadata, and “look” organization,
editing, grading, and sound work means that you can freely move from one task to the next
without skipping a beat. This makes it easy to back up and organize your media, and then
immediately dive into editing a program, switching over to color-correct clips in the middle of
your editing spree, before going right back to editing, and then perhaps a bit of mixing to make
sure things sound right, all without needing to export projects or launch other applications. And
you can go further, using the collaborative features of DaVinci Resolve to enable multiple
artists, for example an editor, a colorist, and assistants, to work together on the same timeline
simultaneously, for the ultimate integrated workflow.
Of course, no postproduction professional works in a vacuum, and DaVinci Resolve makes it
easy to work with other facilities by importing projects and exporting project exchange formats
and rendered or managed media among applications such as Apple’s Final Cut Pro X, Adobe’s
Premiere Pro, Avid’s Media Composer and ProTools, Autodesk’s Smoke and Flame Premium,
and many other applications via robust support of XML, AAF, and EDL import and export
workflows.
This chapter introduces the DaVinci Resolve user interface (UI), explaining where to find each
group of features, and how the highly focused and tightly integrated Media, Edit, Color, Fairlight,
and Deliver pages of functionality work together to let you pursue nearly any postproduction
workflow you can imagine. After this brief tour, the rest of Part 1 of this manual provides much
more in-depth information about every aspect of functionality found in DaVinci Resolve.
This chapter covers the following topics:

Getting Started

11

The Project Manager

11

Preferences

11

User Preferences

13

Project Settings

13

Switching Among Pages

14

About Keyboard Shortcuts in the Documentation

15

The Media Page

15

The Media Storage Browser

16

Viewer

16

Media Pool

17

Metadata Editor

17

Audio Panel

18

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

DaVinci Resolve integrates editing, color correction, audio recording and mixing, and finishing
within a single, easy to learn application. The editing, grading, and audio tools found in DaVinci
Resolve should be immediately familiar to experienced artists who’ve used other
postproduction applications, but they’re also very approachable to folks who are new to
postproduction.

Part 1 – 1

9

18

The Media Pool

19

Effects Library Browsing

19

Edit Index

20

Source/Offline and Timeline Viewers

20

Inspector

21

Toolbar

22

Timeline

22

Edit and Color Page Effects and Fusion Connect

22

The Color Page

23

Viewer

24

Gallery

24

Node Editor

25

Timeline

26

Left Palettes

26

Center Palettes

27

Keyframe Editor

27

The Fairlight Page

28

The Audio Timeline

28

Toolbar

29

Mixer

30

Dedicated Channel Strip Controls

30

The Monitoring Panel

32

The Deliver Page

32

The Render Settings List

33

The Deliver Page Timeline

34

The Viewer

34

The Render Queue

35

Working with the DaVinci Resolve User Interface

35

Working Full Screen vs. within a Floating Window

35

Showing and Hiding Panels of Functionality Using the Interface Toolbar

36

Adjusting the Size of Different Panels

36

Using Single vs. Dual Monitor Layouts

37

Saving Custom Screen Layouts

38

Resetting to the Default Layout

39

Undocking Specific Panels of the Interface

39

DaVinci Resolve User Interface Conventions

41

Contextual Menus

41

Buttons and Pop-up Menus

41

Adjusting Parameters

42

The Three Buttons of a Mouse or Other Input Device

42

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

The Edit Page

Part 1 – 1

10

The Project Manager
The Project Manager is the first window you’ll see when you open DaVinci Resolve. The Project
Manager is a centralized interface for managing all projects belonging to the user who’s
currently logged in, whose name appears at the upper right-hand corner in a project title bar.
The Project Manager is also the place where you import and export projects to and from
DaVinci Resolve, whether you’re moving projects around from user to user, or moving projects
from one DaVinci Resolve workstation to another. Finally, the Project Manager also lets you
organize the databases that are used to manage everything in DaVinci Resolve using the
Database Sidebar.
To open any project, double-click it. To create a new project, double-click the Untitled Project
icon, or click the New Project button.

The Project Manager shows all projects belonging to the current user

More information about the Project Manager appears in Chapter 2, “Managing Projects
and Databases.”

Preferences
The Preferences Window, divided into System preferences and User preferences panels, lets
you set up the overall environment of your DaVinci workstation, choosing what hardware to use
with DaVinci Resolve and what user interface settings you prefer as you work.

Part 1 – 1

When you install DaVinci Resolve and then open it for the first time, there are a few things
you’re going to want to do before you begin working on your first project.

11

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Getting Started

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Part 1 – 1

12

The DaVinci Resolve Preferences let you set up your environment

A quick overview of the most important System and User Preferences appears below, but for a
comprehensive overview and for more information, see Chapter 3, “Project Settings and
Preferences.”

System Preferences
The System preferences let you configure the hardware DaVinci Resolve works with. If you have
a system that doesn’t change very often, then you may only rarely use the Preferences window.
On the other hand, if you’re working with a mobile system with changing video interfaces,
control panels, and scratch volumes, then you may use this window more frequently.
Note: Whenever you change certain core System Settings in the Preferences, you may have to
quit and restart DaVinci Resolve for those changes to take effect.

Hardware Configuration
Lets you choose various options governing how to use the GPUs attached to your computer,
and how to configure Viewers in different pages. This panel also provides an overview, for
reference, of all hardware and computer characteristics that are relevant to DaVinci Resolve
running smoothly, including listing of installed GPUs.

Media Storage
This is a list within which you define the scratch disk used by your system. The first volume in
this list is where Gallery stills and cache files are stored, so you want to make sure that you
choose the fastest storage volume that’s connected.

Control Panels
Lets you choose and configure (if necessary) a control panel that’s connected for use during
grading in Resolve.

User Preferences
User preferences govern the setup of the user interface in Resolve, letting you customize it to
work the way you like.

UI Settings
A Language pop-up at top lets you specify which language the DaVinci Resolve user interface
displays. DaVinci Resolve currently supports English, Chinese, Japanese, and Spanish.
Additional checkboxes let you choose options for which project to open during startup, and
how to configure the Viewers that appear in every page of DaVinci Resolve.

Auto Save
This panel contains the all-important auto-save controls, including the Live Save option that
enables Resolve to incrementally save your changes as you work.

Editing
Numerous controls in this panel let you customize the editing experience in the Edit page,
including default settings to use when making new timelines, and general settings that govern
standard effects durations and trim behaviors.

Color
These controls let you customize the grading experience in the Color page, with options
controlling video scope display, the look of UI overlays, and other color-specific functions.

Keyboard Mapping
This panel has all the controls you need for searching for and customizing the keyboard
shortcuts used for different commands throughout DaVinci Resolve.

Project Settings
Once you’ve created a project, all project-specific settings are found in the Project Settings
window. To open the Project Settings window, just click the gear button at the bottom right on
any page.

Project Manager and Project Settings buttons

Part 1 – 1

The preferences in this panel let you choose which video and audio interfaces you want
DaVinci Resolve to use on your workstation. If you have multiple Blackmagic Design I/O
interfaces connected to your computer, you can choose one to use for monitoring video output,
and one to use for Resolve Live, a feature that lets you grade camera output during a shoot as
part of an on-set workflow.

13

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Video and Audio I/O

Part 1 – 1

14

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

The Project Settings open in the middle of the screen, divided into a series of panels which can
be selected from a sidebar to the left. Each panel contains a collection of related settings that
affects some category of Resolve functionality. To open a panel of settings, simply click its
name in the sidebar at the left.

The Project Settings show all project-specific settings and attributes

The Master Settings define the principal attributes of a project, such as the timeline resolution,
timeline frame rate, color science, and bit depth. Image Scaling settings define how clips that
don’t match the timeline resolution are scaled to fit. There are other panels for Color
Management, Camera RAW, Capture and Playback, et cetera.
For more information about Project Settings, see Chapter 3, “Project Settings and Preferences.”

Switching Among Pages
DaVinci Resolve is divided into five main pages of functionality, which can be accessed using
buttons at the very bottom of the DaVinci Resolve interface. These buttons are organized in
order of workflow, and they’re always available, letting you quickly switch between importing
media, editing, grading, mixing, and outputting your project in a structured manner.

Buttons for switching pages appear at the bottom of the UI

Keyboard Shortcut

Media

Shift-2

Edit

Shift-4

Color

Shift-6

Fairlight

Shift-7

Deliver

Shift-8

About Keyboard Shortcuts in the Documentation
Since the majority of DaVinci Resolve users are on Mac OS, this manual presents all keyboard
shortcuts using the OS X conventions of the Command key and the Option key.
For compatibility with Windows and Linux, the Control key in Mac OS is not used by default for any
keyboard shortcuts (although it can be assigned if you customized your keyboard shortcuts).
All keyboard shortcuts that use the Option key in macOS use the ALT key in Windows and
Linux, and all keyboard shortcuts that use the Command key in macOS use the Control key in
Windows and Linux.

The Media Page
The Media page is the primary interface for media management and clip organization in DaVinci
Resolve. It’s central to the way DaVinci Resolve works that the source media used by a project
is organized separately from the project data that you import and manage in the Edit page. In
this way, you can manage and update the clips used by timelines in the current project with
ease, switching between offline and online media, reorganizing clips, and troubleshooting any
problems that occur.
The Media page also contains much of the core functionality that will be used for on-set
workflows, and in the ingest, organizational, and sound-synching steps of digital dailies
workflows. This chapter covers most of the functionality found in the Media page, including
functions in detail that are referenced throughout this manual.
The Media page is divided into six different areas, designed to make it easy to find, select, and
work with media in your project. Much of the functionality and most of the commands are found
within the contextual menus that appear when you right-click clips in the Library, File Browser,
or Media Pool.

Media page

For more information on using the Media page, see Chapter 7, “Using the Media Page.”

Part 1 – 1

Page

15

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

You can also switch pages using the following keyboard shortcuts.

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

The Media Storage browser shows a list of all volumes that are currently available to your
Resolve workstation. It’s used to locate media that you want to import manually into
your project.

16

Part 1 – 1

The Media Storage Browser

Media Storage with scrubbable Clip view

Viewer
Clips that you select in any area of the Media page show their contents in the Viewer. A jog
bar appears at the bottom, letting you drag the playhead directly with the pointer, while a
jog control between the mode pop-up and transport controls lets you move through a long clip
more slowly. The full width of the jog bar represents the full duration of the clip in the Viewer.
The current position of the playhead is shown in the timecode field at the upper right-hand
corner of the Viewer. Simple transport controls appear underneath the jog bar, letting you
Jump to First Frame, Play/Stop, and Jump to Last Frame.

Media page viewer

You can also put the Viewer into Cinema Viewer mode by choosing Workspace > Viewer Mode
> Cinema Viewer (Command-F), so that it fills the entire screen. This command toggles
Cinema Viewer mode on and off.

Media Pool with the Folder View closed

Metadata Editor
When you select a clip in any area of the Media page, its metadata is displayed within the
Metadata Editor. If you select multiple clips, only the last clip’s information appears. The
Metadata Editor’s header contains uneditable information about the selected clip, including the
file name, directory, duration, frame rate, resolution, and codec. A series of editable fields within
the Metadata Editor lets you review and edit the different metadata items that are available.
A pop-up menu at the upper-right of the Metadata Editor lets you choose from many different
sets of metadata fields and checkboxes, each grouped for a specific task or workflow.

Clip Metadata Editor

Part 1 – 1

The Media Pool contains all of the media that you import into the current project. It also contains
any media that’s automatically imported along with Timelines that have been imported into
Resolve. Ordinarily, all media imported into a project goes into the Master folder, however the
Media Pool can be organized into as many user-definable folders as you like, depending on
your needs. Media can be freely moved from one folder to another from within the Media Pool.

17

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Media Pool

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

The Audio Panel can be put into one of two modes via a pair of buttons above the audio meters.
In the default Meters mode, Audio Meters are displayed that show the levels of audio in clips
you’re playing. In Waveform mode, you can load audio clips side by side with video clips opened
in the Viewer in order to sync them together manually. The Audio Panel can also be hidden.

18

Part 1 – 1

Audio Panel

Audio Meters exposed

The Edit Page
The Edit page exposes a source-record style NLE that incorporates many specialized features
for both creative editing and finishing. The Edit page is divided into three main regions: the
browsers found at the left, the Viewers at the top, and the Timeline at the bottom, all of which
work together to let you import, edit, and trim timelines with a flexible variety of tools
and methods.

The Edit page

For more information on the Edit page, see Chapter 14, “Using the Edit Page.”

The Media Pool in Thumbnail mode

Effects Library Browsing
The Effects Library contains a folder with the different Video Transitions, Title Effects,
Generators, and Filters that are available for editing in the Timeline. The Effects Library has
two panels, a Toolbox panel that contains the default Transitions, Titles, and Generators that
Resolve comes with, and an OpenFX panel that contains any OpenFX transitions and
generators you might have installed on your system.

The Effects Library, made taller to show all of its contents

Part 1 – 1

The Media Pool lets you organize and peruse all of the media and timelines in a project. DaVinci
Resolve projects may contain one or more edited timelines (sometimes called a sequence in
other applications).
The Media Pool in the Edit page is identical to that shown on the Media page, and shows you all
of the source clips and timelines that are available for editing. A Bin list at the left shows a
hierarchical list of folders that you can use to organize your media. By default, the Media Pool
has a single bin, named “Master,” but you can add more bins as necessary to organize your
clips, opening any of them to expose their contents with a single click. The Bin list can be
hidden or shown via the button at the upper-left of the Media Pool. A browser to the right shows
the contents of the currently selected bin.

19

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

The Media Pool

Edit Index List shown open

Source/Offline and Timeline Viewers
The Source Viewer lets you view individual clips from the Media Pool to prepare them for
editing. Meanwhile, the Timeline Viewer shows the frame at the position of the playhead in the
Timeline. You can select either viewer by clicking, and the name of the viewer that currently has
focus appears in orange. The color shown in the Source Viewer usually reflects that of the
original source media, while the Timeline Viewer shows whatever grading you’ve done in the
Color page.

Source and Timeline Viewers

Part 1 – 1

Clicking the Edit Index button opens the Edit Index. By default, this shows an EDL-style list view
of all the edit events in the current Timeline. Whichever timeline is selected in the Timeline list
displays its events here; each clip and transition is shown as an individual event, each of which
contains multiple columns of information. If you re-edit a timeline, your changes are
automatically reflected in this list.

20

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Edit Index

Part 1 – 1

21

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

If you want to change the Edit Page layout to hide the Source Viewer, you can choose View >
Single Viewer Mode to hide the Source Viewer and instead use just a single viewer to
contextually display either a selected Source Clip or the current frame of the Timeline.

Single Viewer mode

In Single Viewer mode, whatever you select in the Media Pool or Timeline determines which
controls appear in the Viewer, which lets you do nearly everything you can do with two
simultaneously open viewers.
You can also put either the Source or Timeline Viewers into Cinema Viewer mode by
choosing Workspace > Viewer Mode > Cinema Viewer (Command-F), causing whichever
Viewer is currently selected to fill the entire screen. This command toggles Cinema Viewer
mode on and off.

Inspector
The Inspector can be opened to let you customize compositing, transform, and cropping
parameters for clips, as well as clip-specific retime and scaling options. Furthermore, the
Inspector lets you edit the parameters of transitions, titles, and generators used in the Timeline,
in order to customize their effect. Ordinarily, the Inspector opens alongside the Source and
Timeline Viewers, but on smaller displays, opening the Inspector switches the Edit page to a
single-viewer mode, showing you the Timeline item that you’re inspecting alongside the
Inspector with that clip’s parameters.

The Inspector, opened and showing a clip’s parameters

Buttons in the Toolbar

Timeline
The Timeline shows whichever timeline you’ve double-clicked in the Timelines browser. It’s the
workspace where you either edit programs together from scratch, or import sequences from
other applications to work on inside of Resolve. You can only have one Timeline open at a time.
The Timeline is divided into audio and video tracks, each of which has a series of header
controls at the left that let you choose destination tracks for editing, name tracks, and turn
tracks on and off, among other things. The appearance of the Timeline can be customized
using the Timeline View Options pop-up in the toolbar.

An edited timeline

Edit and Color Page Effects
and Fusion Connect
DaVinci Resolve has a wealth of effects in both the Edit and Color pages for creating titles,
transforming and animating clips, compositing and creating transparency effects, cutting
mattes, applying filters, image stabilization, lens dewarping, etcetera, etcetera. To use Resolve
to best effect, it’s prudent to begin to think of the Edit and Color pages as complementary sets
of controls. For editors, the Color page is really just a giant inspector filled with every control for
color and visual adjustment you could want, that’s only one click away. For colorists, the Edit
page is a refined environment for dealing with conform issues and taking care of a myriad of
finishing tasks quickly and easily, that itself is only one click away. For more information on the
effects that are available in DaVinci Resolve, see the chapters available within Part 4, “Edit Page
Effects,” and Part 7, “Color Page Effects.”

Part 1 – 1

Eleven buttons starting from the left, running along the top of the Timeline, let you choose
different tools for performing various editing functions.

22

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Toolbar

The New Fusion Connect Clip dialog

The Color Page
The Color page is where you color correct, or grade, your program. It has all of the controls
available for manipulating color and contrast, reducing noise, creating limited secondary color
corrections, building image effects of different kinds, adjusting clip geometry, and making many
other corrective and stylistic adjustments. The Color page is divided into seven main areas that
work together to let you build a grade. It’s divided into seven regions.

The default layout of the Color page

For more detailed information about the Color page, see Chapter 40, “Using the Color Page.”

Part 1 – 1

23

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

However, when you run into instances where the various effects in the Edit and Color page
aren’t enough to achieve the effect you require, you can use the Fusion Connect features of
DaVinci Resolve to send one or more clips from the Edit page timeline to Blackmagic Fusion,
the powerful node-based compositing application from Blackmagic Design, in order to do more
robust compositing and effects work there. This is a simple round-trip operation that lets you
send clips from the Resolve timeline to Fusion, add effects, and then render a finished effect
out of Fusion that will automatically appear back in your timeline. For more information, see
Chapter 32, “Fusion Connect.”

Viewer with transport controls

You can also put the Viewer into Cinema Viewer mode by choosing Workspace > Viewer Mode
> Cinema Viewer (Command-F), so that it fills the entire screen. This command toggles
Cinema Viewer mode on and off. Two other modes, Enhanced Viewer (Option-F) and Full
Screen Viewer (Shift-F), are available to provide more working area for tasks such as window
positioning and rotoscoping.

Gallery
The Gallery is used for storing still frames to use as reference when comparing clips to one
another. Each still frame also stores that clip’s grade so you can copy it later; stills and grades
are stored together. A button lets you open up the Album browser, used for organizing your
stills. At the top of the Gallery, Memories let you store grade information that you can apply
using a control panel or keyboard shortcuts. You can also open a larger Gallery window within
the Color page that provides more room for organizing your saved stills and grades. For more
information on the Gallery page, see Chapter 47, “Using the Gallery.”

Part 1 – 1

The Viewer shows the frame at the current position of the playhead in the Timeline. The
contents of the Viewer are almost always output to video via whichever I/O interface you have
connected. At the top of the Viewer is a header that displays the Project and Timeline names,
as well as a Viewer Timecode display that shows the source timecode of each clip by default.
The Timeline name is also a pop-up display that lets you switch to any other timeline in the
project. A jog bar (sometimes referred to as a scrubber bar) underneath the image lets you drag
the playhead across the entire duration of the clip, while transport controls underneath that let
you control playback. A toolbar at the top provides controls governing Image Wipes, SplitScreen controls, and Highlight display. Additional controls let you turn audio playback on and
off, and choose which on-screen controls are currently displayed.

24

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Viewer

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

Part 1 – 1

25

The Gallery has Memories, Stills saved in Albums and your PowerGrades

Node Editor
The Node Editor is where you assemble one or more individual corrections (nodes) together to
create multi-correction grades (seen as node trees). This is a powerful way of assembling
grades, since different combinations of nodes let you create different corrections and very
specific adjustments by reordering operations, combining keys, or changing the layer order of
different adjustments. For more information about the Node Editor, see Chapter 49, “Node
Editing Basics.”

Node Editor to construct your grade processing signal flow

The Timeline is divided into three parts, each of which shows different information and provides
differing controls. A Timeline Ruler at the top lets you scrub the playhead across multiple clips,
and can be zoomed out enough to show every clip in your entire program. Underneath, the
Mini-Timeline (which can be opened or closed via a button at the right of the palette bar) shows
a small representation of the Timeline in the Edit page wherein each clip is as long as its actual
duration. At the bottom of the Timeline is the Thumbnail timeline, in which each clip is
represented by a single frame. The currently selected clip is outlined in orange, and information
appears above and below each thumbnail such as each clip’s source timecode, clip number
and track number, version name, whether it’s been graded, whether it’s been tracked, if it’s
been flagged, and so on.

The Timeline

Left Palettes
A series of palettes at the bottom left of the Color page provide access to different sets of
grading tools, used principally for manipulating color, contrast, and raw media format settings.
Each individual palette is opened by clicking the corresponding icon at the top of the Palette
panel.
The available palettes are the Camera Raw palette (for making metadata adjustments to raw
media formats), the Color Match palette (for creating automatic grades by sampling on-camera
color charts), the Color Wheels (graphical color balance controls and master wheels or sliders for
adjusting YRGB Lift/Gamma/Gain), the RGB Mixer (for mixing color channels into one another),
and the Motion Effects palette (with controls for noise reduction and artificial motion blur).

Left palette selection buttons

Part 1 – 1

The Timeline in the Color page reflects the contents of the Timeline in the Edit page, but has a
different appearance that’s tailored to the requirements of the colorist. However, the content is
identical, and changes made to the Timeline in the Edit page are immediately seen in the Color
page as you switch back and forth. The Color page Timeline provides several ways of navigating
the clips in your project, as well as keeping track of what has been done to which clips.

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Timeline

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

At 1920x1080 resolution or higher, a second set of palettes is organized at the bottom center of
the Color page. These palettes span a wide range of functionality, and the adjustments you
make with them can be combined with those made using the Color palettes.

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Part 1 – 1

Center Palettes

Center palette selection buttons

NOTE: At lower resolutions, the Left and Center palettes are merged to fit the
DaVinci Resolve interface into a smaller area.

The eight available Center palettes include the Curves palette, the Qualifiers palette, the
Power Windows palette, the Tracker palette, the Blur palette, the Key palette, the Sizing palette,
and the Stereoscopic 3D palette.

Keyframe Editor
The Keyframe Editor provides an interface for animating Color, Sizing, and Stereo Format
adjustments over time. Each node in the Node Editor corresponds to a track in the Keyframe
Editor, which lets you animate each node’s adjustments independently.

Keyframe Editor displaying dynamic grade changes

In single monitor mode, the Fairlight page is an optimized look at the audio tracks of your
project, with an expanded mixer and custom monitoring controls that make it easy to evaluate
and adjust the levels of your program in order to create a smooth and harmonious mix.

Audio page

The Audio Timeline
The heart of the Fairlight page, the Audio Timeline presents the audio channels and tracks of
the currently selected timeline differently than the Edit page does, in a one-channel-per-track
format that’s optimized for audio mixing and sweetening. The Audio page Timeline cannot
be closed.

The Audio page Timeline

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The Fairlight Page

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Furthermore, each node’s track can be opened up to reveal Parameter Groups, so that you can
animate subsets of an individual node’s functions independently of other functions within the
same node.

Audio layering in a mono audio track

The Fairlight page differs in another unique respect from the Edit page Timeline, in that it
supports audio layering. Audio layering is a special audio editing mode that lets you
superimpose multiple audio clips in the same track, and whatever audio clip is on top dictates
which audio will play. In a way, when audio layering is enabled, superimposed audio clips are
treated the same as superimposed video clips that all have opacity set to 100%, with clips on
top obscuring (or muting) clips underneath.
Audio layering is incredibly useful for any situation where you’re combining pieces of multiple
takes together to create a single VO, audio vocal track, or dramatic performance, as you can
choose which pieces to prioritize via their superimposed position in the track, while you’re
preserving the other takes underneath in case you want them later.

TIP: Track Layering can be used on the Edit page as well.

Turning on Track Layers opens up space to edit more audio into each track

Toolbar
The Toolbar has buttons that let you choose modes of audio-specific functionality and other
buttons that let you execute commands, such as placing markers and flags.

Buttons in the Fairlight Page Toolbar

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The Fairlight page of DaVinci Resolve supports multiple audio tracks, and each audio track may
contain multiple lanes. The clips edited into the Timeline appear within each track, with the
recorded channels within each clip occupying as many lanes as that clip has available. At the
left of each track is a header area that contains a number of controls.

The Audio Mixer, with channel strips corresponding
to the tracks in the Timeline

Dedicated Channel Strip Controls
The Mixer also has a series of dedicated channel strip controls that add powerful mastering
capabilities to DaVinci Resolve. These include:
‚‚ EQ: Double-clicking exposes a four band parametric equalizer with additional Hi and Lo
Pass filters, that has both graphical and numeric controls for tuning the frequencies of
the audio on each track. You can select from among four types of EQ filtering from the
Equalizer Type pop-up menu, with options for Earth (the default), Air, Ice, and Fire. Each
band has controls for the filter type (Bell, Lo-Shelf, Hi-Shelf, Notch), Frequency, Gain,
and Q-factor (sharpness of the band).

Part 1 – 1

The Audio Mixer provides a set of graphical controls you can use to assign track channels to
output channels, adjust EQ and Dynamics, set levels and record automation, pan stereo and
surround audio, and mute and solo tracks, all while you continue to edit.
The Audio Mixer exposes a set of channel strips with controls that correspond to the tracks in
the Timeline, one for each track, plus a Master strip corresponding to the Master audio track in
the Timeline, that lets you choose the number of audio channels to output, and also lets you
adjust the overall level of the mix.

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Mixer

The channel strip EQ window

‚‚ Dynamics: Double-clicking exposes a set of dynamics controls with compressor, limiter,
and expander or gate sections. The Equalizer button at the upper left-hand corner lets
you turn all EQ on and off. The first section can be switched between working as an
Expander or a Gate, with attendant Threshold/Range/Ratio and Attack/Hold/Release
controls. The second section provides Compressor controls, while the third section
provides Limiter controls. These controls may be used either singly or in concert to
manage the dynamics of the audio on that track.

The channel strip Dynamics control window

‚‚ Pan: A pan control compatible with stereo and surround panning. You can drag within
this control to adjust pan, or you can double-click to expose a Pan window. What
controls are available in the Pan window depend on the mapping of the audio track, but
both stereo and surround panning controls are available, with corresponding numeric
controls.

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Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

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The Pan control window

The Monitoring Panel
The Monitoring panel shows all of the audio meters corresponding to the tracks in the Timeline,
as well as the Master Output meter, Control Room meters, and a video viewer.

The Monitoring panel

At left, a row of audio meters corresponds to the channel strips of the Mixer, one meter for
every audio track in the Timeline. To the right of these, all buses appear, showing you meters
for the Mains and Subs (submixes) you’re using to mix down your show. Farther to the right of
these, a set of Control Room meters show you the monitored output and loudness meters for a
precise analysis of your mix’s perceived loudness.
Finally, a small viewer to the left of the Monitoring panel shows the frame of video at the
position of the playhead. This viewer can be undocked via a button at the lower right-hand
corner.

The Deliver Page
Once you’ve finished grading your project, you need to either render it, or output it to tape to
deliver it to your client. This is where the Deliver page comes in. The Deliver page can be used
both to output digital deliverables, or to output tape, depending on which mode you enable.
Either way, the Deliver page is divided into five areas of functionality, each of which lets you set
up a different part of a render or output to tape.
The Deliver page is set up to let you queue a series of individual jobs, each of which can have
different settings, or be set up to render different parts of the Timeline. In this way, you can
output multiple deliverables, or re-render multiple areas of a timeline, as your needs require.

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The Deliver page

For more information about using the Deliver page, see Chapter 73, “Using the Deliver Page.”

The Render Settings List
The Render Settings list contains the customizable settings that affect how media is rendered out
of Resolve. These settings are covered in more detail later in “File-based Output.” The Render
Settings you can choose from for outputting from Resolve appear in three panels, separating the
Video, Audio, and File information-based settings in a logical fashion. By default, this list shows
only the most important criteria necessary for defining a render. However, additional controls can
be exposed by clicking the “Advanced settings” button at the bottom of each group of settings.

Render settings

The Deliver page’s Thumbnail and Mini-Timeline match the Color page

The Deliver page Timeline also has the Timeline Filter pop-up at the right-hand side of the
toolbar. Using this pop-up to filter the contents of the Timeline lets you restrict the range of
media you want to output in different ways. For example, if you’ve already rendered a timeline,
but you’ve since made some changes, you can use the “Show Modified Clips” option to display
only the clips that have changed within a particular timeframe. Another possibility is to choose
the “Show Unrendered Clips” option to show all clips that have not yet been rendered.

The Viewer
When rendering file-based media, the Viewer shows you exactly how the media being output
will look using the current settings, and the Transport controls move the playhead throughout
the current Timeline.

Deliver Viewer

When outputting to tape, the Viewer shows you the tape output so you can set up insert or
assembly edit points, and the Transport controls move the tape in the deck if device control is
enabled. You can also put the Viewer into Cinema Viewer mode by choosing Workspace >
Viewer Mode > Cinema Viewer (Command-F), so that it fills the entire screen. This command
toggles Cinema Viewer mode on and off.

Part 1 – 1

The Timeline mirrors the Timeline seen in the Color page. You can use the Timeline in the
Deliver page to turn off tracks with clips you don’t want to include in the operation, define the
range of clips you want to render or output to tape, and to choose which versions for each clip
you want to output. You also have the option of switching the Deliver page Timeline to look like
the Color page timeline instead, if that’s what you’re more comfortable with.

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The Deliver Page Timeline

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

The Render Queue is a list of all the jobs you’ve queued up for file-based rendering. Each job can
have an individualized range of clips and render settings, which you can use to render multiple
sections or clips of a timeline, the same timeline output to multiple formats, or multiple timelines.

35

Part 1 – 1

The Render Queue

The Render Queue displays all jobs

The Render Queue also has the option to show either just the jobs within the current project, or
jobs queued up and saved within all projects for the current user.

Working with the DaVinci Resolve
User Interface
While the DaVinci Resolve interface may not seem very customizable at first, there are actually
many ways in which you can tailor the panels found within each page to your specific needs.

Working Full Screen vs. within a Floating Window
Depending on how you like to work, you can choose to work with DaVinci Resolve in a floating
window with a title bar that can be resized, moved, minimized, and used alongside other
windows. Or, you can choose Workspace > Layout > Full Screen to put DaVinci Resolve into Full
Screen mode, where the title bar disappears and DaVinci Resolve takes up the full dimensions
of your computer display.
Editors may prefer to work within a window if they’re working among multiple applications.
Colorists and Mixers may prefer Full Screen mode as it hides the light-colored title bar that some
find distracting, and provides a tiny bit more screen real estate for the rest of the application.

The interface toolbar for the Color page lets you customize the Color page controls

Each page has a different set of options, that reflect the capabilities of that page.

Adjusting the Size of Different Panels
Each page of Resolve is divided into multiple panels, viewers, and palettes, each of which
contains specific sets of functions. These can be customized in one of three ways.
You can resize different regions of the interface by positioning the pointer at the border
between any two panels, and dragging it to enlarge one and shrink the other.

(Before/After) Resizing UI regions

Certain UI elements can be expanded, in the process rearranging another part of the UI, by
clicking a small gray Expand button. For example, an expand button at the top right of the
Keyframe Editor in the Color page can be clicked to make the Keyframe Editor wider, while at
the same time hiding controls at the center to make room.

Part 1 – 1

Each page in DaVinci Resolve has an Interface Toolbar that runs along the top. This toolbar
contains buttons that let you show and hide different panels of functionality, so you can hide
things you don’t need in order to create more room for controls that you’re using.

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Showing and Hiding Panels of
Functionality Using the Interface Toolbar

(Before/After) Expanding the Keyframe Editor

Using Single vs. Dual Monitor Layouts
The Media, Edit, Color, and Fairlight pages can be switched between single screen and dual
screen layouts by choosing Workspace > Dual Screen > On. Each dual screen layout makes it
possible to see many more controls at once, often in a larger workspace that lets you manage
more clips, more Gallery stills, etcetera.

The Edit page in Dual-screen mode

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If you’re working in the Edit page in Dual-screen mode and you need the biggest timeline
you can get for working through your program, you can choose Workspace > Dual Screen >
Full Screen Timeline to expose a layout with one large full-screen timeline, and all the other
Edit page panels on the other screen.

The Edit page in Full screen Timeline mode

Saving Custom Screen Layouts
If you’ve created a particular set of resized panels that you’ll want to use often, you can save it,
alongside other frequently useful screen layouts you may have saved.
Methods of working with custom screen layouts:
‚‚ To save a custom screen preset: Customize the various pages of DaVinci Resolve
for the purpose at hand, then choose Workspace > Layout Presets > Save Layout As
Preset. Enter a name into the Save Layout as Preset dialog, and click OK.

Part 1 – 1

Using the Full Screen Timeline Option in the Edit Page

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Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

In Single-screen mode, you can choose which display shows the DaVinci Resolve UI by
choosing Workspace > Primary Display > Display 1 or Display 2. In Dual-screen mode,
this reverses the contents of both monitors.

‚‚ To delete a screen preset: Choose Workspace > Layout Presets > LAYOUT NAME >
Delete Preset.
‚‚ To export a screen preset for use on another DaVinci Resolve installation: Choose
Workspace > Layout Presets > LAYOUT NAME > Export Preset.
‚‚ To import a screen preset: Choose Workspace > Layout Presets > Import Layout
as Preset.

Resetting to the Default Layout
If you don’t like the current layout and you want to go back to the default, choose Workspace >
Reset UI Layout.

Undocking Specific Panels of the Interface
There are certain interface elements that can either be docked in their respective pages, or
opened in separate windows.
Media Pool bins can be opened into floating windows simply by right-clicking on the bin and
choosing Open As a New Window in the contextual menu. Even though you’re opening up the
contents of the selected bin, you’re really creating another Media Pool, complete with Bin list,
Browsing area, and all of the organizational controls found in the docked Media Pool. You can
have as many floating Media Pools as you like. They can be dragged to other monitors, and
they can be closed via a button at the upper left-hand corner of the title bar.

A floating Media Pool window

The Video Scopes let you precisely analyze the color and contrast of clips in the Color page.
They can be exposed in their docked position to the right of the Color page palettes by clicking
the Video Scope button in the Color page toolbar.

Part 1 – 1

‚‚ To update a previously saved screen preset: Choose the layout you want from the
Workspace > Layout submenu, make your changes, and then choose Workspace >
Layout Presets > LAYOUT NAME > Update Preset.

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‚‚ To choose a previously saved screen preset: Choose Workspace > Layout Presets >
LAYOUT NAME > Load.

The Video Scope, docked next to the other
palettes at the bottom of the Color page

Optionally, you can click the expand button at the top right of the video scope to open the
video scopes into a floating window, within which you can display all four video scopes
together, or individually, on any monitor connected to your workstation.

Video scopes in a floating window

Additionally, the Audio Mixer and Video Scopes are available in many of the dual-screen layouts
available in Resolve. The video scopes aren’t just available in the Color page. They’re also
available in the Media and Deliver pages for whenever you need to evaluate the video signal
more objectively, such as when you’re setting up to capture from tape or scan from film, or
when you’re setting up for output.
In the Resolve single screen layout, the Audio Mixer and Video Scopes can be moved to a
second computer display if one’s available, and both disappear temporarily if you change pages
or switch to another application.

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Contextual Menus
Nearly every panel on every page exposes additional functionality via contextual menus, which
appear when you right-click on the appropriate item. Sometimes, different commands become
available depending on whether you right-click the background of a particular panel, or on an
item such as a still or node.

Contextual menus expose additional controls in the Color page Viewer

Buttons and Pop-up Menus
Most of the buttons and pop-up menus that appear in various toolbars are activated with a
single click. Many panels and palettes appear with a Mode pop-up at the upper right-hand
corner that lets you choose a different type of function within that palette.

Mode pop-up

Part 1 – 1

While each chapter covers the unique on-screen controls found in each page of DaVinci
Resolve, this section summarizes how to use some of the more common controls you’ll see.

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DaVinci Resolve User
Interface Conventions

42

Option menus

Adjusting Parameters
Numeric parameters can usually be edited in a few different ways. If a slider appears, you can
drag it to change the value. If a number field appears, it can also be used as a “virtual slider” by
clicking and dragging to the right to raise the value, or to the left to lower the value (white
arrows indicate the direction of change).

Using virtual sliders

Double-clicking the field containing most numeric values highlights the number so that you can
type a new value using the keyboard, pressing Return to confirm the change. Finally, to reset
any editable parameter to its default setting, double-click its text label.

The Three Buttons of a
Mouse or Other Input Device
Resolve uses all three buttons of a multi-button mouse, or the three buttons available on other
type of input devices, when available. This section provides a brief summary of all the different
ways these three mouse buttons can be used.

Left Button
The left button is always referred to as a click, as in, “click the auto select button.” You click to
turn buttons or other controls on or off, to make selections, and to give areas of the Resolve UI
focus so that keyboard shortcuts will do whatever is specific to that panel or area of the
user interface.
Double-clicking the left button usually opens items that are openable, such as opening a clip
from the Media Pool into the Source Viewer. You can also use double-clicking to do things like
selecting nodes in the Node Editor of the Color page.

Introduction to DaVinci Resolve

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Additionally, many panels, palettes, and windows expose an Option menu, that appears as
three horizontal dots, which expose additional commands related to that particular function.

However, some areas of the UI use right-clicking in special ways. For example, when you’re
using a color adjustment curve in the Curve palette of the Color page, right-clicking a control
point deletes that point.

Middle Button
The middle button (usually the scroll wheel button, but you may have to turn this on in the
Mouse panel of the System Preferences) is referred to as a middle-click, which does different
things in different places.
‚‚ In all pages, rolling the scroll wheel while the pointer is within a Viewer lets you zoom
into and out of the image being displayed when you need to do more detailed work.
‚‚ In the Color page, you can move the pointer over the Thumbnail timeline and roll up to
scroll to the right or roll down to scroll to the left. You can also roll the scroll wheel while
the pointer is within the Mini-timeline to zoom into or out of the currently displayed area.
Rolling up zooms out, while rolling down zooms in.
‚‚ Middle-clicking and dragging within a Viewer lets you drag the image to pan it around,
which is useful after you’ve used the scroll wheel (or scroll behavior) of your mouse to
zoom in.
‚‚ You can middle-click and drag within the Edit Page timeline to quickly pan around
your edit.
‚‚ You can also use middle-click to copy a grade in the Thumbnail timeline of the Color
page, by first selecting the clip that you want to copy TO (with a simple click) and then
middle-clicking the clip or gallery still you want to copy a grade FROM.
‚‚ Lastly, if you’re drawing a Bezier window in the Color page viewer using the Window
palette, then middle-clicking a control point will delete that point.

Part 1 – 1

The right button is referred to as a right-click, as in, “right-click a clip in the Media Pool.”
Right‑clicking an item or area of the Resolve interface usually opens a contextual menu,
exposing additional commands that are specific to the item or area you’ve right-clicked.

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Right Button

Part 1 – 2

Managing Projects
and Databases

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Managing Projects and Databases

Chapter 2

Managing Projects and Databases

Using the Project Manager

46

Project Management

47

Importing and Exporting Projects in Disk Databases

47

Importing and Exporting Projects in PostgreSQL Databases

48

Project Manager View Options

48

Searching For Projects

49

Organizing Projects in Folders

50

Managing Databases With the Database Sidebar

50

Opening the Database Sidebar

51

Moving Projects From One Database to Another on the Same Workstation

52

Managing Databases in the Database Sidebar

52

Legacy User Organization in the Database Sidebar

57

Saving Projects

57

Dynamic Project Switching

58

Archiving and Restoring Projects

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Managing Projects and Databases

This chapter covers how to use the Project Manager to organize the projects you’re working on
in DaVinci Resolve, as well as how to deal with managing the databases that serve as the
organizational foundation of the Project Manager. You’ll also see how to export and import
projects, and how to archive a project and its media for long-term storage.

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Project Manager

If you’ve already opened a project, you can re-open the Project Manager at any time by clicking
the Home button at the bottom right-hand corner of the DaVinci Resolve window.

The Project Manager button at the bottom right
corner of the DaVinci Resolve interface

Launching DaVinci Resolve For the First Time?
If you’ve just installed DaVinci Resolve and have opened it for the first time, it’s time to
set the preferences in order to specify your language, scratch disk volume, and
hardware configuration for video and audio I/O and control panels (if you have one).
For more information about setting the preferences in DaVinci Resolve, see Chapter 3,
“Project Settings and Preferences.”

Part 1 – 2

Starting with DaVinci Resolve 14, the Project Manager is the only centralized place in which to
manage all your projects and is the first window you’ll see when DaVinci Resolve starts up. It
shows all projects you’ve created, and provides an overall environment in which you create,
organize, import, and export DaVinci Resolve projects.

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Using the Project Manager

Methods of project management:
‚‚ To create a new project: Double-click the Default Project, or click the New Project
button. A new project is created, and DaVinci Resolve opens up the Media page.
Once a project is open, you can alter its project settings by clicking the gear icon.
‚‚ To open a previously saved project: Double-click any Project icon, or Item if you’re in
List view.
‚‚ To open a project in Read-Only Mode: Right-click a Project icon or Item, and choose
Open in Read Only Mode. This lets you open a project without danger of altering it.
If you make changes, you can use the Save As command to save a new copy of the
project with a new name.
‚‚ To rename a project: Right-click a Project icon or Item, choose Rename, and type a
new name in the dialog that appears, clicking OK when you’re finished.
‚‚ To load project settings from another project to the currently open project:
Right‑click a Project icon or Item (other than the currently open project), and choose
“Load Project Settings to Current Project.”
‚‚ To update the thumbnails of a project in the Project Manager: Right-click any project,
and choose “Update Thumbnails.”
‚‚ To delete a project: Select one or more projects, then right-click one of the selected
projects and choose Delete. Click OK when a dialog asks you to confirm the operation.

NOTE: You cannot move or delete the currently loaded project.

Importing and Exporting Projects in Disk Databases
If you’re using Disk Databases to manage your projects, you can copy and import projects using
the project folders in the file manager of either macOS or Windows. This method does not work
for DaVinci Resolve on Linux.
Moving projects from one disk database into another using macOS or Windows:
1

Locate the disk database directory in which the project you want to copy is stored.
If you don’t know where the designated disk database directory is, you can open
DaVinci Resolve and check the directory path for the current disk database in the
Databases sidebar.

2

Copy the project folder from the source workstation to the designated disk database
directory on the destination workstation. If you don’t know where the designated
disk database directory is, you can open DaVinci Resolve on the workstation you’re
copying the project to and check the directory path for the current disk database in the
Databases sidebar.

3

Once you’ve copied the project folder into the correct location, you’ll need to quit
and re-open DaVinci Resolve. Afterwards, the imported project should appear in the
Project Manager.

Part 1 – 2

The Project Manager provides an in-application interface for creating, renaming, and deleting
projects. Many of these commands exist within the contextual menu that appears when you
right-click the background of the Project Manager.

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Project Management

To export the currently open project as a .drp file:
Choose File > Export Project, and when the Save dialog appears, choose a location,
enter a name, and click Save. The result is a self-contained file with a .drp file suffix
saved at the location you chose.
To export a .drp project file from the Project Manager:
1

Right-click a Project icon or Item in the Project Manager, then choose one of the
following commands:
Export: Exports project data, with no LUTs and no stills. Best when you need to export
the smallest possible file.
Export With Stills and LUTs: Exports the project including both still frames in the
gallery and LUTs used in grades). Best when you want to export the most selfcontained file and you can’t guarantee the recipient will have the same LUTs you do.

2

When the Save dialog appears, choose a location, enter a name, and click Save. The
result is a self-contained file with a .drp file suffix saved at the location you chose.

To import a .drp project file, do one of the following:
Drag the .drp file you want to import from your file system and drop it anywhere into the
Project Manager window.
Right-click any empty area of the Project Manager and choose Import, then find and
select a .drp project file using the Import Project File dialog, and click Open.

Project Manager View Options
Four buttons at the top right let you control how projects are viewed in the Project Manager.

Select Icon or List View

‚‚ Zoom slider: (Only appears in Thumbnail view) Lets you adjust the size of the
thumbnails in Thumbnail view.
‚‚ Project Sort Order pop-up: (Only appears in Thumbnail view) Lets you choose the sort
order of projects in Thumbnail view.
‚‚ Information: (Only appears in Thumbnail view) Lets you show or hide additional project
information displayed underneath each project’s thumbnail, including the frame size,
number of timelines within, and when that project was last modified.
‚‚ Thumbnail view: Each project is represented by a large image that can be hoverscrubbed to reveal five representative images from that project.

Part 1 – 2

If you’re using a PostgreSQL database, another set of commands let you import and export
projects using the .drp file format. You can also export .drp files from Disk Databases if you want
to export a more self-contained item to transport.

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Importing and Exporting Projects in PostgreSQL Databases

Hover-scrub over Project icon, information is enabled

‚‚ List View: Every project appears as an item on a list that has seven columns: Name,
Last Modified, Timelines, Format, Frame Rate, Date Created, and Note. You can
click any column header to sort the contents of the Project Manager by that criteria;
clicking the header a second time toggles that column between ascending and
descending sorting.

Project List view

Searching For Projects
Clicking the magnifying glass button at the upper right-hand corner of the Project Manager
exposes the Search Options, which can be used to locate one or more projects based on the
metadata that’s selected in the Filter By pop-up menu to the left of it.

Search field open with Filter by search criteria selected

Managing Projects and Databases

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If you’re organizing a lot of projects, you can create folders to put them into.

A folder (left) and a project (right) in the Project Manager

Methods of working with project folders:
‚‚ To create a folder: Click the New Folder button, then enter a name into the Create New
Folder dialog and click Create.
‚‚ To delete a folder: Right-click a folder, choose Delete, and click Yes when prompted.
All projects inside a deleted folder will be deleted as well.
‚‚ To rename a folder: Right-click a folder, choose Rename, then enter a new name
and click OK.
‚‚ To open a folder: Double-click a folder to open it and view its contents. At the upper lefthand corner of the Project Manager, a folder path view shows you which folder is open,
as well as where you are within a nested series of folders if that’s what you’ve set up.
‚‚ To exit a folder: Use the path control at the bottom left of the Project Manager.
‚‚ To move a project into a folder: Drag the project onto a folder icon, and drop it to place
it inside the folder.
‚‚ To move a project out of a folder: Open a folder, select one or more projects you
want to move, then right-click the selection and choose Cut from the contextual menu.
Then, navigate to the next place in the Project manager where you want to place the
cut projects, right-click the background of the Project Manager, and choose Paste. The
projects should appear in the new location.

Managing Databases
With the Database Sidebar
Unlike other applications which save self-contained project files to user-specified locations
wherever you like in your file system, DaVinci Resolve takes a more centrally organized
approach to project management, using databases. By default, DaVinci Resolve uses a disk
database to keep track of every project you create. The Database sidebar lets you manage
the projects found within this database, which are saved to a specific directory on your system
(particular to that database). The default location of this disk database depends on the
operating system you use.

Part 1 – 2

Organizing Projects in Folders

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Managing Projects and Databases

Using the pop-up menu, you can choose to search by name, or by project format. Once you’ve
chosen a criteria, begin typing into the search field, and the Project Manager will immediately
and dynamically begin to be filtered by your search text.

TIP: However you elect to organize your databases, keep in mind that projects saved
within smaller databases with less project data will load and save faster.

Opening the Database Sidebar
If you already have multiple databases, then clicking the button at the upper-left hand corner of
the Projects Browser reveals a sidebar at the left of the Project Manager that lists every
database on your workstation, with various options for managing these databases and for
browsing the projects found within them.

Database Sidebar button

You can use this sidebar to open different databases and browse the projects found inside.

Project manager with Database sidebar displayed

Part 1 – 2

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Managing Projects and Databases

However, you can create additional databases with which to store other projects, if you like.
For example, you might create one database each for each year in which you work. If you
work on series television, you could create multiple databases for each program you work on.
Or, you could create separate databases for each client you do work for. There’s no hard and
fast rule; ultimately how you use databases is entirely up to you and your individual
organizational preferences.

To view the contents of a database:
1

Click the button at the upper-left hand corner of the Projects window to open the
Databases sidebar.

2

Click to select a database in the sidebar, and an orange highlight will appear
If you had a project already open, you’ll be asked if you want to save it before closing,
because all open projects must be closed prior to viewing the contents of another
database. Then, the projects corresponding to that user within the selected database
appear in the Project Manager window.

To import a project from another database using the Databases sidebar:
1

Click the button at the upper-left hand corner of the Projects window to open the
Databases sidebar.

2

Click to select a database in the sidebar, and if necessary use the pop-up menu at
the right of the database listing to choose a specific user. The projects corresponding
to that user within the selected database appear in the Project Manager window.

3

Select a project you want to import, and press Command-C to copy it.

4

Click to select the current database again (the database you want to work within).

5

Press Command-V to paste the project you copied. A copy appears in the
current database.

NOTE: For more detail on shared database setup and operation, see
Chapter 84, “Managing Databases and Database Servers.”

To import Project Settings from another Project using the Databases sidebar:
1

Click the button at the upper-left hand corner of the Projects window to open the
Databases sidebar.

2

Select a project you want to import Project Settings to so that it’s highlighted.

3

If necessary, click to select another database in the sidebar, and optionally use the
pop-up menu at the right of the database listing to choose a specific user. The projects
corresponding to that user within the selected database appear in the Project
Manager window.

4

Right-click any project and choose “Load Project Settings to Current Project.”
That project’s settings will be copied to the project you selected in step 2.

Managing Databases in the Database Sidebar
Controls within the Database sidebar make it easy to create new databases (via the button at
the bottom), upgrade databases that have been flagged (via circular badges), import and export
databases (via buttons at the top), and reveal additional information about each database (via
buttons at the top of this sidebar).

Part 1 – 2

If you’ve used multiple databases to organize your projects, you can browse the contents of
each database to search for what you’re looking for, and then copy one or more projects from
one database to another if you need to rearrange how they’re organized.

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Managing Projects and Databases

Moving Projects From One Database
to Another on the Same Workstation

Database Sidebar controls

The five controls at the top of the Databases sidebar have the following functions:
‚‚ Backup Database: You can back up databases just like any other file. This provides
added protection should your system drive fail, but a database backup can also
be used to move multiple projects between systems (particularly if you’re using
PostgreSQL). Clicking this button exports the currently selected database, with all
enclosed projects, to a self contained .resolve.backup file.
‚‚ Import Database: Imports .resolve.backup files to restore a backed up database.
‚‚ Sort Order pop-up menu: This menu lets you choose how to sort the various Disk and
PostgreSQL databases displayed in the sidebar. You can sort by Database Name,
Schema (by date), Status, or Location in Ascending or Descending order.
‚‚ Display Database Info toggle: Turning this control on shows additional information
underneath each database in the sidebar. What information depends on the type of
database. Disk databases display their status (compatible/incompatible) and location
(directory path). PostgreSQL databases display their schema (a date), their status
(compatible/incompatible), their IP location, and any remarks that were appended when
that database was updated.
‚‚ Show Search Field: Displays a search field and search criteria pop-up that lets you
search for databases in the side bar by Name, Schema, Status, or Location.

Disk Vs. PostgreSQL Databases
When you first install DaVinci Resolve on a workstation it’s never been installed on
before, you are set up to use a Disk database by default, which saves user-accessible
project files to a disk location of your choosing.
In many respects, Disk databases are simple to use. They’re easier to back up, as
they’re located in an easily found directory, and in fact you can create Disk databases
in custom locations, if you like. Disk databases avoid the need to know or care which
version of PostgreSQL is installed on your machine, as PostgreSQL isn’t used.
Furthermore, projects in Disk databases don’t need to go through an explicit
“upgrade” process when you upgrade significant versions of DaVinci Resolve, as the
project is automatically upgraded when you open it (the upgraded project can be
saved independently from the original project using the Save As command if you want
to leave the un-upgraded version intact).
However, many users prefer to use PostgreSQL database project management,
particularly for situations where you want to use a shared database server so multiple
rooms can access the same project files, and for collaborative workflow, where multiple
editors, colorists, and audio professionals can work within the same project file.
Fortunately, it’s easy to create and use either type of project database for maximum
flexibility in organizing your projects. Then, using the Databases sidebar, it’s easy to
go back and forth between the two types of database management simply by creating
the type of database you need and then switching over to it using the sidebar.

Managing Projects and Databases

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53

To create a new Disk database:
1

Click the button at the upper-left hand corner of the Projects window to open the
Databases sidebar.

2

Click the New Database button at the bottom of the sidebar.

3

When the New Database window appears, click Create.

4

Leave Type set to Disk. The New Database window should look like the following
screenshot:

Creating a Disk database

5

In the remaining fields, do the following:
a. Type a name for the new database into the Name field.
b.	Click within the Location field and use the Filesystem navigation dialog to choose

where to put the directory that will contain all of the DaVinci Resolve project
directories.
6

Click Create, and the new disk database will appear in the Disk database section of the
Databases sidebar.

To create a new PostgreSQL database:
1

Click the button at the upper-left hand corner of the Projects window to open the
Databases sidebar.

2

Click the New Database button at the bottom of the sidebar.

3

When the New Database window appears, click Create.

4

Change Type to PostgreSQL, and different options will appear at the bottom of the
New Database dialog. The New Database window should look like the following
screenshot:

Part 1 – 2

You can use Disk databases and PostgreSQL databases side by side for switching to the use of
one or the other, depending on your needs.

54

Managing Projects and Databases

Creating New Disk and PostgreSQL Databases

Creating a PostgreSQL database

5

Type a name for the new database into the Name field. Because all projects in a
PostgreSQL database are saved internally within the PostgreSQL database, no other
changes are necessary.,

6

Click Create, and the new disk database will appear in the PostgreSQL database
section of the Databases sidebar.

Backing Up and Restoring Databases
You can also back up databases by exporting them, and then reimport them later.
To backup/export a database:
1

Click the button at the upper-left hand corner of the Projects window to open the
Databases sidebar.

2

Select the database you want to back up.

3

Click the Backup button at the top of the Databases sidebar.

The Backup Database button

4

Choose a location to which to save the backup in the Backup Database dialog, and
click Save.

To import a database:
1

Click the button at the upper-left hand corner of the Projects window to open the
Databases sidebar.

2

Click the Import Database button at the top of the Databases sidebar.

The Import Database button

3

Find the database you need to import using the file import dialog, and click Open.

Managing Projects and Databases

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55

A circular badge at the right of a database
indicates that database needs to be upgraded

It’s generally a good idea to back up a database prior to upgrading it, in case something goes
wrong. In general, upgrading from a whole version release to the next whole version release of
DaVinci Resolve usually requires an upgrade, while upgrading to a dot release of the same
version may or may not. If the currently used database requires an update, you’ll be told on
application startup.
To upgrade a database from an old version of DaVinci Resolve:
Right-click a database that needs updating, and choose Upgrade from the contextual
menu. A dialog appears to confirm if you really want to upgrade that database. Click
Upgrade to proceed.

Disconnecting and Deleting Databases
You cannot actually delete databases in DaVinci Resolve; you can only disconnect them so they
don’t appear in the Database list. However, disconnected databases can still be reconnected if
you remember their name. The only way to completely delete a database entry in PostgreSQL
is to do so from the command line, or to use the PGAdmin III application that accompanies the
PostgreSQL installation that’s part of the DaVinci Resolve installation process.
To disconnect a database you no longer need:
Right-click a database that is not currently selected, and choose Disconnect from the
contextual menu. A dialog appears to confirm if you really want to disconnect that
database. Click Disconnect to proceed.

Locating Disk Database Directories in Your File System
Because Disk databases have a link to a specific directory in your file system, there’s a way of
locating that directory.
To disconnect a database you no longer need:
Right-click any Disk database, and choose “Reveal in Finder.” A file system window
opens up showing you the location of that Disk database, inside which are all of
its projects.

Optimizing Databases
Only available for PostgreSQL databases. Sometimes, databases in DaVinci Resolve can
become so large that the size affects performance. In these cases you may need to optimize it
to improve access speed by “vacuuming” the database of unnecessary spaces and
reindexing it.
To Optimize a database you no longer need:
Right-click a database, and choose Optimize from the contextual menu. A dialog
appears to confirm if you really want to optimize that database. Click Optimize
to proceed.

Part 1 – 2

Databases display an upgrade badge (circular arrows) only when you’ve installed a new version
of DaVinci Resolve and you have databases that were created in older versions of DaVinci
Resolve that need upgrading.

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Upgrading Databases

Legacy users in a database

Saving Projects
Once you’ve created and opened a project, you want to make sure that you regularly save
your work.
Methods of saving projects:
‚‚ Choose File > Save Project (Command-S).
‚‚ Push the SAVE button on the DaVinci Control Panel.
‚‚ To save the current state of your project as a copy with a new name, choose File > Save
Project As (Command-Shift-S), then enter a name into the Save Current Project window
and click Save.
To revert to the last saved state of a project:
If you don’t want to save, but you want to revert to last saved state of the project,
choose File > Revert to Last Save.
As you work on your project, the word “Edited” appears to the right of the project name at the
top of the DaVinci Resolve UI to let you know that you have unsaved changes. If you don’t save
in over 15 minutes, the word “Edited” turns yellow, and if you still don’t save in over 30 minutes,
it turns red to let you know that you probably should save. If you move the pointer over the word
“Edited,” a tooltip appears letting you know when the last save was performed.

The word “Edited” to the right of the project name
lets you know you have unsaved changes

Part 1 – 2

DaVinci Resolve was originally designed as a multi-user application for use in commercial
suites. While DaVinci Resolve is still very much used in that capacity in high-end facilities
around the world, starting in DaVinci Resolve 14 the interface that was previously used to create
and manage multiple users on a single workstation has been eliminated in favor of a simpler
method of managing multiple databases right in the Project Manager, via the Databases
sidebar. However, if you’ve upgraded databases that were previously organized using multiple
users, the Database > User > Project structure of older databases is maintained via a pop-up
menu to the right of that database’s name in the Databases sidebar.

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Managing Projects and Databases

Legacy User Organization in the Database Sidebar

Part 1 – 2

58

Managing Projects and Databases

DaVinci Resolve also has two auto save mechanisms that you can enable in the User
Preferences. Enabling Live Save sets DaVinci Resolve to incrementally save changes as you go.
Disabling Live Save enables the more traditional Automatic Save mechanism that automatically
saves your project at periodic intervals. Using Auto Save is highly recommended to prevent the
loss of work in the event you have a problem.

Auto Save controls in the User Preferences

To enable Auto Save:
1

Choose DaVinci Resolve > Preferences, and open the User panel.

2

There are two options available:
Live Save: A progressive, fast, always on autosave mechanism that “saves as you go.”
Automatically save project: A more traditional auto-save mechanism.
There are three settings:
‚‚ Off: Disables Auto Save. This is the default.
‚‚ On: Automatically saves the current project every few minutes, as defined by the
pop-up menu below that has options for 5, 10, 20, and 30 minute, or 1 hour intervals.
If you’re using a PostgreSQL database, you have the additional option of saving
over 1 minute intervals, as PostgreSQL database saving is considerably faster. If
DaVinci Resolve unexpectedly quits before you have a chance to save, you’ll see all
autosaved changes the next time you reopen that project.
‚‚ To backup project: Automatically saves new projects to a backup list. Each backup
is an individual project file, so this lets you version your work. The total number of
backup files that are saved can be selected via the “Retain the last X backups” popup menu. Backups are discarded in first in, first out fashion.

3

Click Save to confirm your change, and then close the Preferences window.

Dynamic Project Switching
Dynamic Project Switching is an option in the Project Manager contextual menu that lets you
load multiple projects into RAM simultaneously, so that you can quickly switch from one to the
other just to work, or when copying and pasting clips, timelines, and node settings back and
forth. If you plan on opening many projects, or even just a few very large projects, you should
be sure your workstation has lots of RAM installed or you could experience a slowdown in
performance.

‚‚ To open multiple projects in RAM: Open any project, then reopen the Project Manager
and open any other project. All projects you open are kept available in RAM.
‚‚ To switch among open projects: Choose File > Switch Project and select the project
you want to switch to from the submenu. You can also choose other projects that have
been opened into RAM from the pop-up menu that appears to the right of the project
name at the top center of the DaVinci Resolve user interface.
‚‚ To close a specific project: Choose File > Close Project and select the project you
want to close from the submenu. You may be prompted to save, after which the
project closes.
‚‚ To close all other open projects: Open the Project Manager. All open projects appear
with a check mark in the upper right-hand corner; the currently open project has an
orange corner mark, while other projects open in memory have a gray corner mark.
Right-click anywhere within the Project Manager, and choose Close Projects in Memory
to close all projects other than the current one.

Switching among open projects using the Project
Title pop-up at the top of the DaVinci Resolve UI

Using dynamic project switching, you can do the following:
‚‚ Copy and paste clips from the Media Pool of one project into another.
‚‚ Copy and paste timelines from the Media Pool of one project into another. When you
paste a timeline from another project, all of the clips used in that timeline will be pasted
to the same location as well.
‚‚ Copy and paste clips from a timeline in one project to a timeline in another.
‚‚ Copy a node’s settings from one project and paste them to a node in another project.
You can also copy and paste clips, timelines, and node settings from one project to another
without using dynamic project switching, but using switching makes this process faster.

Archiving and Restoring Projects
DaVinci Resolve has a convenient feature for quickly archiving every single media file used by a
project, along with the project itself, to a single location. This can be done to hand a project off
to another DaVinci Resolve user, or to bundle a project and its media up for either short- or
long-term archiving using the backup methodology of your choice. The process is simple.
To Archive a project:
1

Open the Project Manager.

2

Locate and right-click the project you want to archive, and choose Archive.

59

Part 1 – 2

‚‚ To enable Dynamic Project Switching: Open the Project Manager, right-click anywhere
within the Project Manager and choose Dynamic Project Switching so that it’s checked.
Dynamic Project Switching will remain enabled until you turn it off.

Managing Projects and Databases

Methods of using Dynamic Project Switching:

Managing Projects and Databases

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60

The contextual menu command for archiving projects

3

When the Archive Project window appears, choose a location to save the archive.
Make sure you choose a volume that’s large enough to accommodate the size of all the
media from the project you’re archiving, and click Save.

4

When the Archive dialog appears, verify the location the archive will be saved
to, and choose which optional media you want to save within the archive. As of
DaVinci Resolve 12.5 or later, you can optionally save Optimized media and/or Render
Cache media associated with a project.

A dialog letting you choose whether to save
Optimized and/or Render Cache media

5

Click Ok, and a dialog with a progress bar will show you how long the archive operation
will take to finish. If any errors come up, resulting from missing or offline media, they’ll
be presented at the end of the process.

The resulting archive that is written is a directory with the .dra file extension. Inside this folder
are a series of subdirectories containing all of the media that’s used by the archived project.
Each directory of media files used is saved within a directory path that mirrors the exact path it
came from, so you have a reference for where each clip came from originally.

Copy the .dra archive directory you want to restore to the volume where you want
those media files to be. Restoring doesn’t move this directory, it only adds the project
file within to the Project Manager, so you should make sure the .dra archive directory is
located on a storage volume with suitable performance for you to work.

2

Open the Project Manager, right-click anywhere, and choose Restore from the
contextual menu.

3

Choose the .dra archive directory you just copied, and click Open.

4

At the prompt, enter a unique project name for the restored project, and click OK. The
project is restored to the Project Manager, and remains linked to the media located
inside the .dra archive.

If, after restoring an archive, you want to move its media to another location, you can use Media
Management to do a move operation for all clips in that project. For more information on Media
Management, See Chapter 26, “Media Management.”

61

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1

Managing Projects and Databases

To restore an Archived project:

Part 1 – 3

Project Settings
and Preferences

62

Project Settings and Preferences

Chapter 3

Project Settings and Preferences

Opening and Editing Project Settings

64

Project Settings

65

Presets

65

Project Settings

66

Timeline Format

66

Color Management

72

General Options

78

Camera Raw

82

Capture and Playback

82

Opening and Editing DaVinci Resolve Preferences

85

System

86

Hardware Configuration

86

Media Storage

87

Video & Audio I/O

88

Audio Plug-ins

89

Control Panels

90

Advanced

90

User

90

Saving User Preference Presets

91

UI Settings

91

Auto Save

92

Editing

93

Color

95

Control Panels

96

Keyboard Mapping

98

Metadata

98

Project Settings and Preferences

This chapter covers the settings used for defining the properties of each individual project.
It’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the information in this chapter prior to setting up your
first project.

Part 1 – 3

63

Once you’ve opened a project, all of the various project settings, deck capture and playback
settings, LUT settings, and application preferences that are available in DaVinci Resolve can be
found in the Project Settings window.

Part 1 – 3

64

To open the Project Settings window:

Project Settings and Preferences

Opening and Editing Project Settings

Click the gear button at the bottom right on any page.

Project Manager and Project Settings buttons

The Project Settings open in the middle of the screen.

Project Settings window

The Project Settings window is divided into a series of panels which can be selected from a
sidebar at the left. Each panel contains a collection of related settings that affects some
category of DaVinci Resolve functionality.
To alter any project settings:
1

Click on the name of any group of settings in the sidebar at the left to open that panel.

2

Change whatever settings you need to change.

3

Do one of the following to apply your changes:
Click Apply to apply the changes you’ve made and close the Project Settings.
Option-click Apply to apply the changes you’ve made and keep the Project Settings
window open, so you can make other changes.

The Project Settings window contains all project-specific parameters that are saved along with
that project. These include essential project properties such as the timeline format, video
monitoring settings, how to optimize media, and where to save cache files. It also includes
image scaling properties, color management settings, and many other properties that affect
projects in fundamental ways.

Presets
The Presets panel lets you save customized collections of Project Settings for future recall.
Presets can save the state of nearly every parameter and setting in every panel of the Project
Settings window, and make it easy to switch among different setups for different tasks, or to
accommodate different types of projects.
There are three default items in the Presets list:
‚‚ Current Project: The current project’s settings. If you load a preset, the current project
becomes selected, showing that the preset you loaded has been applied to the
current project.
‚‚ System Config: The System Config contains the default Project Settings that are
used for all new projects that you create, and consists of the installed defaults that
accompanied DaVinci Resolve. This config is uneditable, but you can use the Save As
button to duplicate it as the basis for a new preset.
‚‚ Guest default config: This setting is a holdover from previous versions of DaVinci
Resolve that had multi-user support. The default configuration for all new projects
created by the currently logged in user. The actual name of this config reflects the
current user name. This config can no longer be altered.
If you like, you can create your own presets, adding as many as you need to accommodate the
types of projects you work on.
To create a new preset:
1

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Right-click a project in the Project Manager, and choose Project Settings from the
contextual menu.
‚‚ Open any project, then open the Project Settings, and select the Presets panel.

2

Select any config in the Presets list that you want to use as the starting point of a new
project preset, and click Save As.

3

Enter a name for the new preset you’re creating into the Preset Name dialog, and click
OK. A new preset should now appear in the Presets list.

4

Select the new preset you’ve just created.

5

Now, use the different panels of the Project Settings window to alter whichever settings
you need to. There’s no need to save your changes as you go.

6

When you’re finished customizing the Project Settings, re-open the Presets panel and
click Save. Your new preset is updated with the new settings you’ve chosen.

Once you’ve created one or more custom presets, you can load them into a project at any time.

Part 1 – 3

Project Settings

65

Project Settings and Preferences

It may be necessary to keep the Project Settings window open in order to continue making
changes that may visibly affect the clips and timelines in your project.

Open a project with a preset you want to update.

2

Click an item in the Presets list.

3

Click Load.
If a dialog appears saying either “Do you want to replace current project’s config with
this selected Preset” or “Apply Current Configuration to System?”, click Yes.

If there’s a custom preset that you’ve created that has outlasted its usefulness, you can delete it.
To delete a custom preset:
1

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Right-click a project in the Project Manager, and choose Project Settings from the
contextual menu.
‚‚ Open any project, then open the Project Settings, and select the Presets panel.

2

Click an item in the Presets list to select it.

3

Click Delete.

4

When the Confirm Delete dialog appears, click Yes.

Project Settings
This panel is project specific and lets you set up and adjust the most essential properties of a
clip, including the timeline format, video monitoring method, and conform options. In many
workflows, you’ll want to adjust these settings before getting started with your project.

Timeline Format
This group of settings affects the geometry and image processing of the current project.
‚‚ Timeline resolution: A pop-up menu that lets you choose a frame resolution preset to
use for image processing while grading. DaVinci Resolve is resolution independent,
so you can change the resolution at any time and all windows, tracks, sizing changes,
and keyframe data will be automatically recalculated to fit the new size. For example,
you can work on a 4K project while monitoring at HD resolutions if your room is only
set up with an HD monitor, and then render the finished project at 4K resolution
for final delivery. Alternately, you can downsize an HD project to an SD resolution
to create another set of deliverables. For more information on Resolve’s resolution
independence, see Chapter 58, “Sizing and Image Stabilization.”
‚‚ Frame size (Labeled “For X x Y processing”): Lets you set resolutions not found in the
“Timeline resolution” pop-up menu.
‚‚ Pixel aspect ratio: Used to select PAR settings for image formats that don’t use the
default square pixel format. You can apply a 16:9 anamorphic PAR, a 4:3 PAR for
SD projects, or a Cinemascope ratio.
‚‚ Timeline frame rate: Determines the primary frame rate used by the project. A variety
of standard and high frame rate (HFR) settings are available. If you’re importing an
AAF or XML file, this setting is automatically set via an option in the Project Import
dialog. Ideally, you should choose a frame rate before importing media into the Media
Pool. However, the first time you import media into an empty Media Pool, you’re
prompted if the incoming media frame rate doesn’t match the Timeline frame rate set
here, and you have the option of automatically updating this setting to match that of the
media you’re importing. Once one or more files have been added to the Media Pool,
this setting cannot be changed.

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1

Project Settings and Preferences

To load a preset’s settings into a project:

‚‚ Enable video field processing: Interlaced media is supported throughout DaVinci
Resolve. The “Enable video field processing” checkbox forces Resolve to process all
operations internally using separated fields. A corresponding checkbox in the Format
settings of the Deliver page, “Field rendering,” lets you enable and disable field
rendering when rendering file-based output. In addition, each clip in the Media Pool
has a Field Dominance pop-up menu in the Video panel of the Clip Attributes window
that lets you specify whether clips are upper- or lower-field dominant; an Auto setting
makes this choice by default.
If you’re working with progressive-frame media, it is not necessary to turn this checkbox
on. Furthermore, if you’re using interlaced clips in a progressive-frame project and
you’re intending to deinterlace those clips using the Enable Deinterlacing checkbox
in the Clip Attributes window, then you must keep “Enable video field processing” off.
Otherwise, the Enable Deinterlacing checkbox will be disabled for all clips. For more
information about deinterlacing clips, see Chapter 10, “Modifying Clips and
Clip Attributes.”
Whether or not it’s necessary to turn field processing on to maintain the field integrity of
interlaced clips in your program depends on what types of corrections you’re applying
to your clips. If you’re mastering your program to an interlaced format, and you’re
applying any adjustments that would cause pixels from one field to move or bleed into
adjacent fields, then field processing should be enabled; effects requiring field
processing include filtering operations such as blur, sharpen, and OpenFX operations,
as well as sizing transforms that include pan, tilt, zoom, rotate, pitch, and yaw.
On the other hand, regardless of whether you’re outputting interlaced or progressiveframe media, if you’re not filtering or resizing your clips, and you’re only applying
adjustments to color and contrast, it’s not necessary to turn on field processing for
interlaced material, and in fact, leaving it off may somewhat shorten your project’s
rendering time.

Video Monitoring
The settings available in this group control the signal that’s output by the video output interface
that’s connected to your workstation, and let you specify what standard of signal is output, and
via which signal path.
By default the frame size and frame rate match those in the Timeline resolution and Playback
frame rate options. However, if necessary you can change these settings to match those of the
external display you’re using to monitor your work. For example, if you’re working with 2K files
for 2K output, but you’re color correcting using a high definition monitor set to 1080 resolution,
you can select the appropriate HD standard for that monitor without changing the Timeline
Resolution settings.

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Playback frame rate: Usually mirrors the frame rate selected in the “Video format”
setting (in the Video Monitoring section below), which is typically based on the
frame rate of the external display that’s connected to your video interface, given
the “Timeline Frame Rate” setting. For example, a 50Hz monitor requires a 25 fps
playback frame rate for synchronous display without dropped frames. If you want to
monitor playback at a slower frame rate, type the frame rate of your choice in this field
and DaVinci Resolve will make the appropriate calculations to drop or repeat frames
as necessary to match it. This can be useful for temporarily seeing how clips look in
slow motion.

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‚‚ Use drop frame timecode: Enables or disables drop frame timecode for the current
project. Off by default.

Use 4:4:4 SDI: A signal path for monitoring image data to monitors that support 4:4:4
chroma sampling via dual SDI connections.
Use Level A for 3Gb SDI output: A signal path for monitoring image data via a single
3 Gb/s SDI connection.
Use left and right eye SDI output: All DaVinci Resolve systems can generate a
side‑by‑side display that can be sent to a Stereoscopic monitor via the HD-SDI output
of an UltraStudio 4K or DeckLink card. When dual SDI 3D monitoring is enabled, each
eye is output separately at full resolution. In this mode, split-screen wipes and cursors
will not be visible on the grading monitor.
‚‚ SDI Configuration: Lets you choose from among Single Link, Dual Link, and
Quad Link SDI.
‚‚ Data Levels: This setting only affects the data levels being output via the video
interface that connects the Resolve workstation to your external display. It has no
effect on the data that’s processed internally by Resolve, or on the files written when
you render in the Deliver page. It is imperative that the option you choose in Resolve
matches the data range to which your external display is set. Otherwise, the video
signal will appear to be incorrect, even though the internal data is being processed
accurately by DaVinci Resolve.
There are two options:
Video: This is the correct option to use when using a broadcast display set to the Rec.
709 video standard.
Full: If your monitor or projector is capable of displaying “full range” video signals, and
you wish to monitor the full 10-bit data range (0- 1023) while you work, this is the correct
option to use.
For more information about data levels, see Chapter 6, “Data Levels, Color
Management, ACES, and HDR.”
‚‚ Video bit depth: Choose the bit depth that corresponds to the capability of your
display. You can choose between 8-bit and 10-bit. Monitoring in 10-bit is more
processor intensive, but preferable to avoid the appearance of banding that may not in
fact be in the image data being processed by Resolve.
‚‚ Monitor scaling: Defaults to basic, and is only enabled to smooth the edges of video
being viewed on a projector with very large screens. These settings minimize high
frequency artifacts that may be seen. This may also be noticeable if you have a 2K or
HD project but are monitoring on an SD monitor. The other option, Bilinear, has different
effects on the monitored image depending on your display device, so you may need to
check to verify that it’s appropriate for your environment.
‚‚ Use Rec601 Matrix for 4:2:2 SDI output: Don’t use this checkbox unless you know
what it does.
‚‚ Enable HDR metadata over HDMI: (only available in Studio version) Turning on this
checkbox outputs the metadata necessary to send High Dynamic Range signals over
HDMI 2.0a and have it be correctly decoded by an HDR-aware video display. When this
checkbox is enabled, it’s recommended to also enable the “HDR mastering is for X nits”
checkbox in the Color Management page, and set the “nit” level (slang for cd/m2) to
whatever peak luminance level your HDMI connected HDR display is capable of.

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Video connection checkboxes: Lets you choose the signal standard to output from your
connected video output interface to the video monitor. Make sure to choose a standard
that’s supported by both your video interface and your monitor. The options are:

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‚‚ Video format: Lets you choose a video standard combination of frame size and frame
rate to be output via your connected video output interface.

‚‚ Optimized Media Resolution: Radio buttons let you choose whether to generate
optimized media at each clip’s Original size, or at Half, Quarter, One-Eighth, or
One‑Sixteenth the resolution of the original media.
‚‚ Optimized Media Format: Specifies the format in which optimized media files will be
written. You can choose from among a variety of Uncompressed, ProRes, and DNxHD
formats, depending on your requirements.
‚‚ Render Cache Format: Specifies the format in which render cache files will be written.
You can choose from among a variety of Uncompressed, ProRes, and DNxHD formats,
depending on your requirements.
‚‚ Enable background caching after X seconds: Specifies the duration of inactivity after
which automatic background caching will begin.
‚‚ Automatically cache transitions in User Mode: If you’re using User mode and you
find that your workstation does not have adequate performance to play transition
effects in real time, you can force these categories of effects to be included in the
Sequence Cache.
‚‚ Automatically cache composites in User Mode: If you’re using User mode and you find
that your workstation does not have adequate performance to play composite mode or
opacity effects in real time, you can force these categories of effects to be included in
the Sequence Cache.

Working Folders
Two fields let you specify to which folders cache and gallery files are written.
‚‚ Cache files location: All render cache files that you create are saved in the directory
path specified by this field. This path defaults to a hidden “CacheClip” directory that’s
created at the location of the first Media Storage Volume you specify in the DaVinci
Resolve Preferences window.
‚‚ Gallery stills location: By default, all stills you save are saved in the DPX format, and
are placed in the directory path specified by this field. This path defaults to a hidden
“.gallery” directory that’s created at the location of the first Media Storage Volume you
specify in the DaVinci Resolve Preferences window.

NOTE: If the volume you’ve selected to use for the cache becomes unavailable,
DaVinci Resolve will warn you with a dialog.

Frame Interpolation
These settings determine the default state for all retiming and speed change effects, including
when clips are in mixed frame rate timelines.
‚‚ Retime Process: This pop-up menu lets you choose a default method of processing
clips in mixed frame rate timelines and those with speed effects (fast forward or slow
motion) applied to them, throughout the project. Since each clip in every timeline
defaults to “Project Settings,” changing this setting will change the way most speed
effected clips will be processed, except for those that have custom settings selected.
There are three options:

Part 1 – 3

These settings govern the resolution and codec of optimized media that DaVinci Resolve can
generate in order to facilitate greater real time performance, as well as cached media that’s
generated by the Smart and User Cache.

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Project Settings and Preferences

Optimized Media and Render Cache

Optical Flow: The most processor intensive, but highest quality method of speed effect
processing. Using motion estimation, new frames are generated from the original
source frames to create slow or fast motion effects. The result can be exceptionally
smooth when motion in a clip is linear. However, two moving elements crossing in
different directions or unpredictable camera movement can cause unwanted artifacts.
‚‚ Motion estimation mode: When using mixed frame rate clips in a timeline that has
Optical Flow retiming selected, or when using Optical Flow to process speed change
effects, this pop-up menu lets you choose between higher speed (Faster) or higher
quality processing (Better).
‚‚ Motion range: When using mixed frame rate clips in a timeline that has Optical Flow
retiming selected, or when using Optical Flow to process speed change effects, this
pop-up menu lets you choose the default setting to use, small, medium or large motion,
for all speed and motion related calculations so you can try and improve the result by
matching the type of motion in the source media. This setting can also be changed on a
clip by clip basis in the Edit page Inspector.

Image Scaling
The Image Scaling panel contains settings that determine how and when clips are resized for
various reasons.

Scaling Options
These settings affect the methods used to resize clips in various situations.
‚‚ Resize Filter: The first group of settings lets you choose the filter method used to
interpolate image pixels when resizing clips:
Sharper: Usually provides the best quality in projects using clips that must be scaled up
to fill a larger frame size, or scaled down to HD resolutions.
Smoother: May provide higher quality for projects using clips that must be scaled down
to fit an SD resolution frame size.
Bicubic: While the Sharper and Smoother options are slightly higher quality, Bicubic is
still an exceptionally good resizing filter and is less processor intensive than either of
those options.
Bilinear: A lower quality setting that is less processor intensive. Useful for previewing
your work on a low-performance computer before rendering, when you can switch to
one of the higher quality options.
‚‚ Override input scaling: Checking this box lets you choose an Input Sizing preset to
apply to the project.
‚‚ Override output scaling: Checking this box lets you choose an Output Sizing preset to
apply to the project.
‚‚ Anti-alias edges: A second group of settings lets you choose how to handle edge antialiasing for source blanking.
Auto: Adds anti-aliasing when any of the Sizing controls are used to transform the
image. Otherwise, anti-aliasing is disabled.
On: Forces anti-aliasing on at all times.
Off: Disables anti-aliasing. It might be necessary to turn anti-aliasing off if you notice
black blurring at the edges of blanking being applied to an image.

Part 1 – 3

Frame Blend: Also processor efficient, but can produce smoother results; adjacent
duplicated frames are dissolved together to smooth out slow or fast motion effects.
This option can provide better results when Optical Flow displays unwanted artifacts.

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Project Settings and Preferences

Nearest: The most processor efficient and least sophisticated method of processing;
frames are either dropped for fast motion, or duplicated for slow motion.

High: A more processor-intensive method that can sometimes yield better results,
depending on the footage, at the expense of slower rendering times.

Input Scaling
Contains one setting, Mismatched resolution files, that lets you choose how clips that don’t
match the current project resolution are handled. There are four options:
‚‚ Center crop with no resizing: Clips of differing resolution are not scaled at all. Clips that
are smaller than the current frame size are surrounded by blanking, and clips that are
larger than the current frame size are cropped.
‚‚ Scale full frame with crop: Clips of differing resolution are scaled so that the clip’s
shortest dimension is fit to match the frame. Excess pixels are cropped.
‚‚ Scale entire image to fit: The default setting. Clips of differing resolution are scaled so
that the clip’s longest dimension is fit to match the frame. The shorter dimension has
blanking inserted (letterboxing or pillarboxing).
‚‚ Stretch frame to all corners: Useful for projects using anamorphic media. Clips of
differing resolutions are squished or stretched to match the frame size in all dimensions.
This way, anamorphic media can be stretched to match full raster, or full raster media
can be squished to fit into an anamorphic frame. An added benefit of this setting is that
it makes it easy to mix anamorphic and non-anamorphic clips in the same project.

Output Scaling
These settings let you optionally choose a different resolution to be output via your video
output interface, for monitoring, outputting to tape, or rendering. In particular, if you set the
resolution in the Render Settings list of the Deliver page to something other than the Timeline
Resolution, these settings are used to make the change (for example, if you’re rendering a
downconversion of the current timeline). This can be used in situations where you’re working on
a high resolution 4K project, but you want to monitor using an HD display and output HD
resolution media for approval.
‚‚ Match timeline settings: Turned on by default, so that these settings mirror the
Timeline Resolution, Image Scaling, and Input Image Scaling settings described above.
Turning this checkbox off lets you choose different settings for monitoring, outputting
to tape, or rendering, using the other settings in this group.
‚‚ Output resolution: Lets you choose an alternate resolution.
‚‚ For: Lets you specify a different custom alternate resolution.
‚‚ Pixel aspect ratio: Lets you specify an alternate pixel aspect ratio to match the
alternate timeline format.
‚‚ Mismatched resolution files: Lets you choose an alternate way of handling mismatched
resolution files given the alternate resolution you’ve chosen. These options work
identically to those of the “Input Image Scaling” group.

Part 1 – 3

Normal: A high-quality deinterlacing method that is suitable for most clips. For many
clips, Normal is indistinguishable from High. Normal is always used automatically during
playback in Resolve.

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Project Settings and Preferences

‚‚ Deinterlace quality: (only available in Studio version) A fourth group of settings lets
you choose the quality/processing time tradeoff when deinterlacing Media Pool clips
using the Enable Deinterlacing checkbox in the Clip Attributes window. There are
two settings:

Color Space & Transforms
If you choose DaVinci YRGB Color Managed or ACES in the Color Science menu at the top,
then the other pop-up menus in this section become enabled. For more information about
DaVinci Resolve Color Management and ACES, see Chapter 6, “Data Levels, Color
Management, ACES, and HDR.” If you’re new to color or color management, you’re strongly
recommended to read this chapter.
If you choose to use Resolve Color Management (RCM), ACEScc, or ACEScct, the settings in
this panel give you extensive control over how color is transformed, starting with choosing the
default color settings for the source media in your project (via the Input Color Space), through
choosing how you want your grading controls in DaVinci Resolve to behave (via the Timeline
Color Space), and then specifying how the final color will look on your monitor and output
device (via the Output Color Space).
While this manual gives you a lot to read, keep in mind that as powerful as this method of color
management is, it’s also incredibly simple to use. All you have to do is choose an Input Color
Space for your clips, a Timeline Color Space (although most will probably default to the
standard Rec.709 Gamma 2.4 setting), and an Output Color Space that’s suitable for creating
the deliverables that are requested of you, and DaVinci Resolve takes care of the rest, making
all necessary color transforms automatically and in real time.
‚‚ Color science: There are four options. The default is the well established DaVinci YRGB
color science, in which you have to manage all and any color transforms from one color
space to another manually, using either LUTs or manual adjustments. Choosing DaVinci
YRGB Color Managed enables the Resolve color-managed workflow (RCM) for grading.
Alternately, you can choose DaVinci ACEScc or ACEScct color science, which are both
standardized color management schemes that are available for facilities using ACES
workflows. For more information about Color Management and ACES, see Chapter 6,
“Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR.”
‚‚ ACES version: This pop-up only appears if you choose one of the DaVinci ACES
options from the Color science pop-up menu. Lets you switch between different
versions of the ACES specification. This lets you choose the appropriate older version
of ACES whenever you open an older project. As of DaVinci Resolve 14, only ACES 1.0.3
is supported.
‚‚ Use Separate Color Space and Gamma: If this checkbox is turned off (the default),
the Color Management panel of the Project Settings exposes one pop-up each for
the Input, Timeline, and Output color space settings, and each setting simultaneously
transforms the gamut and gamma, depending on which option you choose. If you
turn this checkbox on, then the Color Management panel changes so that the Input,
Timeline, and Output color space settings each display two pop-ups. The first popup lets you explicitly set the gamut, while the second pop-up lets you explicitly set
the gamma.

Part 1 – 3

The various options found in the Color Management panel let you configure DaVinci Color
Management (RCM) or ACES if you have either enabled, and they also allow you to pre- or
post-process the DaVinci Resolve image processing pipeline using LUTs and Broadcast Safe
settings, in order to accommodate a wide range of different color workflows.

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Color Management

‚‚ Timeline Color Space: The working color space that affects how effects and grading
controls work. All clips in the Media Pool are transformed from the Input Color Space
that’s either manually or automatically assigned to them, to the Timeline Color
Space setting.
‚‚ Output Color Space: The color space that you’ll be monitoring and outputting as you
work. The Viewers in DaVinci Resolve show you each clip’s image as it’s transformed
from the Timeline Color Space into the Output Color Space.
‚‚ Timeline to Output Tone Mapping: Accommodates workflows where you need to
transform one color space into another with a dramatically larger or smaller dynamic
range by automating an expansion or contraction of image contrast in such a way as
to give a pleasing result with no clipping. There are three options: None, Simple, and
Luminance Mapping.
Simple: Uses a simple curve to perform this transformation, compressing or expanding
the highlights and/or shadows of the timeline dynamic range to better fit the output
dynamic range. Note that this option maps between approximately 5500 nits and 100
nits, so if you’re mapping from an HDR source with more than 5500 nits to an SDR
destination there may still be some clipping of the highlights above 5500 nits.
Luminance Mapping: Actually uses a customized curve operation to precisely map the
timeline dynamic range to the output dynamic range, and automatically populates the
value of the Max. Timeline Luminance control that guides this transform, but leaves it
user-adjustable in case you want to customize the result.
‚‚ Max. Timeline Luminance: The maximum luminance level of the Timeline color space,
in nits. Changing the Timeline Color Space gamma setting automatically updates this
parameter to the appropriate value for mapping the Timeline Color Space to the Output
Color Space, but these two color spaces need to be different in order for tone mapping
to work. In Simple mode, this setting is not used. In Luminance Mapping mode, you can
manually alter this setting to customize how the Timeline color space is remapped to
the Output color space.
‚‚ Timeline to Output Gamut Mapping: Accommodates workflows where you need to
transform one color space into another with a dramatically larger or smaller gamut
by helping to automate an expansion or contraction of image saturation in such a
way as to give a pleasing and naturalistic result with no clipping. Choosing Saturation
Mapping from this menu enables saturation mapping of the image during the Timeline
to Output Color Space transformation that RCM performs when rendering or outputting
a timeline to video.
Saturation Knee: Sets the image level at which saturation mapping begins. Below this
level, no remapping is applied. All saturation values from this level on up are remapped
according to the Saturation Max. slider. A value of 1.0 is maximum saturation in the
currently selected output color space.
Saturation Max: The new maximum level to which you want to either raise or lower all
saturation values that are above the Saturation Knee setting. A value of 1.0 is maximum
saturation in the currently selected output color space.
‚‚ ACES Input Device Transform: (aka IDT) When Color Science is set to ACES, this
pop-up menu lets you choose which IDT to use for the dominant media format in
DaVinci Resolve.

73

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Input Color Space: The default color space that all clips in the Media Pool to which
you’ve not assigned an Input Color Space will default to.

Project Settings and Preferences

The global controls available for Resolve Color Management (RCM) are:

The Enable HDR metadata over HDMI option in the Master Project
Settings lets you output HDR via HDMI 2.0a

When you do so, a setting in the Color Management panel of the Project Settings, “HDR
mastering is for X” lets you specify the output, in nits, to be inserted as metadata into the HDMI
stream being output, so that the display you’re connecting to correctly interprets it. The output
you specify should match what your display is expecting.

The HDR mastering is for setting lets you insert metadata for HDR output via HDMI 2.0a

Lookup Tables
This group of controls lets you add LUTs to the Resolve image processing pipeline that affect
every timeline in the entire project all at once. These LUTs can be used for a wide variety of
functions, such as to trim Timeline grades, apply Log to Linear conversions, simulate film output,
and limit the signal to accommodate Broadcast Safe requirements. Different options let you
insert image processing to different stages of the pipeline as seen in the following diagram:

Monitored Image

DISPLAY LUT

Raw
Image
Data

Camera Raw
Decoding

INPUT LUT

Color Page
Image Processing

OUTPUT LUT

Delivery
Page
Output
Media

Keep in mind that since you can apply both 1D and 3D LUTs simultaneously, 1D LUTs at each
step are always applied before 3D LUTs.

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ HDR Mastering is for: (Only available in Studio version) If you have a DeckLink 4K
Extreme 12G or an UltraStudio 4K Extreme video interface, then DaVinci Resolve 12.5
and above can output the metadata necessary to correctly display HDR video signals
to display devices using HDMI 2.0a when you turn on the “Enable HDR metadata over
HDMI” checkbox in the Master Project Settings.

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Project Settings and Preferences

‚‚ ACES Output Device Transform: (aka ODT) When Color Science is set to ACES, this
pop-up menu lets you choose an ODT with which to transform the image data for
monitoring on your calibrated display, and when exporting a timeline in the Deliver
page. For more information on ACES workflows using these settings, see Chapter 6,
“Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR.”

‚‚ 1D/3D Video Monitor Lookup Table: Two pop-up menus let you add 1D and/or 3D
LUTs that process the current Timeline after every other image processing operation
in DaVinci Resolve. However, Display LUTs are only temporarily applied for purposes
of monitoring; they’re never applied to rendered media, or to the signal that is output
to tape using the controls in the Deliver page. Display LUTs are particularly valuable
for applying a film print emulation LUT in a Log workflow, or for applying a monitor
calibration LUT if you’re outputting to a single display and you don’t have dedicated
outboard calibration hardware.
Here’s an example. It’s common, when grading for film output using a Log workflow,
that you’ll use the Display LUT pop-up menu to apply a film emulation LUT that
simulates the image as it will be output from the film recorder, taking into account the
film lab and print stock used, in order to make sure that the image you’re grading will
appear as close as possible to what the eventual release print will look like in
the cinema.
‚‚ 1D/3D Color Viewer Lookup Table: Two pop-up menus let you add 1D and/or 3D LUTs
that process the image shown in the Viewer on your computer display, independently
of the Display LUT that’s used to output to your broadcast display. By default, this
follows the Video Monitor LUT setting, but you can also use this option to apply a
specific calibration transform for your computer monitor. Alternately, you could use it to
desaturate the GUI Viewer to be able to specifically evaluate image contrast, or if you
don’t want to have to argue with your client over which display looks correct.
‚‚ 1D/3D Scopes Lookup Table: Ordinarily, Resolve’s internal software video scopes
provide an unbiased analysis of the actual video data levels within the Resolve image
processing pipeline. However, you can choose to have the software scopes use the
Video Monitor LUT selection, or any other LUT installed on your system, to transform
this analysis to reflect the monitored output.
‚‚ 3D Lookup Table Interpolation: 3D Lookup tables (LUTs) are 3D tables of red, green,
and blue values that specify an output color value for each input color value, thereby
providing a method of making color transformations using pre-calculated data. While
powerful, 3D LUTs have finite detail; for example, one might have a 17x17x17 LUT that
specifies 4913 individual color transforms. When applied to a floating point image that
contains more data than the LUT specifies transforms for, color values falling between
the 17x17x17 color transforms specified by the LUT need to be interpolated. You can
choose from two methods that trade off processing efficiency for higher quality:
Trilinear: (Default) Trilinear is backward-compatible with grades that use LUTs from
previous versions of Resolve and matches the look of LUTs being applied in other
applications.
Tetrahedral: Tetrahedral is slightly more processor-intensive, but results in higher
image quality, with reduced color-banding. Tetrahedral is recommended for projects
that don’t need to match grades from previous versions of Resolve, or LUTs created in
other applications.
‚‚ Update Lists button: Refreshes the LUT pop-up menus if you’ve added new LUTs to
your system since DaVinci Resolve has been opened.
‚‚ Open LUT Folder button: This selection opens the master folder in your file system, as
described in the list of DaVinci Resolve LUT paths shown above.

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ 1D/3D Output Lookup Table: Two pop-up menus let you add 1D and/or 3D LUTs that
process the current Timeline after the operations applied in the Color page, but before
the temporarily applied Display LUT.

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Project Settings and Preferences

‚‚ 1D/3D Input Lookup Table: Two pop-up menus let you add 1D and/or 3D LUTs that
process the current Timeline before every other image processing operation in
DaVinci Resolve.

The pop-up menus in the Color Management panel include a series of factory preset
LUTs that were installed with DaVinci Resolve, along with any LUTs that have been
generated by DaVinci Resolve, or that you’ve imported into the proper directory for
your operating system.
On OS X: Library/Application Support/Blackmagic Design/DaVinci Resolve/LUT/
On Windows: C:\ProgramData\Blackmagic Design\DaVinci Resolve\Support\LUT
On Linux: /home/resolve/LUT
If you downloaded the non-studio version of DaVinci Resolve from the Apple App
Store, LUTs are saved in a different location in order for DaVinci Resolve to remain
totally self-contained. In this case, you can click the “Open LUT Folder” button in the
Lookup Tables panel of the Project Settings, to open up a Finder window at the
location these LUTs are stored. You can use this window to copy LUTs that you want
Resolve to have access to, or delete LUTs that you no longer need.
If you add a LUT to one of these directories after DaVinci Resolve has been opened,
you can click the Update Lists button to refresh the contents of the pop-up menus.
DaVinci Resolve uses both 1D and 3D LUTs. 3D LUTs that are created by DaVinci
Resolve are in the .cube format, configured as 33x33x33 cubes with 32-bit floating
point processing. DaVinci Resolve can also read and use LUTs in the Shaperlut format.

Broadcast Safe
Broadcast Safe settings can be enabled while you grade to limit both the luma and chroma of
the video signal to one of three levels of acceptable overshoots and undershoots.
‚‚ Broadcast safe IRE (mV) levels: A pop-up menu for choosing one of three levels of
aggressiveness when limiting the signal. Choose the range that corresponds to your
QC requirements.
‚‚ Make Broadcast Safe: A checkbox that turns broadcast safe limiting on and off.

NOTE: The clipping imposed by Broadcast Safe itself does not have an inherently soft
roll-off. For best results, Broadcast Safe should be used in conjunction with the Soft
Clip controls in the Color page, or a Soft Clip LUT (described in the following section).

Generate Soft Clip LUT
Similar to the Soft Clip mode of the Curves, a Soft Clip LUT lets you create an image processing
LUT that applies a timeline-wide “knee” to any clipping that occurs at the upper or lower
extremes of the image. Soft clipping in this context is used to quickly ease off any unpleasantly
harsh loss of detail occurring as a result of blowing out the highlights or crushing the shadows
too aggressively.

Project Settings and Preferences

Adding Lookup Tables to Your DaVinci Resolve Installation

Part 1 – 3

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Generates LUT based on: Defaults to “No LUT selected,” which generates a soft clip
LUT using only the settings within this panel. Choosing another LUT from the list lets
you concatenate the calculations you specify in this panel with the selected LUT, thus
outputting a single LUT that applies both sets of calculations all at once.
Scaled to clipping range: Enables the Maximum and Minimum settings below to work.
Maximum video level: Sets the maximum value that will be output. All image data
above this value will be clipped.
Upper Clipping softness: Sets the threshold, as a percentage below the clipping point,
at which highlights in the image data begin to compress before hard clipping. At 0, no
soft clipping occurs. As you raise this value, more of the clipped highlight values are
compressed, rather then clipped, resulting in softer, more pleasant “glowing” highlights.
Minimum video level: Sets the minimum value that will be output. All image data below
this value will be clipped.
Lower Clipping softness: Sets the threshold, as a percentage above the minimum
clipping point, at which shadows begin to compress before hard clipping. At 0, no soft
clipping occurs. As you raise this value, more of the clipped shadow values are
compressed, rather then clipped, resulting in a softer, more pleasant rolloff in the toe of
the shadows.
Save LUT as: A field into which you can enter a name for a Soft Clip LUT you
want to save.
Generate LUT button: Click this button after entering a name in the Save LUT as field
to save a Soft Clip LUT.
Here’s a procedure for creating a Soft Clip LUT using the controls in this area.
To create a Soft Clip LUT:
1

Open the Project Settings and open the Look Up Tables panel.

2

Choose the settings for the Soft Clip LUT you want to create.

3

Type a name for the new LUT in the “Save LUT as” field, click “Generate LUT.”
The new LUT is saved in the default directory for your system, and is now available in
the LUT pop-up menus of this panel.

Generate LUT From Analyzed Pattern
This somewhat hidden command allows you to analyze a special test pattern in order to derive
a LUT from whatever adjustments were made to that image. It relies on the use of the “trim_lut.
dpx” file that’s located in one of the following directories:
On Mac OS X: Library/Application Support/Blackmagic Design/DaVinci Resolve
On Windows: C:\ProgramData\Blackmagic Design\DaVinci Resolve\Support
On Linux: /home/resolve

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Generate: Lets you choose whether you create a soft-clip LUT as a 1D or 3D LUT. 1D
LUTs are more accurate for this operation, using 1023 data points, as opposed to the
33x33x33 cube of the 3D LUT.

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To be effective, a Soft Clip LUT should be ideally applied using the 3D Output Lookup Table
pop-up menu in the Look Up Tables panel, so it’s the very last operation in the image
processing pipeline.

1

Import a duplicate of the trim_lut.dpx file into an application in which to make an
adjustment.

2

Make a primary color adjustment of some kind, and save the file. Don’t overwrite the
original file.

3

Import the altered trim_lut.dpx file into Resolve, edit it into a timeline, open the Color
page, and select that clip.

4

Open the Color Management panel of the Project Settings, type a name for the LUT
you’re about to create into the Save LUT as field at the bottom of this panel, and click
Generate LUT.

A LUT is generated and saved into the LUT directory of your workstation. To see this LUT’s
effect on another clip, select another clip, right-click a node in the Node Editor, and choose the
LUT you created from the 3D LUT submenu.

General Options
This panel presents a selection of general preferences that affect the interface and operation of
DaVinci Resolve.

Conform Options
The settings in this group determine how clips are conformed to match imported project files
with source media on disk by extracting timecode, reel names, file names, file paths, and so on.
For more information on conforming and relinking, see Chapter 34, “Conforming and
Relinking Clips.”
‚‚ Use Timecode: Determines how DaVinci Resolve extracts timecode from referenced
media files. There are two options:
Embedded in the source clip: The preferred setting for most projects to conform
automatically and apply grades to the resulting clips. As long as DaVinci Resolve can
reference the timecode in either a media file’s timecode track, or in the header
metadata of the frames in a DPX sequence, you can use timecode to re-conform clips,
or even completely change the media file to which a clip refers.
From the source clip frame count: This setting is useful if the source media lacks
timecode metadata, and all that’s available is a frame count that identifies frames via
sequentially numbered integer values.
‚‚ Conform partial clips with black gaps: Inserts black frames whenever you conform a clip
that doesn’t contain all the required frames. When this option is selected, partial clips are
flagged in the Edit page with a P in the thumbnail of the clip that it is lacking frames.
‚‚ Auto conform clips with media added into Media Pool: Enabled by default, must be
disabled to use collaborative workflow. When this checkbox is turned on, DaVinci
Resolve maintains a dynamic relationship between clips in the Media Pool and those
in a project’s various timelines. When this checkbox is on and you import clips with
matching timecode/file names/reel names to clips in a timeline, DaVinci Resolve will
automatically reconform all matching missing clips, and all other timeline clips that have
force conform turned off.

Part 1 – 3

To use Generate LUT From Current Grade:

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Project Settings and Preferences

This procedure is most useful when you want to reverse-engineer an adjustment that’s being
made via a third-party application. Be aware that it’s only useful for analyzing primary
adjustments, such as lift/gamma/gain style adjustments, saturation adjustments, or curve
adjustments. Secondary adjustments and filters such as blurs or sharpen operations cannot be
analyzed, and in fact may cause an incorrect analysis.

Source clip file pathname: Obtains the reel number by extracting it from each media
file’s path. This makes it possible to extract a reel number from all or part of the file
name, or from all or part of the name of any folder in the path that encloses that file.
This extraction is defined using the Pattern field.
Pattern: A code that defines how a reel number should be extracted from the source
clip path name. For more information about creating patterns, see “Using the Pattern
Field” in Chapter 34, “Conforming and Relinking Clips.”
Media Pool folder name: The reel number is obtained from the name of the bin in the
Media Pool that encloses that clip. This option is often used for stereo projects, deriving
the reel number from “Left” and “Right” named directories. It’s also useful for projects
that are inheriting new VFX clips on a daily basis.
Embedding in source clip file: Useful for file formats where the reel number is
embedded within the media file itself. QuickTime files created by Final Cut Pro, DPX
frame files, and CinemaDNG files are all formats that are capable of containing reel
number header data.
Source clip filename: If there is no defined reel number, often it’s easy to just use the
source clip filename. This is a safe option to use in situations where you want to
manually choose different reel name extraction methods for individual clips using the
Clip Attributes window.
‚‚ Extract reel names from EDL comments: Media file formats such as R3D have reel
names, obtained from the file names, that are longer than the eight characters that are
allowable in a standard EDL. This option allows DaVinci Resolve to extract reel names
from appropriately formatted EDL comments, such as those output from Final Cut Pro 7.
‚‚ Sort timeline using reel number and timecode: Lets you change the behavior of
C mode sorting in the Timeline. With this checkbox turned on (the default), all clips
in the Timeline are sorted by reel number first, and then by source timecode. This
way, clips with similar timecode from the same reel will appear next to one another
in C mode. If you turn this checkbox off, reel number is ignored, and all clips in the
Timeline are sorted only by source timecode. This may result in clips from multiple
sources being mixed together, but it is useful in specific situations.
‚‚ Mixed frame rate format: (Only available prior to importing media into a project)
This pop-up menu lets you choose the method used to conform mixed frame rates for
rendering and playback. Which option you choose dictates the accuracy with which
retimed clips in DaVinci Resolve match the same clips that were retimed in other editing
applications when you import those timelines into DaVinci Resolve via XML or AAF. This
pop-up menu also appears in the Load AAF or XML dialogs.
‚‚ If you’re editing from scratch in DaVinci Resolve: You should leave this setting set
to “Resolve.”
When importing timelines via XML from Apple software: Choose the “Final Cut Pro 7”
or “Final Cut Pro X” methods of conform.
When importing timelines via XML or AAF from Premiere Pro, Media Composer,
Smoke, or other NLEs: You should choose “Resolve.”

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‚‚ Assist using reel names from the: When this checkbox is turned on, DaVinci Resolve
uses reel numbers when conforming clips to match any imported project. This setting
must also be turned on if you want to choose different reel name extraction methods
for individually selected clips using the Clip Attributes window. Turning this checkbox
off forces DaVinci Resolve to identify clips using file names when conforming XML and
AAF projects. File names can only be used for conforming XML or AAF files, or when
importing a DaVinci Resolve project. There are four options:

How clips in mixed frame rate timelines are rendered out depends on whether the Render
Settings are set to render individual source clips or one single clip. When you render the
Timeline as individual source clips, all clips are rendered individually at their original frame rate.
If you select ‘single clip,’ all clips are converted to the “Timeline frame rate” frame rate and
rendered as a single media file.

Audio Metering
Two options in the General Options of the Project Settings let you customize the Loudness
Meters on the Fairlight page, while the others affect all other audio meters in DaVinci Resolve.
‚‚ Target Loudness level: Lets you set the LUFS value that’s used as a reference level
for loudness metering. Defaults to –23 LUFS which conveniently makes the display of
these meters scale similarly to traditional audio meters that you’re already used to.
‚‚ Loudness Scale: Lets you choose which scale you want to use with which to measure
the meters. Options currently include the default of EBU +9 Scale (–18 to +9), and EBU
+18 Scale (–36 to +18).
‚‚ Track Meters: Lets you choose how meters in the Fairlight page display their audio
analysis. There are two options:
‚‚ Post Fader: Meters always display the level of each clip’s signal after whatever fader
adjustments have taken place. Fading a track’s level down diminishes the visible level
of that audio signal in the meter. This setting is good if you prefer a visual indication
of the relative levels you’ve set your various audio tracks to, which is a very NLEoriented behavior.
‚‚ Track Source: Meters always use the volume levels of the audio clips in that track,
even if you’ve lowered the level using the sliders. If you’ve keyframed a clip’s volume,
that change will be reflected by the audio meters, even though fader changes are not.
Viewing meters this way means you can always see how much level is available to clips
in your mix regardless of what the current fader levels are set to, in the event you want
to keep track of audio you want to bring back into the mix later on. This is a very DAWoriented behavior.

Color
These settings affect clip versions and timeline interactions when working in the Color page.
‚‚ Luminance mixer defaults to zero: Selecting this option sets the Y channel of the
YRGB parameters for all grades to zero. This is required to be able to export a
compliant ASC-CDL, and will impact all grades that use the Lum Mix control.
‚‚ Use legacy Log grading ranges and curve: DaVinci Resolve 12.5 introduced a
modification to the Log grading controls that provides smoother, more pleasing results
using the same controls. To maintain backward compatibility with older projects, a
“Use legacy Log grading ranges and curve” checkbox in the Color panel of the Project
Settings lets you switch your project between the older Log control behavior and the
newer one. Older projects that are opened in DaVinci Resolve have this checkbox
turned on by default, while new projects have this turned off by default.

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Project Settings and Preferences

When none is selected: DaVinci Resolve conforms and processes all clips in the
Timeline to play at the frame rate that’s selected in the “Timeline frame rate” pop-up
menu. For example, 23.98, 29.97, 30, 50, 59.94 and 60 fps clips will all play at 24 fps
if that’s what “Timeline frame rate” is set to in the Master Project Settings, and clips will
play slower or faster accordingly.

‚‚ Use legacy sizing interactions for windows and effects: DaVinci Resolve 14.1.1
improved how window tracking applies transformations, to correctly handle things like
pixel aspect ratio (par). New projects should leave this setting disabled, however older
projects should leave this checkbox enabled to ensure tracking and transforms remain
applied the way they were before.
‚‚ Apply stereoscopic convergence to windows and effects: When enabled,
automatically applies convergence as appropriate to windows and effects in the
opposite eye of stereo timelines.
‚‚ Use local version for new clips in timeline: Automatically sets all new clips that
are added to existing timelines, or all clips that are added to new timelines that are
imported via AAF, EDL, or XML, to use local grades by default. If you want all clips
added to new timelines to use remote grades instead, as with DaVinci Resolve version
9 and earlier, you can turn this checkbox off.
‚‚ Automatically match master timeline with media pool: If you turn on this option before
importing any media into the Media Pool, or importing any timelines that will in turn
import media into the Media Pool, you can create projects with a Master Timeline.
When enabled, clips are added to and removed from the Master Timeline as they’re
added to and removed from the Media Pool, so that the Master Timeline always
contains all media in the Media Pool. Once media has been imported into a project, this
setting cannot be changed.
‚‚ Save timeline thumbnails with project: To minimize project size, and maximize the
speed of saving and loading projects, you should leave this checkbox unchecked. If
you select the checkbox, all of your Timeline thumbnails will be stored inside every
project, instead of in the default directory that’s ordinarily dedicated to stills, during
both Save and Auto Save operations. This provides a good history of the project but
takes much longer to complete and uses more hard disk space.
‚‚ Use BGR pixel order for DPX v2: Lets you choose a different pixel order for projects
using DPX version 2 media.
‚‚ Embed timecode in audio output: When turned on, directs DaVinci Resolve to output
LTC timecode that’s embedded in channel 16 of the SDI stream and channel 2 of the
analog audio output from your video interface.
‚‚ Use Timelines Bin: This option is only available to be changed before you add clips
to the Media Pool; after you’ve added clips, it’s no longer available. Turning Use
Timelines Bin on creates a dedicated Timelines bin in the Media Pool, at the top of the
Bin List. When enabled, the Timelines bin contains all timelines in a project, and you’re
prevented from putting timelines into any other bin in the Media Pool. Whenever you
create or import a new timeline, it automatically appears in the Timelines bin. You can
add subfolders to the Timelines bin for more specific organization.

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‚‚ Use S-curve for contrast: On by default, this checkbox sets the contrast control in the
Color Wheels palette to apply an “S-curve” to the image, such that the shadows and
highlights of a signal will not be clipped when you increase the value. If you would
prefer for these contrast adjustments to be made linearly, and for the signal to be
allowed to clip when you reach the upper and lower boundaries of the video signal, you
can turn this checkbox off.

Versions
Ten text fields provide a way for you to designate automatic names for the versions of grades
that you select in the Color page. To the right of each text field, a pop-up menu lets you add a
name from a handy list of predefined terms that’s been provided. Alternately, you can simply
click any field and type your own custom name.
When you change the name of a version in the Color page, the names you define in this list are
available from a pop-up menu in the Version Name dialog.

Using the named pop-up when editing the name of a version

Using a predefined list of names for your different versions avoids typos that can later create
folder naming issues when you use the “Commercial Workflow” options for rendering your
media in the Deliver page.

Camera Raw
This panel contains groups of parameters that correspond to every camera raw media format
that’s supported by DaVinci Resolve. Using these parameters in the Camera Raw panel, you can
override the original camera metadata that was written at the time of recording, and make
simultaneous adjustments to all camera raw clips using the “project” raw settings.
These settings are covered in detail in Chapter 4, “Camera Raw Settings.”

Capture and Playback
All settings in this panel let you define the functionality of capture and playout to tape using
device controlled VTRs connected to your Resolve workstation via the connected video
capture and output interface. For more information on deck capture, see Chapter 12, “Ingesting
from Tape.” For more information on video output to tape, see Chapter 77, “Delivering to Tape.”

Part 1 – 3

Defines the default transition from one dynamic keyframe to the next for keyframed effects in
the Color page. By default this transition is linear, with the “Dynamic profile start” and “Dynamic
profile end” parameters set to 1. However, if you need to alter the acceleration of the
interpolation of values from one dynamic keyframe to the next, then you can change that
keyframe’s Dissolve Type in order to “ease” the effect transition you’re creating. The values in
these settings correspond to the graph curves found in the Dynamic Attributes dialog when
editing keyframes in the Color page. For more information, see “Changing Dynamic Attributes”
in Chapter 53, “Keyframing in the Color Page.”

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Dynamics Profile

‚‚ Video capture and playback: You can choose the video format (frame size and
frame rate) with which to output to tape from this pop-up menu. HD timelines can be
downconverted to SD, and SD timelines can be upconverted to HD using the format
conversion of your DeckLink card.
‚‚ Use left and right eye SDI: A checkbox that enables supported video interfaces to
ingest and output muxed stereoscopic video when used with supported VTRs, such
as HDCAM SR decks with 4:2:2 x 2 mode. (When muxed stereoscopic signals are
ingested, each eye is separated into individual left-eye and right-eye image files.)
This parameter only appears when your hardware is set up appropriately.
‚‚ Video connection operates as: Selects between the available signal options: Use 4:4:4
SDI and Enable Single Link. Which options are available depend on which video
capture card you are using.
‚‚ Data Levels: Lets you specify the data range (normally Video or Full) that’s used when
ingesting from or outputting to tape. This option switches the data range of the signal
output by your video capture card, but only during capture from tape in the Media
page, or output to tape in the Deliver page. When capture or output is not currently
occurring, your video capture card goes back to using the identically-named data range
setting in the Master Project Settings pane, which governs how you monitor the signal
being output on an external broadcast display or projector.
‚‚ Video bit depth: Choose the bit depth that corresponds to the capability of your deck.
Depending on your workstation’s configuration, you can choose between 8-bit and 10bit. Outputting to 10-bit is more processor intensive, but higher quality for compatible
devices, and is the default setting.
‚‚ Use deck autoedit: If supported by your video deck, this is the best method to record
video to the deck, as it enables the deck to roll the edit using the specified preroll, and
control the edits via serial device control. If this checkbox is turned off, a basic edit On/
Off mode is used by the deck, with the potential for frame inaccuracies if the “Non auto
edit timing” setting is not properly adjusted.
‚‚ Non auto edit timing: Adjusts the edit synchronization of the connected deck when
auto edit is turned off.
‚‚ Deck preroll: Sets the number of seconds for preroll. How much is appropriate
depends on the performance of your deck.
‚‚ Video output sync source: When using a DeckLink card this is set to Auto. Other
capture cards may require you to set the sync source to “Reference” for playout and
“Input” for ingest. This setting is only available if you have a DVS card installed on
your system.
‚‚ Add 3:2 pulldown: Inserts or removes the 3:2 pulldown required to record or play
23.98 fps media to or from a 29.97 tape format.

Capture
These settings are used when you use the Capture mode in the Media page to capture clips
from tape into the Media Pool.
‚‚ Capture: Lets you choose whether to capture both Video and Audio, or Video Only.
‚‚ Video Format: The format that scanned film frames are saved as. When capturing from
tape, the available options are DPX and QuickTime. When capturing from the Cintel
film scanner, this is restricted to Cintel Raw Image (CRI), which is a raw data format that
DaVinci Resolve automatically debayers as a Cineon log-encoded image for grading.

Part 1 – 3

These settings affect both capture and playback when using the tape ingest options of the
Media page, or the tape output options of the Deliver page.

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Project Settings and Preferences

Deck Settings

‚‚ Browse: Click this button to choose a directory to write captured media to. The
directory you choose appears in the field above.
‚‚ Save in this folder path: A series of checkboxes let you specify what other information
to use to define the directory hierarchy that will hold the captured media. Every
checkbox you turn on adds an additional directory with a name defined by that
checkbox’s metadata. You can choose any or all of the following: Program name, Clip
number, Reel number, and Roll/Card.
‚‚ Apply reel number to: Lets you choose how to write the reel name. Two checkboxes
let you write the reel number to the file’s name, and/or to the Header data.
‚‚ Use prefix: A field lets you type in a prefix to be used in the media file’s name. This
lets you add text identification that will make the media more easily identifiable and
searchable.
‚‚ Apply prefix to: Two checkboxes let you choose to use the prefix you typed in the file
name, and/or in the folder name.
‚‚ Use frame number with: When capturing to image sequences, you can choose how
many digits to use when writing the frame number into the name of each frame file.
‚‚ Set batch ingest handles to: When capturing to image sequences from a batch list,
defines how many frames of additional handles to ingest along with each logged clip.
‚‚ Enable audio input: Turn this checkbox on to capture audio along with the video. If
you’re capturing QuickTime or MXF files, the audio will be written as additional tracks
inside each file. If you’re capturing to a DPX image sequence, then a broadcast .wav file
is recorded separately.
‚‚ Input: Lets you choose how many tracks of audio to capture, from 2 to 16.

Playout
These settings only affect the video signal that’s output when you use the Edit to Tape mode of
the Deliver page.
‚‚ Output: Lets you choose whether to output both Video and Audio, Video Only, or
Audio Only if you’re doing an audio layback.
‚‚ Output Source Timecode: Turn this checkbox on to output each individual clip’s source
timecode. This option is only applicable when assemble editing to tape.
‚‚ Output LTC: With a Blackmagic Design DeckLink or UltraStudio device using HD-SDI,
longitudinal timecode (LTC) is available on track 16 of the HD-SDI video signal, making
it easy to use a Mini Converter de-embedder to extract this analog timecode audio
signal and feed it directly to a recording device. This is particularly helpful if you have
outboard video processing equipment such as a noise reducer or format converter that
does not pass through the VITC timecode.
‚‚ Delay LTC by x frames: When outputting LTC to bypass outboard processing gear, such
as a noise reducer or format converter, you can compensate for the processing delay
by delaying the timecode by a matter of frames to ensure that the processed image
and timecode reach the deck at the same time. With a DVS card there is a separate
timecode output.
‚‚ Enable audio output: When this checkbox is enabled, DaVinci Resolve will play audio
during output.

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Save clips to: A field that displays the directory path to which media files captured from
tape are written. You want to choose a volume that’s fast enough to accommodate the
data rate of the media format you’re capturing.

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‚‚ Codec: The codec used to write captured media. When capturing from tape, these
include the various type of Apple ProRes, 8- and 10-bit YUV 422, 10-bit RGB, and the
various types of DNxHD. Cintel Raw Image files default to rgb.

‚‚ Set batch playout head handle to x seconds: When batch outputting multiple clips, you
can specify a number of frames before the In point of each clip to be output as well.
‚‚ Set batch playout tail handle to x seconds: When batch outputting multiple clips, you
can specify a number of frames after the Out point of each clip to be output as well.
‚‚ Apply gaps between clips: This checkbox lets you add a black gap, of the specified
duration in frames, between every clip in a timeline when outputting in batch mode.

Opening and Editing
DaVinci Resolve Preferences
The DaVinci Resolve Preferences window contains workstation-specific settings for customizing
how DaVinci Resolve works, divided into System and User panes, selectable via buttons at the
top of this window.
To open the Project Settings window, do one of the following:
‚‚ Choose DaVinci Resolve > Preferences
‚‚ Press Command-Comma

System Settings of the Preferences Window

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Output x channels of audio: Choose the number of audio tracks to output to tape.

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‚‚ Offset audio by x frames: Lets you specify an offset between the audio track and video
to achieve proper A/V sync in cases where the video is being delayed by outboard
processing hardware.

1

Click on the name of any group of settings in the sidebar at the left to open that panel.

2

Change whatever settings you need to change.

3

Click Save to apply the changes you’ve made and close the Preferences window.

If you’ve updated certain System Preferences, you’ll be prompted to restart DaVinci Resolve,
but if you’ve updated the User Preferences, this will probably be unnecessary.

System
The System pane of the Preferences window consists of a series of panels that configure the
computer and other hardware that comprises your DaVinci Resolve workstation.

Hardware Configuration
The bottom section of this panel provides an overview, for reference, of all hardware and
computer characteristics that are relevant to DaVinci Resolve running smoothly, including listing
of installed GPUs. Some other options are also available at the top:
‚‚ Pre-allocated System Memory: Most users don’t have to worry about this option, and
should probably ignore it. To understand when this might be useful, DaVinci Resolve
uses RAM to store images as they’re being processed. By default, Resolve only preallocates 50% of the available RAM of your workstation for this purpose, which typically
comes to the 4 GB listed in this field. Workstations with enormous amounts of RAM
available (64 to 128 GB, for example), may find it desirable to raise this cap in order
to improve performance when rendering 5K, 6K, or 8K resolution clips, although the
maximum recommended pre-allocation is 12 GB of RAM.
‚‚ Use Mac Display Color Profile for Viewers: If you’re using DaVinci Resolve on macOS,
this checkbox enables all Viewers in DaVinci Resolve to use whatever display profile is
selected in the Displays panel of the System Preferences. This lets DaVinci Resolve use
ColorSync on macOS so your Viewer image should better match your output display.
‚‚ Use 10-bit precision in viewers if available: This checkbox only appears on Mac OS
X 10.11 (El Capitan) and higher installations of Resolve. Turning this checkbox on lets
Resolve display 10-bit images in the Viewer.
‚‚ Use Display GPU For Compute: By default, a single GPU system uses this one GPU
for the DaVinci user interface and also for image processing. As greater processing
speeds are achievable with two or more GPUs, if two GPUs are installed for image
processing this checkbox enables the shared use of the display GPU instead of
dedicating it to just the DaVinci user interface. Users of the non-studio version of
DaVinci Resolve are restricted to the use of a single GPU, unless DaVinci Resolve is
installed on a 2013 or later Mac Pro, in which case both installed GPUs will be used.
‚‚ Use GPU for RED Debayer: Lets you use your GPU to accelerate debayering of R3D
media for systems without a RED Rocket installed.

Part 1 – 3

To alter any preference setting:

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Project Settings and Preferences

The System and User panes are each divided into a series of panels which can be selected
from a sidebar at the left. Each panel contains a collection of related settings that affects some
category of DaVinci Resolve functionality.

87

‚‚ GPU processing mode: Lets you set DaVinci Resolve to use either OpenCL or CUDA
on systems that have both ATI and Nvidia GPUs installed, to make sure that you’re
using your most powerful GPU for processing. If you choose either OpenCL or CUDA
from this pop-up menu, then a GPU selection mode pop-up appears below that gives
you the option of choosing exactly which GPUs you want to either use or disable. If
you’re using a system that only has ATI GPUs, you should only use OpenCL. Most users
can leave this set to Auto, and DaVinci Resolve will use what’s appropriate.

Project Settings and Preferences

‚‚ GPU selection mode: Lets you choose between Auto, which lets DaVinci Resolve
choose which of the available GPUs on your computer to use for processing, and
Manual, which lets you choose which GPUs to enable or disable for processing from a
list that appears below.
‚‚ GPU selection list: This list only appears when GPU processing mode is set to either
OpenCL, CUDA, or Metal, and when GPU selection mode is set to Manual. A list of
every GPU installed in your computer appears, and you can use checkboxes to the left
of each GPU to enable or disable specific GPUs from being used for processing.

Media Storage
This panel lets you define the scratch disk and other media storage locations used by DaVinci
Resolve, as well as the default cache directories locations to be used when creating
new projects.
‚‚ The Media Storage Locations: This list lets you define the scratch disk of the system.
The first volume in this list is where Gallery stills and cache files are stored, so you want
to make sure that you choose the fastest storage volume to which you have access.
‚‚ Automatically display attached local and network storage locations: This checkbox
lets DaVinci Resolve access media on all temporarily and permanently mounted
volumes, including SATA and eSATA, SAS, USB, FireWire, Thunderbolt, Gigabit Ethernet
(GbE or GigE), Fibre Channel, and otherwise connected hard drives, without having to
add them to this list. This is on by default.
Some versions of DaVinci Resolve do not allow automatic display of attached volumes.
In this case, you can right-click anywhere in the background of the Media Storage
panel’s volumes list on the Media page and choose “Add New Location” to open a
dialog you can use to choose a volume you want to add.

Manually adding a volume to the Media Storage
panel’s volumes list

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Use Red Rocket if available: (only appears if a RED ROCKET-X or RED ROCKET is
installed) This checkbox lets you disable Red Rocket support if you need to force
DaVinci Resolve to use standard RED software CPU debayering to accommodate your
specific workflow, or when troubleshooting. If you are required to debayer R3D media
using your CPU, turn this checkbox off. Additional options appear letting you choose
decompression and debayer settings.

Using Path Mapping to Access Volumes From Other Operating Systems
Shared media path mapping support for Mac, Linux and Windows makes it easier for multisystem shops to share Resolve projects among different platforms that use different file path
conventions.
To add a mapped mount string:
1

Open the Media Storage panel of the Resolve Preferences window.

2

Add the volume you want to map to the Scratch Disks list.

3

Double-click the Mapped Mount column of the drive you added to edit it.

4

Enter the alternate file path you want that volume to have. For example, if you’re on a
Windows workstation and you want to access a Linux volume, type the Linux file path
into the Mapped Mount column.

NOTE: If the volume you’ve selected to use for the cache becomes unavailable,
Resolve will warn you with a dialog.

Video & Audio I/O
The preferences in this panel let you choose video and audio interfaces on your workstation.

Video & Audio I/O
This section lets you choose which Blackmagic Design video interfaces you want to use for
monitoring, capture, playback, and Resolve Live, assuming you have any connected to your
workstation. If no interfaces are connected, no options will be available.
‚‚ For capture and playback use: If you have a compatible video capture card, you should
choose from the card options that appear here. Leaving this set to “None” disables
external video output. Disabling video output can improve real time performance when
external monitoring and output is not a priority. You can also choose “None” when
you’re using Resolve with another application open at the same time that’s using your
workstation’s video output interface. When you’ve quit the other application, you can
reselect the video output interface for use by Resolve.
‚‚ For DaVinci Resolve Live use: When using Resolve Live to monitor the live output
from a camera, you must have a video interface that’s dedicated to doing just that. If
you have only one video interface connected to your computer, you’ll need to disable
it for capture and playback, and enable it for Resolve Live use. However, if you have
two video interfaces connected at the same time, you can use one to monitor camera
output, and the other to output to a video display for critical evaluation.

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If you’re using the Apple App store version of DaVinci Resolve, turning on
“Automatically display attached local and network storage locations” automatically
prompts you via a dialog to add “Macintosh HD” as a storage location. Clicking Add
Location prompts you to select the Macintosh HD volume with another dialog, and
clicking Open then adds that volume to the Media Storage Volumes list. After you click
Save to close the Preference windows, Resolve should now auto-mount any volumes
attached to your computer in the Media Storage browser of the Media page. Don’t do
this until after you’ve added a fast storage volume to the Media Storage Locations list,
because you don’t want Macintosh HD as the first volume in this list – the very first
volume in this list should always be reserved for your fast scratch volume.

‚‚ Enable Fairlight Audio Accelerator: Turning this checkbox on enables an installed
Fairlight Audio Accelerator PCI card to be used by DaVinci Resolve for accelerated
audio processing and for all audio I/O monitoring and recording.
‚‚ Audio Interface: Turning Enable Fairlight Audio Accelerator on exposes an additional
menu that lets you choose which audio interface to use for audio I/O; the choices are
MADI (if you’re going to use a third party MADI interface) or Fairlight Audio Interface
and MADI (if you also want to use the Fairlight Audio Interface).

Speaker Setup
This section lets you define different sets of speakers with which to monitor audio playback.
To access more than the default stereo system output that most workstations default to, you
must use whatever software is available for your operating system to choose the desired audio
hardware you want to use, and define how many audio outputs are required for the type of
monitoring you want to do (stereo, surround, etcetera). For example, on macOS you’ll use the
Audio Midi Setup utility to choose output hardware and select a speaker configuration to be
made available on your system. For more information, see the DaVinci Resolve Configuration
Guide, available on the web from the Blackmagic Design support page at
https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/support/family/davinci-resolve-and-fusion.
‚‚ Monitor Circuit: Lets you choose for which monitoring circuit, of two available, to define
a set of speakers. The choices are Control Room, which corresponds to the room the
audio engineer inhabits, and Studio 1, which corresponds to the recording room the
talent inhabits. This way, you can set up separate monitoring speaker setups for each
area, as necessary.
‚‚ Monitor Set: For each Monitor Circuit, you can define multiple sets of monitoring
speakers. The default two are MAIN (your primary monitoring speakers) and NEAR
(usually a secondary set of inferior speakers for checking the mix on cheaper consumer
gear). However, options for Set 2-15 lets you define up to 15 different combinations
of monitoring speakers that you can switch among for checking or creating different
mixes. Click the Rename button to rename any of the more generically labeled monitor
sets to something more memorable.
‚‚ Monitor Set Format: This menu lets you define the format of the currently selected
Monitor Set. Options include Mono, Stereo, LCR (left/center/right), LCRS (left/center/
right/sub), LCRSS, 5.1, 6.1, 7.1.
‚‚ Monitor output list: Depending on the Monitor Set Format you choose, each stem of
the mix will have an entry in this list with controls that let you map which output goes to
that particular speaker, as well as what gain adjustment (if any) you want to make. The
number of outputs available in this list reflects the number of speakers made available
by your operating system, so if you don’t see the required number of outputs that you
want to map to different stems, you should configure your system audio using the
procedures available in the DaVinci Resolve Configuration Guide.

Audio Plug-ins
A list at top lets you manually add and remove VST plug-in effects directories, if necessary. VST
effects aren’t installed in a standard location, so it may sometimes be necessary to add a newly
installed directory of VST plug-ins that you’ve just installed on your system.

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Use System Audio Output: Lets you force Resolve to output audio via your
workstation’s built-in audio output, even if a compatible video I/O interface is enabled
for capture and playback or for Resolve Live. If no video I/O interface is installed, audio
is output via system audio output automatically.

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‚‚ Release video I/O hardware when not in focus: When turned on, DaVinci Resolve
releases control of the video output device whenever you switch to another application.

Control Panels
Two sections let you specify which Color Grading Panel and Audio Console is connected to
your workstation list.
‚‚ Color Grading Panel: A menu lets you choose which color grading panel you have
connected to your workstation. Some panels expose additional controls.
If you have a DaVinci Resolve Mini or Micro Panel, leave this setting set to None and
these panels will be auto-detected by Resolve when you plug them in.
If you have a control panel that connects via USB, choose your panel from the list.
If you have a DaVinci Resolve Mini Panel connected over Ethernet, choose “DaVinci
Resolve Mini Panel (Ethernet)” and then choose your panel from the pop-up
that appears.
If you’re using a JLCooper Eclipse, choose “JKCooper Eclipse CX” and then enter the IP
and Port number into the fields that appear.
‚‚ Use MIDI Audio Console: A checkbox lets you enable the use of a third-party
audio console that’s connected to your workstation. Turning this on exposes three
additional menus.
MIDI Protocol: Lets you choose either the HUI or MCU protocol, whichever is
compatible with the audio console you want to use.
MIDI Input: Lets you choose the MIDI input used to connect your console.
MIDI Output: Lets you choose the MIDI output used to connect your console.

Advanced
This tab is used for special Resolve configurations and SAN parameters that are applicable to
older file systems.

User
This panel lets you choose user preferences, specific to your workstation, that govern such
things as UI behaviors and appearance, auto save settings, editing and color defaults, control
panel action, and keyboard shortcut mappings

TIP: Many of the settings in the User panel used to be found in the Project Settings
window prior to version 14, but they were moved here to accommodate collaborative
workflows with each user having their own independent general, editing, and color
settings, as well as their own keyboard shortcuts.

Part 1 – 3

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Project Settings and Preferences

Once you’ve added one or more VST directories to the list, a second list underneath shows all
audio plug-ins that are available within these directories. Each plug-in on the list has a
checkbox that shows whether or not it’s currently enabled. Any VST plug-ins that cause Resolve
to crash while loading them during startup will be automatically disabled. You can use this list to
see which plug-ins have been disabled, for troubleshooting purposes, and to reenable such
“blacklisted” plug-ins by turning their checkboxes back on.

The commands for managing User Preference presets in
the option menu of the UI Settings window

Methods of managing User Preference presets:
‚‚ To save a preset: Choose whatever settings you want to use, then click the UI Settings
window Option menu, and choose Save User Preferences as Preset. Enter a name into
the dialog, and click OK. That preset will now appear at the top of the Option menu.
‚‚ To load a preset: Click the UI Settings window Option menu, and choose Load Preset
from the submenu of the preset you want to load.
‚‚ To update a preset: Load a preset you want to edit, then change whatever settings
you need to, and choose Update Preset from the submenu of that preset in the
Option menu.
‚‚ To export a Preset: Choose Export Preset from the submenu of any preset in the
Option menu. A file with the .userprefs extension is saved at the location you chose.
‚‚ To import a Preset: Choose Import User Preferences as Preset in the Option menu, use
the dialog to find the exported .userprefs preset file you want to import, and click Open.
‚‚ To delete a preset: Choose Delete Preset from the submenu of any preset in the
Option menu.
‚‚ To reset all presets: Choose Reset User Preferences from the Option menu to restore
all User Preferences to their default settings.

UI Settings
A collection of operational preferences.
‚‚ Language: A Language pop-up at the top lets you specify which language the DaVinci
Resolve user interface displays. DaVinci Resolve currently supports English, Chinese,
Japanese, and Spanish.
‚‚ Reload last working project when logging in: Automatically reopens the last project
a user had open whenever that user logs back into Davinci Resolve. This checkbox
can only be enabled when editing a preset configuration in the Presets panel, so that
it’s always on no matter which project you open as long as you’re using that particular
preset. Ideally, enable it for your User config (if you’re using a multi-user configuration
of DavInci Resolve) or your Guest Default config (if you’re using a single-user
configuration).
‚‚ Use gray background interface: By default, DaVinci Resolve uses a blue-gray
UI background, intended to provide a more attractive experience for users focused
on the less color-critical aspects of DaVinci Resolve, namely editing. Turning this
checkbox on switches DaVinci Resolve to a totally neutral, desaturated gray UI, which
can be valuable as a point of reference for colorists concerned about the blue-gray UI’s
potential to bias the eye in the dark environment of the grading suite.

Part 1 – 3

It’s possible to save multiple presets for instant recall of different User Preference settings,
using the Option menu in the UI Settings window.

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Saving User Preference Presets

‚‚ Show all viewers on video output: When this setting is disabled, video output is locked
to the Color page viewer only. When this setting is turned on, other elements of the GUI
that have focus in the Media, Edit, and Deliver pages are also output to video.
‚‚ Delay viewer display by X frames: When turned on, you can enter a number of frames
to delay the Viewers in DaVinci Resolve, so that they better sync up with external
displays that are delayed due to various signal processing processes.
‚‚ Output single field when paused: This setting will reduce flicker when grading using
a computer monitor or when working with interlaced material. Ordinarily, when viewing
interlaced material in Stop or Pause mode, field one is displayed followed by field two.
Depending on the image, this can result in a flicker on the display. When this option
is enabled, only field one will be shown on the monitor when playback is paused;
however both fields will be shown when the clips are played.
‚‚ Hide UI overlays for optimized playback: When using a single GPU for both display
and CUDA or OpenCL processing, or if your display GPU is underpowered, or if you
lack the PCIe bandwidth required for the currently specified resolution or frame rate,
you may be able to improve real time performance by turning this option on. When
enabled, on-screen controls such as the cursor, Power Window outlines, and splitscreen views are disabled and hidden during playback. When playback is paused, all
onscreen controls reappear.
‚‚ Minimize Interface updates during playback: When enabled, gives priority to real
time performance during playback by reducing user-interface updates. This is helpful
when you’re creating complex grades on systems with low processing power, or when
working on projects at high resolutions.
‚‚ Stop playback when a dropped frame is detected: When enabled, sets DaVinci
Resolve to stop playback whenever a frame is dropped on output, to warn you that
there are performance issues on your workstation. This is particularly useful when
you’re outputting to tape.

Auto Save
DaVinci Resolve’s Autosave feature can save you from the heartache of lost work resulting from
an unexpected problem. DaVinci Resolve 12.5 has significantly improved save times, so using
Auto Save is highly recommended to prevent the loss of work in the event you have a problem.
‚‚ Live Save: A progressive, fast, always on autosave mechanism that “saves as you go.”
While Live Save is enabled, the rest of the auto save options are disabled.
‚‚ Automatically save project: These options are only available if Live Save is turned off,
as they enable a more traditional auto saving method. There are three options.
Off: Disables auto saving completely.
On: Automatically saves the current project every few minutes, as defined by the
pop-up menu below that has options for 5, 10, 20, and 30 minute, or 1 hour intervals.
If you’re using a PostgreSQL database, you have the additional option of saving in
1 minute intervals, as PostgreSQL database saving is considerably faster. If
DaVinci Resolve unexpectedly quits before you have a chance to save, you’ll see all
autosaved changes the next time you reopen that project.

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Resize image in viewer for correct aspect ratio: This control will select between using
a square or non-square pixel aspect ratio within the Viewer. This is important when
working with SD images which do not have a square pixel aspect ratio.

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‚‚ Use gray background in viewers: When turned on, sets the background of all Viewers
to gray, making it easier to evaluate image blanking or minor sizing adjustments than
with the default dark background.

‚‚ Every: A pop-up menu lets you define how frequently to execute the selected
autosave behavior.
‚‚ List Backups: Shows a window listing all auto saved backup projects. This list can be
sorted by name, date modified, width, or height. Buttons running along the bottom
provide an interface to Load or Delete any item in the list, Delete all, or Refresh the
list. When you load an autosave backup, the current project is lost, and completely
replaced by the autosaved project. You are recommended to export the project first,
before loading, if you want to preserve the current state of the project.

Editing
The settings in this panel affect new timeline settings, editorial default values, trim behaviors,
timeline UI appearance, and frame interpolation settings.

New Timeline Settings
These settings define the presets that populate the New Timeline Options window whenever
you create a new timeline.
‚‚ Start Timecode: You can change the Start Timecode if a specific start time is required.
‚‚ No. of Video Tracks: Enter how many video tracks you want to have. You can also drag
within this field to adjust the number of video tracks with a virtual slider.
‚‚ No. of Audio Tracks: Enter how many audio tracks you want to have. You can also drag
within this field to adjust the number of audio tracks with a virtual slider.
‚‚ Audio Track Type: Choose the channel mapping you want the new audio tracks to use.

General Settings
These settings define the timing of resolve-generated effects and editing operations.

‚‚ Standard generator duration: Defines the default duration of generators you edit into
the Timeline, in Seconds or Frames. The default value is 5 seconds.
‚‚ Standard transition duration: Defines the duration of transitions, in Seconds or
Frames, that you add to an edit point in DaVinci Resolve. The default value is 1 second.
‚‚ Standard still duration: Defines the duration of stills that you import such as TIFF, PNG
and other supported graphic file formats, in Seconds or Frames. The default value is
5 seconds.
‚‚ Pre-roll time: Determines how much of the Timeline before the current position of the
playhead to play when using the Play Around command.
‚‚ Post-roll time: Determines how much of the Timeline after the current position of the
playhead to play when using the Play Around command.
‚‚ Default handles length: The value used when creating a timeline with handles. The
default is one second worth of frames.
‚‚ Default fast nudge length: The number of frames that are nudged when you use the
Shift-comma (,) and Shift-period (.) keyboard shortcuts.

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Retain the last X backups: Sets how many backup versions of the project to save.
Backups are eliminated in a first in, first out fashion. The default is 8 backups.

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To backup project: Saves a full alternate copy of the active database while you work.
While this full backup takes longer than the simpler incremental autosave option, it
offers a complete backup, and is often used by colorists at the end of each workday or
grading timeline.

‚‚ Timeline overlay retains the last performed action: Turn this checkbox on if you
want DaVinci Resolve to always remember the last edit type you used in the Timeline
Viewer Overlay, and highlight it on this Overlay whenever you drag another clip over
the Timeline Viewer to let you know that the last edit you performed is the new default
edit if you drop clips to the left of the overlay.
‚‚ Create Smart Bin for Timelines: Turning this option on automatically creates a Smart
Bin in the Bin List of the Media Pool that filters out all timelines in your project. Unlike
the “Use Timelines Bin” option, this smart bin doesn’t move where these timelines are
actually stored in the Media Pool. Instead, it preserves your original organization of
timelines and clips, and gives you a way of quickly finding them all at once.
‚‚ Always highlight current clip in the media pool: When turned on, any clips at the
position of the playhead on the Edit or Color pages will be automatically highlighted in
the Media Pool.
‚‚ Sync the Master Timeline to the current frame: If you turned on “Automatically match
master timeline with media pool” in the Color settings, then this option lets you make
sure that whenever you open the Master Timeline, the playhead is at the same clip
and frame that it was in the previous Timeline you were working on.
‚‚ Show offline reference for timeline gaps: If there’s a missing clip in a conformed
timeline that results in a gap in the Timeline Editor, turning this option on sets
Davinci Resolve to show the corresponding frames of an “offline reference movie,”
if one has been assigned to that timeline, instead of black. This can be helpful in
emergency situations when you’re missing timeline clips right before a screening
or review session; this feature lets you play or output the missing frames using the
corresponding media from the offline reference movie, instead of outputting black. For
more information on using and assigning Offline Reference Movies, see Chapter 33,
“Preparing to Move a Project to DaVinci Resolve.”
‚‚ Show offline reference for non-conformed edits: If there’s missing media in a project
that results in an unlinked clip in the Timeline Editor (represented by a red exclamation
point overlay on that clip), turning this option on sets DaVinci Resolve to show the
corresponding frames of an “offline reference movie,” if one has been assigned to
that timeline, instead of black. This can be helpful in emergency situations when
you’re missing source media right before a screening or review session; this feature
lets you play or output the missing frames using the corresponding media from the
offline reference movie, instead of outputting black. For more information on using and
assigning Offline Reference Movies, see Chapter 33, “Preparing to Move a Project to
DaVinci Resolve.”

Part 1 – 3

‚‚ Post-playhead shadow length: The number of frames in the Timeline after the
playhead covered by the Playhead Shadow, if enabled by choosing View > Show
Playhead Shadow.

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Project Settings and Preferences

‚‚ Pre-playhead shadow length: The number of frames in the Timeline prior to the
playhead covered by the Playhead Shadow, if enabled by choosing View > Show
Playhead Shadow.

Color

95

Affect a variety of behaviors while working in the Color page.
‚‚ Enable HDR Scopes for ST.2084: (only available in Studio version) If you’re doing
an HDR grade and monitoring with the built-in video scopes in DaVinci Resolve, you
can turn this checkbox on to replace the 10-bit scale of the video scopes with a scale
based on “nit” values (or cd/m2) instead.
‚‚ Master reset maintains RGB balance: Defines how the DaVinci control panel trackball/
ring reset buttons reset primary color adjustments. When this option is turned off (the
default), pressing the ALL Reset button returns the primary correction values to their
default values. When this checkbox is turned on, then pressing the ALL Reset button
(a) resets the YRGB values so that the overall values are kept and the ratio of YRGB to
each other is maintained, and (b) pressing the RGB Reset button sets the three color
channels to the average of what they were previously set to.
‚‚ Wipe wraps when viewing reference stills: Turning this on (the default) lets stills wrap
around the edge of the screen while you’re adjusting the wipe using the mouse, rather
than stopping at the screen’s edge. If you find this behavior awkward when trying to
quickly create full-frame comparisons with stills to flip on and off, it can be disabled.
‚‚ High-Visibility Power Window Outlines: Turning this on sets power window outlines
to be drawn as green (for the center shape) and yellow (for the softness shapes), to
make these windows easier to see in certain circumstances, instead of the default
white and gray.
‚‚ Mattes display high contrast black and white: When enabled, the HILITE command,
which displays the current key, shows a black and white matte (i.e., high contrast)
rather than the standard gray matte. For more information on this setting, and on use
of the HILITE command, see Chapter 44, “Secondary Qualifiers.”
‚‚ Next scene switches to visible track: When grading a project with multiple tracks,
you can use this option to alter the “next scene” command to work better in projects
with multi-clip composites. With this option turned off, pressing NEXT SCENE on
the DaVinci control panel, or using the Down Arrow keyboard shortcut, moves the
playhead to the very next clip in the Thumbnail timeline, regardless of whether it’s
in front of or behind another clip. Turning this option on causes the NEXT SCENE
command to move the playhead to the clip in the highest track if the next clip is part of
a multi-clip composite with multiple clips stacked over one another.
‚‚ Automatically cue x frames into timeline clips: This setting affects the operation of
the NEXT SCENE and PREV SCENE commands in the Color page. The default cue
point when moving from one clip to the next is the first frame of each clip. Entering
a value, in frames, in this field sets the default cue point to the specified number
of frames after the first frame of each clip you move the playhead to. This can be
convenient if the source material has black or camera rollup flashes at the beginning of
every clip while you’re trying to grade dailies.
‚‚ Neighboring Clips in Split Screen: Lets you choose how many neighboring clips next
to the current clips are shown in a grid in the Color page Viewer when you turn on the
Neighbor Clips option of the Split-Screen shot comparison control.

Project Settings and Preferences

General Settings

Part 1 – 3

The settings in this panel govern different behaviors in the Color page.

Selects first node: The first node is always selected when you move to another clip.
Selects last node: The last node is always selected when you move to another clip.
Selects same node: If the clip you’ve moved to has as many or more nodes as the last
clip, the node of the same number will be selected. If the clip you’ve moved to has
fewer nodes than the last clip, the next highest node will be selected.

‚‚ Color picker: Changes the way that colors are selected when using the Secondary
color correction controls. DaVinci Resolve is the normal and modern mode, however
some colorists who are familiar with the legacy 2K prefer the DaVinci 2K mode.

Ripple Mode
This setting determines the behavior of the Ripple command that’s initiated when using the
RIPPLE VALUE button on the DaVinci Advanced control panel.
‚‚ Target clips are set to: The Ripple mode that’s used when you press the RIPPLE VALUE
button on the DaVinci control panel. For more information on using this function, see
Chapter 48, “Grade Management.”
Exact values changed: Changes made to the current clip are rippled to the specified
clips using the exact parameters that were changed. For example, if the Master Gain
level in the current clip is changed to 0.75 of its range, each clip you ripple will have a
Master Gain level of 0.75. Only parameters you adjust are rippled.
Percent value changed: Changes made to the current clip are rippled to the specified
clips by the percentage of change you made to the altered parameters. For example, if
the current clip has a Master Gain level of 1.00 and is changed to 0.90 units, then the
Master Gain level of each clip you ripple will have a relative reduction of 10% relative to
its previous value.
Unit values changed: Changes made to the current clip are rippled to the specified
clips by the same delta of change, using whichever units make sense for the affected
parameter. For example, if the current clip had a Master Gain of 0.80 and you increased
it to 0.90, each rippled scene’s Master Gain level increases by 0.10.
All values are copied: The current clip’s grade is rippled to the specified clips in its
entirety. No comparison is made with the original clip’s parameters, and all memory
parameters are rippled.

Printer Light Step Calibration
For film projects, when you have tight integration with a film lab, it is possible to adjust the
printer light calibration sets to match the lab you are using. You should work with your lab
technician to set up the Lab Aim settings, the Steps adjustments, which is an incremental value,
and the Density Increment adjustment, which is the amount of correction applied within each
step. Usually, the Step and Density values will be identical, but this will be up to your lab and
your preference.

Control Panels
The parameters in this panel let you customize the functionality of the DaVinci Control panel.
Some, but not all, of these settings apply to third party panels.

Part 1 – 3

Selects last adjusted node: The default setting, where each clip in the Timeline retains
its own independent node selection that’s remembered whenever you move back to
that clip.

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‚‚ Switching clips: (this setting can also be changed from the Option menu in the Node
Editor) When switching clips, DaVinci Resolve can switch to the same or another node
in the node graph. The four options below determine which node is selected:

‚‚ Classic DaVinci trackball alignment: When enabled, this checkbox sets all color
balance controls in DaVinci Resolve to the traditional orientation they’ve always used,
which is close to, but not exactly the same as the vectorscope alignment of hues.
When disabled, the alignment of color balance controls is exactly the same as the
vectorscope alignment of hues, which is similar to how other color grading applications
work. You should choose the mode you’re most familiar with.
‚‚ Grading style: Controls the orientation of the trackballs relative to the corrections they
make. There are two options:
DaVinci: Most users will be familiar with the standard DaVinci controls as this mimics
the vectorscope (how closely depends on the Classic DaVinci trackball
alignment setting).
Rank: The Rank settings are somewhat different, so this option is for users who are
familiar with color controls that the Rank control system offered. In this mode, the
orientation of red and green are reversed.
‚‚ Lift RGB balance: Controls how quickly adjustments made to the Lift trackball (on the
left) will adjust the Lift Color Balance parameters in the Color page. This setting affects
third party panels.
‚‚ Lift master: Controls how quickly adjustments made to the Lift ring (surrounding the
leftmost trackball) will adjust the Lift Contrast parameter in the Color page. This setting
affects third party panels.
‚‚ Gamma RGB balance: Controls how quickly adjustments made to the Gamma trackball
(second from the left) will adjust the Gamma Color Balance parameters in the Color
page. This setting affects third party panels.
‚‚ Gamma master: Controls how quickly adjustments made to the Gamma ring
(surrounding the second trackball from the left) adjust the Gamma parameter in the
Color page. This setting affects third party panels.
‚‚ Gain RGB balance: Controls how quickly adjustments made to the Gain trackball (third
from the left) will adjust the Gain Color Balance parameters in the Color page. This
setting affects third party panels.
‚‚ Gain master: Controls how quickly adjustments made to the Gain ring (surrounding the
third trackball from the left) will adjust the Gain Contrast parameter in the Color page.
This setting affects third party panels.
‚‚ Cursor offset: Controls how quickly adjustments made to the fourth trackball affect the
cursor, window position, log-mode offset, and other controls that can be manipulated
via this trackball.
‚‚ Cursor master: Controls how quickly adjustments made to the fourth ring affect logmode master offset, and other controls that can be manipulated via this ring.
‚‚ Hue/Saturation/Luminance qualifier: Controls the sensitivity of the HSL panel
control knobs.

Display Settings
Lets you adjust the display of your Blackmagic Design control panels.
‚‚ LCD brightness: Controls the overall brightness of the DaVinci control panel displays.
‚‚ Key backlighting: Depending on which control panel you have selected, two controls
let you choose LCD Brightness and Key backlighting of the DaVinci Resolve Mini
panel, or three controls let you adjust the color balance of the lit buttons of the DaVinci
Resolve Advanced control panel (the default is red).

Part 1 – 3

Lets you choose the orientation of red on the trackballs, how sensitive trackballs and rings are,
and how sensitive the qualifier knobs are.

97

Project Settings and Preferences

Panel Sensitivity

To search for specific keyboard shortcuts:
1

Open the DaVinci Resolve Preferences, then open the User panel and choose
Keyboard Mapping from the sidebar.

2

Choose whether you want to search for a Command or a Shortcut from the Search
pop-up menu.

3

Type into the Search field, and the Keyboard Mapping list will change to show whatever
commands match the search criteria you’re entering.

Methods of creating and managing keyboard mappings:
‚‚ To create a new keyboard mapping: Choose a keyboard mapping from the popup to use as your starting point, click New, then enter a preset name in the dialog,
and click OK.
‚‚ To change the keyboard shortcut for a particular command: Find the command you
want to remap in the Keyboard Mapping list, double-click its keyboard shortcut, and
type a new one using any combination of modifier keys you like. If you remap a key
that was already assigned to another command, the previous command’s mapping is
cleared. When you’re finished changing keyboard shortcuts, click the Save button at
the bottom right of the Keyboard Mapping list.
‚‚ To export a keyboard shortcut file for use by another DaVinci Resolve workstation:
Click Export, choose a name and a location for the new file, and click Save.
‚‚ To import a keyboard shortcut file: Click Import, choose a DaVinci Resolve keyboard
shortcut file, and click Open.
‚‚ To delete a keyboard mapping: Choose a keyboard mapping to delete, then click the
trash can button.

Metadata
The metadata panel lets you create custom sets of metadata parameters that will be exposed in
the Metadata Editor. For more information on using this panel, see Chapter 9, “Using
Clip Metadata.”

Part 1 – 3

This panel lets you choose which set of keyboard shortcuts to use. Using the “Map keyboard
to” pop-up, you can choose the default DaVinci Resolve set, or one of the other sets that mimic
popular NLEs. You also have the ability to create your own custom sets of keyboard shortcuts.
A hierarchical list of commands organized by the menu they appear within lets you select
individual commands to remap, while a Search field lets you search among the available
keyboard shortcuts to find commands you want to customize.

98

Project Settings and Preferences

Keyboard Mapping

Part 1 – 4

Camera Raw
Settings

99

Camera Raw Settings

Chapter 4

Camera Raw Settings

This chapter covers the following topics:

Camera Raw Decoding Explained

101

Using ARRI ALEXA files

102

Master Settings

102

Project Settings

103

Use Camera Metadata

103

Using RED files

104

Master RED Settings

104

Master

105

Project Settings

106

Decoder Settings

108

Use Camera Metadata

109

Using Sony Raw Files

109

Master Settings

109

Project Settings

110

Use Camera Metadata

111

Using CinemaDNG files

112

Master Settings

112

Project Settings

112

Use Camera Metadata

114

Using Phantom Cine Files

115

Master Settings

115

Project Settings

115

Camera Raw Settings

This chapter discusses in detail each of the settings available for every camera raw format that
is supported in DaVinci Resolve. These settings are available in the Camera Raw panel of the
Project Settings, via a contextual menu command in the Media Pool that exposes a floating
window, or in the Camera Raw palette of the Color page.

Part 1 – 4

100

Raw
Image
Data

Camera Raw
Decoding

Color Page
Image Processing

Deliver
Page Output

Raw decoding is the very first image processing operation that takes place, and it takes place
before all other operations in the Color page, before even the Source bar in the Node Editor.
For this reason, it’s important to understand that the ideal transformation of raw image data to
DaVinci Resolve-friendly image data is one that preserves the maximum amount of image data
for continued processing. Since the 32-bit floating point accuracy of DaVinci Resolve’s image
processing pipeline preserves all transformed raw data with exceptional fidelity, the Camera
Raw parameters are primarily useful for making whatever initial adjustments will produce the
most optimum starting point for grading.
The Camera Raw panel of the Project Settings contain groups of parameters that correspond to
every camera raw media format that’s supported by DaVinci Resolve. Using these parameters in
the Camera Raw panel, you can override the original camera metadata that was written at the
time of recording, and make simultaneous adjustments to all camera raw media throughout
your project.

Camera Raw project settings

Part 1 – 4

Camera raw media formats are so named because they capture raw color space data directly
from the sensor of whatever digital cinema camera did the recording. Raw image data is not
human readable, and must be debayered or demosaiced to convert the original raw data into
image data that can be handed off to DaVinci Resolve’s image processing pipeline.

101

Camera Raw Settings

Camera Raw Decoding Explained

Part 1 – 4

102

Camera Raw Settings

Each supported camera format has different controls that are specific to that format. These
controls are also mirrored in the Camera Raw palette in the Color page, which lets you
individually adjust the Camera Raw parameters for individual clips in a Timeline when you set
Decode Using to Clip.

Camera Raw project palette in the Color page

Each group of Camera Raw settings is available from the RAW Profile menu. This description
covers the settings that are available for each of the camera raw media formats supported by
DaVinci Resolve.

Using ARRI ALEXA files
The ARRI ALEXA can record ProRes, DNxHD, or raw image data. When shooting raw, image
data is recorded straight from the Bayer sensor, and must be debayered by DaVinci Resolve.

Master Settings
ARRI ALEXA media is extremely simple to debayer. There is only one Master setting, for
determining whether or not to alter the clip decoder settings.
‚‚ Decode Quality: Lets you debayer ARRI ALEXA raw files at Full, Half, or Quarter
resolution to improve performance on slower systems. Lower resolution media is
lower quality, but faster to work with and process. If necessary, you can choose a
lower resolution setting that provides better real time playback on systems with
limited performance while you work, and then switch to a higher quality when rendering
the final output. A “Force debayer res to highest quality” checkbox in the Render
Settings list of the Deliver page makes it easy to follow this workflow.
‚‚ Decode Using: The option you select determines whether all ARRI ALEXA media
throughout the project is decoded using the original Camera Metadata settings (the
default selection), using Project settings in which you choose custom settings to be
applied to all clips, or using the ARRI default settings.
‚‚ Import Media at Open Gate Resolution: Enables DaVinci Resolve to access the
“open gate” area of clips from ALEXA cameras capable of shooting in this mode,
which produces a 3.4K image with extra area for stabilization and repositioning.

Project Settings

103

‚‚ Gain: Adjusts the white point of the media, raising or lowing it while scaling all midtone
values between it and the black point. Regardless of how you adjust this control, all
image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments. 0 is unity.
The range is –100 to +100.
‚‚ Contrast: Raising contrast reduces shadows and raises highlights, while leaving
midtones at 50 percent unaffected. Regardless of how you adjust this control, all image
data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments. 0 is unity. The
range is –100 to +100.
‚‚ Tint: Adjusts color balance to push the image between magenta and green; useful for
balancing images with a green or magenta color cast, such as fluorescent or sodium
vapor bulbs. 0 is unity. The range is –150 to +150.
‚‚ Sharpness: A debayer-specific sharpness filter applied to provide the appearance of
enhanced image detail. 0 is unity, and 10 is the default. The range is 0 to 100.
‚‚ Highlights: Makes it easy to selectively retrieve blown-out highlight detail in highdynamic-range media by lowering this parameter, and achieves a smooth blend
between the retrieved highlights and the unadjusted mid tones for a naturalistic result.
0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (maximum).
‚‚ Shadows: Lets you selectively lighten or darken shadow detail. Raising this value
retrieves shadow detail recorded below 0 percent, while leaving the midtones alone. 0
is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (very high).
‚‚ Color Boost: Lets you naturalistically raise the saturation of regions of low saturation,
sometimes referred to as a vibrance operation. Can be used also to lower the
saturation of regions of low saturation. 0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through
+100 (very high).
‚‚ Saturation: Adjusts the color intensity of the image. 0 is unity. The range is –100
(minimum) through +100 (very high).
‚‚ Midtone Detail: When this parameter is raised, the contrast of regions of the image with
high edge detail is raised to increase the perception of image sharpness, sometimes
referred to as definition. When this parameter is lowered to a negative value, regions
of the image with low amounts of detail are softened while areas of high detail are left
alone. 0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (very high).

Use Camera Metadata
The most elemental camera metadata settings for exposure and color that are available.
‚‚ Color Temp: Adjusts color balance to alter the “warmth” of the image. Adjustable in
Kelvin. Lower values correct for “warmer” lighting, while higher values correct for “cool”
lighting. +2000 is unity. The range is +2000 to +11,000.
‚‚ Exposure: Increases or lowers image lightness in units relative to ASA values. If your
intended exposure adjustment lifts image data above the maximum white level, don’t
worry; all image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments. 160
is unity. The range is +160 to +3200.

Camera Raw Settings

‚‚ Lift: Adjusts the black point of the media, raising it or lowering it while scaling all
midtone values between it and the white point. Regardless of how you adjust this
control, all image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments.
The range is –100 to +100.

Part 1 – 4

The following decoder settings let you adjust the color and exposure of ALEXA clips.

104

You can use Resolve Color Management (RCM) to automatically normalize logencoded media according to the type of media it is.
You can create your own adjustment to normalize Log-C clips as part of the grading
process, using the parameters of the Color page. This approach gives you the most
flexibility, as you’ll be making custom settings that maximize the image data that’s
available in every scene.
Alternately, you can use a LUT to normalize Log-C clips to obtain a fast starting point
for additional grading. Used in this way, LUTs can be applied either as an output LUT, if
the entire Timeline is nothing but ALEXA raw media, or as a LUT that’s applied to an
individual node of a grade, if you’re mixing ALEXA raw media with other formats. This
provides a fast and easy solution to linearizing ALEXA media that can be useful for
creating dailies for offline editing. However, one LUT may not be suitable for all clips. If
you’re applying individual LUTs to each clip, you can create multiple LUTs, each with
differing contrast settings, in order to gain the speed benefits of using LUTs, while
taking into account the individual differences among clips.
ARRI has a LUT generator available online that you can use to create custom LUTs for
use with a variety of color correction applications at: www.arri.com/camera/digital_
cameras/tools/lut_generator.html

Using RED files
R3D source media, recorded by the various models of RED DIGITAL CINEMA cameras, contains
one of the most elaborate sets of raw parameters of any of the camera formats. These settings
are divided into four different groups.

Master RED Settings
The Master RED settings are the most important, handling decode quality and the control
governing whether the original camera metadata is used, or if you’re overriding the camera
metadata project-wide with custom settings.
These settings also contain the pop-up menus that let you choose the color space and gamma
curve used to transform the raw image data into image data for processing in DaVinci Resolve
when debayering R3D clips. Which Color Space and Gamma Curve settings you use are solely
a matter of preference; there is no absolute requirement to use one or the other for any given
type of workflow. You’re simply looking for settings that provide the best starting point for the
media you have, given the type of grading you’re looking to do.
For example, in many cases combining the REDcolor3 Color Space setting and REDlog Film
gamma curve will offer a starting point that retains the most image detail with the greatest
latitude for adjustment. On the other hand, if you’re working in a hurry, for example to generate

Camera Raw Settings

ALEXA media is usually recorded using Log-C gamma and color processing, which is
very similar to the Cineon Log gamma curve, developed by Kodak to produce flatcontrast, wide-gamut image data that preserves image detail with a wide latitude for
adjustment. There is no ALEXA raw parameter to adjust this, so for Rec. 709
monitoring and deliverables you need to “normalize” Log-C clips in one of three ways.

Part 1 – 4

ARRI Media and Log-C

Master
These top settings determine the image quality that you’re choosing to extract from the R3D
source media. The tradeoff is that higher quality media at higher resolution will be more
processor-intensive to debayer, depending on your workstation’s capabilities.
‚‚ Decode Quality: Determines the image quality of the decoded R3D data that’s handed
off to the DaVinci Resolve image processing pipeline. The Decode Quality you select
has a direct impact on real time performance. Decoding performance depends entirely
on the hardware capabilities of your system. DaVinci Resolve decodes R3D files
using multi-core CPU processing, but can also decode 4K at Premium quality if you’ve
installed a RED ROCKET card. 5K R3D media requires two RED ROCKET cards or,
subject to release, a single RED ROCKET-X for the same performance. 6K R3D media
requires a RED ROCKET-X card.
If necessary, you can choose a lower quality setting that provides better real time
playback on systems with limited performance while you work, and then switch to a
higher quality when rendering the final output. A “Force debayer res to highest quality”
checkbox in the Render Settings list of the Deliver page makes it easy to follow this
workflow.
‚‚ Bit Depth: DaVinci Resolve can decode R3D files with 8-, 10-, or 16-bit image data for
processing. Choosing 16-bit for maximum quality may impact playback performance on
some hardware.
‚‚ Timecode: The timecode recorded for R3D media depends on the camera setting in
use when it was shot. There are three choices:
Camera: This setting automatically selects between Absolute and Edge depending on
what was chosen as the default timecode mode on the camera. This setting needs to
be selected before you add R3D media to the Media Pool. If you’re browsing R3D
media when you change this setting, you should refresh the folder in the Library of the
Media Pool before adding media to the Media Pool.
Absolute: The default. Records “time of day” timecode. If an external timecode source
was connected and the camera was put into Jam Sync mode, the external timecode
would have been recorded instead.
Edge: The first recorded clip for each magazine starts at 01:00:00:00, and the timecode
of each subsequent clip is recorded sequentially and continuously.
‚‚ Decode Using: The option you select determines whether all R3D media throughout
the project is decoded using the original Camera Metadata settings (the default
selection), using Project settings in which you choose custom settings to be applied to
all clips, or using the RED default settings.

Part 1 – 4

105

Camera Raw Settings

dailies for offline editing, using one of the REDcolor Color Space settings with one of the
REDgamma settings can offer an image that’s more immediately pleasing and that requires
fewer adjustments to achieve an acceptable result. These are not recommendations, they’re
only examples. As always, the ideal settings for your project depend heavily on the quality of
the source media, so you should experiment with media from your own projects to find the most
suitable results to your eye.

‚‚ Color Science: The two options are Original, which was the color science used by
early builds of the REDone camera, and Version 2, which is the current version of
color science used by the entire RED camera line. Unless you need to match the look
of older projects using the older color science, the newest color science is generally
preferable.
‚‚ Color Space: Because RED cameras record R3D data which uses a raw color space,
debayering the native R3D data requires choosing a color space to convert the raw
signal into. Bear in mind that the color space you choose is merely a starting point for
further correction. There is no requirement that you choose one or the other color
space for any given workflow. You should choose the color space that provides the
most pleasing starting point for your particular project.
DragonColor2: A further optimized version of DragonColor that is especially
recommended for underwater footage.
REDcolor4: A further optimized version of REDcolor3 that is especially recommended
for underwater footage.
REDWideGamutRGB: Part of RED’s IPP2 (image processing pipeline 2) initiative; this is
a camera color space designed to encompass all colors that can be recorded by RED
cameras without clipping, and is meant to provide a single common starting point for all
models of RED cameras, for convenient grading to HDR or SDR workflows.
Rec. 2020: Decodes into the standard color space specified by the Rec. 2020 standard
for high definition video, UHD video, and beyond. While you may find this option useful,
it is not required for programs being output to video.
Rec. 709: Decodes into the standard color space specified by the Rec. 709 standard
for high definition video. While you may find this option useful, it is not required for
programs being output to video.
sRGB: Decodes into the standard color space defined by the sRGB standard, typically
used for computer display.
Adobe1998: Decodes into Adobe’s unique version of the sRGB standard.
CameraRGB: Outputs the original, unmodified sensor data. Not a recommended
setting.
REDspace: Fits the raw R3D image data into a color space thatʼs larger than that of Rec.
709. Appropriate for digital cinema mastering and film output. REDspace was the
predecessor to the REDcolor setting.
REDcolor: A color space thatʼs similar to the Rec. 709 option, but modified to balance
accuracy with pleasing color rendition, emphasizing accurate skin tones.
REDcolor2: Similar, but less saturated than, REDcolor.
REDcolor3: Similar saturation to REDcolor, but with additional modifications to improve
the color rendition of skin tone. Introduced as the optimum color space for Epic
cameras, but also appropriate for previous generations of RED cameras.
DragonColor: A color space optimized for cameras with the RED Dragon sensor,
although this color space can be used for previous generations of RED cameras as well.

Part 1 – 4

These settings control the fundamental methods used to debayer R3D media. The selections
you make to these settings determine the basic color and contrast that you’re choosing to
extract from the camera raw image data.

106

Camera Raw Settings

Project Settings

REDlog Film: An improved logarithmic gamma setting that’s designed to remap the
original 12-bit R3D data to the standard Cineon gamma curve. This setting produces
flat-contrast image data that preserves image detail with a wide latitude for adjustment,
and is compatible with log workflows, including those intended for film output.
Linear: No gamma adjustment is made, this is a linear-to-light representation of data
from the RED camera’s sensor.
Rec. 709: A gamma curve typical for Rec. 709 display. Does not provide an abundance
of latitude for grading.
sRGB: Similar gamma setting to that employed by Rec. 709.
HDR ST.2084: The standardized gamma curve for high-dynamic-range (HDR) video.
Also referred to as the PQ curve.
BT.1886: The standardized gamma curve for standard-dynamic-range HD and UHD
display. Does not provide an abundance of latitude for grading.
Log3G12: A wide dynamic range log space developed by RED to support HDR
monitoring and grading.
Log3G10: Part of RED’s IPP2 (image processing pipeline 2) initiative; this is a wide
dynamic range log space designed to encode camera data from all RED models to a
common starting point in RWG color space, for convenient grading to HDR or SDR
workflows.
PDlog 685: A logarithmic gamma setting that maps the native 12-bit RED image data
into the linear portion of a Cineon or film transfer curve.
PDlog 985: A logarithmic gamma setting with different mappings.
Custom PDlog: A logarithmic gamma setting that exposes user adjustable Black Point,
White Point, and Gamma PDlog parameters so you can customize your own log gamma
curve.
REDspace: Similar to Rec. 709, but slightly altered to be more appealing, primarily
through higher contrast and lighter midtones. The predecessor to the REDgamma curve.
REDlog: A logarithmic gamma setting that maps the original 12-bit R3D image data to a
10-bit curve. The blacks and midtones occupying the lowest 8 bits of the video signal
maintain the same precision as in the original 12-bit data, while the highlights that
occupy the highest 4 bits are compressed. While reducing the precision of highlight
detail, the tradeoff is that there’s an abundance of precision throughout the rest of the
signal. This is a good setting for maintaining maximum latitude.
REDgamma: An improved gamma curve designed to be perceptually appealing on
displays calibrated for Rec. 709, with an improved soft roll-off in the highlights to
maintain highlight detail while grading.
REDgamma2: Similar to REDgamma, with higher contrast.
REDgamma3: The most recent iteration of the REDgamma curve. Based on a log
starting point, but with a pleasing “ready to view” contrast curve applied, designed to
be a visually pleasing starting point that maintains excellent dynamic range.
REDgamma3 is also designed to work with REDcolor3.

Part 1 – 4

REDgamma4: The latest iteration of the REDgamma curve, designed to give a good
in-camera look without the need for grading, while retaining great dynamic range and
highlight handling. REDgamma4 is suitable for all RED cameras.

107

Camera Raw Settings

‚‚ Gamma Curve: There are several options available for choosing a gamma profile to be
used when debayering the raw R3D data:

Simple: Blends the two HDRX exposures to achieve a pleasing middle ground.
Magic Motion: Uses a proprietary algorithm to combine the dual exposures to combine
overexposed and well-exposed regions of the picture in a more targeted fashion, while
blending the sharpness of the regularly exposed source with the motion blur of the
underexposed source.
‚‚ Blend Bias: Lets you adjust how much of the regular exposure and how much of the
underexposure are combined.
‚‚ Apply Metadata Curves: If the R3D media files were preprocessed in REDCINE X Pro,
and saved with color curve metadata, you can use this setting to either use or discard
that metadata.
‚‚ D.E.B. (Dragon Enhanced Blacks): A checkbox that enables the elimination of red
noise in RED cameras using the Dragon sensor.
‚‚ Embedded Audio: Enables embedded audio in R3D media.

Decoder Settings
This second group of settings contains additional controls for finessing the debayering of
RED raw image data. Many of the settings in this group are color correction adjustments, some
of which resemble analogous controls in the Color page. However, the FLUT and DRX controls
manage the exposure of the debayered media being fed to the DaVinci Resolve image
processing pipeline, and so can be used to retrieve image detail from R3D source media in
cases where the default settings are clipping or crushing detail in the highlights or shadows
that would be unavailable to DaVinci Resolve as a result.
‚‚ De-noise: Applies image-wide noise reduction. There are seven settings available,
from mild to maximum, that you can use to balance noise reduction against any
possible image degradation.
‚‚ OLPF Compensation: OLPF compensation applies a low pass filter to reduce color
moiré. There are four options: Off (the default), Low, Medium, and High.
‚‚ Image Detail: Controls the demosaicing algorithm that’s used for the software
decoding of R3D media. You can choose a level of sensor detail extraction: Low,
Medium, and High (recommended). If you’re using a RED ROCKET card, this setting is
ignored as there is a fixed algorithm that’s used.
‚‚ FLUT: A gain operation that lets you boost or attenuate the ISO in smaller increments.
0 is unity. The range is -8 to +8.
‚‚ Contrast: Raising contrast reduces shadows and raises highlights, while leaving
midtones at 50 percent unaffected. The image is compressed rather then clipped at the
limits of 100 and 0 percent. 0 is unity. The range is –1 to +1.
‚‚ Saturation: Adjusts the color intensity of the image. 1 is unity. The range is 0 (minimum)
through 5.0 (very high).
‚‚ Tint: Color balance correction for images with a green or magenta color cast, such as
fluorescent or sodium vapor bulbs. This parameter is designed specifically to adjust
RED linear light image data to make the most photometrically accurate correction. 0 is
unity. The range is -100 to +100.
‚‚ DRX: A Dynamic Range control (X) that lets you recover highlights while taking
into account Color Temperature (degrees Kelvin) and Tint. 0 is unity, and 1.0 is the
maximum value.

Part 1 – 4

None: Only the regular exposure is used.

108

Camera Raw Settings

‚‚ Blend Type: Works to control how RED HDRX media is used. When using either Simple
or Magic Motion to blend HDRX exposures, there’s no need to use the second output
in the Node Editor. You can choose from three options:

Use Camera Metadata
The most elemental camera metadata settings for exposure and color that are available.
‚‚ ISO: A gain operation that keeps the black point at 0 while raising or lowering the white
point of the image, linearly scaling everything in between. Raising the ISO results only
in boosted highlights being more compressed, no clipping will occur. 320 is unity. The
range is 50–6400.
‚‚ Exposure: Increases or lowers image lightness in units relative to ƒ-stops. Using
exposure to boost the image beyond 100 or to lower it below 0 will clip, not compress,
the image data that’s passed along to the DaVinci Resolve image processing pipeline.
0 is unity. The range is –7 to +7.
‚‚ Color Temp: Designed to alter the “warmth” of the image while keeping white elements
of the scene looking neutral. Adjustable in degrees Kelvin. Lower values correct
for “warmer” lighting, while higher values correct for “cool” lighting. This parameter
is designed specifically to adjust RED linear light image data to make the most
photometrically accurate correction. 5600 is unity. The range is 1700 to 10,000.

Using Sony Raw Files
Sony makes several digital cinema cameras, such as the F65 and F55, that record wide latitude,
high-gamut media either using Sony’s 12-bit SR codec, or as 16-bit raw media files. Since Sony’s
cameras do not use a traditional Bayer pattern, special debayering is necessary when working
with F65 raw media, and the image data is demosaiced using the following raw controls and
parameters.

Master Settings
These parameters let you choose the decode quality, white balance, color space, and gamma
that Sony raw clips will be transformed to use when debayered.
‚‚ Decode Quality: Determines the image quality of the decoded Sony raw data that’s
handed off to the DaVinci Resolve image processing pipeline regardless of the
Play Quality setting. The Decode Resolution you select has a direct impact on real
time performance, and decoding performance depends entirely on the hardware
capabilities of your system.
If necessary, you can choose a lower resolution setting that provides better real time
playback on systems with limited performance while you work, and then switch to a
higher quality when rendering the final output. A “Force debayer res to highest quality”
checkbox in the Render Settings list of the Deliver page makes it easy to follow this
workflow.
‚‚ Decode Using: The option you select determines whether all F65 media throughout
the project is decoded using the original Camera Metadata settings (the default
selection), using Project settings in which you choose custom settings to be applied to
all clips, or using the Sony default settings.

Part 1 – 4

‚‚ Brightness: Adjusts image lightness. Image data is compressed rather then clipped at
100 and 0 percent. 0 is unity. The range is –10 to +10.

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Camera Raw Settings

‚‚ Shadow: Provides control over the toe (low range) of the FLUT adjustment. 0 is unity.
The range is -2 to +2.

‚‚ White Balance: Designed to very subtly alter the “warmth” of the image. Adjustable in
degrees Kelvin. Lower values correct for “warmer” lighting, while higher values correct
for “cool” lighting. +5500 is unity. The range is +3200 to +5500.
‚‚ Color Space: Two color spaces are adjustable, depending on your intended workflow:
Rec. 709: Decodes into the standard color space specified by the Rec. 709 standard
for high definition video.
P3 D60: Decodes RGB-encoded image data with a D60 white point, intended for
monitoring with a P3-compatible display.
SGamut: Decodes into Sony’s wider S-gamut color space, designed to provide the
widest range of image data for adjustment.
SGamut3: The gamut is identical to SGamut, but color reproduction is more accurate,
according to Sony’s “Technical Summary for S-Gamut3Cine/S-Log3 and
S-Gamut3/S-Log3” whitepaper.
SGamut3.Cine: According to Sony’s “Technical Summary for S-Gamut3Cine/S-Log3
and S-Gamut3/S-Log3” whitepaper, S-Gamut3.Cine is designed to provide a more
traditionally log-encoded workflow with color reproduction that is slightly wider than
the P3 gamut.
P3: Decodes to a RGB-encoded image data with a D61 white point, intended for use
when outputting media for DCI mastering.
‚‚ Gamma: Five gamma settings are available, depending on what starting point you want
to use for further grading.
Gamma 2.4: A simple power-function gamma setting commonly used for broadcast.
Gamma 2.6: A simple power-function gamma setting commonly used for digital cinema
projection.
Rec. 709: A gamma curve typical for Rec. 709 display.
SLog: Not designed for viewing, Sony’s SLog gammas are designed to provide a wide
latitude for grading; 14-stops according to Sony. 18% gray is at 38%.
SLog2: This version has a half stop offset from SLog to allow for a higher dynamic
range. 18% gray is at 32%.
SLog3: An “easier to grade” version of SLog. 18% gray is at 40%. According to Sony’s
“Technical Summary for S-Gamut3Cine/S-Log3 and S-Gamut3/S-Log3,” SLog3 is
designed to provide a more traditionally log-encoded workflow, with a gamma curve
that is similar, but not identical, to Cineon workflows.
Linear: A simple linear gamma setting.
‚‚ Lift: Adjusts the black point of the media, raising it or lowering it while scaling all
midtone values between it and the white point. Regardless of how you adjust this
control, all image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments.
The range is –100 to +100.
‚‚ Gain: Adjusts the white point of the media, raising or lowing it while scaling all midtone
values between it and the black point. Regardless of how you adjust this control, all
image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments. 0 is unity.
The range is –100 to +100.
‚‚ Contrast: Raising contrast reduces shadows and raises highlights, while leaving
midtones at 50 percent unaffected. Regardless of how you adjust this control, all image
data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments. 0 is unity. The
range is –100 to +100.

Part 1 – 4

These settings control the fundamental methods used to debayer Sony raw media. The
selections you make to these settings determine the basic color and contrast that you’re
choosing to extract from the camera raw image data.

110

Camera Raw Settings

Project Settings

‚‚ Highlights: Makes it easy to selectively retrieve blown-out highlight detail in highdynamic-range media by lowering this parameter, and achieves a smooth blend
between the retrieved highlights and the unadjusted mid tones for a naturalistic result.
0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (maximum).
‚‚ Shadows: Lets you selectively lighten or darken shadow detail. Raising this value
retrieves shadow detail recorded below 0 percent, while leaving the midtones alone. 0
is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (very high).
‚‚ Color Boost: Lets you naturalistically raise the saturation of regions of low saturation,
sometimes referred to as a vibrance operation. Can be used also to lower the
saturation of regions of low saturation. 0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through
+100 (very high).
‚‚ Saturation: Adjusts the color intensity of the image. 0 is unity. The range is –100
(minimum) through +100 (very high).
‚‚ Midtone Detail: When this parameter is raised, the contrast of regions of the image with
high edge detail is raised to increase the perception of image sharpness, sometimes
referred to as definition. When this parameter is lowered to a negative value, regions
of the image with low amounts of detail are softened while areas of high-detail are left
alone. 0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (very high).

Use Camera Metadata
The most elemental camera metadata settings for exposure and color that are available.
‚‚ Exposure: Increases or lowers image lightness in units relative to ASA values. If your
intended exposure adjustment lifts image data above the maximum white level, don’t
worry; all image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments.
+800 is unity. The range is +1 to +65,535.
‚‚ Color Temp: Designed to alter the “warmth” of the image. Adjustable in degrees
Kelvin. Lower values correct for “warmer” lighting, while higher values correct for “cool”
lighting. +6500 is unity. The range is +2000 to +50,000.

Sony Media and SLog
Sony’s proprietary SLog gamma setting, which produces flat-contrast, wide-gamut
image data that preserves image detail with a wide latitude for adjustment, is also
available on some other Sony cameras. Similarly to working with clips using the ARRI
ALEXA’s Log-C gamma, you need to normalize SLog clips by using Resolve Color
Management (RCM), by making a manual adjustment to color and contrast, or by
applying a LUT, using the same techniques discussed previously.
When applying a LUT, there are two methods that Sony recommends. A 1D LUT can be
used to transform SLog clips into the standard Cineon (or Log-C) curve if your ultimate
goal is to output Log media for film printing. If you’re planning to output to a normalized
format, you can use a dedicated LUT to make this transformation.
For more information, search the web for Sony’s document “SLog: A new LUT for
digital production mastering and interchange applications.”

Part 1 – 4

‚‚ Sharpness: A debayer-specific sharpness filter applied to provide the appearance of
enhanced image detail. 20 is unity. The range is 0 to 100.

111

Camera Raw Settings

‚‚ Tint: Color balance correction for images with a green or magenta color cast, such as
fluorescent or sodium vapor bulbs. 0 is unity. The range is –150 to +150.

DaVinci Resolve version 11.2.1 introduced improved debayering for raw CinemaDNG media
acquired using any of the Blackmagic Design cameras. The “Apply Pre Tone Curve” setting
controls whether you’re using the older debayering method (when turned on), or the newer,
visually improved debayering method (when turned off).

Master Settings
These parameters let you choose the decode quality, white balance, color space, and gamma
that raw CinemaDNG clips will be transformed to use when debayered.
‚‚ Decode Quality: Lets you debayer CinemaDNG raw files at Full, Half, or Quarter
resolution to improve performance on slower systems. Lower resolution media is
lower quality, but faster to work with and process. If necessary, you can choose a
lower resolution setting that provides better real time playback on systems with limited
performance while you work, and then switch to a higher quality when rendering the
final output. A “Force debayer res to highest quality” checkbox in the Render Settings
list of the Deliver page makes it easy to follow this workflow.
‚‚ Decode Using: The option you select determines whether all CinemaDNG media
throughout the project is decoded using the original Camera Metadata settings (the
default selection), using Project settings in which you choose custom settings to be
applied to all clips, or using the CinemaDNG default settings.
‚‚ Apply Pre Tone Curve: When this checkbox is turned off (the default for new projects
created in DaVinci Resolve 11.2.1 or later), DaVinci Resolve debayers CinemaDNG raw
media using an improved method that delivers better-looking results, specifically for
media acquired using any of the Blackmagic Design cameras. When this checkbox is
turned on (the default for projects created in earlier versions of DaVinci Resolve), the
older debayering method is reenabled for backward compatibility. However, turning
Pre Tone Curve on may also provide better results for CinemaDNG raw files coming
from other sources. If you’re importing .dng media from cameras other than those from
Blackmagic Design, you should try both settings to see which type of debayering you
prefer.
‚‚ Apply Soft Clip: This checkbox is only available when Apply Pre Tone Curve is turned
off. When turned on, high dynamic range parts of the signal (super-white highlights) are
brought back into the picture as visible image detail you can adjust, similar to using the
Highlights control to retrieve these otherwise clipped parts of the signal.

Project Settings
CinemaDNG has a variety of settings that can be adjusted to alter the image quality of the
debayered result. The Color Temp and Tint parameters are only available if the White Balance
pop-up menu is set to Custom.
‚‚ White Balance: The first seven options offer White Balance presets, which
automatically adjust the Color Temp and Tint parameters. These options include
Daylight, Cloudy, Shade, Tungsten, Fluorescent, and Flash. An eighth option, Custom,
makes the Color Temp and Tint parameters user-adjustable.

Part 1 – 4

CinemaDNG is an open format capable of high-resolution raw image data with a wide dynamic
range, and is one of the formats recorded by the Blackmagic Design Camera when you shoot in
raw mode. CinemaDNG images are decoded with full dynamic range when the Highlight
Recovery checkbox is selected.

112

Camera Raw Settings

Using CinemaDNG files

P3 D60: Decodes into the standard P3 color space specified by the DCI standard for
digital cinema projection.
Blackmagic Design: Decodes into a log-encoded color space that remaps the raw data
into an approximation of the Log-C standard. Choosing Blackmagic Design Film also
forces the Gamma setting to Blackmagic Design Film. This setting produces flatcontrast image data that preserves image detail with a wide latitude for adjustment,
which is suitable as a starting point for detailed grading, and is also compatible with log
workflows intended for film output.
‚‚ Gamma: Five gamma settings are available, depending on what starting point you want
to use for further grading.
2.4: A simple power-function gamma setting commonly used for broadcast.
2.6: A simple power-function gamma setting commonly used for digital cinema
projection.
Rec. 709: A gamma of 2.35, with a linear segment near black, approximating the EBU
recommended gamma for broadcast.
sRGB: A gamma of 2.2, with a linear segment near black, intended for reproduction on
computer displays alongside the sRGB color space.
Linear: A simple linear gamma setting.
Blackmagic Design Film: A log-encoded gamma setting that approximates Cineon
encoding, the main difference being that more data is encoded in the darkest portion
of the Blackmagic Design Film signal. When you choose this setting, the appropriate
variation of gamma will be applied based on your particular sensor, be it 4K or 4.6K.
Blackmagic Design Video: A normalized gamma setting that provides a fast starting
point for grading if you don’t want to begin with a log-encoded image.
‚‚ ISO: A gain operation that keeps the black point at 0 while raising or lowering the white
point of the image, linearly scaling everything in between. Raising the ISO can push
image values above maximum white, but these values are not permanently clipped and
are retrievable using the Highlights parameter, or using later adjustments. This control’s
default value and range is dependent on the type of camera the media was shot with.
You should also know that different log curves are applied to 4.6K media depending on
which ISO you choose, to deliver the best possible output.
‚‚ Highlight Recovery: A checkbox that lets you include additional highlight sensor
data that’s usually clipped by the standard decoding matrix. In cases where you have
extremely clipped highlights, you may obtain additional image detail this way, although
it may have unusual color artifacts.
‚‚ Tint: Color balance correction for images with a green or magenta color cast, such as
fluorescent or sodium vapor bulbs. 0 is unity. The range is –150 to +150.
‚‚ Sharpness: A debayer-specific sharpness filter applied to provide the appearance of
enhanced image detail. 20 is unity. The range is 0 to 100.
‚‚ Highlights: Makes it easy to selectively retrieve blown-out highlight detail in highdynamic-range media by lowering this parameter, and achieves a smooth blend
between the retrieved highlights and the unadjusted midtones for a naturalistic result.
0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (maximum).
‚‚ Shadows: Lets you selectively lighten or darken shadow detail. Raising this value
retrieves shadow detail recorded below 0 percent, while leaving the midtones alone.
0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (very high).

113

Part 1 – 4

Rec. 709: Decodes into the standard color space specified by the Rec. 709 standard
for high definition video.

Camera Raw Settings

‚‚ Color Space: Two color spaces are adjustable, depending on your intended workflow:

‚‚ Midtone Detail: When this parameter is raised, the contrast of regions of the image with
high edge detail is raised to increase the perception of image sharpness, sometimes
referred to as definition. When this parameter is lowered to a negative value, regions
of the image with low amounts of detail are softened while areas of high-detail are left
alone. 0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (very high).
‚‚ Lift: Adjusts the black point of the media, raising it or lowering it while scaling all
midtone values between it and the white point. Regardless of how you adjust this
control, all image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments.
The range is –100 to +100.
‚‚ Gain: Adjusts the white point of the media, raising or lowing it while scaling all midtone
values between it and the black point. Regardless of how you adjust this control, all
image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments. 0 is unity.
The range is –100 to +100.
‚‚ Contrast: Raising contrast reduces shadows and raises highlights, while leaving
midtones at 50 percent unaffected. Regardless of how you adjust this control, all image
data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments. 0 is unity. The
range is –100 to +100.

Use Camera Metadata
The most elemental camera metadata settings for exposure and color that are available.
‚‚ Exposure: Increases or lowers image lightness in units relative to ƒ-stops. If your
intended exposure adjustment lifts image data above the maximum white level, don’t
worry; all image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments.
0 is unity. The range is –5 to +5.
‚‚ Color Temp: Designed to alter the “warmth” of the image. Adjustable in Kelvin. Lower
values correct for “warmer” lighting, while higher values correct for “cool” lighting.
+6500 is unity. The range is +2000 to +50,000.

CinemaDNG Files and Blackmagic Design Film
Blackmagic Design’s logarithmically-encoded Blackmagic Design Film gamma setting,
which produces flat-contrast, wide-gamut image data that preserves image detail with
a wide latitude for adjustment, is a modified version of the standard Cineon curve.
However, the modifications are designed to emphasize the strengths of the sensors
used by the Blackmagic Design cameras. Similarly to working with clips using Cineon,
the ARRI ALEXA’s Log-C gamma, or Sony’s proprietary S-Log or S-Log2 formats, you
need to normalize clips using Blackmagic Design Film by using Resolve Color
Management (RCM), by making a manual adjustment to color and contrast, or by
applying a LUT, using the same techniques discussed previously.

Part 1 – 4

‚‚ Saturation: Adjusts the color intensity of the image. 0 is unity. The range is –100
(minimum) through +100 (very high).

114

Camera Raw Settings

‚‚ Color Boost: Lets you naturalistically raise the saturation of regions of low saturation,
sometimes referred to as a vibrance operation. Can be used also to lower the
saturation of regions of low saturation. 0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through
+100 (very high).

Master Settings
These parameters let you choose the decode quality, white balance, color space, and gamma
that raw Phantom Cine clips will be transformed to use when debayered.
‚‚ Decode Using: The option you select determines whether all Phantom Cine media
throughout the project is decoded using the original Camera Metadata settings
(the default selection), using Project settings in which you choose custom settings to be
applied to all clips, or using the Cine default settings.
‚‚ Timecode: There are four types of timecode that Phantom Cine files can be set to use:
Set to zero: Camera timecode is ignored, instead using a simple frame count with the
first frame considered 0.
Time of day (Local): Time of day timecode recording.
Time of day (GMT): Time of day timecode recording based on Greenwich Mean Time.
SMPTE: Standard SMPTE timecode.

Project Settings
The the following settings for exposure, color, and sharpness are available.
‚‚ Gamma: Three options are available for setting the gamma of the debayered output:
Rec. 709
Log 1
Log 2
‚‚ Lift: Adjusts the black point of the media, raising it or lowering it while scaling all
midtone values between it and the white point. Regardless of how you adjust this
control, all image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments.
The range is –100 to +100.
‚‚ Gain: Adjusts the white point of the media, raising or lowing it while scaling all midtone
values between it and the black point. Regardless of how you adjust this control, all
image data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments. 0 is unity.
The range is –100 to +100.
‚‚ Contrast: Raising contrast reduces shadows and raises highlights, while leaving
midtones at 50 percent unaffected. Regardless of how you adjust this control, all image
data is preserved and can be retrieved in subsequent adjustments. 0 is unity. The
range is –100 to +100.
‚‚ Sharpness: A debayer-specific sharpness filter applied to provide the appearance of
enhanced image detail. 20 is unity. The range is 0 to 100.
‚‚ Highlights: Makes it easy to selectively retrieve blown-out highlight detail in
high‑dynamic-range media by lowering this parameter, and achieves a smooth blend
between the retrieved highlights and the unadjusted mid tones for a naturalistic result.
0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (maximum).
‚‚ Shadows: Lets you selectively lighten or darken shadow detail. Raising this value
retrieves shadow detail recorded below 0 percent, while leaving the midtones alone.
0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (very high).

Part 1 – 4

The Phantom line of high-speed digital cinema cameras record wide latitude, high-gamut media
using the Cine Raw format.

115

Camera Raw Settings

Using Phantom Cine Files

‚‚ Midtone Detail: When this parameter is raised, the contrast of regions of the image with
high edge detail is raised to increase the perception of image sharpness, sometimes
referred to as definition. When this parameter is lowered to a negative value, regions
of the image with low amounts of detail are softened while areas of high detail are left
alone. 0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through +100 (very high).

Part 1 – 4

‚‚ Saturation: Adjusts the color intensity of the image. 0 is unity. The range is –100
(minimum) through +100 (very high).

116

Camera Raw Settings

‚‚ Color Boost: Lets you naturalistically raise the saturation of regions of low saturation,
sometimes referred to as a vibrance operation. Can be used also to lower the
saturation of regions of low saturation. 0 is unity. The range is –100 (minimum) through
+100 (very high).

Part 1 – 5

Improving
Performance,
Proxies,
and the
Render Cache
Improving Performance, Proxies, and the Render Cacher

Chapter 5
117

Improving Performance, Proxies,
and the Render Cache

Understanding the GPU Status Display

119

Prioritizing Audio or Video Playback in the Edit Page

119

Performance Mode Improves Overall Performance

120

Proxy Mode Improves Effects Performance

120

Reducing Decode Quality Improves Raw Performance

121

Optimized Media Improves Overall Performance

121

Creating Optimized Media

122

Seeing Which Clips Have Been Optimized

122

Optimized Media for Raw Source Clips

122

Customizing the Type of Optimized Media You Create

123

Switching Between Optimized and Original Media

124

Rediscovering Lost Optimized Media

124

Deleting Optimized Media

124

Using Optimized Media for Delivery

125

The Smart Cache Improves Effects Performance

125

How Cached Media is Organized

126

Choosing a Cache Format and Location

127

When Caching Happens

128

The Difference Between the Smart Cache and User Cache Modes

128

Manually Choosing What to Cache

129

Clearing Cached Media

130

Using Cached Media When Rendering in the Deliver Page

130

Other Project Settings That Improve Performance

131

Improving Performance, Proxies, and the Render Cacher

DaVinci Resolve is a high-performance piece of software designed to enable real time effects
on a variety of workstations. This section describes the various ways you can monitor your
performance to make sure you’re maintaining real time playback, along with different methods
of optimizing real time performance, including using on-the-fly proxies and the background
Render Cache.

Part 1 – 5

118

Frame rate and GPU indication,
green is good

A green status indicator shows there is plenty of GPU processing headroom available. As the
GPU resources is increasingly taxed, this green graph eventually turns red to show that the
available GPU power is insufficient for consistent real time playback.

Red indicates that playback is at
slower than real time

Eventually, as you add more and more effects and corrections, you’ll reach the limits of
available performance, forcing DaVinci Resolve to either drop frames, or play video at a slower
speed in order to maintain high image quality, shown by the red FPS indicator.
When real time performance falls short, DaVinci Resolve provides a variety of controls and
options that let you enhance real time playback and effects. Each is useful for different
situations, and all can work together so you can choose the best trade-off between image
quality and performance while you work. All of these methods can be set up to have no effect
on your delivered output.

Prioritizing Audio or Video
Playback in the Edit Page
When available processing power is insufficient to play the clip or clips at the position of the
playhead due to the grade, transforms, or effects that are applied at that moment in the
Timeline, you have the ability to choose exactly how performance in Resolve degrades, by
turning the “Show All Video Frames” on or off in the Option menu of the Edit page Viewers.
‚‚ Show All Video Frames off: The default setting, ideal for video editing. Prioritizes audio
playback at the expense of dropping video frames when processing power is tight,
resulting in a more conventional playback experience.
‚‚ Show All Video Frames on: An alternate setting that’s ideal when you’re doing effects
work, for which you need to see every single frame play back, sequentially. Audio
quality is compromised while every frame of video plays in slower-than-real-time, if
necessary, to maintain playback.
Keep in mind that this setting only affects playback when GPU performance is lacking. In areas
of the Timeline where performance is adequate, playback remains uncompromised.

Part 1 – 5

Every viewer in Resolve exposes a a GPU status indicator and a frame-per-second (FPS) meter,
which appears in the Viewer’s title bar, which shows you your workstation’s performance
whenever playback is initiated. Since DaVinci Resolve uses one or more GPUs (graphics
processing units) to handle all image processing and effects, the GPU status display shows you
how much processing power is being used by whichever clip is playing.

119

Improving Performance, Proxies, and the Render Cacher

Understanding the GPU Status Display

Performance Mode Improves
Overall Performance

While Performance Mode is turned on, DaVinci Resolve always outputs to video and renders in
the Delivery page and processes via the Media Management command at the highest quality,
so there is no compromise in your output. Creative Editors and Audio Mixers can leave this
on always.
Finishing Editors and Colorists might notice subtle differences between the image on your
computer monitor on less powerful computers when Performance Mode is on versus when it’s
off, which is why this setting can be disabled for instances where GUI interactivity is less
important than your on-screen display.

Proxy Mode Improves
Effects Performance
If you don’t want to either drop frames or play at slower then real time speed whenever the GPU
Status indicator is in the red, an immediate way of improving performance is to turn on the Use
Proxies option in the View menu. Using Proxies reduces processing demands by taking
advantage of the resolution independence of Resolve to lower the resolution of your clips
on-the-fly, thereby increasing real time playback performance without the need to spend time
caching part or all of the timeline, or create optimized media (both discussed later).
To turn Use Proxies on and off, do one of the following:
‚‚ Choose Playback > Proxy Mode > Half Resolution, Quarter Resolution, or None.
‚‚ Press PROXY ON/OFF on the T-bar panel of the DaVinci control panel (Defaults to
the last proxy resolution you selected from the menu. Half is the default if you haven’t
selected a resolution yet.).
Turning on one of the proxy resolutions reduces the working resolution by either half or a
quarter of whatever the current Timeline resolution is for your project. Working at a temporarily
reduced resolution increases your workstation’s real time performance, while the resolution
independence of Resolve guarantees that every window you draw and sizing operation you
make scales correctly to the actual resolution of your project.
Proxy Resolution

Width

Height

Full 8K UHD

7680

4320

Full UHD/Half 8K UHD

3840

2160

Full-HD/Half UHD/Quarter 8K UHD

1920

1080

Half-HD/Quarter UHD/Eighth 8K UHD

960

540

Quarter-HD/Eighth UHD/Sixteenth 8K UHD

480

270

Table of half and quarter proxy resolutions for different television frame sizes

Improving Performance, Proxies, and the Render Cacher

On by default, Performance Mode (Playback > Performance Mode) analyzes your computer’s
configuration, the CPU, GPU, connected video interface, etcetera, and automatically tunes
DaVinci Resolve’s under-the-hood image processing settings to provide the best interactivity
on your machine. On less powerful computers, Performance Mode dramatically improves the
experience of editing, mixing, and grading.

Part 1 – 5

120

‚‚ Decode Quality: Camera raw formats such as R3D and F65 can be debayered at
different levels of quality. For higher real time performance, you can choose a lower
quality setting while you work, and then switch to a higher quality when rendering
the final output. A “Force debayer res to highest quality” checkbox in the Advanced
settings of the Video Panel of the Render Settings list in the Deliver page makes it easy
to follow this workflow.
‚‚ Play Quality: This option provides the additional ability to set a lower resolution
for debayering during playback than for when the playhead is stopped. By default
playback uses the same setting as the Decode Quality pop-up menu.
Options for reducing resolution vary by format, but at the very least include full, half, and quarter
resolution (R3D and Sony Raw have options for full, half, quarter, eighth, and sixteenth). The one
exception is the Phantom Cine format, which doesn’t have Decode Quality options at all.
If you reduce the Decode Quality of raw media formats in your project to improve performance,
you can use the “Force debayer res to highest quality” checkbox in the Render Settings list of
the Deliver page to ensure that Resolve renders all raw formats at the highest quality available,
so you don’t have to worry about forgetting to change the decode quality back when it’s time
to render.

Optimized Media Improves
Overall Performance
If you’re editing or grading processor-intensive media such as camera raw or H.264 sourced
media or 8K raw media, you can create pre-rendered, optimized media in one of a variety of
finishing formats that lets you work more efficiently, by seamlessly turning slow-to-decode
media formats into a more processor-efficient format and resolution, and giving you the ability
to easily switch your project back and forth between these optimized “proxy” files and the
original source media.
The advantage of using optimized media to help you work faster is that it’s pre-generated,
meaning you can render it once and then use the files for the duration of your work in that
project (unless you change the debayering settings of the raw media). Also, optimized media
improves the playback performance of clips throughout Resolve, including in the Media page
and in the Media Pool and Source Viewer of the Edit page, whereas the similar but different
Source Cache component of the Smart Cache only improves the performance of clips that are
already in the Timeline by caching them at the Timeline resolution. This makes optimized media
ideal for editing workflows of all kinds.

Part 1 – 5

The Use Proxy command will improve performance when grades and effects are responsible
for your project’s slower than real time playback, but Use Proxy won’t help when real time
performance is being used up by the need to debayer raw media. The only way to improve
playback performance for debayered clips without taking the time to either generate optimized
media or render to the Source Cache by enabling the Smart Cache is to open the Camera Raw
panel of the Project Settings, and reduce the Decode Quality and/or Play Quality of the raw
media formats you’re using:

121

Improving Performance, Proxies, and the Render Cacher

Reducing Decode Quality
Improves Raw Performance

You have the option of choosing the Resolution and Format of the optimized media
you create, using controls in the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings. Be
aware that the format you choose will determine whether out-of-bounds image data is
preserved when the signal is optimized. If you find that image data (typically bright
highlights) are clipped after optimizing, you should switch to 16-bit float, ProRes 4444,
or ProRes 4444 XQ; in particular, any of these three codecs are appropriate for
HDR grading.

Creating Optimized Media
Creating optimized media to work with is easy. Resolve automatically manages the relationship
between source clips and the optimized media you create, so all you need to do is choose
which clips to make optimized media for. You can manually choose which clips to optimize, or
you can use a Smart Bin to collect all of the media corresponding to one or more formats you
need to optimize to gather it procedurally. In either case, this gives you the option of only
optimizing clips in formats that require optimization, saving you time.
For example, if you’re editing a project that consists half of camera raw media, and half of
DNxHD media, you probably only need to optimize the camera raw media, so you can create a
Smart Bin that gathers all of it, based on Resolution, Codec, File Name, or whatever other
metadata is appropriate. Once gathered, it’s an easy thing to select all of these clips in
preparation for the next step.
To create optimized media for one or more selected clips:
Right-click one of the selected clips, and choose Generate Optimized Media from the
contextual menu.
All optimized media is written to the same directory as the Cache files are written, which
defaults to the first scratch disk listed in the Preference dialog’s Media Storage panel. The
location of Cache and Optimized files is also selectable via the “Cache files location” setting in
the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings.

Seeing Which Clips Have Been Optimized
If you want to check to see which clips have been optimized, an Optimized Media column in the
list view of the Media Pool will be populated with the resolution of whatever optimized media
you’ve created (Original, Half, Quarter, etcetera). Clips that have not been optimized appear
with “None.”

Optimized Media for Raw Source Clips
In general, once you create optimized media, Resolve keeps track of it and continues using it
regardless of whatever changes you make to your project, including changing the Timeline
resolution. However, any change to the camera raw settings of optimized clips will automatically
discard the optimized media, requiring you to re-generate optimized media for them.

Improving Performance, Proxies, and the Render Cacher

Choose the Right Optimized Media Format for Your Project

Part 1 – 5

122

Options available for creating Optimized media in
the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings

There are two settings at the top of the Optimized Media section:
‚‚ Resolution: Lets you choose whether to create optimized media at the same size
as your original media files (by choosing Original), or to reduce the bandwidth of
your optimized media further by reducing its resolution by a Half, Quarter, Eighth,
or Sixteenth. The “Choose automatically” option tries to balance visual quality with
efficiency by only reducing the resolution of media files that are larger than the
currently selected Timeline resolution, using whatever reduction ratio best matches the
Timeline resolution.
‚‚ Format: Lets you choose the format and codec with which to generate optimized
media. Options include Uncompressed 10-bit and Uncompressed 16-bit float for
maximum quality, which stores image data in the optimized and proprietary .dvcc image
format. Other options include ProRes Proxy through 4444 XQ, and DNxHR LB through
444. Be aware that the format you choose will determine whether out-of-bounds
image data is preserved when the signal is optimized. If you find that image data
(typically super-white levels) are clipped after optimization, you should switch to 16-bit
float, ProRes 4444, or ProRes 4444 XQ; in particular, any of these three codecs are
appropriate optimized formats for HDR grading.
The “Choose automatically” option of the Resolution setting bears a bit more explanation.
When selected, only source media with a higher resolution than the selected Timeline
resolution will generate downsized optimized media. How much each clip will be downsized
depends on how much larger each clip is than the Timeline resolution. For example, if you’re
working within a 1080 resolution project, then 8K clips will generate quarter-resolution
optimized media, and 4K clips will generate half-resolution optimized media, such that all
optimized media is somewhere around 1080 resolution. All clips that are 1080 and smaller
generate optimized media at the same resolution as the source clips.
In the example of a 4K project, 8K clips will generate half-resolution optimized media, and all
other clips that are 4K and smaller will generate optimized media at the same resolution as the
source clips.

Part 1 – 5

The Master Settings panel of the Project Settings has a set of controls that govern what kind of
media files are created when you create optimized media.

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Customizing the Type of Optimized Media You Create

Height

Full 8K UHD

7680

4320

Full UHD/Half 8K UHD

3840

2160

Full-HD/Half UHD/Quarter 8K UHD

1920

1080

Half-HD/Quarter UHD/Eighth 8K UHD

960

540

Quarter-HD/Eighth UHD/Sixteenth 8K UHD

480

270

Eighth-HD/Sixteenth UHD

240

135

Table of optimized resolutions for different television frame sizes

Switching Between Optimized and Original Media
Choosing whether or not you’re using optimized media is easy. Simply choose Playback > Use
Optimized Media if Available to switch your entire project between using optimized media (if it’s
been generated), or the original media. Furthermore, a checkbox in the Render Settings of the
Deliver page lets you choose whether you want to use optimized media to speed up rendering,
or render using the original media only.

NOTE: Optimized media is not included in Media Management operations, nor is it
included as part of Archive operations in the Project Manager.

Rediscovering Lost Optimized Media
It’s difficult, but it is possible to lose track of optimized media you’ve generated in certain rare
circumstances. For example, if you generate optimized media on another workstation, but failed
to save the project, DaVinci Resolve may lose the relationship between the clips in the Media
Pool and the optimized media files you created. In these cases, it’s possible to rediscover the
optimized media so you don’t have to regenerate it.
To rediscover lost optimized media:
Select the clips in the Media Pool for which you know you have optimized media, then
right-click one of the selected clips and choose Rediscover Optimized Media from the
contextual menu.

Deleting Optimized Media
The optimized media you generate within a project is persistent; it’s saved for future use even
when the project is closed and later reopened. If you need to delete optimized media to free up
space on your scratch volume, you can do so with a single command.
To clear optimized media:
Open the project, and choose Playback > Delete Optimized Media.

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Proxy Resolution

The Smart Cache Improves
Effects Performance
Another option for achieving real time performance when the GPU Status indicator is in the red
due either to Timeline effects, Color page grading, or processor-intensive media in the
Timeline, is to use the Smart Cache or User Cache modes of the Render Cache. What DaVinci
Resolve calls caching is sometimes referred to by other applications as “rendering.” Both terms
refer to the behind-the-scenes creation of new media, with all effects “baked in,” that DaVinci
Resolve can play back in real time, as opposed to making DaVinci Resolve play the original
source media while processing intensive effects at the same time and risking dropped frames
as a result.
The DaVinci Resolve Smart Cache automatically renders and caches processor-intensive
grades, or clips that you manually flag for caching when right-clicking any clip in the Color page
or Edit page timeline and enabling the Render Cache Clip Output option. When Smart Cache is
enabled, frames of each automatically or manually flagged clip are cached as they play, or
automatically cached whenever you pause work, to the “Cache files location” specified in the
Master Settings panel of the Project Settings.

The settings governing caching in the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings

Once you’ve cached part of the Timeline using either mode, these clips play back in real time
until they’re modified, which triggers the need to re-cache.
To use clip caching on any page, do one of the following:
‚‚ Choose Playback > Render Cache > Smart to set DaVinci Resolve to automatically
cache computationally intensive effects.
‚‚ Choose Playback > Render Cache > User to set DaVinci Resolve to only cache clips
and effects that you manually choose to cache.
‚‚ Choose Playback > Render Cache > Off to disable all render caching.
‚‚ In the Color and Edit pages, press Option-R to cycle among Off, Smart, and User.
‚‚ Press CACHE MODE on the T-bar panel of the DaVinci control panel to toggle among
the available options..

Part 1 – 5

An option in the More options section of the Render Settings in the the Deliver page, “Use
Optimized Media,” lets you output using Optimized Media, rather then the original media, in
order to save rendering time. If you’re planning on using this option, it’s advisable to set the
Optimized media format to a suitably high-quality format to guarantee the best results.

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Using Optimized Media for Delivery

126

How Cached Media is Organized
The cache mechanism in DaVinci Resolve actually comprises three independently managed
media caches that interact with one another. This is done to keep you working quickly by
ensuring that changes you make to your timeline don’t require a grade to be re-cached, and
that changes you make to a grade don’t require the timeline to be re-cached. The three levels
of caching are:

First, the Source Cache
Caches the portion of each source media file that appears in the Timeline in its pre-graded
state at the Timeline resolution. By caching media formats that DaVinci Resolve considers to be
processor-intensive to decode, such as H.264 and various raw camera formats, as well as any
clip with Speed or Retime effects applied to them, you’ll experience vastly improved editing
and grading performance. At any time, you have the option to turn the Source Cache on or off
for individual clips, or for multiple selected clips all at once. This lets you switch between using
the native source format of each clip, or the cache format you’ve chosen.
The advantage of the Source Cache over Optimized Media is that you only cache clips that are
used in a timeline, which is ideal for finishing workflows. However, the Smart and User caches
aren’t useful for speeding up work done with source media in the Media Pool and Source
Viewer when you’re at the very beginning of an edit; that’s what Optimized Media is for (as
described in the previous section).
If Optimized media exists for a given clip, and “Use Optimized Media if available” is turned on,
then Optimized media will be used instead of the Source Cache.

Second, the Node Cache
The Node Cache, which is a separate level of caching from the Source Cache, can be triggered
in several different ways, corresponding to the three different purposes it serves.
When enabled by turning on the Smart Cache, nodes with processor-intensive
operations (along with all nodes appearing upstream in that grade’s node tree) are
automatically cached, meaning that, for example, if Nodes 1 and 2 are cached, you can
continue adjusting Nodes 3, 4, and 5 to your heart’s content without needing to
re-render your grade to the cache. Operations that trigger caching include Noise
Reduction, Motion Blur, and any ResolveFX or OFX plug-in that’s added to a node. If
you’ve added a ResolveFX to a node that’s capable of playing in real time but that node
is being flagged for caching anyway, you can force caching off for that node by rightclicking it and choosing Node Cache > Off from the contextual menu.

Improving Performance, Proxies, and the Render Cacher

You have the option of choosing the Resolution and Format of the cached media you
create, using controls in the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings. Be aware
that the format you choose via the “Cache frames in” menu will determine whether
out-of-bounds image data is preserved when the signal is cached. Formats in this
menu that end in “– HDR” preserve out-of-bounds image data, while formats that
don’t, wont. If you find that image data (typically bright highlights) are clipped after
caching or optimizing, you should switch to 16-bit float, ProRes 4444, ProRes 4444 XQ,
or DNxHR 444; in particular, any of these codecs are appropriate for HDR grading.

Part 1 – 5

Choose the Right Cache Media Format for Your Project

If you apply ResolveFX or OFX filters to clips in the Edit page, these will also be cached
via the Node Cache. If necessary, you can can choose which OFX to cache via the
Render Cache OFX Filter submenu in the contextual menu for clips in the Timeline. This
is useful when you have a combination of realtime and non-realtime filters applied to a
clip; caching the non-realtime filters only enables you to continue adjusting realtime
filters without the need to re-cache. However, be aware that making changes to a filter
being cached in the Edit page timeline will force that clip’s grade to be re-cached in the
Color page, and vice versa.
If multiple nodes are flagged for caching in a particular node tree, than each node will be
individually cached. That way, you can turn a cached node off and on to get a before-and-after
look without needing to re-cache the entire node tree. If a clip is part of a group in the Color
page, you can enable a Group Cache in the Group Pre-Clip and Group Post-Clip Node Editor
modes, which cache these parts of a group grade as part of the Node Cache..

Third, the Sequence Cache
The Sequence Cache is a separate cache for effects that are applied within the Timeline in the
Edit page. These include transitions, opacity adjustments, and composite mode
superimpositions.

Choosing a Cache Format and Location
The cache format is user selectable by opening the Master Settings panel of the Project
Settings, and using the “Cache frames in” pop-up menu to choose one of the ProRes, DNxHR,
or uncompressed 10- or 16-bit float uncompressed .dvcc formats. Selecting a higher quality
cache format guarantees high quality image playback, but makes more demands on the
throughput and size of your available disk storage. On the other hand, choosing a more highly
compressed cache format makes real time playback possible on less capable computers with
slower and smaller storage, at the expense of slightly compromised image quality. Ideally, you
should choose the highest quality cache format that your workstation’s storage can
accommodate.
The format you choose via the “Cache frames in” menu will determine whether out-of-bounds
image data (including “super white” or HDR strength highlights) is preserved when the signal is
cached. Formats in this menu that end in “– HDR” preserve out-of-bounds image data, while
formats that don’t, wont. If you find that image data (typically bright highlights) are clipped after
caching or optimizing, you should switch to 16-bit float, ProRes 4444, ProRes 4444 XQ, or
DNxHR 444; in particular, any of these codecs are appropriate for HDR grading.
The Cache files location defaults to the first volume you add to the Scratch Disks list of the
Media Storage panel of the System Preferences. If no scratch disk is specified, your System disk
will be used, which may pose problems with capacity and/or performance depending on the
size and type of System disk you’re using, and on the media format you choose to cache to. For
this reason, it’s nearly always advisable to set your first scratch disk to the largest, fastest
storage volume available to your workstation.

Part 1 – 5

You can also turn on the “Render Cache Clip Output” option for a clip in the Timeline of
either the Edit or Color pages. This forces that clip’s entire grade to be cached via the
Node Cache, all the way through the Node tree’s output. This can result in higher real
time performance in the Edit page, at the expense of needing to completely re-cache
that clip whenever you adjust any part of its grade.

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You can manually force any node to cache if it and its upstream nodes are
compromising performance but somehow not being automatically flagged, by
right‑clicking a node and choosing Node Cache > On from the contextual menu.

If background caching is enabled in the Project settings, and there are no UI or control panel
adjustments made for a user-definable number of seconds (this is adjustable in the Master
Settings panel of the Project Settings), caching will automatically begin during periods of user
inactivity.

The Difference Between the Smart
Cache and User Cache Modes
The Smart Cache option of the Render Cache submenu provides the best user experience
when you want to “set it and forget it.” Choosing Smart triggers a variety of automatic caching
behaviors designed to optimize playback in DaVinci Resolve by rendering clip formats, grading
operations, and timeline effects that are known to be performance-intensive, while also letting
you manually flag clips that you’d like to cache that the Smart cache hasn’t. The User Cache, on
the other hand, does not automatically cache anything, instead relying on you to control what is
cached and what is not by manually flagging specific clips and effects.
Here are the differences between the Smart and User cache modes for each type of caching
DaVinci Resolve does.

Source Caching
In Smart mode, H.264, DCP, JPEG2K or camera raw clips that have been edited into a timeline,
with Source Clip settings set to either Auto (by default) or On, are automatically cached at their
source. Source Cached clips are resized to the current Timeline resolution regardless of the
media’s original resolution. Camera Raw clips are cached using the currently selected project or
clip debayer settings. Additionally, speed effects are cached at the source level, which makes it
possible to move cached speed effects clips on the Timeline without needing to re-cache them.
In User mode, clips with Render Cache Clip Source set to On are cached, while clips set to Auto
are ignored.

Node Caching in the Node Tree
In Smart mode, DaVinci Resolve automatically caches all nodes that use Motion Blur, Noise
Reduction, or OFX plug-ins. Manually flagged nodes are also cached in Smart mode.
In User mode, DaVinci Resolve only caches nodes that have been manually flagged by rightclicking them and choosing Node Cache > On to force that node to cache in User mode, along
with all upstream nodes to the left of it.

Node Cache indicator seen as a red colored node number on
node two of the Node Editor of the Color page

Part 1 – 5

When either Smart or User caching is enabled, caching always happens whenever you play
clips that are to be cached. Cache indicators on the Edit and Color page timelines show the
status of the cache. Red means “to be cached,” while blue means “has been cached.”

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When Caching Happens

In User mode, manually flagged clips with Render Cache Clip turned on also cache the entire
output of the Color page node graph.

Node Caching for Edit Page Filters Is Also Node Caching
Caching of ResolveFX and OFX filters applied to clips in the Edit page can only be set manually.
Only filters that you have flagged to cache by right-clicking the clip they’re applied to and
choosing them in the Render Cache OFX Filter submenu are cached in either Smart and
User modes.

Sequence Caching
In Smart mode, DaVinci Resolve automatically caches all superimposed clips that use
composite modes other then “Normal,” any clips with opacity or speed effects, and any
transitions. Clips cannot be manually flagged for Sequence caching.
In User mode, Sequence caching is disabled; Sequence caching only happens in Smart mode.
However, if you’re using User mode and you find that your workstation does not have adequate
performance to play composite mode, opacity, and transition effects in real time, you can force
these categories of effects to be included in the Sequence Cache when Render Cache is set to
User via two checkboxes in the Master Settings of the Project Settings, “Automatically cache
transitions in User Mode,” and “Automatically cache composites in User Mode.” When these
options are enabled, you also gain the ability to exclude specific tracks from being cached, by
right-clicking the track header of any video track you want to exclude from caching, and
choosing Exclude track from caching.

Source, Clip, and Sequence Cache bars seen in the Timeline of the Edit page; red bars show
areas of the Timeline that need caching, blue shows areas that have been cached

Manually Choosing What to Cache
This section describes how to manually control each type of caching that happens in
DaVinci Resolve.

Controlling Source Caching
You can manually control which clips in the Timeline are cached, and which are not. You can
select one or more clips in the Timeline of the Edit page, or in the Thumbnail Timeline of the
Color page, right-click one of the selected clips or thumbnails, and choose an option from the
Render Cache Clip Source submenu. There are three options:
‚‚ Auto: The clip will only be cached in Smart mode, and only if it’s a format designated
for caching.
‚‚ On: The clip will be cached in either Smart or User mode, no matter what format.
‚‚ Off: The clip will not be cached, in either Smart or User modes.

Part 1 – 5

In Smart mode, manually flagged clips with Render Cache Clip Output turned on cache the
entire output of the Color page node graph, effectively caching that clip’s entire grade. This is
most useful when you want to improve trimming and playback performance in the Edit page.
Flagging a clip for caching also causes EVERY SINGLE VERSION associated with that clip to be
cached as well.

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Cache Clip Output Is Actually Node Caching

‚‚ Auto: The flagged node and all upstream nodes will only be cached in Smart mode if it
contains an operation that’s designated for caching.
‚‚ On: The node will always be cached in either Smart or User mode, no matter what
operations it performs.
‚‚ Off: The node will not be cached, in either Smart or User modes. This lets you
exclude nodes from caching in smart mode if they’re capable of real time operation on
your system.

Controlling Clip Output Caching
Each clip has a Clip Output setting that you can turn on or off by right-clicking that clip in the
Timeline of the Edit page, and choosing Render Cache Clip Output from the contextual menu.
A checkmark indicates when this setting is turned on.

Controlling Edit Page Filter Caching
You can choose which of the OFX filters applied to a particular clip should be cached by
right-clicking that clip in the Timeline of the Edit page, and choosing which of the filters in the
Render Cache OFX Filter submenu you want to cache.
Each filter applied to that clip appears in this submenu in the order in which it’s applied to the
clip, and you can turn the caching of specific filters on and off (selected filters appear with a
checkmark to the left of their menu item).

Clearing Cached Media
Each project’s cache is persistent; the cache is saved for future use even when the project is
closed and later reopened. If you need to delete a project’s cache to free up space on a
storage volume, there are three options in the Delete Render Cache submenu:
‚‚ All: You can delete all media in the cache to reset every single cached clip.
‚‚ Unused: You can choose to delete only Unused cache clips that no longer correspond
to clips or effects in the Timeline.
‚‚ Selected clips: You can make a manual selection of clips in the Timeline, and delete
the cache corresponding to just those clips.
To clear a project’s cache:
Open the project, and choose Playback > Delete Render Cache > All, Unused, or
Selected Clips.

Using Cached Media When Rendering in the Deliver Page
An option in the “More options” section of the Render Settings in the Deliver page, “Use Render
Cached Images,” lets you export media from the cache, rather then re-rendering from scratch,
in order to save time. If you’re planning on using this option, it’s advisable to set the cache
format to a suitably high-quality format to guarantee the best results.

Part 1 – 5

You can manually control which nodes in a grade are cached, and which are not. Right-click any
node in a node tree, and choose an option from the Node Cache submenu. There are
three options:

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Controlling Node Caching

131

Other Project Settings
That Improve Performance
In addition to working with proxies, using reduced raw decoding quality, generating optimized
media, and enabling the Smart and User caches, there are five additional options in the Project
Settings window and one setting in the UI Settings panel of the User Preferences that you can
use to further improve real time performance if you’re working on an underpowered computer,
at the expense of lower image quality while you work. These settings can then be changed
back to higher quality modes prior to rendering.
‚‚ Set timeline resolution to: (Master Project Settings, Timeline Format) DaVinci Resolve
is resolution independent, so you can change the resolution at any time and all
windows, tracks, sizing changes, and keyframe data will be automatically recalculated
to fit the new size. Lowering the Timeline resolution while you’re grading will improve
real time performance by reducing the amount of data being processed, but you’ll want
to increase Timeline resolution to the desired size prior to rendering. This is effectively
the same as using the Proxy command, but you get to choose exactly what resolution
you want to work at.
‚‚ Enable video field processing: (Master Project Settings, Timeline Format) You can
leave this option turned off even if you’re working on interlaced material to improve
real time performance. When you’re finished, you can turn this setting back on prior to
rendering. However, whether or not it’s necessary to turn field processing on depends
on what kinds of corrections you’re making. If you’re applying any filtering or sizing
operations such as blur, sharpen, pan, tilt, zoom, or rotate, then field processing should
be on for rendering. If you’re only applying adjustments to color and contrast, field
processing is not necessary.
‚‚ Video bit depth: (Master Project Settings, Video Monitoring) Monitoring at 8-bit
improves real time performance, at the expense of possibly introducing banding to the
monitored image.
‚‚ Uses Bilinear filter: (Image Scaling) A lower quality image transform setting that is less
processor intensive. A “Force sizing highest quality” checkbox in the Render Settings
list of the Deliver page helps make sure you don’t accidentally render your final media
at this lower quality setting.

Improving Performance, Proxies, and the Render Cacher

How you use DaVinci Resolve’s various performance-enhancing features together is
entirely up to you, but you should know that they’re not an either/or proposition. For
example, you can create optimized media from the camera raw original clips in your
project, then enable Proxy playback to enhance the performance of your 4K timeline,
and turn on Smart Cache to speed up your work in the Color page as you add noise
reduction and Open FX to every clip. All three of these optimization methods work
happily and seamlessly together to improve your performance while keeping the
image quality of your project as high as the Optimized and Cache formats you’ve
selected in the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings.

Part 1 – 5

Using Proxies, Optimized Media, and Caching Together

‚‚ Minimize interface updates during playback: (User Preferences, UI Settings) Enabling
this setting improves real time performance by hiding on-screen controls that appear in
the Viewer, such as the cursor, Power Window outlines, and split-screen views during
playback. When playback is stopped, onscreen controls reappear.

Part 1 – 5

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‚‚ Match Timeline Settings checkbox: (Image Scaling, Output Scaling Preset) If the
Output resolution doesn’t match the Video format resolution in the Master Project
Settings, there is performance overhead since images need to be resized before
they’re output to SDI. For the best performance while you’re grading, it’s recommended
to set the Output resolution to match the Video format resolution while you’re working.
However, once you’re ready to output via the Deliver page, you should make sure
this setting isn’t using a smaller resolution than you intend to render out with. If
necessary, you can turn Match Timeline Settings back on if the Timeline is set to the
actual resolution you need to output, or you can manually change this to the correct
resolution.

Part 1 – 6

Data Levels, Color
Management,
ACES, and HDR

133

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

Chapter 6

Data Levels, Color Management,
ACES, and HDR

Data Levels Settings and Conversions

135

Internal Image Processing and Clip Data Levels

135

Assigning Clip Levels in the Media Pool

136

Video Monitoring Data Levels

136

Deck Capture and Playback Data Level

137

Output Data Level Settings in the Deliver Page

137

So, What’s the “Proper” Data Range for Output?

138

DaVinci Resolve Color Management

138

Display Referred vs. Scene Referred Color Management

138

Resolve Color Management for Editors

139

Resolve Color Management and Camera Raw Formats

140

Controlling the Input, Timeline, and Output Color Space

140

Single Setting vs. Dual Setting RCM

141

Gamut Mapping From Timeline to Output Color Space

142

Procedures for Using Resolve Color Management

144

Exporting Color Space Information to QuickTime Files

145

Color Management Using ACES

145

Setting Up ACES in the Project Settings Window

146

Tips For Rendering Out of an ACES Project

149

High Dynamic Range (HDR) Grading in Resolve

150

The Different Formats of HDR

150

Dolby Vision

151

SMPTE ST.2084, Ultra HD Premium, and HDR 10

158

Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG)

160

Simultaneous SDR and HDR Output While Grading

162

You Can’t Use Resolve Color Management While Outputting SDR and HDR

162

Setting Up to Display Dual Video Streams via Two SDI Outputs

162

Converting Mono Clips or an Entire Timeline to Stereo

163

Outputting Both Video Streams in the Deliver Page

164

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

This chapter covers operational details that affect how color is managed for media that is
imported into and exported from DaVinci Resolve. If color accuracy is important to you, then it’s
a good idea to learn more about how Resolve handles the data levels of each clip, how DaVinci
Resolve Color Management helps you to work with different formats, and how to use ACES.

Part 1 – 6

134

To generalize, with 10-bit image values (with a numeric range of 0-1023), there are two different
data levels (or ranges) that can be used to store image data when writing to media file formats
such as QuickTime, MXF, or DPX. These ranges are:
‚‚ Video: Typically used by Y’CBCR video data. All image data from 0 to 100 percent must
fit into the numeric range of 64–940. Specifically, the Y’ component’s range is 64–940,
while the numeric range of the CB and CR components is 64–960. The lower range of
4–63 is reserved for “blacker-than-black,” and the higher ranges of 941/961–1019 are
reserved for “super-white.” These “out of bounds” ranges are recorded in source media
as undershoots and overshoots, but they’re not acceptable for broadcast output.
‚‚ Full: Typical for RGB 444 data acquired from digital cinema cameras, or film scanned
to DPX image sequences. All image data from 0 to 100 percent is simply fit into the full
numeric range of 4 to 1023.
Keep in mind that every digital image, no matter what its format, has absolute minimum and
maximum levels, referred to in this section as 0–100 percent. Whenever media using one data
range is converted into another data range, each color component’s minimum and maximum
data levels are remapped so that the old minimum value is scaled to the new data level
minimum, and the old maximum value is scaled to the new data level maximum:
(minimum Video Level) 64 = 4 (Data Level minimum)
(maximum Video Level) 940 or 960 = 1023 (Data Level maximum)
Converting an image from one data range to another should result in a seamless change. All
“legal” data from 0–100 percent is always preserved, and is linearly scaled from the previous
data range to fit into the new data range.
The sole exception is that the undershoots and overshoots of “Video Levels” media, if present,
are usually clipped when converted to full-range “Full Levels.” However, Resolve preserves this
data internally, and these clipped pixels of detail in the undershoots and overshoots are still
retrievable by making suitable adjustments in the Color page to bring them back into the
“legal” range.

Internal Image Processing and Clip Data Levels
It’s useful to know that, internally to DaVinci Resolve, all image data is processed as full range,
uncompressed, 32-bit floating point data. What this means is that each clip in the Media Pool,
whatever its original bit-depth or data range, is scaled into full-range 32-bit data. How each clip
is scaled depends on its Levels setting in the Clip Attributes window, available from the Media
Pool contextual menu.

Selecting Video or Full levels

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Different media formats use different ranges of values to represent image data. Since these
data formats often correspond to different output workflows (cinema vs. broadcast), it helps to
know where your project’s media files are coming from, and where they’re going, in order to
define the various data range settings in DaVinci Resolve and preserve your program’s data
integrity.

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Data Levels Settings and Conversions

When you first import media into the Media Pool, either manually in the Media page or
automatically by importing an AAF or XML project in the Edit page, Resolve automatically
assigns the “Auto” Levels setting. When a clip is set to Auto, the Levels setting used is
determined based on the codec of the source media.
DaVinci Resolve generally does a good job of figuring out the appropriate Levels setting of
each clip on its own. However, in certain circumstances, such as when you’re mixing videooriginated media and digital cinema camera-originated media, you may find that you need to
manually choose the appropriate settings so that the levels of each clip are interpreted
correctly. This can be done using each clip’s Levels setting in the Clip Attributes window,
available from the Media Pool contextual menu in either the Media or Edit pages.
To change a clip’s Data Level setting:
1

Open the Media or Edit page.

2

Select one or more clips, then right-click one of them and choose Clip Attributes.

3

Click the Levels ratio button corresponding to the data level setting you want to assign,
then click OK.

TIP: If you need to change the Levels setting of a range of clips that share a unique
property such as reel name, resolution, frame rate, or file path, you can view the Media
Pool by column, and sort by the particular column that will best isolate the range of
media to which you need to make a data level assignment.

Once you change a clip’s Levels setting, that clip will automatically be reconverted based on
the new assignment. If it appears to be correct, then you’re ready to work. If it doesn’t, then you
may want to reconsider the Levels assignment you’ve made, and you should check with the
person who provided the media to find out how it was generated, captured, and exported.
So long as the Levels settings used by your clips are accurate, you should be ready to work.
However, problems can still occur based on what external video hardware you’re using with
your workstation, and how you need to deliver the finished media to your client. For this reason,
there are three additional data level settings that you can use to maintain data integrity, while at
the same time seeing the proper image as you work.

Video Monitoring Data Levels
Superficial problems may result if the settings used by your external display differ from the
settings you’re using to process data levels in Resolve. Accordingly, there is a Video/Full Level
setting in the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings (in the Video Monitoring section).
When you change this setting, the image being output to your external display should change,
but the image you see in your Viewer will not. That’s because this setting only affects the data
levels being output via the video interface connecting the Resolve workstation to your external
display. It has no effect on the data that’s processed internally by Resolve, or on the files written
when you render in the Deliver page.

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Assigning Clip Levels in the Media Pool

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By converting all clips to uncompressed, full-range, 32-bit floating point data, Resolve
guarantees the highest quality image processing that’s possible. As always, the quality of your
output is dependent on the quality of the source media you’re using, but you can be sure that
Resolve is preserving all the data that was present in the original media.

‚‚ Full: If your monitor or projector is capable of displaying “full range” video signals, and
you wish to monitor the full 10-bit data range (4-1023) while you work, then this is the
correct option to use.
It is imperative that the option you choose in Resolve matches the data range the external
display is set to. Otherwise, the video signal will appear to be incorrect, even though the
internal data is being processed accurately by DaVinci Resolve.

Video/Full Level selection for monitoring

Deck Capture and Playback Data Level
There is a separate “Video/Data Level” setting that is specific to when you’re capturing from or
outputting to VTRs. This setting also affects the video signal that is output via the video
interface connecting the Resolve workstation to your VTR (which is usually also in the signal
chain used for monitoring). However, it only takes effect when you’re capturing from tape in the
Media page, or editing to tape in the Deliver page. If you never capture or output to tape, this
setting will never take effect.
This setting is found in the Deck Capture and Playback panel of the Project Settings.
The reason for a separate option for tape capture and output is that often you’d want to monitor
in one format (normally scaled Rec. 709), but output to tape in another (full range RGB 444). This
way, you can set up Resolve to accommodate this workflow, and then not have to worry about
manually switching your video interface back and forth.
There are two options:
‚‚ Video: This is the correct option to use when you want to output conventional Rec. 709
video to a compatible tape format.
‚‚ Full: This is the correct option to use when you want to output “full range” RGB 444
video to a compatible tape format.
Once tape ingest or output has finished, your video interface goes back to outputting using the
setting specified by the “Colorspace conversion uses” setting in the Master Settings panel of
the Project Settings (in the Video Monitoring section).

Output Data Level Settings in the Deliver Page
Finally, there’s one last set of data level settings, available in the Render Settings list, within the
Format group. It’s the “Set to video or data level” pop-up menu. It’s there to give you the ability
to convert the data level of your rendered output, if necessary.
All media is output using a single data level, depending on your selection. There are
three options:
‚‚ Automatic: The output data level of all clips is set automatically based on the codec
you select to render to in the “Render to” pop-up menu.
‚‚ Video: All clips are rendered as normally scaled for video (10-bit 64-940).
‚‚ Full: All clips are rendered as full range (10-bit 4-1019).

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‚‚ Video: This is the correct option to use when using a broadcast display set to the Rec.
709 video standard (10-bit 64-940).

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

There are two options:

So, What’s the “Proper” Data Range for Output?
Strictly speaking, there is no absolutely “proper” data range to use when outputting image data.
As long as the Levels setting of each clip in the Media Pool is set to reflect how each clip was
created, your primary consideration is which data range is compatible with the media format or
application you’re delivering to. If the media format you’re exporting to supports either normally
scaled or full range, and the application that media will be imported into supports either normally
scaled or full range, then it’s really your choice, as long as everyone involved with the project
understands how the data range of the media is meant to be interpreted once they receive it.
Outputting to hardware is a bit trickier, in that you need to make sure that the external display or
VTR you’re outputting to is set up to receive a signal using the data range you’ve chosen. If the
device is limited to only one data range, then you need to be sure that you’re outputting to it
using that data range, or the levels of the image will appear to be incorrect, even though the
image data being processed by Resolve is actually fine.

DaVinci Resolve Color Management
How color is managed in DaVinci Resolve depends on the “Color Science” setting at the top of
the Color Management panel of the Project Settings. There are four options: DaVinci YRGB,
DaVinci YRGB Color Managed, DaVinci ACEScc, and DaVinci ACEScct. This section discusses
the second setting, DaVinci YRGB Color Managed. ACEScc and ACEScct is discussed in the
following section in this chapter.

Display Referred vs. Scene Referred Color Management
The default DaVinci YRGB color science setting, which is what DaVinci Resolve has always
used, relies on what is called “Display Referred” color management. This means that Resolve
has no information about how the source media used in the Timeline is supposed to look; you
can only judge color accuracy via the calibrated broadcast display you’re outputting to.
Essentially, you are the color management, in conjunction with a trustworthy broadcast display
that’s been calibrated to ensure accuracy.
Starting in DaVinci Resolve 12, there’s a color science option called “DaVinci YRGB Color
Managed,” or more simply “Resolve Color Management” (RCM). This is a so-called “Scene
Referred” color management scheme, in which you have the option of matching each type of
media you’ve imported into your project with a color profile that informs DaVinci Resolve how to
represent each specific color from each clip’s native color space into the common working color
space of the timeline in which you’re editing, grading, and finishing.
This is important, because two clips that contain the same RGB value for a given pixel may in
actuality be representing different colors at that pixel, depending on the color space that was
originally associated with each captured clip. This is the case when you compare raw clips shot
with different cameras made by different manufacturers, and it’s especially true if you compare
clips recorded using the differing log-encoded color spaces that are unique to each camera.

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For most projects, leaving this setting on “Automatic” will yield the appropriate results. However,
if you’re rendering media for use by another image processing application (such as a
compositing application) that is capable of handling “full range” data, then full range output is
preferable for media exchange as it provides the greatest data fidelity. For example, when
outputting media for VFX work as a DPX image sequence, or as a ProRes 4444 encoded
QuickTime file, choosing “Unscaled full range data” guarantees the maximum available image
quality. However, it is essential that the application you use to process this media is set to read
it as “full range” data, otherwise the images will not look correct.

This sort of thing can also be done manually in a more conventional Display Referred workflow,
by assigning LUTs that are specific to each type of media, in order to transform each clip from
the source color space to the destination color space that you require. However, RCM uses
mathematical transforms, rather then lookup tables, which makes it easier to extract highprecision, wide-latitude image data from each supported camera format, in order to preserve
high-quality image data from acquisition, through editing, color grading, and output. RCM is also
easier to use, freeing you from the need to locate and maintain a large number of LUTs to
accommodate your various workflows.
The preservation of wide-latitude image data deserves elaboration. LUTs clip image detail that
goes outside of the numeric range they’re designed to handle, so this often requires the
colorist to make a pre-LUT adjustment to “pull back” image data in the highlights that you want
to retrieve. Using RCM eliminates this two-step process, since the input color space math used
to transform the source preserves all wide-latitude image data, making highlights easily
retrievable without any extra steps.

How is DaVinci Resolve Color Management Different from ACES?
This is a common question, but the answer is pretty simple. Resolve Color
Management (RCM) and ACES are both Scene Referred color management schemes
designed to solve the same problem. However, if you’re not in a specific ACES-driven
cinema workflow, DaVinci Resolve Color Management can be simpler to use, and will
give you all of the benefits of color management, while preserving the the same “feel”
that the DaVinci Resolve Color page controls have always had.

Resolve Color Management for Editors
RCM is also easier for editors to use in situations where the source material is log-encoded.
Log-encoded media preserves highlight and shadow detail, which is great for grading and
finishing, but it looks flat and unpleasant, which is terrible for editing.
Even if you have no idea how to do color correction, it’s simple to turn RCM on in the Color
Management panel of the Project Settings, and then use the Media Pool to assign the particular
Input Color Space that corresponds to the source clips from each camera. Once that’s done,
each log-encoded clip is automatically normalized to the default Timeline Color Space of
Rec.709 Gamma 2.4. So, without even having to open the Color page, editors can be working
with pleasantly normalized clips in the Edit page.

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Scene Referred color management via RCM doesn’t do your grading for you, but it does try to
ensure that the color and contrast from each different media format you’ve imported into your
project are represented accurately in your timeline. For example, if you use two different
manufacturer’s cameras to shoot green trees, recording Blackmagic Film color space on one,
and recording to the Sony SGamut3.Cine/SLog3 color space on the other, you can now use
RCM to make sure that the green of the trees in one set of clips match the green of the trees in
the other, within the shared color space of the Timeline.

Controlling the Input, Timeline, and Output Color Space
An additional benefit of using Scene Referred color management via RCM is that, not only do
you have the ability to identify the color science of each source media format (the Input Color
Space), but you also have explicit control over the working color space (the Timeline Color
Space), and you have separate control over the Output Color Space. Basically, Resolve Color
Management consists of two color transforms working together, converting the source clips via
assignable Input Color Spaces to the Timeline Color Space in which you work, and then
converting the Timeline Color Space to whatever Output Color Space you require to deliver
the project.

Input Color Space

Timeline Color Space

Output Color Space

Resolve Color Management consists of three color transforms working together

This means that, as a colorist, you can set the Timeline Color Space that you’re working in to
whatever you prefer. If you prefer grading log media because you like the way the grading
controls behave in that color space, you can set the Timeline Color Space in the Color
Management panel of the Project Settings to any of the available log formats, including ARRI
Log C and Cineon Film Log. If you instead prefer grading in the Rec. 709 color space because
you’re more comfortable with how the controls feel in that color space, you can choose that
instead. Whatever Timeline Color Space you assign is what all source clips will be transformed
to for purposes of making grading adjustments in the Color page, so you can make this choice
using a single setting.
A key benefit of the color space conversions that RCM applies is that no image data is ever
clipped during the Input to Timeline color space conversion. For example, even if your source is
log-encoded or in a camera raw format, grading with a Rec. 709 Timeline Color Space does
nothing to clip or otherwise limit the image data available to the RCM image processing
pipeline. All image values greater than 1.0 or less than 0.0 are preserved and made available to
the next stage of RCM processing, the Timeline to Output color space conversion.

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When you use RCM in a project that uses Camera Raw formats, color science data from each
camera manufacturer is used to debayer each camera raw file to specific color primaries with
linear gamma, so that all image data from the source is preserved and made available to
DaVinci Resolve’s color managed image processing pipeline. As a result, the Camera Raw
project settings and Camera Raw palette of the Color page are disabled, because RCM now
controls the debayering of all camera raw clips, and all image data from the raw file is available
no matter which Timeline Color Space you choose to work within.

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Resolve Color Management and Camera Raw Formats

TIP: If you want to use Resolve Color Management, but you want the Input and Output
Color Spaces to match whatever you set the Timeline Color Space to, you can choose
“Bypass” in the “Input Colorspace” and “Output Colorspace” pop-up menus.

Finally, it is the Output Color Space that determines the final color space of your rendered
result. While no image data is clipped during the Source to Timeline color space conversion,
image data will be clipped during the Timeline to Output color space conversion in order for the
final image to conform to the color space being rendered and output, unless you use the Gamut
Mapping options to compress image data during the Timeline to Output Color Space
conversion.

Single Setting vs. Dual Setting RCM
Starting in Resolve 12.5, there are two ways you can set up RCM. When the “Use Separate
Color Space and Gamma” checkbox is turned off, the Color Management panel of the Project
Settings exposes one pop-up each for the Input, Timeline, and Output Color Space settings.
Each setting lets you simultaneously transform the gamut and gamma, depending on which
option you choose. This makes it a bit simpler to set up the transform you need.

Single setting Resolve Color Management

If you turn the “Use Separate Color Space and Gamma” checkbox on, then the Color
Management panel changes so that the Input, Timeline, and Output Color Space settings each
display two pop-ups. The first pop-up lets you explicitly set the gamut, while the second
pop-up lets you explicitly set the gamma. This makes it easier to see exactly which pair of
transforms is being used at each stage of RCM.

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Consequently, if you’re grading in a color space other than the one you need to output to, you
don’t have to worry about data loss during the color transformation back to the color space you
actually want to output to. The Output Color Space setting gives you the freedom to work using
whatever Timeline Color Space you like while grading, with Resolve automatically converting
your output to the specific color space you want to monitor with and deliver to. And thanks to
the precision of the image processing in DaVinci Resolve, you can convert from a larger color
space to a smaller one and back again without clipping or a loss of quality. Of course, if you
apply a LUT or use Soft Clip within a grade, then clipping will occur, but that’s a consequence of
using those particular operations.

Dual setting Resolve Color Management

Additionally, Dual Setting RCM enables you to assign separate gamut and gamma transforms to
clips in the Media Pool.

Dual setting Resolve Color Management assignments for Media Pool clips

Gamut Mapping From Timeline to Output Color Space
Starting in DaVinci Resolve 14, to accommodate workflows where you need to transform one
color space into another that has a dramatically larger or smaller gamut, an additional group of
settings have been added that can help to automate the expansion or contraction of image
data necessary to give a pleasing result.

Additional Gamut Mapping controls in DaVinci Resolve Color Management

Enabling one of the the “Timeline to Output Tone Mapping” and/or “Timeline to Output Gamut
Mapping” options will compress or expand your image data as necessary during the Timeline to
Output Color Space transformation that RCM performs when rendering or outputting a timeline
to video, in order to make sure that the final result is either not clipping or taking better
advantage of the new color space. This is not meant to provide your final grade. Rather, it’s
meant to give you a faster starting point, when you need it, for proceeding with your own more
detailed grade of the result.
Here are some examples of what the Gamut Mapping controls of RCM can be used for:
‚‚ If you’re working with high-dynamic-range log-encoded media and you’re outputting
to Rec. 709 as you work, turning on Gamut Mapping lets RCM use saturation and tone
mapping to give you a more immediately pleasing image with highlight detail that’s
not clipped.
‚‚ If you’re working with standard-dynamic-range log-encoded media and you’re
outputting to an HDR format as you work, turning on Gamut Mapping lets RCM use
saturation and tone mapping to expand the highlights of the image to HDR strength to
give you an image with more immediate visual impact on HDR screens.

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143

(Before/After) Gamut Mapping used to automatically fit
high‑dynamic-range media into the Rec. 709 color space

Here are the various gamut mapping settings that are available in the Color Management panel
of the Project Settings:
‚‚ Timeline to Output Tone Mapping: Accommodates workflows where you need to
transform one color space into another with a dramatically larger or smaller color space
by automating an expansion or contraction of image contrast in such a way as to give a
pleasing result with no clipping.
There are three options, None, Simple, and Luminance Mapping. Choosing “Simple“
uses a static S-curve to perform this transformation as it compresses or expands the
highlights and/or shadows of the timeline dynamic range to fit the output dynamic
range, and automatically populates the value of the Max. Timeline Luminance field that
guides this transform. Choosing “Luminance Mapping” actually uses a customized
curve operation to precisely map the timeline dynamic range to the output dynamic
range, and automatically populates the value of the Max. Timeline Luminance control
that guides this transform, but leaves it user-adjustable in case you want to customize
the result.
Max. Timeline Luminance: The maximum luminance level of the Timeline color space,
in nits. Changing the Timeline Color Space gamma setting automatically updates this
parameter to the appropriate value for mapping the Timeline Color Space to the Output
Color Space, but these two color spaces need to be different in order for tone mapping
to work. In Simple mode, this setting is non-adjustable. In Luminance Mapping mode,
you can manually alter this setting to customize how the Timeline color space is
remapped to the Output color space.

Saturation Knee: Sets the image level at which saturation mapping begins. Below this
level, no remapping is applied. All saturation values from this level on up are remapped
according to the Saturation Max. slider. A value of 1.0 is maximum saturation in the
currently selected output color space.
Saturation Max: The new maximum level to which you want to either raise or lower all
saturation values that are above the Saturation Knee setting. A value of 1.0 is maximum
saturation in the currently selected output color space.

Procedures for Using Resolve Color Management
Despite the seeming complexity of color management, using it is actually pretty simple, since
the goal is to enable Resolve to automatically take care of as much of the complexity as
possible, freeing you up to focus on doing creative work. In essence, all you have to do is (A)
turn RCM on, (B) assign the appropriate Input Color Space to each clip in the Media Pool based
on its source, and (C) choose the Timeline and Output Color Space combination you
want to use.
To enable Resolve Color Management:
Open the Color Management panel of the Project Settings, and choose DaVinci YRGB
Color Managed from the “Color Science” pop-up menu.
To choose the default color space for all clips with an unassigned Input Color Space:
Open the Color Management panel of the Project Settings, choose whether you want
to use Single Setting or Dual Setting color management, and then choose the desired
options from the “Input Colorspace” pop-up menu or menus. This setting determines
the color space of all clips you haven’t manually assigned an Input Color Space to. The
default setting is “Rec.709 Gamma 2.4.” If you choose “Bypass,” then all clips will
default to whatever color space is selected in the “Timeline Colorspace” pop-up menu.
To assign an Input Color Space to one or more selected clips in the Media Pool:
1

Select the clip or clips you want to assign. Since you can assign an Input Color Space to
more then one clip at a time, it will speed things up if you use a sort or find operation,
or create a Smart Bin or Smart Filter, to identify every clip from a specific camera using
a particular format, so you can assign them all at once.

2

Do one of the following:
‚‚ In the Media Pool, right-click one of the selected clips, and choose the Input Color
Space and/or Input Gamma (if Dual Setting color management is enabled) that
corresponds to those clips from the contextual menu.
‚‚ In the Color page, right-click any clip’s thumbnail in the Thumbnail timeline, and
choose the Input Color Space and/or Input Gamma (if Dual Setting color management
is enabled) that corresponds to those clips from the contextual menu.

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‚‚ Timeline to Output Gamut Mapping: Accommodates workflows where you need to
transform one color space into another with a dramatically larger or smaller gamut
by helping to automate an expansion or contraction of image saturation in such a
way as to give a pleasing and naturalistic result with no clipping. Choosing Saturation
Mapping from this menu enables saturation mapping of the image during the Timeline
to Output Color Space transformation that RCM performs when rendering or outputting
a timeline to video.

To enable Gamut Mapping:
1

Open the Color Management panel of the Project Settings, and do one or both of
the following:

a. Set the “Timeline to Output Tone Mapping” pop-up to Simple or Luminance Mapping.
b. Set the “Timeline to Output Gamut Mapping” pop-up to Saturation Mapping.
2

If necessary, adjust the Max. Timeline Luminance and Saturation Knee and/or
Saturation Max controls to refine the desired output.

All in all, using RCM is an easy way to ensure high image quality and a predictable starting point
when working on projects requiring log-encoded conversion, or that incorporate multiple
media formats.

Exporting Color Space Information to QuickTime Files
If you render QuickTime files from the Deliver page, then color space tags will be embedded
into each file based on either the Timeline Color Space (if Resolve Color Management is
disabled) or the Output Color Space (if Resolve Color Management is enabled).
The following tags will be written, if currently selected:
REC 709
REC 2020
REC 2021
CIE XYZ
P3DCI
P3D60

Color Management Using ACES
The ACES (Academy Color Encoding Specification) color space has been designed to make
scene-referred color management a reality for high-end digital cinema workflows. ACES also
makes it easier to extract high-precision, wide-latitude image data from raw camera formats, in
order to preserve high-quality image data from acquisition through the color grading process,
and to output high-quality data for broadcast viewing, film printing, or digital cinema encoding.
An oversimplification of the way ACES works is that every camera and acquisition device is
characterized to create an IDT (Input Device Transform) that specifies how media from that
device is converted into the ACES color space. The ACES gamut has been designed to be large
enough to encompass all visible light, with more than 25 stops of exposure latitude. In this way
ACES has been designed to be future-proof, taking into consideration advances in image
capture and distribution.
Meanwhile, an RRT (Reference Rendering Transform) is used to transform the data provided by
each image format’s IDT into standardized, high-precision, wide-latitude image data that in turn
is processed via an ODT (Output Device Transform). Different ODT settings correspond to each

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Open the Color Management panel of the Project Settings, and choose the desired options
from the single menu or pair of pop-up menus for the “Timeline Colorspace” and “Output
Colorspace” RCM settings. The default settings are “Rec.709 Gamma 2.4.” If you choose
“Bypass” in the “Output Colorspace” pop-up menu, then the Output Color Space will match
whatever you’ve selected in the “Timeline Colorspace” pop-up menu.

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

To change the Timeline and Output Color Space:

Image
Data

IDT

DaVinci Decoding
to Normal or Log

DaVinci Image
Processing

ACES
Reencoding

ODT

RRT

Monitoring

Disable
ODT for
Deliver
page
Output

ACES signal and processing flow

By using the ACES color space and specifying an IDT and an ODT, you can ingest media from
any capture device, grade it using a calibrated display, output it to any destination, and
preserve the color fidelity of the graded image.

Setting Up ACES in the Project Settings Window
There are four parameters available in the Color Science pop-up of the Color Management
panel of the Project Settings that let you set up DaVinci Resolve to use the ACES workflow:
‚‚ Color science is: Using this pop-up menu, you can choose either DaVinci ACES,
or DaVinci ACEScc color science, which enables ACES processing throughout
DaVinci Resolve.
DaVinci ACEScc: Choose DaVinci ACEScc color science to apply a standard Cineonstyle log encoding to the ACES data before it is processed by Resolve. This well
defined common encoding makes it possible for ASC CDL values to be used across
systems using the same ACEScc encoding. After processing, a reverse encoding is
applied in order to output ACES linear data.
DaVinci ACEScct: A variation of ACEScc that adds a roll-off at the toe of the image
that’s different from the encoding of ACEScc, in order to make color correction lift
operations “feel” more like they do with film scans and LogC encoded images, which
makes it easier to raise the darkest values of the image and get milky shadows,
something that can be difficult with ACEScc. After processing, a reverse encoding is
applied in order to output ACES linear data.
‚‚ ACES Version: When you’ve chosen one of the ACES color science options, this
pop‑up becomes available to let you choose which version of ACES you want to use.
As of DaVinci Resolve 14, only ACES 1.0.3 is supported.

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standard of monitoring and output, and describe how to accurately convert the data within the
ACES color space into the gamut of that display in order to most accurately represent the image
in every situation. The RRT and ODT always work together.

Rec.709 (Camera): A deprecated legacy IDT for Rec. 709 that’s included for backward
compatibility. Converts the source data to linear based on Rec. 709 and transforms the
result to ACES, but while this transformation is technically correct, it’s not necessarily
pleasing after conversion through the matching ODT. For this reason, the academy
updated to the following Rec. 709 IDT, which is the inverse of the Rec. 709 ODT.
Rec.709: A standard transform designed to move media in the Rec. 709 color space
into the ACES color space. This option is used for any other file type that might be
imported, such as ProRes from Final Cut Pro, DNxHD from Media Composer, and any
media file captured from tape.
Rec.709 (D60 Sim): A standard transform designed to move media in the Rec. 709
color space with a white point of D60 into the ACES color space.
Rec.2020 (Camera): A deprecated legacy IDT for Rec. 2020 that’s included for
backward compatibility.
Rec.2020: This IDT transforms media created with the wide-gamut standard for
consumer and broadcast television.
Rec.2020 ST2084 (1000 nits): This IDT transforms media created within the widegamut standard for consumer and broadcast television, using the SMPTE standard PQ
(ST.2084) tone curve for High Dynamic Range (HDR) postproduction. A single setting is
provided for HDR televisions with peak luminance at 1000 nits.
Rec.2020 ST2084 (1000 nits, P3 gamut clip): This IDT transforms media within with
the wide-gamut standard for consumer and broadcast television but with hard clipping
at the boundary of the P3 gamut, for televisions that are limited to the smaller P3 gamut
for digital cinema; also uses the SMPTE standard PQ (ST.2084) tone curve for High
Dynamic Range (HDR) postproduction. A single setting is provided for HDR televisions
with peak luminance at 1000 nits.
REDcolor/2/3/4/DRAGONcolor/2 and REDgamma3/4/REDlogFilm combinations:
Different combinations of the latest REDcolor, DRAGONcolor, REDgamma, and
REDlogFilm settings are provided for RED workflows.
DCDM (Camera): A deprecated legacy IDT for DCDM that’s included for backward
compatibility.
DCDM: This IDT transforms X’Y’Z’-encoded media with a gamma of 2.6.
P3-D60: Transforms RGB-encoded image data with a D60 white point, intended for
monitoring with a P3-compatible display using a D60 white point.
P3-D60 (Camera): A deprecated legacy IDT for P3 D60 that’s included for backward
compatibility.
P3-D60 ST2084 (1000/2000/4000 nits): Transforms an image that’s compatible with
the P3 color gamut, using the SMPTE standard PQ (ST.2084) tone curve for High
Dynamic Range (HDR) postproduction. Three settings for three different peak
luminance ranges are provided; which one is appropriate to use depends on the
maximum white level of the display used to create the media. Preliminary standards
exist for HDR displays with peak luminance at 1000 nits, 2000 nits, and 4000 nits.

Part 1 – 6

ALEXA/BMD Film/4K/4.6K/Canon 1D/5D/7D/C300/C500/Panasonic V35/Sony RAW/
slog2/slog3: Each listed camera has its own transform in this list that is specific to each
camera’s sensor. Some of these transforms (specifically the Canon C300 and C500
transforms) have multiple selections for daylight and tungsten, and for different
combinations of gamut and gamma.

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‚‚ ACES Input Transform: This pop-up menu lets you choose which IDT (Input Device
Transform) to use for the dominant media format in use. DaVinci Resolve currently
supports the following IDTs:

P3-DCI (Camera): A deprecated legacy IDT for P3 DCI that’s included for backward
compatibility.
ADX (10 or 16): 10-bit or 16-bit integer film-density encoding transforms meant for use if
you’re working with film scans that were initially encoded in an ACES workflow. This
transform is designed to maintain the variation in look between different film stocks.
sRGB: A standardized transform designed for media created for computer display in a
consumer environment.
sRGB (D60 Sim.): A standardized transform designed for media created for computer
display in a consumer environment.
ACEScc/ACEScct/ACEScg: Standardized transforms for each of these ACES standards.
If you’re working on a project that mixes media formats that require different IDTs, then you can
assign different IDTs to clips using the Media Pool’s contextual menu, or using the Clip
Attributes window, which is also accessible via the Media Pool’s contextual menu.
‚‚ ACES Output Transform: This pop-up menu lets you choose an ODT (Output Device
Transform) with which to transform the image data for monitoring on your calibrated
display, and when exporting a timeline in the Deliver page. You can choose from the
following options:
Rec.709: This ODT is used for standard monitoring and deliverables for TV.
Rec.709 (D60 Sim): A standard transform designed to move media in the Rec. 709
color space with a white point of D60 into the ACES color space.
Rec.2020: This ODT is for compatibility with the wide-gamut standard for consumer
and broadcast television.
Rec.2020 ST2084 (1000 nits): This ODT transforms media created within the widegamut standard for consumer and broadcast television, using the SMPTE standard PQ
(ST.2084) tone curve for High Dynamic Range (HDR) postproduction. A single setting is
provided for HDR televisions with peak luminance at 1000 nits.
Rec.2020 ST2084 (1000 nits, P3 gamut clip): This ODT transforms media within with
the wide-gamut standard for consumer and broadcast television but with hard clipping
at the boundary of the P3 gamut, for televisions that are limited to the smaller P3 gamut
for digital cinema; also uses the SMPTE standard PQ (ST.2084) tone curve for High
Dynamic Range (HDR) postproduction. A single setting is provided for HDR televisions
with peak luminance at 1000 nits.
DCDM: This ODT exports X’Y’Z’-encoded media with a gamma of 2.6 intended for
handoff to applications that will be re-encoding this data to create a DCP (Digital
Cinema Package) for digital cinema distribution. This can be displayed via an XYZcapable projector.
P3 D60: Outputs RGB-encoded image data with a D60 white point, intended for
monitoring with a P3-compatible display using a D60 white point.

Part 1 – 6

P3-D65 ST2084 (1000/2000/4000 nits): Transforms an image that’s compatible with
the P3 color gamut, using the SMPTE standard PQ (ST.2084) tone curve for High
Dynamic Range (HDR) postproduction. Three settings for three different peak
luminance ranges are provided; which one is appropriate to use depends on the
maximum white level of the display used to create the media. Preliminary standards
exist for HDR displays with peak luminance at 1000 nits, 2000 nits, and 4000 nits.

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P3-D65: Transforms RGB-encoded image data with a D65 white point, intended for
monitoring with a P3-compatible display using a D65 white point.

149

P3 DCI: Outputs RGB-encoded P3 image data with the native P3 white point, intended
for monitoring with a P3-compatible display (using its native white point).

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

P3-D65: Transforms RGB-encoded image data with a D65 white point, intended for
monitoring with a P3-compatible display using a D65 white point.
P3-D65 ST2084 (1000/2000/4000 nits): Transforms an image that’s compatible with
the P3 color gamut, using the SMPTE standard PQ (ST.2084) tone curve for High
Dynamic Range (HDR) postproduction. Three settings for three different peak
luminance ranges are provided; which one is appropriate to use depends on the
maximum white level of the display used to create the media. Preliminary standards
exist for HDR displays with peak luminance at 1000 nits, 2000 nits, and 4000 nits.
P3 DCI: A standardized ODT that outputs RGB-encoded image data with a D61 white
point, intended for use when outputting media for DCI mastering.
ADX (10 and 16): A standardized ODT designed for media destined for film output. Two
settings accommodate 10-bit and 16-bit output. This ODT is not meant to be used for
monitoring.
sRGB: A standardized transform designed for media created for computer display in a
consumer environment.
sRGB (D60 Sim.): A standardized ODT designed for media destined for computer
display in a consumer environment. Suitable for monitoring when grading programs
destined for the web.
ACEScc/ACEScct/ACEScg: Standardized transforms for each of these ACES standards.
You must manually select an ODT that matches your workflow and room setup when
working in ACES.

The Initial State of Clips When Working in ACES
Don’t worry if the initial state of each image file appears differently than what was monitored
originally on set. What’s important is that if the camera original media was well exposed, the IDT
used in ACES mode will retain the maximum amount of image data, and provide the maximum
available latitude for grading, regardless of how the image initially appears on the Timeline.

Tips For Rendering Out of an ACES Project
When choosing an output format in the Deliver page, keep the following in mind:
‚‚ If you’ve delivering graded media for broadcast, set the ACES Output Device Transform
to be Rec. 709, then you can output to whatever media format is convenient for
your workflow.
‚‚ When you’re delivering graded media files to another ACES-capable facility using the
DCDM or ADX ODCs, you should choose the OpenEXR RGB Half (uncompressed)
format in the Render Settings, and set the ACES Output Device Transform to “No
Output Device Transform.”
‚‚ When you’re rendering media for long-term archival, you should choose the OpenEXR
RGB Half (uncompressed) format in the Render Settings, and set the ACES Output
Device Transform to “No Output Device Transform.”

Part 1 – 6

P3 D60 ST2084 (1000/2000/4000 nits): Outputs an image that’s compatible with the
P3 color gamut, using the SMPTE standard PQ tone curve for High Dynamic Range
(HDR) postproduction. Three settings for three different peak luminance ranges are
provided; which one is appropriate to use depends on the maximum white level of your
display. Preliminary standards exist for HDR displays with peak luminance at 1000 nits,
2000 nits, and 4000 nits.

High Dynamic Range (HDR) video describes an emerging family of video encoding and
distribution technologies designed to enable a new generation of television displays to play
video capable of intensely bright highlights and increased saturation. The general idea is that
the majority of an HDR image will be graded similarly to how a Standard Dynamic Range (SDR)
image is graded now, with the shadows, midtones, and low highlights being mostly the same
between traditionally SDR and HDR-graded images, to maintain a comfortable viewing
experience and easier backward compatibility. However, HDR provides abundant additional
headroom for very bright highlights and color saturation that far exceed what has been visible in
SDR television and cinema, without clipping, that enable the colorist to create more vivid and
life-like highlights in images such as sunsets, lit clouds, firelight, explosions, sparkles, and other
intensely bright and colorful imagery. This not only provides more life-like lighting intensity and
saturation, but it also dramatically expands the contrast available in the scene. For example, an
SDR display may have a peak luminance level of 100 “nits” (cd/m2), but HDR displays may have
peak luminance levels of 500, 1000, or even 4000 nits.
However, because it’s an emerging technology, the technical standards being proposed far
exceed what the first few generations of consumer displays are capable of. At the time of this
writing, consumer televisions are only capable of outputting closer to 300, 500, or 800 nits,
and are saddled with automatic brightness limiting (ABL) circuits in order to limit power
consumption to acceptable levels for home use, which means that only a certain percentage of
the picture may reach these peak values at any one time. This is fine, because the point of HDR
is not that you’re making the entire image brighter, it’s that you have more headroom for high
saturation and specific bright highlights.
For this reason, HDR standards focus on describing what displays should be capable of, not
how these levels are to be used. This means that the question of how to utilize the expansive
headroom for brightness and saturation that HDR enables is fully within the domain of the
colorist, as a series of creative decisions that must be made regarding how to assign the
varying levels of brightness that are available in your source media to the HDR standard you’re
mastering to as you grade.

The Different Formats of HDR
While different HDR technologies use different methods to map the video levels of your
program to an HDR display’s capabilities, they all output a “near-logarithmically” encoded signal
that requires a compatible television that’s capable of correctly stretching this signal into its
“normalized” form for viewing. This means if you look at an HDR signal that’s output from
the video interface of your grading workstation on an SDR display, it will look flat, desaturated,
and unappealing until it’s plugged into your HDR display of choice.

A graded HDR image being output looks similar to a log-encoded image

Part 1 – 6

The HDR features found in DaVinci Resolve are only available in DaVinci Resolve Studio.

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High Dynamic Range (HDR)
Grading in Resolve

However, these standards have nothing to say about how these HDR-strength levels are to be
used creatively. This means that the question of how to utilize the expansive headroom for
brightness and saturation that HDR enables is fully within the domain of the colorist, as a series
of creative decisions that must be made regarding how to assign the range of highlights that are
available in your source media to the above-100 nit HDR levels you’re mastering to as you
grade, given the peak luminance level that you’re mastering with. Which HDR peak luminance
level you use (1000 nit, 4000 nit) probably depends on which monitor you have access to, and
which HDR mastering technology you’re using.
The following sections will describe how to work with Dolby Vision, HDR 10, and Hybrid
Log‑Gamma in Resolve.

Dolby Vision
Long a pioneer and champion of the concept of HDR for enhancing the consumer video
experience, Dolby Labs has developed a method for delivering HDR called Dolby Vision. Dolby
Vision uses the SMPTE 2084 “PQ” EOTF along with colorist-controlled metadata that maintains
a program’s artistic intent across multiple displays capable of a wide luminance range, from 0 to
10,000 cd/m2. Resolve provides access to the SMPTE 2084 PQ EOTF settings required for
mastering Dolby Vision, both as Color Space settings in RCM and as a set of 3D LUTs. While
Dolby Vision content is not limited to a particular color space, Resolve Color Management
provides a P3 D65 setting that matches the capabilities of the current generation of mastering
monitors available from Dolby.
However, to accommodate backward compatibility with SDR displays, as well as the
varying maximum brightness of different makes and models of HDR consumer displays, Dolby
Vision offers both dual layer backward compatible and single layer non-backward compatible
output options (mastering is identical for both). The dual layer backward compatible output
option accommodates a two-stream video delivery method that consists of a base layer and an
enhancement layer with metadata. On an SDR television, only the base layer is played, which
contains a Rec. 709-compatible image that’s a colorist-guided approximation of the HDR image.
On a Dolby Vision-enabled HDR television, however, both the base and enhancement layers
will be recombined, using additional “artistic guidance” metadata generated by the colorist to
determine how the resulting HDR image highlights should be scaled to fit the varied peak white
levels and color volume performance that’s available on any given Dolby Vision television.
Those, in a nutshell, are the twin advantages of the Dolby Vision system. It’s backward
compatible with SDR televisions, and it’s capable of intelligently scaling the HDR highlights to
provide the best representation of the mastered image for whatever peak luminance and color
volume a particular television is capable of. All of this is guided by decisions made by the
colorist during the grade.

Part 1 – 6

Each of these standards is most easily enabled using Resolve Color Management (RCM) via
Color Space options in the Color Management panel of the Project Settings. Alternately, LUTs
are available for each of these color space conversions if you want to do things the old
fashioned way, but Resolve Color Management has become so mature in the last year that, from
experience, I personally recommend this approach to handling HDR in Resolve.

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At the time of this writing, there are three approaches to mastering HDR that DaVinci Resolve is
capable of supporting, including Dolby Vision, HDR 10 and ST.2084 (derived from the PQ curve
developed by Dolby), and Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG). Each of these HDR standards focuses on
describing how an HDR signal is encoded for output and later mapped to the output of an
HDR display.

DaVinci Resolve Hardware Setup for Dolby Vision
To master with Dolby Vision in DaVinci Resolve, you need a somewhat elaborate hardware
setup, consisting of the following equipment:
‚‚ Your DaVinci Resolve grading workstation, outputting via either a DeckLink 4K Extreme
12G or an UltraStudio 4K Extreme video interface
‚‚ A Dolby Vision Certified HDR Mastering Monitor
‚‚ An SDR (probably Rec. 709-calibrated) display
‚‚ A standalone hardware video processor called the Content Management Unit (CMU),
which is a standard computer platform with a Video I/O card. The CMU is only available
from Dolby Authorized System Integrators; please contact Dolby for an Authorized
Systems Integrator near you.
‚‚ A video router such as the BMD Smart Videohub
This hardware is all connected as seen in the following illustration:

DaVinci Resolve
DeckLink 4K
Extreme 12G

A-Link
B-Link

BMD Smart Videohub

A-Link

SDI

Master
HDR Monitor

B-Link

A-Link

A-Link

Dolby CMU
B-Link

B-Link

SDR or
EDR Monitor

Gigabit Ethernet

Illustration of how to connect the necessary equipment for Dolby Vision grading in Resolve

Your Resolve workstation will connect its dual SDI outputs to the BMD Smart Videohub, which
splits the video signal to two mirrored sets of SDI outputs. One mirrored pair of SDI outputs
goes to your HDR display. The other mirrored pair of SDI outputs goes to the CMU (Content
Mapping Unit), which is itself connected to your SDR display via SDI. Lastly, the Resolve
workstation is connected to the Dolby CMU via Gigabit Ethernet to enable the CMU to
communicate back to Resolve.
The CMU is an off-the-shelf video processor that uses a combination of proprietary automatic
algorithms and colorist-adjustable metadata within Resolve to define how an HDR-graded
video should be transformed into an SDR picture that can be displayed on a standard Rec. 709
display, as well as how the enhancement layer should scale itself to varying peak
luminance levels.

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So, who’s using Dolby Vision? At the time of this writing, all seven major Hollywood studios are
mastering in Dolby Vision for Cinema. Studios that have pledged support to master content in
Dolby Vision for home distribution include Universal, Warner Brothers, Sony Pictures, and MGM.
Content providers that have agreed to distribute streaming Dolby Vision content include Netflix,
Vudu, and Amazon. If you want to watch Dolby Vision content on television at home, consumer
display manufacturers LG, TCL, Vizio, and HiSense have all announced models with Dolby
Vision support.

Dolby Vision Controls in DaVinci Resolve
When your DaVinci Resolve workstation is authorized, a variety of controls become available in
DaVinci Resolve, starting with the Dolby Vision panel in the Project Settings, which exposes
settings for choosing what kind of Master Display you’re using, how the CMU should be
configured to output, a button to let you refresh your connection to the CMU, and a checkbox
that enables and disables Dolby Vision controls.

The Dolby Vision panel that appears in the Project Settings

All of the Dolby Vision analysis commands appear in the Color > Dolby Vision submenu. There
are four commands that let you analyze clips in the Timeline in different ways:
‚‚ Analyze All Shots: Automatically analyzes each clip in the Timeline and stores the
results individually.
‚‚ Analyze Selected Shot(s): Only analyzes selected shots in the Timeline.
‚‚ Analyze Selected And Blend: Analyzed multiple selected shots and averages the
result, which is saved to each clip. Useful to save time when analyzing multiple clips
that have identical content.
‚‚ Analyze Current Frame: A fast way to analyze clips where a single frame is
representative of the entire shot.

The Analyze commands in the Color > Dolby Vision menu

Part 1 – 6

To expose the Dolby Vision controls in DaVinci Resolve Studio, you need a Dolby Vision
Mastering license from Dolby. To install this license, refer to the instructions provided with the
license from Dolby. After installation, analyze any clip using the Color > Dolby Vision submenu
controls, and the Dolby Vision palette should become visible.

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Authorizing Resolve to Work With Dolby Vision

Controls found in the Dolby Vision palette are only visible once you’ve
authorized your system with a special key, available from Dolby

These Dolby Vision analysis and trim controls in DaVinci Resolve send metadata to the CMU by
encoding it into the first line of the SDI output. This metadata guides how the CMU makes this
transformation, because the CMU is actually the functional equivalent of the Dolby Vision chip
that’s inside each Dolby Vision-enabled television; what you’re really doing is using the CMU to
make your SDR display simulate a 100 nit Dolby Vision television.
Additionally, the CMU can be used to output 600 nit, 1000 nit, and 2000 nit versions of your
program, if you want to see how your master will scale to those peak luminance levels. This, of
course, requires the CMU to be connected to a display that’s capable of being set to those
peak luminance output levels.
Though not required, you have the option to visually trim your grade at up to four different peak
luminance levels, including 100 nit, 600 nit, 1000 nit and 2000 nit reference points, so you can
optimize a program’s visuals for the peak luminance and color volume performance of many
different televisions with a much finer degree of control. If you take this extra step, Dolby
Vision-compatible televisions will use the artistic guidance metadata you generate in each trim
pass to ensure the creative intent is preserved as closely as possible, in an attempt to provide
the viewer with the best possible representation of the director’s intent.
For example, if a program were graded relative to a 4000 nit display, along with a single 100 nit
Rec. 709 trim pass, then a Dolby Vision-compatible television with 750 nit peak output will
reference the 100 nit trim pass artistic guidance metadata in order to come up with the best way
of “splitting the difference” to output the signal correctly. On the other hand, were the colorist to
do three trim passes, the first at 100 nits, a second at 600 nits, and a third at 1000 nits, then a
750 nit-capable Dolby Vision television would be able to use the 600 and 1000 nit artistic intent
metadata to output more accurate HDR-strength highlights that take better advantage of the
750 nit output of that television.

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A Dolby Vision palette exposes a set of six controls, consisting of luminance-only Lift/Gamma/
Gain controls (that work slightly differently than those found in the Color Wheels palette),
Saturation, Chroma Weight Offset (which darkens parts of the picture to preserve colorfulness
that’s clipping in Rec. 709), and Tone Detail Weight, which preserves contrast detail in the
highlights that might otherwise be lost when the highlights are mapped to lower dynamic
ranges, usually due to clipping. Currently, this control is disabled for 100 nit/Rec. 709 grades (for
grades higher than 100 nits, increasing Tone Detail Weight increases the amount of highlight
detail that’s preserved).

‚‚ The Sony BVM X 300 (30”, 1000 nit, 4K)
‚‚ The Dolby PRM 32FHD (32”, 2000 nit, 1080)
‚‚ The Dolby Pulsar (42”, 4000 nit, 1080)
Of these, only the Sony is commercially available. The Dolby monitors are not commercially
available and are provided only in limited availability from Dolby.
When grading Dolby Vision, the HDR monitor should set to use P3/D65.

Setting Up Resolve Color Management For Grading HDR
Once the hardware is set up, setting up Resolve itself to output HDR for Dolby Vision mastering
is easy using Resolve Color Management (RCM). This procedure is pretty much the same no
matter which HDR mastering technology you’re using; only specific Output Color Space settings
will differ.
1

Set Color Science to DaVinci YRGB Color Managed in the Color Management panel of
the Project Settings.

2

Then, open the Color Management panel, and set the Output Color Space pop-up to
the ST.2084 setting that corresponds to the peak luminance, in nits, of the grading
display you’re using. For example, if you’re grading with a Sony BVM X300, choose
ST.2084 1000 nits. Be aware that whichever HDR setting you choose will impose a hard
clip at the maximum nit value supported by that setting. This is to prevent accidentally
overdriving HDR displays, which can have negative consequences.
‚‚ ST.2084 300 nit
‚‚ ST.2084 500 nit
‚‚ ST.2084 800 nit
‚‚ ST.2084 1000 nit
‚‚ ST.2084 2000 nit
‚‚ ST.2084 4000 nit
This setting is only the output EOTF (a sort of gamma transform, if you will, using the
terminology that DaVinci Resolve’s UI has used up until now).

3

Next, choose a setting in the Timeline Color Space that corresponds to the gamut you
want to use for grading, and that will be output. For example, if you want to grade the
Timeline as a log-encoded signal and “normalize” it yourself, you can choose ARRI Log
C or Cineon Film Log (this workflow is highly recommended for the best results). If you
would rather save time by having DaVinci Resolve normalize the Timeline to P3‑D65
and grade that way, you can choose that setting as well. In terms of defining the output
gamut, the rule is that if “Use Separate Color Space and Gamma” is turned off, the
Timeline Color Space setting will define your output gamut. If “Use Separate Color
Space and Gamma” is turned on, then you can specify whatever gamut you want in
the left Output Color Space pop-up menu, and choose the EOTF from the right pop-up
menu (as described in step 2).

Part 1 – 6

At the time of this writing, only three displays have been certified as Dolby Vision Certified
Mastering Monitors. Requirements include a minimum peak brightness of 1000 nits, a 200,000:1
contrast ratio, greater than Rec. 709 color gamut (preferably P3), and native support for SMPTE
ST.2084 (otherwise known as the PQ curve) as the EOTF. These displays include:

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Dolby Vision Certified Mastering Monitors

5

Additionally, the “Timeline resolution” and “Pixel aspect ratio” (in the project settings)
that your project is set to use is saved to the Dolby Vision metadata, so make sure your
project is set to the final Timeline resolution and PAR before you begin grading.

Resolve Grading Workflow For Dolby Vision
Once the hardware and software is all set up, you’re ready to begin grading Dolby Vision HDR.
The workflow is fairly straightforward.
1

First, grade the HDR image on your Dolby Vision Certified Mastering Monitor to look as
you want it to. Dolby recommends starting by setting the look of the HDR image, to set
the overall intention for the grade.

2

When using various grading controls in the Color page to grade HDR images, you may
find it useful to enable the HDR Mode of the node you’re working on by right-clicking
that node in the Node Editor and choosing HDR mode from the contextual menu. This
setting adapts that node’s controls to work within an expanded HDR range. Practically
speaking, this makes controls that operate by letting you make adjustments at different
tonal ranges, such as Custom Curves, Soft Clip, etcetera, work more easily with widelatitude signals.

3

When you’re happy with the HDR grade, click the Analysis button in the Dolby Vision
palette. This analyzes every pixel of every frame of the current shot, and performs and
stores a statistical analysis that is sent to the CMU to guide its automatic conversion of
the HDR signal to an SDR signal.

4

If you’re not happy with the automatic conversion, use the Lift/Gamma/Gain/Chroma
Weight/Chroma Gain controls in the Dolby Vision palette to manually “trim” the result to
the best possible Rec. 709 approximation of the HDR grade you created in step 1. This
stores what Dolby refers to as “artistic guidance” metadata.

5

If you obtain a good result, then move on to the next shot and continue work. If you
cannot obtain a good result, and worry that you may have gone too far with your HDR
grade to derive an acceptable SDR downconvert, you can always trim the HDR grade a
bit, and then re-trim the SDR grade to try and achieve a better downconversion. Dolby
recommends that if you make significant changes to the HDR master, particularly if you
modify the blacks or the peak highlights, you should re-analyze the scene. However, if
you only make small changes, then reanalyzing is not strictly required.

As you can see, the general idea promoted by Dolby is that a colorist will focus on grading the
HDR picture relative to the 1000, 2000, 4000, or higher nit display that is being used, and will
then rely on the colorist to use the Dolby Vision controls to “trim” this into a 100 nit SDR
version with artistic guidance. This “artistic guidance” metadata is saved as part of the mastered
media, and it’s used to more intelligently scale the HDR highlights to fit within any given HDR
display’s peak highlights, to handle how to downconvert the image for SDR displays, and also
how to respond when a television’s ABL circuit kicks in. In all of these cases, the colorist’s
artistic intent is used to guide all dynamic adjustments to the content.

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Be aware that, when it’s being properly output, HDR ST.2084 signals appear very
“log‑like,” in order to pack a wide dynamic range into the bandwidth of a standard
video signal. It’s the HDR display itself that “normalizes” this log-encoded image to look
as it should. For this reason, the image you see in your Color page Viewer is going to
appear flat and log-like, even though the image being displayed on your HDR reference
display looks vivid and correct. If you’re using a typical SDR computer display, and you
want to make the image in the Color Page Viewer look “normalized” at the expense of
clipping the HDR highlights (in the Viewer, not in the grade), you can use the 3D Color
Viewer Lookup Table setting in the Color Management panel of the Project Settings
to assign the appropriate ST.2084 setting with a peak nit level that corresponds to the
HDR broadcast display you’re outputting to.

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

4

‚‚ 1023 = 10,000 nits (no known display)
‚‚ 920 = 4000 nits (peak luminance on a Dolby Pulsar Monitor)
‚‚ 844 = 2000 nits (peak luminance on a Dolby PRM 32FHD)
‚‚ 767 = 1000 nits (peak luminance on a Sony BVM X300)
‚‚ 528 = 108 nits (Dolby Cinema projector peak luminance)
‚‚ 519 = 100 nits
‚‚ 447 = 48 nits (DCI projection and Dolby Cinema 3D peak luminance)
‚‚ 0 = 0 nits
If you’re monitoring with the built-in video scopes in DaVinci Resolve, you can turn on the
“Enable HDR Scopes for ST.2084” checkbox in the Color panel of the User Preferences,
which will replace the 10-bit scale of the video scopes with a scale based on “nit” values
(or cd/m2) instead.

The Video Scopes with “Enable HDR Scopes for ST.2084”
enabled in the Color panel of the User Preferences

If you’re unsatisfied with the amount of detail you’re seeing in the 0 – 519 range (0 – 100 nits) of
the video scope graphs, then you can use the 3D Scopes Lookup Table setting in the Color
Management panel of the Project Settings to assign the appropriate “HDR X nits to Gamma 2.4
LUT,” with X being the peak nit level of the HDR display you’re using. This converts the way the
scopes are drawn so that the 0 – 100 nit range of the signal takes up the entire range of the
scopes, from 0 through 1023. This will push the HDR-strength highlights up past the top of the
visible area of the scopes, making them invisible, but it will make it easier to see detail in the
midtones of the image.

Rendering a Dolby Vision Master
To deliver a Dolby Vision master after you’ve finished grading, you want make sure that the
Output Color Space of the Color Management panel of the Project Settings is set to the
appropriate HDR ST.2084 setting, based on the peak luminance in nits of your HDR display.
Then, you want to set your render up to use one of the following Format/Codec combinations:
‚‚ TIFF, RGB 16-bit
‚‚ EXR, RBG-half (no compression)

Part 1 – 6

When you’re using waveform scopes of any kind, including parade and overlay scopes, the
signal will fit within the 10-bit scale much differently owing to the way HDR is encoded. The
following chart of values will make it easier to understand what you’re seeing:

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Analyzing HDR Signals Using Scopes

On distribution, televisions that have licensed Dolby Vision use the base layer and
enhancement layer+metadata to determine how the HDR image should be rendered given each
display’s particular peak luminance capabilities. Distributors, for their part, need to provide a
minimum 10-bit signal to accommodate Dolby Vision’s wide range. As a result, DolbyVision
videos will look as they should on displays from 100 nits through 1000 nits peak luminance and
above, scaling the enhancement layer’s HDR-strength highlights to whatever peak luminance
level is possible on that display and recombining these highlights with the base layer, with no
unpredictable clipping.

SMPTE ST.2084, Ultra HD Premium, and HDR 10
Many display manufacturers who have no interest in licensing Dolby Vision for inclusion in their
displays are instead going with the simpler method of engineering their displays to be
compatible with SMPTE ST.2084. It requires only a single stream for distribution, there are no
licensing fees, no special hardware is required to master for it (other than an HDR mastering
display such as the Sony X300), and there’s no special metadata to write or deal with (at
this time).
Interestingly, SMPTE ST.2084 ratifies the “PQ” EOTF that was developed by Dolby and that’s
used by Dolby Vision that accommodates displays capable of peak luminance up to 10,000 cd/
m2 into a general standard. This standard requires at minimum a 10-bit signal for distribution,
and the EOTF is described such that the video signal utilizes the available code values of a
10-bit signal as efficiently as possible, while allowing for such a wide range of luminance in
the image.
SMPTE ST.2084 is also part of the “Ultra HD Premium” industry specification, which stipulates
that televisions bearing the Ultra HD Premium logo have the following capabilities:
‚‚ A minimum UHD resolution of 3840 x 2160
‚‚ A minimum gamut of 90% of P3
‚‚ A minimum dynamic range of either 0.05 nits black to 1000 nits peak luminance (to
accommodate LCD displays), or 0.0005 nits black to 540 nits peak luminance (to
accommodate OLED displays)
‚‚ Compatibility with SMPTE ST.2084
Finally, ST.2084 has been included in the HDR 10 standard adopted by the Blu-ray Disc
Association (BDA) that covers Ultra HD Blu-ray. HDR 10 stipulates that Ultra HD Blu-ray discs
have the following characteristics:
‚‚ UHD resolution of 3840 x 2160
‚‚ Up to the Rec. 2020 gamut
‚‚ SMPTE ST.2084
‚‚ Mastered with a peak luminance of 1000 nits
The downside is that, by itself, this EOTF is not backwards compatible with Rec. 709 displays
using BT.1886 (although the emerging metadata standard SMPTE ST.2086 seeks to address
this). Furthermore, no provision is made to scale the above-100 nit portion of the image to
accommodate different displays with differing peak luminance levels. For example, if you grade
and master an image to have peak luminance of 4000 nits, and you play that signal on an

Part 1 – 6

Playing Dolby Vision at Home

158

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

When you render for tapeless delivery, the artistic intent metadata is rendered into a Dolby
Vision XML and delivered with either the Tiffs or EXR renders. These two sets of files are then
delivered to a facility that’s capable of creating the Dolby Vision Mezzanine File (this cannot be
done in Resolve).

Comparing the original 1000 nit waveform representing the grading monitor to
a 500 nit clipped waveform representing the consumer television

How much of a problem this is really depends on how you choose to grade your HDR-strength
highlights. If you’re only raising the most extreme peak highlights to maximum HDR-strength
levels, then it’s entirely possible that the audience might not notice that the display is only
outputting 800 nits worth of signal and clipping any image details from 801 – 1000 nits because
there weren’t that many details above 800 anyway. Or, if you’re grading large explosive fireballs
up above 800 nits in their entirety because it looks cool, then maybe the audience will notice.
The bottom line is, when you’re grading for displays that are only capable of ST.2084, you need
to think about these sorts of things.

Part 1 – 6

This is because ST.2084 is referenced to absolute luminance. If you grade an HDR image
referencing a 1000 nit peak luminance display, as is recommended by HDR10, then any display
using ST.2084 will respect and reproduce all levels from the HDR signal that it’s capable of
reproducing as you graded them, up to the maximum peak luminance level it can reproduce.
For example, on an HDR10-compatible television capable of outputting 500 nits, all mastered
levels from 501 – 1000 will be clipped, as seen in the screenshot below.

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Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

ST.2084-compatible television that’s only capable of 800 nits, then everything above 800 nits
will be clipped, while everything below 800 nits will look exactly as it should relative to
your grade.

Setting up Resolve Color Management to grade for ST.2084 is identical to setting up to grade
for Dolby Vision. You’ll also monitor the video scopes identically, and output a master
identically, given that both standards rely upon the same PQ curve.

TIP: If you’re monitoring with the built-in video scopes in Resolve, you can turn on the
“Enable HDR Scopes for ST.2084” checkbox in the Color panel of the User
Preferences, which will replace the 10-bit scale of the video scopes with a scale based
on “nit” values (or cd/m2) instead.

Connecting to HDR-Capable Displays using HDMI 2.0a
If you have a DeckLink 4K Extreme 12G or an UltraStudio 4K Extreme video interface, then
DaVinci Resolve 12.5 and above can output the metadata necessary to correctly display HDR
video signals to display devices using HDMI 2.0a when you turn on the “Enable HDR metadata
over HDMI” checkbox in the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings.

The Enable HDR metadata over HDMI option in the Master Settings panel
of the Project Settings lets you output HDR via HDMI 2.0a

When you do so, a setting in the Color Management panel of the Project Settings,
“HDR mastering is for X” lets you specify the output, in nits, to be inserted as metadata into the
HDMI stream being output, so that the display you’re connecting to correctly interprets it. The
output you specify should match what your display is expecting.

The HDR mastering is for setting lets you insert metadata
for HDR output via HDMI 2.0a

Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG)
The BBC and NHK jointly developed another method of encoding HDR video, referred to as
Hybrid Log-Gamma (HLG). The goal of HLG was to develop a method of mastering HDR video
that would support a range of displays of different peak luminance capabilities without
additional metadata, that could be broadcast via a single stream of data, that would fit into a
10-bit signal, and that in the words of the ITU-R Draft Recommendation BT.HDR, “offers a
degree of compatibility with legacy displays by more closely matching the previous established
television transfer curves.”

Part 1 – 6

Monitoring an ST.2084 image is as simple as getting a ST.2084-compatible HDR display (such
as the Sony X300), and connecting the output of your video interface to the input of the display.
In the case of the Sony X300, which is a 4K capable display, you can connect four SDI outputs
from a DeckLink 4K Extreme 12G with the optional DeckLink 4K Extreme 12G Quad SDI
daughtercard, or an UltraStudio 4K Extreme, directly from your grading workstation to the X300,
and you’re ready to go.

160

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

Monitoring and Grading to ST.2084 in DaVinci Resolve

161

On a Hybrid Log-Gamma compatible HDR display, however, the log-like highlights of the image
(not the BT.1886-like bottom portion of the signal, just the highlights) would be stretched back
out, relative to whatever peak luminance level a given HDR television is capable of outputting,
to return the image to its true HDR glory. This is different from the HDR10 method of distribution
described previously, in which the graded signal is referenced to absolute luminance levels
dictated by ST.2084, and levels that cannot be represented by a given display will be clipped.

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

And while this facility to support multiple HDR displays with differing peak luminance levels is
somewhat analogous to Dolby Vision’s ability to tailor HDR output to the unique peak luminance
levels of any given Dolby Vision-compatible television, HLG requires no additional metadata to
guide how the highlights are scaled, which depending on your point of view is either a benefit
(less work), or a deficiency (no artistic guidance to make sure the highlights are being scaled in
the best possible way).
As is true for most things, you don’t get something for nothing. The BBC White Paper WHP 309
states that, for a 2000 cd/m2 HDR display with a black level of 0.01 cd/m2, up to 17.6 stops of
dynamic range without visible quantization artifacts (“banding”) is possible. BBC White Paper
WHP 286 states that the proposed HLG EOTF should support displays up to about 5000 nits.
So, partially, the backwards compatibility that HLG makes possible is due in part to discarding
long-term support for 10,000 nit displays. However, given that the brightest commerciallyavailable HDR display at the time of this writing is only 1000 nits peak luminance (the Sony
X300), and the brightest HDR display currently in use outputs 4000 nits peak luminance (the
experimental Dolby Pulsar), it’s an open question whether or not over 5000 nits is even
necessary for consumer enjoyment.
At the time of this writing, only Sony has demonstrated consumer HDR televisions capable of
displaying HLG encoded video. DaVinci Resolve, however, supports this standard through
Resolve Color Management.

Grading Hybrid Log-Gamma in DaVinci Resolve
Monitoring an ST.2084 image is as simple as getting a Hybrid Log-Gamma-compatible HDR
display, and connecting the output of your video interface to the input of the display.
Setting up Resolve Color Management to grade for HLG is identical to setting up to grade for
Dolby Vision, except that there are four HLG settings to choose from for the Output
Color Space:
‚‚ Rec.709 HLG ARIB STD-B67
‚‚ Rec.2020 HLG ARIB STD-B67
‚‚ Rec.2100 HLG
‚‚ Rec.2100 HLG (Scene)
Optionally, if you choose to enable “Use Separate Color Space and Gamma,” you can choose
either Rec. 2020, Rec. 2021, or Rec. 709 as your gamut, and Rec. 2100 HLG as your EOTF.
The levels you’ll be monitoring in your scopes will be different from the table of data to “nit”
values listed previously for grading to the PQ EOTF.

Part 1 – 6

The basic idea is that the HLG EOTF functions very similarly to BT.1886 from 0 to 0.6 of the
signal (with a typical 0 – 1 range), while 0.6 to 1.0 smoothly segues into logarithmic encoding for
the highlights. This means that, if you just send an HDR Hybrid Log-Gamma signal to an
SDR display, you’d be able to see much of the image identically to the way it would appear on
an HDR display, and the highlights would be compressed to present an acceptable amount of
detail for SDR broadcast.

The Dolby Vision workflow accounts for this by virtue of the hardware setup that’s required, but
if you’re grading using a more generic HDR 10 or HLG workflow, there’s still a way you can set
this up using the Stereo 3D features that have been upgraded in DaVinci Resolve 12.5.1.
What you do is to convert your media and timeline to stereo, so that you can use the Stereo 3D
palette to keep all of your SDR grades associated with one eye’s output, and all your HDR grades
associated with the other eye’s output. You can switch back and forth between each eye using
the Stereo 3D palette’s controls to choose which version you’re grading, and as you work, the
SDR and HDR versions of each shot will be simultaneously output to different displays via your
compatible Blackmagic Design video interface’s dual SDI outputs. It’s a bit of a hack, but it works.

You Can’t Use Resolve Color Management
While Outputting SDR and HDR
Resolve Color Management (RCM) cannot be used in this workflow, because it doesn’t let you
choose different Output Color Space settings for each SDI output. Instead, you must turn RCM off,
and use the built-in HDR LUTs found in the 3D LUT submenu of each Corrector node’s contextual
menu in the Node Editor of the Color page to convert one of the two streams into HDR.
The easiest way to do this is to apply the necessary LUT using the Timeline grade, since that’s
the very last operation applied to every clip in a timeline. When you work on a timeline in
stereo, the left and right eye streams of the Timeline grade are capable of holding separate
corrections, which is a new feature as of 12.5.1.

Setting Up to Display Dual Video
Streams via Two SDI Outputs
Originally intended for high-quality Stereo 3D monitoring, two separate SDI signals can be
simultaneously output at full resolution using one of the following Blackmagic Design video
interfaces:
‚‚ DeckLink HD Extreme 3D+
‚‚ DeckLink 4K Extreme
‚‚ DeckLink 4K Extreme 12G
‚‚ UltraStudio 4K
‚‚ UltraStudio 4K Extreme
‚‚ UltraStudio 4K Extreme 3

Part 1 – 6

It’s usually the case that you need to deliver both SDR and HDR versions of a program as
deliverables. Opinions vary about whether it’s better to grade the HDR version first and then do
a trim pass to produce the SDR version, versus grading the SDR version first and then doing a
trim pass to produce the HDR version. Either way, it can be a big help to see both the HDR and
SDR signals output at the same time to displays that are side-by-side, so you can directly
compare them as you trim.

162

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

Simultaneous SDR and
HDR Output While Grading

The following procedures describe how to set up stereo 3D monitoring in two different ways.

163

Open the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings, then do the following:
‚‚ Make sure Video Connection is set to YUV 4:2:2 SDI.
‚‚ Turn on the “Use left and right eye SDI output” checkbox.

2

Open the Stereo 3D palette, and do the following:
‚‚ Set Vision to Stereo.
‚‚ Set the Out pop-up menu to None.

NOTE: When “Enable dual SDI 3D monitoring” is turned on, split-screen wipes and
cursors will not be visible on the grading monitor, nor will you be able to view
image resizing

Converting Mono Clips or an Entire Timeline to Stereo
If you want to grade an HDR and non-HDR version of your timeline at the same time while
outputting each to a separate display for monitoring, you need to do the following:
‚‚ Convert the clips used by that timeline from mono into stereo so each clip can have
separate grades for each of the two SDI streams you’ll be outputting.
‚‚ Convert that timeline into a stereo timeline to enable dual-SDI output.
‚‚ Apply an HDR LUT to the Timeline grade of the left- or right-eye video stream so that
stream can be output to the SDI output being connected to an HDR display.
First, you need to convert your media into stereo clips. This won’t actually do anything to add
depth effects to the clips, it just flags them to be able to contain two grades capable of being
output separately.
To convert one or more mono clips into stereo clips:
1

Select one or more non-stereo clips in the Media Pool. In this case, you’ll want to
convert all of the clips used by a particular timeline you’re grading.

2

Right-click one of the selected clips and choose Convert to Stereo from the
contextual menu.
Afterwards, the selected clips appear in the Media Pool as Stereo 3D clips and can
expose their controls in the 3D Stereo palette of the Color page when they appear in
a timeline.

Once you have a timeline full of clips that you’ve converted into stereo using the above
procedure, you need to take the additional step of setting the Timeline to stereo in order to
enable dual-SDI output of that timeline.
To convert a timeline to have to stereo for simultaneous HDR/SDR output while grading:
Right-click a timeline in the Media Pool and choose Timelines > Set Timeline to Stereo
Once you’ve set a timeline and its media to be faux Stereo 3D, you’re ready to set up which
stream should be graded and output as HDR.

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

1

Part 1 – 6

Monitoring via dual SDI to dual SDI:

Open the Stereo 3D palette, and click the Left or Right button to choose which video
stream you want to monitor, grade, and output as HDR.

2

Turn off the Link button that’s to the right of the Left and Right buttons to make sure
that each stream’s grade is unlinked. This is necessary to keep the SDR and HDR
grades separate.

3

Choose the Timeline grade mode in the Node Editor, and press Option-S to create
a new node.

4

Right-click the node you just created, and choose the desired output option from the
3D LUT > HDR ST.2084 or 3D LUT > HDR Hybrid Log-Gamma submenus. The output
option you choose should correspond to the type of HDR display you have, and in the
case of ST.2084, the maximum luminance value your display can output.

At this point, you’re all set up to grade and output the SDR version of your program using one
eye of the Stereo 3D palette, with the HDR version of your program graded and output via the
other eye using the 3D LUT you’ve chosen.
To choose which stereo stream you want to grade:
Open the Stereo 3D palette, and click the Left or Right button to choose which video
stream you’re grading.
The Left and Right buttons of the Stereo 3D palette choose which video stream you’re set to
grade in every single clip of the timeline. If you look at the small 3D badge at the bottom of
each clip in the Thumbnail timeline, Orange indicates you’re grading the left eye stream, and
light blue indicates you’re grading the right eye stream.

Outputting Both Video Streams in the Deliver Page
After you’ve graded both the SDR and HDR streams, you can choose to render one or both of
them using the Render Stereoscopic 3D settings in the Video panel of the Render Settings in
the Deliver page. You can choose to render “Both eyes as” with the option “Separate Files,” or
you can choose to render just the Left eye or Right eye media.

164

Part 1 – 6

1

Data Levels, Color Management, ACES, and HDR

To set one of the stereo streams to output HDR:

PART 2

Part 2 – 7

Using the
Media Page

166

Using the Media Page

Chapter 7

Using the Media Page

The Media page also contains much of the core functionality used for on-set workflows, as well
as most of the functions that are used in the ingest, organization, and sound-synching
procedures corresponding to digital dailies workflows.
This chapter covers the following topics:

Understanding the Media Page User Interface

168

The Interface Toolbar

168

The Media Storage Browser

169

The Media Storage Browser’s Volume List

169

The Media Storage Browser Area

170

Viewer

172

Live Media Preview

173

Media Pool

174

The Bin List

174

Showing Bins in Separate Windows

174

Bins, Power Bins, and Smart Bins

175

Filtering Bins Using Color Tags

176

Sorting the Bin List

177

Thumbnail View and List View in the Media Pool

177

Searching for Content in the Media Pool

178

Taking Advantage of the Media Pool’s Usage Column

178

Metadata Editor

178

Audio Panel

179

Dual Monitor Layout

180

Customizing the Media Page

181

Using the Media Page

The Media page is the primary interface for media import and clip organization in
DaVinci Resolve. As of version 12, it’s also where all timelines that you edit in DaVinci Resolve or
import from other applications are organized. Although timelines and clips are now saved in the
same place, it’s central to the way DaVinci Resolve works that the source media used by a
project is managed separately from your timelines. In this way, you can manage and update the
clips used by timelines with ease, importing and reorganizing clips, switching between offline
and online media, and troubleshooting any problems that occur.

Part 2 – 7

167

Media page

Much of the functionality and most of the commands are found within the contextual menus that
appear when you right-click clips in the Media Storage browser or Media Pool.

The Interface Toolbar
At the very top of the Media page is a toolbar with buttons that let you show and hide different
parts of the user interface. These buttons are as follows, from left to right:

The interface toolbar

‚‚ Media Storage full/half height button: Lets you set the Media Storage browser to take
up the full height of your display, if you need more area for browsing at the expense of
a smaller Media Pool.
‚‚ Media Storage: Lets you hide or show the Media Storage browser. Hiding the Media
Storage browser creates more room for the Viewer.
‚‚ Clone Tool: Shows or hides the Clone tool, used for cloning media from camera cards
or hard drives.
‚‚ Audio Panel: Hides or shows the Audio Panel.
‚‚ Metadata: Hides or shows the Metadata Editor.
‚‚ Capture: Switches the Viewer and Audio Panel to Capture Mode, exposing the controls
necessary for cuing up a device-controllable deck, and batch recording from tape.
‚‚ Audio Panel/Metadata Editor full/half height button: Lets you set the Audio Panel
or Metadata Editor to take up the full height of your display, if you need more area for
either of those functions.

Part 2 – 7

By default, the Media page is divided into five different areas, designed to make it easy to find,
select, and work with media in your project.

168

Using the Media Page

Understanding the Media
Page User Interface

Media Storage browser with scrubbable clip view

The Media Storage Browser’s Volume List
At the left of the Media Storage browser is a list of all volumes that are currently available to
your DaVinci Resolve workstation. It’s used to locate media that you want to import manually
into your project. The list is divided into two vertical areas of volumes. At the top are the actual
volumes on your workstation:
‚‚ Scratch volumes: Indicated by a usage statistic to the right of the volume name that
lists how full that volume is, these are disks that you’ve added to the Media Storage
panel of the System Preferences window. The topmost of these scratch disks is used to
store Gallery stills and cache files.
‚‚ Available volumes: Indicated by disk icons, this is a list of all fixed, removable,
and network volumes that are currently available to your workstation. When the
“Automatically display attached local and network storage locations” checkbox is
turned on in the Media Storage panel of the System Preferences, new volumes that are
attached to your workstation should automatically appear in this list.
This is a hierarchical list; clicking the disclosure triangle to the left of any volume opens up an
additional list of that volume’s subdirectories, with additional disclosure triangles next to each
subdirectory. Using the Media Storage browser, you can drill down into as many subdirectories
as you need to.

Part 2 – 7

The Media Storage browser lets you see all of the volumes connected to your workstation,
browsing them for media that you want to import into your DaVinci Resolve project in one way
or another. Whereas other applications have some sort of import dialog, DaVinci Resolve has
the Media Page. To facilitate media import, the Media Storage browser is divided into two
areas, the Volume List, and the Media Browser.

169

Using the Media Page

The Media Storage Browser

If you’re using the Apple App Store version of DaVinci Resolve, auto-mounting of attached
storage volumes is not enabled automatically. However, you can enable this in the Media
Storage panel of the System Preferences. For more information, see the DaVinci Resolve
Preferences section of Chapter 3, “Project Settings and Preferences.”

Media Storage Browser Favorites
Underneath this is the Favorites area. If there are special directories that you find yourself
frequently accessing, you can add them to the Favorites in order to avoid having to traverse
complex hierarchies in order to access the media you need. The Favorites can be easily
customized and used.
Methods of organizing favorite file system locations in the Media Storage Browser:
‚‚ To add a favorite: Right-click any folder in the Media Storage browser folder list, and
choose “Add folder to favorites” from the contextual menu. The new favorite appears at
the bottom of the Favorites area.
‚‚ To open a favorite: Click any favorite to expose the contents of the corresponding
directory in the Media Storage browser.
‚‚ To remove a favorite: Right-click the favorite you want to remove, and choose “Remove
folder from favorites” from the contextual menu.

The Media Storage Browser Area
Once you’ve selected a volume or subdirectory in the Media Storage browser, you can view its
contents in List view or Thumbnail view to search though the media that’s available to you as
you try to find what you need.

List View
In List view, the following columns are available for sorting media prior to importing it into the
Media Pool:
‚‚ File name: The name of a file.
‚‚ Reel name: The reel name as it’s currently derived according to the Conform Options
that are currently chosen in the General Options panel of the Project Settings.
‚‚ Start TC: The first timecode value in the source media.
‚‚ Start: The first frame number in the source media.
‚‚ End: The last frame number in the source media.
‚‚ Frames: The duration of each clip in frames.
‚‚ Resolution: The frame size of the source media.
‚‚ Bit Depth: The bit depth of the source media.
‚‚ FPS: The frame rate of the source media.
‚‚ Audio Ch: The number of audio channels within the source media.
‚‚ Date Modified: The date modified metadata from the source media file.
‚‚ Shot: Additional metadata from media formats that support it.
‚‚ Scene: Additional metadata from media formats that support it.

Part 2 – 7

If you need to access a storage volume that doesn’t appear on this list, for example if you’re
using the version of DaVinci Resolve that is available in the Apple App Store, then you can
right-click anywhere in the background of the Volume list and choose “Add New Location” to
open a dialog you can use to choose a volume you want to add.

170

Using the Media Page

Adding Volumes That Don’t Appear in This List

‚‚ Angle: Additional metadata from media formats that support it.

171

If you work in List view, you gain additional organizational control by exposing columns that
show the metadata that each clip contains, prior to media being added to your timeline. You can
use these columns to help organize your media.
Methods of customizing metadata columns in List view:
‚‚ To show or hide columns: Right-click at the top of any column in the Media Storage
browser and select an item in the contextual menu list to check or uncheck a particular
column. Unchecked columns cannot be seen.
‚‚ To rearrange column order: Drag any column header to the left or right to rearrange
the column order.
‚‚ To resize any column: Drag the border between any two columns to the right or left to
narrow or widen that column.
‚‚ To sort by any column: Click the column header you want to sort with. Each additional
time you click, the same header toggles that column between ascending and
descending sort order.
You can also customize column layouts in the Media Storage area. Once you’ve customized a
column layout that works for your particular purpose, you can save it for future recall.
Methods of saving and using custom column layout:
‚‚ To create a column layout: Show, hide, resize, and rearrange the columns you need
for a particular task, then right-click any column header in the Media Pool and choose
Create Column Layout. Enter a name in the Create Column Layout dialog, and click OK.
‚‚ To recall a column layout: Right-click any column header in the Media Pool and choose
the name of the column layout you want to use. All custom column layouts are at the
top of the list.
‚‚ To delete a column layout: Right-click any column header in the Media Pool and
choose the name of the column layout you want to delete from the Delete Column
Layout submenu.

Thumbnail View
While in Thumbnail view, you can scrub through a clip’s icon to see its contents, and you can
also click the Clip Info pop-up menu at the bottom right corner of any clip’s thumbnail to see an
instant summary of that clip’s vital information, including:
‚‚ File name: The name of that file.
‚‚ In timecode: The first frame in the source media.
‚‚ Out timecode: The last frame in the source media.
‚‚ Duration: The total duration of the source media.
‚‚ Resolution: The frame size of the source media.
‚‚ Frame Rate: The frame rate, in fps, of the source media.
‚‚ Pixel Aspect Ratio: The aspect ratio of the source media.
‚‚ Codec: Which codec is used by the source media.
‚‚ Date Created: The date created metadata from the source media file.
‚‚ Flags: Flag metadata applied either by the camera that shot the media, in the Metadata
Editor, or in the Color page Timeline.

Using the Media Page

‚‚ Good Take: Additional metadata from media formats that support it.

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‚‚ Take: Additional metadata from media formats that support it.

Part 2 – 7

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Using the Media Page

Also while in Thumbnail view, you can use the Thumbnail Sort pop-up menu (between the zoom
slider and the Thumbnail view button) to choose a criteria by which to organize the thumbnails.
Options include File Name, Reel Name, Start TC, FPS, Audio Ch, and Date Modified.

The Thumbnail Sort pop-up in the
Media Storage browser

Going Immediately to a Finder Location in the Media Browser
If you drag a folder from the Finder into the Media Storage browser, the Media Storage browser
will immediately update to show the location of that folder.

Viewer
Clips that you select in any area of the Media page show their contents in the Viewer. The
current position of the playhead is shown in the timecode field at the upper right-hand corner of
the Viewer.

Viewer

Simple transport controls appear underneath the jog bar, letting you Jump to First Frame,
Play Backwards, Stop, Play Forward, and Jump to Last Frame. A jog control to the left of these
buttons lets you move through a long clip more slowly; click it and drag to the left or right to
move through a clip a frame at a time.

There’s an additional option for the Media Page Viewer that you can expose by choosing Mark
In/Mark Out Timecode from the Viewer option menu. This reveals an info bar at the top of the
Viewer that displays the In and Out timecode, as well as the duration of the currently marked
section of media.

An optional info bar for showing the timecode and duration of a marked section of media

You can also put the Viewer into Cinema Viewer mode by choosing Workspace > Viewer Mode
> Cinema Viewer (Command-F), so that it fills the entire screen. This command toggles Cinema
Viewer mode on and off.

Live Media Preview
Enabled by default, the Live Media Preview setting found in the Viewer options menu (the
three-dots menu found at the upper right-hand corner of the Viewer) makes it possible for
thumbnails that you’re skimming in either the Media Storage browser or Media Pool to show the
skimmed frame in the Viewer. When skimming with Live Media Preview enabled, the playhead
that appears in the thumbnail is locked to the playhead displayed in the Viewer’s jog bar. You
can turn Live Media Preview on or off.

When Live Media Preview is on in
the Viewer options menu, skimming
thumbnails mirrors to the Viewer

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A jog or scrubber bar appears directly underneath the image, letting you drag the playhead
directly with the pointer. The full width of the jog bar represents the full duration of the clip in
the Viewer.

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Using the Media Page

To the right of the transport controls, In and Out buttons let you set In and Out points for the
current clip. The current In and Out points are indicated in the jog bar, and their timecode
values, along with the resulting clip duration, are shown in the In, Out, and Duration timecode
fields below. The Cue buttons move the playhead to these In and Out cue points. The clip’s
timecode is also displayed at the top right.

Media Pool with the Bin list open

The Bin List
Ordinarily, all media imported into a project goes into the Master bin, which is always at the top
of the Bin list and encompasses everything in a given project. However, you can add bins of
your own, and the Media Pool can be organized into as many user-definable bins as you like,
depending on your needs. Media can be freely moved from one bin to another from within the
Media Pool. When working in projects with multiple bins, you can choose to expose the bin
structure in one of two ways:
‚‚ Bin list open: The Bin List button at the upper left-hand corner of the Media Pool lets
you open a separate List view showing all bins in your project, hierarchically. Bins that
contain other bins appear with a disclosure button to their left, that you can use to show
or hide the contents. With the Bin list exposed, it’s easy to organize clips among a large
collection of bins.
‚‚ Bin list closed: When the Bin list is closed, all bins are hidden, and contents of
whichever bin is currently selected populate the Media Pool browser.

Showing Bins in Separate Windows
If you right-click a bin in the Bin list, you can choose “Open As New Window” to open that bin
into its own window. Each window is its own Media Pool, complete with its own Bin, Power Bins
and Smart Bins lists, and display controls.
This is most useful when you have two displays connected to your workstation, as you can drag
these separate bins to the second display while DaVinci Resolve is in single screen mode. If you
hide the Bin list, not only do you get more room for clips, but you also prevent accidentally
switching bins if you really want to only view a particular bin’s contents in that window. You can
have as many additional Bin windows open as you care to, in addition to the main Media Pool
that’s docked in the primary window interface.

Part 2 – 7

The Media Pool contains all of the media that you import into the current project and all of the
timelines you create. It also contains all media that’s automatically imported along with Projects
or Timelines that have themselves been imported into DaVinci Resolve. In the Media page,
enough room is given to the Media Pool to make it an ideal place to sort, sift through, and
organize the clips in your project. However, the Media Pool is also mirrored in the Edit and
Fairlight pages, so you can access clips to build your projects.

174

Using the Media Page

Media Pool

Using the Media Page

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175

Media Pool bins opened as new windows

Bins, Power Bins, and Smart Bins
There are actually three kinds of bins in the Media Pool, and each appears in its own section of
the Bin list. The Power Bin and Smart Bin areas of the Bin list can be shown or hidden using
commands in the View menu (View > Show Smart Bins, View > Show Power Bins).
Here are the differences between the different kinds of bins:
‚‚ Bins: Simple, manually populated bins. Drag and drop anything you like into a bin,
and that’s where it lives, until you decide to move it to another bin. Bins may be
hierarchically organized, so you can create a Russian dolls nest of bins if you like.
Creating new bins is as easy as right-clicking within the Bin list and choosing Add Bin
from the contextual menu.
‚‚ Power Bins: Hidden by default. These are also manually populated bins, but these
bins are shared among all of the projects in your current database, making them ideal
for shared title generators, graphics movies and stills, sound effects library files, music
files, and other media that you want to be able to quickly and easily access from any
project. To create a new Power Bin, show the Power Bins area of the Bin list, then rightclick within it and choose Add Bin.
‚‚ Smart Bins: These are procedurally populated bins, meaning that custom rules
employing metadata are used to dynamically filter the contents of the Media Pool
whenever you select a Smart Bin. This makes Smart Bins fast ways of organizing the
contents of projects for which you (or an assistant) has taken the time to add metadata
to your clips using the Metadata Editor, adding Scene, Shot, and Take information,
keywords, comments and description text, and myriad other pieces of information to
make it faster to find what you’re looking for when you need it. To create a new Smart
Bin, show the Smart Bin area of the Bin list (if necessary), then right-click within it and
choose Add Smart Bin. A dialog appears in which you can edit the name of that bin and
the rules it uses to filter clips, and click Create Smart Bin.

For example, you can identify the bins that have clips you’re using most frequently with a red
tag. A bin’s color tag then appears as a colored background behind that bin’s name.

Using Color Tags to identify bins

Once you’ve tagged one or more Media Pool bins, you can use the Color Tag Filter pop-up menu
(the pop-up control to the right of the Bin List button) to filter out all but a single color of bin.

Using Color Tag filtering to isolate the blue bins

To go back to seeing all available bins, choose Show All from the Color Tag Filter pop-up.

Part 2 – 7

If you’re working on a project that has a lot of bins, you can apply color tags to identify particular
bins with one of eight colors. Tagging bins is as easy as right-clicking any bin and choosing the
color you want from the Color Tag submenu.

176

Using the Media Page

Filtering Bins Using Color Tags

You can also choose User Sort from the same contextual menu, which lets you manually drag all
bins in the Bin list to be in whatever order you like. As you drag bins in this mode, an orange line
indicates the new position that bin will occupy when dropped.

Dragging a bin to a new position
in the Bin list in User Sort mode

If you use User Sort in the Bin list to rearrange your bins manually, you can switch back and forth
between any of the other sorting methods (Name, Date Created, Date Modified) and User Sort
and your manual User Sort order will be remembered, making it easy to use whatever method of
bin sorting is most useful at the time, without losing your customized bin organization.

Thumbnail View and List View in the Media Pool
The contents of the Media Pool can be browsed one of two ways:
‚‚ Thumbnail view: Each clip is represented by an icon, with its file name appearing
underneath. When you move the pointer over a clip’s icon, DaVinci Resolve
automatically scrubs through that clip, showing you its contents. Also, a Clip Info popup menu appears in the lower right-hand corner. Click the Clip Info pop-up to see an
overlay appear showing essential information about that clip. In Thumbnail view, you
can use the Sort Order pop-up to choose how clips are sorted.
‚‚ List view: Each clip is represented by an item on a text list. Additionally, multiple
columns of information appear, organized by headers. Clicking any header lets you sort
the list by that column, in either ascending or descending order.
For more information about browsing the contents of the Media Pool, see Chapter 8, “Adding
and Organizing Media with the Media Pool.”

Part 2 – 7

The Bin list (and Smart Bin list) of the Media Pool can be sorted by bin Name, Date Created, or
Date Modified, in either ascending or descending order. Simply right-click anywhere within the
Bin list and choose the options you want from the Sort by submenu of the contextual menu.

177

Using the Media Page

Sorting the Bin List

To search for a clip by name:
1

Select which bin or bins you want to search.

2

Click the magnifying glass button at the upper right-hand corner of the Media Pool.

3

Choose the particular column of information you want to search (or All Fields to search
all columns) using the Filter by pop-up menu. Only selected bins will be searched.

4

Type your search string into the Search field that appears. A few letters should be
enough to isolate only those clips that have that character string within their name.
To show all clips again, click the cancel button at the right of the search field.

TIP: Smart Bins are essentially multi-criteria search operations that scope the entire
project at once and are saved for future use.

Taking Advantage of the Media Pool’s Usage Column
In List view, the Usage column does not automatically update to show how many times a
particular clip has been used. However, you can manually update this metadata by right-clicking
within the Media Pool and choosing Update Usage Data from the contextual menu that
appears. Afterwards, each clip will display how many times it’s been used in this column.
Clips that have not been used yet display an x.

Metadata Editor
Both the Media and Edit pages have a Metadata Editor. When you select a clip in any area of
the Media page, its metadata is displayed within the Metadata Editor. If you select multiple clips,
only the last clip’s information appears. The Metadata Editor’s header contains uneditable
information about the selected clip, including the file name, directory, duration, video codec,
frame rate, resolution, audio codec, sample rate, and number of channels.
Because there are so very many metadata fields available, two pop-up menus at the top let you
change which set of metadata is displayed in the Metadata Editor.
‚‚ Metadata Presets (to the left): If you’ve used the Metadata panel of the User
Preferences to create your own custom sets of metadata, you can use this pop-up to
choose which one to expose. Surprisingly enough, this is set to “Default” by default.
‚‚ Metadata Groups (to the right): This pop-up menu lets you switch among the various
groups of metadata that are available, grouped for specific tasks or workflows.
The heart of the Metadata Editor is a series of editable fields underneath the header that let you
review and edit the different metadata criteria that are available. For more information on
editing clip metadata and creating custom metadata presets, see Chapter 9, “Using Clip
Metadata.”

Part 2 – 7

An optional Search field can be opened at the top of the Media Pool that lets you quickly find
clips by name, partial name, or any of a wide variety of Media Pool metadata.

178

Using the Media Page

Searching for Content in the Media Pool

Using the Media Page

Part 2 – 7

179

Clip Metadata Editor showing the Clip Details panel

Audio Panel
The Audio Panel can be put into one of two modes via an option menu. In the default Meters
mode, Audio Meters are displayed that show the levels of audio in clips you’re playing. In
Waveform mode, you can open audio clips side by side with video clips in the Viewer in order
to sync them together manually.
When set to Levels mode, you can check audio embedded within clips you’ve imported into the
Media Pool. As you play a clip, each audio meter shows the levels for whichever of these tracks
contain audio. You can toggle individual tracks on and off by clicking the track number
underneath. A Mute button, at the bottom-left of the meters, lets you disable and enable
audio playback.

Audio Meters Exposed

To enter dual screen mode:
Choose Workspace > Dual Screen > On.

The Media page in dual-screen mode

To switch which UI elements appear on which monitors:
Choose Workspace > Primary Display > Display 1 or Display 2, which reverses the
contents of both monitors in dual screen mode.

Part 2 – 7

The Edit page has a dual monitor layout that provides maximum space for the Media Storage
browser and Media Pool on the primary monitor, and an enlarged Viewer, Audio Panel, and
Metadata Editor on the secondary monitor, along with a complete set of video scopes for
helping you to evaluate media as you organize it.

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Using the Media Page

Dual Monitor Layout

To resize any area of the Media page:
Drag the vertical or horizontal border between any two panels to enlarge one and
shrink the other.
Methods of hiding different parts of the Media Page:
‚‚ To toggle the Clone Tool on and off: Click the Clone Tool button in the UI toolbar
at the top.
‚‚ To toggle the Audio Panel on and off: Click the Audio button in the UI toolbar
at the top.
‚‚ To toggle the Metadata Editor on and off: Click the Metadata button in the UI toolbar
at the top.
‚‚ To toggle the Media Storage browser folder list on and off: Click the button at the
top-left corner of the Media Browser.
‚‚ To toggle the Media Pool Bin list on and off: Click the button at the top-left corner of
the Media Pool.
Methods of organizing favorite file system locations in the Media Storage browser:
‚‚ To add a favorite: Right-click any folder in the Media Storage browser folder list, and
choose “Add folder to favorites” from the contextual menu.
‚‚ To remove a favorite: Right-click the favorite you want to remove, and choose “Remove
folder from favorites” from the contextual menu.
To return all pages to their default layout:
Choose Workspace > Reset UI Layout.

Part 2 – 7

The Media Page can be customized to create more room in different areas to accommodate
specific tasks.

181

Using the Media Page

Customizing the Media Page

Part 2 – 8

Adding and
Organizing
Media with the
Media Pool
Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

Chapter 8
182

Adding and Organizing Media
This chapter covers the following topics:

Copying Media Using the Clone Tool

184

Adding Media to the Media Pool

186

Basic Methods for Adding Media in the Media Page

186

Adding Subclips From the Media Storage Browser

187

Adding Individual Frames From Image Sequences

188

Adding Media Based on EDLs

188

Splitting Clips Based on EDLs

188

Adding Media With Offset Timecode

189

Adding Clips From the Timeline to the Media Pool

189

Adding Media to the Edit and Fairlight Pages

190

Removing Media From the Media Pool

190

Adding and Removing External Mattes

191

Using Embedded Mattes in OpenEXR Files

193

Adding Offline Reference Movies

193

Extracting Audio

194

Organizing the Media Pool

194

Organizing Media into Bins

194

Showing Bins in Separate Windows

195

Using the Media Pool in Thumbnail View

195

Working With Columns in List View

196

Creating and Using Power Bins

199

Creating and Using Smart Bins

200

Finding Clips and Timelines in the Media Pool

202

Finding Clips and/or Timelines in the Media Pool

202

Finding Timeline Clips in the Media Pool

203

Finding Timelines in the Media Pool

203

Finding Media in the Media Storage Browser and Finder

203

Going Immediately to a File System Location in the Media Browser

203

Relinking Media Simply

204

Relink Selected Clips

204

Change Source Folder

204

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

Before you can edit or grade media, you need to add it to the Media Pool, which is the central
repository of clips in DaVinci Resolve. The Media Pool is a feature-rich environment, giving you
many different methods of importing clips into your project and organizing them.

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183

Whether you’re on-set working as a DIT, or doing data ingest at a post facility, the Clone Tool in
the Media page lets you safely and accurately copy media from SD Cards, SSDs, or disk drives,
to multiple destinations, with a checksum report (based on a choice of six checksum options)
written to the root of each destination volume that verifies the absolute accuracy of the
duplicate media saved to each destination.
To duplicate media using the Clone Tool:
1

Open the Clone tool by clicking the Clone button at the far left of the Media Pool
toolbar, which reveals the Clone Tool palette.

2

Click the Add Job button at the bottom left to create a new job. A job item appears
within the Clone Tool palette, with overlays to guide you through its use.

3

Drag a volume or folder from the Media Storage browser to the “Drop source here”
drop zone. Alternately, you can right-click any volume or folder in the Media Storage
browser and choose Set As Clone Source.

4

Next, drag one or more volumes or folders from the Media Storage browser to the
“Drop destination here” drop zone. Alternately, you can right-click any volume or folder
in the Media Storage browser and choose Set As Clone Destination. You can have
more then one destination.

5

If you want to preserve the top level folder name from the source volume or folder, click
the Clone Tool panel’s option menu and choose “Preserve Folder Name.” The overall
folder structure of the cloned media is always preserved.

6

If you want to change the checksum method used by DaVinci Resolve to verify that
each clip has copied properly, you can choose an option from the Checksum submenu
of the Clone Tool’s option menu. Each option is a tradeoff between the speed of
your file copy operation and the security of the verification process. Greater security
generally means a slower copy operation.
The options are:

NONE: Disables data verification, sacrificing safety for speed.

File Size: Fast, but minimal data verification. Data verification is done simply by
comparing the file size of a duplicate file with that of the original. “Collision resistance”
refers to whether two files (or a file and an incorrectly duplicated file) may coincidentally
have the same comparison value (be it file size, an error-detecting code, or a hash). File
Size is very fast, but it’s minimally collision resistant.
CRC 32: Faster than MD5, but less secure. An error-detecting code rather than the
hash used by the next three options. A “check value” is generated based on the
remainder of a polynomial division of the file’s contents. By comparing the check value
derived from an original file with that derived from a copy, data integrity can be verified.
This is a much faster data verification scheme than MD5 (the default), but it is
significantly less collision resistant.

Part 2 – 8

One of the few things you may want to do before you add media to your project is to clone all
camera original media onto a safe set of backup volumes, for redundancy in case any one
volume fails. Additionally, you should consider cloning all media to an off-site backup as well.

184

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

Copying Media Using the Clone Tool

SHA 256, SHA 512: Slower, but more secure. SHA is a more collision resistant hash
function than MD5; options are provided for 256- and 512-bit value generation, with 512
being even more collision resistant than 256. However, these options are progressively
slower than MD5, and will result in significantly slower copy times. Similarly to MD5,
data integrity is checked by comparing the hash value generated by the original file to
that generated by the copied file.
When you’re ready, click the Clone button to initiate the cloning process.

To duplicate media quickly using the Clone Tool:
1

Right-click any volume or folder in the Media Storage browser and choose Set as Clone
Source. A job item appears within the Clone Tool palette, populated by the volume or
folder you selected.

2

Next, right-click any volume or folder in the Media Storage browser and choose Set As
Clone Destination. You can do this more than once because you can have more than
one destination.

3

If you want to preserve the top level folder name from the source volume or folder, click
the Clone Tool panel’s option menu and choose “Preserve Folder Name.” The overall
folder structure of the cloned media is always preserved.

4

When you’re ready, click the Clone button to initiate the cloning process.

The Clone tool with a job set up

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185

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

7

MD5: This is the default setting. A reasonable tradeoff between speed and security.
A hash function generates a 128-bit value that’s unique to a particular file; Data integrity
is checked by comparing the hash value generated by the original file to that generated
by the copied file. MD5 is not as collision resistant as the SHA options, but it’s a faster
operation, and the probability of such collisions in conventional film and video
workflows is probably small.

If you import XML or AAF projects, you can choose to automatically import all accompanying
media as part of the import process you initiate in the Edit page. However, if you find yourself
needing to replace updated effects or stock footage in the Timeline, or you’re called upon to
add additional media such as animated titles or superimposed clips for compositing, then you’ll
still need to use the Media page to do so.
Whatever kind of project you’re working on, you can add clips to the Media Pool from as many
different volumes as you need. All imported clips are linked to the original media on whichever
disks you found them; files are not moved, copied, or otherwise transcoded when you add
them to the Media Pool. Consequently, it’s a good idea to make sure that all media you want to
import into your project has already been copied to a suitably fast volume before importing it.

Basic Methods for Adding Media in the Media Page
There are several ways of adding clips to the Media Pool.
To add individual clips from the Media Storage browser to the Media Pool:
1

Use the Media Storage browser to find a media file to import.

2

If you have multiple bins available in the Bin list, choose the bin you want to add the
incoming media to.

3

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Shift-click or Command-click multiple files, then right-click one of the selected files
and choose “Add into Media Pool.”
‚‚ Drag a clip from the Media Storage browser browser to the Media Pool, or to a
specific bin in the Bin list.

4

If a dialog appears asking if you want to change your project to match the criteria,
click “Change” to alter the project’s settings, or click “Don’t Change” to continue
importing the media while leaving the project at its previous frame rate. Once clips
have been imported into the Media Pool, the frame rate cannot be changed again,
so choose carefully.

You also have the option of dragging media directly from the Mac OS Finder into the
Media Pool.
To drag one or more clips from the Finder to the Media Pool (macOS only):
1

Select one or more clips in the Finder.

2

Drag those clips into the Media Pool of DaVinci Resolve, or to a bin in the Bin list.
Those clips are added to the Media Pool of your project.

If you need to add the contents of all directories and subdirectories to the Media Pool as a flat
group of media, that’s easily accomplished. A good example of this is when you’re importing
camera-original media from a cloned file structure, in which clips are organized into
subdirectories that are many levels deep. DaVinci Resolve can easily import all of these clips
and put them all into the same bin.

Part 2 – 8

At minimum, you’ll be using the Media page to add clips to a project to begin editing, in
preparation to create dailies, or as a prelude to conforming a project using an EDL. All clips you
want to work with must first be added to the Media Pool to be available for grading and
processing in DaVinci Resolve, regardless of whether or not there’s edited project data to go
along with it.

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Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

Adding Media to the Media Pool

Use the Media Storage browser to find the directory containing the files you need
to import.

2

If you have multiple bins available in the Bin list, choose the bin you want to add the
incoming media to.

3

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Right-click the directory and choose Add Folder into Media Pool to add only clips
from the selected directory. Subdirectories are ignored.
‚‚ Right-click the directory and choose Add Folder and SubFolders into Media Pool to
add clips from the selected directory, and all subdirectories within.
Drag the folder you want to the browser area of the Media Pool to add its contents to
the currently selected folder in the Folder View.

You also have the option of using the directories and subdirectories that organize media in your
file system as bins in the Media Pool, so that you can preserve the original organization of
your media.
To add all clips and folders in a directory organized into matching folders in the Media Pool:
1

Use the Media Storage browser to find the directory containing the files you need
to import.

2

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Right-click the directory and choose “Add Folder and SubFolders into Media Pool
(as Folders)”
‚‚ Drag the folder you want to import from the Media Storage browser to the Folder
View of the Media Pool to add that folder, and all subfolders within, as a new folder in
the Folder View.
A folder appears in the Media Pool with the same name as the folder you dragged in.
All clips and all subdirectories appear within, nested hierarchically in the Media Pool as
they were in the file system.

Adding Subclips From the Media Storage Browser
If you’re browsing long source clips in the Media Storage browser, but you only want to import a
small segment of a much longer clip into the Media Pool, you can create subclips directly from
the Media Storage browser.
To add a subclip from a clip in the Media Storage browser to the Media Pool:
1

Single-click any clip in the Media Storage browser to open it into the Viewer in order to
create a subclip without needing to first import that clip into the Media Pool.

2

Set In and Out points in the Source Viewer to define the section you want to turn into
a subclip.

3

Right-click the jog bar and choose Make Subclip from the contextual menu.

187

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1

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

To add the entire contents of a directory of clips to the Media Pool:

To add an individual frame from a number sequence of images in the Media Storage browser:
1

Click the Media Storage browser option menu, and choose Show Individual Frames.
Each image sequence is now separated into its individual frames, allowing you to select
only the frames you need.

2

Use any of the previous described methods to add the frames you want to the
Media Pool as individual clips.

Adding Media Based on EDLs
Another strategy for adding media to the Media Pool is to use an EDL to add only the clips it
refers to from a directory. This lets you add only the clips that are necessary for conforming a
particular imported project before conforming an EDL, and eliminates the need to add too much
media to the Media Pool, which might slow you down in the case of projects referencing
terabytes of media. Furthermore, you can choose multiple EDLs to base the import on, and
many directories to examine.
The EDLs will reference clips via their timecode and sometimes reel name and path. It is these
settings and the conform frame rate that you made previously in the Configuration screen that
are now used to place images correctly into the Media Pool.
To add only media used in an EDL to the Media Pool:
1

If necessary, open the General Options panel of the Project Settings, turn on the “Assist
using reel names from the” checkbox, and choose a method with which to extract reel
name information from the media files you’re about to import. For more information, see
Chapter 9, “Using Clip Metadata.”

2

Right-click a directory in the Media Storage browser, and choose one of the
following commands:
‚‚ Add Folder Based on EDLs into Media Pool
‚‚ Add Folder and SubFolders Based on EDLs into Media Pool

3

Using the file dialog that appears, select one or more EDLs to use.

DaVinci Resolve searches the directory hierarchy, either one level deep or all levels deep, for
every media file matching the source timecode and the reel ID of an event in one of the
selected EDLs.

Splitting Clips Based on EDLs
You can also use EDLs to split a media file into multiple clips in the Media Pool, either as an
alternate means of “preconforming” a flattened master media file, or to import multiple sections
of a longer media file that happen to be referenced by an EDL.

Part 2 – 8

If you’re working with image sequences, or with sequentially numbered image files from any
source, DaVinci Resolve automatically presents them as clips in the Media Storage browser.
This is good if that’s what they are, but there are instances where sets of photos, of which each
frame is in actuality a separate media file, are also sequentially numbered. For this reason, you
can import individual frames, rather then entire image sequences.

188

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

Adding Individual Frames From Image Sequences

Right-click a directory in the Media Storage browser, and choose “Split and add into
Media Pool.”

2

Using the file dialog that appears, select an EDL to use, and click Open.

3

Choose a frame rate to use to conform the clips to in the “File Conform Frame Rate”
dialog, and click OK.

4

Choose a handle size, in frames, and whether or not you want to split unreferred clips
from the “Enter handle size for splitting” dialog, and click Split & Add. The media file is
split into the component clips specified in the EDL, and added to the Media Pool.

TIP: Turning on the Split Unreferred Clips checkbox automatically splits out sections of
the file that were not referred to by the EDL you selected, and adds them to the Media
Pool separately, giving you access to every piece of media that’s available.

Adding Media With Offset Timecode
Sometimes source media was created with incorrectly offset timecode, due to mistakes made
earlier in the postproduction process. If this offset is consistent, you can use the “Add Folder
with Source Offset” command to add media to the Media Pool as clips with a timecode offset.
To add a folder of clips to the Media Pool with offset timecode:
1

Right-click a directory in the Media Storage browser, and choose one of the
following commands:
‚‚ Add Folder with Source Offset
‚‚ Add Folder and SubFolders with Source Offset

2

Choose a number of frames with which to offset the timecode from the “Change Frame
Offset” dialog, and click Apply.

The media is imported as clips with offset timecode in the Media Pool. However, the original
source timecode of the clips on disk has not been altered. All media rendered out of the Deliver
page will reflect the offset timecode.

Adding Clips From the Timeline to the Media Pool
Starting with DaVinci Resolve 12.5, it is possible to drag a clip from the Timeline back into the
Media Pool, in order to create a duplicate of that clip for future use. This duplicate is entirely
separate from the original instance of that clip that was imported into DaVinci Resolve, capable
of storing its own metadata and its own markers that are completely distinct from the original
clip that was imported into your project.
In fact, the original clip in the Timeline remains “Force Conformed” to the original clip that was
imported into the Media Pool; deleting the original clip from the Media Pool will make that clip
“non-conformed” in the Timeline, even though the duplicate you just created is still there
(although you can always turn Force Conform off for that clip in the Timeline and re-conform the
Timeline Clip to the duplicate you just created).
You can also duplicate clips in the Media Pool for whatever reason.

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1

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

To split and add clips based on an EDL:

To add media by dragging one or more clips from the Finder to the Edit page Media Pool
(Mac OS only):
1

Select one or more clips in the Finder.

2

Drag those clips into the Media Pool of DaVinci Resolve, or to a bin in the Bin list.
Those clips are added to the Media Pool of your project.

To use the Import Media command in the Edit page Media Pool:
1

With the Edit page open, right-click anywhere in the Media Pool, and choose
Import Media.

2

Use the Import dialog to select one or more clips to import, and click Open.
Those clips are added to the Media Pool of your project.

Removing Media From the Media Pool
If you’ve added clips to the Media Pool that you need to eliminate, this is easy to do, either
singly, or in the aggregate.
To remove clips from the Media Pool:
‚‚ Select one or more clips in the Media Pool, then press the Delete or Backspace key
‚‚ Select one or more clips in the Media Pool, right-click one of the selected clips, and
then choose Remove Selected Clips
‚‚ Right-click anywhere in the Media Pool, and choose Remove All Clips in Bin

NOTE: If you’ve turned on “Automatically match master timeline with media pool” in
the General Options panel of the Project Settings, you cannot remove all clips from the
Media Pool if there are other timelines using that media.

To remove clips from the Master Timeline (if it’s exposed):
Open the Edit page, then select one or more clips in the Media Pool, right-click one of
the selected clips, and choose “Remove Selected Clips from Master Timeline.”
For more information about using the Master Timeline, see Chapter 14, “Using the
Edit Page.”

Part 2 – 8

While adding clips to the Media Pool in the Media page provides the most organizational
flexibility and features, if you find yourself in the Edit or Fairlight page and you need to quickly
import a few clips for immediate use, you can do so in a couple of different ways.

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Adding Media to the
Edit and Fairlight Pages

Matching RGB and Matte images

Attached mattes appear listed underneath a clip in the Media Pool when it’s in List view. When
the Media Pool is in Icon view, clips with attached mattes appear with a badge.

An attached matte, seen in List view

Alternately, you can add an unattached matte clip (also referred to as a Timeline matte) to the
Media Pool, which isn’t attached to any clip, that can be used as a key source in the Color page
within any clip’s Clip grade, or within a Timeline Grade. Unattached matte clips appear as
stand-alone clips in the Media Pool.

Part 2 – 8

If you’ve been provided with matte files to accompany one or more media files used by a
program you’re grading, you can attach them directly to specific clips in the Media Pool, in order
to use them as key sources for a Clip Grade in the Node Editor of the Color page. You can even
use matte files that pack multiple mattes within a single piece of media. This can be done by
either writing different mattes to each of the red, green, and blue channels of a clip, or by
embedding multiple matte passes within a single OpenEXR file.

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Adding and Removing External Mattes

An unattached matte, seen in Thumbnail view

Matte files are useful for two things. Traditionally, mattes are grayscale media files that identify
regions of varying opacity, with white representing solid areas, and black representing
transparency. For example, exported clips from a compositing application sometimes are
accompanied by one or more matte files that correspond to keys or rotoscoped mattes from the
composite. By importing these matte files using the “Add as Matte” command, you can attach
them to the clips they belong to in the Media Pool, so that they’re only available to the clips
they’re synced to.
However, mattes can also be used as creative tools to apply grain and texture for effect. What a
matte does depends on how you connect it in the Node Editor of the Color page. These are
media files that you may want to use as mattes for potentially any clip, so they can also be
added to the Media Pool as a so-called unattached matte, that can be applied to any
clip you want.
Tip: If necessary, you can also apply LUTs to both attached and unattached mattes in the Media
Pool, simply by right-clicking a matte, and choosing a LUT from the 1D LUT or 3D LUT
submenus. This can be helpful for adjusting incorrectly formatted mattes.
To add an assigned matte to a clip in the Media Pool:
1

Select a clip in the Media Pool to which you want to attach an external matte.

2

Select the matching external matte file in the Media Storage browser, right-click it, and
choose Add to Media Pool as a Matte.
The external matte is attached to the clip. A badge indicates that clip has a matte when
the Media Pool is in Icon view, and the matte itself can be seen, if you put the Media
Pool into List view, appearing as a nested item underneath the clip it’s attached to.

Removing external mattes from clips in the Media Pool:
1

Put the Media Pool into List view.

2

Right-click the external matte file you need to remove, and choose Remove
Selected Clips.
Removing an external matte clip also removes that matte’s key from any clip grades that
use it, such that any clips using it as a key input change from a secondary operation to
a primary operation, where the color adjustment affects the entire image.

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

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192

Make sure no clip is selected in the Media Pool.

2

Select an external matte file in the Media Storage browser, right-click it, and choose
Add to Media Pool as a Matte.
The external matte appears in the Media Pool, unattached.

For more information on using external matte clips as keys when grading, see Chapter 51,
“Combining Keys and Using Mattes.”

Using Embedded Mattes in OpenEXR Files
If you’re importing OpenEXR files with embedded matte passes, there’s nothing special you
need to do, as the mattes are within the clip you’ve just imported into the Media Pool. For more
information on how to use mattes within OpenEXR files, see Chapter 51, “Combining Keys and
Using Mattes.”

Adding Offline Reference Movies
When moving a project from another application to DaVinci Resolve, it’s useful to export the
entire program as a single media file for use as an Offline Reference Movie. Then, you can
import this file in a special way to use for dual Viewer comparison in the Edit page, or as a
split-screen comparison for fade wipe in the Color page.
To add a clip as an offline reference clip:
Right-click it in the Media Storage browser, and choose “Add As Offline Clip.”
That clip appears with a small checkerboard badge in its icon in the Media Pool, or as the icon
to the left of the Media Pool.

Checkerboard icon indicating an Offline comparison video

For more information on using an Offline video to compare with an imported Timeline in the Edit
page, see Chapter 33, “Preparing Timelines for DaVinci Resolve Import.” For more information
on split-screen reference of Offline video in the Color page, see Chapter 40, “Using the
Color Page.”

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To add an unassigned matte to the Media Pool:

If there’s a video clip in the Media Storage browser that has audio you need, but you don’t want
the video component, you can use the Extract Audio command to create a self-contained audio
clip that you can then import into the Media Pool by itself.

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To extract the audio from a media file:

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

Extracting Audio

1

Right-click a clip in the Media Storage browser and choose “Extract Audio.”

2

Click the Browse button in the the Extract Audio dialog to find another disk location for
the extracted clip.

3

Click “Extract.” The audio channels are extracted and written as a .WAV file to the
selected destination.

4

After you’ve extracted the stand-alone .WAV file, you’ll need to import it into the Media
Pool if you want to use it in your project.

Organizing the Media Pool
Whether you’re doing onset work, creating digital dailies, organizing media to edit, or ingesting
media to conform to an imported project, it’s vitally important to stay organized. The Media Pool
provides many different tools for doing so.

Organizing Media into Bins
You can easily organize clips into different bins in the Media Pool. For some workflows, this is
required, while with other workflows it’s purely optional.
Methods of working with bins in the Media Pool:
‚‚ To add a bin to the Media Pool: Right-click in the Bin list and choose Add Bin. To add a
bin inside another bin, right-click any bin and choose Add Bin.
‚‚ To add a bin and move selected clips into it: Select all the clips you want to put into
a new bin, then right-click one of the selected clips, and choose Create Bin With
Selected Clips.
‚‚ To rename a bin: Select the bin you want to rename, and then click its name a second
time to make it editable. With the bin name highlighted, type a new name and press
Return. Alternately, you can right-click a bin, choose Rename Bin, and then type a new
name and press Return.
‚‚ To add incoming clips to a specific bin in the Media Pool: Click a bin to select it, then
use any of the previously described methods to add media from the Media Storage
browser directly to that bin.
‚‚ To move media from one bin to another: Drag one or more selected clips from their
current location in the Media Pool into that bin. Multiple clips in the Media Pool can be
selected by Shift-clicking or Command-clicking them, or by dragging a bounding box
over a group of clips. You can also drag one bin into another one.
‚‚ To delete a bin: Select the bin you want to delete, and press the Backspace or Delete
key. Or, right-click a bin and choose Delete Bin. Deleting a bin with nested bins inside
of it results in that entire set of bins being deleted.

Showing Bins in Separate Windows
If you right-click a bin in the Bin list, you can choose “Open As New Window” to open that bin
into its own window. That window is basically its own Media Pool, complete with its own Bin List,
Power Bins and Smart Bins lists, and display controls. This is most useful when you have two
displays connected to your workstation, as you can drag these separate bins to the second
display while DaVinci Resolve is in single screen mode. If you hide the Bin list, not only do you
get more room for clips, but you also prevent accidentally switching bins if you really want to
only view a particular bin’s contents in that window.

Multiple Media Pool bins opened as new windows

Using the Media Pool in Thumbnail View
If you work in Thumbnail view using the controls at the top right of the Media Pool, you have the
option to resize the thumbnails to make them easier to see, and you can move the mouse
pointer over each clip to hover scrub through its contents. Clicking any clip to select it displays
it in the Media page Viewer. Whichever clip is currently selected is also output to video for
monitoring.
In Thumbnail view, you can use the Sort Order pop-up, at the top right of the Media Pool,
between the Icon Size slider and the Icon/List view buttons, to choose how clips are sorted.
There are eleven options: File Name, Reel Name, Display Name, Start TC, Duration, Type, FPS,
Audio Ch, Flags, Date Modified, Date Created.

Part 2 – 8

‚‚ To reorganize bins manually: Right-click anywhere within the Bin list and choose Sort
By > User Sort. Then, drag bins up or down in the Bin list to put them into the order you
want. An orange dividing line shows where dragged bins will be placed when you drop
them and helps you see when a bin you’re dragging will become nested within another
bin or not. The User Sort order is saved even when you change to another sort order,
and selecting User Sort again results in your custom sort order being recalled.

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‚‚ To sort bins: Right-click anywhere within the Bin list and choose an option from the Sort
By submenu. You can choose from Name, Date Created, Date Modified, and User Sort.

Methods of customizing metadata columns in List view:
To show or hide columns: Right-click at the top of any column in the Media Pool to reveal the
column list, and while the column list is open, click the checkboxes of any columns you want to
show or hide. Unchecked columns cannot be seen. When you’re finished, click anywhere else
in the Media Pool to dismiss the column list.
‚‚ To rearrange column order: Drag any column header to the left or right to rearrange
the column order.
‚‚ To resize any column: Drag the border between any two columns to the right or left to
narrow or widen that column.
‚‚ To sort by any column: Click the column header you want to sort with. Each additional
time you click, the same header toggles that column between ascending and
descending sort order.
Once you’ve customized a column layout that works for your particular purpose, you can save it
for future recall.
Methods of saving and using custom column layouts:
‚‚ To create a column layout: Show, hide, resize, and rearrange the columns you need
for a particular task, then right-click any column header in the Media Pool and choose
Create Column Layout. Enter a name in the Create Column Layout dialog, and click OK.
‚‚ To recall a column layout: Right-click any column header in the Media Pool, choose the
name of the column layout you want to use from the contextual menu, and choose Load
from that item’s submenu. All custom column layouts appear at the top of the list.
‚‚ To edit a column layout: Load the column layout you want to edit, make whatever
changes you need to, then right-click any column header in the Media Pool, choose
the name of the column layout you just edited from the contextual menu, and choose
Update from that item’s submenu.
‚‚ To delete a column layout: Right-click any column header in the Media Pool, choose
the name of the column layout you want to delete from the contextual menu, and
choose Delete from that item’s submenu.
While the available columns of metadata correspond to those fields shown in the Metadata
Editor, the available columns in the Media Pool of the Media and Edit pages are a subset of the
total amount of metadata that’s available, although they represent the most commonly used
metadata you’ll find yourself referring to when editing and finishing. The available columns in
List view include:
‚‚ File Name: The file name of that clip.
‚‚ Reel Name: The reel name of that clip. Dynamically generated by the “Assist using reel
names from the” setting in the General Options panel of the Project Settings.

Part 2 – 8

If you work in List view using the controls at the top right of the Media Pool, you gain additional
organizational control by exposing columns that show the metadata that each clip contains,
prior to media being added to your timeline. You can use these columns to help organize
your media.

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Working With Columns in List View

‚‚ Start TC: The timecode value of the first frame in the media file.
‚‚ End TC: The timecode value of the last frame in the media file.
‚‚ Duration: The total duration of the clip, in timecode.
‚‚ In: The timecode value of the In point, if any, that’s stored for that clip.
‚‚ Out: The timecode value of the Out point, if any, that’s stored for that clip.
‚‚ Start: The first frame number of the media file.
‚‚ End: The last frame number of the media file.
‚‚ Frames: The total duration, in frames.
‚‚ Type: The type of item, such as Video+Audio, Video, Audio, Timeline, Multicam, Still,
et cetera.
‚‚ Resolution: The frame size of the media file.
‚‚ FPS: The frame rate of the media file.
‚‚ Audio Ch: The total number of audio tracks in the media file.
‚‚ Audio Bit Depth: The bit depth of any audio channels in the media file.
‚‚ File Path: The file path where that media file is located on disk.
‚‚ Format: The image format used by that clip, such as QuickTime, MXF, WAVE, et cetera.
‚‚ Video Codec: The specific codec used by the video portion of the media file.
‚‚ Audio Codec: The specific codec used by the audio portion of the media file.
‚‚ Optimized Media: Populated with the resolution of whatever optimized media you’ve
created (Original, Half, Quarter, etcetera). Clips that have not been optimized appear
with “None.”
‚‚ Flags: Which flags, if any, have been added to a media file.
‚‚ Usage: After a Timeline has been created by importing an AAF, EDL or XML project,
you can right-click the Media Pool and choose “Update usage” to refresh the
information shown in the Usage column to reflect how many times each clip is used
in the project. This makes it easy to identify clips that aren’t in use, and which can be
removed from the Media Pool.
‚‚ IDT: If ACES color science is selected in the Color Management panel of the Project
Settings, the IDT used by that clip is listed here.
‚‚ Input LUT: Which Input Look-Up-Table has been assigned, if any.
‚‚ PAR: The Pixel Aspect Ratio, if assigned.
‚‚ Data Level: The data level setting for the media file.
‚‚ Date Created: The date the media file was created.
‚‚ Date Modified: The last date the media file was modified.

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‚‚ Display Name: Editing the Display Name lets you change the name with which clips
appear throughout DaVinci Resolve when View > Use Display Name for Clip Titles is
enabled. By default, the display name mirrors the source clip’s file name. When editing
the display name in the List view of the Media Pool, you can use “metadata variables”
that you can add as graphical tags that let you reference clip metadata. For example,
you could add the corresponding metadata variable tags %scene_%shot_%take and
that clip would display “12_A_3” as its name if “scene 12,” “shot A,” “take 3” were its
metadata. The display name can also be edited in the Clip Attributes window. For more
information on the use of variables, as well as a list of all variables that are available in
DaVinci Resolve, see Chapter 81, “Using Variables and Keywords.”

‚‚ Slate TC: The Slate timecode track used to sync audio with video.

198

‚‚ Keyword: A user-editable field for entering searchable keywords pertaining to that clip.
‚‚ Shot: An editable field to contain the shot number of the media, relative to the scene.
‚‚ Scene: An editable field to contain the scene number of the media, relative to the script.
‚‚ Take: An editable field to contain the take number of the media, relative to the shot.
‚‚ Angle: An editable field to contain the angle of the media in a multi-camera shoot.
‚‚ Good Take: An editable field to contain the circled state of media, relative to the script
supervisor’s notes.
‚‚ Roll/Card: An editable field to contain the roll number of media that was scanned
from film.
‚‚ HDRX: Only displayed for R3D media, indicates whether or not it’s HDRX media.
‚‚ Frame/Field: Whether that media file is progressive or interlaced.
‚‚ H-FLIP: Whether that media file is horizontally flipped in DaVinci Resolve.
‚‚ V-FLIP: Whether that media file is vertically flipped in DaVinci Resolve.
‚‚ Input Color Space: If Resolve Color Management is selected in the “Color Science”
menu of the Color Management panel of the Project Settings, then this column will
show the Input Color Space that has been assigned to each clip. By default, all clips
inherit the Input Color Space setting that’s been selected in the Color Management
panel of the Project Settings.
‚‚ Input Sizing Preset: The currently selected Input Format Preset, if there is one.
‚‚ Start KeyKode: The starting KeyKode value of a scanned negative.
‚‚ Duration: The duration of the media file.
‚‚ Bit Depth: The bit depth of the media file.
‚‚ Sample Rate: The sample rate of the media file’s audio, if there is any.
‚‚ S3D Sync: Shows a frame count when you slip an eye to fix non-synced timecode
using the “Slip Opposite Eye One Frame Left/Right” commands. This parameter is
editable in the Media Pool.
‚‚ Audio Offset: Lists the audio offset, in frames, for clips that have been synchronized to
separately recorded audio. This parameter is editable in the Media Pool.
‚‚ Offline Video: Lists the offline reference video that has been assigned to a
given timeline.

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

‚‚ Comments: A user-editable field for entering information about that clip.

Part 2 – 8

‚‚ Description: A user-editable field for entering information about that clip.

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

Power Bins provide a way of importing and organizing media that you want to be available to all
projects in DaVinci Resolve. Power Bins reside in a separate area of the Media Pool, with
resizable dividers separating them from both the ordinary bins and Smart Bins areas. Power Bins
are hierarchical, just like regular bins, and you can nest as many as you like, one inside another.

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Creating and Using Power Bins

The Power Bins area of the Bin list

Like regular bins, Power Bins must be manually created by right-clicking within the Power Bins
area and choosing Add Bin. The difference is that whatever clips you import into Power Bins are
shared among all projects in a single-user installation, or all projects belonging to a particular
user in a multi-user installation. In this way, they’re similar to Power Grades in the gallery of the
Color page. This makes Power Bins ideal for storing shared media that’s re-used often, such as
stock video, sound effects, stills, and things like company slates and network graphics and
animations that go into every show of a series.
Power Bins are created and used like any other bin, using the procedures described previously.
To show or hide the Power Bin area of the Bin list:
Choose View > Show Power Bins to toggle the visibility of all power bins on and off.

In fact, Smart Bins can be very sophisticated, allowing you to automatically gather clips together
using multiple criteria, and using multiple groups of multiple criteria for situations where you
need to gather clips that match all of one set of criteria, but only one of a second set of criteria.
In this way, you can create Smart Bins to solve a wide variety of organizational needs as you
edit your program.
It’s important to point out, however, that as much intrinsic metadata is available to every clip in
DaVinci Resolve automatically (clip properties such as frame rate, frame size, codec, file name,
et cetera), the more time you take entering extra metadata in the Metadata Editor to prepare
your project for editing and grading, for example entering scene and take information, and
keywords for things like character names, day and night, interior and exterior, framing, et cetera,
the more powerful Smart Bins can be in helping you to sift and sort through the contents of a
program you’re grading.
Imagine being able to gather all the clips in a particular scene, find all the interview clips for a
particular subject, or find all the establishing shots corresponding to a particular location. If you
or an assistant can take the time to enter metadata for the source material in a project that
identifies these characteristics, you’ll be able to work even more quickly to find the clips you
need for any given situation.
To show or hide the Smart Bin area of the Bin list:
Choose View > Show Smart Bins to toggle the visibility of all Smart Bins on and off.
To create a Smart Bin:
1

If necessary, open the Bin List and choose View > Show Smart Bins, and then right-click
anywhere in the background of the Smart Bin area of the Bin List and choose Create
Smart Bin.

2

In the Create Smart Bin dialog, enter a name for the filter, and use the following controls
to create one or more filter criteria (you can have as many filter criteria as you like):

The Create Smart Bin dialog

‚‚ Match options: For multi-criteria filtering, choosing All ensures that every single criteria
you specify is met for a clip to be filtered. Choosing Any means that if only one out of
several criteria is met, that clip will be filtered.
‚‚ Filter criteria enable checkbox: Lets you enable or disable any criteria without having
to delete it.

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Another completely automated way of organizing media in the Media Pool is to create your own
custom Smart Bins, in order to sift out clips based on any of the intrinsic or user-entered
metadata that’s available in the Metadata Editor and Media Pool. Smart Bins work much the
same way as Smart Filters in the Color page, and they’re created and edited using the same
procedures. For more information about Smart Filters, see Chapter 40, “Using the Color Page.”

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Creating and Using Smart Bins

‚‚ Metadata type pop-up: For choosing which exact type of metadata to use, of the
options available in the selected metadata category.
‚‚ Metadata criteria pop-up: Lets you choose the criteria by which to filter, depending on
the metadata you’ve selected. Options include “true/false,” integer ranges, date ranges,
string searches, flag and marker colors, et cetera.
‚‚ Add filter criteria button: Lets you add additional criteria to create multi-criteria filters.
You could use multiple criteria to, for example, find all exterior clips, that also contain
the keyword “Sunset,” that aren’t closeups, in order to find all the exterior long and
medium shots in sunset lighting. Additionally, if you Option-click this button, you can
add a nested match option in order to create even more sophisticated filters, such as
when the filter must match all of one set of criteria, and any of another set of criteria.

A complicated Smart Bin with multiple criteria and a second match option setting

As you’re editing the filter criteria, the thumbnail timeline automatically updates to show you
how the Smart Bin you’re creating is working.
When you’re done editing the filter criteria, click Create Smart Bin. The resulting Smart Bin
appears in the Smart Bin area of the Bin list, at the left of the Media Pool’s browser area.
Once you’ve created a Smart Bin, it appears in the lower half of the Media Pool’s Bin list,
alongside every other Smart Bin in that project. This keeps them organized, separate from the
manually-created bin shown above.

All Smart Bins appear together at the bottom
of the Media Pool’s Bin list

Once you’ve created a Smart Bin, you can re-edit it whenever the situation requires.

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‚‚ Metadata category pop-up: Lets you choose which category of metadata you want to
select a criteria from. Each category of metadata that’s available in the Metadata Editor
is available from this pop-up menu. Additionally, Color Timeline Properties (containing
many properties unique to the Color page timeline) and Media Pool Properties
(containing every column in the Media Pool) provide access to additional metadata you
can use for filtering.

‚‚ To edit a Smart Bin: Double-click the smart bin, then edit the filter criteria, and click OK.
‚‚ To delete a Smart Bin: Right-click the Smart Bin you want to delete, choose Delete
Smart Bin from the contextual menu, and click Delete in the warning dialog. Deleting a
Smart Bin does not delete any gathered media associated with that bin.

Smart Bins Work Better With Metadata
Keep in mind that the more metadata you associate with each clip, the more methods
you have at your disposal for creating custom Smart Bins (for editing) and Smart Filters
(for grading) with which to zero in on the clips you need for any given situation. This
will not only make it easier to find what you need, but it’ll help you to work faster. At
the very least, it would be valuable for you to use the Metadata Editor to add
information to each clip such as a Description, Shot and Scene designations, take
information, and possibly some useful keywords such as character names, shot
framing, interior or exterior keywords, et cetera.
For example, if you’ve entered enough metadata, then you can create multi-criteria
Smart Bins or Smart Filters that let you find the equivalent of “every close-up of Sally
inside the diner,” or “every long shot of Antonio outside in the parking lot.” In a
documentary, you could easily isolate “every interview shot of Louis from camera 1,” or
“every B-roll clip with Robyn.” All of this will help you find media faster for editing, or
quickly isolate similar clips that you need to match together for grading.
For more information about using the Metadata Editor, see Chapter 9, “Using
Clip Metadata.”

Finding Clips and
Timelines in the Media Pool
There are several ways to locate different items in the Media Pool, be they clips or timelines.

Finding Clips and/or Timelines in the Media Pool
Clicking the magnifying glass button at the upper right-hand corner of the Media Pool exposes
the Search Options, which can be used to locate one or more clips based on the metadata
that’s selected in the Filter By pop-up menu to the left of it.

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‚‚ To rename a Smart Bin: Right-click the Smart Bin you want to rename, choose Rename
from the contextual menu, enter a new name, and press return.

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

Methods of modifying existing Smart Bins:

The Search Options
pop-up menu (as
seen in the Edit page
Media Pool) lets you
choose what metadata
you’re searching

To find a clip in the Media Pool, first choose a criteria from the Search Options pop-up menu at
the top right of the Media Pool; you can choose All Fields to do a simultaneous search of every
metadata column in the Media Pool at once, or you can choose a specific criteria to restrict your
search. Then, type a search term in the Search field. As soon as you start typing, all clips that
don’t match the search criteria are temporarily hidden. To show all clips in the Media Pool again,
click the cancel button at the right of the search field.

Finding Timeline Clips in the Media Pool
If you have a clip in a timeline and you want to find the corresponding clip that it’s conformed to
in the Media Pool, you can right-click that clip and choose Find in Media Pool from the
contextual menu.

Finding Timelines in the Media Pool
If you’d like to find the currently open timeline’s location in the Media Pool, you can choose
Timeline > Find Current Timeline in Media Pool.

Finding Media in the Media
Storage Browser and Finder
If you find yourself needing to determine the location of a clip’s source media file on disk, you
can right-click an item in the Media Pool and choose Reveal in Media Storage browser. The
Library automatically opens to the folder containing the media file you’ve selected, with that
media file selected in the Library browser to the right.
Another feature that’s only available for OS X systems is the ability to right-click an item in the
Media Pool and choose Reveal In Finder. A file system window opens up, revealing the media
file that clip is linked to.

Going Immediately to a File System
Location in the Media Browser
Conversely, if you drag a folder from the Mac OS Finder into the Media Storage browser, the
Media Storage browser will immediately update to show the location of that folder.

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

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203

This section summarizes the top two methods of relinking. For more comprehensive information
on conforming projects and relinking media, see Chapter 34, “Conforming and Relinking Clips.”

Relink Selected Clips
The easiest method of relinking clips in your project that have gone offline is to use the
appropriately named “Relink selected clips” command. This is the most flexible method of
relinking clips in your project with clips in a file system directory of your choice, using file name
and timecode as the primary criteria for drawing a correspondence between each clip and the
corresponding media file on disk. When you relink clips this way, the original file path in DaVinci
Resolve is ignored, so this is a good command to use to relink to media that’s been
reorganized on disk.
To relink selected clips:
1

Select one or more offline clips to relink, or select a bin in the Media Pool bin list
that contains clips you want to relink, then right-click one of the selected clips or the
selected bin, and choose “Relink Selected Clips” from the contextual menu.

2

When the Relink File dialog opens, choose a directory in which to look for the files
you want to relink to, and click OK. DaVinci Resolve attempts to find every clip with a
matching file name in the subdirectories of the directory you chose, using the original
file paths of the clips being relinked to do this as quickly as possible. By first looking for
the clips in the directories they were originally in, relinking can be quite fast.

3

If there are any clips that couldn’t be found using the method in step 2, you’re prompted
with the option to do a “deep search” by a second dialog. If you click Yes, then DaVinci
Resolve will look for each clip inside every subdirectory of the directory you selected
in step 2. This may take significantly longer, but it should be completely successful so
long as the media that’s required is within the selected directory structure.

4

If there are still other clips that couldn’t be found, you’re prompted to either choose
another directory altogether to continue searching, or quit.

Change Source Folder
If you’ve used your file system to move media that’s associated with a DaVinci Resolve project,
but you haven’t changed the directory structure with which it’s organized, you can use the
“Change Source Folder” command to quickly relink selected clips in the Media Pool to the new
file path of the media on disk, using the original file paths as a guide. This is a good relinking
method to use, if possible, for projects on a SAN where you don’t want to risk the excessively
long search times that could result from using the Relink command to examine a nested
hierarchy of folders in a more flexible way.

Part 2 – 8

DaVinci Resolve keeps track of the relationship between clips in your project and their
corresponding source media on disk. If, for whatever reason, source media that links to clips in
your project becomes unavailable, DaVinci Resolve has several different methods of relinking
those clips in the Media Pool.

204

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

Relinking Media Simply

Select one or more clips in the Media Pool, then right-click one of the selected clips,
and choose “Change Source Folder” from the contextual menu. The Relink Media
window appears displaying the original path for the material, with controls for choosing
a new directory.

2

Click the “…” button to the right of the “Change To” field, and then use the file
navigation dialog to find the new location of the media file, select it, and click Open.

3

If you succeeded in finding the appropriate media file, click Change. Otherwise,
click Cancel.

205

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1

Adding and Organizing Media with the Media Pool

To relink your Media Pool clips to a new location:

Part 2 – 9

Using
Clip Metadata

206

Using Clip Metadata

Chapter 9

Using Clip Metadata

This chapter covers the following topics:

Editing Clip Metadata

208

Using the Metadata Editor

208

Editing Keywords

210

Creating Custom Metadata Groups

211

Importing and Exporting Media Pool Metadata

212

Different Ways of Using Clip Metadata

214

Renaming Clips Using Display Names

214

Switching Between File Names and Display Names

215

Using Metadata to Define Display Names

215

Using Clip Metadata

DaVinci Resolve has powerful tools for viewing, editing, exporting, and importing metadata
associated with each clip in the Media Pool. Once your metadata house is in order, you can use
this metadata in the Edit, Color, and Audio pages to find, sort, and organize the clips in your
project, so you can work faster.

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207

At the very least, it would be valuable for you to use the Metadata Editor that’s available in
either the Media page or the Edit page to add information to each clip such as a Description,
Shot and Scene designations, Take information, and possibly some useful keywords such as
Character Names, Shot Framing, Interior or Exterior keywords, et cetera. If you’re especially
ambitious (or you have a very responsible assistant), you could go further and add Shoot Day,
Camera Type, Audio Notes, and other valuable information. Much of the metadata that is useful
in the day to day work of editing and grading can be found in the Shot & Scene group, but there
are many other potentially useful groups as well that you should explore.
Keep in mind that the more metadata you associate with each clip, the more methods you have
at your disposal for creating custom Smart Bins (for editing) and Smart Filters (for grading) with
which to zero in on the clips you need for any given situation. This will not only make it easier to
find what you need, but it’ll help you to work faster.
For example, if you’ve entered enough metadata, then you can create multi-criteria Smart Bins
or Smart Filters that let you find the equivalent of “every close-up of Sally inside the diner,” or
“every long shot of Antonio outside in the parking lot.” In a documentary, you could easily
isolate “every interview shot of Louis from camera 1,” or “every B-roll clip with Robyn.” All of this
will help you to find media faster for editing, or to quickly isolate similar clips that you need to
match together for grading.

Using the Metadata Editor
Whenever you select a clip in the Media Pool, its editable metadata appears in the
appropriately named Metadata Editor (so long as it’s displayed). You can use this editor to
further massage the metadata of the clips in a project, adding information on set that will be of
help later during editing and finishing.
By default, clips initially appear with a set of clip metadata called “Clip Details,” that shows some
of the most fundamental details of the clip such as start and end timecode, duration, bit depth,
et cetera.
Because there are so very many metadata fields that are available, two pop-up menus at the
top right of the Metadata Editor let you change which set of metadata is displayed.
‚‚ Metadata Presets (to the left): If you’ve used the Metadata panel of the User
Preferences to create your own custom sets of metadata, you can use this pop-up to
choose which one to expose. Surprisingly enough, this is set to “Default” by default.
‚‚ Metadata Groups (to the right): This pop-up menu lets you switch among the various
groups of metadata that are available, grouped for specific tasks or workflows.

Part 2 – 9

Whether you’ve imported media in preparation for editing, or you’ve imported a project for
grading that resulted in media being imported automatically, once you’ve added clips to the
Media Pool, it would behoove you to consider taking the time to review and add metadata to
your clips.

208

Using Clip Metadata

Editing Clip Metadata

Using Clip Metadata

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209

Metadata categories pop-up menu

If you want to see a list of every piece of metadata in a clip, you can choose All Groups.
Otherwise, you can choose any set of metadata to narrow your focus to just those items of
information.
To edit metadata for a single clip:
Select any clip in the Media Pool, and edit whatever metadata fields you require.
The edited metadata is immediately saved.
To edit metadata for multiple clips:
1

Choose a metadata set using the pop-up menu in the Metadata Editor.

2

Select multiple clips in the Media Pool by Shift-clicking, Command-clicking, or dragging
a bounding box around them.

3

Edit whichever metadata fields you want to. Checkboxes are automatically turned on
for any metadata fields you edit.

4

When you’re done, always click the Save button at the bottom of the Metadata Editor.
When you edit metadata for multiple clips at once, it’s not automatically saved if you
create a new selection in the Media Pool without clicking the Save button first.

Once added, keywords are incredibly useful for facilitating searching and sorting in the Media
Pool, for creating Smart Bins in the Media and Edit pages, and for use in Smart Filters on the
Color page. Reaping these benefits by adding and editing keywords is simple, and works
similarly to the method of entering metadata variables that’s described in Chapter 81, “Using
Variables and Keywords.”
To add a keyword:
Select the Keyword field of the Metadata Editor, and begin typing the keyword you want to use.
As you begin typing, a scrolling list appears showing all keywords that are available using the
string of characters you’ve just typed.
To find a specific keyword in the list, start typing that keyword’s name and this list automatically
filters itself to show only keywords that contain the characters you’ve just typed. Choose which
keyword you want to use in the list using the Up and Down Arrow keys, and press Return to
choose that keyword to add.

The keyword list that appears when you type
within the Keyword field

As soon as you add one or more keywords, they appear as a graphical tag. To re-edit any
keyword, simply click anywhere within the Keyword field to edit it.
To edit a keyword:
Double-click any keyword to make it editable, then edit it as you would any other piece
of text, and press Return to make it a graphical keyword tag again.
To remove a keyword:
Click any keyword to select it, and press Delete.

Part 2 – 9

While most metadata in the Metadata Editor is edited via text fields, checkboxes, or multiple
button selections (such as Flags and Clip Color), the Keyword field is unique in that it uses a
graphical “tag” based method of data entry. The purpose of this is to facilitate consistency with
keyword spelling by making it easy to reference both a built-in list of standardized keywords, as
well as other keywords that you’ve already entered to other clips.

210

Using Clip Metadata

Editing Keywords

211

Editing metadata is like taking vitamins. Nobody wants to, but you know you probably
should. To encourage you to undertake this task so you can reap the benefits, here
are a few pointers.

Part 2 – 9

‚‚ Don’t start editing until you review your footage and add metadata. If you get into
the habit of entering your clip metadata before you get preoccupied with your
edit, you’ll be in a much better position to edit faster using organizational tools that
leverage the metadata you’ve entered.

Using Clip Metadata

Tips For Editing Metadata

‚‚ Enter metadata starting with groups of clips and then moving to individual clips.
Since the Metadata Editor lets you add metadata for multiple selected clips at once,
it becomes easy to select groups of clips based on their thumbnails for entering
information such as Scene designations, Interior or Exterior keywords, Character
keywords, and Framing keywords. You’ll be surprised how fast this goes, and how
useful this information is later on, for both editing and grading.
‚‚ After you’ve entered all the metadata you can in groups of clips, then switch
to entering clip-specific metadata such as Shot designations, Take numbers,
descriptions of action, and other clip-specific keywords.
‚‚ There’s no right or wrong way to edit or use metadata, but a lack of consistency will
make it less useful. For example, if you’re identifying each clip that takes place at
the same diner, try to use the same keyword or descriptive text. If you call half the
shots “diner” and the other half “restaurant,” your ability to easily search for all the
diner shots will be compromised.

Creating Custom Metadata Groups
The Metadata panel in the User Preferences lets you create custom sets of metadata
parameters that will be exposed in the Metadata Editor. Using this panel, you can create
customized subsets of metadata that are focused on your particular needs.
Presets that you create are available from the Option menu that’s just to the left of the Metadata
categories pop-up menu.

Custom metadata categories pop-up menu

Choose any custom preset to restrict the Metadata Editor to only showing the metadata fields in
that preset. To see the full set of custom metadata fields you’ve saved to a particular preset, you
should set the Metadata Categories pop-up menu to All Groups. To make the full set of
metadata fields reappear, just choose default presets in the same pop-up.
Making and managing metadata presets is simple.

Open the Metadata panel of the User pane of the Preferences window, and click New.

2

Click the checkboxes of every metadata tag you want to include in this preset, or click
the checkbox of a group name on the list to include all metadata tags within it.
Every single metadata tag available in DaVinci Resolve appears within one of several
groups that appear as a list. To open any group to see its contents, move the pointer
over that group’s entry on the list, and click the Open button when it appears.

3

When you’re finished, click the Save button.

To edit an existing metadata preset:
1

Select a preset from the list, and click Edit.

2

Turn checkboxes on and off to include or exclude whatever tags you need.

3

Click the Save button.

To delete a metadata preset:
Select a preset from the list and click Delete.

Importing and Exporting
Media Pool Metadata
Once you’ve taken the trouble to add metadata to the clips in your project, DaVinci Resolve
makes it possible to export metadata from the Media Pool of one project for import into the
clips of another project, for instances where you need to move metadata around.
For example, a DIT might have entered a lot of metadata to the DaVinci Resolve project used
for generating dailies, but then an impatient editor might have created a separate project to
begin editing those dailies. Instead of requiring the editor to enter each clip’s metadata all over
again, you can export the metadata from the DIT’s project and import it into the editor’s new
project, automatically matching the relevant metadata to each corresponding clip.
To export Media Pool metadata:
1

Open a project containing Media Pool metadata you want to export.

2

Optionally, select which clips in the Media Pool you want to export metadata for.

3

Choose File > Export Metadata From > Media Pool to export metadata from every clip
in the Media Pool, or choose File > Export Metadata From > Selected Clips to only
export metadata from clips you selected in step 2.

4

When the Export Metadata dialog appears, enter a name and choose a location for the
file to be written, then click Save. All metadata is exported into a .csv file that can be
viewed and/or edited in any spreadsheet application.

If you open the resulting metadata .csv file, the first line is a header that lists what metadata is to
be found for each item listed in this document, and in what order. Only metadata fields that
have been populated for at least one clip are exported and listed in this header; unused
metadata fields in the Metadata Editor or Media Pool are ignored.
This file can now be imported into another project file to reattach the metadata to the
same clips.

212

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1

Using Clip Metadata

To create a new metadata preset:

Open a project containing clips you want to populate with imported metadata.

2

Optionally, select which clips in the Media Pool you want to import metadata to.

3

Choose File > Import Metadata To > Media Pool to import metadata to potentially every
clip in the Media Pool, or choose File > Import Metadata To > Selected Clips to only
import metadata to clips you selected in step 2.

4

When the Import Metadata dialog appears, choose a metadata .csv file to import, and
click Open.

5

When the Metadata Import dialog appears, choose the Import Options you want to
use to match the .csv file’s metadata to the correct clips in the currently open project.
By default, DaVinci Resolve tries to use “Match using filename” and “Match using clip
start and end Timecode” to match each line of metadata in the .csv file with a clip in the
Media Pool, but there are other options you can use such as ignoring file extensions,
using Reel Name, and using source file paths.

6

Next, choose which Merge Option you want to use in the Metadata Import dialog.
There are three options:
Only update metadata items with entries in the source file: The default setting. Only
updates a clip’s metadata if there’s a valid entry in the imported .csv file. Other clip
metadata fields are left as they were before the import.
Update all metadata fields available in the source file: For each clip that corresponds
to a line of metadata in the imported .csv file, every single metadata field referenced by
the .csv file is overwritten, regardless of whether or not there’s a valid entry for that field.
Update all metadata fields available in the source file and clear others: For each
clip that corresponds to a line of metadata in the imported .csv file, every single
metadata field referenced by the .csv file is overwritten, regardless of whether or not
there’s a valid entry for that field. Furthermore, metadata fields that aren’t referenced by
the imported .csv file are cleared of whatever metadata was there before.

The Metadata Import dialog that lets you choose options
for how to match and merge imported metadata

7

When you’re finished choosing options, click Ok and all available metadata from the
source .csv file will be imported.

213

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1

Using Clip Metadata

To import Media Pool metadata:

‚‚ Searching for clips in the Media Pool
‚‚ Searching for clips in the Timeline
‚‚ Sorting the Media Pool by metadata columns in list view
‚‚ Creating Smart Bins in the Edit page
‚‚ Creating Timeline Filters in the Color page
‚‚ Using Metadata to create clip Display Names
‚‚ Displaying Metadata in frame using the Color page Burn In palette

Renaming Clips Using Display Names
The most fundamental piece of clip metadata is each clip’s name, which is used to identify clips
nearly everywhere they appear inside DaVinci Resolve. By default, clips show the file name of the
corresponding media file on disk. Since the dawn of tapeless recording, however, editors have
been stuck with camera original media having names that are not exactly “human readable.”
Fortunately, you have the option of entering a more user-friendly display name to use instead,
while preserving the original file name that’s critical for maintaining the link between a clip and
its media, as well as for tracking an offline clip’s corresponding link to the online media from
which it originated. There are a few ways you can edit the display name of a clip.
Note: You can also edit the display names of timelines, compound clips, and multicam clips, so
that you can have two sets of naming conventions for these items, one for when you’re doing
creative editing, and one for when you’re doing finishing tasks.
To edit a clip’s display name, do one of the following:
‚‚ In the Media Pool’s List view, show the Display Name column (hidden by default). By
default, the Display Name mirrors the source clip’s file name, but you can click the
Display Name column for any clip to add a new name from scratch.
‚‚ With the Display Name column exposed in the Media Pool’s List view, Option-click
the Display Name column for any clip to edit the file name, rather than entering a
brand new name.
‚‚ To edit the display name of multiple clips, select all of the clips for which you want to
change the display name, then right-click one of the selected clips and choose Clip
Attributes. Open the Name panel of the Clip Attributes window, edit the Display Name
field, and click OK.
After you’ve changed a clip’s display name, that clip appears in the following places using the
display name instead of the original file name:
‚‚ The Media Pool’s Thumbnail view
‚‚ The name bar of each clip in the Timeline
‚‚ The Source Viewer title bar
‚‚ The Display Name field of the Clip Attributes dialog’s Name panel

Part 2 – 9

To encourage you to take advantage of the clip metadata tools that exist in DaVinci Resolve,
here’s a short list of the many different ways you can use clip metadata to help you work faster.

214

Using Clip Metadata

Different Ways of Using Clip Metadata

To switch between file names and display names:
Choose View > Show Display Names for Clip Titles to toggle between both naming
conventions.

Using Metadata to Define Display Names
If you’re an enthusiastic user of clip metadata (and you should be), you can use “metadata
variables” that you can add into a field that let you reference other metadata for that clip. For
example, you could add the combination of variables and text seen in the following screenshot.
Variables, once they’ve been entered, are represented as graphical tags shown with a
background, while regular text characters that you enter appear before and after these tags.

Variables and text characters entered to create a display
name based on a clip’s metadata

As a result, that clip would display “12_A_3” as its name if scene “12,” shot “A,” and take “3”
were its metadata. When you do this, you can freely mix metadata variables with other
characters (the underscore, as in the example above) to help format the metadata to make it
even more readable.
Every single item of metadata that’s available in the Metadata Editor can be used as a variable,
and several other clip and timeline properties such as the version name of a clip’s grade, a clip’s
EDL event number, and that clip’s timeline index number can be also referenced via variables.
Since the use of metadata variables is a great way to automatically generate names for multiple
clips, you may find it more useful to add metadata variable-driven display names by selecting all
of the clips you want to edit, and opening the Clip Attributes window. By editing the Display
Name field found in the Name panel, you can add a single display name to all selected
clips at once.
To add a variable to a text field that supports the use of variables:
1

Type the percentage sign (%) and a scrolling list appears showing all variables that are
available.

2

To find a specific variable quickly, start typing the characters of that variable’s name
and this list automatically filters itself to show only variables that contain the characters
you’ve just typed.

3

Choose which variable you want to use using the Up and Down Arrow keys, and press
Return to choose that variable to add.

Part 2 – 9

Since different tasks require different information, you have the ability to switch between using
clip file names and display names. For example, finishing editors will probably have more
reason to refer to the file name of each clip, making it easier to troubleshoot problems with
reconforming and relinking. Creative editors, on the other hand, will want to use easier-to-read
display names to make it easier to find what they need.

215

Using Clip Metadata

Switching Between File Names and Display Names

The variable list that appears when
you type the % character

As soon as you add one or more metadata variables to a clip’s Display Name column and press
return, the string is replaced by its corresponding text. To re-edit the metadata string, simply
click within that column, and the metadata variables will re-appear. Be aware that, for clips
where a referenced metadata field is blank, no characters appear for that corresponding
metadata variable in the Display Name column.
To remove a metadata variable:
Click within a field using variables to begin editing it, click a variable to select it, and
press Delete.
For more information on the use of variables, as well as a list of all variables that are available in
DaVinci Resolve, see Chapter 81, “Using Variables and Keywords.”

Using Clip Metadata

Part 2 – 9

216

Part 2 – 10

Modifying Clips
and Clip Attributes

217

Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Chapter 10

Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

This chapter covers the following topics:

Syncing Audio

219

Syncing Dailies Using Timecode

219

Syncing Dailies by Matching Waveforms

220

Manually Syncing Clips in the Timeline

221

Offsetting the Sync of Previously Synched Clips

222

Changing Clip Attributes

222

Video Attributes

223

Audio Attributes

224

Timecode Attributes

226

Reel Name Attributes

227

Update Timecode from Audio – LTC

228

Changing Clip Thumbnails in the Media Pool

229

Creating Subclips

229

Organizing Stereo 3D Media

229

Camera Raw Decoding

230

Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Once you’ve added clips to the Media Pool, you may find you have to make some changes to
prepare it for use in your project. This chapter covers diverse tasks that include syncing
dual-source audio, redefining the clip attributes associated with each source clip to reinterpret
video and audio attributes, timecode values, and display names, converting LTC timecode
recorded on an audio track into usable timecode, chopping long clips into more manageable
subclips, and creating stereo clips from left and right eye media.

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218

Syncing Dailies Using Timecode
Ideally, if the sound recordist on set was highly organized, and the camera and audio recorder
both used synchronized timecode, you can use a single command to automatically sync every
clip in a Timeline to a bin of Broadcast .wav files that have matching timecode.
To batch sync dailies using timecode:
1

Create a new project, open to the Media page by default, and import the video media
you need to sync into any bin of the Media Pool.

2

Import the matching Broadcast .wav files into the same bin as the accompanying video
media you imported in Step 1. If you want to stay more organized, you can create
another bin to contain the audio clips, but it must be inside the bin that contains the
video files. The audio bin can be named anything you like.

Organizing production audio in a bin created
within the accompanying camera media bin

3

Right-click the bin containing the matching audio and video clips, and choose one of
the following commands from the contextual menu:
‚‚ Auto-Sync Audio Based on Timecode: Replaces each video clip’s previous audio
channels with audio channels from the newly synced .wav files.
‚‚ Auto-Sync Audio Based on Timecode and Append Tracks: Adds new channels
in addition to the audio channels that were previously in the media file. The newly
synced channels are added to an additional track, so when edited into the Timeline,
a clip that’s synced this way appears with one video clip and two audio clips
that occupy two different audio tracks, so you can edit the camera original audio
independently from the synced audio.
Every clip in the selected bin for which there was an accompanying Broadcast .wav file
with matching timecode is immediately synced with an audio track. All synced clips
appear with an audio icon at the bottom left in the Media Pool when Thumbnail view is
selected. Now that the clips are synced, you can edit them in the Edit page, or use the
Deliver page to export offline dailies or online media with embedded synch audio for
use in other applications.

Part 2 – 10

If you’re processing dailies for a shoot that used dual-system recording, where audio is
recorded to a separate device than video, you can sync the dailies in DaVinci Resolve in one of
two ways. Synced clips can be output as media files with embedded audio, or output to tape,
whatever your client requires.

219

Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Syncing Audio

To batch sync dailies using waveform syncing:
1

Create a new project, open to the Media page by default, and import both the video
and audio media you need to sync. There’s no need to organize your files in any
particular way, but it’s not a bad idea, on multi-day shoots, to organize the audio
and video files so that it’s easy to select all of a single day’s clips at once so that
you can sync your files in smaller batches. Even organizing your clips by scene can
make waveform syncing go faster by reducing the number of files that need to be
compared at once.

2

If you’ve placed the audio and video into separate bins, then you can Command-click
both bins in the bin list to select them and expose all of their contents in the Media
Pool. If you placed your media in the same bin, this is not necessary.

3

Select one of the exposed clips in the Media Pool, and press Command-A to select all
audio and video clips you want to sync.

4

Right-click one of the selected clips, and choose one of the following commands from
the contextual menu:
‚‚ Sync Video and Audio Clips: Analyzes and compares the waveforms of each of the
selected clips, and replaces each video clip’s previous audio channels with the newly
synced .wav files.
‚‚ Sync Video and Audio Clips and Append Tracks: Adds new channels in addition
to the audio channels that were previously in the media file. The newly waveformsynced channels are added to an additional track, so when edited into the Timeline,
a clip that’s synced this way appears with one video clip and two audio clips that
occupy two different audio tracks, so you can edit the camera- original audio
independently from the synced audio.
A progress bar dialog appears, showing you how long the syncing operation will take.
When it’s complete, your clips will be synced.

Progress dialog for syncing dialog using waveforms

TIP: After syncing, you may be notified via a dialog that one or more clips
could not be synced. Note these clips, as it may be possible to use waveform
syncing more successfully on just the selected pair of audio and video items
that belong together.

Part 2 – 10

If you don’t have matching timecode in the audio and video source clips you’re syncing, but you
had the foresight to record camera audio at the same time as the dual source production audio
you want to sync to, DaVinci Resolve can use waveform syncing to compare the audio
waveforms of your audio and video source files, and sync the ones that match.

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Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Syncing Dailies by Matching Waveforms

To manually sync dailies:
1

Create a new project, and import the video media you need to sync into the Media
Pool. If a dialog appears asking whether or not you want to update the project to match
the media, click OK.

2

If you want to stay organized, create a second bin in the Media Pool, named Audio
Clips, and import the matching Broadcast .wav files into it. The name of the bin is not
important, and having all the audio in one bin is simply a matter of convenience.

3

Click the Waveform button at the top of the Audio Panel, which lets you view and scrub
along the waveform of audio clips you select in the Media Pool.

4

Select a video clip to sync, and move the Viewer playhead to line up with the first visual
sync point in the first clip. This could be the clap of a clapper board, the red flash of
a tablet computer’s slate app, a hand clap, or any clear visual cue to which there is a
corresponding audible sound.

5

Now, select whichever audio clip corresponds to the current video clip in the Viewer, to
open its waveform into the audio panel.

6

Use the Audio panel transport controls and scrubber bar in the Source Viewer to move
the playhead to the audio sync point that corresponds to that video sync point. This
may be a clap, a beep, or some other staccato sound that’s easy to sync to. As you play
through the clip, the bottom half of the Viewer shows a zoomed out waveform for the
entire clip, while the top half of the Viewer shows a zoomed in section of the waveform
that immediately surrounds the playhead. Hopefully, the sync point you’re looking for
is a distinct, loud spike somewhere towards the beginning or the end (in the case of a
tail slate) of the audio clip.

Aligning video and audio sync points with the Audio Panel Set to show the Waveform panel

7

When you’ve found the audio sync point that matches the video sync point, click the
Link/Unlink Audio button at the bottom right of the audio panel to embed the now
synched audio into the video clip.

Clicking the sync link button to lock sync

Part 2 – 10

If you have a collection of WAV or AIFF audio files with video source media that lacks matching
timecode, you need to manually sync each pair of media files together, one-by-one, using a
sync reference such as the clap of a clapperboard, or any other sharp sound with a distinct
audio/visual correspondence.

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Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Manually Syncing Clips in the Timeline

If you need to offset the audio (or stereo 3D) sync of the items that make up a clip later on, you
need only select the synced clip you want to resync in the Media Pool, then click the Waveform
button at the top of the Audio Panel to show the clip’s audio waveform, turn off the linked clip
button, change either the audio or video sync points, and turn the linked clip button back
on again.
You can also use two sets of commands for slipping the sync of any clip:
‚‚ Trim > Slip Audio > Slip Audio One Frame Forward/Reverse: (Option-period and
Option-comma) Slips the audio/video sync of any clip in whole frame increments.
‚‚ Trim > Slip Audio > Slip Audio One Subframe Forward/Reverse: (Option-right arrow
and Option-left arrow) Slips the audio/video sync of any clip in 1/10th frame increments.
‚‚ Trim > Slip Eye > Slip Eye One Frame Forward/Reverse: (Command-Option-period and
Command-Option-comma) Slips the sync relationship between the eyes within a stereo
clip in whole frame increments.

Changing Clip Attributes
Using the Clip Attributes window, you can alter additional attributes for multiple clips all at once.
This window has some overlap with other clip attributes that are editable directly from
submenus within the Media Pool clip contextual menu.
To edit the attributes of one or more clips in the Media Pool:
1

Select one or more clips in the Media Pool by Shift-clicking, Command-clicking, or
dragging a bounding box around them.

2

Right-click one of the selected clips, and choose Clip Attributes.

3

Click to open the panel of the attributes you want to edit. If you’ve selected multiple
clips, then making your alterations automatically checks the box of the attributes
being changed.

4

When you’re finished, click OK to accept the changes.

Starting in DaVinci Resolve 12.5, you can also edit select clip attributes for clips that have been
edited into the Timeline.
To edit the attributes of one or more clips in the Timeline:
1

Select one or more clips in the Timeline by Shift-clicking, Command-clicking, or
dragging a bounding box around them.

2

Right-click one of the selected clips, and choose Clip Attributes.

3

Click to open the panel of the attributes you want to edit. If you’ve selected multiple
clips, then making your alterations automatically checks the box of the attributes
being changed.

4

When you’re finished, click OK to accept the changes.

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Offsetting the Sync of Previously Synched Clips

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Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

The audio and video items are linked. At this point, you can use the newly synced clips
in the Edit page, and use the Deliver page to export offline or online media with
embedded audio for editing.

Video Attributes

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Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Part 2 – 10

These affect individual clip frame rate, geometry, and data levels.

The Video panel of the Clip Attributes Window

‚‚ Video Frame Rate: In cases where a clip’s frame rate was specified incorrectly by
another application or recording device, or if there is no frame rate metadata available
at all, you can change what DaVinci Resolve considers the frame rate of the source clip
to be by either choosing “Custom” and typing a value, or using this menu to choose
a frame rate from 1 to 120 fps. Changing a clip’s Video Frame Rate will change its
duration and relative playback speed in DaVinci Resolve. A clip’s audio, however, will
be unaffected.
‚‚ Data Levels: In certain circumstances, you may find that you need to manually choose
appropriate data levels for clips that are not being interpreted correctly, choosing
between “Video Level” and “Data Level.” For more information on this setting, and
how it affects the image data in your project, see Chapter 6, “Data Levels, Color
Management, ACES, and HDR.”
‚‚ Pixel Aspect Ratio: In projects using a mix of media with different frame sizes, you can
assign specific pixel aspect ratios using this pop-up menu.
‚‚ Horizontal and Vertical Image Flip: Modifies the horizontal and vertical image flip
camera metadata for r3d clips, which is useful for stereoscopic 3D projects shot with a
mirrored camera rig that reverses the media from one eye, or in cases where steadicam
rigs result in upside-down clips. These settings are different from the Flip Image
controls in the Sizing palette of the Color page.
‚‚ Input Sizing Preset: You can use this panel to assign a Sizing palette preset to select
clips. For example, if you have a special Input Format Preset for standard definition
PAL widescreen clips that you’ve edited into a high definition project, you can do a sort
in the Media Pool to isolate them, and then select them all and apply this preset.

The Alpha Mode options that are available when a clip has
an embedded alpha channel

‚‚ Field Dominance: By default, the Auto setting enables DaVinci Resolve to automatically
determine whether a particular clip is Upper- or Lower-field dominant. If this automatic
determination is wrong, you can choose Upper or Lower to manually override this..
‚‚ Enable Deinterlacing: (only available in Studio version) This checkbox is only enabled
if “Enable video field processing” is turned off in the Master Settings panel of the
Project Settings. Turning the “Enable Deinterlacing” checkbox on sets DaVinci Resolve
to deinterlace clips using the “Deinterlace quality” setting that’s located in the Image
Scaling panel of the Project Settings. Normal is a high-quality deinterlacing method
that is suitable for most clips, while High is a more processor-intensive method that can
sometimes yield better results, depending on the footage.
Alpha Mode: The options presented here depend on the format of the clip you’ve
selected, since only certain formats (such as ProRes 4444, QuickTime Animation,
OpenEXR, TIFF sequences, et cetera) are capable of containing alpha channels. If
you’ve imported clips with embedded alpha channels, this panel lets you enable or
disable their use in DaVinci Resolve (by choosing None), choose the type of alpha
channel (Premultiplied or Straight), or invert the alpha channel. If you select a clip that
doesn’t contain an alpha channel, then most of these options don’t appear.

The Alpha Mode options that are available when a clip has an embedded alpha channel

Audio Attributes
The Audio panel lets you alter the channel format and channel assignments for one or more
clips. These settings affect what appears in the audio tracks of the Timeline when you edit a
clip into a program. When you first import clips into the Media Pool, you can use the Audio
Attributes panel to define which embedded audio tracks can be used for editing, and how they
will appear in the Timeline.

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Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

‚‚ Alpha Mode: The options presented here depend on the format of the clip you’ve
selected, since only certain formats (such as ProRes 4444, QuickTime Animation,
OpenEXR, TIFF sequences, et cetera) are capable of containing alpha channels. If
you’ve imported clips with embedded alpha channels, this panel lets you enable or
disable their use in DaVinci Resolve (by choosing None), choose the type of alpha
channel (Premultiplied or Straight), or invert the alpha channel. If you select a clip that
doesn’t contain an alpha channel, then most of these options don’t appear.

Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Part 2 – 10

225

The Audio panel of the Clip Attributes Window

‚‚ Channel Format: A pop-up that lets you choose what format each specified track of a
clip’s audio uses. The setting you choose here affects how many channels appear in
the Channel Assignments list below, as well as what kind of Timeline audio track will be
required to expose all channels of that clip. If you choose a Channel Format with fewer
channels than are embedded in a clip, all extraneous channels will be disabled. The
available options are:
Mono: Appropriate for single-channel clips
Stereo: Appropriate for clips with two-channel left/right audio
5.1: Appropriate for 5.1 surround mixes.
7.1: Appropriate for 7.1 surround mixes.
Adaptive: Appropriate for multiple-mono production audio, such as multi-channel
recordings where a boom microphone, two separate lavaliere microphones, and a
mix-down track are recorded simultaneously.
‚‚ Audio Tracks: Shows how many tracks of embedded audio a clip has, this parameter
is freely editable. Each track specified will result in an additional linked audio item
being edited into an additional audio track when this clip is edited into the Timeline.
For example, if you have a multi-channel production recording with four different
microphones, you can set the Channel format to Mono, then specify 3 Audio Tracks and
assign each channel to a separate track to expose each channel as an individual audio
clip in the timeline for purposes of editing each microphone separately.

A clip with a single track of two-channel stereo audio at left, compared to a
clip with two tracks of single channel mono audio at right

‚‚ Audio Channels: Defined by the Channel Format, shows how many channels will be
embedded in each Track. This value is only editable if the Channel Format is set to
Adaptive, in which case it can be set from 1 to 16.
‚‚ Source Channel Assignments list: This list shows an entry for each track made
available by the selected Channel Format. A pop-up menu lets you change which
embedded clip audio channel is mapped to each available track as determined by
the Channel Format. Alternately, you can disable channels you don’t want to use by
choosing Mute.

Timecode Attributes
If you find yourself dealing with clips that have incorrect timecode, or timecode with an
incorrect relationship to the EDL, XML, or AAF project you’ve been given, you can use these
attributes to modify the timecode and reel name of clips in the Media Pool. None of these tools
alter the source media on disk. They simply change the timecode metadata in your DaVinci
Resolve project, which by extension affects the timecode of any media you render.

The Timecode panel of the Clip Attributes Window

Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Part 2 – 10

226

To set appropriate Slate timecode, select a clip in the Media Pool with a visible
timecode slate, and move the playhead to a frame where the timecode in the slate is
clearly readable. Then, open the Timecode panel of the Clip Attributes window, and
type the timecode value you see in the image into the Slate Timecode field.
‚‚ Offset Source Timecode: If an entire set of clips has timecode that’s merely offset, you
can correct the timecode offset for as many selected clips as you like.

Reel Name Attributes
The “Assist using Reel Names” checkbox in the General Options panel of the Project Settings is
an extremely important setting for controlling how the conform process works. By default it’s
turned off, and Reel Names are left blank. This is fine for conform workflows where all you need
is the file path or file name and source timecode to successfully identify which media files
correspond to what clips. However, if you need more information than that to reconform the
clips in your project, you can turn on the “Assist using Reel Names” checkbox to enable DaVinci
Resolve to use one of four different methods to automatically define reel names for every clip in
the Media Pool.
Using the Clip Attributes dialog, you also have the option of manually defining how one or more
selected clips in the Media Pool have their Reel Names defined. This is useful when there are
certain clips in a project that need to use a different method of reel name extraction, or
manually entered reel names. Once you’ve used Clip Attributes to change the reel names of
clips, those clips no longer automatically update when you change the “Assist using Reel
Names” options in the Project Settings.
You must first turn on “Assist using Reel Names” in the General Options of the Project Settings,
and choose a Reel Assist setting, for the reel name attributes in the Clip Attributes window to
be editable.

The Reel Name panel of the Clip Attributes Window

Part 2 – 10

‚‚ Slate Timecode: In situations where source media comes from a shoot where a
timecode slate was used during the shoot, then you can assign the slate timecode as
a second timecode track that can be used for various operations, without changing the
primary timecode of the clip, which may already be in use for program sync.

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Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

‚‚ Current Frame Timecode: Lets you assign a new time for the timecode at the currently
viewed frame of the clip.

‚‚ Media Pool bin name: The reel name is obtained from the name of the bin in the
Media Pool that encloses that clip. For example, in a stereoscopic workflow you might
want to export offline stereo media with the “Left” and “Right” bin names in which
they’re organized as reel names. Another example would be organizing VFX being
incrementally processed in individually named bins, such as “VFX_Tuesday_10-12.”
‚‚ Embedding in Source clip file: Useful for file formats where the reel name is
embedded within the media file itself. CinemaDNG and other digital cinema cameras,
QuickTime files created by Final Cut Pro, and DPX frame files are formats that can
contain reel name header data.
‚‚ Source clip filename: If there is no defined reel number, often it’s easy to just use the
Source clip filename.
‚‚ User Defined: This option is only available when you manually alter the reel name for
one or more selected clips in the Media Pool using the Clip Attributes dialog. Choosing
User Defined lets you type any string of text you like to use as the reel name.

Update Timecode from Audio – LTC
Some cameras do not offer the ability to sync to an external timecode source. Their recorded
timecode may be time of day or free run timecode, but it would not be frame accurately synced
to other cameras, the dual system audio recorder or the digital slate. This makes multi-cam or
dual sound system syncing a time consuming manual operation.
DaVinci Resolve offers a solution to this problem if, by connecting an externally generated
timecode to the camera audio input, the video that’s recorded by the camera has a timecode
reference recorded on the audio track during the shoot.
Select this clip, or clips, in the media pool, then right-click on one of the highlighted clips and
select “Update timecode from audio - LTC.” DaVinci Resolve automatically and instantly updates
the clip timecode using the LTC it finds on the audio tracks. You can now use the clips as
though they were synced on set.

Part 2 – 10

‚‚ Pattern: A code that defines how a reel name should be extracted from the source clip
pathname. More information about creating patters appears later in this chapter.

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Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

‚‚ Source clip file pathname: Obtains the reel name by extracting it from each media
file’s path. This makes it possible to extract a reel name from all or part of the file name,
or from all or part of the name of any folder in the path that encloses that file. This
extraction is defined using the Pattern field.

To customize the thumbnail of any clip:
1

Move the pointer over a clip you want to customize the thumbnail of.

2

Hover for a moment, then scrub to a representative frame.

3

Right-click that clip, and choose Set Poster Frame.

To clear the custom poster frame of any clip:
Right-click a clip and choose Clear Poster Frame.

Creating Subclips
Subclips give you another way of organizing media in the Media Pool, letting you break
excessively long clips into shorter ones. For example, if the director of a project is fond of
“rolling takes” where multiple takes are all recorded within a single clip, you can break these
takes up by making them into subclips.
To create a subclip:
1

Select any clip in the Media Pool to open it into the Viewer.

2

Set In and Out points to define the section you want to turn into a subclip.

3

Right-click the jog bar and choose Make Subclip.
A new subclip appears in the Media Pool, automatically selected so that you can
immediately edit its metadata in the Metadata Editor.

Once created, subclips appear and work like any other clip in DaVinci Resolve.

Organizing Stereo 3D Media
When working with stereo media in DaVinci Resolve, one of the first tasks you must perform is
that of syncing each stereo pair of clips to act as a single clip. This is easily accomplished so
long as you’re careful about how you organize your media in the Media Pool.
Each set of right- and left-eye media should always be organized into separate left-eye bins and
right-eye bins, to facilitate later syncing of these clips using the Stereo 3D Sync command in the
Media Pool contextual menu. For more information about setting up media for stereo
workflows, see the “Stereoscopic Workflows” section of Chapter 80, “Stereoscopic Workflows.”

Part 2 – 10

When the Media Pool is in Thumbnail mode, each clip is represented by a small image that
defaults to the first frame of that clip. You can scrub the thumbnail of any clip to view its
contents using the pointer after hovering over it for a moment. However, when you’re done
scrubbing, moving the pointer away from any clip returns its thumbnail to the first frame of
media, which may or may not be representative of its contents. You can change this, if you like.

229

Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Changing Clip Thumbnails
in the Media Pool

Camera raw media formats are so named because they capture raw color space data directly
from the sensor of whatever digital cinema camera did the recording. Raw image data is not
human readable, and must be debayered or demosaicked to convert the original raw data into
image data that can be handed off to DaVinci Resolve’s image processing pipeline.

Part 2 – 10

230

There are four ways you can control how camera raw media is debayered into a useful,
“normalized” image for adjustment or output:

Modifying Clips and Clip Attributes

Camera Raw Decoding

‚‚ The Camera Raw panel of the Project Settings contain groups of parameters that
correspond to every camera raw media format that’s supported by DaVinci Resolve.
Using these parameters in the Camera Raw panel, you can override the original camera
metadata that was written at the time of recording, and make simultaneous adjustments
to all camera raw media throughout your project.
‚‚ When you right-click one or more selected camera raw clips in the Media Pool, there
are a series of “Edit Codec Settings” menu options corresponding to each supported
camera format in the contextual menu that appears. Choosing one of these commands
opens a Camera Raw window that exposes controls mirroring those found in the
Camera Raw panel of the Project Settings.
‚‚ The Camera Raw palette in the Color page lets you individually adjust Camera Raw
parameters for individual clips in the Timeline.
‚‚ When you use Resolve Color Management (RCM) in a project that uses Camera Raw
formats, color science data from each camera manufacturer is used to debayer each
camera raw file to specific color primaries with linear gamma, so that all image data
from the source is preserved and made available to DaVinci Resolve’s color managed
image processing pipeline. As a result, the Camera Raw project settings and Camera
Raw palette of the Color page are disabled, because RCM is controlling the debayering
of all camera raw clips, and all image data from the raw file is available for conversion to
the Timeline Color Space you choose to work with as you grade.
For more information about each of the Camera Raw formats that can be adjusted in DaVinci
Resolve, see Chapter 4, “Camera Raw Settings.”

Part 2 – 11

Using
Scene Detection

231

Using Scene Detection

Chapter 11

Using Scene Detection
This chapter covers the following topics:

Using Scene Detection

233

The Scene Detect Window Interface

233

The Scene Detect Viewers

233

The Scene Detect Graph

235

Cut List

236

The Scene Detect Options Pop-Up Menu

237

An Example Scene Detect Workflow

237

Using Scene Detection

If you have a program that someone has delivered as a single media file, with no accompanying
EDL with which to split it up, you can use DaVinci Resolve’s Scene Detect window to
automatically find the cut points and split it into individual clips, ready for grading.

Part 2 – 11

232

To open a clip into the Scene Detect window:
1

Open the Media page, and use the Media Storage browser to find and select the clip
you need to split apart. Do not add a clip you want to use scene detection on to the
Media Pool first. You need to use Scene Detection before the clip has been imported.

2

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Right-click the file and choose Scene Cut Detection.
‚‚ Using the DaVinci control panel, press SHIFT DOWN and DECK/REVIVAL/SCENE on
the T-bar panel.

The Scene Detect window opens up, containing the clip you selected.

The Scene Detect Window Interface
The Scene Detect Window is divided into three main areas, the Viewers, the Graph, and the Cut
List. Together, these controls let you analyze the movie, examine the automatically found cuts,
and manage the Cut List in preparation for sending back to your project.

Scene Detector window

The Scene Detect Viewers
A set of three viewers appear at the top of the Scene Detect window. These three viewers are
designed to make it easy to test whether the playhead in the Scene Detect Graph is on a cut
point or not. The leftmost viewer is the last outgoing frame of a detected cut point. The center
viewer shows the first incoming frame of that cut point, and the rightmost viewer shows the
second incoming frame of that cut point.

Part 2 – 11

Initiating scene detection is easy:

233

Using Scene Detection

Using Scene Detection

The Scene Detect Viewers show the last frame of the outgoing clip, and the
first two frames of the incoming clip

If all three viewers appear to display a continuous series of frames, then you’re not looking at a
cut point.

No scene cut here as all images are almost the same

Underneath the viewers are a series of controls.

The Scene Detect viewer transport controls

‚‚ Transport Controls: A set of seven transport controls include: first frame, step back,
play reverse, stop, play forward, step forward, last frame.

The In, Out, Prune, and Show Cut List controls

‚‚ In: Lets you set a red In point, with which to define a range of the Scene Detection
Graph to prune.
‚‚ Out: Lets you set a cyan Out point, with which to define a range of the Scene Detection
Graph to prune.
‚‚ Prune: If you’ve identified a large number of false positive scene cuts (for example, a
cluster of cuts corresponding to a dissolve from one shot to another), use the In and
Out buttons to surround the undesirable range of scene cuts in the Scene Detect
Graph, and then click Prune Scene Cuts to eliminate all scene cuts between these
points that are within one frame of another scene cut. Within the group of identified
cuts, the highest probability cut will remain while the other cuts are deleted.

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Using Scene Detection

If the playhead in the Scene Detect Graph is directly on top of an edit point, the leftmost viewer
should show a completely different frame than the center and rightmost viewers, which should
be very similar to one another. This can be seen in the following example.

Using Scene Detection

Part 2 – 11

235

(Left) Isolating scene cuts to prune with In and Out points,
(Right) The result of clicking the Prune button to eliminate all unwanted scene cuts but one

‚‚ Show Cut List: Shows and hides the Cut List, which shows the currently detected
scene cuts.

The Scene Detect Graph
The majority of the bottom half of the Scene Detect window, to the left, consists of the Scene
Detect Graph, which shows the scene detect analysis results after you’ve clicked the
Start button.

Detection graph displays potential scene cuts

Frames that DaVinci Resolve thinks are cut points appear as green vertical “scene cuts” of
various heights. The height of each scene cut corresponds to the likelihood that frame is really
an edit point, and not a swish pan, sudden jump in the motion of the frame, or abrupt change in
color or lighting, all of which can fool the scene detection algorithm.
A horizontal magenta confidence bar lets you choose the threshold of confidence required for
scene cuts to be added to the Cut List. If you drag this bar up above any shorter scene cuts of
low confidence, those lines turn gray and are omitted from the Cut List.

NOTE: Dissolves and other transitions are not automatically detected, although
dissolves most often appear as a triangular cluster of lines peaking in the middle.

Three controls appear underneath the graph.

236

‚‚ Delete: Lets you manually delete a scene cut located at the position of the current
frame indicator within the graph.
‚‚ Zoom Slider: Lets you zoom into and out of the Scene Detect Graph to see more or
less detail as you examine the results.

Cut List
At the lower right of the Scene Detect window, the Cut List displays one entry for each of the
scene cuts that intersect the confidence bar.

The Cut List shows all currently detected cuts

Three columns show each cut’s order number, frame number, and timecode value. You can
select items in the Cut List to evaluate each cut using the three viewers above. Whenever you
select a new item in the Cut List, the playhead jumps to that frame in the Scene Detect Graph.

Using Scene Detection

‚‚ Add: Lets you manually add a scene cut at the current position of the playhead.
Sometimes two adjacent clips with similar color and lighting will appear to be a single
clip to the scene detection algorithm. This lets you add scene cuts at frames where
they weren’t initially found.

Part 2 – 11

‚‚ Start Scene Detect: This initiates the scene cut detection process.

To select items in the Cut List:

237

‚‚ Press P (previous) or the Up Arrow to select the next item previous.
As you move up and down the list, you can delete items that you can confirm aren’t real cuts
using the viewers above. If it’s a long list and you don’t have time to check it all at once, it can
be saved for later recall using commands found in the Scene Detect Options pop-up menu.
Once you’re finished checking the list and are satisfied that each cut is accurate, you can use it
to split the media file into individual clips in the Media Pool by clicking “Add Cuts to Media Pool,”
located immediately below.

The Scene Detect Options Pop-Up Menu
The Options pop-up menu, located at the upper right-hand corner of the Scene Detect window,
contains a variety of commands.
‚‚ Reset Zoom: Sets the zoom level of the Scene Cut Graph such that the entire clip fits
within the current width.
‚‚ Reset Marks: Clears the current In and Out points you’ve set.
‚‚ Prune SceneCuts: If you’ve identified a large number of false positive scene cuts (for
example, a cluster of cuts corresponding to a dissolve from one shot to another), use
the In and Out buttons to surround the undesirable range of scene cuts in the Scene
Detect Graph, and then click Prune Scene Cuts to eliminate all scene cuts between
these points that are within one frame of another scene cut. Within the group of
identified cuts, the highest probability cut will remain while the other cuts are deleted.
‚‚ Save SceneCut: Saves the current scene cut detection information, including the
probability metadata, to disk. SceneCut files use the file extension .sc and can be
reimported later to continue working on a lengthy scene detection task.
‚‚ Load SceneCut: Imports an existing .sc file into the Scene Detect window. You must
first open the media file you’re working on into the Scene Detect window before you
can load a SceneCut file.
‚‚ Save EDL: Exports the Cut List as a CMX-style EDL.
‚‚ Load EDL: Loads a CMX-style EDL into the Cut List, letting you use the cut information
from the EDL during the Scene Cut Detection process.
‚‚ Auto Cue: When enabled, the playhead jumps to each new scene cut as it’s detected
when you initiate scene detection. This lets you evaluate each scene cut as it’s found
using the three viewers above.

An Example Scene Detect Workflow
This section describes an ideal workflow for using scene detection without an EDL.
To scene detect a media file:
1

Locate a media file to scene detect using the Media Storage browser of the
Media page.

2

Verify its frame rate and if it uses drop-frame timecode, and make sure that the
“Timeline frame rate” matches the “Use drop frame timecode” parameter in the Master
Settings panel of the Project Settings. These parameters are not automatically set if the
project already has media in the Media Pool, and you may have problems if they don’t
match your media.

Using Scene Detection

‚‚ Press N (next) or the Down Arrow to select the next item down.

Part 2 – 11

‚‚ Click any item in the Cut List.

4

When the Scene Detect window appears, click the Options pop-up menu and choose
Auto Cue (it should be on by default, but it’s always good to check), then click Auto
Scene Detect.
Scene detection initiates, and you can evaluate each scene cut as it’s found. If any
scene cut looks wrong (three sequential frames in a row), note its place in the list for
future evaluation.

5

When DaVinci Resolve has finished scene detection, move the playhead to some of
the shorter scene cuts, and verify if they’re actual cuts by checking the three viewers
above. If the frames being displayed are “different-same-same,” then it’s a genuine cut.
If the frames being displayed are “same-same-same” (actually three sequential frames),
then these aren’t cuts.

TIP: Fast camera motion such as whip pans, sudden changes in lightness such
as camera flashes, or even film coming up to speed causing the shutter to
“flash” can confuse the analysis, which looks for large changes in the image.

6

If there are numerous low-confidence scene cuts that you’ve verified aren’t cuts, drag
the magenta confidence bar so that the low-confidence scene cuts fall below it to
automatically remove them all from the list.

7

Next, you may want to move down the Cut List, evaluating each scene cut to verify that
it’s correct. Click the first scene cut in the list, check it, then press the keyboard down
arrow to select the next list item down, check it, and repeat until you’ve checked every
item in the list. If you need to move back up the list, you can press the up arrow to
select the previous list item. If any item is not a cut point, click the “Minus” button at the
bottom left corner of the Scene Detect window to eliminate that scene cut.

8

If there are sections in the Scene Detect Graph with dense groups of spikes, these are
probably frames with types of motion that confused the Scene Cut Detector. To delete
this unwanted “noise” in the data, use the In and Out buttons to isolate the data, and
then click “Prune” to delete these unwanted scene cuts.

9

If there’s a gap between any two scene cuts that you’re positive should have another
scene cut, then scrub the playhead or use the transport controls to find the missing cut,
and click the “Plus” button at the bottom left corner of the Scene Detect window to add
another scene cut.

TIP: Adjacent shots with very similar ranges of color and contrast may
sometimes go undetected by the scene detection algorithm. If you know of
scenes in the media you’re analyzing that are like this, you may want to scrub
through them a bit more carefully to make sure you’re not missing anything.
However, if you find you’ve missed a cut later, you can always use the Split
Clip control in the Edit page timeline to add a new edit point.

238

Part 2 – 11

Right-click the media file, and choose Scene Cut Detection.

Using Scene Detection

3

12 Close the Scene Detect window.
The individually cut up clips of the media file you analyzed now appear in the Media
Pool, and you can edit the entire sequence of clips into a new Timeline in order, ready
for grading.

Part 2 – 11

11 When the Conform Settings dialog appears, click OK if you checked your settings
in step 2.

239

Using Scene Detection

10 When you’re confident that the Cut List is accurate, split the media file into individual
clips in the Media Pool by clicking “Add Cuts to Media Pool.”

Part 2 – 12

Ingesting
From Tape

240

Ingesting From Tape

Chapter 12

Ingesting From Tape
This chapter covers the following topics:

Tape Ingest

242

The Tape Capture Interface

242

Setting Up to Capture From Tape

243

Capture and Playback Project Settings

243

Capture

244

The Three Methods of Capture

245

Using Capture Now

245

Logging and Capturing Individual Clips

245

Logging and Capturing Multiple Clips

246

Batch Capture Via EDL

247

Ingesting From Tape

DaVinci Resolve is capable of capturing media from tape using a compatible video input device,
such as a Blackmagic Design UltraStudio, DeckLink, or Intensity device.

Part 2 – 12

241

To switch to tape capture in the Media page:
Click the Capture button, located to the left of the Interface toolbar at the top of the
Media page.
The Media page updates to reflect the relevant controls for editing to tape, and the Audio panel
is replaced by a dedicated set of capture metadata and controls to help you track the
resulting clips.

The Tape Capture Interface
While in Capture mode, the Media page is used to control the VTR, in order to establish In and
Out points for logging or capturing a selected range of the tape.

Tape Capture viewer in the Media page

‚‚ Transport Controls: The transport controls, while similar in appearance to those
used when simply playing through selected clips in the Media page, now work to
control the VTR.
‚‚ Shuttle Control: A Shuttle Control appears in what was formerly the Scrubber Bar,
which lets you shuttle through the range of reverse and forward speeds compatible
with the connected deck.
‚‚ In and Out Controls: In Capture mode, the In and Out buttons to the right of the
transport controls define a range of the tape from which to capture.

Part 2 – 12

This chapter covers how to capture media from tape directly into the Media Pool in DaVinci
Resolve. Whether you need to capture a handful of clips to incorporate into an existing project,
or you need to recapture every clip corresponding to the events of an EDL, you can use the
Media page in Capture mode to capture from any device-controllable deck via a compatible
video interface.

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Ingesting From Tape

Tape Ingest

Part 2 – 12

243

Ingesting From Tape

‚‚ Capture panel: The panel automatically switches to the Capture panel, with
tape‑specific metadata and capture controls. Populating File Name Prefix updates
the file name preview that’s shown above in the Header, that also shows the Capture
directory, Resolution, and Frame Rate specified in the Capture and Playback panel of
the Project Settings.

Editable capture metadata

Setting Up to Capture From Tape
Before you begin capturing from tape, you need to adjust a variety of settings in the Capture
and Playback panel of the Project Settings. Two groups of settings, in particular, need to
be defined.

Capture and Playback Project Settings
These settings affect both capture and playback when using the Tape Ingest options of the
Media page, or the Tape Output options of the Deliver page.
‚‚ Video capture and playback: You can choose the video format (frame size and
frame rate) with which to output to tape from this pop-up menu. HD timelines can be
downconverted to SD, and SD timelines can be upconverted to HD using the format
conversion of your DeckLink card.
‚‚ Use left and right eye SDI: A checkbox that enables the Blackmagic Design DeckLink
HD Extreme 3D+ to ingest and output muxed stereoscopic video when used with
supported VTRs, such as HDCAM SR decks with 4:2:2 x 2 mode. (When muxed
stereoscopic signals are ingested, each eye is separated into individual left-eye and
right-eye image files.)

‚‚ Video bit depth: 10-bit is the only available option.
‚‚ Use deck autoedit: If supported by your video deck, this is the best method to record
video to the deck, as it enables the deck to roll the edit using the specified preroll, and
control the edits via serial device control. If this checkbox is turned off, a basic edit On/
Off mode is used by the deck, with the potential for frame inaccuracies if the “Non auto
edit timing” setting is not properly adjusted.
‚‚ Non auto edit timing: Adjusts the edit synchronization of the connected deck when
auto edit is turned off.
‚‚ Deck preroll: Sets the number of seconds for preroll. How much is appropriate
depends on the performance of your deck.
‚‚ Video output sync source: When using a DeckLink card this is set to Auto. Other
capture cards may require you to set the sync source to “Reference” for playout and
“Input” for ingest. This setting is only available if you have the DVS card installed on
your system.
‚‚ Add 3:2 pulldown: Inserts or removes the 3:2 pulldown required to record or play
23.98 fps media to or from a 29.97 tape format.

Capture
These settings are used when you use the Capture mode in the Media page to capture clips
from tape into the Media Pool, or when controlling the Cintel Film Scanner to scan film of
different formats.
‚‚ Video Format: The format captured media will be saved to. When capturing from tape,
the available options are DPX and QuickTime.
‚‚ Codec: The codec used to write captured media. When capturing from tape, these
include the various type of Apple ProRes, 8- and 10-bit YUV 422, 10-bit RGB, and the
various types of DNxHD.
‚‚ Save clips to: A field that displays the directory path to which media files captured from
tape are written. You want to choose a volume that’s fast enough to accommodate the
data rate of the media format you’re capturing.
‚‚ Browse: Click this button to choose a directory to write captured media to. The
directory you choose appears in the field above.
‚‚ Save in this folder path: A series of checkboxes lets you specify what other information
to use to define the directory hierarchy that will hold the captured media. Every
checkbox you turn on adds an additional directory with a name defined by that
checkbox’s metadata. You can choose any or all of the following: Program name, Clip
number, Reel number, Roll/Card.
‚‚ Apply reel number to: Lets you choose how to write the reel name. Two checkboxes
let you write the reel name to the file’s name, and/or to the Header data.

Part 2 – 12

‚‚ Video/Full Data Level: Lets you specify the data range (normally scaled or full range)
that’s used when ingesting from or outputting to tape. This option switches the data
range of the signal output by your video capture card, but only during capture from
tape in the Media page, or output to tape in the Deliver page. When capture or output
is not currently occurring, your video capture card goes back to using the identically
named data range setting in the Master Settings panel of the Project Settings pane,
which governs how you monitor the signal being output on an external broadcast
display or projector.

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Ingesting From Tape

‚‚ Video connection operates as: Selects between the available signal options: Use
4:4:4 SDI and Enable Single Link. Which options are available depend on which video
capture card you are using.

‚‚ Use frame number with: When capturing to image sequences, you can choose how
many digits to use when writing the frame number into the name of each frame file.
‚‚ Set batch ingest handles to: Lets you add additional frames of handles to the
beginning and end of each scanned clip when batch capturing with the scanner.
‚‚ Enable audio input: Turn this checkbox on to capture audio along with the video. If
you’re capturing QuickTime or MXF files, the audio will be written as additional tracks
inside each file. If you’re capturing to a DPX image sequence, then a Broadcast .wav file
is recorded separately.
‚‚ Input x channels of audio: A pop-up that lets you choose how many tracks of audio
to capture.

The Three Methods of Capture
Once you’ve set up all relevant settings in the Project Settings window, including at minimum
“Video Capture and Playback,” “Capture Clips Saved to,” and Apply Reel Name to” settings,
then you’re ready to start capturing. Depending on your workflow, there are three methods of
capturing from tape that you can use.
For all capture methods, media can only be ingested as DPX image sequences.

Using Capture Now
If you simply need to capture a section of tape quickly, you can use the Capture Now command.
To Capture Now:
1

Use the transport controls and the In button to identify what you want to capture.

2

Enter all relevant information into the various fields of the Metadata Editor. The Header
updates to show a preview of the file name that will be saved.

3

Use the transport controls to start playback, and then click the Capture Now button at
the bottom of the Metadata Editor.

4

When the section of tape you wanted to record has finished, click Capture Now again
to stop capture.
A new clip appears in the Media Pool, automatically placed in a new folder in the Media
Pool with a name defined by the timecode value converted into a frame count, based
on the ingest frame rate. For example, 00086400.dpx is the file name of a clip
captured at timecode 01:00:00:00.

Logging and Capturing Individual Clips
If you’re capturing an exact range of tape, or multiple sections at once, you can also work by
logging each section of tape you want to capture in advance, before using the Capture Clip or
Batch Clips commands in a second step.

Part 2 – 12

‚‚ Apply prefix to: Two checkboxes let you choose to use the prefix you typed in the file
name, and/or in the folder name.

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Ingesting From Tape

‚‚ Use prefix: A field lets you type in a prefix to be used in the media file’s name. This
lets you add text identification that will make the media more easily identifiable and
searchable.

Use the transport controls to find the beginning of the section of tape you want to
record, and click the In button. Then, find the end of the section of tape you want to
record, and press the Out button.

2

Enter all relevant information into the various fields of the Metadata Editor. The Header
updates to show a preview of the file name that will be saved.

3

When you’re finished, click Capture Clip.
Deck control is automatically used to play through the specified range of tape and
capture that clip. When capture is complete, the new clip appears in the Media Pool.

Logging and Capturing Multiple Clips
For efficiency’s sake, you can also log multiple clips at once, from multiple tapes if necessary,
and then batch capture them all at once.
To log one or more clips:
1

Use the transport controls to find the beginning of the section of tape you want to
record, and click the In button. Then, find the end of the section of tape you want to
record, and press the Out button.

2

Enter all relevant information into the various fields of the Metadata Editor. The Header
updates to show a preview of the file name that will be saved.

3

When you’re finished, click Log Clip.
That clip is added to the Media Pool as an offline tape clip, indicated by a black icon
with a tape badge.

Logged clip in the Media Pool prior to capture

To batch capture one or more logged clips:
1

(Optional) Put the Media Pool into List view, and click the Reel No column header to sort
the Media Pool clips by reel number. This makes it easier to select a range of clips to
capture from a particular reel.

2

Select one or more offline tape clips in the Media Pool that come from a particular reel.

3

Click Batch Clips, at the bottom of the Metadata Editor. To interrupt capture at any time,
click Batch Clips again.
Deck control is automatically used to play through the current tape in the VTR and
capture every logged clip you’ve selected that can be found on that tape, starting with
the clip with the lowest timecode value and ending with the clip having the highest
timecode value. A progress bar with accompanying text shows how much longer to go
until capture is complete. As each clip is captured, its corresponding logged clip in the
Media Pool updates with a thumbnail reflecting the captured media.
When DaVinci Resolve finishes capturing all clips from a particular reel,
Batch Capture stops.

246

Part 2 – 12

1

Ingesting From Tape

To capture a single clip using device control:

To import an EDL as a batch capture list:
1

Open the Project Settings, click Master Panel in the sidebar, and make sure of
the following:
‚‚ Set “Timeline frame rate” to the frame rate of your EDL.
‚‚ Turn on “Use drop frame timecode” if your EDL requires it.
‚‚ Make sure “Use Timecode” is set to “Embedded in the source clip”
‚‚ Turn on “Assist using reel names from the”

2

Choose File > Import Batch List From EDL.

3

When a Conform Settings dialog appears asking you to confirm the current Project
Settings, click OK if the settings are good.

4

Use the controls of the Select EDL files dialog to select one or more EDLs, then click
Open. If you select multiple EDLs, then every event in each EDL is imported at once.

5

In the dialog that appears next, choose a frame rate to conform the EDL at,
and click OK.
Each event in the EDL now appears as offline tape clips in the Media Pool, ready for
capturing. If you load an EDL and there are already clips in the Media Pool that have the
same reel name and start timecode as events in the EDL, DaVinci Resolve will not
create new offline tape clips for those.

A set of logged clips imported from an EDL

6

(Optional) Put the Media Pool into List view, and click the Reel No column header to sort
the Media Pool clips by reel number. This makes it easier to select a range of clips to
capture from a particular reel.

7

(Optional) If there are any offline clips that you don’t need to capture, you can remove
them from the Media Pool by right-clicking them and choosing Remove Selected Clips.

8

Select which of the offline tape clips you want to capture. It’s best to select ranges of
clips that come from the same reel.

Part 2 – 12

You can also use an EDL to create offline tape clips, one for each event in the EDL, with which
to batch capture all the media necessary to conform a project from tape.

247

Ingesting From Tape

Batch Capture Via EDL

When DaVinci Resolve finishes capturing all clips from a particular reel,
Batch Capture stops.

248

Part 2 – 12

Click the Capture mode button to the left of the transport controls, and then click Batch
Clips to begin capture. To interrupt capture at any time, click Batch Clips again. Deck
control is automatically used to play through the current tape in the VTR and capture
every logged clip you’ve selected that can be found on that tape, starting with the clip
with the lowest timecode value and ending with the clip having the highest timecode
value. A progress bar with accompanying text shows how much longer to go until
capture is complete. As each clip is captured, its corresponding logged clip in the
Media Pool updates with a thumbnail reflecting the captured media.

Ingesting From Tape

9

Part 2 – 13

Capturing
From the Cintel
Film Scanner

249

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

Chapter 13

Controlling the Cintel Film Scanner

251

The Cintel Scanner Interface

252

Cintel Media Page Settings

254

Calibration

254

Film Type

254

Light Source

255

Image Stabilization

256

Film Protection

257

Film Scanning Workflows

258

Before You Begin

258

Load and Align the Film

258

Focus the Scanner

258

Check the Automatic Perf Detection Stabilization Overlay

259

Reset the Timecode for That Roll

259

Choose a Location to Save the Scanned Frames

260

Check the Frame Rate

260

Adjusting the Color of the Scanner

260

Scanning One or More Sections of Film

261

Extracting Audio

262

Audio Extraction Settings

263

Grading and Sizing Scanned Media

266

Part 2 – 13

This chapter covers the following topics:

250

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

The Blackmagic Cintel film scanner is a compact, easy to use, real time film scanner capable of
converting 35mm and 16mm (with a separately purchased gate) positive and negative film
formats into Cintel Raw Image (CRI) digital files that can be organized, edited, and graded using
DaVinci Resolve, delivered to any format DaVinci Resolve can output, and archived for later use.

251

Part 2 – 13

Controlling the Cintel Film Scanner

The Cintel scanner

DaVinci Resolve can control any Blackmagic Cintel film scanner that’s connected to your
computer via Thunderbolt 1 or 2. Once connected, the Film Scanner controls in the Media page
can be enabled, which let you choose the film type to be scanned, align the film frames to the
sensor, adjust the scanner’s light source for optimal exposure and color, and choose whether to
use the scanner’s hardware-based Automatic Perf Detection to perform image stabilization.
Note: This chapter of the DaVinci Resolve manual describes the use of a Cintel film scanner
connected to DaVinci Resolve for the purpose of ingesting scanned film. For other operational
inquiries, please see the documentation that accompanies the scanner itself, or visit the
Blackmagic Design support page on the web to download it.
Similar to Tape Capture, you can choose to scan sections of film a shot at a time, or as part of a
batch capture workflow by logging all of the clips on a particular roll that you want to scan.

The Cintel Raw Format
The raw Bayer pattern of each film frame scanned with the Cintel scanner sensor is
saved with embedded scanner metadata as a 12-bit linear Cintel Raw Image (CRI)
image sequence. When grading in DaVinci Resolve, CRI raw images are automatically
debayered as 12-bit log-encoded image data. The logarithmic encoding is similar, but
not identical to, Cineon encoding; negative film is encoded using a gamma of 2.046
for density, while print film is encoded using a full-range Gamma 2.2 curve to ensure
that no image data is clipped. Both of these logarithmic encodings can be converted
to a linear color space using the “Cintel to Linear” 1D LUT, as a precursor to converting
to other color spaces you may want to work in.

Cintel Raw Image files don’t have dedicated debayering controls in DaVinci Resolve.
To control the quality of debayered CRI files, use the Decode Quality and Play Quality
CinemaDNG settings of the Camera Raw panel of the Project Settings.

The Cintel Scanner Interface
If you have a Cintel Scanner connected to your computer, then clicking the Capture button in
the UI toolbar at the top of the DaVinci Resolve screen sets the Media page to control either the
Cintel scanner or a video deck that’s been connected to your workstation. For film scanning,
open the Film Scanner panel to set up, calibrate, and choose options for logging or scanning a
selected range of the currently spooled roll of film. If you want more room for viewing the Cintel
scanner controls, click the full height button that’s all the way to the right of the UI toolbar, and
turn off the Metadata panel.

Cintel scanner controls in the Media page

‚‚ Transport Controls: These controls, while similar in appearance to those used while in
Playback mode, now work to control the Cintel scanner. Additional controls appear for
moving forward or backward a frame at a time.
‚‚ In and Out Controls: In Cintel Scanner mode, the In and Out buttons to the right of the
Transport controls define a range of the film roll from which to capture.

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

The film is scanned using the full sensor aperture of 4096x3072 for an extracted
35mm or 16mm image to accommodate waveform visibility for audio extraction and
perforation visibility for stabilization, but 16mm is cropped to 2160x1702. The resolution
of the resulting files depends on the source film format; Super 35 film is at the UHD
resolution of 3840x2877, while Super 16 format scans are at nearly HD resolution at
1903x1143. The resultant files are approximately 22.4MB for a 35mm frame and
6.6MB for 16mm.

Part 2 – 13

252

Part 2 – 13

253

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

‚‚ Capture Info: In Cintel Scanner mode, a set of capture metadata fields appears at
the bottom of the Film Scanner panel. Populating the File Name Prefix updates the
file name preview that’s shown above in the Header, that also shows the file path,
Resolution, Frame Rate, Duration, and Format (Cintel Raw Image).

Editable capture metadata

Before you begin scanning, you may want to adjust the settings in the Cintel Scanner panel of
the Project Settings, and you’ll definitely need to adjust some settings in the Cintel panel of the
Media page.

Capture Location in the Capture Info Section
Prior to beginning a film scanning session, you should scroll down to the Capture Info
section of the Capture panel to make sure the scanned files are being saved to the
directory and volume where you want them. Click the Browse button and choose a
location from the File Destination dialog. It’s good to do this first, as this step is easy
to forget.
Your clips will be saved to independent sub-folders in the destination folder, with a
timecode prefix in the file name. If you want to save all your clips into one master
destination folder, deselect the Timestamp Prefix checkbox in the Capture
Info section.

Calibration
This option lets you calibrate the optics of the scanner to eliminate optical blemishes or dust
that cannot be removed (this is not for dust-busting the film itself).

The calibration button underneath Image Stabilization

‚‚ Calibrate button: Lets you eliminate light optical blemishes and dust from the optics
of the Cintel scanner via digital calibration. While it’s recommended to spray dust the
optics before scanning new material, it’s possible over time for some blemishes on the
optics to be unremovable, in which case using the Calibrate button will eliminate them
from the scanned image. The skid plate does not normally need to be removed for
calibration; however, in cases where there is severe dirt, remove the skid plate and dust
it first. You must use the Calibrate button before you load film into the scanner, while
there’s nothing in the optical path, to remove any remaining optical blemishes or dust.

Film Type
These controls let you select the type of film you’re scanning, align the film with the sensor, and
choose what speed you’re scanning at.

Film Type controls in the Media page

‚‚ Film Type pop-up: Lets you choose what type of film you’re scanning. The choices are
Positive, Negative, Interpositive, and Internegative.

NOTE: when scanning interpositive film, the increased density of the film
requires slightly extended pulse durations from the light source. Normally, this
does not affect the scan, however, a slight reduction in resolution may occur
when scanning at above 12 frames per second. If you do notice a difference in
resolution, simply reduce your scanning speed to 12 frames per
second or less.

Part 2 – 13

The following groups of settings appear to the right of the Media page Viewer when in Cintel
Scanner mode to scan clips from film into the Media Pool.

254

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

Cintel Media Page Settings

‚‚ Frame buttons: These buttons are push and hold to activate; when on, the film is slowly
advanced to move the frame up or down and when released the film stops in place.
This is useful for aligning the film frame with the scanner’s sensor. Using the Perf Nudge
and Frame buttons, align the visible film frame such that the bottom of the previous
frame and the top of the next frame are just visible at the top and bottom of the Viewer,
and the current frame is centered vertically (it’s important to make sure the image in the
Viewer is not zoomed in when you do this). Command-Left Arrow moves the frame up,
while Command-Right Arrow moves the frame down.
‚‚ Scan speed slider: With adequate disk performance, you should be able to scan at
30 fps. However, if you’re scanning to a slow hard drive, you can reduce the scanning
speed to a frame rate that’s suitable for your workstation without dropping frames.
‚‚ Feed buttons: Sets the wind direction of the left-hand side feed spool. While autodetection will prevent incorrect operation, you should manually configure the reel
winding direction based on how each film roll is wound.
‚‚ Take up buttons: Sets the wind direction of the right-hand side take up spool. While
auto-detection will prevent incorrect operation, you should manually configure the reel
winding direction based on how each film roll is wound.
‚‚ Focus Assist check-box: Enables luminance peaking on the scanner HDMI monitor
output, which makes it easy to obtain optimum focus adjustments.

Light Source
These controls let you adjust the scanner’s light source to adjust the optimal Dmin (the minimum
scanned signal value) and color temperature of the scanned material. Using the built-in software
scopes in DaVinci Resolve, which can be opened in the Media page by choosing Workspace >
Video Scopes > On, you can adjust these settings to make sure you’re not clipping image data
during the scanning process.

Light Source controls in the Media page

Part 2 – 13

‚‚ Perf nudge buttons: Used for making fine adjustments of the perf position relative to
the scanner gate aperture. Command-J nudges up, while Command-L nudges down.

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Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

‚‚ Gauge and perf count pop-up: Lets you choose what reel type you’re scanning, the
choices are 35mm 2, 3, and 4 perf, and 16mm 1 perf.

‚‚ Auto Black button: Analyzes the current frame displayed in the Viewer and does an
automatic adjustment to put the film base of the signal at the Dmin value of 95 for
negative, or for print to set the white point to 90%.
‚‚ RGB controls: By default, a color balance control lets you adjust all three color
channels by varying amounts to alter the color temperature of the light source used to
illuminate the film, while the adjusted R, G, and B values are displayed in three fields
below. Optionally, you can choose to put this control into Color Bars mode using the
mode pop-up to the right of the Light Source title bar, which changes this control to
three vertical Red, Green, and Blue color channel sliders.

Image Stabilization
These controls let you enable and disable as well as control image stabilization to eliminate
vertical film hop and horizontal gate weave.

Image Stabilization controls in the Media page

‚‚ Image Stabilization enable/disable control: The dot to the left of the Image
Stabilization title bar lets you enable or disable the scanner’s hardware-based image
stabilization altogether. While hardware stabilization is typically desirable when you
have high-quality perforations, you may want to turn this option off if the condition
of the perforations is poor and you decide to use DaVinci Resolve’s software-based
stabilization instead. When Image Stabilization is enabled (the default), small white
vertical (Y axis) and horizontal (X axis) detection overlays are displayed in the Viewer,
highlighting which part of the film perforation is to be used as the reference for
stabilization. These overlays are automatically hidden when recording.
‚‚ Enable X and Y checkboxes: Lets you choose whether to use hardware image
stabilization to fix horizontal gate weave (Enable X) and vertical gate hop (Enable Y). If
the results are unsatisfactory with both axes enabled, you can turn off the axis that’s
causing issues with stabilization.
‚‚ Automatic Perf Detection checkbox: When enabled (the default), the Cintel scanner
attempts to automatically place the stabilization detection overlay at the best location,
with reference to the perforation shown on the currently loaded frame, for the best
stabilization result. For optimum stabilization, the position of the overlay should
resemble the following screenshot, with the box over the flat bottom area of the perf
and the bar positioned in the middle of the perf. If the automatic positioning is not
ideal, you can turn Automatic Perf Detection off, and manually move the overlay to a
more ideal position, either by dragging it in the Viewer, or by using the Horizontal and
Vertical sliders described below.

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Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

‚‚ Master Offset control: Adjusts the intensity of the light source used to illuminate the
film, raising or lowering the RGB channels all at once. For typical camera negative, this
lets you adjust the black point of the film image (the darkest part of the image, which in
fact corresponds to the highlights of the film image) to sit just above the typical Dmin
value of 95, as measured on the Histogram of the video scopes, which guarantees that
the highlights won’t be clipped by a Cineon-style LOG conversion. For positive film,
simply adjust Master offset so that no part of the signal is being clipped.

Hardware stabilization control correctly positioned
over a perforation in the Viewer

‚‚ X and Y sliders: Used to manually reposition the stabilization overlay when Automatic
Perf Detection is turned off. Ideal placement of the stabilization overlay should position
the top box to surround the top flat edge of the perf, with the lower part of the overlay
flush against and centered on the side of the perf. This enables hardware stabilization of
vertical gate hop (along the Y axis), as well as gate weave (along the X axis). If the default
position of the stabilization overlay is not ideal, you can either drag it to another location
in the Viewer, or use the Horizontal and Vertical sliders to position it numerically.

Film Protection
These controls are intended to allow delicate film to be handled gently by the Cintel Scanner.
Fast acceleration and shuttle speeds can be hard on archival footage, so it’s recommended to
lower both of these sliders from their defaults whenever you’re scanning older film.

The Acceleration and Shuttle Speed sliders should be lowered
when scanning older, delicate archival film

‚‚ Max Acceleration: Changes the scanning speed to operate between 5–30 frames
per second.
‚‚ Max Shuttle Speed: Changes the speed of shuttling from one section of film to another
between 1–100 frames per second for 35mm film, and between 1-200 frames per
second for 16mm film.
‚‚ Film Tension Adjust: Adjusts the amount of tension applied to the film. For example,
when loading delicate archival film, or compensating for film shrinkage.

NOTE: There is no possible way you can damage the film using the Film
Tension Adjust setting. The adjustment values are very small and only gentle
changes are all that’s required to prevent sprocket picking.

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The following sections describe how to scan film using DaVinci Resolve to control the Cintel
scanner. Throughout, the procedures outlined above are presented in the order in which you’ll
perform each step of the scanning process.

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Before You Begin

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

Film Scanning Workflows

Following the instructions that accompany your Cintel scanner, connect the Scanner to your
workstation using a Thunderbolt cable. The Cintel scanner is compatible with either
Thunderbolt 1 or 2, and either has the bandwidth to transfer the scanner’s output to
your computer.
Before turning your scanner on and loading film, you should first dust the gate to make sure
your scans are as clean as possible. This can be accomplished using compressed air, but if the
gate is extremely dirty, you can remove it to give it a more thorough cleaning. Once that’s
finished, turn on the Cintel scanner, open DaVinci Resolve and create the project you’ll be using
to scan film, then click the Cintel Scan button on the Media page. Next, click the Film Scanner
tab to select the Cintel panel.
Before you load film into the scanner or do anything else, click the Calibrate button at the
bottom left of the Cintel panel. While you should always dust the gate of the scanner before
loading a new reel of film, clicking the Calibrate button eliminates any unremovable blemishes
in the scanner’s optics from the scans you’re about to make.

Load and Align the Film
Load the film you want to scan. In the presence of an image, the scanner will automatically align a
frame. You should note that the image may be framed incorrectly if you first load blank film leader.
Next, choose the Film type. If necessary, use the Perf Nudge and Frame buttons to manually
improve the alignment of the framing bar to the scanner’s sensor such that the bottom of the
previous frame and the top of the next frame are just visible at the top and bottom of the
Viewer, and the current frame is centered vertically. It’s important to make sure the image in the
Viewer is not zoomed in when you do this.

Focus the Scanner
Just as you need to focus the lens on a camera, you’ll need to focus the projected film image
on your scanner’s sensor. To achieve perfect focus, turn on the Focus Assist checkbox in the
Film Scanner capture settings of DaVinci Resolve. This superimposes a focus peaking overlay
over the Ultra HD image that’s output from the scanner’s HDMI output, and is also displayed in
DaVinci Resolve’s Capture window. For best results, connect an Ultra HD display to your Cintel
scanner, so that you can monitor at the maximum available resolution while you focus.
With Focus Assist turned on, focus peaking will detect the film grain of the scanned image
whenever the film plane is in perfect focus. This enables the operator to focus the scanner even
if the film image is out of focus. Simply monitor the Ultra HD output of the scanner while you
turn the Cintel scanner’s focus wheel. Your image will be in focus when the grain running
throughout the image displays peaking outlines.

Other Ways to Focus the Scanner
Another accurate way to achieve perfect focus, if you don’t have a display connected
directly to the scanner, is to use DaVinci Resolve’s RGB Parade scope to monitor the
signal while you focus. Open the Video Scopes by choosing Workspace > Video
Scopes > On. To see the Parade Scope in more detail, you can set the Video Scopes
window to display only a single scope using the layout buttons at the upper right-hand
corner of the Video Scope window, and then choose the Parade Scope from the
pop-up in the scope title bar (if necessary).
To focus, watch the tops of the red, green, and blue scope graphs while you turn the
Cintel scanner’s focus wheel. Your image will be in perfect focus when all three color
channels in the scopes are “peaking,” or displaying the maximum amount of information
at their highest point.

Check the Automatic Perf Detection Stabilization Overlay
Next, play the loaded film and check that the automatic perf detection has found an appropriate
section of the perf to successfully stabilize the film. If necessary, you can drag the stabilization
overlay that appears in the Viewer so that the top box surrounds the top flat edge of the visible
perf to make best use of the hardware-based stabilization built into the scanner.

Reset the Timecode for That Roll
To set the timecode for the roll of film you’re about to scan, you need to locate the zero frame
for that roll. It’s standard practice to punch a small physical hole within the frame before the first
frame of necessary film on a roll, to use as a permanent reference for whenever that roll is
scanned. This is referred to as the marker frame, lab roll hole, or head punch. By always setting
the first frame of timecode to match the marker frame, subsequent film scans will have the same
frame count as previous scans, making it possible to rescan and reconform the same material
whenever necessary.
To reset scanned timecode at the marker frame of a new film roll:
1

Use the transport controls to locate the marker frame.

2

Click the Viewer option menu and choose “Current Frame Timecode.”

Choosing Current Frame Timecode from the Viewer Option menu

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

TIP: You can verify the focal adjustments you’ve made by checking the edges of your
film’s perforations. When these are sharp, your film will be in focus.

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Enter a timecode value in the dialog box that appears. For example, if you’re scanning
the first roll of a project, you can enter 01:00:00:00.

260

The Set Current Frame Timecode dialog

4

When you’re done, click OK.

Timecode cannot be negative, so don’t set the start frame to zero. Another common
organizational technique is to change the hour number whenever you change rolls, to coincide
with the film roll’s number, which makes it easy to track the correspondence between a
scanned clip and the source roll and frame range it was scanned from.

NOTE: The Cintel scanner does not read Keykode, Aaton code, or edge code from
camera negative. However, the Cintel Scanner does have“Options Interfaces” ports for
adding optional third-party hardware in the future to accomplish this.

Choose a Location to Save the Scanned Frames
Once all this is done, scroll down to the Capture Info controls in the Capture panel, and click the
Browse button to choose a location for the scanned files. You can use the other fields in this
section to set what prefix (if any) you want to add to the name of the scanned files and
enclosing folders, and what Roll, Reel, Clip, and Program information you want associated with
the scanned media.
The Timestamp Prefix checkbox in the Capture info controls is selected by default and will save
your clips to independent sub-folders within the destination folder, together with a timecode
prefix in the file name. If you want to save all your clips together in one master destination
folder, simply deselect the checkbox.

Check the Frame Rate
There’s an FPS field in the Capture Info that identifies the frame rate of the scanned clips. Make
sure this frame rate is set correctly to ensure that the header data of your film scans is correct.

Adjusting the Color of the Scanner
The Cintel panel gives you control over the exposure and color temperature of the light used to
illuminate the film for scanning via the Master Offset and RGB Offset controls, in order to
maximize the amount of information you’re extracting from each frame, while preventing any
part of the image from being irretrievably clipped. While it’s true that CRI is a raw image format,
there’s no latitude beyond the internal data range used by DaVinci Resolve; be mindful that if
you’re clipping data in the built-in video scopes while scanning, it might be clipped permanently
in the scanned media.

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

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3

This is important because the Master Offset and RGB Offset settings cannot be automatically
changed between scanned clips in a log and capture workflow. This means that the current
Light Source settings will be used for all clips you scan until you manually change those settings
again, even for clips that you’ve logged from different parts of a film roll. This means that the log
and capture style of working is only advisable in situations where it makes sense to log multiple
clips that share the same Master Offset and RGB Offset adjustments.
Otherwise, it’s recommended you make lighting adjustments on a clip by clip basis, as you scan
each clip, in situations where you need maximum image quality for finishing. Keep in mind that
the goal for these adjustments is to maximize image data from the scan, not to create the final
look of the clips, which you’ll accomplish later in the grading phase of work using the controls of
the Color page.
To adjust the Light Source settings, find a typical image for the section of roll or for the first
series of shots you’re going to scan, and adjust the light source while viewing the built-in
Video Scopes.
Adjust Master Offset to set the intensity of the light source used to illuminate the film, raising or
lowering the level of the R, G, and B channels all at once. For typical camera negative, this lets
you adjust the black point of the film image (the darkest part of the image, which in fact
corresponds to the highlights of the film image) to sit just above the typical Dmin value of 95, as
measured on the Histogram of the video scopes, which guarantees that the highlights won’t be
clipped by the Cineon LOG conversion that DaVinci Resolve uses to debayer the CRI image for
grading. For positive film, simply adjust Master offset so that no part of the highlights or
shadows of the signal is being clipped.

TIP: You can turn on Show Reference Levels in the Waveform, RGB Parade, or
Histogram scopes, and set the Low value to indicate the digital Dmin value of 95.

Once that’s accomplished, adjust the RGB Offset controls to rebalance all three color channels
by varying amounts to alter the color temperature of the light source used to illuminate the film,
to produce the most useful (typically neutral) color balance in the scanned result.

Scanning One or More Sections of Film
After you’ve adjusted the Light Source, it’s a good idea to stay organized as you scan each clip
by entering all relevant metadata into the Metadata Editor as you go. The Capture group of
metadata fields contains information for defining the File Name Prefix, Roll, Reel Number, Clip
Number, Program Name, Flags, and whether a particular take is good. If you populate these
fields before scanning a clip, that metadata will be written into the clip.

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Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

How often you’ll adjust the color and exposure of scanned shots depends on how much variety
there is in the scenes on a particular film roll. For example, some rolls may have many takes of
the same scene, all of which have the same lighting and which can share the same adjustments.
Meanwhile, other rolls may have a variety of different scenes with widely different lighting in
each one, necessitating you to make individual adjustments for each scanned clip to maximize
data quality.

‚‚ Capture Clip: A more controlled means of scanning specific sections of film. After
you’ve used the Transport controls and the In and Out button to define a section of film,
clicking Capture Clip scans that one clip and then stops.
‚‚ Batch Clips: A way you can log multiple clips in advance of scanning them all at once
using the current Light Source settings in the Cintel panel. Log each clip in advance by
setting In and Out points for each section of film you want to scan, and click the Log
Clip button to save that frame range as an unscanned clip in the Media Pool. When you
click Batch Clips, all unscanned clips will be scanned one after the other until the job is
complete. You can also select one or more unscanned clips, and only the selected clips
will be scanned. Furthermore, you can import an EDL that corresponds to a particular
film roll, and use the resulting logged clips for scanning.
For more information on Batch Capture workflows, see Chapter 12, “Ingesting From Tape.”

Extracting Audio
If the film you’re scanning also contains an optical sound track, you can extract the audio in a
separate step. There is a standard image frame to audio frame offset of 26 frames for 16mm and
21 frames for 35mm that DaVinci Resolve automatically aligns when extracting the audio. Select
all of the clips that have an optical sound track, then right-click one of the selected clips and
choose Extract Audio. DaVinci Resolve analyzes the overlapping optical track area of each
frame and automatically generates a matching audio track, synchronized with the scanned
image sequence. Each clip’s audio will be automatically extracted, embedded in the clip, and
saved to the same directory the scanned frames have been written to.
Each clip’s audio will be automatically extracted, embedded in the clip, and saved to the same
directory the scanned frames have been written to. A small audio icon will appear on the corner
of your clip’s thumbnail so you know there is a corresponding audio file.
To make extraction easier, you can filter the clips in the media storage by name, resolution, date
modified, or by film clips only. Filtering your clips makes it easier for you to find and select
exactly what you need. You can also make a large selection and extract audio from multiple
clips at once by right-clicking on your selection and choosing Extract Audio… from the
drop-down menu.

You can filter the contents in the media storage to make it easier to manage them

Part 2 – 13

‚‚ Capture Now: Clicking Capture Now begins scanning near the current frame, ending
whenever you click Stop Capture. Using Capture now, you can capture long sections of
a roll all at once.

262

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

With all of this accomplished, you can scan clips from film in one of three ways:

During audio extraction, an information box will appear to
indicate the progress. You can stop the extraction at any
time by clicking on the Stop button

NOTE: If the Timestamp Prefix checkbox was deselected in the Capture Info
section when your clips were scanned, and you want to have extracted audio
automatically embedded in your clips, always remember to extract audio from
the clips inside the Media Pool.

Audio Extraction Settings
Normally, once you have selected the film type, the automatic features in DaVinci Resolve will
extract your optical audio perfectly. However, the condition of the optical track can vary with
the condition of the film being loaded and in some instances this can confuse the automation.
If this happens, you can bypass the automatic features and make adjustments manually.

For manual adjustments, open the Audio Extraction settings window by clicking Show Cintel Audio
Settings in the Inspector options near the top right of the Viewer

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

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Inside the box is a thin red line. This line is the mid point detector which detects the
separation between stereo audio channels. When mono sound is detected during
audio extraction, the mid point detector disappears and the guides will adjust
automatically to suit the width of the mono optical track.

TIP: If you need a closer inspection of the audio scan area guides, you can
zoom into the Viewer and move the Viewer position up or down, and left or
right. Simply choose the amount of zoom from the sizing options at the top left
corner of the Viewer, then click and drag the Viewer with your mouse or
track pad.

When Show Audio Scan Area is turned on, the audio area guides will be visible so you
can see exactly what information is being used and monitor the extraction process

‚‚ Override audio scan area: This setting provides sliders for adjusting the horizontal
and vertical positioning, width, and height of the audio scan area guides. These
settings include:
Left and Width: If your film type is such that audio appears on the right side of the
frame, you can simply adjust the Left slider to move the guide box to the right. Normally,
this will happen automatically if you have the corresponding film type selected, but the
setting gives you more flexibility for adjustments if you need it. Similarly, the Width
setting is used to adjust the width of the scan area.

264

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‚‚ Show audio scan area: This checkbox turns the audio scan area guides on or off. The
guides are displayed as a box on the side of the frame covering the optical audio scan
area and show what optical information will be used during extraction. The position of
the guides will conform to the film type you have selected; however, you can change
the position manually if you need to. The audio scan area guides are also great
indicators to show you what is happening during the extraction process so you can
identify any potential troubles and make manual adjustments.

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

Audio extraction settings let you make the following manual adjustments:

Height: Sometimes film frames on older rolls of film may be slightly smaller than normal
due to shrinkage over time. When making manual adjustments to the guide box, you
can make adjustments for film shrinkage using the Height slider.
‚‚ Auto adjust audio scan height: This setting is on by default and automatically adjusts
the guide box height to align with the audio waveform at the top of each frame. The
automatic feature works well for normal audio conditions; however, if during extraction
you notice the box moving randomly and the quality of the extraction is affected, it may
be due to similar features in the audio track overlapping between frames. If this occurs,
deselect the checkbox and try the extraction again.

TIP: If deselecting the Auto Adjust Audio Scan Height checkbox, make sure
the Height setting places the guide box at the optimal position for the frame.
Making manual adjustments can help if you need them, but don’t forget to turn
the automatic features back on afterwards
‚‚ Audio waveform color is white: Depending on the scanned film type, the audio
waveform may be black or white. If the waveform is white, make sure the corresponding
checkbox is enabled. This will ensure the white information in the waveform is used
during audio extraction. If the waveform is black and the surrounding audio area is
white, disable the checkbox so DaVinci Resolve knows to use the black information in
the waveform. Other automatic features, such as mid point and mono detection, also
rely on this setting being set correctly.
‚‚ Override firmware stability: In rare instances, the condition of the film may have
created large movements in the frame due to the internal firmware stabilization. This
can cause the audio extraction guide box to misalign with the optical track. If this
occurs, enabling “Override Firmware Stability” lets the audio extraction guide box
to track the film perforations independently and adjust its positioning for potentially
better results.
‚‚ Variable density audio: If your film contains variable density audio, make sure you
select the Variable Density Audio checkbox so DaVinci Resolve knows the type of
audio to extract. The default state is set to Off for variable area audio soundtracks.

TIP: If you haven’t used variable density audio before, you can visually identify
it as a tight sequence of shaded lines, similar to a bar code with the lines
squeezed closer together. By comparison, Variable Area soundtracks appear
as an audio waveform.

Part 2 – 13

Top: Adjusts the vertical position of the guide box.

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Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

These are helpful tools for making subtle adjustments to the side edges of the guide
box if there are unwanted elements inside the film’s optical audio area. This can happen
due to perforation wear and tear, or varying print qualities, and can sometimes interfere
with the quality of the audio extraction. You can help avoid this by making a subtle
movement to the side edges to keep the stray elements outside of the guide box.

Using three nodes to convert a film scan using LUTs, node 1 converts from Negative or Print to Linear,
node 2 converts from Linear to Rec. 709, and node 3, if required, inverts the color

NOTE: Applying a LUT within a node will clip any image data falling below 0
and above 1. To correct for this, you can use the Lift/Gamma/Gain controls
within any node with a LUT applied to adjust your image levels prior to the
transform applied by the LUT within that node.

Depending on the format you’re scanning and the way the material was shot, you may
need to also resize the resulting scans, resizing, zooming, stretching, panning, and
tilting to create the final framing you require. You can use the Input Sizing mode of the
Sizing palette in the Color page to create the necessary framing, and save a sizing
preset (by clicking the Create button and entering a name in the resulting dialog). Once
you’ve created an appropriate sizing preset for a given type of media, you can apply
that preset to multiple film scans all at once, in either the Color page or in the Media
Pool using the Change Input Sizing Preset command, found in the contextual menu of
selected clips. For more information on sizing in DaVinci Resolve, see Chapter 58,
“Sizing and Image Stabilization.”

Creating a sizing preset in the Sizing palette of the Color page

Part 2 – 13

A pair of 1D LUTs, “Cintel Negative to Linear,” and “Cintel Print to Linear,” have been provided to
help you convert scanned media to a color space in which you can do further work. You can
apply these LUTs via a node in the Color page to convert the original scans to a Linear color
space. However, if you want to convert the image to Rec. 709 or to Cineon for further
adjustment, you’ll want to apply a second LUT in a second node. In general for Negative film, it’s
best to ‘color invert’ after the second LUT is applied so you can then apply grade operations on
the Linear data. There are a variety of VFX IO LUTs available in the 3D LUT submenu of each
node’s contextual menu that let you convert an image from Linear color space to any other color
space you want to work within. For more information, see Chapter 49, “Node Editing Basics.”

266

Capturing From the Cintel Film Scanner

Grading and Sizing Scanned Media

PART 3

Part 3 – 14

Using the
Edit Page

268

Using the Edit Page

Chapter 14

Using the Edit Page
In this chapter, you’ll learn how to use and configure the Edit page user interface to prepare for
editing projects in DaVinci Resolve. For more information on how to use the Edit page to import
and conform projects edited in other applications for color correction and finishing in DaVinci
Resolve, see Chapter 34, “Conforming and Relinking Clips.”

Part 3 – 14

This chapter covers the following topics:

Using the Edit Page

269

The Edit Page User Interface

271

The Interface Toolbar

271

The Media Pool

272

Importing Media Into the Media Pool on the Edit Page

272

Bins, Power Bins, and Smart Bins

273

Showing Bins in Separate Windows

273

Filtering Bins Using Color Tags

274

Sorting the Bin List

275

Searching for Content in the Media Pool

276

Taking Advantage of the Media Pool’s Usage Column

276

More About Timelines and Grading

276

Timelines, Grades, and Versions

276

Enabling the Use of a Master Timeline

277

Using the Effects Library

278

The Toolbox

279

OpenFX

279

AudioFX

279

Effects Library Favorites

280

Edit Index

280

Navigating The Timeline Using the Edit Index

281

Edit Index Columns

281

Filtering the Edit Index

282

Exporting the Edit Index

283

Source and Timeline Viewers

283

How Each Clip’s Grade Looks in Each Viewer

284

Source and Timeline Viewers vs. Single Viewer Mode

284

Viewer Controls

284

Simultaneous Audio Waveform Display in the Source Viewer

287

Cinema Viewer Mode

287

Viewer Indicators

287

Other Viewer Options

288

Opening Clips in the Source Viewer

288

Timeline Viewer Edit Overlays

289

289

Inspector

291

Timeline

291

Timeline Options

293

Switching Among Multiple Timelines

295

Toolbar

295

Toolbar Audio Monitoring Controls

297

The Clip and Track Mixer

297

Using Video Scopes

298

Navigating the Edit Page Using the Keyboard

299

Dual Monitor Layout

299

Customizing the Edit Page

300

Undo and Redo in the Edit Page

301

Using the Edit Page

Metadata Editor

Part 3 – 14

270

The Edit Page in its entirety

The Interface Toolbar
At the very top of the Edit page is a toolbar with buttons that let you show and hide different
parts of the user interface. These buttons are as follows, from left to right:

The Interface toolbar

‚‚ Media Pool/Effects Library/Edit Index height button: Lets you set the area used by the
Media Pool, Effects Library, and/or Edit Index to take up the full height of your display
(you can display two at a time), giving you more area for browsing at the expense of a
narrower timeline. At half height, the Media Pool/Effects Library/Edit Index are restricted
to the top of the UI (you can only show one at a time), and the timeline takes up the full
width of your display.
‚‚ Effects Library: Opens or hides the repository of all transitions, generators, OpenFX,
and audio filters available to use in the Edit page.
‚‚ Edit Index: Opens or hides the list of all edit events in enabled tracks of the Timeline.
‚‚ Metadata: Hides or shows the Metadata Editor.
‚‚ Inspector: Shows or hides the Inspector, which shows you the transform and
compositing effects of selected clips, or the editable options of selected effects such
as transitions or generators.

Part 3 – 14

The Edit page has evolved into a source-record style NLE that contains nearly every editorial
tool you need for creative editing through finishing. The Edit page is divided into three main
regions: the browsers found at the left, the Viewers at the top, and the Timeline at the bottom,
all of which work together to let you import, edit, and trim timelines with a flexible variety of
tools and methods.

271

Using the Edit Page

The Edit Page User Interface

In the Edit page, the Media Pool contains all of the media you’ve imported for editing into the
project at hand, as well as all of the timelines that you’re going to be editing into. The Media
Pool is also mirrored on the Media and Fairlight pages, so you can access any clip or timeline
from any page where they can be used.

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272

The Bin list at the left shows a hierarchical list of bins used for organizing your media, which is
also used to organize your timelines. By default, the Media Pool consists of a single bin, named
“Master,” but you can add more bins as necessary to organize timelines and clips by rightclicking anywhere in the empty area of the Media Pool and choosing Add Bin. You can rename
any custom bin by double-clicking on its name and typing a new one, or by right-clicking a bin’s
name and choosing Rename Bin. The Bin list can be hidden or shown via the button at the
upper left-hand corner of the Edit page toolbar.

Using the Edit Page

The Media Pool

The Media Pool in Thumbnail mode, shown in half-height mode

The browser area to the right shows the contents of the currently selected folder. Every timeline
you create, and every AAF, XML, or EDL file you import, appears here. You can create or import
as many timelines as you need within a single project.
As in the Media page, the Media Pool can be displayed in either Icon or List view. In List view,
you can sort the contents by any one of a subset of the total metadata that’s available in the
Metadata Editor of the Media page. Of particular interest to editors are columns for Name, Reel
Name, different timecode streams, Description, Comments, Keyword, Shot, Scene, Take, Angle,
Circled, Start KeyKode, Flags, Usage, Resolution, and Frames Per Second.
For more information on using the myriad features of the Media Pool, see Chapter 8, “Adding
and Organizing Media with the Media Pool.” In the sections that follow, some key features of the
Media Pool are summarized for your convenience.

Importing Media Into the Media Pool on the Edit Page
While adding clips to the Media Pool in the Media page provides the most organizational
flexibility and features, if you find yourself in the Edit or Fairlight page and you need to quickly
import a few clips for immediate use, you can do so in a couple of different ways.

Select one or more clips in the Finder.

2

Drag those clips into the Media Pool of DaVinci Resolve or to a bin in the Bin list.
Those clips are added to the Media Pool of your project.

To use the Import Media command in the Edit page Media Pool:
1

With the Edit page open, right-click anywhere in the Media Pool, and choose
Import Media.

2

Use the Import dialog to select one or more clips to import, and click Open.
Those clips are added to the Media Pool of your project.

For more information on using the myriad features of the Media Pool, see Chapter 8, “Adding
and Organizing Media with the Media Pool.” Below, some key features of the Media Pool are
summarized for your convenience.

Bins, Power Bins, and Smart Bins
There are actually three kinds of bins in the Media Pool, and each appears in its own section of
the Bin list. The Power Bin and Smart Bin areas of the Bin list can be shown or hidden using
commands in the View menu (View > Show Smart Bins, View > Show Power Bins). Here are the
differences between the different kinds of bins:
‚‚ Bins: Simple, manually populated bins. Drag and drop anything you like into a bin,
and that’s where it lives, until you decide to move it to another bin. Bins may be
hierarchically organized, so you can create a Russian dolls nest of bins if you like.
Creating new bins is as easy as right-clicking within the bin list and choosing Add Bin
from the contextual menu.
‚‚ Power Bins: Hidden by default. These are also manually populated bins, but these
bins are shared among all of the projects in your current database, making them ideal
for shared title generators, graphics movies and stills, sound effects library files, music
files, and other media that you want to be able to quickly and easily access from any
project. To create a new Power Bin, show the Power Bins area of the Bin list, then rightclick within it and choose Add Bin.
‚‚ Smart Bins: These are procedurally populated bins, meaning that custom rules
employing metadata are used to dynamically filter the contents of the Media Pool
whenever you select a Smart Bin. This makes Smart Bins fast ways of organizing the
contents of projects for which you (or an assistant) has taken the time to add metadata
to your clips using the Metadata Editor, adding Scene, Shot, and Take information,
keywords, comments and description text, and myriad other pieces of information to
make it faster to find what you’re looking for when you need it. To create a new Smart
Bin, show the Smart Bin area of the Bin list (if necessary), then right-click within it and
choose Add Smart Bin. A dialog appears in which you can edit the name of that bin and
the rules it uses to filter clips, and click Create Smart Bin.

Showing Bins in Separate Windows
If you right-click a bin in the Bin List, you can choose “Open As New Window” to open that bin
into its own window. Each window is its own Media Pool, complete with its own Bin List, Power
Bins and Smart Bins lists, and display controls.
This is most useful when you have two displays connected to your workstation, as you can drag
these separate bins to the second display while DaVinci Resolve is in single screen mode. If you

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1

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To add media by dragging one or more clips from the Finder to the Edit page Media Pool
(macOS only):

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hide the Bin list, not only do you get more room for clips, but you also prevent accidentally
switching bins if you really want to only view a particular bin’s contents in that window. You can
as many additional Bin windows open as you care to, in addition to the main Media Pool that’s
docked in the primary window interface.

Media Pool bins opened as new windows

Filtering Bins Using Color Tags
If you’re working on a project that has a lot of bins, you can apply color tags to identify particular
bins with one of eight colors. Tagging bins is as easy as right-clicking any bin and choosing the
color you want from the Color Tag submenu.
For example, you can identify the bins that have clips you’re using most frequently with a red
tag. A bin’s color tag then appears as a colored background behind that bin’s name.

Using Color Tags to identify bins

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Once you’ve tagged one or more Media Pool bins, you can use the Color Tag Filter pop-up
menu (the pop-up control to the right of the Bin List button) to filter out all but a single
color of bin.

Using Color Tag filtering to isolate the red bins

To go back to seeing all available bins, choose Show All from the Color Tag Filter pop-up.

Sorting the Bin List
The Bin list (and Smart Bin list) of the Media Pool can be sorted by Bin Name, Date Created, or
Date Modified, in either ascending or descending order. Simply right-click anywhere within the
Bin list and choose the options you want from the Sort by submenu of the contextual menu.
You can also choose User Sort from the same contextual menu, which lets you manually drag all
bins in the Bin list to be in whatever order you like. As you drag bins in this mode, an orange line
indicates the new position that bin will occupy when dropped.

Dragging a bin to a new position
in the Bin list in User Sort mode

Searching for Content in the Media Pool
An optional Search field can be opened at the top of the Media Pool that lets you quickly find
clips by name, partial name, or any of a wide variety of Media Pool metadata.
To search for a clip by name:
1

Select which bin or bins you want to search.

2

Click the magnifying glass button at the upper right-hand corner of the Media Pool.

3

Choose the particular column of information you want to search (or All Fields to search
all columns) using the Filter by pop-up menu. Only selected bins will be searched.

4

Type your search string into the Search field that appears. A few letters should be
enough to isolate only those clips that have that character string within their name.
To show all clips again, click the cancel button at the right of the search field.

TIP: Smart Bins are essentially multi-criteria search operations that scope the entire
project at once and are saved for future use.

Taking Advantage of the Media Pool’s Usage Column
In List view, the Usage column does not automatically update to show how many times a
particular clip has been used. However, you can manually update this metadata by right-clicking
within the Media Pool and choosing Update Usage Data from the contextual menu that
appears. Afterwards, each clip will display how many times it’s been used in this column. Clips
that have not been used yet display an x.

More About Timelines and Grading
DaVinci Resolve projects contain one or more edited timelines (sometimes called a sequence in
other applications) which are also organized in the Media Pool, and displayed in the Timeline
Editor (referred to as “the Timeline”). Timelines contain clips, the source media of which is kept
in the Media Pool, and which also appear as edit events in the Edit Index that can be shown at
the right of the Timeline.

Timelines, Grades, and Versions
Within any given timeline, grades are associated with the timecode of the source clip they’re
applied to. That means that as you alter the timeline, each clip’s grade moves along with it,
making it extremely easy to move back and forth between editing and grading as your needs
require. By default, each timeline in a project has independent sets of grades using Local
versions; this is true even if your timelines are duplicates. That means each clip within every
timeline has a completely independent grade.

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If you use User Sort in the Bin list to rearrange your bins manually, you can switch back and
forth between any of the other sorting methods (Name, Date Created, Date Modified) and User
Sort and your manual User Sort order will be remembered, making it easy to use whatever
method of bin sorting is most useful at the time, without losing your customized bin
organization.

Enabling the Use of a Master Timeline
Previous versions of DaVinci Resolve had a Master Timeline, which consisted of one long
timeline containing every clip in the Media Pool, arranged by default in ascending order by
timecode. While the Master Timeline was useful for a variety of tasks, architectural
improvements have rendered it unnecessary, and by default the Master Timeline does not
appear in new projects created by DaVinci Resolve version 10 or later.
However, if you want a Master Timeline in order to have a single timeline that always contains
all clips currently in the Media Pool, there’s a way you can create one. You need to do it
immediately upon creating a new project, before adding any media to the Media Pool. Once
you’ve added one or more clips to the Media Pool, the option you need to do so will
be disabled.
To create a new Master Timeline:
1

Create a new project, open the General Options panel of the Project Settings, and turn
on the “Automatically match master timeline with media pool” checkbox. If you also
want all clips to use Remote versions as you grade by default as in previous versions of
DaVinci Resolve, you can turn off the “Store grade with local version by default.”

The option to use a Master Timeline is in the Color section of the
General Options panel of the Project Settings

2

Click Save to close the Project Settings window.

3

Open the Edit page, and choose File > New Timeline (Command-N).

4

When the New Timeline Properties window appears, turn the Empty Timeline checkbox
off, and click Create New Timeline.
Now, in addition to the new timeline, a Master Timeline appears in the Timeline list.

TIP: If you want to make sure that you always have a Master Timeline when
you create new projects, you can alter the Project Setting preset for your user
account to reflect these settings, or you can create a new Project Setting
preset with these settings that you can easily switch to.

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You can switch a timeline between using Local and Remote grades at any time. For more
information on using Local versus Remote versions, see Chapter 48, “Grade Management.” You
can also copy grades from one timeline to another using the ColorTrace feature. For more
information about ColorTrace, see Chapter 54, “Copying and Importing Grades Using
ColorTrace.”

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However, if you switch the clips in one or more timelines to use Remote versions, a clip’s grades
are shared by every instance of that clip in all timelines with clips that also use Remote versions.
If you import a new timeline that rearranges clips into a different order and switch it to using
Remote versions, then grades will automatically follow the clips, so that the clips within each
new timeline inherits the grades applied to those same clips in other timelines.

Creating a Master Timeline

The Master Timeline consists of one long sequence of every clip in the Media Pool, arranged in
ascending order by timecode. Each clip in the Master Timeline appears at its full duration,
regardless of the duration of corresponding clips in an EDL-, AAF-, or XML-imported timeline.
Whenever you add more clips to the Media Pool, they’re automatically added to the Master
Timeline.
The Master Timeline is useful for organizing media for which no editing has yet been done, such
as when grading digital dailies. The Master Timeline is also useful for identifying a range of
similar clips, based on their similar ranges of timecode. For example, you could find all the
talking head shots from a particular section of tape clustered together in the Master Timeline.

Using the Effects Library
All effects that you can add to your edit, including filters, transitions, titles, and generators, are
found in the Effects Library, which is split into two parts. To the left is a bin list that shows a
hierarchical list of all of the different Transitions, Title Effects, Generators, and Filters that are
available, sorted by category. To the right is a browsing area in which you can see the contents
of whichever bins are selected.

The Effects Library

Similar to the Media Pool, the Effects Library’s bin list can be opened or closed using a button
at the top left, while a menu just to the right of this button lets you sort the list into
different categories.

Using the Edit Page

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‚‚ Toolbox: Exposes all Transitions, Titles, Generators, and Effects at once.
Video Transitions: Contains all of the built-in transitions that are available from DaVinci
Resolve. You can drag any video transition to any edit point in the Timeline that has
overlapping clip handles to add it to your edit; you have the option to drag the transition
so that it ends on, is centered on, or starts on the edit point.
For more information, see Chapter 24, “Using Transitions.”
Audio Transitions: Contains audio transitions for creating crossfades.
Titles: Titles can be edited into the Timeline like any other clip. Once edited into the
Timeline, you can edit the title text and position directly in the Timeline Viewer, or you
can access its controls in the Inspector for further customization.
Generators: Generators can also be edited into the Timeline like any other clip.
Selecting a generator and opening the Inspector lets you access its controls for further
customization. You can also choose a standard duration for generators to appear with
in the Editing panel of the User Preferences.

OpenFX
DaVinci Resolve supports the use of third-party OpenFX filters, transitions, and generators in
the Edit page. Once you install these effects on your workstation, they appear in this section of
the Effects Library, organized by type and group depending on the metadata within each effect.
‚‚ OpenFX: Exposes all ResolveFX and third-party OpenFX installed on your
workstation at once.
Filters: Contains the ResolveFX filters that ship with DaVinci Resolve, as well as any
third-party OFX plug-ins you’ve installed on your workstation. Filters can be dragged
onto video clips to apply an effect to that clip. Once applied, filters can be edited and
customized by opening the OpenFX panel of the Inspector.
Transitions: Contains any third party OFX transitions you have installed on your
workstation. OFX transitions can be used similarly to any other transition, but they also
expose an OpenFX panel next to the Transition panel in the Inspector, where you can
customize settings that are unique to that transition.
Generators: Contains any third party OFX generators you have installed on your
workstation. Can be edited into the Timeline just like the native Generators that ship
with DaVinci Resolve, but they also expose an OpenFX panel next to the Transition
panel in the Inspector, where you can customize settings that are unique to that
transition.

AudioFX
On OS X and Windows, DaVinci Resolve supports the use of third-party VST audio plug-ins.
On OS X, DaVinci Resolve supports Audio Unit (AU) audio plug-ins. Once you install these
effects on your workstation, they appear in this panel of the Effects Library. Audio plug-ins let
you apply effects to audio clips or an entire track’s worth of audio to add creative qualities such
as echo or reverb, or to take care of mastering issues using noise reduction,
compression, or EQ.

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All of the video and audio transitions, titles, and generators that ship along with DaVinci Resolve
appear in the Toolbox category of the Effects Library.

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The Toolbox

Using the Edit Page

You can click on the far right of any transition, title, or generator to flag that effect with a star as
a favorite effect. When you do so, the favorited effects appear in a separate Favorites area at
the bottom of the Effects Library Bin list.

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Effects Library Favorites

Stars indicate a flagged favorite effect; all
favorites are currently filtered

Edit Index
Clicking the Edit Index button opens the Edit Index. By default, this shows an EDL-style list view
of all the edit events in the current timeline. Whichever timeline is selected in the Timeline list
displays its events here. However, the contents of the Edit Index can be filtered using
commands found in the Option pop-up, described later in this section.

Edit Index List shown open

Navigating The Timeline Using the Edit Index
Whenever you move the Timeline playhead to intersect a clip, the Edit Index updates to show
only the clips on the video track the intersecting clip is on, and that clip’s event is highlighted in
the Edit Index. This makes it easy to see the correspondence between a clip in the Timeline
and its event, which is helpful when troubleshooting problems. There are also commands
available in the Option menu to display only clips on enabled tracks, only video clips, and only
audio clips.

Edit Index Columns
Each event populates several columns of information. These columns can be rearranged by
dragging them to the left or right, depending on what information is most important to you.
The available columns of information are:
‚‚ #: The event number (which corresponds to the clip number shown in the Thumbnail
timeline of the Color page).
‚‚ Reel: The reel name of the corresponding clip.
‚‚ Match: Flags clips that have clip conflicts, which display a question mark in this column.
Once the clip conflict has been resolved, this flag disappears.
‚‚ V: Video event.
‚‚ C: The event type (C for cut, D for dissolve or transition).
‚‚ Dur: A number showing the duration of a transition in frames.
‚‚ Source In/Source Out: The Source In and Source Out timecode indicating the range of
timecode referenced by that clip; corresponds to the timecode locations of each clip’s
In and Out point relative to the source media it comes from.
‚‚ Record In/Record Out: Record In and Record Out timecode indicating that clip’s
position in the Timeline.
‚‚ Name: The name of the clip.
‚‚ Comments: Whatever comments were present in the EDL that was imported. For
example, clip names exported from the original NLE to be used as reel names in RED
workflows using EDL import.
‚‚ Source Start/ Source End: The very first and last frame of media available in the
Source Media for that clip.
‚‚ Source Duration: The duration, in timecode, of the total source media available in
that clip.
‚‚ Codec: The codec of the corresponding clip.
‚‚ Source FPS: The frame rate of the corresponding clip.
‚‚ Resolution: The frame size of the corresponding clip.
‚‚ Color: The color of flags or markers applied to that clip.
‚‚ Notes: Notes entered inside of markers applied to clips or the Timeline.
The columns in the Edit Index can be customized to prioritize the information that’s
important to you.

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Each clip and transition is shown as an individual event, each of which contains multiple
columns of information. If you re-edit a timeline, your changes are also reflected in this list. The
Edit Index is useful for creative editors that are looking for specific effects that are used in the
current timeline, or for finishing editors that need more information about a specific clip, or who
might need to filter the entire edit by specific criteria in order to troubleshoot various issues.

‚‚ To rearrange column order: Drag any column header to the left or right to rearrange
the column order.
‚‚ To resize any column: Drag the border between any two columns to the right or left to
narrow or widen that column.
You can also customize column layouts in the Edit Index. Once you’ve customized a column
layout that works for your particular purpose, you can save it for future recall.
Methods of saving and using custom column layout:
‚‚ To create a column layout: Show, hide, resize, and rearrange the columns you need
for a particular task, then right-click any column header in the Media Pool and choose
Create Column Layout. Enter a name in the Create Column Layout dialog, and click OK.
‚‚ To recall a column layout: Right-click any column header in the Media Pool and choose
the name of the column layout you want to use. All custom column layouts are at the
top of the list.
‚‚ To delete a column layout: Right-click any column header in the Media Pool and
choose the name of the column layout you want to delete from the Delete Column
Layout submenu.

Filtering the Edit Index
You can use options found in the Edit Index’s option menu to filter specific things that you want
to check out, whether to go through all of the marked clips to see if there are any notes you
need to address, or to isolate all offline clips, or to go through edits to see if there’s anything
you need to fix. You can filter the Edit Index in the following ways:
‚‚ Show All: Shows all entries in the list. Choose this option after using any of the other
options to go back to seeing the entire timeline.
‚‚ Show Active Track Items: Filters out all clips that appear on tracks above or below
tracks identified with a Destination Control. For example, if you have three video tracks
and the Destination Control is on track V2, then all clips on tracks V1 and V3 will be
hidden from the Edit Index.
‚‚ Show Video Track Items: Filters out all audio clips so only video clips appear in the list.
‚‚ Show Audio Track Items: Filters out all video clips so only audio clips appear in the list.
‚‚ Show Flags: Isolates clips with flags in the list. A submenu lets you choose to show all
clips with flags or only clips with a particular color of flag.
‚‚ Show Markers: Isolates all clips with markers in the list. A submenu lets you choose to
show all clips with markers or only clips with a particular color of marker.
‚‚ Show Clip Colors: Isolates all clips that have been labelled with clip colors in the list. A
submenu lets you choose to show all clips that are labelled using any clip color or only
clips labelled with a particular color.
‚‚ Show Through Edits: Filters only clips that have through edits, or cuts where
continuous timecode appears from the outgoing to the incoming half of the edit, that
you may or may not want to remove, depending on why they’re there.
‚‚ Show Offline Clips: Isolates all offline clips (clips that have become unlinked from the
corresponding source media on disk) in the Timeline, so you can quickly navigate to
each one and troubleshoot the issue.

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‚‚ To show or hide columns: Right-click at the top of any column in the Edit Index and
select an item in the contextual menu list to check or uncheck a particular column.
Unchecked columns cannot be seen.

Using the Edit Page

Methods of customizing metadata columns in the Edit Index:

‚‚ Show Clips With Composite Effects: Filters all clips with Composite mode or Opacity
settings other than the default (Normal, 100).
‚‚ Show Clips With Transform Effects: Filters all clips with altered Transform settings.
‚‚ Show Clips With Filters: Filters all clips with ResolveFX or OFX filters applied to them.
‚‚ Show Stills and Freeze Frames: Filters all clips that are stills or that have freeze frame
speed effects applied to them.
‚‚ Show Compound Clips and Nested Timelines: Filters all compound clips and nested
timelines in the Timeline.
‚‚ Show Fusion Connect Clips: Filters all Fusion Connect Clips.

Exporting the Edit Index
If you’ve filtered a series of edits in the Edit Index that you’d like to share with someone else,
this is easy to do. For example, you might filter the Edit Index to show a list of all the offline clips
in the current timeline, and then export a list as either a .csv or .txt file to give to your assistant
editor so they can chase down the necessary media. Both types of files are widely compatible
with spreadsheet and database software in the event you want to import the data into another
application.
To export the Edit Index:
1

Right-click the currently open timeline in the Media Pool, and choose Timelines >
Export > Edit Index… from the contextual menu.

2

Use the Export Edit Index window to choose a location to save the exported file, and
choose a format from the pop-up menu at the bottom. You can export either a Comma
Separated Values (.csv) file, or a Tab Delimited Values (.txt) file.

3

Click Save.

Source and Timeline Viewers
By default, the Edit page presents a traditional source/record style editing experience. The
Source Viewer lets you view individual clips from the Media Pool to prepare them for editing.
Meanwhile, the Timeline Viewer lets you play through your program, showing you the frame at
the position of the playhead in the Timeline.

Source and Timeline Viewers

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‚‚ Show Clips With Speed Effects: Filters all clips with linear or variable Speed Effects in
the Timeline.

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Using the Edit Page

‚‚ Show Clip Conflicts: Filters all clips with clip conflict warning badges (indicating there is
reel, name, and timecode metadata that overlap that of another clip) in the Timeline, so
you can quickly navigate to each one and check whether they’re using the correct clip.

The Color Viewer Lookup Table options in the Color Management panel of the Project Settings
only affect the GUI Viewer in the Color page. They do not affect the viewers in the Edit page.

Source and Timeline Viewers vs. Single Viewer Mode
If you want to change the Edit Page layout to hide the Source Viewer, you can choose View >
Single Viewer Mode to instead use just a single viewer to contextually display either a selected
Source Clip or the current frame of the Timeline.

Single Viewer mode turned on

In Single Viewer mode, whatever you select in the Media Pool or Timeline determines which
controls appear in the Viewer, which lets you do nearly everything you can do with two
simultaneously open viewers.

Viewer Controls
Both viewers share the following onscreen controls:
‚‚ Zoom pop-up menu: Choosing Fit fits the currently visible frame to the available size
of the viewer. Choosing a percentage zooms the visible frame to that size. You can also
use the scroll wheel functionality of your mouse, trackpad, or tablet to zoom in and out
of the viewer.
‚‚ Duration field: At the top left-hand side of the Source Viewer, this displays the
total duration of the clip, or the duration from the In to the Out point, if these have
been placed. In the Timeline tab, this displays the total duration of the currently
selected timeline.
‚‚ GPU Status Display: Every viewer in DaVinci Resolve exposes a a GPU status indicator
and a frame-per-second (FPS) meter, which appears in the viewer’s title bar, which
shows you your workstation’s performance whenever playback is initiated. Since
DaVinci Resolve uses one or more GPUs (graphics processing units) to handle all image
processing and effects, the GPU status display shows you how much processing power
is being used by whichever clip is playing.

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How Each Clip’s Grade Looks in Each Viewer

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Using the Edit Page

You can select either viewer by clicking with the pointer, or by pressing Q (Source/Timeline
Viewer), and the name of the viewer that currently has focus appears in orange.

‚‚ Source Viewer Option menu: Contains the following commands:
Gang Viewers: With Gang Viewers enabled, the movement of the Source and Timeline
Viewer playheads is locked together, so that they move in unison. This is useful when
you’re matching the timing of part of a clip in the Source Viewer to match an event in
the Timeline.
Live Media Preview: Enabled by default, makes it possible for thumbnails that you’re
skimming in the Media Pool to show the skimmed frame in the Viewer. When skimming
with Live Media Preview enabled, the playhead that appears in the thumbnail is locked
to the playhead displayed in the Viewer’s jog bar.
Show All Video Frames: When available processing power is insufficient to play the
clip or clips at the position of the playhead due to the grade, transforms, or effects that
are applied at that moment in the Timeline, you have the ability to choose exactly how
performance in DaVinci Resolve degrades. When off, DaVinci Resolve prioritizes audio
playback at the expense of dropping video frames when processing power is tight,
resulting in a more conventional playback experience. When on, audio quality is
compromised while every frame of video plays in slower-than-real time to
maintain playback.
Show Zoomed Audio Waveform: When enabled, shows an audio waveform overlay at
the bottom of the Source Viewer with a zoomed in section of the audio surrounding the
current position of the playhead.
Show Full Clip Audio Waveform: When enabled, shows an audio waveform overlay at
the bottom of the Source Viewer that displays the audio over the entire duration
of the clip.
Show Marker Overlays: Enabled by default, markers that intercept the playhead when
playback is paused appear superimposed in the Viewer.
Markers submenu: When one or more markers are applied to the clip in the Source
Viewer, they appear in this list in chronological order, listed by Name and Note.
Choosing a marker from this menu jumps the playhead to that marker in the
Source Viewer.
‚‚ Timeline Viewer Option menu: Contains the following commands:
Gang Viewers: With Gang Viewers enabled, the movement of the Source and Timeline
Viewer playheads is locked together, so that they move in unison. This is useful when
you’re matching the timing of part of a clip in the Source Viewer to match an event in
the Timeline.
Show All Video Frames: When available processing power is insufficient to play the
clip or clips at the position of the playhead due to the grade, transforms, or effects that
are applied at that moment in the Timeline, you have the ability to choose exactly how
performance in DaVinci Resolve degrades. When off, DaVinci Resolve prioritizes audio
playback at the expense of dropping video frames when processing power is tight,
resulting in a more conventional playback experience. When on, audio quality is
compromised while every frame of video plays in slower-than-real time to
maintain playback.

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‚‚ Source/Timeline Timecode/Frame/Keykode Display: At the top right-hand side of
the Source Viewer, this field shows the timecode of the current frame at the position
of the playhead in the Source Viewer’s jog bar, and can be switched between
source timecode, source frame, and keykode by right-clicking and choosing from the
contextual menu. In the Timeline Viewer, this field shows the record timecode of the
current frame at the position of the playhead in the Timeline, and can be switched
between source and record timecode, source and record frames, and keykode by rightclicking and choosing from the contextual menu.

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‚‚ Clip Name: The clip name is displayed at the center of the Source Viewer title bar.
The Timeline Viewer displays the timeline name and is also a pop-up menu that lets
you switch among other timelines in the current project. The clip/timeline name is
highlighted orange when either the Source or Timeline Viewer has focus.

‚‚ Source Viewer Mode pop-up (Source Viewer only): This pop-up menu lets you set the
Source Viewer to display different views of the clips you’re working on, depending on
what you need to do.
Offline Reference Movie button: If you’ve assigned an offline reference movie to the
currently selected timeline, clicking the Offline Mode button lets you display the offline
movie so you can compare it with the currently open timeline. In this mode, Source and
Timeline playback are synched; an Offset field replaces the duration field, letting you
re-sync the offline reference movie, if necessary.
Video button: Shows the video of the currently open clip in the Source Viewer.
Audio button: Shows the audio waveforms corresponding to all channels of the
currently open clip in the Source Viewer. The top of this audio-only view shows the
waveform for the entire duration of the clip, while the main region of the viewer shows a
zoomed in section of the audio waveform. The level of zoom displayed is controlled by
the zoom pop-up at the upper left-hand corner of the Source Viewer.
Multicam: Shows you the multi-angle Multicam Viewer that you can use to switch
among different angles of video and audio while multicam editing a clip in the Timeline.
For more information on multicam editing, see Chapter 21, “Multicam Editing.”
‚‚ Transform Mode pop-up (Timeline Viewer Only): This functions as both a toggle
switch and a pop-up menu. Clicking the button control to the left enables or disables
onscreen controls that you can use to transform the clip right in the viewer. Clicking the
pop-up control to the right lets you switch between two modes of transforms:
Transform: Exposes controls for Pan (X) and Tilt (Y), Scale X and Y, and Rotation.
Crop: Exposes controls to crop from the top, bottom, left, and right.
‚‚ Jog control: Clicking the Jog control and dragging left and right lets you move slowly
through a clip or the Timeline a frame at a time.
‚‚ Transport controls: These controls include, from left to right, Jump to First Frame, Play
Reverse, Stop, Play Forward, Jump to Last Frame.
‚‚ Loop Playback: Enables or disables looped playback. Looping is also controllable via
the Playback > Loop/Unloop command (Command-/). When enabled, each playback
command loops back to the beginning when the end of that command’s range is
reached. In and Out points in the Source or Timeline Viewers do not trigger looping.
For example, when enabled, the Play command will play through the entire clip or
timeline, and then loop back to the beginning when the end is reached and start
playing automatically. The Play Around command, on the other hand, will start at the
beginning of pre-roll, play through the post-roll, and then immediately loop back around
to the beginning of pre-roll, continuing playback in this manner until you stop it.
‚‚ Match Frame: In the Source Viewer, Match Frame attempts to move the playhead in
the Timeline to match the current frame of the clip in the Source Viewer. In the Record
Viewer, Match Frame opens the Media Pool clip corresponding to the clip at the current
position of the playhead into the Source Viewer, setting In and Out points and the
playhead position to match those of the clip in the Timeline.
‚‚ In/Out buttons: Places In and Out points with which to define a range of the clip, or of
the Timeline, in preparation for making different kinds of edits.
‚‚ Jog bar: In the Source Viewer, drag within the jog bar to reposition the Source
playhead, scrubbing through the clip. In the Timeline tab, drag to reposition the
playhead throughout the entire program.

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Markers submenu: When one or more markers are applied to a Timeline, they appear
in this list in chronological order, listed by Name and Note. Choosing a marker from this
menu jumps the playhead to that marker in the Timeline.

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Show Marker Overlays: Enabled by default, markers that intercept the playhead when
playback is paused appear superimposed in the Viewer.

‚‚ Show Current Frame Audio Waveform: Shows a zoomed-in section of audio that
scrolls as you play the clip. Useful for seeing dialog and music cues as you play
through a clip.
‚‚ Show Full Clip Audio Waveform: Shows the audio waveform for the entire source
media of that clip. The section of audio from the In to Out points you’ve set in the
Source Viewer are highlighted. Useful for using the audio waveform to navigate
throughout that clip using the waveform as a reference.

The Source Viewer with “Show Current Frame Audio Waveform” enabled

Cinema Viewer Mode
You can also put either the Source or Timeline Viewers into Cinema Viewer mode by choosing
Workspace > Viewer Mode > Cinema Viewer (Command-F), causing whichever viewer is
currently selected to fill the entire screen, which is good for doing a test viewing of your edit
without the distractions of the DaVinci Resolve Edit Page UI. This command toggles Cinema
Viewer mode on and off.

Viewer Indicators
Certain frames trigger visible indicators in either the Source or Timeline viewers. For example,
if the playhead is at the very first or last frame of media available to a particular clip, indicators
appear in the lower-left or right corner of the frame to let you know there’s no more media in
that direction.

The first and last frame clip indicators

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When the Source Viewer is set to Source, two options in the Option Menu let you see a
superimposed audio waveform running along the bottom of the viewer, over the video of the
currently selected clip.

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Simultaneous Audio Waveform Display in the Source Viewer

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If the playhead in the Timeline is on the first frame of black immediately after the last video clip
in the Timeline, an end of sequence indicator appears in the Timeline Viewer to let you know
that you’re viewing the last frame of the current sequence of clips, even though the playhead is
actually on a frame of black. This makes it easy to see what you’re doing while you’re first
assembling clips together.

The end-of-sequence indicator

Other Viewer Options
There are additional overlays and options you can use to customize how the viewer appears,
available in the View menu.
‚‚ Safe Area: Choosing View > Safe Area > On lets you turn on Safe Area overlays
showing you Title Safe, Action Safe, among other available overlays. If you want to
choose the aspect ratio with which these overlays are represented, you can do so from
the View > Select Aspect Ratio submenu.
‚‚ Use Gray Background: Choosing View > Use Gray Background in Viewers sets the
empty area of the viewer (if there is any) to a lighter gray, making it easier to see which
parts of the viewer are black because of blanking, and which parts are simply empty
because of the way the image is zoomed or panned.

Opening Clips in the Source Viewer
There are two methods of opening clips into the Source Viewer. Which is enabled depends on
the “Live Media Preview” setting found in the Viewer options menu (the three-dots menu found
at the upper right-hand corner of the Viewer).
‚‚ When Live Media Preview is enabled (by default), skimming a thumbnail in the Media
Pool also shows the skimmed frame in the Source Viewer, effectively opening each
clip you skim in the Media Pool into the Source Viewer. As you skim, the playhead
that appears in the thumbnail is locked to the playhead that’s displayed in the
Viewer’s jog bar.
‚‚ When Live Media Preview is disabled, you must either double-click a clip in the Media
Pool to open it into the Source Viewer, or you can select a clip in the Media Pool and
press the Return key to open it into the Source Viewer.
Which method is best is purely a matter of preference.

Using the Edit Page

Dragging a clip from the Media Pool or Source Viewer onto the Timeline Viewer also exposes
edit overlays that let you choose what kind of edit you want to make by choosing which overlay
to drop the clip onto.

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Timeline Viewer Edit Overlays

The overlay that appears when you drag a clip onto the Timeline
Viewer lets you choose from a variety of edits

This overlay exposes every type of edit that’s available in DaVinci Resolve, including the Insert,
Overwrite, Replace, Fit to Fill, Place On Top, Ripple Overwrite, and Append at End edits, all of
which are also available from the Edit menu. It’s a useful method of making three-point edits if
you like drag and drop editing, but it also provides a nice reminder of what types of edits are
available, given all the different options that are available.
By default, the larger empty area to the left of these overlays defaults to the highlighted
Overwrite overlay, while all the smaller buttons let you perform each of the other edit types that
are available.
However, the “Timeline overlay retains the last performed action” checkbox in the Editing panel
of the User Preferences can be turned on if you want DaVinci Resolve to always remember the
last edit type you used, and highlight it on this Overlay whenever you drag another clip over the
Timeline Viewer to let you know that the last edit you performed is the new default edit if you
drop clips to the left of the overlay. For example, with this option enabled, if you perform a Place
On Top edit, then the next time you drop a clip into the empty area to the left of the overlays,
the result will be another Place On Top edit. This option is off by default.

Metadata Editor
Both the Media and Edit pages have a Metadata Editor. In the Edit page, the Metadata Editor
opens in the same place as the Inspector, to the right of the Source and Timeline Viewers.
When you select a clip in the Media Pool or Timeline, its metadata is displayed within the
Metadata Editor, and the title bar indicates whether you’re evaluating a clip in the Timeline or
Media Pool. If you select multiple clips, only the last clip’s information appears. The Metadata
Editor’s header contains uneditable information about the selected clip, including the file name,
directory, duration, frame rate, resolution, and codec.

‚‚ Metadata Groups (to the right): This pop-up menu lets you switch among the various
groups of metadata that are available, grouped for specific tasks or workflows.
The heart of the Metadata Editor is a series of editable fields underneath the header that let
you review and edit the different metadata criteria that are available. For more information on
editing clip metadata, and on creating custom metadata presets, see Chapter 9, “Using
Clip Metadata.”

Clip Metadata Editor showing the Clip Details
panel for a clip in the Timeline

Part 3 – 14

‚‚ Metadata Presets (to the left): If you’ve used the Metadata panel of the User
Preferences to create your own custom sets of metadata, you can use this pop-up to
choose which one to expose. Surprisingly enough, this is set to “Default” by default.

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Because there are so very many metadata fields available, two pop-up menus at the top let you
change which set of metadata is displayed in the Metadata Editor.

Using the Edit Page

The Inspector can be opened to let you customize compositing, transform, and cropping
parameters for clips, as well as clip-specific retime and scaling options. Furthermore, the
Inspector lets you edit the parameters of transitions, titles, and generators used in the Timeline,
in order to customize their effect.

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Inspector

The Inspector, opened and showing a clip’s parameters

When the Inspector is open, the Source and Timeline viewers move to the left, to sit alongside the
Inspector showing the selected clip’s parameters. However, if your computer display’s resolution
is not high enough, opening the Inspector may result in the Source Viewer being hidden.
Methods of showing parameters in the Inspector:
‚‚ To open a video or audio clip’s transform settings when the Inspector is closed:
Select that clip, and then click the Inspector button at the far right of the Edit
page toolbar.
‚‚ If the Inspector is already open: You need only select a clip or effect to reveal its
controls in the Inspector.
‚‚ If the Inspector is closed: Double-clicking any Transition will automatically open it.
The Inspector shows different buttons at the top that let you switch among different pages of
parameters. For example, when you select a clip with both audio and video components, the
Inspector shows Video and Audio buttons at the top that let you switch among each set of
controls. If you select a Generator effect, the Inspector only shows the controls corresponding
to that generator.

Timeline
The Timeline shows whichever timeline you’ve double-clicked in the Timelines browser. It’s
where you either edit programs together from scratch, or import sequences from other
applications. For imported programs, the Timeline provides a visual representation of the edited
program that’s helpful for verifying that the project was imported correctly, checking the media
corresponding to each clip in the program, and performing whatever editorial tasks are
necessary to prepare a project for grading (such as replacing or adding clips, superimposing
composites, and modifying composite modes or transitions).

An edited timeline

‚‚ Timecode field: Shows the current timecode value corresponding to the position of
the playhead.
‚‚ Video Tracks: DaVinci Resolve supports multiple video tracks. At the left of each track
is a header area that contains a number of controls.
‚‚ Track Header: The Track Header contains different controls for selecting, locking/
unlocking, and enabling/disabling tracks. Each track header also lists how many clips
appear on that track. The Track Header contains the following five controls, from
left to right:

Track Header area showing the controls
for each track that are located within

‚‚ Track Color: Each track can be color-coded with one of 16 different colors. These color
codes correspond to the Edit page Mixer, and to the Fairlight page Mixer and Audio
Meters. You can choose a new color for any track by right-clicking the track header and
choosing from the Change Track Color submenu.
‚‚ Destination control and Track Number: These controls are highlighted orange when
that track is selected for editing, dark gray when that track is not selected, and flat gray
if that track is disabled for editing. The Destination buttons dictate into which tracks
audio and video media in the Source Viewer will be placed when an edit is executed.
Ordinarily, there is one video destination control (V1) and one audio destination control
(A1). If you add additional tracks, you can see that each destination control is numbered
according to its track position. The bottom track is “V1,” and subsequently numbered
tracks appear higher in the Timeline. Click any track’s number to select that track for
different editing functions; the selected track is highlighted black.
‚‚ Track Name: Each track has a name that defaults to the type of track and the track
number, such as Video 1, Audio 1. However, you can click any track’s name and edit it to
be whatever you like. For example, you can rename each audio track with the type of
audio you’re editing onto it, such as Production, Ambience, SFX, or Music. These track
names are also used to identify each track’s channel in the Edit page Mixer and in the
Fairlight page Mixer.

Part 3 – 14

‚‚ Playhead: The playhead automatically syncs with the Timeline Viewer’s jog bar
playhead, the playheads in the Mini-Timeline and Thumbnail timeline of the Color
page, and the playhead on the Deliver page. Furthermore, the Edit Index event that
corresponds to the clip intersecting the playhead is automatically highlighted.

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Using the Edit Page

‚‚ Timeline Ruler: The Timeline Ruler shows the program’s timecode, and the playhead
indicates the current frame of the current clip. Whichever clip intersects the playhead is
the one that you’ll be working on in the Color page. Dragging within the Timeline Ruler
moves the playhead. When you add markers to the timeline, these markers appear
within the Timeline Ruler, as well.

‚‚ Auto Select button: On by default. Light gray when that track is selected, dark
gray when that track is not selected. When this control is on, clips on that track are
automatically included in operations that affect all clips that intersect the position of
the playhead, or that intersect a region defined by the Timeline In and Out points.
When this control is off, clips on that track are ignored by those same operations.
Furthermore, rippling is suspended on tracks with Auto Select turned off for operations
that would otherwise ripple the Timeline. Note, manual selections made in the Timeline
that highlight specific clips take precedence over the Auto Select controls, so if Auto
Select is turned off on track 1, but you’ve selected a clip on track 1, the selected clip will
be still be affected by whatever operation you’re about to perform.
‚‚ Audio Channel Type indicator: Audio tracks also show which channel configuration
that track uses, listing the number of channels for mono, stereo, 5.1, 7.1, and adaptive.
‚‚ Number of clips: The number of clips on that particular track of the Timeline is listed,
but only if the track is tall enough to have room for them.
‚‚ Vertical and horizontal scroll bars: If your project is longer than the current width of the
Timeline, or the number of video tracks is taller than the current height of the Timeline,
these scroll bars let you drag to navigate around your program.
‚‚ Individual Timeline track resizing: Any track in the Timeline can be individually resized
by dragging its top divider in the Track Header area.

Resizing an individual timeline track by dragging
its top border in the Track Header

Timeline Options
Specific elements and behaviors within the Timeline can be customized in various ways.

Show Playhead Shadow
Ordinarily, the playhead is shown in the Timeline as a single line that indicates the beginning of
the frame that you’re viewing in the Timeline Viewer. However, you can choose View > Show
Playhead Shadow to display an orange-ish background surrounding the playhead.

Part 3 – 14

‚‚ Lock Track button: Light gray when turned on, dark gray when turned off. When a track
is locked, clips can’t be replaced, moved, or otherwise edited, although clips on locked
tracks can be graded.

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Using the Edit Page

‚‚ Enable Track/Mute button: A slash indicates when a track is disabled. This control lets
you turn tracks on and off. Clips on tracks that are turned off aren’t visible in the viewer,
don’t show up in the Color page, and aren’t available for rendering or output. For Audio
tracks this is the Mute button.

Using the Edit Page

Part 3 – 14

294

(Left) The playhead’s default look, (Right) The playhead showing the optional Playhead Shadow

This shadow can make it easier to see the playhead’s position, and it can also serve as a
measuring tool for projects where you have an interest in visualizing a specific offset, in frames,
both before and after the current position of the playhead. This offset can be adjusted by
changing the Pre- and Post-Playhead Shadow Length parameters in the Editing panel of the
User Preferences, which let you specify the number of frames to shadow both before and after
the playhead. The default length of the Playhead Shadow is 5 frames.

TIP: You can set the “Pre-playhead shadow length” to 0, and the “Post-playhead
shadow length” to 1 if you want to display a “Media Composer-style” playhead that
shows the duration of the current frame.

Enabling and Disabling Audio Scrubbing
Audio scrubbing is enabled by default, meaning that you’ll hear audio when dragging the
playhead with the mouse back and forth. While this can be useful when you’re searching for
audio cues, it can also be distracting if you’re just focused on the picture.
To enable or disable audio scrubbing:
Choose Timeline > Audio Scrubbing (Shift-S)

To enable or disable Playback Post-Roll:
Choose Timeline > Playback post-roll

Switching Among Multiple Timelines
Timelines can be organized like any other clip in the Media Pool. To open or switch among
timelines, use the following procedures.
To switch timelines, do one of the following:
‚‚ In the Edit page Media Pool, double-click a timeline.
‚‚ In the Edit page Timeline Viewer, choose a timeline from the Timelines pop-up menu at
the top of the viewer.
‚‚ In the Color page, choose a timeline from the Timelines pop-up menu at the top of
the viewer.
‚‚ In the Audio page, choose a timeline from the Timelines pop-up menu to the left of the
transport controls.

Toolbar
At the center of the toolbar that sits above the Timeline, eleven buttons let you choose different
tools and options for performing various editing functions.

Buttons in the Toolbar

‚‚ Selection Mode: The default mode in which you can move and resize clips in the
Timeline, roll edits, and do other basic editing tasks.
‚‚ Trim Edit Mode: In this mode, the Trim tool lets you make slip, slide, ripple and roll edits
by dragging different parts of clips in the Timeline, or by making specific selections
and using the “nudge” keyboard shortcuts of comma and period to move the selection
left or right.
‚‚ Razor Edit Mode: Lets you add cuts to the Timeline by clicking.
‚‚ Insert Edit: Performs an insert edit to the Timeline with whatever clip is in the
Source Viewer.
‚‚ Overwrite Edit: Performs an overwrite edit to the Timeline with whatever clip is in the
Source Viewer.
‚‚ Replace Edit: Performs a replace edit to the Timeline with whatever clip is in the
Source Viewer.
‚‚ Snapping: Enables or disables clip snapping. When turned on, clip In and Out points,
markers, and the playhead all snap to one another for reference while you’re editing.

Part 3 – 14

Enables the playhead to continue playing past the last clip in the Timeline for a duration equal
to the “Post-roll time” Project Setting in the Editing panel. This is good for editors that want to
experience a few moments of playback after cutting or fading to black after the last frame of
audio and video in the Timeline.

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Using the Edit Page

Playback Post-Roll

‚‚ Add Marker/Marker Colors pop-up menu: Markers identify specific frames of individual
clips. Clicking the Add Marker button adds a marker of the currently displayed color
to the clip at the position of the playhead in the Timeline. A pop-up menu to the right
lets you choose differently colored markers, and clear all markers from the currently
selected clip.
‚‚ Customize Timeline pop-up menu: Three controls at the top let you customize the look
of the clips on the tracks (filmstrip, thumbnail, or minimized), whether or not to display
audio waveforms, whether or not to display flags and markers, and the adjustable
height of the video and audio tracks.

Selecting the Timeline View options

‚‚ Zoom slider: Lets you zoom into or out of the clips in the Timeline. Use the scroll wheel
of your mouse to horizontally zoom into and out of the Timeline. Scrolling up zooms
in, while scrolling down zooms out. You can also use Command-Plus to zoom in, and
Command-Minus to zoom out, and Shift-Z to fit every clip in your program into the
available width of the Timeline.
‚‚ Show Audio Meters/Audio Mixer button and pop-up: Opens and closes the Edit
page audio meters or Audio Mixer, which you can switch between. The Audio Mixer
also contains the audio mute button. If you have a display with 2560x1440 resolution
you can see all 16 audio meters, but on lower resolution displays only 8 audio
meters appear.
These functions are described in greater detail in the following sections of this chapter.

Part 3 – 14

‚‚ Flag Clip/Flag Colors pop-up menu: Flags identify clips, and indicate all clips that
correspond to the same item of media in the Media Pool. Clips can have multiple flags.
Clicking the Flag button automatically adds a flag to whichever clip is currently selected
in the Timeline. A pop-up menu to the right lets you choose differently colored flags,
and clear all flags from the currently selected clip.

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Using the Edit Page

‚‚ Link Audio/Video: Enables or disables Audio/Video linking. When turned on, clicking a
video clip in the Timeline automatically selects the corresponding audio clip if they’re
linked together. When turned off, clicking a video clip won’t select its audio. Clip linking
can be toggled while you work by pressing the Option key while clicking to make
selections in the Timeline.

The monitoring controls in the Edit page

The Clip and Track Mixer
The Audio Mixer provides a set of graphical controls you can use to assign track channels to
output channels, set levels, pan stereo audio, and mute and solo tracks, all while you
continue to edit.
To open the Audio Mixer, do one of the following:
‚‚ Choose Workspace > Audio Mixer.
‚‚ Click the Mixer button on the Interface toolbar.
The Audio Mixer exposes a set of channel strips with controls that correspond to the tracks in
the Timeline, one for each track, plus a Main 1 bus by default that lets you adjust the overall
level of the mix.

The Audio Mixer, with four channel strips
corresponding to the four tracks in the Timeline

Part 3 – 14

At the far right of the toolbar, a set of three monitoring controls lets you quickly control the
output volume of your mix. An audio Enable/Disable button lets you turn audio playback on and
off, while a slider lets you change the volume, and a DIM button lets you temporarily duck the
monitored volume being output in order to have a quick chat with your client about sports or
the state of the world while keeping half an ear on the mix.

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Using the Edit Page

Toolbar Audio Monitoring Controls

DaVinci Resolve has a set of four real-time video scopes that you can use to monitor the internal
data levels of clips in your project as you work. Each scope provides an unambiguous graphical
analysis of the various characteristics of the video signal, showing you the relative strength and
range of individual color components including luma, chroma, saturation, hue, and the red,
green, and blue channels that, together, comprise the color and contrast of the images in
your program.
To open video scopes from the Media, Color, or Deliver pages, do one of the following:
Choose Workspace > Video Scopes > On/Off (Command-Shift-W) to open video
scopes into a floating window.
Choose Workspace > Dual Screen > On to open video scopes as part of a dual
screen layout.

Video scopes in a floating window

The video scopes aren’t just available in the Color page. They’re also available in the Media and
Deliver pages for whenever you need to evaluate the video signal more objectively, such as
when you’re setting up to capture from tape or scan from film, or when you’re setting up
for output.
For more information on using the Video Scopes, see Chapter 40, “Using the Color Page.”

Part 3 – 14

Using Video Scopes

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Using the Edit Page

For more information about the use of the Mixer in the Edit page, see Chapter 25, “Working
With Audio in the Edit Page.” For more information about using the Mixer in the Fairlight page,
see Chapter 68, “Track Level Mixing.”

Key

Function

Q

Toggle between Source and Timeline Viewers.

Command-1

Source Viewer

Command-2

Timeline Viewer

Command-3

Timeline

Command-4

Bin List

Command-5

Media Pool

Command-6

Effects Library

Command-7

Edit Index

Command-8

n/a

Command-9

Inspector

Dual Monitor Layout
The Edit page has a dual monitor layout that provides maximum space for the Timeline and
Viewers on the primary monitor, and an enlarged Media Pool, simultaneously displayed
Timelines browser, Edit Index, Effects Library, and Metadata Editor on the secondary monitor.
To enter dual screen mode:
Choose Workspace > Dual Screen > On.

Part 3 – 14

The following keyboard shortcuts can be used to give focus to different parts of the Edit page
in order to select bins, clips, the Source and Timeline Viewers, the Timeline, the Effects Library,
Edit Index, and Inspector.

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Navigating the Edit Page
Using the Keyboard

Using the Edit Page

Part 3 – 14

300

The Edit page in dual-screen mode

To switch which UI elements appear on which monitors:
Choose Workspace > Primary Display > Display 1 or Display 2, which reverses the
contents of both monitors in dual screen mode.

Customizing the Edit Page
The default layout is quite efficient for a number of tasks on most displays. You can always
return to the default layout by choosing Workspace > Reset UI Layout. However, the Edit page
can be customized to create more room for specific areas of the interface to accommodate
different tasks.
To resize any area of the Edit page:
Drag the vertical or horizontal border between any two panels to enlarge one and
shrink the other.
To expand the width of the Timeline:
Click the Media Pool/Effects Library/Edit Index height button to reduce the area used
by the Media Pool, Effects Library, and/or Edit Index to shrink to half height. At this size,
the Media Pool/Effects Library/Edit Index are restricted to the top of the UI (you can
only show one at a time), and the Timeline takes up the full width of your display.
Hiding the Edit Index and the Effects Library causes the Timeline to expand to the full
width of your screen.
To resize the height of individual video or audio tracks:
Move the pointer to the top border of any video track header, or the bottom border of
any audio track header, and when it becomes a resize cursor, drag that border up or
down to resize that track. Each track can have an independent size when you do this.
To enable a full-screen timeline in Dual Screen mode:
Choose Workspace > Layout > Dual Screen > Full Screen Timeline, which causes the
Timeline to fully occupy the primary display, while the Browser, Viewers, Audio Mixer,
Edit Index, and Effects Library appear on the secondary display.

To sort the Edit Index by any column:
Click the Option button at the top right to display all active tracks, just the video, or just
the audio tracks.
To rearrange Edit Index columns:
Drag the header of any column to the left and right to move that column.
To show and hide the Audio Meters or Audio Mixer:
Click the Mixer button in the UI Toolbar.
To switch between the Audio Meters and the Audio Mixer:
Choose Meters or Mixer from the Option menu at the top right corner of the Mixer.

Undo and Redo in the Edit Page
The Edit page shares its multiple-undo stack with the Fairlight page. However, the Edit and
Fairlight page undo stack is entirely separate from the multiple-undo stacks maintained for each
clip in the Color page, making it easy and reliable to undo edits and other changes you make in
the Timeline without disturbing your work in the Color page.
There are two ways you can undo.
To undo and redo:
Press Command-Z to Undo, and Shift-Command-Z to Redo.
To undo and redo using the Undo list:
1

Choose Edit > Undo List.

2

When the History dialog appears, click an item on the list to undo back to that point.
The most recent thing you’ve done appears at the bottom of this list.

The Undo List

3

When you’re done, close the History window.

Part 3 – 14

To resize any column of the Edit Index:
Move your pointer over the divider between any two columns and drag when the
horizontal resize cursor appears.

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To customize the columns in the Edit Index:
To show or hide columns in the Edit Index: Right-click any column header, and choose
the column you want to show or hide from the contextual menu. Checked columns are
shown, unchecked columns are hidden.

Part 3 – 15

Creating and
Working
with Timelines
Creating and Working with Timelinesr

Chapter 15
302

Creating and Working with Timelines
This chapter covers the following topics:

Creating and Duplicating Timelines

304

Creating Blank and Stringout Timelines

304

Creating Timelines by Drag and Drop

305

Creating Timelines From Bins and Selections

305

Duplicating Timelines

306

Timeline View Options

306

Modifying Timeline Tracks

307

Naming Timeline Tracks

308

Using Timeline Snapping and Zooming

308

Scrolling Through the Timeline

309

Resizing the Timeline’s Video and Audio Track Regions

309

Comparing Timelines

310

The Timeline Comparison Window

310

Creating and Working with Timelinesr

In this chapter, you’ll learn how to create and modify the timelines into which you edit clips to
create the edited sequences that are your programs.

Part 3 – 15

303

Creating Blank and Stringout Timelines
If you’re cutting a new program, you’ll want a blank timeline. However, it’s often useful to create
blank timelines when putting together dailies. For example, you could create an empty timeline,
sort the Media Pool by reel name, and add all clips from a particular reel to a dedicated timeline.
To create a new blank timeline:
1

Select or create a Folder in the Bin list in which to put the new timeline (optional).

2

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Choose File > New Timeline (Command-N).
‚‚ Right-click within the Media Pool, and choose Timelines > Create New Timeline.

3

When the New Timeline Options window opens, set the following options:
‚‚ Start Timecode: You can change the Start Timecode if a specific start time
is required.
‚‚ Timeline Name: Enter a name into the Timeline Name field.
‚‚ No. of Video Tracks: Enter how many video tracks you want to have. You can also
drag within this field to adjust the number of video tracks with a virtual slider.
‚‚ No. of Audio Tracks: Enter how many audio tracks you want to have. You can also
drag within this field to adjust the number of audio tracks with a virtual slider.
‚‚ Audio Track Type: Choose the channel mapping you want the new audio
tracks to use.
‚‚ Empty Timeline: Checked by default, this sets new timelines to be created empty.
If you turn off the Empty Timeline checkbox, the new Timeline that’s created will
contain all media found within the Media Pool, effectively creating a stringout of
everything you’ve imported.
‚‚ Use Selected Mark In/Out: Only available when “Empty Timeline” is turned off. When
you turn this checkbox on, each clip’s duration in the new Timeline is defined by the
In and Out points saved within each clip. If there are no In/Out points in a clip, the
clip’s entire duration is used.

4

Click Create New Timeline.

A new timeline is created. If necessary, you can duplicate an existing timeline in order to alter
an edit or create an alternate grade.

TIP: If you’re going to be creating several new timelines with a specific set of
parameters, you can open the User pane of the Preferences and edit the New
Timeline Settings, found in the Editing panel. This will define new presets that
populate the New Timeline Options window from that point forward.

Part 3 – 15

If you’re not importing a project that’s been edited elsewhere, you can create a new timeline to
cut together a new edit from scratch, or to grade a set of dailies. When you create a new
timeline, you can either create a timeline that contains all clips found in the Media Pool to
quickly create a big batch of offline dailies, or an empty timeline that’s ready for you to add
specific clips to.

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Creating and Duplicating Timelines

To create a timeline by dragging and dropping a clip:
Drag any clip into the empty Timeline Editor area underneath the Viewers on the
Edit page, and a new timeline will automatically be created.

Creating Timelines From Bins and Selections
The “Create Timeline Using Bin” and “Create Timeline Using Selected Clips” commands let you
quickly assemble a timeline using the contents of the Media Pool, using whatever In and Out
points have been added to each clip, and using the sort order of the enclosing bin to determine
the order in which the clips will be assembled.

TIP: These commands are especially useful for putting together quick assembly edits
if you have metadata-rich media with scene, shot, and take information that you can
use to sort clips into the proper order, and In and Out points that you’ve
already logged.

To create a timeline using the full contents of a bin:
1

(optional) Put the Media Pool into List mode, set In and Out points for each clip in your
Bin, and sort the Media Pool by the column that will put all clips in the order you want
them to be assembled.

2

Right-click the bin in the Bin list, and choose “Create Timeline Using Bin.”

3

Type the name of the new timeline in the New Timeline Properties dialog. If you want
to use the In and Out points of each clip, make sure “Use Selected Mark In/Out” is
checked, and click Create New Timeline.

To create a timeline using manually selected clips:
1

(optional) Put the Media Pool into List mode, set In and Out points for each clip in your
Bin, and sort the Media Pool by the column that will put all clips in the order you want
them to be assembled.

2

Select one or more clips you want to assemble into a new timeline.

3

Right-click one of the selected clips, and choose “Create Timeline Using
Selected Clips.”

4

Type the name of the new timeline in the New Timeline Properties dialog. If you want
to use the In and Out points of each clip, make sure “Use Selected Mark In/Out” is
checked, and click Create New Timeline.

Part 3 – 15

When you first create a new project, no timeline inhabits the Timeline Editor, and you have an
opportunity to create a new timeline by drag and drop.

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Creating Timelines by Drag and Drop

To duplicate a Timeline:
Right-click any timeline in the Media Pool, and choose Timelines > Duplicate Timeline
from the contextual menu. The duplicate timeline appears with “copy” appended
to the name.

Where Are Timelines Stored?
Ordinarily, timelines are created in the currently selected Media Pool bin. However, if
you’d enabled “Use Timelines Bin” in the General Options panel of the Project Settings
before you added anything to the Media Pool, a dedicated Timelines bin appears at
the top of the Bin List, which contains all timelines in a project.
When using the Timelines bin, you’re prevented from putting timelines into any other
bin of the Media Pool. Whenever you create or import a new timeline, it automatically
appears in the Timelines bin. You can add subfolders to the Timelines bin for more
specific organization.
If you don’t want this kind of strict organization, but you would like an easy way to
browse all the timelines in your project at once, regardless of their diverse locations,
you can enable the “Create Smart Bin for Timelines” option, which is in the Editing
panel of the User Preferences. This creates a Smart Bin in the Bin List of the Media
Pool that filters all timelines in your project, making it easy to see all your timelines
without altering your original organization.

Timeline View Options
As you’re working on an edit, it can often be useful to modify the appearance of the Timeline,
changing the height of video or audio clips, choosing whether audio waveforms are drawn or
not, etcetera. Using the Timeline View Options pop-up at the bottom right of the Timeline, you
can make these kinds of changes as you work.

The Timeline View Options pop-up

Part 3 – 15

You can also duplicate existing timelines in preparation for saving a copy prior to making
modifications, or as a starting point for a different version of your content.

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Duplicating Timelines

‚‚ Show Audio Waveforms checkbox: Lets you turn audio waveform viewing off and on.
When Audio Waveform is turned off, audio tracks are minimized.
‚‚ Show Flags and Markers checkbox: Lets you turn the drawing of Flags and Markers
off and on.
‚‚ Video track height slider: Lets you resize the size of all video tracks at once,
independently of the audio tracks.
‚‚ Audio track height slider: Lets you resize the size of all audio tracks at once,
independently of the video tracks.
In addition, any track in the Timeline can be individually resized by dragging its top divider in
the Track Header area.

Resizing an individual Timeline track by dragging its top border in the Track Header

Modifying Timeline Tracks
When you’re getting ready to edit clips into the Timeline, you need to make sure you’ve got
enough tracks to do the job. The following procedures cover the different methods available for
adding, removing, and rearranging tracks as you work. These commands are all available via
the contextual menu that appears when you right-click anywhere in the Timeline header area
(the header of the Timeline is the area to the left where each track’s various buttons and
controls are located).
Methods for adding, deleting, and rearranging tracks:
‚‚ To add a track to the Timeline: Right-click anywhere in the Timeline header and
choose Add Track. If you add an audio track, you can choose what type of channel
mapping you want. For more information about audio track channel mappings, see
Chapter 25, “Working with Audio in the Edit Page.”
‚‚ To add multiple tracks to the Timeline at a specific position: Right-click anywhere in
the Timeline header and choose Add Tracks. When the Add Tracks dialog appears,
choose the number of video and audio tracks you want to add, choose the position you
want to insert the tracks above or below, and choose the Audio Track Type you want to
add if you’re adding audio tracks. When you’re done, click “Create New Tracks.”
‚‚ To delete a track from the Timeline: Right-click within a track’s Timeline header and
choose Remove Track. If there are clips on a track you remove, they are deleted from
the Timeline.

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‚‚ Track appearance buttons: Three buttons let you choose the overall appearance of
video and audio tracks. From left to right, the options are: Video Filmstrips, Video tracks
with thumbnails, Minimized tracks.

Creating and Working with Timelinesr

You have the following options:

Naming Timeline Tracks
If you’re a stickler for organization, you can also name the tracks on a timeline to identify
its purpose.
To rename a track:
1

Make sure the Timeline View Options are set to either the Filmstrip view or the
Thumbnail view, and that audio tracks are tall enough, so that track names are visible.

2

To edit the name of any track, click the default “Video X” or “Audio X” track name to
select it, then type your preferred name and press the Return key.

Using Timeline Snapping and Zooming
When preparing to make an edit into the Timeline, you can set the snapping and zoom controls
to whichever state is most useful for the operation you need to perform. For example, if you’re
editing an insert shot into a rapid-fire section of edits in the Timeline, you may want to zoom in
to better see the exact place where you want to place the incoming clip. Since there are many
edits at that point, disabling snapping might make it useful to avoid having the clip jump to the
nearest edit point if you need to move the incoming clip to a very specific frame.
Playhead Snapping and Timeline Zoom:
‚‚ To turn clip and playhead snapping on and off: Click the Snapping button in the
toolbar, or press N. When snapping is turned on, the In and Out points and markers
of clips all snap to one another and to the playhead. You can also press N to turn
snapping on or off while dragging a clip in the Timeline.

The snapping button in the toolbar

‚‚ To zoom into and out of the Timeline: Drag the zoom slider to the left to zoom out, and
right to zoom in. You can also press Command-Minus (–) and Command-Equal (=) to
zoom out and in. Either way, zooming is always centered on the current position of the
playhead, even if the playhead is off screen.
‚‚ To frame every clip into the width of the Timeline: Press Shift-Z. This is a toggle,
so pressing Shift-Z frames your whole edited sequence to the width of the Timeline,
and then pressing Shift-Z again returns the Timeline to whatever level of zoom you
were using previously. Using this keyboard shortcut makes it really easy to navigate
the Timeline when you’re zoomed in, as you can press Shift-Z, move the playhead to
another part of the Timeline you want to work on, and then press Shift-Z again to zoom
back into the new location of the Timeline.

Part 3 – 15

‚‚ To move tracks and the clips on them up and down: Right-click within a track’s
Timeline header and choose Move Track Up or Move Track Down from the contextual
menu. That track, along with all clips on it, will be moved up or down relative to the
other tracks in the Timeline.

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‚‚ To delete all unused tracks in the Timeline: Right-click anywhere in the track header
area and choose Delete Empty Tracks. All tracks without clips will be deleted at once.

‚‚ You can scroll left and right, or up and down, by dragging the Timeline’s horizontal and
vertical scroll bars.
‚‚ You can also scroll up and down the tracks of the Timeline using the scroll wheel, scroll
ball, or scroll gestures of your mouse, trackball, trackpad, or other pointing device.
‚‚ You can also scroll within the Timeline by middle-clicking and dragging in any direction,
which works the same as panning around a viewer that you’ve zoomed into. This frees
you from having to use the scroll bars as you move around your edited clips.
If you scroll past the position of the playhead, a small playhead indicator appears in the bottom
scroll bar to let you know where it is relative to the entire duration of your edited sequence.

A small indicator shows the position of the playhead if it’s
outside of the visible area of the Timeline

Resizing the Timeline’s Video
and Audio Track Regions
If you need to see more of the video or audio tracks in the available area of the Timeline, you
can drag the horizontal divider that separates the audio and video tracks up or down to create
room where you need it.

Dragging the Timeline center divider to make
more room for audio or video tracks

Part 3 – 15

When you’re zoomed into the Timeline, there are several methods you can use to scroll around
as you work.

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Scrolling Through the Timeline

To compare two timelines:
1

Open the first timeline you want to compare.

2

Right-click a second timeline in the Media Pool, and choose Compare With
Current Timeline.
A Timeline Comparison window appears, showing you the currently opened Timeline at
the bottom and the Timeline you right-clicked at the top.

The Timeline Comparison Window
When you first open the Timeline Comparison window, the first thing you see is a pair of
miniature timelines. The currently open Timeline appears at the bottom and the Timeline you
right-clicked appears at the top.

The Timeline Comparison window

Comparison Window Playhead Output
By default, the two playheads are ganged together, with the top playhead being displayed in
the Source Viewer, and the bottom playhead being displayed in the Timeline Viewer. These
playheads can be unganged if you want to compare different areas of both timelines, simply by
turning off Gang Playheads in the option menu.

Highlighting Differences
Special highlights indicate sections of both timelines that are different. Individual changes are
not individually highlighted, although they can be seen, on the premise that you’re more
interested in a section by section analysis of what your collaborating editor has been doing, for
purposes of deciding whether to incorporate changes or reversions based on this comparison.

Part 3 – 15

For instances where you’re importing multiple versions of a timeline that’s been edited in
another application, or where you’re working with multiple editors on different versions of the
same Timeline in either collaborative mode or on multiple separate DaVinci Resolve
installations, DaVinci Resolve provides a method of comparing two timelines with one another.
Using the Timeline Comparison window, you can both see a visual comparison of which
sections of two timelines differ, and you can derive a more traditional change list by opening up
the Difference Index.

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Comparing Timelines

Each section of differences between the two timelines are highlighted

When using this tool, you can change the bottom Timeline to match the top Timeline, on a
section by section basis, by right-clicking a highlighted section and choosing Accept Change
from the contextual menu. When you do this, the currently open Timeline is immediately
changed to incorporate the altered section from the Timeline you’re comparing to. If necessary,
you can undo this.

Identifying Differences Using Clip Labelling
You can also use the Timeline Comparison window to use clip labeling to indicate all
differences between the comparison Timeline and the currently open Timeline. The method for
doing this has not yet been defined at the time of this writing.

The Change List
Clicking the Diff Index button opens the change list, which shows you a more conventional item
by item comparison of the differences between the two timelines.

The Change List of the Timeline Comparison window

The method of exporting this change list has not yet been defined at the time of this writing.

Creating and Working with Timelinesr

Part 3 – 15

311

Part 3 – 16

Preparing Clips
for Editing and
Viewer Playback

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Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

Chapter 16

Preparing Clips for Editing
and Viewer Playback

This chapter covers the following topics:

Browsing Clips in the Media Pool

314

Selecting Clips in the Media Pool to Edit

315

Duplicating Clips in the Media Pool

316

Viewer Playback and Navigation

316

Source and Timeline Viewers vs. Single Viewer Mode

317

Opening Clips Into the Source Viewer to Prepare for Editing

317

Viewer Transport Controls

318

Simple Keyboard Shortcuts for Playback and Navigation

319

Using JKL to Control Playback

320

Special-Purpose Playback Commands

320

Enabling and Disabling Audio Scrubbing

321

Playback Post-Roll

321

Moving the Playhead Using Timecode

321

How to Enter Timecode Values

322

Gang Viewers (Playhead Ganging)

323

Adding Markers

323

Adding Markers to Clips

323

Setting In and Out Points

324

Saving In and Out Point Ranges as Markers with Duration

326

Organizing Media by Creating Subclips

327

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

Before you start editing, there are a wide variety of things you can do to prepare your clips for
editing. In this chapter, you’ll learn how to browse, select, and play through clips that you need
to log, adding markers, setting In and Out points, and creating subclips as you identify pieces
you’ll be using later as you edit.

Part 3 – 16

313

Methods of browsing clips in the Media Pool:
‚‚ Using thumbnail hover scrub in the Media Pool’s Thumbnail view: Drag the pointer
over a thumbnail to scrub though its contents.

Thumbnail hover scrubbing

‚‚ Using the Media Pool Filmstrip in the Media Pool’s List view: Select a clip to expose it
in the Filmstrip at the top of the Media Pool, and hover the pointer over the Filmstrip to
watch it play. At any time, you can double-click a clip in the Filmstrip to open it into the
Source Viewer.

Using the Filmstrip when the Media Pool is in List view

TIP: When browsing media, you can open clips you want to have a closer look
at in the Source Viewer by double-clicking them in the Media Pool. Meanwhile,
you can continue to open other clips in the Filmstrip with a single clip in order
to compare different clips with your main selection that remains in the Viewer.

Part 3 – 16

The following procedures show how to select one or more clips in the Media Pool to accomplish
various editing tasks, either by opening a clip in the the Source Viewer, or selecting a group of
clips with which you want to do drag and drop editing. This section starts by presenting
different ways you can browse the contents of the Media Pool to find clips you want to use, in
preparation for making a selection for your next operation.

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Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

Browsing Clips in the Media Pool

Methods of selecting clips in the Media Pool using the mouse:
‚‚ To select a single clip using the mouse: Click a clip in the Media Pool with the mouse.
‚‚ To select a contiguous range of clips: In either Thumbnail or List view, drag a selection
box over all the clips you want to select, or click to select the first clip in a series, then
Shift-click the last clip to select those clips and everything in between.

Selecting a contiguous range of clips

‚‚ To select a noncontiguous range of clips: Command-click each clip you want to
include in the selection. Or, you can hold the Command key down while you drag
bounding boxes over unselected clips to add them to the current selection, or over
selected clips to remove them from the selection.

Selecting a discontiguous range of clips

‚‚ To select all clips in the Media Pool: Make sure the Media Pool has focus by clicking a
clip or clicking anywhere in the background of the Media Pool, then press Command-A
to select all clips.

Part 3 – 16

Once you’ve found one or more clips that you want to use in your edit, you’ll need to make a
selection in preparation for performing an edit.

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Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

Selecting Clips in the Media Pool to Edit

‚‚ To select a single clip using the keyboard: Press Command-5 to make the Media
Pool browser the active pane of the Edit page, then use the Arrow keys to change the
selection from clip to clip in the Media Pool, up, down, left, and right. Once a clip is
selected, you can press an edit keyboard shortcut to edit the selected Media Pool clip
straight to the currently open Timeline.
‚‚ To select multiple clips using the keyboard: Hold the Shift key down while you’re using
the Arrow keys to move the selection to expand or contract a continuous selection in
the Media Pool.
‚‚ To open a selected clip into the Source Viewer: Press the Enter or Return key. Once
you’ve opened a clip into the Source Viewer, you can use the transport controls to play
through it.

Duplicating Clips in the Media Pool
If you want to create duplicates of clips in the Media Pool, you can Option-drag one or
more clips to another bin. The duplicate clips have their own individual links to the source
media on disk.

Viewer Playback and Navigation
By default, the Edit page presents a traditional source/record style editing experience. The
Source Viewer lets you view individual clips from the Media Pool to prepare them for editing.
Meanwhile, the Timeline Viewer lets you play through your program, showing you the frame at
the position of the playhead in the Timeline.

Source and Timeline Viewers

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Part 3 – 16

‚‚ To navigate the Bin list: Either click any bin in the Bin list to the left of the Media Pool,
or press Command-4 to make the Bin list the active pane of the Edit page, then use
the Up and Down Arrow keys to to move up and down among the available bins. Use
the Right Arrow key to open a bin that’s closed, and use the Left arrow key to close the
bin again.

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

Methods of selecting clips using the keyboard:

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

If you want to change the Edit Page layout to hide the Source Viewer, you can choose View >
Single Viewer Mode to instead use just a single viewer to contextually display either a selected
Source Clip or the current frame of the Timeline.

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Part 3 – 16

Source and Timeline Viewers vs. Single Viewer Mode

Single Viewer mode

In Single Viewer mode, whatever you select in the Media Pool or Timeline determines which
controls appear in the Viewer, which lets you do nearly everything you can do with two
simultaneously open viewers.

Opening Clips Into the Source Viewer to Prepare for Editing
Once you’ve decided which clips you want to use in your program, you can open them into the
Source Viewer to review them more completely. How this works depends on the Source
Viewer’s Live Media Preview setting.
To skim through a Media Pool thumbnail and view clips in the Source Viewer using Live
Media Preview:
1

Turn on Live Media Preview (if necessary) by clicking the Source Viewer option menu
and choosing Live Media Preview.

2

With the Media Pool open and in Thumbnail mode, position the pointer over a clip,
and after a few moments when that clip’s thumbnail starts to skim, you can see the clip
you’re scrubbing in the Source Viewer. Do one of the following:

a.	As you skim within the thumbnail, the playhead that appears in the thumbnail is locked
to the playhead displayed in the Viewer’s jog bar. While skimming, you can add markers
and set In and Out points.
b.	Leaving the pointer positioned over that clip, use the JKL keyboard shortcuts to play
through the clip, adding markers and setting In and Out points as you like.
3

It takes a moment for skimming to begin, which allows you to quickly move the pointer
from that clip back to the Source Viewer without opening any other clip.

Turning off Live Media Preview lets you use more traditional and controlled methods of opening
clips into the Source Viewer.

To open a clip into the Source Viewer using the keyboard:
1

If necessary, press Command-4 to select the Bin list, and press the Up and Down
arrows to choose a folder to view its contents. Press the Right Arrow key to open
folders and show any nested folders within, or the Left Arrow key to close folders and
hide their nested contents.

2

Press Command-5 to select the Media Pool browser, and use the Arrow keys to change
the selection from clip to clip in the Media Pool, up, down, left, and right.

3

When the clip you want is highlighted, press Return to open it into the Source Viewer.

To open a timeline into the Source Viewer:
Drag and drop any timeline into the Source Viewer in preparation for either ganging it
to the existing Timeline, or editing it, in whole or in part using In and Out points, into the
currently open Timeline.

Monitoring With An External Video Display
While working in the Edit page, the image that’s displayed on an external
video display (if one is connected) is determined either by the current
selection in the Media Pool, or by which part of the Edit page interface has
focus. For example, if you select a clip in the Media Pool so it’s displayed
within the Filmstrip, that clip is output to video. If you then open it into the
Source Viewer, then the contents of the Source Viewer are output to video.
If you switch to the Timeline Viewer, then your timeline is output to video.

Viewer Transport Controls
The Edit page has two Viewers. The left Viewer, when you’re editing, should be set to show
either source video or source audio, so it shows the source clip in any edit you’re setting up.
At right is the Timeline Viewer, that shows the frame at the current position of the playhead in
the Timeline. Using the Source and Timeline Viewers, you can set up a wide variety of edits.
There are identical transport controls underneath each of the Viewers.

The transport controls at the bottom of the Source Viewer

A jog bar appears directly underneath the transport controls, letting you drag the playhead
directly with the pointer. The full width of the Source Viewer’s jog bar represents the full
duration of a clip, while the full width of the Timeline Viewer’s jog bar represents the full
duration of the current timeline. The current position of each playhead is shown in the timecode
field at the upper right-hand corner of each viewer.

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Part 3 – 16

Double-click any clip in the Media Pool, or in the Filmstrip of the Media Pool, to open it into the
Source Viewer.

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

To open a clip into the Source Viewer using the mouse:

Simple Keyboard Shortcuts for Playback and Navigation
There are many different keyboard shortcuts you can use to simply navigate clips and timelines,
and control playback.
‚‚ Spacebar: You can use the spacebar to start and stop playback.
‚‚ Step One Frame Forward/Step One Frame Back: The Left Arrow and Right Arrow keys
move the playhead back and forth one frame at a time, while Shift-Left Arrow and ShiftRight Arrow move the playhead in one second increments.
‚‚ Step One Second Forward/Step One Second Reverse: Shift-Left Arrow and Shift-Right
Arrow moves the playhead back and forth one second at a time.
‚‚ Next Edit/Previous Edit: Up Arrow moves the playhead to the previous edit and selects
the edit point, while Down Arrow moves the playhead to the next edit and selects the
edit point.
‚‚ First Frame/Last Frame of the Current Clip: The Semicolon key moves the playhead
to the first frame of the clip intersecting the playhead, while the Apostrophe key moves
the playhead to the last frame of the clip intersecting the playhead.
‚‚ Previous Keyframe/Next Keyframe: Shift-Semicolon moves the playhead to the next
previous keyframe on the left when keyframes are displayed in the Timeline, while
Shift-Apostrophe moves the playhead to the next keyframe to the right.
‚‚ Previous Marker/Next Marker: If there are markers in either the Timeline Ruler or within
clips in the Timeline, Shift-Up Arrow and Shift-Down Arrow moves the playhead left and
right from one marker to the next.
‚‚ Previous Gap/Next Gap: If any tracks of the Timeline that have auto-select control
enabled have gaps between clips, Option-Command-Semicolon and OptionCommand-Apostrophe moves the playhead left and right from one gap to the next.
‚‚ Timeline Start/Timeline End: The Home key moves the playhead to the first frame of
the Source or Timeline Viewer, while the End key moves the playhead to the last frame
of the Source or Timeline Viewer.
‚‚ Go to In Point/Go to Out Point: Shift-I moves the playhead to the In point set in either
the Viewer or the Timeline. Shift-O moves the playhead to the Out point.

TIP: One of the options in the Editing panel of the User Preferences window, “Always
highlight current clip in the media pool,” lets you decide whether the current selection
in the Timeline is mirrored in the Media Pool.

Part 3 – 16

Transport controls appear above the jog bar. In the Source Viewer, these controls let you Jump
to the First Frame, Play Reverse, Stop, Play Forward, and Jump to the Last Frame. In the
Timeline Viewer, these control move to the Previous Edit, Play Reverse, Stop, Play Forward, and
move to the Next Edit. A loop control governs the looping behavior during playback.

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A separate jog control, to the left of the other transport controls, provides a way to jog more
slowly through long clips or a long timeline. Click and drag to the left and right to move through
a clip or the Timeline a frame at a time.

J

Plays 100% backward.

K

Stops playback.

L

Plays 100% forward

Press J repeatedly

Increases backward play speed each time you press J, for a range of
fast-reverse speeds.

Press L repeatedly

Increases forward play speed each time you press L, for a range of
fast-forward speeds.

Shift-J

Plays in fast reverse.

Shift-L

Plays in fast forward.

K+J

Plays backward at slow motion (with slow motion audio playback).

K+L

Plays forward at slow motion (with pitch-corrected audio
playback on OS X).

Pressing K while tapping J

Moves the playhead back one frame.

Pressing K while tapping L

Moves the playhead forward one frame.

Command-J and Command-L

Holding the Command key down while using the J and L keyboard
shortcuts lets you dynamically resize or trim selected edit points or
clips at 100 percent or faster speed, depending on whether the
Selection or Trim tool is enabled. More information on dynamic
trimming appears later in this chapter.

Once you learn all the different methods of JKL playback, they will probably become one of the
main ways you move the playhead around in DaVinci Resolve.

Special-Purpose Playback Commands
In addition to the standard transport controls, there are some additional playback controls,
available via keyboard shortcuts or the Playback menu, that let you perform different playback
operations.
‚‚ Loop: Command-Forward Slash (/). Toggles looped playback off and on. While
looped playback is on, playback initiated with any of the following commands will loop
automatically until you stop playback.
‚‚ Play around selection: Forward Slash (/). This command works contextually depending
on what’s selected in the Timeline. Plays a section of the Timeline from x frames before
to y frames after (a) the playhead (if nothing’s selected), (b) the currently selected edit
point, (c) the currently selected clip, (d) a selection of multiple clips. This command is
useful for previewing how the current selection plays within the context of the clips
immediately surrounding it. The pre-roll and post-roll time is customizable in the Editing
panel of the User Preferences.

Part 3 – 16

The JKL keyboard shortcuts are common to many editing applications, and experienced editors
know these to be some of the most useful controls for playback and editing there are. Here’s a
list of the many different ways you can use these three keyboard shortcuts to play through clips
and timelines as you work.

320

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

Using JKL to Control Playback

‚‚ Play Around In: Option-Space. Plays a section of the Timeline from x frames before to
y frames after the current assigned In point, letting you preview the transition from one
clip to the next. The pre-roll and post-roll time is customizable in the Editing panel of
the User Preferences.
‚‚ Play Around Out: Shift-Space. Plays a section of the Timeline from x frames before to y
frames after the current assigned Out point, letting you preview the transition from one
clip to the next. The pre-roll and post-roll time is customizable in the Editing panel of
the User Preferences.
‚‚ Play In to Out: Option-Forward Slash (/). If you’ve marked a section of a clip or timeline
with In and Out points, this command lets you preview how it will play.
‚‚ Play to In: (no default key assigned). Initiates playback and stops at the current In point.
‚‚ Play to Out: Option-Command-Option-Forward Slash (/). Initiates playback and stops at
the current Out point.

Enabling and Disabling Audio Scrubbing
Audio scrubbing is enabled by default, meaning that you’ll hear audio when dragging the
playhead with the mouse back and forth. While this can be useful when you’re searching for
audio cues, it can also be distracting if you’re just focused on the picture.
To enable or disable audio scrubbing:
Choose Timeline > Audio Scrubbing (Shift-S)

Playback Post-Roll
Enables the playhead to continue playing past the last clip in the Timeline for a duration equal
to the “Post-roll time” Project Setting in the Editing panel. This is good for editors that want to
experience a few moments of playback after cutting or fading to black after the last frame of
audio and video in the Timeline.
To enable or disable Playback Post-Roll:
Choose Timeline > Playback post-roll

Moving the Playhead Using Timecode
You can use absolute or relative timecode entry to either move the playhead in both the Source
and Timeline Viewers, or to move or trim selected edit points or clips. When navigating the
Timeline, timecode entry lets you move the playhead very precisely, or jump to specific
timecode values really quickly.

Part 3 – 16

‚‚ Play around current clip: (no default key assigned). Plays a section of the Timeline
from x frames before to y frames after the current clip intersecting the position of the
playhead. The pre-roll and post-roll time is customizable in the Editing panel of the User
Preferences.

321

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

‚‚ Play around current frame: Plays a section of the Timeline from x frames before to y
frames after the current position of the playhead. This command is useful for previewing
how edits play within the context of the clips immediately surrounding them. The preroll and post-roll time is customizable in the Editing panel of the User Preferences.

How to Enter Timecode Values

‚‚ The right-most pair of timecode values (or period) you enter is always the
frame number.
‚‚ A period to the left or to the right of any number you type is considered to be a pair
of zeroes.
‚‚ A single period between two numbers is considered to either be a single zero, or
ignored if it’s between two pairs of numbers.
‚‚ Any untyped pairs of values to the left of what you enter are assumed to be whatever
those values were prior to the timecode you entered; this makes it easy to type partial
timecode values even when the Timeline starts at hour one.
‚‚ It’s not necessary to enter colons or semicolons.
Absolute timecode is entered simply by typing in a timecode value. So long as no clips or edit
points are selected when you press the Return key, the playhead will move to that timecode
value. If an edit point or clip is selected, those will be moved or trimmed to the corresponding
timecode value, if possible.
Here are some examples of absolute timecode entry using this method:
Original TC Value

User-Typed Value

New TC Value

01:10:10:10

15245218

15:24:52:18

01:10:10:10

2..

01:02:00:00

01:10:10:10

15

01:10:10:15

01:10:10:10

12

01:10:10:12

01:10:10:10

1.2

01:10:01:02

01:10:10:10

115..

01:15:00:00

01:10:10:10

23...

23:00:00:00

Relative timecode is entered by starting the timecode value with a plus (+) or minus (–). Adding
a plus results in the value you type being added to the current timecode value for purposes of
offsetting the playhead or moving a selection. Adding a minus will subtract the value you type
from the current timecode value.
Here are two examples of relative timecode entry:
+20.

00:00:20:00 is added to the current timecode value.

-5

00:00:00:05 is subtracted from the current timecode value.

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

When entering timecode, type each pair of hour, minute, second, and frame values from left to
right, with a period representing a pair of zeros for fast entry. The numbers you enter appear in
the timecode field at the upper left-hand corner of the Viewer with focus. When you’re finished
typing, press the Return key to execute the timecode command. The rules for timecode entry
are as follows:

Part 3 – 16

322

Ordinarily, the playhead movement in the Source and Timeline Viewers is independent.
However, if you click the Option menu at the upper right-hand corner of either Viewer and turn
Gang Viewers on, the movement of the Source and Timeline Viewer playheads is locked
together, so that they move in unison.

Part 3 – 16

323

This is useful when you’re marking the In and Out points of a clip in the Source Viewer to match
the duration of a clip or other event in the Timeline.

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

Gang Viewers (Playhead Ganging)

Adding Markers
While markers, flags, and clip labels are covered in much more detail elsewhere in the editing
section, the use of markers is so important that a summary of how to add and edit markers
appears here. Markers are used to call attention to a particular frame within a specific clip.
Markers can be individually colored, and can have customized name and note text. Whenever
you enter text into a marker, that marker displays a small dot that indicates there’s more
information inside of it. Once placed, markers snap to In and Out points, edit points, the
playhead, and other markers whenever snapping is enabled, making it easy to use markers to
“measure” edits and trims that you make in the Timeline.

Adding Markers to Clips
You can place markers on the jog bar of source clips in the Source Viewer (or in the Media Page
Viewer) and on clips that are selected within a timeline.

(Top) Markers placed on a source clip,
(Bottom) Markers placed on a clip in the Timeline

To mark a source clip in the Source Viewer or Media Page Viewer, do one of the following:
‚‚ To place a marker without doing anything else, move the playhead to the frame you
want to mark, and then press M.
‚‚ To place a marker and immediately open the marker dialog to enter a name or note
within it during playback, press Command-M. Playback pauses until you enter the text
you want to and close the marker dialog again, at which point playback continues.

To open a marker’s edit dialog to alter its properties:
1

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Press Command-M to add a marker during playback and immediately open its
edit dialog.
‚‚ Double-click any marker you want to edit.
‚‚ Move the playhead to the frame containing the marker you want to annotate using
Shift-Up Arrow/Down Arrow and press M.
‚‚ Select a marker anywhere in the Source Viewer or Timeline, and press Shift-M.

2

When the marker dialog opens, you can modify several properties.

The properties found in the Marker Dialog

For much more information about markers, see Chapter 20, “Marking and Finding Clips in the
Timeline.”

Setting In and Out Points
Now that you’ve used playback commands to review your clips, you can place In and Out points
to set the range of each clip that you want to edit into the Timeline. If you don’t set In or Out
points, then the entire clip will be edited into the Timeline. If you do set In and Out points, those
points will be saved in the Media Pool and used the next time you edit that clip.
To set In and Out points while skimming a thumbnail in the Media Pool’s Thumbnail view:
Set the Media Pool to Thumbnail view, then move the pointer over a clip and wait a moment
until dragging the pointer begins to skim through that clip. As you skim, press I and O to set In
and Out points to encompass the part of that clip you’re going to want to use. When you’re
finished, that clip’s thumbnail will show a range indicator at the bottom to show how much of the
clip you’ve selected.

Part 3 – 16

‚‚ Once you’ve added some markers, you may want to edit their contents to make them
more useful.

324

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

‚‚ Move the playhead to the frame you want to mark, then right-click in the jog bar and
choose a marker color from the Add Marker submenu of the contextual menu.

Marking In and Out points in the Filmstrip of the Media Pool in List view

The Filmstrip will dim the heads and tails to let you see the range of media you’ve marked.
Once you’ve marked In and Out points in the Filmstrip, you can drag them to the left and right to
move them.
To set In and Out points in the Source Viewer:
1

Either skim a Media Pool thumbnail with Live Media Preview enabled in the Source
Viewer’s option menu, or open a clip into the Source Viewer.

2

Use JKL, the spacebar, the transport controls, or drag in the jog bar to move the
playhead to where you want to set an In or Out point.

3

Do one of the following:
‚‚ To mark simple In and Out points: Use the In and Out buttons to the right of the
transport controls, or press the I or O keys.
‚‚ To mark split In and Out points in preparation for making a split edit: Right‑click
the Jog Bar and choose Mark Split > Video In (Shift-Option-I) / Audio In
(Command‑Option-I) / Video Out (Shift-Option-O) / Audio Out (Command-Option-O).

(Top) Marking In and Out points in the Source Viewer, both as simple
(Bottom) Split edits

Simple In and Out points let you join the audio and video of two clips at a single edit point in the
Timeline. However, setting split In or Out points sets you up to create split edits where the
video is offset from the audio in a single step.

325

Part 3 – 16

Set the Media Pool to List view, then select a clip to expose it in the Filmstrip at the top of the
Media Pool, drag the pointer through the Filmstrip to watch it play, and press I and O to set In
and Out points to the appropriate range.

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

To set In and Out points using the Media Pool’s List view Filmstrip:

‚‚ To clear Split In or Split Out points: Press Shift-Option-X to clear the Video In and
Video Out points. Press Command-Option-X to clear Audio In and Audio Out points.
‚‚ To clear both the In and Out points at once: With the pointer over a marked thumbnail
in the Media Pool or over the Media Pool film strip, or with the Source Viewer selected,
press Option-X.
To jump the playhead to the current In or Out points in the Source or Timeline Viewer:
Press Shift-I to move the playhead to the current In point,
Press Shift-O to move the playhead to the current Out point.
Once set, In and Out points remain in place within each source clip or timeline until you
set new ones.

Saving In and Out Point Ranges
as Markers with Duration
This chapter will be updated during the beta testing period for the final release.
If you want to log the most important sections of clips using In and Out points, you can only log
a single section at a time, as In and Out points are used to identify the next section of a clip to
be edited in a three point edit. However, you can save any pair of In and Out points as a marker
with duration, which lets you identify multiple regions of a clip that you might later want to edit
into a program.
To turn In and Out points into a marker with duration:
1

Set In and Out points in the Source Viewer jog bar to identify a region you want to log
for future reference.

Marking In and Out points in preparation
to log that section of the clip

2

Do one of the following:
Right-click the jog bar and choose Convert In and Out to Duration Marker
A marker with duration appears above the In and Out points. To edit its name or notes,
double-click the marker, press Shift-M, or choose Mark > Modify Marker.

A marker with duration is created from the
In and Out points

In this way, you can log several regions within a single clip for future use.

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Part 3 – 16

‚‚ To clear In or Out points: Move the pointer over a marked thumbnail in the Media Pool
or over the Media Pool film strip, or open a clip in the Source Viewer, and then press
Option-I to clear the current In point, or Option-O to clear the current Out point.

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

To clear In and Out points:

This an extremely useful logging technique for two reasons. First, markers with duration can be
searched for in the Media Pool using the All Fields, Marker Name, and Marker Notes Filter by
options. Second, they can be filtered with Smart Bins using the Marker Name and Marker Notes
Media Pool Properties options.

Organizing Media by Creating Subclips
Subclips give you another way of organizing media in the Media Pool, letting you break
excessively long clips into shorter ones. For example, if the director of a project is fond of
“rolling takes” where multiple takes are all recorded within a single clip, you can break these
takes up by making them into subclips.
To create a subclip in the Edit page:
1

Do one of the following to open a clip into the Source Viewer in either the Media page
or the Edit page, in preparation for creating subclips.
‚‚ Double-click any clip in the Media Pool.
‚‚ Single-click any clip in the Media Library of the Media page to create a subclip
without needing to first import that clip into the Media Pool.

2

Set In and Out points in the Source Viewer to define the section you want to turn into
a subclip.

3

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Choose Mark > Create Subclip
‚‚ Press Option-B
‚‚ Right-click the jog bar and choose Make Subclip from the contextual menu
A new subclip appears in the Media Pool, automatically selected so that you can
immediately edit its metadata in the Metadata Editor.

Once created, subclips appear and work like any other clip in DaVinci Resolve. You can also
create subclips in the Media page while performing other organizational tasks there.

Preparing Clips for Editing and Viewer Playback

A clip with multiple logged sections identified via markers with duration

Part 3 – 16

327

Part 3 – 17

Editing Basics

328

Editing Basics

Chapter 17

Editing Basics

This chapter covers the following topics:

Drag and Drop Editing

330

Drag and Drop Editing of Individual Clips Into the Timeline

330

Drag and Drop Editing of Several Clips Into the Timeline At Once

331

Drag and Drop Editing of Video-Only or Audio-Only Edits

332

Dragging Clips From the macOS Finder Into the Timeline

333

Other Ways of Assembling Edits Into the Timeline

333

Example: Assembling Clips Into the Timeline From the Source Viewer

333

Example: Assembling Clips Into the Timeline from the Media Pool

335

Making Selections in the Timeline

336

Manually Selecting Clips in the Timeline

336

Selecting Clips Based on Markers, Flags, and Clip Color

337

Selecting Edits in the Timeline

337

A Practical Example of Keyboard-Driven Selections

339

Using Auto Select Controls to Define Selections

340

Defining Selections With the Help of Auto Select Controls

340

Overriding Automatic Selections By Making Manual Selections

340

Using Auto Select Controls to Control Other Operations

341

Locking Tracks You Don’t Want to Change

343

Position Lock

343

Position Locking All Tracks

344

Position Locking Individual Tracks

344

Disabling and Re-Enabling Clips in the Timeline

345

Deleting Clips and Gaps from the Timeline

345

Finding, Selecting, and Deleting Gaps in the Timeline

347

Audio/Video Linking

348

Controlling Audio/Video Linking While Making Selections

348

Dealing with Audio Video Sync Offsets

348

Manually Unlinking and Relinking Audio and Video

349

Linking Multiple Clips in the Timeline

350

Commands for Slipping Audio/Video Sync

350

Editing Basics

In this chapter, you’ll learn many of the fundamental methods and commands you’ll use when
beginning to assemble clips into the Timeline. This includes drag and drop operations to begin
assembling a timeline, different ways of selecting and deselecting the clips you’ve edited in
preparation for different tasks, maintaining sync between the audio and video components of
clips you’re editing, and deleting clips and gaps you don’t want.

Part 3 – 17

329

Drag and Drop Editing of Individual Clips Into the Timeline
If you’re just editing one clips at a time to create an edited sequence in a timeline, this is how
that works.
1

If you need to edit specific ranges of the clips you’re editing, you can set In and Out
points in source clips first by doing one of the following:
Setting In and Out points while skimming a thumbnail in the Media Pool: As you’re
skimming over a clip’s thumbnail in the Viewer, press I and O to set In and Out points to
encompass the part of that clip you’re going to want to use. When you’re finished, that
clip’s thumbnail will show a range indicator at the bottom to show how much of the clip
you’ve selected.
Using the Media Pool Filmstrip in the Media Pool’s List view: Set the Media Pool to
List view, then select a clip to expose it in the Filmstrip at the top of the Media Pool,
drag the pointer through the Filmstrip to watch it play and press I and O to set In and
Out points to the appropriate range. The Filmstrip will dim the heads and tails to let you
see the range of media you’ve marked.
Using the Source Viewer: Open a clip in the Viewer by double-clicking it in the Media
Pool, or selecting it in the Media Pool and pressing the Return key. Then use the
transport controls, jog bar, or control panel buttons to move the playhead, and place In
and Out points using the In and Out buttons to the right of the transport controls, or by
pressing the I or O keys.

2

Drag the clip you want to edit from either the Media Pool or the Source Viewer, and
drop it onto the desired position in the Timeline to perform an overwrite edit. If you
drag a clip on top of another clip that’s already in the Timeline, the clip you’re dragging
will overwrite the part of the clip that it overlaps.

Dragging a clip from the Media Pool to overwrite a clip in the Timeline

Part 3 – 17

If you’ve already used other editing programs, the procedures in this section will almost
certainly be remedial, but if you’re just getting started, this section covers the most basic
methods of editing a series of clips into the Timeline. The simplest method of editing is to drag
clips from the Media Pool and drop them into the Timeline. You can do this with individual clips,
or with selected groups of clips.

330

Editing Basics

Drag and Drop Editing

Drag and Drop Editing of Several Clips
Into the Timeline At Once
The procedure above also works when you want to edit several clips into the Timeline at once
by dragging them from the Media Pool.
1

Change the sort order of the Media Pool’s browser area to put the clips into the order
in which you want them to appear. In Thumbnail view you can use the Sort Order
menu, but in List view you can click the header of any metadata column to sort by that
column’s data.

Using the Sort Order menu to change the sort
order of clips in the Media Pool

2

Use the Media Pool thumbnails, the Media Pool List view Filmstrip, or the Source
Viewer to set In and Out points to define the part of each clip that you want to edit into
the Timeline.

3

Select the the Media Pool clips you want to edit into the Timeline by dragging a
bounding box, Command-dragging multiple bounding boxes over different sets
of clips, by Shift-clicking a range of clips, or by Command-clicking individual noncontiguous clips.

4

Drag any of the selected clips to the desired position in the Timeline to perform an
overwrite edit.

Editing Basics

TIP: If you drag a clip into the blank area above an existing video track or below an
existing audio track, a new track will automatically be created.

Part 3 – 17

331

Editing Basics

Part 3 – 17

332

Dragging multiple clips into the Timeline in the sort order of the Media Pool

The clip(s) you drag overwrite whatever other clips they overlap in the Timeline.
Multiple clips dragged from the Media Pool will be edited in the order in which they’re
sorted in the Media Pool, using each clip’s In and Out points.

Drag and Drop Editing of Video-Only or Audio-Only Edits
While it’s easy to edit just the video or just the audio of a clip by disabling the audio or video
destination control in the Timeline prior to doing any sort of edit (described later in Chapter 19,
“Three and Four Point Editing”), there’s also a pair of keyboard modifiers you can use to do the
very same thing while you’re dragging.
‚‚ Option-drag clips from the Media Pool/Filmstrip, Source Viewer, or Finder into the
Timeline to edit only the video component of that clip into the Timeline.
‚‚ Shift-drag clips from the Media Pool/Filmstrip, Source Viewer, or Finder into the
Timeline to edit only the audio component of that clip into the Timeline.
‚‚ Open a clip into the Source Viewer, then move the pointer over the Source Viewer and
drag from either the Video-only or Audio-only overlays that appear over the bottom of
the image.

Video and Audio-only overlay controls appear in
the Source Viewer that let you drag just the video
or just the audio into the Timeline

Editing Basics

You can also drag a clip directly from the Finder to the Timeline using the macOS version of
DaVinci Resolve.

333

Part 3 – 17

Dragging Clips From the macOS Finder Into the Timeline

Dragging multiple clips into the Timeline from the Mac OS Finder

Other Ways of Assembling
Edits Into the Timeline
While drag and drop editing is intuitive enough, there are other simple methods of editing clips
into the Timeline by using the playhead to define where those clips will start. The examples in
this chapter all use “Overwrite” edits, which are also shown above. Because Overwrite edits
delete overlapping clips in the Timeline with the new incoming clip, they let you both delete
unwanted media from the Timeline, and add clips that you do want. Here are two examples of
how to do this.

Example: Assembling Clips Into the
Timeline From the Source Viewer
The following example shows how you can use the Edit page to assemble a quick first cut of
edits using different features of the Media Pool, Viewers, and Timeline.
1

Open the first clip you want to edit into the Source Viewer.

2

If necessary, set In and Out points to define the section of that clip you want to edit into
your program.

3

Choose what video and audio tracks you want to edit the clip to in the Timeline by
clicking, dragging, using the Command-Option and Command-Shift Up and Down
Arrow Key shortcuts, or using the Option-1–8 and Command-Option-1–8 key shortcuts
to assign the video and audio destination controls. By default, the destination controls
are assigned to tracks V1 and A1.

4

Click any destination control itself to disable the video or audio component if you want
to edit clips into the Timeline as audio or video only. By default, all destination controls
are enabled.

Editing Basics

Part 3 – 17

334

Setting the destination control to the track
you want to edit into.

5

In the Timeline Viewer or the Timeline itself, move the Timeline playhead to the frame
you want the beginning of the clip you’re about to edit to start.

6

To perform the edit, do one of the following:
‚‚ Drag the clip from the Source Viewer to the Timeline Viewer and drop it on the
Overwrite overlay. (Note: If you’re in single viewer mode, this overlay only appears
when you drag a clip from the Media Pool to the Timeline Viewer)
‚‚ Click the Overwrite Clip button at the middle of the Toolbar.
‚‚ Choose Edit > Overwrite ( or press F10).
The selected clip(s) are overwritten to the selected track at the position of the
playhead, and the playhead automatically moves to the end of the newly edited clip,
ready for you to perform another edit. If that clip is the last one on the Timeline, you’ll
see the last frame to the left of the playhead (with a jagged overlay at the right-hand
side of the Timeline Viewer) instead of the black that is the actual frame after that clip.
This makes it easier for you to line up the next edit. Otherwise, the playhead will show
whatever frame happens to be at that point in time.

The Timeline playhead at the first frame after the clip you’ve just edited, the Timeline
Viewer shows a jagged overlay at the right to let you know this isn’t a real frame

Example: Assembling Clips Into the
Timeline from the Media Pool
If you want, you can also edit clips directly into the Timeline from the Media Pool using a variety
of commands. This can be a fast way of appending clips to the end of the Timeline (although
you can also perform Insert edits this way).
To edit one or more clips from the Media Pool to the Timeline:
1

If necessary, set In and Out points for each of the clips you want to edit into the
Timeline using either the Media Pool thumbnails (in Thumbnail view), the Media Pool
Filmstrip Viewer (in List view), or by opening each one into the Source Viewer. For each
method, press I to set an In point, and O to set an Out point.
Change the sort order of the Media Pool’s browser area to put the clips into the order in
which you want them to appear. In Thumbnail view you can use the Sort Order menu,
but in List view you can click the header of any metadata column to sort by that
column’s data.

2

Click, drag, use the Command-Option and Command-Shift Up and Down Arrow Key
shortcuts, or use the Option-1–8 and Command-Option-1–8 key shortcuts to assign the
video and audio destination controls to the tracks you want to edit the video and audio
of the incoming clip(s) to. Click any destination control itself to disable it if you want to
edit clips into the Timeline as audio or video only.

3

Select one or more clips you want to edit. Insert, Overwrite, Place On Top, Ripple
Overwrite, and Append At End edits are all capable of editing multiple clips at once,
while Replace and Fit to Fill edits can only edit one clip at a time, and will only edit the
first of multiple selected clips into the Timeline.

4

To perform the edit, do one of the following:
‚‚ Use any of the editing commands in the Edit menu.
‚‚ Use the equivalent keyboard shortcuts to Insert (F9), Overwrite (F10), Replace (F11),
Place On Top (F12), Ripple Overwrite (Shift-F10), Fit to Fill (Shift-F11), or Append To End
of Timeline (Shift-F12) the selected clips into the Timeline.
‚‚ Right-click one or more selected clips in the Media Pool, and choose “Insert Selected
Clips to Timeline” or “Append Selected Clips to Timeline.”
The selected clip(s) are edited into the Timeline.

335

Part 3 – 17

To edit another clip, open the next clip you want to edit into the Source Viewer,
set In and Out points, and use the Overwrite Clip button or command to edit it into
the Timeline. Continue this process until you’ve edited together the assembly of
edits you want.

Editing Basics

7

Once you’ve assembled a sequence of clips in the Timeline, you’ll probably need to manipulate
them further, moving, deleting, trimming, or otherwise adjusting the clips in the Timeline to
make the edit play with the pacing and verve you require.

Part 3 – 17

336

Manually Selecting Clips in the Timeline

Editing Basics

Making Selections in the Timeline

Many operations require you to make a selection first, to define the scope of what you’re about
to do. There are many ways to do so.
Selections you can make using the mouse:
‚‚ To select one clip: Click a clip with the mouse.
‚‚ To select a continuous range of clips by dragging: Drag a bounding box from an
empty area of the Timeline to surround a group of clips.

Dragging a bounding box to select a continuous range of clips in the Timeline

‚‚ To select a continuous range of clips by Shift-clicking: Click the first clip you want to
select, and then shift-click the last clip you want to select, and all clips in-between will
automatically be selected as well.
‚‚ To select a discontinuous range of clips: Command-click any clips to select them
no matter where they appear on the Timeline. Command-clicking a selected clip
deselects it.

Command-clicking to select a discontinuous range of clips in the Timeline

‚‚ To select all clips forward of the playhead on the current track: Move the playhead
to the first clip you want to include in the selection, then press the Y key (Timeline >
Select Clips Forward > On This Track) to select that clip and every clip to its right in
the same track of the Timeline.
‚‚ To select all clips forward of the playhead on all tracks: Move the playhead to the
first clip you want to include in the selection, then press Option-Y (Timeline > Select
Clips Forward > On All Tracks) to select that clip and every clip to its right in all tracks
of the Timeline.
‚‚ To select all clips backward from the playhead on the current track: Move the
playhead to the last clip you want to include in the selection, then press Command-Y
(Timeline > Select Clips Backward > On This Track) to select that clip and every clip to
its left in the same track of the Timeline. By default, there’s no keyboard shortcut for
this command, but you can assign one.
‚‚ To select all clips backward from the playhead on all tracks: Move the playhead to
the last clip you want to include in the selection, then choose Command-Option-Y
(Timeline > Select Clips Backward > On All Tracks) to select that clip and every clip
to its left in all tracks of the Timeline. By default, there’s no keyboard shortcut for this
command, but you can assign one.
‚‚ To select all clips in the Timeline: Make sure the Timeline has focus, then press
Command-A.
To change which clip is selected using the keyboard:
Select a clip, then use the Left Arrow and Right Arrow keys to change the selection to
the previous or next clip among all tracks with Auto Select turned on.

Selecting Clips Based on Markers, Flags, and Clip Color
It’s also possible to select multiple clips that have a particular color of marker, flag, or clip
coloration. This is useful in any situation where you’re using these organizational tools to keep
track of clips with specific characteristics that you might need to later select for multi-clip
operations.
For example, you might add purple markers to a series of audio clips that might need special
EQ settings. Later, you can choose Timeline > Select Clips With Marker Color > Purple to select
all of those clips in order to move them to another track, where you can apply the same EQ to
all of them using an audio filter applied to the track. There are three ways of selecting
groups of clips.
To select groups of clips based on Marker, Flag, or Clip Color:
‚‚ Choose Timeline > Select Clips With Flag Color > Blue – Purple
‚‚ Choose Timeline > Select Clips With Marker Color > Blue – Purple
‚‚ Choose Timeline > Select Clips With Clip Color > Green – Gray

Selecting Edits in the Timeline
A variety of editing and trimming methods require you to select an edit point, or part of an edit
point, in order to resize, ripple, or roll an edit. You can do so using the mouse or using
the keyboard.

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‚‚ To select one clip: Using the keyboard, make sure the Auto Select button for
the track the clip is on is enabled, then move the playhead over that clip and
press Shift-V.

Editing Basics

Selecting clips using the keyboard or menu commands:

Selecting an edit point to roll

‚‚ To select just the incoming or outgoing half of an edit point to resize or ripple: Move
the mouse to the left or right of the center of an edit, and when the resize/ripple cursor
appears, click to select that portion of the edit.

Selecting incoming or outgoing halves of an
edit point to resize or ripple

To select multiple edit points, do one of the following:
‚‚ To select multiple roll points: Command-click the center of multiple edit points.
Command-click a selected edit point to deselect it.

Command-clicking the center of several edits to prepare to roll them all

‚‚ To select multiple ripple points: Command-click the left or right sides of multiple
edit points.

Command-clicking the left or right of several edits to ripple them all

‚‚ To drag to select many edit points: Select the Trim tool (T), and drag a bounding-box
over the edit points you want to select. You can press U to switch all selected edit
points among rippling incoming edits, rippling outgoing edits, and rolling edits.

Using the Trim tool, you can drag to select multiple edits

There is also a flexible set of keyboard shortcuts that makes it easy to select edit points in
preparation for various operations if you like to avoid using the mouse.

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Part 3 – 17

‚‚ To select an edit to roll: Move the mouse to the center of an edit point, and when the
ripple cursor appears, click to select the edit.

Editing Basics

Methods for selecting edit points using the mouse:

‚‚ Option-C: Selects the nearest video edit point to the playhead on the lowest track with
Auto Select enabled. Linked audio edit points are not selected.
‚‚ Shift-C: Selects the nearest audio edit point to the playhead on the lowest track with
Auto Select enabled. Linked video edit points are not selected.
‚‚ U: Once you’ve selected an edit point, this shortcut toggles among selecting the
outgoing half, incoming half, or the entire edit.
‚‚ Option-U: Once you’ve selected an edit point, this shortcut toggles among selecting
the video+audio of the edit, just the video, or just the audio.
To move the selection to another edit:
Select a single edit point, then use the Up Arrow key (Previous Edit) or Down Arrow key
(Next Edit) to change the selection to the previous or next edit point among all tracks
with Auto Select turned on.
To deselect all edit points:
‚‚ Using the mouse: Click any empty area of the Timeline.
‚‚ Using the keyboard: Press Shift-Command-A.

A Practical Example of Keyboard-Driven Selections
Here’s an example of how you would use these keyboard shortcuts together as a sequence of
operations.
To select an edit point using the keyboard:
1

Move the Timeline playhead close to the edit point you want to select using
the JKL keys.

2

Press the V key to select the nearest edit point to the playhead on the lowest track with
Auto Select enabled. If there are overlapping superimposed clips on multiple tracks,
turn off the Auto Select controls of tracks with edits you don’t want to select using
Option-F1 through Option-F8 corresponding to the auto select controls on tracks 1-8.
Using the mouse, you can solo a track’s Auto Select state by Option-clicking its Auto
Select button. (Option-F9 toggles the auto select controls of all video tracks.)

3

Initially, the entire edit is selected, in preparation for a roll edit. To toggle among
selecting the outgoing half, incoming half, and the entire edit, press the U key.

4

To toggle among selecting the video+audio of the edit, just the video, or just the audio,
press Option-U.

5

Perform whatever operation you need to. When you’re finished, using Up-Arrow or
Down-Arrow to move the selection backward or forward in the Timeline, or press
Command-Shift-A to deselect it.

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‚‚ V: Selects the nearest edit point to the playhead on the lowest track with Auto Select
enabled. Selects both the audio and video edit points of a clip together.

Editing Basics

Keyboard shortcuts for selecting edits:

Also, the Timeline Auto Select controls are particularly convenient when you’re using keyboard
shortcuts to edit and you don’t want to have to grab your mouse to explicitly select a single clip,
since you can turn Auto Select on or off via keyboard shortcuts.

Defining Selections With the Help of Auto Select Controls
Here is the easiest example of when the Auto Select controls are indispensable. In the following
example, there are two superimposed video clips and three superimposed audio clips.
Supposing you only want to delete the media from tracks V2, V1, and A1, but you want to leave
the media on A2 and A3 alone, you can turn off the Auto Select controls for tracks A2 and A3,
and set Timeline In and Out points to define the range of the clips you want to delete. When
you press the Delete key, only the media on the Auto Select-enabled tracks is deleted.

Overriding Automatic Selections By
Making Manual Selections
It’s important to note that manual selections that you make which highlight specific clips in the
Timeline always override whatever the Auto Select control of a track is set to. In the following
example, three clips are superimposed and the Auto Select control of every track except V2
has been turned off. Setting Timeline In and Out points now automatically defines that region of
the clip on track V2 to be deleted were you to press the Delete key. You can see the affected
part of the Timeline because it’s highlighted while the rest of the Timeline is dimmed.

Soloing the Auto Select control on track V2 to limit a Delete operation

However, if you clicked the clip on track V1 to select it manually, the automatic selection defined
by the In and Out points disappears in favor of the highlighted clip you just clicked. This is
because manual selections almost always take precedence over automatic selections you
define using the In and Out points and Auto Select controls.

Part 3 – 17

The Timeline Auto Select controls are extremely useful and versatile controls that serve many
purposes. In short, they give you a way to specify which tracks will be affected or considered
when you’re performing an operation upon multiple superimposed clips on multiple tracks of
the Timeline.

340

Editing Basics

Using Auto Select Controls
to Define Selections

Making a manual selection overrides the Auto Select controls

This is good to keep in mind for situations where the fastest way to do the operation you need
to do is to simply manually select the clip you want to define the operation.

Using Auto Select Controls to Control Other Operations
Other operations that are affected by the Auto Select controls include any command that uses
“the clip on the lowest-numbered track with Auto Select enabled” to define what happens.
This includes Copy and Paste, Mark Clip, Go To Next Edit/Previous Edit, the Selection Follows
Playhead mode, Next Gap/Previous Gap, etcetera (a full list of affected operations
appears later).
A common example of when this is important is whenever you use the Mark Clip command to
automatically set In and Out points to match the duration of a clip on the Timeline. If that clip
happens to be at a section of the Timeline where there are multiple superimposed clips, each
of which has a different duration, then by default the In and Out points (first and last frames) of
the clip on the lowest numbered track is used to set Timeline In and Out points when you use
Mark Clip.

Using Mark Clip with all Auto Select controls enabled, the clip on the
lowest-numbered video track with Auto Select enabled defines the result

However, if you disable the Auto Select control of track V1, then whichever clip is on the lowest
video track with Auto Select still enabled is used as the target clip for the Mark Clip operation.
In this example, the shorter clip on track V2 now sets the locations of the In and Out points.

Using Mark Clip with Auto Select controls enabled

Editing Basics

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341

Methods of enabling and disabling the Auto Select controls:

342

‚‚ To toggle Auto Select for all video tracks off and on: Press Option-8.
‚‚ To toggle Auto Select for audio tracks 1-8: Press Option-Command-F1 through F8.
‚‚ To toggle all video track Auto Select tracks off and on: Press Option-F9.
‚‚ To toggle all audio track Auto Select tracks off and on: Press Option-Command-F9.
‚‚ To “solo” Auto Select for a track and disable Auto Select on all other tracks:
Option‑click any Auto Select control to leave that control on while turning off all other
Auto Select controls of that type (video or audio).
‚‚ To turn all audio or video Auto Select controls on and off: Shift-click any video or
audio Auto Select control to toggle on or off all Auto Select controls of that type (video
or audio).
The following operations are affected by the state of each track’s Auto Select control:
‚‚ Cutting, Ripple Cutting, Copying, or Deleting clips: When using Timeline In and Out
points to delete a range of media from the Timeline, only media on tracks with an
enabled Auto Select control will be cut, copied, or deleted.
‚‚ Deleting gaps: When selecting and deleting gaps in the Timeline, clips on other tracks
that overlap the selected gap will also be deleted on tracks with an enabled Auto
Select control. Media to the right of affected tracks will ripple left to close the gap.
‚‚ Selecting edit points using the keyboard: When you press V to select the nearest edit
point, the edit point on the lowest track with Auto Select enabled is selected. When
pressing the Up Arrow and Down Arrow keys to move the selection from edit point to
edit point, edit points on tracks with a disabled Auto Select control are ignored.
‚‚ Selecting clips using the keyboard: When a clip is selected, you can press the Up
Arrow and Down Arrow keys to move the selection from clip to edit clip, but clips on
tracks with a disabled Auto Select control are not seen by this operation.
‚‚ Using Mark Clip: When using the Mark Clip command, clips on tracks with disabled
Auto Select controls are ignored. This lets you choose a target clip to use for marking
the clip when there are multiple overlapping superimposed clips.
‚‚ Match Frame: When making a Match Frame operation, clips on tracks with disabled
Auto Select controls are ignored. This lets you choose a target clip to use for matching
a frame when there are multiple overlapping superimposed clips.
‚‚ Rippling the Timeline during a trim operation: Tracks with Auto Select turned off
will not be rippled. More information on the rules of ripple trimming appear later in
this chapter.
‚‚ Pasting clips: All copied clips will be pasted to the lowest numbered track with
Source Control enabled. If all tracks of a particular type have their Auto Select controls
turned off, then no clips of that type will be pasted at all.
‚‚ Paste Insert: Tracks with Auto Select turned off will not be rippled or affected by clips
being pasted via a Paste Insert command.
‚‚ Using the Insert or Ripple Overwrite edits: Only clips on tracks with Auto Select
turned on will be rippled during an Insert edit or Ripple Overwrite edit.
‚‚ Finding gaps: When using Playback > Previous Gap (Command-Option-;) or Next Gap
(Command-Option-‘ ), gaps on tracks with Auto Select disabled will be ignored.
‚‚ Using Selection Follows Playhead: When you turn on “Selection Follows Playhead” so
that all clips intersecting the position of the playhead are automatically selected, clips
on tracks with Auto Select disabled will not be selected.

Editing Basics

‚‚ To toggle Auto Select for video tracks: Press Option-F1 through F8 to toggle Auto
Select for tracks V1 through V8.

Part 3 – 17

‚‚ To toggle Auto Select for any track: Click any track’s Auto Select control.

Tracks V2, V1, and A1 are unlocked, while tracks A2, A3, and A4 are locked

Clips on locked tracks cannot be moved, deleted, cut, or otherwise affected by editorial
operations. Furthermore, parameters of locked clips cannot be edited in the Inspector.
However, clips on locked tracks can be graded and otherwise modified in the Color page.
To toggle the lock or unlock state of tracks, do one of the following:
‚‚ Click any track’s lock control to toggle lock on and off.
‚‚ Shift-click any track’s lock control to toggle locking on and off for all tracks.
‚‚ Press Option-Shift-1 through 8 to lock or unlock tracks V1 through V8.
‚‚ Press Option-Shift-9 to lock or unlock all video tracks.
‚‚ Press Option-Shift-F1 though F8 to lock or unlock tracks A1 through A8.
‚‚ Press Option-Shift-F9 to lock or unlock all audio tracks.

Position Lock
In a nutshell, turning position lock on prevents clips from being moved to the left or right, and it
prevents all ripple operations. This is primarily useful when you’re near the end of post on a
project for which the cut has been locked (or at least as “locked” as directors and producers
allow any more), but you still need to make surgical changes that don’t risk throwing the video
out of sync with audio that may be being edited and mixed elsewhere because of an
accidentally rippled edit.
With position lock on, you can still make edits (such as Replace), slip clips, roll edits, add
ResolveFX and other OpenFX, and alter all manner of effects in the Inspector. You just can’t do
anything that alters the position of clips in the Timeline, or ripples entire sections of the
Timeline.
There are two ways you can enable Position Lock.

Part 3 – 17

Another step you can take to prepare before performing any kind of editorial operation is to
lock tracks with media that you don’t want to be affected by whatever it is you’re about to do.
For example, if you have a complex set of music edits on track A3 that you don’t want to be
affected by operations that will ripple the Timeline, you can lock track A3 so those clips
remain unaffected.

343

Editing Basics

Locking Tracks You
Don’t Want to Change

Position Locking All Tracks

344

The Position Lock button on the toolbar

When you turn position lock on, the Lock button of all tracks changes to show that position lock
is enabled instead.

Position lock indicated by each track’s Lock icon changing

Position Locking Individual Tracks
You can also be extra tricky and enable position lock on a track-by-track basis by Commandclicking any track’s Lock button.

Command-click any track’s Lock button to put that
track into Position Lock mode

Position lock can be released by simply clicking that track’s Lock icon.

Editing Basics

Part 3 – 17

You can turn Position Lock on and off for all tracks via a button in the toolbar above the Timeline.

Disabled clips appear dimmed in the Timeline. They don’t play back, they’re not rendered, and
they’re not output to video. However, their position is preserved in the Timeline, so you can
always re-enable them at a later time if you change your mind and decide you want
to use them.

A clip that’s been disabled between two enabled clips; the disabled clip is dimmed

To disable or re-enable one or more selected clips:
‚‚ Right-click part of the selection and choose Enable Clip from the contextual menu
‚‚ Choose Clip > Enable Clip
‚‚ Press D

Deleting Clips and Gaps
from the Timeline
There are two ways you can delete clips you don’t want in the Timeline. Using the Delete key,
you can perform what’s sometimes called a “lift edit,” removing the unwanted clips and leaving
a gap. Using the Forward Delete key, you can perform a “ripple delete,” removing unwanted
clips and closing the gap by rippling the rest of the edited Timeline to the right of the deleted
clip/s by moving it to the left.
Deleting clips as a “lift edit” operation:
‚‚ To remove one or more clips from the Timeline, leaving a gap: Select a clip in the
Timeline, or Shift-click or Command-click to select the clips you want to remove, and
press the Delete key (or right-click the selection and choose Delete).
‚‚ To remove a range of media from the Timeline on multiple tracks, leaving a gap:
Set Timeline In and Out points defining the range of media you want to delete, then
turn off the Auto Select controls of any tracks with media you want to preserve, and
press the Delete key (or right-click the selection and choose Delete).

Part 3 – 17

Sometimes there’s one or more video or audio clips in the Timeline that you don’t want to play
along with the rest of the edited sequence, but you don’t want to remove from the Timeline
either, in case you change your mind later. For this reason, it’s possible to Disable clips,
effectively turning them off without removing them.

345

Editing Basics

Disabling and Re-Enabling
Clips in the Timeline

Editing Basics

Part 3 – 17

346

Deleting Clip I using the Backspace or Delete key and leaving a gap

Deleting clips as a “ripple delete” operation:
‚‚ To delete one or more clips and close the gap by rippling the Timeline left: Select
a clip in the Timeline, or Shift-click or Command-click to select the clips you want to
remove, and press the Forward Delete key.
‚‚ To delete a range of media and close the gap by rippling the Timeline left: Set
Timeline In and Out points defining the range of media you want to delete, then turn off
the Auto Select controls of any tracks with media you want to preserve, and press the
Forward Delete key.

Deleting Clip I using the Forward Delete key to ripple all clips with In
points to the right in the Timeline to close the gap

As with any ripple operation, all clips with In points to the right of the deleted range of media on
tracks with auto -select enabled are rippled to close the gap, and any clips with In points to the
left of the In point of the affected range of media are unaffected.

To move the playhead to the next gap on the Timeline:
1

Turn off the Auto Select controls of any tracks you want to omit from this operation.

2

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Choose Playback > Previous Gap, or press Option-Command-Semicolon (;) to move
the playhead to the next gap to the left of the playhead’s current position.
‚‚ Choose Playback > Next Gap, or press Option-Command-Apostrophe (‘) to move the
playhead to the next gap to the right of the playhead’s current position.

To select or deselect a gap:
Click once to select a gap, and click that gap again to deselect it.
You can only select one gap at a time. The principal reason to select a gap is to delete it, in the
process rippling the Timeline to close the gap. In the following example, there’s a gap between
two clips on track V1 that you’d like to close.

Selecting a gap on Track V1

To delete a gap:
Press the Delete key to close the gap. All clips to the right of it on tracks with Auto
Select enabled will be rippled to the left to close the gap. Clips on tracks with Auto
Select disabled will not ripple.
If you select a gap in a timeline with clips on multiple tracks, which clips will be deleted
depends on the state of the Auto Select controls for each track in the Timeline.
‚‚ All tracks with Auto Select enabled: The range of media that overlaps the selected
gap will also be deleted. Clips on those tracks will ripple left to fill the gap.
‚‚ All tracks with Auto Select disabled: The range of media that overlaps the selected
gap will be left intact, and clips on those tracks will not ripple left, going out of sync with
whichever clips do ripple.

Part 3 – 17

A gap is defined as a space between any two clips on the same track. Often gaps are desirable
as they allow audio or video clips to be spaced apart from one another very specifically, but
sometimes they’re not. If you want to find accidental gaps in your timeline that may be too small
to see, a pair of commands lets you do this.

347

Editing Basics

Finding, Selecting, and Deleting Gaps in the Timeline

Controlling Audio/Video Linking While Making Selections
While selecting edits and clips, you can also choose whether the video and audio associated
with a clip should be selected together (linked) or not. This determines whether operations
performed to the video of a clip automatically affect the audio of the clip, and vice versa. In
most instances, you’ll probably want to leave Audio/Video Linking turned on, so that selecting
the video of a clip to move it elsewhere in the Timeline also results in the audio being selected
and moved at the same time. Disabling A/V linking in this case could cause your video and
audio to go out of sync undesirably.
However, there are plenty of instances when you’ll want to temporarily suspend this linked A/V
relationship, such as when you want to create a split edit, where a clip’s audio In point is at a
different frame than the video In point. In this case, you can suspend Audio/Video Linking to
select just the audio In point, then roll it either further back or forward to create the split, without
changing the In point of that clip’s video. When you’re finished, you can re-enable A/V linking.
At all times, the state of Audio/Video Linking is visible via the Chain-link button at the right of
the toolbar.

The Audio/Video Linking button

To turn Audio/Video Linking off and on:
Click the Link Audio/Video button (or press Shift-Command-L).
To temporarily suspend Audio/Video Linking while making a selection:
Press the Option key while clicking a clip or edit point to select the video without
selecting the audio, or vice versa.

Dealing with Audio Video Sync Offsets
Audio/Video sync is one of the most important things to maintain in any edited program.
However, there are times when you may want to override the sync relationship of a clip’s audio
and video to make a particular edit, so moving a clip’s audio and video out of sync is allowed.
If you disable Audio/Video Linking and then move the audio or video of a clip independently of
its linked video or audio counterpart, you’ll see red “out-of-sync” indicators at the right of each
clip’s name bar, that displays the timecode offset by which the audio and video of that clip are
out of sync. In the following example, the audio and video of a clip have been moved out of
sync by Option-clicking the video and dragging it to the right.

Sync markers on a clip with audio and video out of sync

Part 3 – 17

DaVinci Resolve gives you complete control over the linked relationship between the video and
audio associated with a clip. By default, DaVinci Resolve tries its best to keep the video and
audio of clips and timelines in sync. However, there are several ways you can suspend
automatic syncing when you need to make a specific kind of edit.

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Audio/Video Linking

‚‚ Move into place: Moves the selected clip so that it’s in sync with the other items that
are linked to that clip.
‚‚ Slip others into place: Slips the content of all other items that are linked to the selected
clip, without moving them, so that all linked items are in sync.
‚‚ Move others into place: Moves all other items that are linked to the selected clip so
that all linked items are in sync.

Commands in the contextual menu of sync tooltips

Manually Unlinking and Relinking Audio and Video
By default, clips that you import into DaVinci Resolve have their video and audio linked
together, which makes it easy to maintain the relationship and sync of the audio and video
components of a clip while you’re editing. However, there are many reasons you might want to
override this automatic relationship, either breaking the a/v linking of a clip’s audio and video
completely, or breaking it and relinking in a different way, or to different clips.
Methods of permanently changing Audio/Video Linking in the Timeline:
‚‚ To unlink audio and video from one another: Select a clip, then right-click it and
choose Link from the contextual menu (or press Option-Command-L). Unlinked clips do
not appear with a dot before the clip name in the Timeline.
‚‚ To link audio and video clips to one another: Command-click an audio clip and a video
clip so they’re both selected, then right-click the selected clips and choose Link from
the contextual menu (or press Option-Command-L). A dot appears before the name of
linked clips in the Timeline.

Left - linked video and audio with a dot to the left of the clip name,
Right - unlinked audio and video items have no dot

Part 3 – 17

‚‚ Slip into place: Slips the content of the selected clip, without moving the clip, so that it’s
in sync with the other items that are linked to that clip.

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Editing Basics

If you’ve moved the audio and video of a clip out of sync with one another, there’s a really easy
way of getting them back into sync, by right-clicking the red out-of-sync indicator of any clip and
choosing one of the available commands:

‚‚ You can link a text generator with a subtitle to the clip it plays along with.
‚‚ You can link a sandwich of overlapping audio sound effects with the video clip they
accompany.
‚‚ You can link off camera audio to an on camera shot.
‚‚ You can link the background and foreground clips of a green screen composite, with
sound from both.
Linking multiple clips in the Timeline works the same as linking a single audio and video clip
together; every single linked item appears with a dot to the left of the clip name, and
suspending linked selection to force any single clip out of sync will result in the display of an
“out-of-sync” indicator.

Multiple audio and video items that have been manually linked
together to act as a single clip in the Timeline when Linked
Selection is enabled

Commands for Slipping Audio/Video Sync
Another set of commands in the Trim > Slip Audio submenu let you slip the contents of one or
more selected clips in order to alter the sync between the audio and video, either in whole
frame increments, or in sub-frame increments if there are clips with marginal sync that you want
to improve.
‚‚ One Frame Forward (Option-Period)
‚‚ One Frame Reverse (Option-Comma)
‚‚ One Subframe Forward (Option-Right Arrow)
‚‚ One Subframe Reverse (Option-Left Arrow)

Part 3 – 17

You don’t just have to link audio and video clips that sync together, though. You can actually link
any number of video and audio clips that you want to be able to select, move, and edit together
as one, even if they were never originally meant to be synced. This makes linking an
organizational mechanism as much as a sync management tool. Here are some examples of
how you can use this:

350

Editing Basics

Linking Multiple Clips in the Timeline

Part 3 – 18

Modifying Clips
in the Timeline

351

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Chapter 18

Modifying Clips in the Timeline
This chapter covers the following topics:

Moving, Resizing, and Rolling Clips in Selection Mode

353

Trimming Gaps

355

Resizing or Trimming Clips in the Source Viewer

355

Shuffle or Swap Edits and Inserts

357

Splitting and Joining Clips

359

Enabling and Disabling Clips and Tracks

360

Copying and Pasting Clips in the Timeline

361

Paste Insert

361

Copying and Pasting Partial Clip Segments Using In and Out Points

361

Copying and Pasting Clips to a Different Track

362

Audio Channels When Copying and Pasting Audio Clips

362

Duplicating Clips and Transitions in the Timeline

363

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Once you’ve edited a variety of clips into the Timeline, you’ll start working with them as you
refine your edit. In this chapter, you’ll learn simple methods of modifying clips, including
resizing, splitting, shuffling, disabling, copying and pasting, and duplicating.

Part 3 – 18

352

The Selection Mode button at left is enabled;
the Trim mode button at right is disabled

This is the default mode when you open DaVinci Resolve, and allows you to move clips to other
places in the Timeline, resize them to make them longer or shorter, and roll the edit points
between two clips to move the edit to an earlier or later position on the Timeline. What this tool
does depends entirely on what you click to select as you work.
Manipulating clips using the mouse:
1

Click the ”Selection Mode” tool (the arrow), or press A.

2

Do one of the following:
To move clips in the Timeline: Drag any clip in the Timeline to any other position. If you
drag a clip to overlap another clip, the clip you’re dragging overwrites the clip you’re
dropping it onto.

Moving a clip in the Timeline to overwrite part of another
clip; a tooltip shows you how many frames you’ve moved

To move clips in the Timeline up or down to other tracks while keeping them at the
same time: Hold the Shift key down while dragging clips up or down in the Timeline.
Or, you can hold the Option key down and press Up or Down Arrow.

Moving a clip into another track without sliding it in time by holding the Shift key down

Part 3 – 18

After editing a series of clips into a timeline, the next thing even the most careful of editors
probably needs to do is to start making changes. The simplest changes are made in Selection
Mode, using the regular arrow pointer.

353

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Moving, Resizing, and Rolling
Clips in Selection Mode

Resizing a clip in the Timeline to create a gap; a tooltip shows the offset, and
outlines show you how much media is available in the clip being adjusted

To roll any edit: Move the Selection Mode pointer over any edit point, and when it turns
into the Roll Edit cursor, drag it to the left or right to move the edit point while
simultaneously resizing the outgoing and incoming edits points of the two clips
surrounding it.

Rolling an edit; a tooltip shows the offset, and an outline
shows the available area you can roll within

Manipulating clips using the keyboard:
1

Press A to choose ”Selection Mode.”

2

Do one of the following:
To roll any edit: Select the closest edit point to the playhead using the V key, moving
the selection to another edit, if necessary, using the Up Arrow and Down Arrow keys,
and then press the Comma key (nudge 1 frame left) or Period key (nudge 1 frame right)
to roll the selected edit to the left or right. Shift-Comma and Shift-Period nudges
by 5 frames.
To shorten or lengthen clips: Select the closest edit point to the playhead using the V
key, then use the U key to toggle the selection among the end of the outgoing clip and
the beginning of the incoming clip. Then, press the Comma key (nudge 1 frame left) or
Period key (nudge 1 frame right) to shorten or lengthen that side of the clip. If you nudge
one end of a clip to overlap another, the clip you’re nudging overwrites the adjacent
clip. Shift-Comma and Shift-Period nudges by 5 frames.
To move clips forward or back in the Timeline: To select a clip in preparation for
moving it, either click it, or move the playhead over it and press Shift-V. Then press the
Comma key (nudge 1 frame left) or Period key (nudge 1 frame right) to move the clip to
the left or right. If you nudge a clip to overlap another clip, the clip you’re nudging
overwrites the adjacent clip. Shift-Comma and Shift-Period nudges by 5 frames.

Part 3 – 18

354

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

To shorten or lengthen clips: Move the Selection Mode pointer over the beginning or
end of a clip, and when it turns into the Resize cursor, drag the In or Out point to the left
or right to change the clip’s length.

355

TIP: When holding down the Shift key while nudging a selection to do a “fast
nudge,” the duration of the nudge is customizable in the Editing panel of the
User Preferences. By default it’s five frames, but you can set it to
whatever you want.

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Trimming Gaps
The start and end of gaps can also be rippled using the Trim tool. For more information, see
“Using Trim Mode and the Trim Tool” later in this chapter.

Using the Trim tool to ripple the out point of a gap to narrow it

Resizing or Trimming Clips
in the Source Viewer
You can also double-click a clip in the Timeline to open it into the Source Viewer for trimming.
When the Selection tool is selected, you can drag the In and Out markers, or use the playhead
and I and O keyboard shortcuts to resize that clip in the Timeline.

Part 3 – 18

To move clips up or down to other tracks: To select a clip in preparation for moving it,
either click it, or move the playhead over it and press Shift-V. Then, press Option-Up
Arrow to move the Video and Audio of that clip to the next higher-numbered track, or
press Option-Down Arrow to move the Video and Audio to the next lowernumbered track.

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Part 3 – 18

356

A Timeline clip being resized by opening it in the Source Viewer and dragging its In point

Additionally, you can open Timeline clips into the Source Viewer for trimming using the Trim
tool, dragging to ripple the In and Out points, and slipping the contents of the clip by holding
the Shift key down and dragging the In and Out points.

NOTE: To open a match frame of a clip in the Timeline using the mouse as in previous
versions of DaVinci Resolve, hold the Option key down while double-clicking a clip.

You have a lot of flexibility in how you shuffle clips around. You can select one clip, or multiple
consecutive clips to shuffle. If you select multiple consecutive clips, they’ll move together as a
single block. You can even select multiple consecutive clips on multiple tracks to shuffle around
the Timeline as a single item.
Furthermore, you can also select clips that are part of split edits, where the audio and video In
and Out points start or end at different frames. In this case, how other clips move in the
Timeline to make room for the Split-edit clip you’re dragging depends on whether you click the
video or audio portion of the clip to start dragging:
‚‚ If you click-and-drag the video portion of the clip, then all clips will rearrange
themselves based on the duration of that video item on that track, so that all video
items on that track rearrange themselves without either overwriting one another or
leaving gaps. As you drag to shuffle the selection through the Timeline, overlapping
linked audio items will either overwrite the audio on neighboring clips, or leave a gap.
‚‚ If you click-and-drag the audio portion of the clip, then all clips will rearrange
themselves based on the duration of that audio item on that track, so that all audio
items on that track rearrange themselves without either overwriting one another or
leaving gaps. As you drag to shuffle the selection through the Timeline, overlapping
linked video items will either overwrite the video on neighboring clips, or leave a gap.
Given the rules previously described, shuffling clips is really easy, and you can do so in one
of two ways.
To shuffle clips with adjacent clips in the Timeline:
Select one or more consecutive clips you want to shuffle, then press and hold the
Command and Shift keys down and drag either the Video or Audio portion of the
selected clips to the left or right. Adjacent clips will automatically switch places with the
selection of clips you’re dragging, until you drop it in the desired location.

Before and after clip L being shuffled with clips I, K, and J in a scene to rearrange the sequence

To shuffle insert one clip into adjacent clips in the Timeline:
Select one or more consecutive clips you want to shuffle, then press and hold the
Command and Option keys down and drag either the Video or Audio portion of the
selected clips to the left or right. The selection of clips you’re dragging will be inserted
in the middle of adjacent clips as you drag, with the cut portion of each clip being
moved into the gap left behind by the clip you’re dragging. Drop the clip into the
desired location when you’re finished.

Part 3 – 18

A Shuffle edit (sometimes referred to as a Swap edit) lets you quickly rearrange selected clips in
the Timeline simply by Command-Shift dragging them to the left or right (or Command-Option
dragging them to do a shuffle insert). When you do so, the surrounding clips automatically move
to the right or left to switch places with the clip or clips that you’re dragging. This is a really fast
way to reorder clips to try out different arrangements, without needing to drag clips onto
multiple tracks to get them out of the way, first.

357

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Shuffle or Swap Edits and Inserts

Before and after clip L being inserted into the middle of Clip K, which is split in half to make way for it

To shuffle multiple clips to another position in the Timeline:
Select all of the clips you want to move to another position of the Timeline, then press
and hold the Command and Shift keys, and drag the clips left or right. Make sure the
item you click to drag is on the same track as the majority of clips you’re rearranging;
the item you click defines which track is used to guide the rearrangement of clips. In
the following example, the video item of Clip C is selected on track V1, so as it’s
dragged to the right, all clips on other tracks are rearranged according to the duration
and location of clips B and C on track V1. As a result, clips on tracks other than V1 may
be overwritten, or leave gaps, as necessary for the items on track V1 to be
rearranged cleanly.

Before and after a group of clips being shuffled to the right. The clip that
was clicked to drag defines how all other clips will be rearranged

IMPORTANT: If you begin Command-Shift-dragging a superimposed clip on a track
with large gaps, the resulting shuffle edit operation will jump all the way to the next
clip on that track. For this reason, shuffle edits work best on tracks containing the
majority of clips in your edit.

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Part 3 – 18

358

Methods of splitting and joining clips:
‚‚ To split a clip once: Drag the playhead to the frame where you want to split a clip, and
press Command-Backslash (\) to split every clip on a track with Auto Select enabled.
‚‚ To split many clips: Click the Razor Edit mode button (or press B), and then click clips in
the Timeline to split as many clips as you want.
‚‚ To split clips using the DaVinci control panel on the Color page: Move the playhead to
the frame you want to split, then press SHIFT UP and SPLIT/UNDO on the T-bar panel.
‚‚ To join clips using the DaVinci control panel on the Color page: Move the playhead to
the edit point you want to join, and press SHIFT UP and JOIN/REDO on the T-bar panel.
Both clips must be from the same media file, and the frames to either side of the edit
point need to be continuous for those clips to be joined.
When you split a clip, a through edit appears to show that you currently have an edit with
continuous timecode running from the outgoing to the incoming half. This is called a Through
Edit, and is displayed with a dotted line running along its edge so you know that it’s special.

A through edit seen in the Timeline

To eliminate a through edit:
Select it in the Timeline, and press Delete.

TIP: You can show an isolated list of every Through Edit in the Timeline by opening the
Edit Index and choosing “Show Through Edits Only” in the Edit Index Option menu.
Clicking any item in the list jumps the playhead to that Through Edit, making it easy to
check all the Through Edits in a timeline to see if they’re necessary or not.

Part 3 – 18

In many situations you may find yourself splitting clips in order to separate multiple clips that
were inadvertently baked together, or to cut up clips into sections that you’re planning on
applying different effects to or grading differently.

359

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Splitting and Joining Clips

A disabled clip on track V2

In another example, you’ve edited a series of titles on track V3, so you need to disable track V3
in its entirety to output a textless version of the movie as a deliverable.
When a clip or track is disabled, clips within it appear dimmed, and these disabled clips don’t
appear in the Color page, and aren’t output to tape or rendered to disk in the Deliver page until
that track is re-enabled first.

Track V3 is disabled, making the Timeline textless as a result

To disable/enable one or more clips in the Timeline:
Select one or more clips, then right-click the selection and check or uncheck Clip
Enable in the contextual menu, or press D to toggle a clip’s enabled state.
To disable/enable an entire track:
Click the track enable button.

Part 3 – 18

As you work in the Timeline, you’ll find there are times when you want to disable clips that you
don’t want to appear during playback, without actually removing them from the edit. For
example, you may decide to disable superimposed clips that are positioned as insert shots in
the middle of a scene because of a client’s notes, but you don’t want to eliminate the clips
because they might change their minds.

360

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Enabling and Disabling Clips and Tracks

Methods of doing simple cut, copy, and paste:
‚‚ To Cut one or more clips, leaving a gap: Make a selection, and choose Edit > Cut
(Command-X). The selected clip or clips are removed from the Timeline and stored in
memory for pasting.
‚‚ To Ripple Cut one or more clips and ripple the Timeline to close the gap: Make a
selection, and choose Edit > Ripple Cut (Command-Shift-X). The selected clip or clips
are removed from the Timeline and stored in memory for pasting. All clips on tracks
with Auto Select enabled will be rippled to the left to fill the gap left by the cut clips.
‚‚ To Copy one or more clips: Make a selection, and choose Edit > Copy (Command-C).
The selected clip or clips are left in the Timeline, but copies are stored in memory
for pasting.
‚‚ To Paste one or more clips to the same track: Move the playhead to the frame where
you want the pasted selection to start, and then choose Edit > Paste (Command-V). By
default, each copied clip is pasted onto the same track it was copied from. Pasted clips
overwrite any clips in that track that are in the way.
‚‚ To Paste one or more clips to a different track: Pasting clips to a different track
requires a slightly different procedure. Move the playhead to the frame where you want
the pasted selection to start, then either Option-click any empty area on the track you
want to paste the clip(s) to or Option-click the Auto Select control of that track to solo
that track, and then choose Edit > Paste (Command-V). Pasted clips overwrite any clips
in that track that are in the way.

Paste Insert
Another paste command, Edit > Paste Insert (Command-Shift-V), lets you paste clips that you cut
or copied via an Insert Edit, so that an edit is added at the position of the playhead to clips that
are already in the Timeline, and all media to the right of the playhead is rippled farther right to
make room for the clip or clips being pasted. As with all other ripple edits, only clips on tracks
with their auto select control turned on are affected.

Copying and Pasting Partial Clip
Segments Using In and Out Points
You can use the Timeline’s In and Out points to cut and copy partial segments of longer clips in
various ways. This is a valuable technique for doing in-depth audio and dialog editing, although
it’s useful for copying partial segments of any kind of clip in the Timeline.
To Cut or Copy part of a clip to Paste elsewhere:
1

Set In and Out points to isolate the part of the clip you want to cut or copy. You can
use the Auto Select controls to include or omit clip segments on specific tracks while
you do this.

Part 3 – 18

Clips can be cut, copied, and pasted in a variety of ways using standard keyboard shortcuts.
You can cut or copy one clip or a selection of several, and you can also choose to copy or cut
just the video or audio media of a clip. When pasting, you can paste to the same timeline, or to
a different timeline if you want to move media from one to another.

361

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Copying and Pasting Clips
in the Timeline

3

Clear the In and Out points by pressing Option-X. Otherwise, you’ll paste the clip
segment right back into the same place it started.

4

Move the playhead to the frame of the Timeline you want the pasted clip to start, and
use the Paste or Paste Insert commands to paste the clip segment there.

You can also use In and Out points to paste only a partial segment of a much longer clip that
you’ve cut or copied.
To Paste only part of a clip:
1

Select a clip, and press Command-X to cut or Command-C to copy that clip.

2

Set In and Out points to identify the region of the Timeline you want to paste into.

3

Use the Paste or Paste Insert commands to paste only as much of the Cut or Copied
clip as will fit between the In and Out points you’ve placed.

Copying and Pasting Clips to a Different Track
If all Auto Select controls on all tracks are turned on, clips are always pasted back to the same
track they were copied from, starting at the position of the playhead. This is valuable for the
many instances where you’ll find yourself copying and pasting clips you want to repeat,
especially when doing audio editing.
However, if you want to paste the clips you cut or copied to a different track entirely, you need
to use the Auto Select controls to specify which track you want to paste to. Here are the rules:
‚‚ You can force paste what you copied to a specific track by Option-clicking that track’s
Auto Select control to solo it before pasting. Another way to do this is to Option-click
any empty area of the track you want to Auto Select solo.
‚‚ When one or more Auto Select controls are disabled, then clips are pasted to the
lowest-numbered track with an enabled Auto Select control.
‚‚ If you’ve copied clips on multiple tracks, clips on the lowest copied track will be pasted
to the lowest Auto Select enabled track, and all other clips will be pasted to higher
tracks, with new tracks automatically created, if necessary.
‚‚ If Auto Select is disabled on every single track, then a new track will be created above
all other video tracks and/or below all other audio tracks, and the clip will be pasted
into this new track, which has Auto Select turned on.

Audio Channels When Copying and Pasting Audio Clips
Copying and pasting audio has one other consideration. If you’re force pasting a clip into a
different track, the track you solo the Auto Select control of could possibly be set to an audio
channel mapping that doesn’t match the clips you’re pasting there. An example of when this
would happen is if you copy stereo audio clips from a stereo track and paste them to a mono
audio track.
DaVinci Resolve allows you to do this, so you have the freedom of pasting audio clips to any
track you want to. However, extra audio channels within clips that exceed the number of
channels supported by the audio track they’re on will be muted. Fortunately, this situation is
easy to rectify. Simply right-click the track header of the problem audio track, and use the
Change Track Type To submenu to change its channel mapping to one more appropriate to the
clips you’ve pasted into it.

362

Part 3 – 18

Press Command-X to cut or Command-C to copy that clip segment.

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

2

Individual selected transitions can also be duplicated by Option-dragging them to another
edit point.

Part 3 – 18

One or more clips can be duplicated by making a selection, and then Option-dragging the
selected clips to another position and/or track in the Timeline. When duplicating clips in this
way, you must hold the Option key down until you release the mouse button.

363

Modifying Clips in the Timeline

Duplicating Clips and
Transitions in the Timeline

Part 3 – 19

Three and Four
Point Editing

364

Three and Four Point Editing

Chapter 19

Three and Four Point Editing
This chapter covers the following topics:

Introduction to Three-Point Editing

366

Choosing a Track to Edit to Using Destination Controls

366

Setting In and Out Points in the Timeline

367

Mark Clip and Mark Current Selection

368

Preview Marks During Three-Point Editing

370

Dragging Preview Marks to Change an Edit

371

The Rules of Three Point Editing

371

Editing Rules for Split In and Out Points

373

Editing a Specific Range of the Source Clip Into the Timeline

373

Editing Part of a Source Clip to Fit Into a Specific Range of the Timeline

374

Backtiming a Source Clip When Editing Into the Timeline

375

Switch Focus to Timeline After Edit

377

Different Types of Three and Four Point Edits

377

Overwrite Edits

377

Insert Edits

378

Replace Edits

379

Fit to Fill

382

Place On Top

383

Ripple Overwrite

384

Append at End

387

Insert Selected Clips to Timeline with Handles

387

Three Point Editing From the Media Pool

388

Example: Assembling Clips Into the Timeline From the Media Pool

388

Three and Four Point Editing

A more controlled form of editing is to use three and four point editing to make a specific range
of source media fit into a specific range of the Timeline. This chapter covers the basics of three
and four point editing, as well as the wide variety of edit commands that are available.

Part 3 – 19

365

Choosing a Track to Edit to Using
Destination Controls
The orange destination controls, found in the Timeline header area, let you specify which video
and audio tracks you want incoming source clips to be edited to when you use editing methods
other then drag and drop. No matter how many video or audio channels may be embedded
within a single clip of media, only one video and one audio destination control is available. In
the case of video, you can only expose one video channel of a clip at a time. In the case of
audio, all audio channels for a given clip are embedded within a single Timeline track, making it
a snap to edit stereo or other multi-channel audio sources together. (For more information
about working with audio, see Chapter 25, “Working with Audio in the Edit Page.”)
Setting the destination control of a track is a vital step in the process of creating an edit, and is
easy to do. You can set the video and audio destination controls to be separate tracks.
To set the destination tracks of incoming source clips, do one of the following:
‚‚ Click the destination control of any unassigned track to enable that track as the
destination.
‚‚ Drag the destination control to any unassigned track in the Timeline.
‚‚ Press Command-Option Up Arrow and Down Arrow to move the Video Destination
control up and down among different video tracks, or press Command-Shift Up Arrow
and Down Arrow to move the Audio Destination control up and down among different
audio tracks.
‚‚ Press Option-1 through 8 to set a video destination, or press Option-Command-1
through 8 to set an audio destination on tracks 1 through 8.

Moving the destination control to
track V2, labeled “Titles”

You can also disable the Video or Audio Destination controls in situations where you want to
edit a source video clip into the Timeline without its audio, or vice versa.

Part 3 – 19

Three-point editing is a standard editorial method that’s shared with many other postproduction
applications, so this procedure should feel familiar. The idea is that you need only set any
combination of three In and Out points in the source clip and Timeline to edit a clip into your
program at a specific time, and DaVinci Resolve automatically figures out the fourth edit point
that’s necessary to execute the edit. Three-point editing is most commonly accomplished using
Overwrite and Insert edits.

366

Three and Four Point Editing

Introduction to Three-Point Editing

A disabled destination control

Setting In and Out Points in the Timeline
When you’re setting up an edit to the Timeline, you can oftentimes get away with simply putting
the Timeline playhead at the frame where you want to edit the incoming source clip. In the
absence of In or Out points, the playhead is used as the In point. However, you can set up
different kinds of edits by setting specific In and Out points to define different ranges of
the Timeline.
Methods of setting and clearing In and Out points in the Timeline:
‚‚ To set an In or Out point: Select the Timeline or Timeline Viewer by clicking or
pressing the Q key, then use the transport controls, jog bar, or control panel buttons
to move the playhead, and press the I key to set an In point, or the O key to set an
Out point.
‚‚ To clear In or Out points: With the Timeline Viewer selected, press Option-I to clear the
current In point, or Option-O to clear the current Out point.
‚‚ To clear both the In and Out points at once: Press Option-X.
‚‚ To jump the playhead to the current In or Out points: Press Shift-I to immediately
move the playhead to the current In point, or Shift-O to move the playhead to the
current Out point.

In and Out points shown in the Timeline, with unmarked areas outside the selection dimmed

367

Part 3 – 19

Click an already assigned destination control to toggle it off and then on again.
Disabled destination controls are highlighted white.

Three and Four Point Editing

To disable or reenable a destination control, do one of the following:

Methods of moving In and Out points in the Timeline:

368

The area of the Timeline outside the region that’s currently defined by In and Out points is
dimmed, to call attention to the portion of the Timeline that will be affected by the next edit
you’ll make.

Mark Clip and Mark Current Selection
These commands are automatic ways of setting In and Out points in the Timeline both at once,
using the timing of other clips. They’re both exceptionally handy for defining the range of an
incoming edit using clips that are already in the Timeline that you want to replace, or gaps in the
Timeline that you want to fill.
In short, Mark Clip uses the first and last frame of a target clip or gap in the Timeline to
automatically set Timeline In and Out points for editing. For example, if there’s a shot in an edit
that you want to replace with a different take of the same action, or there’s a gap in a sequence
of clips that you’d like to quickly fill with b-roll, you can use the Mark Clip command to help
set this up.
Mark Current Selection uses the first and last frames of a range of selected clips to
automatically set Timeline In and Out points for editing. A good example is when you have a
series of clips in the Timeline, all of which you’d like to overwrite with a single incoming source
clip, you can use the Mark Current Selection command.
To use Mark Clip:
1

Move the playhead to intersect either a clip you want to use to set In and Out points, or
a gap (empty area) between two other clips that you want to target. The playhead can
be on any frame of this clip, it doesn’t matter which.

Positioning the playhead at a clip you want to mark

2

If there are other clips on a multi-track timeline that overlap the clip you’re targeting
for this operation, then the clip on the lowest video track will be used as the target
to set the In and Out points. If you want to target a clip on a higher track, then either
disable the Auto Selection controls of all timelines underneath, or Option-Click the Auto
Selection control of the track with the clip you’re targeting to solo it, which will force that
track to be the target of this operation.

3

Press the X key to automatically set In and Out points that match the first and last
frames of the target clip.

Three and Four Point Editing

‚‚ Drag any In or Out point in the Timeline ruler to another position.

Part 3 – 19

‚‚ Press the I or O keys at any time to change the In or Out points.

Using Mark clip to set In and Out points that match a clip’s duration

TIP: To clear both In and Out points, press Option-X, which is the opposite of
this command.

To use Mark Selection:
1

Select one or more clips in the Timeline.

Selecting clips you want to use as a range to mark In and Out points

2

Press Shift-A to automatically set In and Out points that match the first and last frames
of the selection. A range of discontinuous clips will produce the same result as a range
of continuous clips.

Marking a selection to set In and Out points

Three and Four Point Editing

Part 3 – 19

369

For example, if you set In and Out points in the Source Viewer, and an In point in the Timeline,
then a preview marker will appear in the Timeline Ruler to show the implied Out point in the
Timeline of the edit you’re about to make.

A preview marker in the Timeline shows the Timeline Out point being automatically
calculated by DaVinci Resolve based on the In and Out points that are set in the Viewer,
and the In point in the Timeline

On the other hand, if you set both In and Out points in the Timeline, and only an Out point in the
Source Viewer, a preview marker appears in the jog bar of the Source Viewer to show you the
implied In point, in the Source Viewer, of the edit you’re about to make.

A preview marker in the Source Viewer shows the Source Viewer In point being
automatically calculated by DaVinci Resolve based on the In and Out points that are set in
the Timeline, and the In point in the Source Viewer

Part 3 – 19

In order to help you see what will happen whenever you execute a three-point edit, preview
marks appear in either the Source Viewer or the Timeline Ruler to let you know the exact
duration of the Timeline that’s about to be affected by the edit you’re preparing to make. To
prevent them from being a distraction, preview marks only appear once you’ve explicitly
marked three edit points in the Source Viewer and Timeline, and they can be turned on and off
by choosing View > Show Preview Marks.

370

Three and Four Point Editing

Preview Marks During Three-Point Editing

You can drag preview marks to alter the edit you’re about to make. When you drag a preview
mark, the corresponding In or Out point that’s opposite the Viewer with focus is altered to
accommodate the new three point edit you’re setting up. For example, if you have an In point in
the Source Viewer, and In and Out points set in the Timeline, a preview mark appears in the
Source Viewer to show the Out point that will be used to edit the clip in the Source Viewer into
the Timeline. However, you can drag this preview mark to the left in the Source Viewer, and the
result will be that the Out point in the Timeline will move along with it, since you’re
retiming the edit.

Dragging a preview mark in the Source Viewer changes
the opposite edit point in the Timeline

The Rules of Three Point Editing
In the previous examples, three point editing was being used by virtue of source In and Out
points being set to define a range of the source clip to be edited into the Timeline, and the
Timeline playhead being used as the acting Timeline In point; three points defined the edit to
be made. However, three point editing is also very useful when you need to overwrite sections
of a previously edited timeline with new source clips in a controlled manner, such as when
adding an insert shot to a scene to cover a particular change you’re making that would
break continuity.

Part 3 – 19

Dragging Preview Marks to Change an Edit

371

Three and Four Point Editing

If you like, you can move the playhead to the position of the preview mark by using Shift-I if the
preview mark is an In point, or Shift-O if the preview marker is an Out point.

‚‚ If there is no Out point in the source clip: The last frame of media will used as the
acting source Out point. This can be seen by the thick bar that extends to the right of
the In point in the Source Viewer’s jog bar.

A thick bar indicates which part of the source clip
will be used in the absence of a Source Out point

‚‚ If there are no In or Out points in the Timeline: The playhead will be used as the
acting Timeline In point.
‚‚ If you set a Timeline In point but no Timeline Out point: The whole range from the In
to Out points of the source clip is edited into the Timeline such that the Source In point
is aligned with the Timeline In point. This can be seen by the thick bar that extends to
the right of the In point in the Timeline Ruler.

A thick bar indicates where the Source clip will be
edited in the absence of a Timeline Out point

‚‚ If you set a Timeline Out point but no Timeline In point: The incoming source clip
will be backtimed so the Out point of the source clip is aligned with the Timeline Out
point. This can be seen by the thick bar that extends to the left of the Out point in the
Timeline Ruler.

A thick bar indicates a backtimed edit in the absence of a Timeline In point

Part 3 – 19

‚‚ If there is no In point in the source clip: The first frame of media will be used as the
acting source In point. This can be seen by the thick bar that extends to the left of the
Out point in the Source Viewer’s jog bar.

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Depending on the combination of Source and Timeline In and Out points you set, the following
rules govern three-point editing:

TIP: If you want to use all four Source and Timeline edit points to retime a
source clip to fit into a specific range of the Timeline, use a Fit-to-Fill edit
instead of an Overwrite edit.

Editing Rules for Split In and Out Points
If you’ve created split In and Out points in the Source Viewer or Timeline, the following
rules apply:
‚‚ If the Source Viewer has split In and Out Points: The leftmost split point of the
incoming clip, whether video or audio, will be aligned with the playhead when the clip is
edited; the other split point will be offset to the right.
‚‚ If the Timeline has split In and Out Points: The In point of the incoming clip will be
aligned with the left-most split point, whether video or audio; the accompanying audio
or video In point will be offset to the split point to the right.

Editing a Specific Range of the
Source Clip Into the Timeline
This section provides some common examples of three-point editing when performing edits in
the middle of a previously edited timeline. In the following example, you have a specific range
of source media that you need to edit into the Timeline, and you don’t particularly care what
gets overwritten in the Timeline by the incoming clip.
1

Set In and Out points in a source clip, either in the Media Pool or in the Source Viewer.

Setting source clip In and Out points

2

To set where you want the incoming clip to go, set the destination control to the tracks
you want to edit onto, and then do one of the following:
‚‚ Move the Timeline playhead to the frame you want to use as the Timeline In point
for the edit.
‚‚ Set a Timeline In point for the edit.

Part 3 – 19

‚‚ If you set all four Source In and Out and Timeline In and Out edit points: The Timeline
edit points dictate the duration of source clip that is edited into the Timeline, and the
frame at the Source In point is aligned with the Timeline In point, unless you perform a
Fit to Fill or Ripple Overwrite edit, both of which can be done as four point edits.

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Three and Four Point Editing

‚‚ If you set Timeline In and Out points but only a Source Out point: In this case, the
incoming source clip will also be backtimed so the Out point of the source clip is
aligned with the Timeline Out point, with the Timeline edit points defining the duration
of the source clip being edited.

Setting a Timeline In point

3

To make the edit, click the Overwrite Clip button in the toolbar, press the F10 key, or
drag a clip onto the appropriate overlay in the Timeline Viewer.

The resulting edit; the duration of the source clip defines the duration of the edit

Editing Part of a Source Clip to Fit Into a
Specific Range of the Timeline
In this example, you have a section of a clip or a gap in the edited sequence of clips in the
Timeline that you want to fill with as much of the current source clip as it will take to “plug
the hole.”
1

Set an In point in the source clip, if necessary, to define the first frame of the range of
source media that you want to edit into the Timeline.

Setting a source clip In point only

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374

Set In and Out points in the Timeline to set both where you want the incoming clip to
go, and how much of the incoming clip you want to use.

375

Setting both In and Out points of the Timeline for a gap

3

To make the edit, click the Overwrite Clip button in the toolbar, press the F10 key, or
drag a clip onto the appropriate overlay in the Timeline Viewer.

The resulting edit; the duration of the Timeline edit points
define how much of the source clip is edited

Backtiming a Source Clip When Editing Into the Timeline
In this last example, you’ve got a specific moment in the second half of a source clip that you
need to align with an Out point in the Timeline, such that the remaining duration of the incoming
clip overwrites the edited sequence of clips from the right to the left. This is referred to as
backtiming, when you’re lining up a Source Out point with a Timeline Out point in order to make
an edit, and can be set up one of two ways.
Backtiming method one:
1

Set In and Out points in the source clip, either in the Media Pool or in the
Source Viewer.

2

Set an Out point in the Timeline, at the frame where you want the corresponding
Out point of the incoming source clip to be aligned.

Three and Four Point Editing

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2

Setting up a backtimed match-on-action edit via In and Out points
in the Source Viewer, and only an Out point in the Timeline

3

To make the edit, click the Overwrite Clip button in the toolbar, press the F10 key, or
drag a clip onto the overwrite overlay in the Timeline Viewer.

The resulting edit, aligning the Out point of the source clip with the Out point of the Timeline

Backtiming method two:
1

Set an Out point in the source clip, either in the Media Pool or in the Source Viewer.

2

Set In and Out points in the Timeline to set both where you want the incoming clip to
go, and how much of the incoming clip you want to use.

Setting up a backtimed edit by setting an Out point in the Source Viewer,
and In and Out points in the Timeline to define the duration of the edit

To make the edit, click the Overwrite Clip button in the toolbar, press the F10 key, or
drag a clip onto the appropriate overlay in the Timeline Viewer.

The resulting edit, aligning the Out point of the source clip with the Out point of the Timeline

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For example, if you’re assembling clips from many different source files into the Timeline, and
trimming the results as you go, leaving this option on may save you time. In this case, after
every edit, the focus switches from the Source Viewer to the Timeline, so you can quickly select
the clip or edit point you want to trim and make your adjustments before loading the next clip
into the Source Viewer in preparation for the next edit.
On the other hand, if you’re editing several pieces from a long interview clip into the Timeline,
you may want to turn this setting off to make it easy to continue playing forward in the Source
Viewer, setting In and Out points and editing clips into the Timeline as you go. After every edit,
focus remains on the Source Viewer, so you can continue making edits from the same source
clip without interruption.

Different Types of Three
and Four Point Edits
This section covers the different types of edits that are available for cutting source clips into the
currently open Timeline.

Overwrite Edits
The most common type of edit you’ll make, an overwrite edit eliminates whatever media was in
the Timeline previously with the incoming source clip taking the place of whatever was there.
Overwrite edits are commonly used when initially assembling clips, or doing three-point editing.
Overwrite edits do not ripple the Timeline.
To overwrite one or more clips in the Timeline:
1

Move the playhead to the frame of the Timeline where you want to insert a clip.

2

Click the appropriate audio and video destination controls of the tracks you want to edit
the incoming source clip onto. If necessary, create new tracks.

3

Select a single clip in the Media Pool to open it into the Source Viewer, then set In and
Out points to define the range of media you want to insert.

4

To make the edit, choose Edit > Overwrite, click the Overwrite Clip button in the toolbar,
press the F10 key, or drag a clip onto the Overwrite overlay in the Timeline Viewer.

Part 3 – 19

A setting in the Edit menu, “Switch focus to timeline after edit,” lets you set whether or not
DaVinci Resolve changes the application focus from the Source Viewer to the Timeline Viewer/
Timeline every time you make an edit. This setting is on by default.

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Switch Focus to Timeline After Edit

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378

Before and after an overwrite edit, the Timeline duration stays the same

The selected clips in the Media Pool are overwrite edited to the selected track starting
at the position of the playhead, eliminating whatever was there originally while adding
incoming clip. No other clips are rippled during this operation.

Insert Edits
An insert edit splits whatever media is already in the Timeline at the position of the playhead,
and pushes that media to the right to make room for the incoming clip.
Insert edits have the effect of rippling almost all clips in the Timeline that are to the right of the
Insert Edit point you’re making, pushing them further to the right by the duration of the incoming
source clip. However, clips in any tracks of the Timeline that overlap to the left of the Insert Edit
point aren’t rippled, and remain in place.
For example, if you’re insert editing a clip into the middle of a sequence of clips in track V1 and
A1 of the Timeline, and there’s also a clip of music edited into track A2 that overlaps well to the
left of the insert edit point, the music clip remains where it is, but the other clips on track V1 and
A1 that are to the right of your edit point on are pushed to the right.
To insert edit one or more clips into the Timeline:
1

Move the playhead to the frame of the Timeline where you want to insert a clip.

2

Click the appropriate audio and video destination controls of the tracks you want to edit
the incoming source clip onto. If necessary, create new tracks.

3

If necessary, set In and Out points in the clip or clips you want to insert edit into the
Timeline using the controls of the Media Pool or the Source Viewer.

4

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Select one or more clips in the Media Pool, right-click one of the selected clips, and
choose “Insert Selected Clips to Timeline.”
‚‚ Choose Edit > Insert, click the Insert Edit button in the toolbar, press the F9 key, or
drag any clip onto the Insert overlay in the Timeline Viewer.

Part 3 – 19

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Three and Four Point Editing

The selected clips are insert edited to the selected track at the position of the
playhead, pushing all other media in the destination track back by the total duration of
the selected clips, except for clips on other tracks that overlap to the left of the edit
point (as seen by the overlapping music clip in the example below).

Before and after an overwrite edit, the Timeline gets longer as nonoverlapping clips to the left of the edit point are rippled to the right

Replace Edits
Replace edits are a unique three-point edit type that aligns the frame at the Source Viewer
playhead with the frame at the Timeline playhead when the edit is executed. This is the fastest edit
type to use when you need to align an action at a specific frame of video, or a sound at a specific
frame of audio, to a particular frame’s action or sound in the video or audio of the Timeline.
The fastest way of using the Replace Edit is to not bother setting either In or Out points in the
Source Viewer, and to either use the duration of an existing clip intersecting the Timeline to
define the edit, or a pair of timeline In/Out points specifying either a section of a clip you want
to overwrite, or an empty section of the Timeline to which you want to edit.
Replace edits do not ripple the Timeline.

Replace Edits to Replace Existing Clips in the Timeline
A replace edit automatically replaces an existing clip in the Timeline with a clip in the Source
Viewer, so long as that clip overlaps the playhead and is on a track with its destination control
enabled. When you make a Replace edit in this way, DaVinci Resolve automatically uses the
duration of the Timeline clip to define the duration of the incoming media, and the positions of
the Viewer and Timeline playheads to line up how the incoming media should be placed. This is
an extremely fast edit to make, since you needn’t use any In or Out points at all.
To replace a clip in the Timeline:
1

Move the playhead in the Timeline to the clip that you want to replace, and align it with
a frame that you want to line up with a frame in the clip you’ll be replace editing into
the Timeline.

2

Click the appropriate audio and video destination controls of the track containing the
clip you want to replace.

3

Open a clip into the Source Viewer.

In the example shown below, the original clip that was shot on location of a car driving
past a slab of real concrete (shown in the Timeline Viewer at right) is going to be replaced
by a VFX shot of a concrete wall with a small hole for the car to drive through (shown in
the Source Viewer at left). The playhead in the Source Viewer is aligned on the very
same frame as the playhead in the Timeline Viewer, which can be seen by the identical
position of the white stripe on the road in the lower right-hand corner of the picture.

In the Source Viewer to the Left is a VFX clip we want to edit into the Timeline to
replace the existing Timeline clip, shown in the Timeline Viewer at Right

5

Now that the playheads are aligned on the frames that must match one another in
both the Source and Timeline Viewers, choose Edit > Replace, click the Replace
Clip button in the toolbar, press F11, or drag any clip onto the Replace overlay in the
Timeline Viewer.

The resulting replace edit, in which the original timeline clip is replaced by the
incoming Source Viewer clip by aligning the frames at each playhead

The camera original clip in the Timeline is now replaced with the VFX source clip from the
Media Pool, with the source frame at the Source Viewer playhead aligned with the frame at the
Timeline playhead.

Replace Edits to Edit Clips Into Empty Tracks
You can also use a replace edit to edit a clip into an empty track of the Timeline so that the
frame at the position of the Source playhead is aligned with the Timeline playhead, and the In
and Out points of the incoming clip fall where they may. This is useful when you want to “spot” a
particular action of an alternate take or a cue in a sound effect to a specific frame of
the Timeline.

380

Part 3 – 19

Move the playhead in the Source Viewer to the frame that you want to line up with the
frame at the position of the playhead in the Timeline.

Three and Four Point Editing

4

Move the playhead in the Timeline to the clip that contains the moment you want to
align the new incoming audio or video clip with, and position it on the exact frame that
you want to line up with a frame of the clip you’re going to edit into the Timeline.

2

Click the appropriate audio and video destination controls of the empty track you want
to edit the incoming clip into.

3

Open a clip into the Source Viewer.

4

Move the playhead in the Source Viewer to the frame that you want to line up with
the frame at the position of the playhead in the Timeline. This may be the sample
of a sound effect that corresponds to the action in a particular frame of your
program’s video, or a frame of video that corresponds to a particular sound in your
program’s audio.

5

If necessary, set In and Out points in the Timeline to restrict how much of the incoming
clip will be edited. Otherwise, the entire source clip will be edited into the Timeline.

In the Source Viewer to the Left is an SFX clip, shown in the Timeline
Viewer at Right

6

Now that the playheads are aligned on the frames that must match one another in
both the Source and Timeline Viewers, choose Edit > Replace, click the Replace
Clip button in the toolbar, press F11, or drag any clip onto the Replace overlay in the
Timeline Viewer.

The resulting replace edit, in which the incoming Source Viewer
clip is aligned perfectly with the video

The SFX source clip has now been edited into the specified audio track, with the
source frame at the Source Viewer playhead perfectly aligned with the frame at the
Timeline playhead

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Part 3 – 19

1

Three and Four Point Editing

To use Replace Edit to spot a sound effect or action video clip into the Timeline:

Fit-to-fill edits are especially valuable when you have a source clip in which the action is slightly
slow, and you just want to speed it up by squeezing it into a shorter duration of the Timeline.
They’re also incredibly handy in situations when you have a gap in an edited sequence of clips
to fill with a source clip that’s just not long enough, but in which slightly slower motion won’t be
noticeable.
Fit-to-fill edits do not ripple the Timeline.
To use Fit-to-fill to edit a clip into the Timeline:
1

Do one of the following to define where in the Timeline to edit the incoming clip:

a.	You can set both In and Out points in the Timeline, to define the duration you want to fill
with the incoming source clip as a three point edit.
b.	You can clear the Timeline In and Out points (pressing Option-X), so that you can
instead use the duration of whichever clip or gap intersects the playhead on the track
with the destination controls assigned to them. In the following screenshot, the clip can
easily be edited to take the place of the gap by positioning the playhead anywhere
within it.

Setting timeline In and Out points to mark a gap

2

Next, you’ll need to set both In and Out points in the Source Viewer to define a longer
or shorter source clip that you want to fill into the available space. In this example, we
have a very short section of the source clip defined that, because of the matching
action in the Timeline, must be fit into the larger gap seen above.

Setting In and Out points in a source clip to define a shorter
duration segment that you want to completely fill the gap

3

Click the audio and video destination controls of the tracks you want to edit the
incoming source clip onto. If necessary, create new tracks.

4

Choose Edit > Fit to Fill, drag any clip onto the Fit-to-Fill overlay in the Timeline Viewer,
or press Shift-F11.

Part 3 – 19

Fit-to-fill edits are the only edit type that actually use all four edit points, and it’s the only edit
type that retimes clips at the same time as they’re being edited. By setting In and Out points in
the incoming source clip, and another pair of In and Out points in the Timeline, you can stretch
or compress the timing of the specified range of source media to cover the entire specified
range of the Timeline. In the process, the speed ratio of the clip changes so the clip plays in
either fast or slow motion.

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Three and Four Point Editing

Fit to Fill

The resulting edit; the shorter source clip is retimed to fit into the longer timeline gap

The incoming source clip is retimed, as necessary, to fit into the specified duration of
the Timeline. This can be seen by the retiming badge that appears within the clip that’s
just been edited into the Timeline.

Place On Top
Place-on-top edits automatically superimpose clips onto the first empty track above (for video
clips) or below (for audio clips) any other clips in the Timeline that either intersect the playhead
or fall in between the currently set Timeline In and Out points, regardless of the current track
specified by the destination controls. It’s designed to make it easy to superimpose titles and
other clips you want to composite over another clip, or to add additional versions of clips such
as VFX on top of previous versions that you want to preserve.
Place-on-top edits create new timeline tracks if necessary, and do not ripple the Timeline.
To use Place-on-top to edit a clip into the Timeline:
1

To choose where in the Timeline the clip will be “placed on top,” do one of the following:
‚‚ Move the playhead to intersect the clip you want to edit the incoming source clip
on top of.
‚‚ Set In and Out points in the Timeline to define the duration within which you want to
place the incoming source on top.

2

Set In and Out points in a source clip that you want to edit.

3

Choose Edit > Place on Top, drag any clip onto the Place-on-Top overlay in the Timeline
Viewer, or press F12.

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383

Before and after using Place on top, the incoming text generator is
superimposed to a track above the clip at the position of the playhead

Incoming video clips will be edited to the topmost video track so they are above any
previously existing video in the Timeline. Incoming audio clips are edited to the
bottom-most audio track so they are below any previously existing audio. If necessary,
new video and/or audio tracks will be created automatically to hold the new
incoming clip.

Ripple Overwrite
Ripple Overwrite is a four-point edit that’s useful when you can identify a segment of the
Timeline you want to overwrite, but the incoming clip is of a different duration and you want
DaVinci Resolve to automatically ripple the Timeline to accommodate the difference.
You can use the Ripple Overwrite command one of two different ways:
‚‚ You can overwrite an entire clip in the Timeline with a another clip of different length.
‚‚ You can overwrite a section of the Timeline marked with In and Out points with a
another clip of different length.
In both cases, all clips to the right of the clip or timeline section being overwritten are rippled to
the right or left to make room or fill the gap. Because of this, the Ripple Overwrite edit will most
likely change the overall duration of your edited sequence of clips.

Using Ripple Overwrite on an Entire Clip in the Timeline
Using Ripple Overwrite as an automatic four-point edit, you can overwrite whichever clip in the
Timeline intersects the playhead on the tracks defined by the destination controls, in its
entirety, with the incoming clip. For this to work, there must be no In or Out points set in
the Timeline.
After performing a Ripple Overwrite in this way, the original timeline clip is eliminated and the
incoming clip takes its place, and all clips to the right of the clip being replaced are either (a)
rippled to the right if the incoming clip is longer than the original timeline clip, or (b) rippled to
the left if the incoming clip is shorter than the original timeline clip. All of this is done in a
single step.
This is useful in situations where you want to quickly switch one clip in the Timeline with another
of unequal duration and have the Timeline automatically make room to allow this all in one step.
To use Ripple Overwrite to replace an entire clip in the Timeline with another source clip:
1

Move the playhead in the Timeline to intersect the clip that you want to replace; the
playhead’s exact position is not important.

2

Click the appropriate audio and video destination controls of the track containing the
clip you want to replace, and press Option-X to eliminate any In and Out points there
might be in the Timeline.

Three and Four Point Editing

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384

4

To execute the edit, choose Edit > Ripple Overwrite, drag the clip to the Ripple
Overwrite overlay of the Timeline Viewer, or press Shift-F10.

385

Part 3 – 19

Open a clip into the Source Viewer, and set In and/or Out points as necessary to define
how much of the clip you want to edit into the Timeline.

Three and Four Point Editing

3

Before and after of using Ripple Overwrite with no Timeline In or Out points; Clip K at the
position of the playhead is replaced in its entirety by the short segment of Clip U from the
Source Viewer; all clips with In points to the right are rippled to the left to fill the gap

Using Ripple Overwrite on a Section of the Timeline Defined by In/Out Points
You can also use Ripple Overwrite as an explicit four-point edit, to overwrite a section of the
Timeline that’s marked with In and Out points with an incoming clip that’s also marked with In
and Out points that is of unequal duration.
After performing a Ripple Overwrite in this way, the section of the Timeline marked with In and
Out points is eliminated and the incoming clip takes its place, and all clips to the right of the clip
being replaced are either (a) rippled to the right if the incoming clip is longer then the original
timeline clip, or (b) rippled to the left if the incoming clip is shorter then the original timeline clip.
All of this is done in a single step.
A good example of when this can be useful is when you’re cutting a close-up of an actor
performing a particular action into a medium shot of the actor performing the same action that’s
already in the Timeline, and the action you’re matching is of different durations in each of the shots.
To use Ripple Overwrite to replace a section of the Timeline with another source clip:
1

Set In and Out points in the Timeline to mark what part of the clip or clips you want
to overwrite. You must set both In and Out points for this to work as expected. In this
example, the part of the clip where the woman leans forward is marked.

Setting In and Out points to identify an action in the Timeline that you want
to overwrite with another clip that has a matching action

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Part 3 – 19

Open a clip into the Source Viewer, and set In and/or Out points as necessary to define
how much of the clip you want to edit into the Timeline. In this example, a section of the
woman’s close up where she leans forward in a way that matches the same movement in
the wider shot is marked.

Three and Four Point Editing

2

Setting In and Out points to identify an action in a source clip that you want to
overwrite the action you’ve marked in the Timeline. It’s a matching action, but
the timing might be different, and that’s okay with this kind of edit.

3

To execute the edit, choose Edit > Ripple Overwrite, drag the clip to the Ripple
Overwrite overlay of the Timeline Viewer, or press Shift-F10. As a result, the section of
the timeline that was marked in step 1 is overwritten by the section of the source clip
marked in step 2, and all clips to the right of this edit in the Timeline are rippled to the
right to make room for the much longer source clip. The final result is an edit where the
movements match nicely.

After the Ripple Overwrite, the part of the Timeline clip marked with In and Out points
has been overwritten by the part of the Source clip marked with In and Out points, and
all clips to the right of this edit in the Timeline are rippled left or right as necessary

To use Append at End to edit a clip into the Timeline:
1

Set In and Out points in a source clip that you want to add to the end of the current
Timeline. If necessary, change the sort order of the Media Pool to put these clips into
the order in which you want them to be added to the Timeline.

2

Click the audio and video destination controls of the tracks you want to edit the
incoming source clip onto. If necessary, create new tracks.

3

Choose Edit > Append to End Of Timeline, drag the clip to the Append At End overlay
of the Timeline Viewer, or press Shift-F12.
Incoming video clips are added after the very end of the last clip in the Timeline.

Insert Selected Clips to Timeline with Handles
“Insert Selected Clips to Timeline With Handles” is a command that’s available from the Media
Pool contextual menu for editing one or more selected clips to the currently open timeline, such
that the default handles length is subtracted from the beginning and end of each clip. The goal
is to make it easy to string together a series of clips that you want to connect using transitions
by automatically changing the In and Out points of each clip being edited into the Timeline in
order to add handles.
To use Insert Selected Clips to Timeline with
Handles to edit one or more clips into the Timeline:
1

Select one or more clips in the Media Pool that you want to add to the Timeline. If
necessary, change the sort order of the Media Pool to put these clips into the order in
which you want them to be added to the Timeline.

2

Click the audio and video destination controls of the tracks you want to edit the
incoming source clip onto, and position the playhead where you want the incoming
clips to start. If necessary, create new tracks.

3

Right-click one of the selected clips in the Media Pool and choose “Insert selected clips
to timeline with handles” from the contextual menu.
The selected clips are added to the Timeline starting at the position of the playhead.

To change the length of handles that are removed, open the Editing panel of the User
Preferences and change the “Default handles length” setting. Handles will not be added in
either of the following two cases:
‚‚ If any of the selected clips in the Media Pool already have handles because of In and
Out points that you’ve set, then additional handles won’t be added.
‚‚ If the duration of the frames to be removed to create handles in this operation is greater
than the duration of one or more of the clips you’ve selected in the Media Pool, then
handles won’t be added at all.

Part 3 – 19

Append at End always puts the edited clip at the very end of the current Timeline. It’s a very
useful edit type when you’re quickly stringing together a series of clips.

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Three and Four Point Editing

Append at End

Example: Assembling Clips Into the
Timeline From the Media Pool
If you want, you can also edit clips directly into the Timeline from the Media Pool using a variety
of commands. This can be a fast way of appending clips to the end of the Timeline (although
you can also perform Insert edits this way).
To edit one or more clips from the Media Pool to the Timeline:
1

If necessary, set In and Out points for each of the clips you want to edit into the
Timeline using either the Media pool thumbnails (in Thumbnail view), the Media Pool
Filmstrip Viewer (in List view), or by opening each one into the Source Viewer. For each
method, press I to set an In point, and O to set an Out point.

2

Change the sort order of the Media Pool’s browser area to put the clips into the order
in which you want them to appear. In Thumbnail view you can use the Sort Order
menu, but in List view you can click the header of any metadata column to sort by that
column’s data.

3

Position the playhead to where you want to edit the clips.

4

Click, drag, use the Command-Option and Command-Shift Up and Down Arrow Key
shortcuts, or use the Option-1–8 and Command-Option-1–8 key shortcuts to assign the
video and audio destination controls to the tracks you want to edit the video and audio
of the incoming clip(s) to. Click any destination control itself to disable it if you want to
edit clips into the Timeline as audio or video only.

5

Select one or more clips you want to edit. Insert, Overwrite, Place On Top, Ripple
Overwrite, and Append At End edits are all capable of editing multiple clips at once,
while Replace and Fit to Fill edits can only edit one clip at a time, and will only edit the
first of multiple selected clips into the Timeline.

6

To perform the edit, do one of the following:
‚‚ Drag the selected clips to the Timeline Viewer and drop them on an editing overlay
to execute that edit type.
‚‚ Right-click one or more selected clips in the Media Pool, and choose “Insert Selected
Clips to Timeline,” or “Append Selected Clips to Timeline.”
The selected clip(s) are edited into the Timeline.

Part 3 – 19

You can also execute three point edits directly from the Media Pool, with no need to use the
Source Viewer.

388

Three and Four Point Editing

Three Point Editing From the Media Pool

Part 3 – 20

Marking and
Finding Clips in
the Timeline

389

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Chapter 20

This chapter covers the following topics:

Using Flags

391

Using Markers

391

Adding Markers to Clips

391

Adding Markers to Timelines

393

Saving In and Out Point Ranges As Markers with Duration

393

Editing Marker Information

394

Reading Marker Information

396

Using Markers for Navigation

397

Exposing Markers in Lists

397

Editing With Markers in the Media Pool

398

Color Labeling Clips in the Timeline

399

Finding Clips, Media, Markers, Gaps, and Timelines

400

Finding Clips in the Timeline

400

Finding Offline Clips in the Timeline

400

Finding Edit Index Events Using Clips in the Timeline

400

Finding Clips in the Media Pool

400

Finding Clips Using Markers or Flags

401

Finding Gaps

401

Finding the Currently Open Timeline in the Media Pool

401

Finding Media Using Match Frame Operations

402

Matching From the Timeline

402

Matching From a Source Clip

403

Finding a Clip in the Media Pool Using a Timeline Clip

404

Using a Clip in the Source Viewer to Find a Media Pool Clip

404

Using a Clip in the Timeline to Find a Media Pool Clip

404

Part 3 – 20

As you work on your project, you’ll find it useful to identify important information about each
clip, and about significant moments in each timeline, using a combination of Flags, Markers, and
clip Label colors. These can be applied to source clips in the Media Pool, or to clips that have
already been edited into timelines. In the case of markers, these can also be added to the
Timeline ruler itself to help you keep track of important moments or notes, and to help you with
snapping. You’ll also find yourself modifying clips in different ways, unlinking and relinking the
audio and video of different clips, enabling and disabling clips in the timeline.

390

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

The Flag and Marker buttons and pop-ups.

You can apply multiple flags to clips, with a variety of colors to choose from. In addition to
flagging specific media files, flags can be useful for timeline filtering in the Color page, sorting
by column in the Media Pool, and a variety of other operations.
Methods for flagging clips:
‚‚ To flag a clip: Select one or more clips, and either click the Flag button to flag that
clip with the current color, or click the Flag pop-up in the toolbar to choose a different
color and then click the Flag button. In the Edit page, flags appear in the Timeline
superimposed in the name bar of each clip.
‚‚ To remove all flags from a clip: Select one or more clips with flags you want to remove,
then click the Flag pop-up in the toolbar, and choose the top “Clear All” option.
‚‚ To filter all flagged clips in the Edit Index: Click the Option menu of the Edit Index
and choose Show Flags. Each flagged clip appears in a list, with a column showing the
color(s) of the flags applied to each entry in the list.

Using Markers
Markers are used to call attention to a particular frame within a specific clip. Markers can be
individually colored, and can have customized name and note text. Whenever you enter text
into a marker, that marker displays a small dot that indicates there’s more information inside of it.
Once placed, markers snap to In and Out points, edit points, the playhead, and other markers
whenever snapping is enabled, making it easy to use markers to “measure” edits and trims that
you make in the Timeline.

Adding Markers to Clips
You can place markers on the jog bar of source clips in the Source Viewer (or in the Media page
Viewer), and on clips that are selected within a timeline.

(Top) Markers placed on a source clip, (Bottom) Markers placed on a clip in the Timeline

Part 3 – 20

Flags are meant to mark an entire clip, and they also flag every other clip in the Timeline that
shares the same Media Pool source clip, making this a handy way of quickly identifying which
clips in a given timeline come from the same Media Pool source.

391

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Using Flags

Markers can be viewed as separate clips identified by marker
name when the Media Pool is set to List view

The following procedures describe how to add markers to clips and timelines in
DaVinci Resolve.
To mark a source clip in the Source Viewer or Media Page Viewer, do one of the following:
‚‚ To place a marker without doing anything else, move the playhead to the frame you
want to mark, and then press M.
‚‚ To place a marker and immediately open the marker dialog to enter a name or note
within it during playback, press Command-M. Playback pauses until you enter the text
you want to and close the marker dialog again, at which point playback continues.
‚‚ Move the playhead to the frame you want to mark, then right-click in the jog bar and
choose a marker color from the Add Marker submenu of the contextual menu.
To mark a clip in the Timeline, do one of the following:
‚‚ Select one or more clips you want to mark, then move the playhead to the frame of a
selected clip in the Timeline, and click the Marker button in the toolbar (or press M) to
place a marker at that frame, using the current color (if multiple overlapping clips are
selected, you’ll add a marker to all clips).
‚‚ To place a marker during playback and immediately open the marker dialog to enter
a name or note within it, select one or more clips you want to mark, play through the
selection until you want to place a mark, then press Command-M. Playback pauses
until you enter some text and close the marker dialog again, at which point playback
continues.
‚‚ Select one or more clips you want to mark, and then click the Marker pop-up to choose
a different color, and click the Marker button.

Markers appear in the Timeline at the top of the title bar of the clip to which they’re applied

Part 3 – 20

392

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

When you add markers to a source clip, those markers also appear in the Media Pool as
hierarchically disclosable items attached to that clip in List view (markers are not visible in
Thumbnail view). More information about using markers in the Media Pool’s List view appears
later in this chapter.

Timeline markers placed for future reference

You should note that all markers placed on clips or in the Timeline also appear within the
Mini-Timeline of the Color page, making it easy to place notes for later reference when grading.

Clip and Timeline markers as seen in the Mini-Timeline of the Color page

Once you’ve added one or more markers placed on clips, snap to clip In and Out points, edit
points, the playhead, and other markers whenever snapping is enabled.
To mark the Timeline itself, make sure all clips are deselected, and do one of the following:
‚‚ Click the Marker button (or press M) to place a marker of the currently selected color in
the Timeline ruler.
‚‚ To place a marker during playback and immediately open the marker dialog to
enter a name or note within it, select one or more clips you want to mark, then press
Command-M. Playback pauses until you enter some text and close the marker dialog
again, at which point playback continues.
‚‚ Click the Marker pop-up to choose a different color, and click the Marker button.
‚‚ Right-click in the Timeline ruler and choose a marker color from the Add Marker
submenu of the contextual menu.

Saving In and Out Point Ranges As Markers with Duration
You can also create markers with duration to keep track of any region of a clip or timeline that
you’ve defined with In and Out points. This lets you identify multiple regions of a clip that you
might later want to edit into a program.
To turn In and Out points into a marker with duration:
1

Set In and Out points in the Source Viewer jog bar to identify a region you want to log
for future reference.

Marking In and Out points in preparation to log
that section of the clip

Part 3 – 20

You can also place markers of any color into the Timeline ruler to denote specific times for
future reference, or add notes about issues you want to keep track of.

393

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Adding Markers to Timelines

2

Do one of the following:

394

A marker with duration is created from the In and Out points

In this way, you can log several regions within a single clip for future use.

A clip with multiple logged sections identified via markers with duration

This an extremely useful logging technique for two reasons. First, markers with duration can be
searched for in the Media Pool using the All Fields, Marker Name, and Marker Notes Filter by
options. Second, they can be filtered with Smart Bins using the Marker Name and Marker Notes
Media Pool Properties options.

Editing Marker Information
Once you’ve added some markers, you may want to edit their contents to make them
more useful.
To open a marker’s edit dialog to alter its properties:
1

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Press Command-M to add a marker during playback and immediately open its
edit dialog.
‚‚ Double-click any marker you want to edit.
‚‚ Move the playhead to the frame containing the marker you want to annotate using
Shift-Up Arrow/Down Arrow and press M.
‚‚ Select a marker anywhere in the Source Viewer or Timeline, and press Shift-M.

2

When the marker dialog opens, you can modify several properties.

The properties found in the Marker Dialog

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

‚‚ A marker with duration appears above the In and Out points. To edit its name or
notes, double-click the marker, press Shift-M, or choose Mark > Modify Marker.

Part 3 – 20

‚‚ Right-click the jog bar and choose Convert In and Out to Duration Marker

‚‚ Time: The frame the marker is positioned at relative to that clip or timeline.

395

‚‚ Notes: A field where you can enter any information you want to keep track of.
‚‚ Color: A series of buttons for choosing the color of the marker.
‚‚ Remove Marker: Deletes that marker.
‚‚ Done: Closes the marker edit dialog.
3

When you’re finished, click Done.

Once you add notes to a marker, a small symbol appears on top of that marker to show you it
has information.

A small dot on a marker shows
that it contains notes

To move one or more markers in the Timeline or Source Viewer:
‚‚ Click a marker or Command-click multiple markers you want to move, and drag them
to a new location.
‚‚ Drag a bounding box from the Timeline up into the Timeline ruler to select multiple
markers, and drag them to a new location.
To enable marker rippling:
Choose Timeline > Ripple Timeline Markers. When checked, all markers to the right of a
clip being ripple edited, trimmed, or ripple deleted will ripple to the left along with the
rest of the Timeline. You can turn this behavior off and on at will.
To modify marker duration:
‚‚ Option-drag any marker to the right or left to create a marker with duration.
‚‚ Move the playhead to the frame containing the marker you want to modify and press
M, or double-click the marker you want to edit, then type a number into the duration
field, and click Done.
‚‚ Markers with duration appear as a bar in the Timeline ruler or jog bar of the Source
Viewer. Drag the middle of a marker with duration to move it, or drag the left or right
edge to change its duration.
‚‚ To eliminate a marker’s duration, set its numeric duration to 00:00:00:00 in the
marker dialog, or drag either end so that it merges with the other as a single marker.

A marker with duration in the Timeline

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

‚‚ Name: The name of the marker, defaults to the number of that marker in the order it
was added.

Part 3 – 20

‚‚ Duration: Optional, the length of a marker that’s been assigned a duration.

‚‚ To remove a marker using the keyboard: Move the playhead to the marker you want
to delete, and press Option-M.
‚‚ To remove all markers from a clip: Select one or more clips with markers you want
to remove, then either press the Backspace key, or click the Marker pop-up in the
Toolbar, and choose Clear All.
‚‚ To remove all markers from the Timeline: With all clips deselected, choose Clear
All from the marker pop-up menu in the Toolbar, or right-click the Timeline ruler, and
choose Remove All Markers from the contextual menu.

Reading Marker Information
Once you’ve added a number of markers with custom information, there are two ways of
viewing this information without having to open the marker dialog.
To read marker notes using your pointer:
Double-click a marker to open its marker dialog.
Move the pointer over any marker in the Source Viewer or Timeline to see a tooltip
showing that marker’s information.

Moving the pointer over a marker displays its information in a tooltip

To read marker information in the Source and/or Timeline viewers:
1

Open the Source or Timeline Viewer’s option menu, and turn on Show Marker Overlays.

2

Stop playback, and move the playhead to a marker. That marker’s information is
displayed in the Viewer, superimposed.

Marker information shown in the Source Viewer

396

Part 3 – 20

‚‚ To remove one or more markers using the mouse: Click to select a marker, or
Command-click to select multiple markers, and press the Delete key. You can also
double-click a marker to open its dialog, and click the Delete button.

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Methods of deleting markers:

To move the playhead to the next or previous marker:
‚‚ Press Shift-Up Arrow to move the playhead to the next marker to the left in
the Timeline.
‚‚ Press Shift-Down Arrow to move the playhead to the next marker to the right in
the Timeline.
To move the playhead to a specific marker using the Source or Timeline Viewer’s Marker list:
For a source clip or timeline with multiple markers, you can move the playhead
immediately to a specific marker by opening the Source or Timeline Viewer’s Option
menu, and choosing a marker from the Markers submenu, which exposes all the
markers that are available in that Viewer, by name and note.

All markers in the currently open clip as seen in the Source Viewer Option menu Markers list

Exposing Markers in Lists
You can also use the Edit Index to filter out a list of markers appearing within the current
Timeline. You can filter all markers at once, in which case columns expose the notes and colors
applied to each marker. You can also filter by a specific marker color if you only want to see one
type of marker.
Methods of working with markers in the Edit Index:
‚‚ To filter all clips with markers in the Edit Index: Click the Option menu of the Edit
Index and choose Show Markers > All or choose a specific color. Each clip with a
matching marker appears in a list, with columns corresponding to the color(s) and notes
of each Timeline and Clip marker.
‚‚ To move the playhead to the position of a marker in the Edit Index: Click that marker’s
entry in the list.
‚‚ To show hidden marker columns: Right-click any column header, and turn on either
Color or Notes to reveal that column. If necessary, columns can be rearranged by
dragging them left or right.
You also have the option to export lists of markers as an EDL, a .txt, or .csv file.

Part 3 – 20

Markers can be used to aid navigation, via two keyboard shortcuts that let you jump the
playhead from marker to marker. When moving the playhead among markers, Clip and Timeline
markers are mixed together.

397

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Using Markers for Navigation

‚‚ To export all filtered markers in the Edit Index as a .txt or .csv file: After you choose
Show Markers in the Edit Index option menu, then right-click that timeline in the Media
Pool, and choose Timelines > Export > Edit Index. Choose a location and export format
from the Export Edit Index dialog, and click Save.

Editing With Markers in the Media Pool
Once you’ve added one or more markers to source clips in the Media Pool, you can use them
for editing in a considerably more direct way than just using them to move the playhead around.
Markers can be exposed in the List view of the Media Pool, and once exposed, they can be
opened into the Source Viewer, and they can be edited into the Media Pool just like any other clip.
To show markers in the Media Pool:
Set the Media Pool to List view, then click the disclosure button to the left of the clip
with markers you want to work with. They appear as a hierarchical list underneath the
clip to which they’re attached.

Markers exposed in the Media Pool in List view

To open a marker in the Media Pool into the Source Viewer:
Double-click any marker to open that clip into the Source Viewer with the playhead at
the position of that marker.
To edit a clip defined by the marker into the Timeline:
Drag any marker into the Timeline. A clip will be edited into the Timeline with the In
point defined as the frame at the marker, and the Out point defined by either (a) the
frame before the next marker in that clip, or (b) the duration of that marker if the duration
is greater than the default 1 frame.

398

Part 3 – 20

‚‚ To export Timeline markers as an EDL: Right-click that timeline in the Media Pool, and
choose Timelines > Export > Timeline Markers to EDL. Choose a location and export
format from the Export Edit Index dialog, and click Save. Each Timeline marker is listed
in the resulting EDL, with any notes included along with a duration, where applicable.

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Exporting lists of markers:

Clip Type

Color

Video Clip

Steel Blue

Audio Clip

Light Green

Generator

Light Purple

Text

Beige

Additionally, you can assign one of sixteen colors to clips that appear in the Timeline. While you
can assign clip colors in a variety of ways, they only appear once a clip has been edited into the
Timeline, as a way to tint clips to identify them at a glance. Each clip can only have a single color
assigned to it. Clip colors are also clip-specific, so assigning a clip color to one clip in the
Timeline has no effect on other clip that share the same source media in the Media Pool.

A timeline with audio clips that have been tinted to identify what they are to the editor

NOTE: Clip colors are distinct from flags, which appear as badges in the Timeline,
Media Pool, and Color page.

To assign a clip color to one or more clips, do one of the following:
‚‚ Use the Media page to assign clip colors to clips in the Media Pool using the Shot &
Scene preset in the Metadata Editor. Clip colors do not appear in the Media Pool. Clip
colors can be removed by clicking the X to the left of the Clip Color buttons in the
Metadata Editor.
‚‚ Right-click one or more selected clips in the Timeline, and choose a color from the
Clip Color submenu of the contextual menu. Clip colors can be removed by choosing
Default Color from this same submenu.

Part 3 – 20

By default, different clips have specific colors that identify each type of clip. Furthermore, clips
with effects applied to them (adjustments in the Inspector, volume level changes, speed
changes, etcetera), appear as a darker shade of their default color to help you identify at a
glance which clips have been modified. The following table lists what these default colors are.

399

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Color Labeling Clips in the Timeline

Finding Clips in the Timeline
DaVinci Resolve makes it easy to find one or more clips in the Timeline that correspond to
specific criteria using the Edit Index.
To find a clip in the Timeline:
1

Open the Edit Index.

2

Click the magnifying glass button to open the search controls.

3

Choose a criteria from the Filter By pop-up menu

4

Type a search term in the Search field at the top right of the Edit Index.
As soon as you start typing, all edit events that don’t match the search criteria are
temporarily hidden. To show all of the clips in the Edit Index again, click the cancel
button at the right of the search field.

5

Click any event in the Edit Index to move the playhead to that clip in the Timeline.

Finding Offline Clips in the Timeline
It’s also easy to use the Edit Index to find all of the offline clips that may be in the Timeline.
To locate offline media in the current Timeline via the Edit Index:
1

Open the Edit Index

2

Click the Option menu of the Edit Index and choose Show Offline Clips Only.
The Edit Index is filtered to only show the offline clips in the currently open Timeline,
and you can click any item on the list to jump the playhead to that particular clip in
the Timeline.

3

Click any event in the Edit Index to move the playhead to that clip in the Timeline.

Finding Edit Index Events Using Clips in the Timeline
You can also locate specific Edit Index events using the Timeline playhead.
To locate a clip in the Edit Index from the Timeline:
Move the Timeline playhead to intersect a clip you want to find in the Edit Index. That
clip’s corresponding event (or events if the playhead intersects multiple clips) are
automatically highlighted in the Edit Index.
To move the playhead to a clip in the Timeline via the Edit Index:
Click any event in the Edit Index to move the Timeline playhead to the In point of
that clip.

Finding Clips in the Media Pool
As you work, there are a variety of methods you can use to find clips in the Media Pool.

Part 3 – 20

DaVinci Resolve has several methods of locating clips, markers, and gaps, to help you
troubleshoot problem timelines, or to find media that you want to edit into a timeline differently.

400

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Finding Clips, Media, Markers,
Gaps, and Timelines

‚‚ To locate a Timeline clip in the Media Pool: Right-click any clip in the Timeline, and
choose Find in Media Pool. That clip appears highlighted in the Media Pool.
‚‚ To locate a Source Viewer clip in the Media Pool: With any clip open in the Source
Viewer, press Option-F.
‚‚ To locate a media file in the Finder from the Media Pool: Right-click any clip in the
Media Pool and choose Reveal in Finder. A Finder window, or its equivalent in Windows
and Linux, opens to the directory with that clip, which appears highlighted.

Finding Clips Using Markers or Flags
If you’re using markers to keep track of notes, issues, or items on your to-do list, there are a few
different ways of finding and moving among them.
Methods of finding Markers or Flags:
‚‚ To find all markers or flags via the Edit Index: Click the Option menu of the Edit Index
and choose Show Markers or Show Flags. Each clip with one or more markers appears
in a list, with columns corresponding to the color(s) and notes of each timeline and
clip marker.
‚‚ To find a specific marker or flag in the Edit Index: Click the magnifying glass button
in the Edit Index, choose Notes in the Filter by pop-up, and type a search term in the
Search field.
‚‚ To move the playhead to the next marker forward or previous: Choose Playback >
Previous Marker (Shift-Up Arrow) or Next Marker (Shift-Down Arrow).

Finding Gaps
Gaps, or spaces between two clips on the Timeline, appear by default as black. Unwanted gaps
may appear as black flashes while your program plays back, and are generally to be avoided.
DaVinci Resolve makes it easy to find gaps in specific tracks of your timeline.
To find gaps in the Timeline:
1

Make sure that the Auto Select control is enabled on any track you want to search for
gaps. Turn Autoselect off on any tracks you don’t want to search for gaps (for example,
title tracks where gaps are to be expected).

2

Do one of the following:
‚‚ Choose Playback > Previous Gap or press Option-Command-; (semicolon)
‚‚ Choose Playback > Next Gap or press Option-Command-‘ (apostrophe)
The playhead will automatically move to the first frame of the next gap in the Timeline.

Finding the Currently Open Timeline in the Media Pool
If you’re not using one of the available methods for organizing timelines separately from clips,
it can be easy to lose track of where your timeline happens to be. To find the currently open
Timeline in the Media Pool, choose Timeline > Find Current Timeline in Media Pool.

401

Part 3 – 20

‚‚ To find a clip in the Media Pool: Open the Media Pool, if necessary, and click the
magnifying glass button to open the search controls. Then choose a criteria from the
Filter By pop-up menu, and type a search term in the Search field. As soon as you start
typing, all clips that don’t match the search criteria are temporarily hidden.

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Methods of finding clips in the Media Pool:

Matching From the Timeline
A classic example of using Match Frame is when you originally edited a video clip into the
Timeline without its corresponding audio, and you later decide you want that audio in the
Timeline after all. An easy fix is to move the playhead in the Timeline to intersect the clip you
need to fix, and use the Match Frame command to automatically load the original source media
for that clip into the Source Viewer, setting Source In and Out points that match those of the
Timeline clip, and putting the Source playhead at the same frame as the Timeline playhead. At
that point, you can simply edit the source audio and video back into the Timeline to overwrite
the video-only clip you started with, confident that you’re editing exactly the same range of
media at the same place.
Using the pointer to Match Frame from the Timeline to find a source clip:
Hold the Option key down and double-click the clip in the Timeline.
The original source media for that clip is automatically loaded into the Source Viewer, with In
and Out points that match those of the targeted Timeline clip; the Source playhead is at the
same frame as the Timeline playhead.
Using keyboard shortcuts or Viewer controls to
Match Frame from the Timeline to find a source clip:
1

Move the Timeline playhead to intersect the clip you want to target.

Placing the playhead over a clip to Match Frame

2

If there are other clips on a multi-track timeline that overlap the clip you’re targeting
for this operation, then the clip on the lowest video track will be used as the target
for Match Frame operations. If you want to target a clip on a higher track, then either
disable the Auto Selection controls of all timelines underneath, or Option-Click the Auto
Selection control of the track with the clip you’re targeting to solo it.

3

Press the F key, or click the Match Frame button at the bottom right of the Timeline
Viewer (it’s at the left of the In and Out buttons).

Part 3 – 20

Match frame operations are a terrific time saver when you need to match the original source clip
to a clip in the Timeline, or when you want to use a clip in the Source Viewer to find that same
clip in the Timeline. With a single command, you can match one clip to another in order to set up
a new edit to take care of a variety of tasks.

402

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Finding Media Using
Match Frame Operations

The frame that’s matched to the frame at the playhead in the Timeline;
In and Out points are set to match those of the clip in the Timeline

4

The original source media for that clip is automatically loaded into the Source Viewer,
with In and Out points that match those of the targeted Timeline clip; the Source
playhead is at the same frame as the Timeline playhead.

Matching From a Source Clip
Match Frame also works in the opposite direction. You can open a source clip into the Source
Viewer that you know corresponds to a clip in the Timeline, and then you can use Match Frame
to automatically find any clip in the Timeline that corresponds to media found within the
source clip.
To use Match Frame in the Source Viewer to find a clip in the Timeline:
1

Open a clip in the Source Viewer that includes a range of media that’s already been
edited into the Timeline. If no part of the source clip has been edited into the Timeline,
source match framing won’t work.

2

Move the Source Viewer playhead to a frame that you want to find in the Timeline.
Again, if the frame at the position of the playhead in the Source Viewer hasn’t already
been edited into the Timeline, the Source Match Frame command won’t work.

3

Click the Match Frame button at the bottom right of the Source Viewer (it’s at the left of
the In and Out buttons), or press the F key.
The Timeline playhead automatically moves to the the clip and frame after the current
playhead position that matches the clip in the Source Viewer.

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Part 3 – 20

403

Using a Clip in the Source Viewer to Find a Media Pool Clip
To locate the original clip in the Media Pool that corresponds to a clip in the Timeline:
1

Open a Timeline clip into the Source Viewer by doing one of the following:
‚‚ Double-click a clip in the Timeline.
‚‚ Move the playhead to a clip in the Timeline, press Shift-V to select it, then press the
Return key.

2

Press Option-F to locate the source clip corresponding to the clip that’s open in the
Source Viewer in the Media Pool. That clip appears highlighted in the Media Pool.

Using a Clip in the Timeline to Find a Media Pool Clip
To locate a Timeline clip’s corresponding clip in the Media Pool, right-click any clip in the
Timeline, and choose Find in Media Pool from the contextual menu. That clip appears
highlighted in the Media Pool.

Part 3 – 20

There are two ways you can use a clip in the Timeline to find a clip in the Media Pool.

404

Marking and Finding Clips in the Timeline

Finding a Clip in the Media
Pool Using a Timeline Clip

Part 3 – 21

Multicam Editing

405

Multicam Editing

Chapter 21

Multicam Editing
If you’re working with media that was shot simultaneously using multiple cameras, then you can
use the Multicam Editing tools in DaVinci Resolve to create multicam clips that can be edited
using a visual switcher. Additional controls let you change the angles of multicam clips that have
already been edited into the Timeline.

Part 3 – 21

This chapter covers the following topics:

Multicam Editing

406

Introduction to Multicam Editing

407

Creating and Modifying Multicam Clips

407

Logging and Editing Multicam Clips

409

Setting up a Timeline for Multicam Editing

409

Opening and Altering Multicam Clips

410

Performing a Multicam Edit

411

Multicam Controls in the Source Viewer

413

Multicam Keyboard Controls

413

Editing Multicam Clips in the Timeline

414

Grading Multicam Clips

415

‚‚ First, you have to create multicam clips from the individual camera angles (called “ISOs,”
or isolated cameras).
‚‚ Second, you need to put the multicam clips you’ve created into a timeline.
‚‚ Third, you turn on the Multicam Viewer, and then you’re ready to start cutting and
switching among angles, as if you were a live multi-camera director.
This section describes all of these steps, and the various options available for each of them.

Creating and Modifying Multicam Clips
Before you do anything else, you need to create one or more multicam clips.
To create a multicam clip:
1

Import all the ISO (isolated camera) clips that correspond to the multi-camera
performance or event that you’ll be editing into the Media Pool.

2

Select all the clips that you need to sync together, right-click the selection, and choose
“Create Multicam Clip Using Selected Clips.”

3

When the New Multicam Clip Properties dialog opens, choose from the
following options:

New Multicam Clip Properties dialog

‚‚ Start Timecode: Presents the start timecode of the new multicam clip you’re about
to create, which is determined by either the timecode value of the sync point if Angle
Sync is defined by timecode, or by the sync point timecode value of the clip with the
earliest timecode if Angle Sync is defined by waveform.
‚‚ Multicam Clip Name: Use to choose a more descriptive name than “Multicam 1” for
the multicam clip you’re about to create.

Part 3 – 21

If you’re working on a program where a performance, interview, or event was recorded using
multiple simultaneous cameras, DaVinci Resolve has multi-camera editing tools; multicam
editing for short. Editing using these tools is a three part process:

407

Multicam Editing

Introduction to Multicam Editing

‚‚ Angle Name: The method used to name each angle within the multicam clip being
created. The angles can have Sequential numbering, use Angle or Camera metadata,
or use the Clip name.
‚‚ Detect clips from same camera: Turning on this checkbox results in multiple clips
that are identified as being from the same camera being put into the same angle
track of the resulting multicam clip being created. It also enables the “Link using”
pop-up menu.
‚‚ Detect Using: The metadata used to determine which clips come from the same
camera. You can choose from Camera ID, Angle, Reel Number, and Roll/Card, which
are user-editable in the Metadata Editor of the Media page, or you can choose Reel
Name which is automatically or manually derived using either the Conform Options
of the General Options panel of the Project Settings, or the Name panel of the Clip
Attributes window. For more information on the Conform Options, see Chapter 3,
“Project Settings and Preferences.”
‚‚ Move Source Clips to “Original Clips” Bin: A checkbox that lets you move all of
the original ISO clips into an Original Clips bin to get them out of the way after the
multicam clip has been created.
4

When you’re done choosing options, click Create. Depending on the Angle Sync
method you chose, a waveform analysis might generate a progress bar, and then the
new multicam clip is created in whichever bin is currently selected in the Media Pool.
Multicam clips appear with a multicam badge in the lower left-hand corner of the clip
thumbnail.

A Multicam clip showing its badge in the Media Pool

408

Part 3 – 21

‚‚ Angle Sync: The method used to synchronize all of the different angles. If you’re
manually syncing all of the angles, you can use In or Out points that you set within
each clip, or you can use the first Marker that you’ve set within each clip. If matching
timecode was jam synced to each camera recording an angle, you can choose
Timecode for a fast sync that’s as accurate as the timecode is. If each camera had a
microphone with which to simultaneously record the location audio, you can choose
Sound to use the shape of each audio waveform to align all of the angles.

Multicam Editing

‚‚ Frame Rate: Automatically lists the frame rate associated with the clips you selected.

Markers set in a multicam clip in the Media page to prepare for editing

Setting up a Timeline for Multicam Editing
Once you’ve created one or more multicam clips, preparing them for editing is as simple as
editing them into the Timeline, either by dragging and dropping the multicam clip to the
Timeline from the Media Pool, or by opening the multicam clip into the Source Viewer, and then
using any of the available editing methods to cut it into the Timeline from there. Once edited,
they appear in the Timeline like any other clip, just with a multicam badge to the left of the
clip name.

Multicam clip badge in the Timeline

When you perform a multicam edit, DaVinci Resolve plays the entire audio mix while you’re
editing, so if you want to take the opportunity to edit a master audio mix file or additional piece
of music to play along with the multicam clip, you can do so.

Part 3 – 21

Once you create one or more multicam clips, you can view them in the Media page or in the
Source Viewer of the Edit page, and add markers to them (all angles share the same markers) to
prepare for the multicam edit you’re planning on performing. When viewing multicam clips in the
Media page, you can choose how many angles to show in the viewer via the Viewer
Option menu.

409

Multicam Editing

Logging and Editing Multicam Clips

Multicam Editing

After you’ve created a multicam clip and put it into a timeline, you can modify it in a variety of
ways by right-clicking it in the Media Pool and choosing “Open in Timeline.” This replaces the
contents of the Timeline with a vertical stack of superimposed angles, one per track, each of
which is offset from the beginning of the Timeline to align with one another.

410

Part 3 – 21

Opening and Altering Multicam Clips

An open multicam clip appears like a timeline with a vertical stack of clips

With the multicam clip open, you can make a variety of changes in preparation for editing:
‚‚ You can slide a multicam clip left or right to alter its sync (selecting an angle and
using the period (.) and comma (,) “nudge” keyboard shortcuts can be a good way of
doing this).
‚‚ You can delete the track of an angle you don’t need (right-click the track header and
choose Delete Track).
‚‚ You can rearrange tracks to rearrange the order in which angles appear (right-click any
track header and choose Move Track Up or Move Track Down).
‚‚ You can rename tracks to change the angle name that appears by default in the
Multicam Viewer.
‚‚ You can disable audio or video tracks that correspond to angles you don’t want to see,
but don’t want to eliminate, either.
‚‚ You can grade each multicam angle separately (discussed later in this section).
When you’ve finished altering the contents of the multicam clip, you can close it using the path
control at the bottom left-hand corner of the Timeline. Click the name of the edited timeline to
go back, in preparation for the next steps.

A path control lets you exit the multicam clip

1

Open the Timeline you created to hold the multicam clip or clips comprising your edit,
and position the playhead where you want to start editing.

2

Choose Multicam from the Source Viewer mode pop-up.

Switching the Source Viewer to Multicam viewing

The Source Viewer changes to display all of the different angles within that clip as
switching controls.
3

Choose how many angles you want to display from the pop-up menu at the bottom
right of the Source Viewer. If you’re using a computer that’s not very fast, you may need
to reduce the number of angles you’re viewing to maintain real time playback.

Choosing how many angles to view in the Multicam Viewer

If there are more angles within the multicam clip intersecting the playhead in the
Timeline than the Multicam Viewer is set to show, then page controls appear to the left
of this pop-up menu that let you choose which set of angles you want to view. You can
move to another page of angles by doing one of the following:
‚‚ Click any dot to jump to that page of angles.
‚‚ Click the arrows to move among next/previous sets of angles.
‚‚ Choose Edit > Multicam > Previous Page (Option-Shift-Left Arrow) or Next Page
(Option-Shift-Right Arrow).

Part 3 – 21

After you’ve created one or more multicam clips and edited them into a timeline, actually
executing a multicam edit is simple.

411

Multicam Editing

Performing a Multicam Edit

412

Part 3 – 21

Choose whether you want to switch both the audio and video, just the video, or just the
audio using the Audio/Video selection buttons at the bottom center of the Multicam
Viewer. You can also choose Edit > Multicam > Video and Audio (Option-Shift-[ ), Video
Only (Option-Shift-] ), Audio Only (Option-Shift-\).

Multicam Editing

4

Buttons for choosing whether to switch the
video, the audio, or both

5

Start playback, and while watching the program play, do one of the following:
‚‚ Click any angle in the Multicam Viewer to insert a cut in the Timeline and switch to
that angle. As you cut-and-switch, the cuts immediately appear in the Timeline while
you play onward.
‚‚ Option-click any angle to switch the angle used by the current clip without adding
a cut. This is useful if you later regret the angle you cut to and just want to switch
the entire segment since the last cut you made. This can also be accomplished by
choosing Edit > Multicam > Previous Angle (Command-Shift-Left Arrow) or Next Angle
(Command-Shift-Right Arrow).
As you play, the entire mix in the Timeline will play along with what you’re switching, so
you can work in context.

A timeline while it’s being edited using cut and switch

6

When you’re ready to stop multicam editing, simply stop playback. If you want to start
trimming the Timeline to fine-tune what you’ve done, choose Source from the Source
Viewer mode pop-up, and you can re-edit and trim the multicam clips in the Timeline
just like any others.

Multicam Editing

The Source Viewer, in Multicam mode, has four sets of controls that let you set up and execute
multicam editing.

413

Part 3 – 21

Multicam Controls in the Source Viewer

The Source Viewer showing Multicam switching controls

‚‚ Multicam Angle buttons: Each multicam angle displayed in the Source Viewer is a
button that lists the angle name underneath. Clicking any of these buttons inserts a cut
and switches the angle of the next clip, while Option-clicking changes the angle of the
clip at the position of the playhead without adding a cut.
‚‚ Audio/Video Selection buttons: Clicking any of these buttons inserts a cut and
switches the angle of the next clip, while Option-clicking changes the angle of the clip
at the position of the playhead without adding a cut.
‚‚ Multicam display pop-up: Lets you choose how many angles to view while switching.
Depending on your workstation’s performance, reducing the number of angles can
improve playback performance while you edit. You can choose from a grid of 1x1, 1x2,
2x2, 3x3, or 4x4 angles to view.
‚‚ Multicam Page buttons: If there are more angles within the multicam clip intersecting
the playhead in the Timeline than the Multicam Viewer is set to show (via the multicam
display pop-up), then page controls appear that let you choose which set of angles you
want to view. Click any dot to jump to that page of angles, or click the arrows to move
among next/previous sets of angles.

Multicam Keyboard Controls
There’s also a full set of keyboard shortcuts that can be used for multicam editing.
‚‚ Multicam Cut: (Clip > Multicam Cut submenu) Pressing the 1 through 9 number keys
performs a cut-and-switch operation, the same as if you’d clicked on an angle button of
a multicam clip in the Source Viewer.
‚‚ Multicam Switch: (Clip > Multicam Switch submenu) Pressing Option-1 through 9
performs a switch operation, the same as if you’d Option-clicked an angle button of a
multicam clip in the Source Viewer.

‚‚ Previous/Next Page: (Edit > Multicam submenu) Pressing Option-Shift-Left or Right
Arrow lets you move to the previous or next page of multicam angles, if there are more
angles than can be displayed in the Viewer’s current multi-angle setting.

Editing Multicam Clips in the Timeline
When it comes to editing and trimming, there’s no functional difference between multicam
clips and any other kind of clip. Because you’re technically adding through-edits to a single clip,
you have the option or deleting any edit by selecting it and pressing the Delete key.
But multicam clips are special in that you always have the option of switching angles, either
using the Multicam Viewer, or right in the Timeline via each clip’s contextual menu.
To switch the angle of any multicam clip in the Timeline:
Right-click any clip and choose a new angle from the “Switch Multicam Clip
Angle” submenu.
In the event that you want to eliminate all unused angles from a multicam clip and “flatten” it to
simply be a single clip in the Timeline, there’s a command for that.
To flatten a multicam clip in the Timeline:
Right-click any clip and choose Flatten Multicam Clip from the contextual menu.
All unused angles are deleted, the clip becomes shorter if it included black tails
because of another unused angle, and you end up with a single ordinary clip in
the Timeline.

Referencing a Line Cut
You may sometimes be provided with what’s called a “Line Cut” from a production.
This is a pre-edited version of the program, cut live with the switcher and recorded
during the performance or event, that’s meant to be used as a reference for what
you’re doing. If you want to reference a Line Cut that’s been given to you as a movie
file, you can add it as an Offline Reference Movie, and compare it to the Timeline using
the Offline Reference Movie mode of the Source Viewer in the Edit page. For more
information on using an Offline video to compare with a timeline in the Edit page, see
Chapter 33, “Preparing Timelines for DaVinci Resolve Import.”

Part 3 – 21

‚‚ Audio/Video Switching: (Edit > Multicam submenu) Pressing Option-Shift-[ sets the
Multicam Viewer to cut or switch both Video and Audio at the same time. Pressing
Option-Shift-] sets the Multicam Viewer to cut or switch Video only. Pressing OptionShift-\ sets the Multicam Viewer to cut or switch Audio only.

414

Multicam Editing

‚‚ Previous/Next Angle: (Edit > Multicam submenu) Pressing Command-Shift-Left or
Right Arrow lets you switch to the previous or next angle.

Multicam clips appear like any other clip in the Color page. However, each angle within a
multicam clip has its own grade (unlike the Take Selector described later, in which all takes
share the same grade). If you grade a multicam clip, you’re actually editing the grade of the
specific angle that’s currently exposed in that clip.

Part 3 – 21

415

If you want access all of the angles within a multicam clip for grading, right-click it and choose
“Open in Timeline” to expose each angle within a superimposed stack. Then you can open the
Color page and grade whatever angles you want, whether they’re visible back in the Edit page
or not. You might do this to make the different angles match one another better, or to pre-grade
all of the angles to give them the look you want prior to multicam editing.

Multicam Editing

Grading Multicam Clips

An open multicam clip in the Color page exposes all of its angles for individual grading

Because opening multicam clips in the Timeline results in a vertical stack of superimposed
clips, you’ll want to turn on Unmix in the Color page viewer so that you can actually see the
currently selected angle in the Thumbnail Timeline while you work.

The Unmix control lets you see only one
of a superimposed stack of clips

When you’re done grading the individual angles, go back to the Edit page, and use the path
control at the bottom left-hand corner of the Timeline to return to your edited timeline.

Part 3 – 22

Take Selectors,
Compound
Clips, and
Nested Timelines
Take Selectors, Compound Clips, and Nested Timelines

Chapter 22
416

Take Selectors, Compound Clips,
and Nested Timelines

This chapter covers the following topics:

Take Selectors

418

Compound Clips

419

Grading Compound Clips

421

Nested Timelines

422

Editing the Contents of a Nested Timeline

422

Swapping the Source Viewer With the Timeline

423

Decomposing Nested Timelines in Place

423

Decomposing Nested Timelines While Editing

423

Grading Nested Timelines

423

Take Selectors, Compound Clips, and Nested Timelines

This chapter covers a variety of different ways you can turn multiple clips into a single object in
the Timeline, to accommodate a variety of different editing tasks. Take Selectors, Compound
Clips, and Nested Timelines all appear as a single clip in the Timeline, but they all organize
multiple clips in different ways. Take Selectors let you organize multiple clips vertically, making it
easy to associate clips with one another so you can easily switch among them. Compound Clips
and Nested Timelines let you organize multiple clips horizontally, so that you can manage long
or short sequences of clips within an edit as a single clip, when convenient.

Part 3 – 22

417

Take Selectors in DaVinci Resolve provide a way for you to manage multiple takes or versions
of a particular clip in the Timeline. They’re ideal for storing multiple useful takes for scenes
where you or the client can’t quite decide which one is the best, or for maintaining multiple
versions of VFX clips that are going through different iterations.

Part 3 – 22

418

When you place a number of clips inside a Take Selector, only one clip appears in the Timeline,
but you can open that Take Selector and switch to any other take or version that’s stored within
to switch which clip appears in the Timeline whenever you want.

Take Selectors, Compound Clips, and Nested Timelines

Take Selectors

A Take Selector, shown open, with several alternate takes placed within

Take selectors are easy to create and use and populate. Once you’ve placed a number of clips
inside the Take Selector, you can slip each clip’s range of media, or choose a new clip to appear
in the Timeline, before closing the Take Selector.

When closed, a Take Selector appears as a regular clip with a badge

‚‚ To create a Take Selector: Right-click any clip that’s not a Title or Generator, and
choose Take Selector from the contextual menu. The Take Selector interface
appears, disabling the rest of the Timeline temporarily while you work with the Take
Selector’s contents.
‚‚ To populate a Take Selector: Drag any clip from the Media Pool into the Take Selector,
and it appears “stacked” on top of the original clip in the Timeline.
‚‚ To choose the current clip: Click any clip so that it’s highlighted in blue, and click the
close button at the upper-left corner of the Take Selector. When next you open the
Take Selector, the current clip appears at the bottom of the stack, with a star at the
upper-left corner.
‚‚ To set a Take Selector to ripple the Timeline when a longer or shorter take is
selected: Click the Ripple Take button, at the upper right-hand corner of the Take
Selector panel, to the left of the trash can button.
‚‚ To slip a clip within the Take Selector: Drag any clip to the left or right to slip the range
of media that appears within the Take Selector’s duration in the Timeline.
‚‚ To remove a clip from a Take Selector: Click the clip you want to remove to select it,
then click the garbage can button at the upper-right corner of the Take Selector.
‚‚ To close a Take Selector: Click the X close button.
‚‚ To reopen a Take Selector: Double-click the Take Selector badge at the left of
a clip’s name, or right-click a multi-take clip and choose Take Selector from the
contextual menu.
‚‚ To eliminate a Take Selector: Close the Take Selector, if open, then right-click that clip
in the Timeline and choose Finalize Take from the contextual menu.

Compound Clips
You can select a series of clips in the Timeline, be they edited one after the other in serial or
superimposed and stacked in parallel, and turn them into a Compound Clip, which is a single
clip in the Timeline that’s actually comprised of many other audio and video clips embedded
inside. This allows you to work with a block of clips as if it were a single unit, governed by a
single set of Inspector controls, and able to be connected to another clip in your timeline by a
single transition.
Editing a compound clip works the same as editing any other type of clip. They can be edited,
trimmed, and deleted using all the same methods. In addition, compound clips can be renamed,
and decomposed back into their component clips right in the Timeline.

Part 3 – 22

Methods of using Take Selectors:

419

Take Selectors, Compound Clips, and Nested Timelines

When closed, multi-take clips can be edited, trimmed, graded, and rendered like any other clip
in the Timeline. A Take Selector badge appears to the left of the name of a clip to which it’s
applied to show its status; double-clicking this badge opens the Take Selector so you can
adjust its contents.

To create a compound clip:

420

Select a range of clips.

Selecting a range of clips to turn into a compound clip

2

Right-click one of the selected clips and choose New Compound Clip.

3

Enter an optional start timecode, a name, and choose what kind of audio tracks you
want for the compound clip you’re about to make, and click Create.

The New Compound Clip Properties dialog

A compound clip is created which takes the place of the original clips you selected on
the Timeline. Additionally, a copy of that compound clip appears in the currently
selected bin of the Media Pool.

The resulting compound clip

To rename a compound clip:
1

Either click the name of the compound clip twice to select the name text, or right-click
the clip and choose Rename from the contextual menu.

2

Type a new name, and press the Return key to accept the change.

Take Selectors, Compound Clips, and Nested Timelines

Part 3 – 22

1

To edit a compound clip:

An open compound clip in the Timeline

To return to the original timeline when you’re finished, click the name of the enclosing
timeline in the Path Control at the bottom left-hand corner of the Timeline.

The path control you can use to close the compound clip

To decompose a compound clip into its individual clips:
Right-click any compound clip and choose Decompose in Place from the contextual
menu. The compound clip is replaced by the individual clips it was made from.
To edit a compound clip from the Media Pool to the Timeline as individual clips:
Command-drag a compound clip from the Media Pool or Source Viewer to the Timeline
to edit it as a sequence of individual, decomposed clips. You can press or release the
Command key any time while dragging to choose whether to edit it as a single
compound clip or multiple decomposed clips.

Grading Compound Clips
Since compound clips act like a single clip in the Timeline, you can grade them as a single clip
in the Color page. However, if you want to individually grade the original clips inside the
compound clip, you can use the Open in Timeline command to access its constituent clips, and
then open the Color page, where you’ll find each of the individual clips available for separate
grading. When you’re done, go back to the Edit page and close the compound clip, and you’ll
go back to seeing it as a single clip whenever you open the Color page.

Part 3 – 22

The Timeline updates with the contents of the compound clip, which you can re-edit at
your discretion.

2

421

Right-click any compound clip and choose Open in Timeline from the contextual menu.

Take Selectors, Compound Clips, and Nested Timelines

1

Timelines can be edited inside other timelines, either partially or whole. For example, if you’ve
edited a program in scenes or reels such that each reel is contained in a separate timeline, you
can edit all of the timelines together, one after the other, into a single timeline to assemble them
into a final program.

Part 3 – 22

422

Multiple timelines edited together into a single sequence

Take Selectors, Compound Clips, and Nested Timelines

Nested Timelines

Nested Timeline clips appear with a special badge to the left of the Timeline name.

The badge that indicates a nested timeline

Timelines can be edited like any other clip, you can select one or more timelines and drag and
drop them into another timeline, drag them onto the Timeline Viewer editing overlay, or use the
toolbar editing buttons or keyboard shortcuts to edit them, just as you would any other clip.
Additionally, you can select multiple timelines in the Media Pool, right-click them, and choose
Create Timeline Using Selected Clips to quickly assemble a group of timelines into a
nested sequence.
The one exception is that you must drag and drop a timeline into the Viewer if you want to use it
to set In and Out points, since double-clicking a timeline, or selecting a timeline and pressing
Return simply opens it into the Timeline Editor. However, you can set In and Out points for
timelines in the Filmstrip of the Media Pool, or you can edit a timeline into another timeline in its
entirety, and then trim the head and tail down to just what you need. Double-clicking a nested
timeline opens it into the Source Viewer for trimming, exactly like any other clip.

Editing the Contents of a Nested Timeline
If you want to edit the contents of a nested timeline, you can right-click it and choose Open in
Timeline. Unlike Compound Clips, no path control appears when you do this, because you’ve
simply opened the original timeline. To go back to the previous timeline, find and double-click it
in the Media Pool, or choose it from the Timeline pop-up at the top of the Timeline Viewer.
Editing an original timeline does nothing to change the duration of nested instances of that
timeline inside other timelines. If you trim or delete clips in the original timeline that appear in
nested instances of that timeline, then those areas of the nested timeline simply go black.

Decomposing Nested Timelines in Place
To decompose a nested timeline that’s already been edited into another timeline back into its
constituent clips, right-click it and choose Decompose in Place. You can also do this for multiple
selected nested timelines, all at once.

Decomposing Nested Timelines While Editing
You can also Command-drag a Timeline clip from the Media Pool or Source Viewer to the
Timeline to edit it as a sequence of individual, decomposed clips. You can press or release the
Command key at any time while dragging to choose whether to edit a timeline as a single clip,
or as individual decomposed clips.

Grading Nested Timelines
Similarly to Compound Clips, nested timelines act like a single clip in the Timeline; you can
grade them as a single clip in the Color page. However, if you want to individually grade the
original clips inside the Nested Timeline, you can either open that timeline from the Media Pool,
or right-click that clip and choose Open in Timeline in order to access its constituent clips.

Part 3 – 22

When editing the partial contents of one timeline into another, it can be useful to see the
contents of a timeline that’s open in the Source Viewer in the Timeline Editor. To do so, choose
Timeline > Swap Timeline and Source Viewer (Command-Page Up). This puts the Timeline that
was open in the Source Viewer into the Timeline Editor, and the Timeline that was in the
Timeline Editor into the Source Viewer. This makes it easier to mark In and Out points while
seeing the exact boundaries of clips, prior to pressing Command-Page Up to swap the contents
of the Source Viewer and Timeline Editor once again in preparation for executing the next edit.

423

Take Selectors, Compound Clips, and Nested Timelines

Swapping the Source Viewer With the Timeline

Part 3 – 23

Trimming

424

Trimming

Chapter 23

Trimming

This chapter covers the following topics:

Summarizing Trim Operations

426

Selection-Based Trimming Using the Trim Tool

426

How the Trim Tool Differs From the Selection Tool

426

Using the Trim Tool With the Mouse

428

Turning Off the Heads Up Display While You Trim

432

Trim Tool Operations With the Keyboard

432

Trimming Using Timecode Entry

435

How to Enter Timecode Values

435

Commands to Make Selections and Trim

436

Trimming Clips in the Source Viewer

437

Ripple Editing Rules

438

Using Auto Select Controls to Control Trimming

440

Using Auto Select to Control Which Clips are Trimmed

440

Using Manual Selections to Control Which Clips Are Trimmed

441

Using Auto Select to Control Which Tracks Are Rippled

442

Trimming Multiple Edits or Clips at Once

444

Resizing and Rolling Multiple Edit Points

444

Rippling Multiple Edit Points

444

Asymmetric Trimming

446

Slipping Multiple Clips

448

Sliding Multiple Clips

449

Keyboard Trimming During Looped Playback

449

Dynamic JKL Trimming

450

Quick Trimming

450

Trimming in Dynamic Mode

451

Trim Operations that are Targeted Using the Playhead

452

Trim Start and Trim End

452

Resize, Ripple, and Roll Start and End Commands

453

Slip and Slide Playhead to In and Out Commands

454

Extend Edits

454

Trimming

Most editors would agree that trimming is half the job of editing. While you can make many
kinds of changes in the Timeline using the selection and razor blade tools, there is a dedicated
Trim mode in which you can perform more sophisticated trim operations in fewer steps using
either the mouse or keyboard shortcuts, depending on how you like to work. Mastering DaVinci
Resolve’s trimming operations will save you time when doing the necessary work of fine-tuning
your edit.

Part 3 – 23

425

‚‚ Resize: Shortens or lengthens the end of an outgoing clip or the beginning of an
incoming clip, while either overwriting a neighboring clip or leaving a gap behind as
necessary. While this isn’t usually included in a discussion of “trim” operations, it’s
actually the simplest kind of trimming you can do.
‚‚ Roll: Moves an edit point to the left or right by either shortening the outgoing clip while
lengthening the incoming clip, or vice versa. Roll edits do not change the duration of
the overall Timeline.
‚‚ Ripple: Shortens or lengthens the end of an outgoing clip or the beginning of an
incoming clip, while simultaneously moving all clips either to the right in the Timeline
(if you’re rippling to lengthen a clip) or left in the Timeline (if you’re rippling to shorten a
clip) to fill the gap or prevent overwriting that would otherwise occur if you were doing
a resize operation. Ripple edits do change the duration of the overall Timeline and can
alter the sync relation between different tracks if you’re not careful.
‚‚ Slip: Keeps a clip in the same place in the Timeline, while changing the range of media
that appears in that spot. Slip edits do not change the duration of the overall Timeline.
‚‚ Slide: Keeps a clip’s range of media the same, but moves that clip to the left or right by
either shortening the outgoing clip to its left while lengthening the incoming clip to its
right, or vice versa.

Selection-Based Trimming
Using the Trim Tool
Trim mode differs from Selection mode in that operations that would move clips with the
Selection tool will either slip or slide clips with the Trim tool. Other operations that would resize
edits with the Selection tool instead ripple the Timeline to automatically close gaps when using
the Trim tool. The following sections describe the various trim operations that are available,
both when using the mouse, and when using the keyboard.
To enter Trim Edit mode:
Click the Trim Edit button, or press the T key.

How the Trim Tool Differs From the Selection Tool
Aside from the actual trimming operations that are available, there are a few other important
differences between the Trim tool and the Selection tool.

Selecting Edit Points
When the Trim tool is selected, dragging a bounding box over a series of clips in the Timeline
selects the edit points to join clips together, instead of the clips themselves. This makes it fast
and easy to select multiple edit points that you want to operate on simultaneously.

Part 3 – 23

Before going into the different methods of trimming that are available, users who are new to
editing might benefit from a quick summary of what each trimming operation actually does.
Each trim operation is designed to let you move edits and clips in relation to whichever clips are
around them, by performing several operations at once. The five primary methods of
trimming are:

426

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Summarizing Trim Operations

Selecting edit points in the Timeline using the Trim tool

Rippling the Timeline With Different Operations
When the Trim tool is selected, other commands and controls that would ordinarily resize a clip
or clips and leave gaps in the Timeline instead move (ripple) clips that are to the right of the clip
or edit you’re trimming over to the left to prevent gaps whenever clips or edits are moved
or resized.

Rippling the incoming edit point of Clip L to resize it and prevent a gap from
appearing by moving all clips that are to the right (Clips P, L, and N) over to the left

For example, the Retime controls, the Extend and Trim Start/End commands, and the Nudge
keyboard shortcuts all work differently depending on whether you’re using the Selection or
Trim tools. This lets you use one set of tools to do different operations, depending on what you
need to do.

Rippling Gap
You can also use the Trim tool (or other trim operations described later in this chapter) to ripple
the start and end of a gap in the Timeline. Rippling a gap lets you grow or shrink the gap while
moving the portion of the Timeline to the right of the gap forward or backward in time.
Whenever you ripple against gap, a two-up display appears that lets you see both the clip
you’re trimming and whatever superimposed clips may be showing through that gap.

Using the Trim tool to ripple the out point of a gap to narrow it

Trimming

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427

Methods of trimming with the mouse in Trim Edit mode:
‚‚ To slip a clip: To slip a clip’s range of content without changing its position in the
Timeline, click the middle top region of a clip, and then drag to the left or right to
“slip” the clip to contain a different range of frames. A dashed overlay shows the total
duration of media available for you to slip with, which moves left and right as you drag.

Clicking the top clip area before a slip, an overlay shows the clip’s available range of media

After dragging to slip, clips don’t move, but the slipped clip’s range of media has changed

When slipping clips, a 4-up display shows all relevant outgoing and incoming frames, so you
can compare the continuity of action from one clip to the next. During a slip, the top two frames
update to show you the new incoming and outgoing frames of the clip being slipped, relative to
the unchanging outgoing frame of the clip to the left and incoming frame of the clip to the right.

TIP: You can temporarily disable this four-up display by pressing the Shift key while
you ripple so that you only see the frame at the position of the playhead. This makes it
possible for you to see which frame passes the playhead by as you ripple the
Timeline. You can toggle this two-up display off completely by choosing View > Enable
Preview During Editing, or by pressing Shift-Q.

Part 3 – 23

When trimming using the mouse, you can perform every kind of trim operation that’s available
using a single tool, simply by clicking the Trim mode/tool button, and then dragging on the
appropriate area of a clip in the Timeline.

428

Trimming

Using the Trim Tool With the Mouse

Trimming

Part 3 – 23

429

Four-up display when slipping a clip

‚‚ To slide a clip: To slide a clip, moving it to another position in the Timeline while
simultaneously adjusting the Out point of the previous clip and the In point of the next
clip to accommodate the change in position of the current clip being dragged, click the
bottom-middle name bar of the clip and drag it to another position.

After dragging to slide, the selected clip is at a new location, surrounding clips filled the gap

When sliding clips, a 4-up display shows all relevant outgoing and incoming frames, so you can
compare the continuity of action from one clip to the next. During a silde, the bottom two
frames update to show you the new outgoing frame of the clip to the left, and the new incoming
frame of the clip to the right of the clip being slid.

TIP: You can temporarily disable this four-up display by pressing the Shift key while you
ripple so that you only see the frame at the position of the playhead. This makes it
possible for you to see which frame passes the playhead by as you ripple the Timeline.
You can toggle this two-up display off completely by pressing Shift-Q

Trimming

Part 3 – 23

430

Four-up display when sliding a clip

‚‚ To roll an edit point: To roll an edit, moving the Out point of the outgoing clip and the In
point of the incoming clip at the same time, drag an edit point between two clips to the
left or right. (Roll edits can also be done in Selection Mode.)

Selected edit point before roll

Edit point moved further to the right, both adjacent clips resized to prevent gap

When rolling an edit, a 2-up display shows the changing continuity of action from the
outgoing frame of the clip to the left to the incoming frame of the clip to the right.

Trimming

Part 3 – 23

431

Two-up display when rolling an edit

‚‚ Ripple Edit: To ripple the outgoing or incoming part of an edit to add or remove media
to a clip while simultaneously moving all other clips at the left in the Timeline to make
room, click the Ripple tool, and drag an edit point to a new position in the Timeline

Selected outgoing half of an edit point before ripple

Rippled clip is shorter, the rest of the Timeline has moved left to fill the gap

When rippling an edit, a 2-up display shows the continuity of action from the outgoing
frame of the clip to the left to the incoming frame of the clip to the right. Which frame
updates depends on which side of the edit you’re rippling.

TIP: You can temporarily disable this two-up display by pressing the Shift key while
you ripple so that you only see the frame at the position of the playhead. This makes it
possible for you to see which frame passes the playhead by as you ripple the
Timeline. You can toggle this two-up display off completely by pressing Shift-Q.

Trimming

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432

Two-up display when rippling an edit

Turning Off the Heads Up Display While You Trim
If you press the Shift key while performing most drag and trim operations, you can suspend the
multi-frame heads up displays that appear in the Timeline window in order to focus on the frame
that intersects the Timeline.
To toggle the two- and four-frame heads up displays off or on:
‚‚ Choose View > Enable Preview During Editing
‚‚ Press Shift-Q to toggle the trimming display off, and Shift-Q again to toggle it back on.

Trim Tool Operations With the Keyboard
You can also perform every trim operation more precisely using the Nudge keyboard shortcuts.
To trim with the keyboard:
1

Press T to select the Trim tool.

2

To trim the selection, do one of the following:
‚‚ To slide a clip: Press Shift-V to select a clip, and press the Comma key to slip it one
frame to the left, or the Period to slip it one frame to the right. Shift-Comma and ShiftPeriod slips the clip in 10 frame increments.
‚‚ To slip a clip: Press Shift-V to select a clip, then press the S key to toggle to Slip
mode (pressing S again toggles back to Slide mode) and press Comma or Period to
slide its contents to the left or right. Shift-Option-Comma and Shift-Option-Period
slides the contents in 5 frame increments.
‚‚ To roll an edit: Press V to select an edit point, then press the Comma key to nudge
it one frame to the left, or the Period to nudge it one frame to the right. Shift-Comma
and Shift-Period rolls the edit in 5 frame increments.
‚‚ To ripple an edit: Press V to select an edit point, then press U to select either the
incoming or outgoing side of the edit by itself. Then, press the Comma key to ripple
the selected In or Out point of the clip to the left, or the Period to ripple it one frame
to the right. Shift-Comma and Shift-Period ripples in 5 frame increments.

3

If you want to suspend the two or four-up display that appears in the Timeline Viewer
while trimming, you can press Shift-Q to toggle the trimming displays off and on.

Important Trimming Keyboard Shortcuts
When trimming using the keyboard, the following keyboard shortcuts are important for you to
remember. Most of these commands, and many more that haven’t been assigned to keyboard
shortcuts, can also be found in the Trim menu. You can remap many of these commands to
different keyboard shortcuts using the Keyboard Mapping panel of the User Preferences.
For more information, see Chapter 3, “Project Settings and Preferences.”

Key Shortcut

Function

T

Trim mode, ripples edits and slips or slides clips.

A

Selection mode, resizes edits and moves clips.

Command-L and J

Fast trim commands, lets you dynamically trim the selection at 100%
forward and reverse speeds.

W

Dynamic trim or resize mode, uses JKL to trim the selection

S

Toggles between Slip and Slide mode when a clip is selected in
Trim mode.

V

Selects the edit point closest to the playhead, and moves the
playhead there.

Shift-V

Selects the clip or gap that intersects the playhead, and moves the
playhead to the center of the clip or gap. If there are superimposed
clips, turn off the Auto Select controls of tracks containing clips you
don’t want to select.

Shift

A modifier that temporarily disables the 2- and 4-up display that
appears when trimming edits and clips with either the pointer or
keyboard shortcuts.

Shift-Q

Toggles Enable Preview During Editing, which controls visibility of
the 2- and 4-up displays that appear in the Viewer when trimming
edits and clips.

Option-F1 through F9

Toggles Auto Select for video tracks 1 through 9, making it possible
to restrict certain selection and trim operations performed with
the keyboard.

Command-Option
F1 through F9

Toggles Auto Select for audio tracks 1 through 9, making it possible
to restrict certain selection and trim operations performed with
the keyboard.

U

Toggles the currently selected edit point among the outgoing,
centered, or incoming part of the edit.

Option-U

Toggles the currently selected edit point or clip among Video+Audio,
Video Only, or Audio Only.

Trimming

TIP: When holding down the Shift key while nudging to do a “fast nudge,” the duration
of the nudge is customizable in the Editing panel of the User Preferences. By default
it’s five frames, but you can set it to whatever you want.

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433

Comma (,)

After you’ve made a selection, nudges selected edits or clips one
frame to the left. Shift-Comma nudges 5 frames (the duration is
customizable in the Editing panel of the User Preferences).

Period (.)

After you’ve made a selection, nudges selected edits or clips one
frame to the right. Shift-Period nudges 5 frames (the duration is
customizable in the Editing panel of the User Preferences).

Forward-Slash (/)

This command works contextually depending on what’s selected in
the Timeline. Plays a section of the Timeline from x frames before to
y frames after (a) the playhead (if nothing’s selected), (b) the currently
selected edit point, (c) the currently selected clip, (d) a selection of
multiple clips. This command is useful for previewing how the current
selection plays within the context of the clips immediately
surrounding it. The pre-roll and post-roll time is customizable in the
Editing panel of the User Preferences.

Command-/

Toggles looped playback off and on.

Down Arrow, Up Arrow

Moves both the playhead and selection state to the next or previous
edit point. If multiple clips or edits are superimposed, the first clip on
the lowest numbered track will be selected first, then the next clip
up, and so on until the topmost superimposed clip is selected, before
selecting the next clip in the Timeline.

E

Extend edit. Resizes or ripples selected edit points to the current
position of the playhead.

Shift-[

Trim Start. Resizes (Selection) or ripples (Trim) the In point of all clips
on auto-select-enabled tracks that intersect the playhead to the
position of the playhead.

Shift-]

Trim End. Resizes (Selection) or ripples (Trim) the Out point of all clips
on auto-select-enabled tracks that intersect the playhead to the
position of the playhead.

Shift-Command-[

Ripple Trim Start. Regardless of whether Selection or Trim mode is
enabled, always ripples the In point of clips on auto-select-enabled
tracks that intersect the playhead to the position of the playhead.

Shift-Command-]

Ripple Trim End. Regardless of whether Selection or Trim mode is
enabled, always ripples the Out point of clips on auto-select-enabled
tracks that intersect the playhead to the position of the playhead.

IMPORTANT: While the Slip, Roll, and Slide tools will change the sync relationship of
the clips you’re adjusting with a matching soundtrack, the rest of the Timeline won’t be
affected. Using the Ripple tool can alter the overall sync relationship of large portions
of your timeline and its matching soundtrack, so you should use it with extreme care.

Trimming

Function
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434
Key Shortcut

‚‚ To roll an edit: Select the center of an edit point, enter a timecode value, and
press Return.
‚‚ To ripple an edit: Select either the outgoing or incoming half of an edit point, enter a
timecode value, and press Return.
‚‚ To slip a clip: Select a clip, and press S if necessary to switch to Slip mode, enter a
timecode value, and press Return.
‚‚ To slide a clip: Select a clip, and press S if necessary to toggle to Slide mode, enter a
timecode value, and press Return.

How to Enter Timecode Values
When entering timecode, type each pair of hour, minute, second, and frame values from left to
right, with a period representing a pair of zeros for fast entry. The numbers you enter appear in
the Timecode field at the upper left-hand corner of the Viewer with focus. When you’re finished
typing, press the Return key to execute the Timecode command. The rules for timecode entry
are as follows:
‚‚ The right-most pair of timecode values (or period) you enter is always the
frame number.
‚‚ A period to the left or to the right of any number you type is considered to be a pair
of zeroes.
‚‚ A single period between two numbers is considered to either be a single zero or
ignored if it’s between two pairs of numbers.
‚‚ Any untyped pairs of values to the left of what you enter are assumed to be whatever
those values were prior to the timecode you entered; this makes it easy to type partial
timecode values even when the Timeline starts at hour one.
‚‚ It’s not necessary to enter colons or semicolons.
Absolute timecode is entered simply by typing in a timecode value. So long as no clips or edit
points are selected when you press the Return key, the playhead will move to that timecode
value. If an edit point or clip is selected, those will be moved or trimmed to the corresponding
timecode value, if possible.

Part 3 – 23

You can also use absolute or relative timecode entry to trim clips and edits. What is trimmed
depends on the selection you’ve made prior to entering timecode. If you want to use timecode
to trim the selection forward relative to its current position, be sure to type an equal sign or plus
(= or +) before the timecode value; to trim the selection backward relatively, type minus (–)
before the timecode value.

435

Trimming

Trimming Using Timecode Entry

User-Typed Value

New TC Value

01:10:10:10

15245218

15:24:52:18

01:10:10:10

2..

01:02:00:00

01:10:10:10

15

01:10:10:15

01:10:10:10

12

01:10:10:12

01:10:10:10

1.2

01:10:01:02

01:10:10:10

115..

01:15:00:00

01:10:10:10

23...

23:00:00:00

Relative timecode is entered by starting the timecode value with a plus (+) or minus (–). Adding
a plus results in the value you type being added to the current timecode value for purposes of
offsetting the playhead or moving a selection. Adding a minus will subtract the value you type
from the current timecode value.
Here are two examples of relative timecode entry:
+20.

00:00:20:00 is added to the current timecode value.

-5

00:00:00:05 is subtracted from the current timecode value.

Commands to Make Selections and Trim
A series of commands in the Trim menu make it fast to automatically select the In or Out point of
the clip that’s nearest to the current position of the playhead, and go into either Selection or
Trim mode in preparation for resizing or ripple trimming that edit point. These commands are:
‚‚ Select Nearest Edit to Resize In
‚‚ Select Nearest Edit to Resize Out
‚‚ Select Nearest Edit to Ripple In
‚‚ Select Nearest Edit to Ripple Out
‚‚ Select Nearest Edit to Roll
‚‚ Select Nearest Clip to Move
‚‚ Select Nearest Clip to Slip
‚‚ Select Nearest Clip to Slide
These commands are similar to using the Edit Selection (V) or Clip Selection (Shift-V) keyboard
shortcuts along with those for choosing the Selection (A) or Trim tool (T) both at once, to get
you ready for trimming in the way that you want. However, they have the added benefit of, in
some cases, letting you specifically choose the In or Out points of the clip nearest the current
position of the playhead. These commands don’t have keyboard shortcuts by default, but if you
prefer this way of working, you can assign them to keyboard shortcuts of your choosing using
the Keyboard Mapping panel of the User Preferences.

Part 3 – 23

Original TC Value

436

Trimming

Here are some examples of absolute timecode entry using this method:

Trimming

Additionally, you can double-click a clip in the Timeline to open it into the Source Viewer for
trimming. When the Selection tool is selected, you can drag the In and Out markers, or use the
playhead and I and O keyboard shortcuts to resize that clip in the Timeline. With the Trim tool
selected, you can ripple the In and Out points of the clip.

437

Part 3 – 23

Trimming Clips in the Source Viewer

A Timeline clip being ripple-resized by opening it into the
Source Viewer dragging its In point using the Trim tool

438

A Timeline clip being slipped by opening it into the Source
Viewer and Shift-dragging its In point using the Trim tool

NOTE: To open a match frame of a clip that’s part of an edited sequence into the
Source Viewer using the mouse, hold the Option key down while double-clicking a
clip in the Timeline.

Ripple Editing Rules
Ripple operations are the only trim functions that change the duration of the overall Timeline,
and that can potentially alter the sync relationship between multiple clips on different tracks.
This makes them incredibly useful, but it’s important to understand which parts of the Timeline
will move as part of a ripple operation, and which parts won’t.
The following operations ripple the Timeline:
‚‚ Ripple deleting a clip or gap (Forward-Delete)
‚‚ Ripple cutting a clip (Shift-Command-X)
‚‚ Rippling one or more edits or gaps using the Trim tool (press T to choose the Trim tool)
‚‚ Using the Extend Edit (E), Trim Start (Shift-[), or Trim End (Shift-]) commands
in Trim mode
‚‚ Using the Ripple Start (Command-Shift-[) or Ripple End (Command-Shift-]) commands
in any mode
‚‚ Performing an Insert Edit (F9) or Ripple Overwrite (Shift-F10) edit
‚‚ Using the Retime controls to speed up or slow down a clip in Trim mode
‚‚ Using the Change Speed dialog with the Ripple Sequence checkbox turned on
‚‚ Changing clips in a Take Selector with the Ripple control enabled
During a ripple edit, superimposed clips with an In point that’s to the left of the edit point or clip
being rippled are not moved. This can be seen in the previous example via the audio clip at the
bottom of the Timeline, which stays in place even as the clips on track V1 and A1 are rippled. All
clips with In points to the right of the edit point or clip being rippled move left to follow the trim
operation you’re making.

Trimming

Part 3 – 23

You can slip the contents of the clip by holding the Shift key down and dragging either the In or
Out point.

Trimming

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439

Before Ripple

After Ripple
The rules of timeline rippling illustrated. All clips with In points to the left of Subclip B (the clip being
rippled) are left in place (area in blue), while all clips to the right of the edit being rippled are moved by
the duration of the ripple operation (in red)

This simple rule means that, if you’re in the habit of building sequences of clips from left to
right, long overlapping superimpositions such as titles, graphics, and music clips will stay in
place while you’re rippling various clips within a montage that you’re editing in relation to these
longer clips.
However, there’s one exception to this rule. It is often the case that split edits, where linked
audio and video are cut at different places, creates a situation where the audio In point of a pair
of linked audio and video items precedes a video In point that you want to ripple. In other
words, the audio In point extends to the left of the video In point, which ordinarily would trigger
the rule that clips with edit points to the left of a rippled edit point won’t be moved, which
would throw the audio and video of this item out of sync. In this case, you probably want to
maintain sync, so all items that are linked to a clip being rippled always ripple along with it, even
if they do have In points that extend to the left of the edit point being rippled.

‚‚ Operations that affect clips intersecting the position of the playhead
‚‚ Operations that affect clips intersecting a region defined by timeline In and Out points
‚‚ Operations that ripple clips to the right of an affected clip on the Timeline
When a track’s Auto Select control is off, clips on that track are ignored by those same
categories of operations, unless you manually select one or more clips or edit points.
The next three sections go into detail on how the Auto Select buttons help you control the
trimming operations described in this chapter, particularly when it comes to operations that
ripple the Timeline, and the kinds of “playhead-targeted” trim operations described later in this
chapter. For more information on using the Auto Select controls to define selections and control
other editing operations, see Chapter 17, “Editing Basics.”

Using Auto Select to Control Which Clips are Trimmed
One of the principal uses of the Auto Select controls is to let keyboard shortcut-driven editors
choose which specific clips on which tracks will be affected by an operation that would
otherwise affect every superimposed clip at the position of the playhead or encompassed by In
and Out points set in the timeline.
For example, if multiple clips are superimposed in V1, V2, and V3, and A1, A2, and A3, all six tracks
have their Auto Select controls turned on, and you park the playhead over one of them and use
the Trim End command in Selection mode, then all six superimposed clips will be trimmed.

Trimming all clips at the position of the playhead

Part 3 – 23

The Auto Select buttons on each track in the Timeline control a host of different operations, but
while they’re deceptively powerful, they’re also among the most misunderstood controls of the
Timeline. When a track’s Auto Select control is on, clips on that track are automatically included
in three different types of operations:

440

Trimming

Using Auto Select Controls
to Control Trimming

Part 3 – 23

441

Trimming

However, if you only want to trim the clip in track V3, then you can solo the Auto Select control
of V3 by Option-clicking it, and then when you use the Trim End command, the clip on V3 is the
only one that’s trimmed, the other clips are ignored.

Trimming only the clip in V3 by soloing the V3 auto select controls

Using Manual Selections to Control
Which Clips Are Trimmed
It’s important to know that manual selections you make in the Timeline that highlight specific
clips always take precedence over whatever the Auto Select controls are set to. For example, if
Auto Select is turned on for tracks V1, V2, and V3, but you’ve selected a clip on track V1, only
the selected clip will be still be affected by whatever operation you decide to perform. For
example, if you use Trim End, the clip on track V1 will be affected.

Trimming

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442

Manual selection of a clip on track V1 overrides
the auto select controls on all tracks

Using Auto Select to Control Which Tracks Are Rippled
Each track’s Auto Select control is also used to control how trimming and editing operations
that ripple the Timeline affect timelines with multiple tracks and superimposed clips. Using Auto
Select controls, you can turn off rippling on specific tracks, while leaving it on for others.
For ease of use, you’ll typically want to leave Auto Select on for all tracks when rippling clips, to
ensure that all the parts of your timeline stay in sync with one another. However, when the
occasion requires, the Auto Select controls provide the option to suspend rippling on specific
tracks while allowing rippling on others.
The rules are simple:
‚‚ Tracks with Auto Select enabled: Ripple editing or ripple deleting affects all clips to
the right of the clip or clips on that track being trimmed.

Before and After, clip to the right of Clip T on tracks V2, V1, A1, and A2 are rippling because those
track’s Auto Select controls are enabled

443

Trimming

Part 3 – 23

‚‚ Tracks with Auto Select disabled: Rippling is disabled on these tracks.

Before and After, clip to the right of Clip T on tracks V1 and A1 are rippling because
those tracks’ Auto Select controls are enabled, but clips on tracks V2 and A2 aren’t
rippling because those tracks’ Auto Select controls are disabled

Another set of rules govern what happens when you select clips or edits for trimming
on tracks with Auto Select disabled:
‚‚ Selected Tracks with Auto Select turned off with an edit selection: If you select the
outgoing or incoming half of an edit on a track that has Auto Select off, the result will be
a resize operation. Ripple deleting clips leaves a gap.

Before and After, clips to the right of Music Cue 03 on tracks V1, V2, A1, and
A2 are rippling because Auto Select is enabled on those tracks, but because
the clip being trimmed on track A3 has Auto Select disabled, it doesn’t ripple,
instead resizing to open up a gap

No matter how ambitious a trim operation you want to set up, the procedure is exactly the same
as for an ordinary trim operation. Just make sure you follow these three general steps, and
you’ll be good:
1

Choose Selection mode, and select the edit points or clips you want to trim. To make
multiple selections, click once to select the first item, then Command-click each
subsequent item you want to add to the selection. You can select as many clips and/or
edit points on as many tracks as you like.

2

To ripple, slip, or slide the entire selection at once, choose Trim mode. To resize or
move each selected item at once, continue using Selection mode.

3

Use the mouse, keyboard shortcuts, or timecode entry to execute the trimming
operation, just as you would if a single edit point or clip were selected.

The following sections describe each of the special-case multi-selection trim operations that
are possible, along with each one’s special rules and limitations.

Resizing and Rolling Multiple Edit Points
You can resize or roll multiple edit selections at once. In this way, you can adjust the edit points
of multiple superimposed clips all together. Trimming multiple edit points essentially lets you
“gang” them so that all selected edits move together as one.
To resize multiple clips at once, select the left (outgoing) or right (incoming) half of each edit
point you need to adjust, then use the Selection tool to drag those edit points to resize them all.
To roll multiple clips at once, select every edit point you need to adjust right at the center, so
that both the incoming and outgoing halves of each edit point are selected, then use either the
Selection or Trim tools to drag those edit points to roll them all.

NOTE: You cannot combine ripple and roll operations at the same time.

Rippling Multiple Edit Points
It’s also possible to select multiple incoming or outgoing edit points on either superimposed
video tracks, or on the same video track, in order to ripple them all at once. A good example of
when you’d want to ripple multiple clips on the same track is if you’ve got an end credit
sequence of fourteen text generators, and you’d like to shorten the entire sequence by a
particular amount. This example can be seen below.

Part 3 – 23

DaVinci Resolve lets you select multiple edit points or clips for certain trimming operations,
making it possible to trim multiple edits and clips at the same time. In simple cases, this makes it
easy to resize, ripple, slip, and slide several superimposed clips at the same time, which is a real
convenience, or you can select the In point of every title generator in a credit sequence at once
in preparation for shortening or lengthening them all at once. In more complicated cases, this
lets you create more complicated trimming scenarios, such as multi-track asymmetric trimming,
to quickly take care of difficult tasks.

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Trimming

Trimming Multiple Edits or Clips at Once

‚‚ You can also choose to ripple each selected edit by the same amount, for example
removing 3 frames from each of the selected edits, all at once. To do so, hold the
Command key down while dragging selected edits with the Trim tool, or use Dynamic
JKL trimming, or trim by entering relative timecode values, or use the nudge keys
(period and comma).
To ripple trim multiple edits on the same track:
1

Click the Trim tool, and drag a bounding box in the Timeline to select all fortynine edits.

2

Press the U key to select the incoming half of each selected edit.

3

Use whichever trimming method you prefer to ripple the sequence to be shorter or
longer. Dragging using the Trim tool lets you trim by an arbitrary number of frames,
while holding the Command key down while dragging with the Trim tool, using
timecode entry to trim, using the comma and period nudge keys, or using Dynamic JKL
trimming lets you trim every selected edit by the same number of frames

(Before) Selecting fourteen incoming credits edit points, (After) Trimming them all at once

In the following example, the incoming edit of three clips in the following montage are selected
and simultaneously rippled using the Trim tool. Notice that each overlapping clip ripples along
with the nearest selected edit that’s to the left of it; this means that the superimposed clip in
track V2 and the audio clip in track A4 ripples along with the third selected edit, while the audio
clip in track A2 ripples along with the second selected edit. Since the audio clip in track A3
starts to the left of the first selected edit, it does not ripple.

Part 3 – 23

‚‚ If you use use the Trim tool via dragging in the Timeline, then you can choose to
ripple the entire selection of edits by an arbitrary duration, for example, shortening or
lengthening the entire selection by 8 frames. To do this, DaVinci Resolve performs your
multi-selection trim operation one edit at a time, removing a frame at a time from each
selected edit from the left to the right as you trim, until either you stop the operation,
or every single selected edit has had a frame removed, at which point DaVinci Resolve
begins trimming the second frame from each selected edit from the left to the right, and
then the third, and so on, until you stop trimming. Working this way, you can use the
mouse to trim any number of clips to fit into any duration.

445

Trimming

When you ripple trim multiple edits on the same track, how many frames are trimmed in a
particular trim depends on what method you use to do your trimming.

Trimming

Part 3 – 23

446

(Before) Selecting three incoming edit points, (After) Trimming them all at once

Asymmetric Trimming
Asymmetric resize or ripple trimming can also be done to multiple clips, with one selection per
track allowable on as many tracks as you require. To asymmetrically trim two or more clips,
select an outgoing edit point on one track, and then Command-click an incoming edit on
another track.

Selecting opposite outgoing video and incoming audio edit points
in preparation for performing an asymmetric ripple trim

To select the outgoing video edit of one clips and the incoming audio edit of the next clip in
preparation for making a split edit, you can Option-click the outgoing video edit to suspend
linked selection, and then Command-click the incoming audio edit to add it individually to the
selection. Now when you drag, nudge, or use timecode to trim, each selected edit point will
move in the opposite direction.

Trimming

Part 3 – 23

447

Dragging to perform an asymmetric ripple trim to create a
split edit using the Trim tool

Starting in version 12, you can also do asymmetric trims to multiple edits in the same video and/
or audio track. There are two compelling reasons for doing so:
Select the outgoing half of an edit point (the left side), then Command-click to select the
incoming half of the same edit point (the right side) separately. This will not perform a roll edit,
but will allow you to either use the Selection tool to resize both edit points away from each
other to create a gap, or use the Trim tool to ripple both sides of the edit to shorten both clips
while tightening up the Timeline at the same time.

Before and After ripple trimming both the incoming and outgoing
halves of an edit to shorten the duration of both clips at once

You can also select the In and Out points of a clip in the Timeline at the same time, and use the
Trim tool to ripple both the beginning and end of the clip closer to the center, shortening the
clip while preserving the content in the middle, while tightening up the Timeline.

Trimming

Part 3 – 23

448

Before and After ripple trimming both the In and Out points of a clip at the same time, shortening the
clip by removing heads and tails, and preserving the action in the middle

In short, you can use nearly any combination of edit selections you need to simultaneously trim
multiple clips in the same track, in multiple tracks, whatever you need to do to save time.
Furthermore, asymmetric trimming can be done in either Selection or Trim mode, either to open
and close gaps, or to move edit points to overlap one another to create split edits.

Slipping Multiple Clips
You can simultaneously slip any number of selected clips (so long as they have handles) on any
combination of tracks by selecting the clips you want to slip, then choosing the Trim tool, and
dragging their name bars or using the comma and period keys to nudge the selection.

Dragging to slip multiple selected clips at once

Trimming

Starting in version 12, you can select as many clips as you like in preparation for a slide
operation. If you select multiple contiguous clips, they slide together as one.

449

Part 3 – 23

Sliding Multiple Clips

(Before) Selecting four clips to slide, (After) All four clips slid to the right using the mouse

Keyboard Trimming During
Looped Playback
A great technique for editors who like to do precision trimming using the Nudge commands is
the ability to enable looped-playback so that the Play Around command (Forward Slash) will
loop continuously around the edit point you’re trimming as you nudge one or five frames at a
time to fine tune the cut.
To trim while looping:
1

Move the playhead near the edit point you want to trim, and press V to select it.

2

Press the U to choose which side of the edit you want to select in order to ripple or roll
it, and/or Option-U to choose whether you want to trim video+audio, the video only, or
the audio only.

3

Press Command-Forward Slash (/) to enable looped playback.

4

Press Forward Slash (/) to play around the current selection. With looping on, playback
will continue until you stop it. Pre-roll and post-roll can be changed in the Edit panel of
the User Preferences.

5

During looped playback, press the comma (,) and period (.) keys to trim the selection
back or forward by a single frame, or Shift-comma and Shift-period to trim the selection
in 5 frame increments.

6

When you’re finished, press the Space Bar or K key to stop playback.

TIP: When holding down the Shift key while nudging to do a “fast nudge,” the duration
of the nudge is customizable in the Editing panel of the User Preferences. By default
it’s five frames, but you can set it to whatever you want.

Trimming while viewing the selected clip or edit point playing back has the advantage of letting
you get emotionally involved in what you’re watching, as well as experiencing the timing of a
clip as it plays, in order to help you get a better feel for how, exactly, you need to trim a
particular cut.
While you’re dynamically trimming, you see the same two-up or four-up display, the same
Timeline overlays, and the same dynamically updating Timeline that appear when you use the
Trim tool with the mouse. The only difference is that you’re trimming while your program plays.
There are two methods of doing dynamic trimming:
‚‚ Quick Trim: You can select one or more edit points or clips, and immediately trim it
by pressing Command-J or Command-L to trim back or trim forward. This is a fast way
of dynamically trimming, but you can only trim forward and backward at 100 percent
speed or greater.
‚‚ Turning on Dynamic Mode: If you want to do more detailed work, you can press the W
key to enable Dynamic mode (or choose Trim > Dynamic Trim Mode), at which point you
are in a special mode where the JKL shortcuts only trim the current selection, whatever
it happens to be. However, this mode also gives you additional options for controlling
which part of the selection, in the case of multiple selection trims, you want to monitor
for audio/video playback.

TIP: If nothing is selected while you’re in Dynamic Trim mode, JKL simply plays through
the Timeline, as usual.

Quick Trimming
If you’re in a hurry and you can accomplish the trim you want via real time or faster playback,
then pressing the Command key while using the J or L keyboard shortcuts lets you dynamically
trim any selection in the Timeline, with audio/video playback.
To dynamically trim using Command-J or Command-L:
‚‚ To dynamically roll an edit: In either Selection or Trim mode, select the center of one
or more edit points, and hold the Command key down while using J or L to move the
selection around.
‚‚ To dynamically ripple an edit: Choose Trim mode, select the outgoing or incoming half
of one or more edit points, and hold the Command key down while using J or L to move
the selection around.
‚‚ To dynamically resize an edit: Choose Selection mode, select the outgoing or
incoming half of one or more edit points, and hold the Command key down while using
J or L to move the selection around.
‚‚ To dynamically move a clip: Choose Selection mode, select one or more clips, and
hold the Command key down while using J or L to move the selection around.

Part 3 – 23

One of DaVinci Resolve’s most interactive trimming features is the ability to dynamically resize,
ripple, roll, slip, slide, or move selected edit points and clips using the JKL transport control
keyboard shortcuts. This means that you can make an appropriate selection in the Timeline
(edit points to resize, ripple or roll, or clips to slip or slide) then trim them during playback, while
monitoring audio and watching the video.

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Trimming

Dynamic JKL Trimming

TIP: When you’re finished with a dynamic trim operation and you want to see how that
edit plays, you can press the Forward Slash key (/) to play around the current selection
to quickly preview that section of the Timeline.

Trimming in Dynamic Mode
If you want to also have the option of trimming in slow motion or frame by frame, in addition to
trimming at 100% or greater playback speeds, then you’ll need to enable Dynamic mode.
To use dynamic mode to dynamically trim one or more selected clips or edits:
1

Press W to enter Dynamic mode. The word Dynamic and Slip or Slide (depending on
what mode you’re in) appears in the toolbar and the playhead turns yellow to let you
know you’re in Dynamic Trim mode, in which all you can do is trim.

Dynamic appears in the toolbar to let you know you’re in
Dynamic mode, followed by either Slip or Slide depending
on what mode you’re in

2

Choose the type of operation you want to perform by selecting either Selection mode
(A) or Trim mode (T):
‚‚ In Selection mode, you can dynamically resize or roll edits, and move or slip clips.
‚‚ In Trim mode, you can dynamically ripple or roll edits, and slip or slide clips.

3

Make a selection that’s appropriate to the trim operation you need to accomplish.
Select edit points to resize, ripple or roll, or select clips that you want to slip or
slide (using the S key to toggle between slipping and sliding). You can also select
combinations of multiple clips to trim.

4

If you have selected multiple edit points, then you can use the Left and Right arrow
keys in Dynamic mode to move the playhead to the selected edit point you want to
monitor while trimming. If the playhead isn’t on a selected edit point, then it will jump to
the nearest selected edit point once trimming commences.

5

Use any combination of the JKL keyboard shortcuts to initiate playback and trimming,
including:
‚‚ J+K or K+L to trim in slow motion, with slow motion audio playback
‚‚ Pressing K while tapping J or L to trim a frame at a time
‚‚ Pressing J or L to trim with real time playback
‚‚ Pressing J or L repeatedly to trim in fast-reverse or fast-forward, at a variety of speeds
As you dynamically trim, all audio clips in all audio tracks will play back as they cross
the playhead, so you can hear your entire mix as you’re trimming.

Part 3 – 23

If you’re trimming multiple selections, you can control which edit point you monitor during the
trim operation by positioning the playhead at one of the selected edit points.

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Trimming

‚‚ To dynamically slip or slide a clip: Choose Trim mode, select one or more clips to slip,
or a single clip to slide, press S to toggle between Slip or Slide modes, then hold the
Command key down while using J or L to execute either slip or slide operations.

7

When you’re finished, press W again to toggle Dynamic mode off.

You always want to be sure to turn Dynamic mode off when you’re done, because otherwise
using JKL will continue trimming selections, instead of playing the Timeline.

Trim Operations that are
Targeted Using the Playhead
The following series of Trim editing commands let you trim clips and edits in different ways
using the position of the playhead to guide the result.

Trim Start and Trim End
The Trim > Trim Start (Shift-[) and Trim End (Shift-]) commands let you move the In or Out point of all
clips that intersect the playhead as either a ripple operation (in Trim mode) or a resize operation
(in Selection mode). You do not need to make a selection to use Trim Start and Trim End, making
these commands fast to use in the right situation. A classic use of Trim End is when you have
several superimposed clips of different lengths that you want to either start or end at the
same time.
Trim Start resizes or ripples (depending on what mode you’re in) all clips that intersect the
playhead, so that each clip’s In point is moved to the current playhead position.

Before and After a Trim Start operation, all clips
that intersect the playhead are trimmed

452

Part 3 – 23

After you’ve made a trim, you can press the Spacebar to initiate Play Around Current
Selection to see how that trim plays. In Dynamic Mode, the spacebar only executes
a Play Around Current Selection operation, rather than play forward. What is played
by Play Around Current Selection depends on what is selected; a selected edit plays
around just that edit, a selected clip plays around the whole clip, multiple clips or edits
play around the total selection, including the current Pre-Roll and Post-Roll settings in
the Editing panel of the User Preferences.

Trimming

6

453

Trimming

Part 3 – 23

Trim End resizes or ripples intersecting clips so that each intersecting clip’s Out point is moved
to the current playhead position.

Before and After a Trim End operation, all clips that intersect the playhead
are trimmed; clips that don’t intersect the playhead are not affected

Clips that don’t intersect the playhead are not affected. Furthermore, you can exclude clips on
specific tracks from this operation by disabling the auto-select controls on those tracks.

Resize, Ripple, and Roll Start and End Commands
Another set of commands in the Trim menu lets you combine the Trim Start and Trim End
functions with the act of choosing either Selection or Trim mode, and the ability to resize, ripple,
or roll, all with single commands.
‚‚ Resize Start to Playhead
‚‚ Resize End to Playhead
‚‚ Ripple Start to Playhead (Command-Shift-[)
‚‚ Ripple End to Playhead (Command-Shift-])
‚‚ Roll Start to Playhead
‚‚ Roll End to Playhead
Just as with Trim Start and Trim End, these commands use the Timeline Auto Select controls to
determine, of all clips intersecting the playhead, which clips on which tracks to trim. Many of
these commands don’t have keyboard shortcuts by default, but if you prefer this way of
working, you can assign them to keyboard shortcuts of your choosing using the Keyboard
Mapping panel of the User Preferences.

‚‚ Slip Playhead to In
‚‚ Slip Playhead to Out
‚‚ Slide Playhead to In
‚‚ Slide Playhead to Out

TIP: The Slip Playhead to In command functions identically to using the Extend edit
while the playhead intersects a selected clip.

Just as with Trim Start and Trim End, these commands use the Timeline Auto Select controls to
determine, of all clips intersecting the playhead, which clips on which tracks to trim. These
commands don’t have keyboard shortcuts by default, but if you prefer this way of working, you
can assign them to keyboard shortcuts of your choosing using the Keyboard Mapping panel of
the User Preferences.

Extend Edits
The Extend Edit command (choose Trim > Extend Edit, or press E) lets you resize or ripple one
or more selected edit points or clips. Unlike Trim Start and Trim End, it doesn’t matter if the
playhead intersects clips when doing an Extend edit.

Extend Editing Edit Points
Make one selection per track of any combination of In or Out points, and press the E key to
move those edit points to the current position of the playhead.

Before and After a multi-track extend edit performed in selection mode

Part 3 – 23

Yet another set of commands in the Trim menu lets you either Slip or Slide a clip from the frame
at the current position of the Playhead to the In or Out point of that clip.

454

Trimming

Slip and Slide Playhead to In and Out Commands

Part 3 – 23

455

Trimming

In Trim mode, selected edit points will ripple instead of resizing affected clips. However, to
simplify multi-track extend edit operations when using the Trim tool, the lowest numbered video
track with auto-select enabled defines the amount by which the extend edit will ripple the rest
of the Timeline; all selected edit points on other tracks are simply resized to the position of
the playhead.

Before and After a multi-track extend edit performed in Trim mode; you can see that the lowest
numbered track with a selection defines how far the Timeline will be rippled

Extend Editing to Slide Clips
You can also use the Extend edit command to slide the contents of a single selected clip using
either the Selection or Ripple tools. Simply select a clip, position the playhead over the frame of
that clip you want to slip to the In point of that clip’s position in the Timeline, and press E to
perform the slip. You can even do this during playback if you want to watch the clip play and
press E to slip that frame back when the moment feels right.

Using the Extend edit to Slip a clip in the Timeline, the red marker shows that the
frame at the playhead is slipped back to the In point of that clip in the Timeline

Part 3 – 24

Using Transitions

456

Using Transitions

Chapter 24

Using Transitions
This chapter covers the following topics:

Working With Transitions

458

Adding and Editing Transitions

458

Adding Transitions When There’s Not Enough Handles

460

Adding Transitions By Dragging to Create Overlap

460

Transition Properties in the Inspector

461

Using Transition Curves

462

Organizing Transitions

463

Changing the Standard Transition

464

DaVinci Resolve Transitions

464

OpenFX Transitions

469

Using Transitions

Transitions are the connective tissue binding together moments requiring a more significant
way of changing from one image to the next than a simple cut. This chapter shows the many
ways you can add and edit transitions in your program.

Part 3 – 24

457

Video and audio transitions in the Timeline

The default transitions that come with DaVinci Resolve appear within the Toolbox panel of the
Effects Library, while OpenFX transitions appear within the OpenFX panel.

Adding and Editing Transitions
The following procedures describe how to work with add and edit transitions in the Timeline
using both the mouse and keyboard shortcuts.
Methods of adding transitions using the mouse:
‚‚ To add a transition by dragging it from the Effects Library: Drag a video transition
from the Effects Library to an edit point in the Timeline so that it’s centered at, ends at,
or starts at the edit point. If there is no overlap between the heads and tails of the two
clips, you may not be able to add a transition where you want.
‚‚ To add a transition using the Effects Library contextual menu: Select one or more
edit points (one per track), then right-click a video transition in the Effects Library and
choose Add to Selected Edit Points. That transition will be added to every selected edit
point at once.

The Transition contextual menu in the Effects Library

Part 3 – 24

Transitions provide another way of bridging the change from one clip to another, and are often
used to indicate a change in time or location when changing scenes. DaVinci Resolve supports
a variety of transitions ranging from various forms of the traditional cross-dissolve to different
types of wipes, allowing for great flexibility when finishing creative edits. In addition, DaVinci
Resolve supports third-party OpenFX transitions that you install on your system. Transitions are
applied at edit points, and appear as editable objects in the Timeline.

458

Using Transitions

Working With Transitions

Part 3 – 24

459

Using Transitions

To add a transition using the Edit Point contextual menu: Right-click any edit point between clips
with overlapping handles, and choose one of the four durations available for the Standard
Transition; the available choices are quarter-second, half-second, one second, and two
seconds, expressed in frames at whatever the current frame rate of the Timeline is.

The Transition contextual menu for an edit in the Timeline

Methods of adding transitions using keyboard shortcuts:
‚‚ To add a video+audio transition using the keyboard: Select one or more edit points
using the Selection tool, or move the playhead near an edit you want to select and
press V to select it, then press Command-T (Timeline > Add Transition) to add the
standard transition. Transitions are added using the “Standard transition duration” as
specified in the Editing panel of the User Preferences, which defaults to one second, or
however long the overlapping handles of the selected edit point allow.
‚‚ To add a video or audio-only transition using the keyboard: Select one or more
edit points, and press Option-T (Timeline > Add Video Only Transition) to add only a
video transition, or Shift-T (Timeline > Add Audio Only Transition) to add only an audio
transition. Transitions are added using the “Standard transition duration” as specified
in the Editing panel of the User Preferences, which defaults to one second, or however
long the overlapping handles of the selected edit point allow.
‚‚ To add a transition with specific alignment using the keyboard: Select an edit, press
the U key to choose the start, center, or end of the edit, then press Command-T.
The standard transition will be added with its alignment based on the edit selection;
selecting the start of the edit places a transition that ends on the edit; selecting the end
of the edit places a transition that starts on the edit, and choosing the center of the edit
places a transition that is similarly centered.
Methods of moving and duplicating transitions:
‚‚ To move a transition from one edit to another: Select a transition, then drag it to
another edit point.
‚‚ To copy a transition from one edit to another: Select a transition, then option-drag it to
another edit point.
Methods of altering transitions in the Timeline:
‚‚ To change a transition’s type: Drag a different transition from the Effects Library onto
the current one in the Timeline.
‚‚ To change a transition’s duration: Drag the beginning or end of the transition in the
Timeline to be longer or shorter symmetrically about the current edit. Alternately, you
can double-click any transition to open it in the Inspector, and set a new duration in
seconds or frames.
‚‚ To change a transition’s alignment: Right-click a transition in the Timeline and choose
a new method of alignment from the contextual menu. Alternately, you can doubleclick any transition to open it in the Inspector, and choose a new option from the
Alignment pop-up.
‚‚ To remove a transition: Select a transition in the Timeline and press the Delete key.
Or, right-click a transition in the Timeline and choose Delete from the contextual menu.

‚‚ Trim Clips: You can automatically trim the incoming and outgoing sides of each
selected edit point to create the overlap needed for adding the standard transition.
‚‚ Skip Clips: Don’t add transitions to the selected edit points that lack the
appropriate overlap.
‚‚ Cancel: Cancel the operation entirely.

Adding Transitions By Dragging
to Create Overlap
There’s another method you can use to create transitions that makes it easy to create
transitions while you’re doing drag-and-drop editing by simply overlapping the beginning and
end of two clips where you want a transition to appear. Just press and hold the Option and Shift
keyboard modifiers together while you drag a clip or edit to create overlap with another clip.
You can do this in three ways:
‚‚ Select the In or Out point of a clip, then press and hold Option-Shift down and drag the
selected edit point to overlap a neighboring clip where you want to create a transition.

Creating a transition by Option-Shift-Dragging an
edit point to create an overlap between two clips

‚‚ Select a clip, then press and hold Option-Shift down and drag the entire clip to overlap
a neighboring clip where you want to create a transition.

Creating a transition by Option-Shift-Dragging a whole clip
to create an overlap between it and another clip

Part 3 – 24

If the outgoing and incoming overlapping handles at a given edit point don’t have enough
frames to fit the standard transition duration, and you try to add a transition by selecting one or
more edit points and pressing Command-T, or by right-clicking an edit point and using the
transition options in the resulting contextual menu, then you’ll be presented with a dialog that
gives you three choices:

460

Using Transitions

Adding Transitions When
There’s Not Enough Handles

461

Creating a transition by Option-Shift-Dragging a clip from
the Media Pool to overlap a clip in the Timeline

Transition Properties in the Inspector
Double-clicking a transition in the Timeline opens that transition’s properties in the inspector.
Each transition has the following properties you can edit.
‚‚ Duration: The duration of the transition, shown in both seconds and frames.
‚‚ Alignment: A pop-up that lets you choose the transition’s position relative to the
edit point it’s applied to. Your choices are “End on Edit,” “Center on Edit,” and
“Begin on Edit.”
‚‚ Video Transition style: A pop-up that lets you change the type of transition; you can
choose from among all of the transitions that come with DaVinci Resolve by default.
‚‚ Audio Transition style: If an audio transition is simultaneously selected, presents
a pop-up that lets you change the type of audio transition; you can choose from
among all of the audio transitions that come with DaVinci Resolve by default. For
more information about Audio Transitions, see Chapter 25, “Working with Audio in the
Edit Page.”
Additional properties that are specific to each type of transition appear in another group below.
Since the Cross Dissolve transition is the most common transition used, its properties will be
shown as an example.
‚‚ Style: The different Dissolve transitions (Cross Dissolve, Additive Dissolve, etcetera)
expose this pop-up that lets you choose different ways for the outgoing clip to
blend into the incoming clip during the dissolve. There are six different options to
choose from:
Video: A simple linear dissolve; the outgoing clip fades out as the incoming
clip fades in.
Film: A logarithmic dissolve, simulating film dissolves as created by an optical printer.
Additive: The outgoing and incoming clips are cross faded using the Additive
composite mode. As a result, the transition seems to brighten at the halfway point.
Subtractive: The outgoing and incoming clips are cross faded using the Subtractive
composite mode. As a result, the transition seems to darken at the halfway point.
Highlights: The outgoing and incoming clips are cross faded using the Lighten
composite mode. The lightest parts of each clip are emphasized during this transition.
Shadows: The outgoing and incoming clips are cross faded using the Darken
composite mode. The darkest parts of each clip are emphasized during this transition.

Using Transitions

Part 3 – 24

‚‚ Hold the Option-Shift keys down while you drag a clip from the Media Pool to overlap a
clip that’s already in the Timeline.

‚‚ Reverse: Reverses the transition. This parameter is disabled for Dissolve transitions.
‚‚ Ease: A pop-up that lets you apply non-linear acceleration to the beginning, ending,
or overall duration of a transition. The result is to add inertia to the transition from the
outgoing clip to the incoming clip, and providing a gentler change from each clip into
and out of the transition.
In: The outgoing clip lingers as the beginning of the transition dissolves more slowly
than the end.
Out: The outgoing clip fades away more quickly, as the beginning of the transition
dissolves more quickly than the end.
In & Out: Both the outgoing and incoming clips make slower transitions at the
beginning and end of the dissolve, but the very center of the transition is faster
as a result.
Other types of transitions display properties that are specific to that transition’s particular effect.
These are described at length in the following section.

Using Transition Curves
You can create even more highly customized transition effects using the transition curve
associated with each transition you add to the Timeline. Clicking the button at the bottom-right
corner of a transition in the Timeline reveals a Keyframe Editor, and clicking the Curve Editor
button in the Keyframe Editor track for the transition reveals the Transition Curve Editor.

A Transition Curve opened underneath a Cross Dissolve transition

The Transition Curve Editor works identically to the Curve Editor you can access from any clip,
except instead of using the curve to animate image transforms, you use the curve to retime the
transition. Combined with eased or bezier keyframes at the beginning and end of a transition
curve, you can create transitions that slowly start and quickly end, quickly start and slowly end,
or any variation your project requires.

Part 3 – 24

‚‚ End Ratio: Defines the percentage of completion for the transition at its last frame.
Setting the End Ratio to anything but 0 results in the transition never fully dissolving to
the incoming shot at its last frame.

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Using Transitions

‚‚ Start Ratio: Defines the percentage of completion for the transition at its first frame,
from 0 to 100 percent. Setting the Start Ratio to anything but 0 results in the transition
immediately appearing at a more fully cross-dissolved state from the very first frame.

‚‚ To adjust a bezier handle: Drag the bezier handle in any direction to alter the curve.
Whenever you customize bezier handles on a Transition curve, the Ease pop-up of the
Transition Properties in the Inspector changes to Custom.
‚‚ To add a new control point to a curve: Option-click anywhere on a curve to add a new
control point.
‚‚ To drag a control point on a curve: Click any control point and drag left or right to
retime it, and up or down to change the value of the control point. Once you begin to
move the pointer, the control point is constrained in that direction.
‚‚ To delete a control point from a curve: Right-click a keyframe and choose Delete
Selected from the contextual menu. You cannot delete the last two control points of a
transition curve.
‚‚ To turn a curve on and off: Clicking the green dot at the upper left-hand corner of the
Keyframe Editor lets you turn a transition curve’s effect on and off, without disabling the
transition. When you turn the keyframes off, the transition defaults to a linear transition
with no easing.

Organizing Transitions
While DaVinci Resolve provides a wide variety of transitions by default, most editors typically
only use a subset of these in their day-to-day work. Also, it’s typical to save customized versions
of a particular transition in order to reuse that specific set of transition settings over and
over again.
To set a transition or other effect as a favorite in the Effects Library:
Move the pointer over any transition, and click the star button when it appears to set
that transition as a favorite. Click any transition’s star to “un-favorite” it. Favorites are
displayed in the Favorites area of the Effects Library bin list.
To save a Transition Preset for future use:
1

Add a transition to the Timeline, then double-click it to open it in the Inspector to adjust
its settings to be the way you need it to be.

2

(optional) if necessary, open the transition’s Curve Editor and set the type of curve you
want the transition to have. A customized transition curve will be saved inside of that
transition’s preset.

3

Right-click on the transition you want to save, and choose “Create Transition Preset.”

4

Type a name for the Transition Preset in the dialog that appears, and click OK. That
transition is saved to the bottom of the Toolbox Video Transitions area, where you can
apply it just like any other transition.

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Part 3 – 24

‚‚ To change the interpolation of a control point: Click the control point you want to edit,
and then click one of the four bezier interpolation buttons in the Curve Editor title bar.
Adding bezier handles to a transition control point lets you create an eased transition. If
you chose an option from the Ease pop-up of the Transition Properties in the Inspector,
one or both of the transition curve keyframes may already be set to bezier.

Using Transitions

Methods of editing a Transition Curve:

To change the Standard Transition:
Right-click any transition or effect and choose “Set as Standard Transition.” The
standard transition appears with an orange indicator to the left of its name in the
Effects Library.

The Effects Library open, showing starred transitions that have been favorited,
and the standard transition with an orange indicator to the left of its name

To change the standard transition duration:
Open the Editing panel of the User Preferences, and change the “Standard transition
duration” setting (there are controls for setting the duration in either Seconds or
Frames). Click Save when you’re finished.

DaVinci Resolve Transitions
The following are transitions that are available within DaVinci Resolve by default, along with the
parameters that are available for each of them from the Inspector:
Audio Transitions:
Cross Fade +3/–3/0 dB: An audio-only transition that lets you fade from one audio clip
to another. Three different crossfades let you choose the power of the actual transition
from one level to the other.
Video Transitions:
‚‚ Additive Dissolve: Style lets you choose what type of cross dissolve you want;
choices include: Video, Film, Additive, Subtractive, Highlights, Shadows. Start Ratio
lets you adjust how far along the transition is when it first begins. End Ratio lets you
adjust how far the transition gets at the very end. The Reverse checkbox reverses the
direction of the transition.

Part 3 – 24

Different projects may require different transitions be used as the Standard Transition.
DaVinci Resolve gives you several tools for dealing with this.

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Using Transitions

Changing the Standard Transition

‚‚ Arrow Head Up
‚‚ Arrow Head Bottom
‚‚ Arrow Head Left
‚‚ Arrow Head Right
‚‚ Band Wipe: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition. Preset lets you choose one of the following presets:
‚‚ Horizontal
‚‚ Vertical
‚‚ Horizontal Bilinear
‚‚ Vertical Bilinear
‚‚ Barn Door: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition. Box mode lets you choose one of the following presets:
‚‚ Barn Door Vertical
‚‚ Barn Door Horizontal
‚‚ Blur Dissolve: Horizontal/Vertical Strength sets how much blur is performed in the X
and Y dimensions during the course of this transition. Start Ratio lets you adjust how
far along the transition is when it first begins. End Ratio lets you adjust how far the
transition gets at the very end. The Reverse checkbox reverses the direction of the
transition.
‚‚ Box: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of the
border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition. Box mode lets you choose one of the following options:
‚‚ Upper Left
‚‚ Upper Right
‚‚ Lower Left
‚‚ Lower Right
‚‚ Left Center
‚‚ Top Center
‚‚ Right Center
‚‚ Bottom Center
‚‚ Center Wipe: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width
of the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Angle specifies the angle of the wipe
as it emerges from the middle of the screen. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition.

Part 3 – 24

Box mode lets you choose one of the following presets:

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Using Transitions

‚‚ Arrow Iris: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Offset to center lets you alter the center
point at which this transition is positioned. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition.

‚‚ Cross Iris: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Offset to Center identifies the center
point at which the cross wipe begins, as X and Y coordinates on the screen. Feather
is a checkbox that, when turned on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of
feathering at the edge of the transition.
‚‚ Diamond Iris: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width
of the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Offset to Center identifies the center
point at which the diamond-shaped wipe begins, as X and Y coordinates on the screen.
Feather is a checkbox that, when turned on, uses the Border slider to determine the
amount of feathering at the edge of the transition.
‚‚ Dip to Color Dissolve: Start Ratio lets you adjust how far along the transition is when
it first begins. End Ratio lets you adjust how far the transition gets at the very end. The
Reverse checkbox reverses the direction of the transition. Color lets you choose what
color the dissolve dips to at the midpoint.
‚‚ Edge Wipe: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Angle specifies the angle of the wipe
as it moves across the screen. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned on, uses the
Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the transition.
‚‚ Eye Iris: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of the
border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition.
‚‚ Heart: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of the
border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Offset to Center identifies the center point
at which this circular wipe begins, as X and Y coordinates on the screen. Feather is
a checkbox that, when turned on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of
feathering at the edge of the transition.
‚‚ Hexagon Iris: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Offset to center lets you alter the center
point at which this transition is positioned. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition. Box mode lets you choose one of the following presets:
‚‚ Hexagon
‚‚ Hexagon Rotate
‚‚ Non-Additive Dissolve: Start Ratio lets you adjust how far along the transition is when
it first begins. End Ratio lets you adjust how far the transition gets at the very end. The
Reverse checkbox reverses the direction of the transition.
‚‚ Oval Iris: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Offset to Center identifies the center
point at which this circular wipe begins, as X and Y coordinates on the screen. Oval
Ratio changes the aspect ratio of the oval, making it either wider or taller. Feather is
a checkbox that, when turned on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of
feathering at the edge of the transition.

Part 3 – 24

‚‚ Cross Dissolve: Style lets you choose what type of cross dissolve you want; choices
include: Video, Film, Additive, Subtractive, Highlights, Shadows. Start Ratio lets you
adjust how far along the transition is when it first begins. End Ratio lets you adjust how
far the transition gets at the very end. The Reverse checkbox reverses the direction of
the transition.

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Using Transitions

‚‚ Clock Wipe: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width
of the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Angle specifies the starting angle
of the wipe as it spins around the center of the screen. The Clockwise checkbox sets
the direction of the clock wipe. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned on, uses the
Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the transition.

‚‚ Pentagon Down
‚‚ Push: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of the
border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition. Box mode lets you choose one of the following presets:
‚‚ Push Left
‚‚ Push Right
‚‚ Push Up
‚‚ Push Down
‚‚ Radial Wipe: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition.
‚‚ Slide: Direction determines whether or not the incoming clip slides in or the outgoing
clip slides out. Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width
of the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when
turned on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of
the transition.
Box mode lets you choose one of the following presets:
‚‚ Slide, Left-Right
‚‚ Slide, Right-Left
‚‚ Slide, Bottom-Up
‚‚ Slide, Top-Down
‚‚ Slide, Top-Left
‚‚ Slide, Bottom-Right
‚‚ Smooth Cut: A special-purpose transition designed to make short jump cuts in the
middle of a clip less noticeable. This is done by using optical flow processing to match
the same features on either side of a cut in order to automatically morph a subject
from one position to another over the duration of the transition. This effect works
best on clips such as sit-down interviews and close-up head shots with a minimum of
background and subject motion, and where the subject’s position on either side of the
cut is not significantly different. A good example of when Smooth Cut is effective is
when you’re cutting pauses, partial repeats, filler sounds such as “um” or “you know,”
or other speech disfluencies out of an interview clip to tighten the dialog, and you want
to eliminate the little “jump” that occurs at the cut without having to cut away to b-roll.
Applying a short two or four frame Smooth Cut transition to the edit can make this kind
of edit invisible, as long as the speaker doesn’t change position significantly during
the cut. The more motion there is in the background of the shot, and the more the
speaker changes position, the harder it will be to get a useful result using Smooth Cut.
Although the default duration for any transition is one second, you’ll find that Smooth
Cut transitions work much better when they’re short; 2-6 frame Smooth Cut transitions
often work best to disguise jump cuts.

Part 3 – 24

‚‚ Pentagon Up

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Using Transitions

‚‚ Pentagon Iris: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width
of the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Offset to center lets you alter the
center point at which this transition is positioned. Feather is a checkbox that, when
turned on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of
the transition. Box mode lets you choose one of the following presets:

‚‚ Star: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of the
border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Offset to Center identifies the center point
at which this circular wipe begins, as X and Y coordinates on the screen. Feather is
a checkbox that, when turned on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of
feathering at the edge of the transition.
‚‚ Triangle Iris: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Offset to center lets you alter the center
point at which this transition is positioned. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition.
Box mode lets you choose one of the following presets:
‚‚ Triangle Up
‚‚ Triangle Bottom
‚‚ Triangle Left
‚‚ Triangle Right
‚‚ Triangle Left: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition.
‚‚ Triangle Right: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width
of the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when
turned on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of
the transition.
‚‚ Venetian Blind Wipe: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the
width of the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Repeat specifies how many
“blinds” appear within the wipe effect. Angle specifies the angle of this multi-wipe
effect. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned on, uses the Border slider to determine
the amount of feathering at the edge of the transition.
‚‚ X Wipe: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of the
border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition.

Part 3 – 24

‚‚ Split: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of the
border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition.

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Using Transitions

‚‚ Spiral Wipe: Color sets the color of the border, if there is one. Border sets the width of
the border, in pixels, with 0 creating no border. Feather is a checkbox that, when turned
on, uses the Border slider to determine the amount of feathering at the edge of the
transition.

Using Transitions

If you’ve installed one or more sets of OpenFX plug-ins on your DaVinci Resolve workstation,
any transitions within those sets will appear in the OpenFX panel of the Effects Library.

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Part 3 – 24

OpenFX Transitions

OpenFX Transitions in the Effects Library

Part 3 – 25

Working with
Audio
in the Edit Page

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Chapter 25

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

When you’ve finished doing the editorial audio work in your program, and you want to really drill
into your program’s audio for detailed audio editing and mixing, you can use the audio-specific
tools of the Fairlight page. For more information, see Chapter 62, “Using the Audio Page.”
This chapter has the following topics:

Audio in the Edit vs. Fairlight Pages

473

Compatible Audio Formats

473

Assigning Audio Channels in the Media Pool

473

Editing Audio Into the Timeline

476

Editing Audio Using the Source Viewer

476

Simultaneous Audio Waveform Display in the Source Viewer

476

Using Multi-Channel Timeline Tracks

477

Editing Audio Clips Into the Timeline

478

Changing Audio Clip Attributes After Editing

479

Displaying Waveforms in the Timeline

480

Editing Audio In the Timeline Using In and Out Points

481

Audio Settings in the Inspector

483

Setting Clip Levels

483

Adjusting Audio in the Inspector

483

Adjusting Audio in the Timeline

483

Adjusting Clip Levels Using Keyboard Shortcuts

484

Clip EQ

485

Master EQ Controls

485

Graphical EQ controls

486

Bands 1 and 4

486

Bands 2-3

486

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

DaVinci Resolve has a solid set of features for editing, mixing, and mastering audio in your
programs right in the Edit page. Whether you’re adjusting synced audio for dailies, finessing the
levels of an edited project you’re assembling, mixing a program for output, or importing and
laying in audio mix files from the sound designer to output for mastering, DaVinci Resolve has
Level, Pan, and Channel Assignment controls to control your audio output for both monitoring
and delivery, automated fader recording at both the track and clip level for mixing, and VST and
Audio Unit audio filter support for mastering audio tracks and channels using industry-standard
noise reduction, compression, EQ, and other filters. And, if all that’s not enough for you, you can
export to Pro Tools in the Delivery page to hand off your program and its audio in a state ready
for further work.

Part 3 – 25

471

487

Curve Editor Controls for Clip Audio

487

How to Add and Adjust Audio Keyframes

487

Audio Fade Handles

488

Audio Crossfades

489

The Audio Mixer

490

Audio Mixer Controls

491

Disabling Track Audio vs. Muting Tracks

491

Displaying Audio Meters

491

Using Audio Filters

492

Installing Audio Filters

493

The Fairlight Page

494

Pro Tools Export

494

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Keyframing Audio

Part 3 – 25

472

Compatible Audio Formats
DaVinci Resolve is compatible with WAVE, Broadcast WAVE, AIFF, MP3, AAC (M4A), CAF
(macOS only), MTS and QuickTime containers using the AC3 audio format, and Enhanced AC-3
(macOS and Windows) at sample rates including 32, 44.1, 48, 88.2, 96, and 192 kHz.

Assigning Audio Channels
in the Media Pool
When you first import audio into the Media Pool, it’s a good idea to make sure that whatever
channels those files contain are assigned correctly before you start editing clips into the
Timeline. In other words, you want to make sure that stereo files are set to be stereo clips, that
5.1 and 7.1 files are set to be surround clips, and that multi-channel files are set to expose
however many channels you want to edit separately in your program. Clip channel assignments
are made in the Audio panel of the Clip Attributes window.
This is particularly important when clips have more than two channels of audio. For example,
production sound recordists might record three, six, or even more audio channels,
corresponding to a variety of microphones on set along with mixdown tracks. In this case, you
need to define how many of these channels you want to play, and how many items you want to
appear in the Timeline.
Mono, stereo, 5.1, and 7.1 clips are handled automatically, but multi-channel clips needing
custom assignments in the Media Pool should be remapped as necessary using Clip Attributes,
so that DaVinci Resolve can more easily place incoming audio clips into the correct track of the
Timeline. You can alter the clip attributes for clips one at a time, or for multiple selected clips at
once. For more information on these settings, see Chapter 10, “Modifying Clips and
Clip Attributes.”
Each clip with audio has the following options in the Audio panel of the Clip Attributes window:

The controls available for defining tracks and channels

Part 3 – 25

While the Fairlight page provides dedicated audio editing and mixing capabilities that are
suitable for sweetening the audio of your program once it’s been edited, the Edit page has
extensive audio capabilities of its own. This enables editors to edit and refine audio clips, set
levels, and do simple mixes as they assemble the program in the first place. However, once
things have been edited together, you’re meant to go freely back and forth between the Edit
and Fairlight page as you refine your work, using whichever environment is most suitable for the
task at hand.

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Audio in the Edit vs. Fairlight Pages

‚‚ Audio Channels: Defines how many audio channels appear within each track.
How you handle audio in your timeline is up to you. In the case of production audio consisting
of five channels, four for different microphones plus one mixdown channel, you might use Clip
Attributes to map all channels to a single track, muting all channels except for the mixdown
channel.

The Channels controls in the Audio panel of the Clip Attributes window

With this mapping, this audio clip exposes only one item in the Timeline.

A single audio channel exposed in the Timeline

Alternately, you might elect to set these clips up with five separate audio tracks with a
single audio channel each, in order to expose each channel separately in the Timeline for
independent editing.

Part 3 – 25

‚‚ Audio Tracks: Defines how many audio items will appear in the Timeline when this clip
is edited. Each audio track can be edited independently, if necessary, with separate In
and Out points.

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

‚‚ Channel Format: Defines the relationship between audio tracks and audio channels.
Select Mono, Stereo, 5.1, 7.1, or Adaptive as appropriate for your clip. The selected
channel format determines how many default channels appear in the Source Channel
list below. For multi-channel production audio, Adaptive is probably the best choice.

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Part 3 – 25

475

The Channels controls in the Audio panel of the Clip Attributes window

Editing such a clip into the Timeline results in five linked audio items appearing on five separate
audio tracks, each of which can be edited separately in the Timeline.

Each channel exposed as a separately editable clip in the Timeline

Editing Audio Using the Source Viewer
Opening an audio-only clip into the Source Viewer, or opening a clip with both video and audio
and setting the Viewer to Audio Waveform results in a split view, with the complete waveform of
the entire source clip shown in the top half, and a zoomed-in view of the waveform in the
bottom half that can be set to zoom from 1x to 50x from the Zoom menu at the upper left-hand
corner of the Source Viewer. This view makes it easy to drag the box at the top to find the
section of audio you need relative to the entire clip, and yet still place In and Out points with
great precision using the scrubber bar below.
This view shows every channel within each track of the current clip.

An audio clip opened into the Source Viewer

You can add markers and set In and Out points for audio clips just as you would for any other
clip, in preparation for editing.

Simultaneous Audio Waveform Display in the Source Viewer
It’s also possible to edit using audio waveforms even when the Source Viewer is set to Source.
Two options in the Option Menu let you see a superimposed audio waveform running along the
bottom of the Viewer, over the video of the currently selected clip.
‚‚ Show Current Frame Audio Waveform: Shows a zoomed-in section of audio that
scrolls as you play the clip. Useful for seeing dialog and music cues as you play
through a clip.
‚‚ Show Full Clip Audio Waveform: Shows the audio waveform for the entire source
media of that clip. The section of audio from the In to Out points you’ve set in the
Source Viewer are highlighted. Useful for using the audio waveform to navigate
throughout that clip using the waveform as a reference.

Part 3 – 25

A separate set of audio tracks contain all of the audio that you edit into the Timeline, as well as
any stand-alone audio files that might have been imported along with an AAF or XML files.

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Editing Audio Into the Timeline

The Source Viewer with “Show Current Frame Audio Waveform” enabled,
displaying the audio waveform along the bottom of the image

Using Multi-Channel Timeline Tracks
Multi-channel audio tracks are extremely convenient when you’re dealing with clips that are
stereo, 5.1, 7.1, or have an arbitrary number of channels that were recorded in the field, as you
can fit all of these channels as a single clip into a single track, that will be correctly mapped to
your project’s outputs, and that can be edited conveniently as a single item in the Timeline.
However, there are different types of audio tracks just like there are different types of audio
clips: Mono, Stereo, 5.1, and Adaptive. While you can edit any kind of audio clip into any kind of
audio track, all audio channels in excess of the number of audio channels enabled by a
particular timeline track will be muted. For example, you’re allowed to edit a six-channel
Adaptive audio clip into a Mono audio track, but only the first channel will play because of the
way that track is mapped to the mixer outputs.
Because of this, it’s a good idea to organize your timeline such that all clips appear on tracks
that can accommodate the number of channels they have.

Defining Timeline Audio Track Channels at Creation
When you first create a new audio track, you have to choose what kind of audio track it will be.
Right-clicking in the bottom audio portion of the Timeline track header reveals a contextual submenu that lets you create one of three different kinds of audio tracks.
‚‚ Mono: Holds a single channel.
‚‚ Stereo: Holds stereo left and right channels. Stereo tracks can be panned.
‚‚ 5.1: Holds the six channels corresponding to a 5.1 surround mix. For broadcast, SMPTE
specifies Left, Center, Right, Left Surround, Right Surround, and LFE. For cinema
distribution these tracks are ordered Left, Right, Center, LFE, Surround Left, Surround
Right, and LFE.
‚‚ 7.1: Holds the eight channels corresponding to a 7.1 surround mix. For broadcast,
SMPTE specifies Left, Center, Right, Left Surround, Right Surround, LFE, Back Surround
Left, and Back Surround Right. For cinema distribution these tracks are ordered Left,
Right, Center, LFE, Left Surround, Right Surround, Back Left Surround, and Back
Right Surround.

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Part 3 – 25

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Part 3 – 25

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

‚‚ Adaptive: Capable of holding up to 24 audio channels. An adaptive audio track can
hold clips with different combinations of channels, up to the maximum number of
channels allowed within that track. The number of channels allowable on a particular
Adaptive track is user-definable (1–24) at the time that track is created. If you edit a clip
with more channels into an Adaptive track that was created to hold fewer channels, the
extra channels are muted.

Four audio tracks with each type of audio track shown. From the
top down, Mono, Stereo, 5.1, Adaptive

Changing How Many Channels an Audio Track Has
If you had set up your timeline with one kind of audio track, but you discover you actually need
a different kind, you can change any audio track’s type at any time. Just right-click anywhere in
that audio track’s timeline header, and choose an option from the Change Track Type To
submenu of the contextual menu.

Contextual menu for changing audio track types

Editing Audio Clips Into the Timeline
When you edit a video clip with accompanying audio, or an audio-only clip, into the Timeline,
what you see depends on how the audio’s internal tracks and channels were defined in the
Media Pool, using Clip Attributes.
If you’ve defined a clip to expose multiple channels of audio via multiple tracks, you exchange
the convenience of managing multiple channels of audio as a single item for the freedom to

Part 3 – 25

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

individually edit each channel of audio separately, as individual clips in the Timeline.
For example, if you’ve been given a multi-channel recording that consists of a two boom
microphones, two separate lavaliere microphones, and a mix-down track that were recorded
simultaneously, you can use the Audio Panel of the Clip Attributes window to set that clip’s
audio up as 5 channel Adaptive audio with 5 tracks containing one channel each. Editing this
into the Timeline, you end up with five separate audio items appearing in five tracks.

Editing a multi-channel production recording as five separate tracks of audio

This way, when you edit that clip into the Timeline, each audio channel appears as its own clip
in its own audio track of the Timeline, which can be separately edited so you can edit the scene
to isolate the best dialog from each microphone.

Editing multi-track audio to isolate the best dialog from each microphone

Changing Audio Clip Attributes After Editing
It’s best to make decisions about which audio tracks and channels are assigned prior to
beginning editing. This is because once you’ve edited a clip into a timeline, you can’t use the
Clip Attributes window to edit how many Audio Tracks and Audio Channels are assigned or
exposed.

If, for whatever reason, you need to expose more audio tracks in the Timeline than you
originally set an audio clip to use, you can do the following.
To re-edit an audio clip to expose more audio tracks than were originally available:
1

Right-click the clip you want to change the audio track mapping of in the Timeline, and
choose Find in Media Pool from the contextual menu.

2

Right-click that clip in the Media Pool and choose Clip Attributes from the contextual
menu.

3

Open the Audio panel of the Clip Attributes dialog, and choose how many audio tracks
and audio channels you want to set that clip up with. Click OK.

4

Once that’s done, edit the changed audio clip from the Media Pool to the Timeline
to replace the original clip using whichever method makes sense.

Displaying Waveforms in the Timeline
The Timeline View options palette lets you turn Audio Waveform display on and off via a
checkbox. If the audio waveform is turned off, then all audio channels are minimized.

The Audio Waveform display option in the
Timeline View pop-up

While a single averaged audio waveform representing all the channels in that clip is shown by
default, you can switch any clip to seeing each individual waveform in a vertical stack by
right-clicking any audio clip and choosing Display Individual Audio Channels.

Enabling the display of multiple channel waveforms in the Timeline

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

However, you can use Clip Attributes to change which channels are assigned and/or muted
within the available Tracks and Channels. For example, if you’re editing clips that have five
channels of source audio (channels 1 and 2 are a stereo mix and channels 3 through 5 are three
different microphones), you may have set your synced source clips to have one audio track and
five audio channels, with channels 3-5 muted. Later you have a few clips that would sound
much better if you only used channel 4, which is the isolated lavaliere microphone for that actor,
so you can select those clips and use the Audio panel of Clip Attributes to mute all channels but
channel 4.

Audio clips can be edited using all of the commands and tools available for video clips.
However, it’s good to know that one of the most common techniques of editing audio in
other environments is available in DaVinci Resolve, and that is the ability to identify a range of
audio to cut, copy, or delete using Timeline In and Out points, so that you can easily eliminate,
move, or duplicate partial sections of audio without having to use the Razor Edit or Split Clip
commands.
To delete a section of audio using In and Out points:
1

Set In and Out points in the Timeline to identify the range of audio you want to
eliminate. If necessary, turn off the auto select controls of tracks to omit overlapping
audio clips you don’t want to delete from this operation.

Setting In and Out points to identify a range of audio to delete

2

Press the Backspace key to delete the section of audio and leave a gap, or press the
Forward Delete key to delete the section of audio and ripple the Timeline to close
the gap.

Deleting the audio using the Backspace key to leave a gap

Part 3 – 25

Editing Audio In the Timeline
Using In and Out Points

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Whenever you cut an audio clip, you cut all audio channels with it. Audio channels that are
embedded within a single track cannot be individually edited.

Set In and Out points in the Timeline to identify the range of audio you want to copy.
If necessary, turn off the auto select controls of tracks with overlapping audio you don’t
want to copy; you can Option-click the auto-select control of the audio track you’re
copying from to solo it, and you can Shift-click any video track’s auto-select control
to turn them all off. In this example, we’re copying some background ambience to
continue building an ambience track.

Setting In and Out points to identify a range of audio to copy

2

Press Command-C to copy that section of audio.

3

Press Option-X to clear the Timeline In and Out points, and move the playhead to
where you want to paste the copied section of audio.

4

Press Command-V to paste the copied audio. If you’re looping a section of audio, you
can paste many times to loop what you’ve copied.

Pasting the background ambience several times to loop it

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1

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

To copy a section of audio using In and Out points:

‚‚ Volume: Each clip has a single volume control that corresponds to the volume overlay
over each audio clip.
‚‚ Equalizer: Each clip also has a four-band EQ, complete with low-pass, high-pass, and
parametric settings for fine tuning and problem-solving audio issues at the clip level.
Additionally, when you apply other audio plug-ins from the Audio FX panel of the Effects
Library, additional parameters and controls are exposed (covered towards the end of this
chapter).

Setting Clip Levels
Each audio clip, or audio item in the case of audio clips with linked audio on multiple tracks, has
its own Volume level. This means that audio clips with multiple channels share a common
Volume setting. There are several ways you can adjust these levels simply.

Adjusting Audio in the Inspector
Each clip has individual Level parameters that are accessible in the Audio panel of the Inspector
when one or more audio clips are selected.

The Volume and Pan parameters available for
audio clips in the Inspector

Selecting an audio clip in the Timeline and adjusting its Volume or Pan only alters that clip,
which lets you set basic levels for individual clips in your program. The Volume control affects
every channel within that clip simultaneously.
If you select multiple clips in the Timeline, then adjusting the Volume or Pan sliders or virtual
sliders for all of them simultaneously will make a relative adjustment to all of the clips,
preserving their offsets from one another. If you want to set all clips to the same level, then
making a numeric adjustment will set all selected clips to the same absolute level.

Adjusting Audio in the Timeline
Each clip (or item) of audio in the Timeline has a Volume overlay that lets you set that clip’s level
by simply dragging it up or down with the pointer. This overlay corresponds to the Volume
parameter in the Inspector.

Part 3 – 25

Each clip has some simple audio-related parameters in the Audio panel of the Inspector.

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Audio Settings in the Inspector

Dragging a Volume overlay to adjust the clip level

If you want to adjust the Pan of that clip in the Timeline, you need to click the Curve Editor
button at the bottom right-hand corner of the audio clip, which opens the Audio Curve Editor.
You can then use the Parameter pop-up at the upper left-hand corner of the Curve Editor to
turn on the Pan checkbox and select the Pan overlay. This overlay can then be dragged up or
down to adjust the pan of the clip.

Showing the Pan overlay in the Curve Editor

The Audio Curve Editor can also expose curves for the various parameters of the clip-based EQ
that’s available.

Adjusting Clip Levels Using Keyboard Shortcuts
You can also adjust the Volume of selected clips using keyboard shortcuts, even while the
Timeline is playing. There are several ways you can set this up.
‚‚ To adjust just one clip: Select that clip, and choose Clip > Increase Audio Level 1dB
(Option-Command-Plus) or Clip > Decrease Audio Level 1dB (Option-Command-Minus).
‚‚ To adjust any clip at the position of the playhead: Turn on Timeline > Selection
Follows Playhead (Command-W) so that whichever clip intersects the playhead
becomes selected, and then choose Clip > Increase Audio Level 1dB (OptionCommand-Plus) or Clip > Decrease Audio Level 1dB (Option-Command-Minus).

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

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TIP: An additional pair of commands in the Clip menu, Increase/Decrease
Audio Level 3 dB, are available, but unmapped to keyboard shortcuts by
default.

Clip EQ
Each audio clip in the Timeline has a four band equalizer that has both graphical and numeric
controls for boosting or attenuating different ranges of frequencies within that clip, before it
even gets to the EQ built into the mixer. Each band has controls for the filter type (Bell, Lo-Shelf,
Hi-Shelf, Notch), Frequency, Gain, and Q-factor (sharpness of the band), with the available
controls for each band of EQ changing depending on the filter type.
When a channel strip’s EQ is enabled, the EQ button displays the equalization curve that’s
being applied. This indicator cannot be adjusted; you must open the EQ window to make
modifications.

The channel strip’s EQ indicator, (Left) EQ is at detente, (Right) EQ is adjusted

Master EQ Controls
The Equalizer window has the following overall controls:
‚‚ Enable button: Turns the overall EQ effect off and on, without resetting the controls.
‚‚ Reset button: Resets all controls of the EQ window to their defaults.

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

‚‚ To adjust multiple clips all together: Select all of the clips you want to adjust, all
at once, and choose Clip > Increase Audio Level 1dB (Option-Command-Plus) or
Clip > Decrease Audio Level 1dB (Option-Command-Minus). If the clips you select
have differing Volume levels, these differences will be maintained as you make
your adjustments.

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

A graph at the top shows a curve with handles that correspond to each of the enabled EQ bands
listed below. You can drag any numbered handle to boost or attenuate the range of frequencies
governed by that band, using whatever type of equalization that band has been set to.

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Graphical EQ controls

The EQ graph with user-draggable handles

Dragging the numbered handles on this graph in turn modifies the parameters of the
corresponding band, and changing each band’s parameters will also alter the EQ graph, which
serves the additional purpose of providing a graphical representation of the equalization being
applied to that track.

Bands 1 and 4
The outer two sets of band controls let you make high-pass and low-pass adjustments, if
necessary.
‚‚ Band enable button: Turns each band of EQ on and off.
‚‚ Band filter type: Bands 1 and 6 can be switched among four specific filtering options
for processing the lowest or highest frequencies in the signal. These include (from top
to bottom) Hi-Shelf, Hi-Pass, Lo-Pass, and Lo-Shelf.
‚‚ Freq: Adjusts the center frequency of the EQ adjustment.
‚‚ Gain: Adjusts the amount by which the affected frequencies are affected. Negative
values attenuate those frequencies, while positive values boost those frequencies.

Bands 2-3
The middle two sets of band controls let you make a wide variety of equalization adjustments.
‚‚ Band enable button: Turns each band of EQ on and off.
‚‚ Band filter type: Bands 2–5 can be switched among four different filtering options
(from top to bottom) Lo-Shelf, Bell, Notch, and Hi-Shelf.
‚‚ Frequency: Adjusts the center frequency of the EQ adjustment.
‚‚ Gain: Adjusts the amount by which the affected frequencies are affected. Negative
values attenuate those frequencies, while positive values boost those frequencies.
‚‚ Q Factor: Adjusts the width of affected frequencies. Lower values include a wider
range of frequencies, higher values include a narrower range of frequencies.

For more information on keyframing in the Inspector, see Chapter 31, “Keyframing.”
Any keyframes you create using the Keyframe controls of the Inspector automatically appear on
the Volume Curve of that audio clip in the Timeline.

Curve Editor Controls for Clip Audio
Each audio clip in the Timeline appears with a Curve control overlaid on top of it, that by default
starts out completely flat. Similar to such controls found in other applications, the Level Curve
lets you alter each clip’s volume, either overall, or dynamically using keyframes.

Volume curves adjusting the level of a clip’s audio in the Timeline

Additionally, you can click any clip’s Audio Curve Editor button, at the bottom right-hand corner
of each audio clip, to open an audio-specific Curve Editor with which you can keyframe not just
Volume, but Pan, and the parameters of any audio filters you might have applied to that clip.

The button for opening an
audio clip’s Curve Editor

A pop-up at the upper left-hand corner of the Audio Curve Editor lets you choose which audio
parameters you want to expose for editing and keyframing. This includes the individual
parameters of any audio filters you’ve applied to that clip, which appear in submenus
corresponding to each filter you’ve applied. When you’re finished using the clip Audio Curve
Editor, you can click the close button at the bottom right of the audio clip to hide it.

How to Add and Adjust Audio Keyframes
Mixing audio by adding and adjusting individual keyframes can be a fast and effective way of
balancing clip levels with one another, fixing level problems within a particular clip, or even
creating simple mixes (although the mixing capabilities of the Fairlight page are considerably
more robust). When manually editing any audio parameter curve, you can use the following
procedures.

Part 3 – 25

There are two ways you can keyframe audio in the Edit page. You can use each audio clip’s
Volume Curve in the Timeline, or you can use the keyframe controls in the Inspector to animate
the Volume parameter of individual clips as you would any other clip attribute, fading the level
up or down, panning from left to right, or dynamically changing any one of a host of
filter controls.

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Keyframing Audio

‚‚ To add keyframes to the level curve: Hold the Option key down and click the curve
to place a keyframe at that frame. You must add at least two keyframes to create an
automated change in volume.
‚‚ To adjust any keyframe: Move the pointer over a keyframe so that the four-way
cursor appears, and then click and drag in the intended direction of adjustment,
either vertically to change the volume of the clip at that frame, or horizontally to move
the keyframe to a different point in time. Once you start dragging a keyframe into
a particular direction, keyframe movement is constrained in that direction until you
release that keyframe.
‚‚ To change the interpolation of a keyframe: Click the keyframe you want to edit, and
then click one of the four bezier interpolation buttons at the top of the Curve Editor.
‚‚ To adjust a bezier handle: Drag the bezier handle in any direction to alter the curve.
‚‚ To delete keyframes: Select any keyframe on a curve, and press the Delete key to
make it disappear.

Audio Fade Handles
When you position the pointer directly over an audio clip, a pair of Audio Fade handles appear
at the In and Out points. Dragging each of these handles towards the center of the clip lets you
fade in the clip volume at the beginning of the clip, and fade out the clip volume at the end of
the clip.

Audio Fade handles at either end of an audio clip

NOTE: When you import a Final Cut Pro X project, the fade handles for each clip
automatically import as well.

Once you’ve created a fade effect, you can adjust the curve of the fade by dragging the handle
that appears right on top of the fader curve. Dragging the handle up and down affects the angle
of the curve, and dragging the handle left and right affects the shape of the curve. In this way,
you can create all manner of fade effects.

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Part 3 – 25

‚‚ To adjust any curve segment: Position the pointer between any two keyframes,
directly on top of the curve segment you want to raise or lower, and when the move
cursor is displayed, click and drag up to raise the level, or down to reduce the level.

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

Methods of adjusting different audio curves using the pointer:

Adjusting the curve of the fade

Fade effects can be created and edited on both the Edit and Fairlight pages.

Audio Crossfades
You can add Cross Fade transitions to any edit point between two overlapping audio clips, the
same way you’d add video transitions, by dragging and dropping from the Effects Library, by
right-clicking an edit and choosing an option from the contextual menu, or by selecting an audio
edit point and choosing Timeline > Add Audio Only Transition (Shift-T).
Cross Fade transitions fade the volume of the outgoing clip down while simultaneously fading
the volume of the incoming clip up, letting you create a smooth aural transition between two
audio clips.

An audio Cross Fade transition applied between two clips

You can double-click a Cross Fade transition to open it into the Inspector, revealing the
following parameters:
‚‚ Duration: The duration of the transition, shown in both seconds and frames.
‚‚ Alignment: A pop-up that lets you choose the transition’s position relative to the
edit point it’s applied to. Your choices are “End on Edit,” “Center on Edit,” and
“Begin on Edit.”
‚‚ Transition style: For Cross Fade transitions, there is only one style available.
‚‚ Fade In/Fade Out levels: There are three options that affect the incoming and outgoing
halves of the Cross Fade effect independently. 0dB applies a linear fade. +3dB applies
a boosted curve; when applied to both Fade In and Fade Out, this can compensate
for diminished levels in the middle of a Cross Fade. -3dB applies an attenuating curve,
which deliberately lowers the level of the Cross Fade.
Crossfades can be created and edited on both the Edit and Fairlight pages.

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

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To open the Audio Mixer, do one of the following:
Click the Mixer button on the interface toolbar.
The Audio Mixer exposes a set of channel strips with controls that correspond to the tracks in
the Timeline, one for each track, plus (by default) a Main 1 that lets you adjust the overall level of
the mix. Each channel strip’s controls affect the level and panning of every single clip on
that track.

The Audio Mixer, with four channel strips
corresponding to the four tracks in the Timeline

NOTE: You cannot record automation in the Edit page. Comprehensive mixing controls
with full automation recording are found in the Fairlight page.

Part 3 – 25

The Audio Mixer on the Edit page is a simplified version of the Mixer on the Fairlight page,
designed to provide a streamlined set of graphical controls you can use to set basic track
levels, pan stereo audio, and mute and solo tracks, while you work.

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Working with Audio in the Edit Page

The Audio Mixer

Audio Mixer Controls

491

‚‚ Track Number: The number of the timeline audio track corresponding to each channel
strip appears here.
‚‚ Pan control: Lets you pan a Mono channel’s audio from left to right, or invert a Stereo
channel’s left and right audio channels, or do surround mixing.
‚‚ Name: The name of the audio track that channel strip corresponds to. If you’ve edited
the audio track names in the Timeline, those names will appear here. Double-clicking a
channel strip names toggles between your custom track name and the number of each
audio track in the Timeline. You can also choose whether or not to show track names in
the Mixer by choosing View > Use Track Names in Audio Mixer.
‚‚ Solo: Mutes all tracks other than ones that are soloed.
‚‚ Mute: Disables that audio track.
‚‚ dB: Shows you the volume, in decibels, that track is currently set to.
‚‚ Fader: Each track’s vertical fader can be dragged with your mouse or other pointing
device to adjust the volume of that track and perform automation recording. Dragging
up increases volume, dragging down decreases volume.
‚‚ Audio meters: Audio meters to the right of each fader display the audio volume of
all channels on that track during playback. Each channel strip has individual meters
corresponding to the number of channels that track has been set to accommodate.

Disabling Track Audio vs. Muting Tracks
When you use the mute or solo controls of the Audio Mixer, track audio is disabled during
playback. However all muted (or non-soloed) tracks are re-enabled for output to tape or
rendering as file-based output when you use the controls in the Deliver page. If you want to
disable tracks for output, you can use the Enable Track button, in the track header of the
Timeline in the Edit page or the Deliver page, to turn any tracks off that you don’t want to output.

Displaying Audio Meters
Clicking the Mixer button in the interface toolbar of the Edit page opens up the Mixer by default,
but you can choose Audio Meters from the Mixer’s Option menu to display simple audio meters
to the right of the Timeline that let you monitor the level of the Master mix during playback.
The audio meters are capable of displaying however many channels you’ve defined as your
output format.

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

‚‚ Track Color: Each track can be differently color-coded to help you keep organized.
These colors also appear in the timeline track header and the Fairlight page.

Part 3 – 25

Each track’s channel strip has the following controls:

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

On Mac OS X and Windows, DaVinci Resolve supports the use of third-party VST audio
plug-ins. On Mac OS X, DaVinci Resolve supports Audio Unit (AU) audio plug-ins. Once you
install these effects on your workstation, they appear in the Audio FX panel of the Effects
Library.

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Using Audio Filters

Audio filters in the Effects Library

Audio plug-ins let you apply effects to individual audio clips or entire tracks worth of audio, to
add creative qualities such as echo or reverb, or to take care of mastering issues using noise
reduction, compression, or EQ.
Methods of applying Audio Filters to clips in the Edit Page:
‚‚ To apply an audio filter to a clip: Drag any filter from the Audio FX panel of the Effects
Library onto the clip in the Timeline you want to apply it to.
‚‚ To apply an audio filter to multiple clips: Select all of the clips you want to apply an
audio filter to, then drag any filter from the Audio FX panel of the Effects Library onto
any of the selected clips.
To edit a clip’s audio filters:
Select that clip and open the Inspector. All audio filters applied to that clip appear
under the volume and pan controls, with that filter’s controls appearing directly in the
Inspector.
Many VST and Audio Unit audio filters have a custom user interface that makes it much easier
to manipulate that filter’s controls. These can be opened from within DaVinci Resolve.

The custom audio filter interface for Izotope RX4

To expose a filter’s custom controls:
Click the Custom Control button (the button to the right of the trash can). The custom
controls appear in a floating window. When you’re finished adjusting the custom
controls, close the window.

The button for opening a filter’s custom control

Methods of working with audio filters in the Inspector:
‚‚ To disable or re-enable a filter: Click the toggle button at the far left of each filter’s
title bar.
‚‚ To remove a filter: Click the Trash Can button.
Once applied to a clip or track, audio filters can also be keyframed or automated just like
volume and pan settings, to create dynamic audio effects that change over time.

Installing Audio Filters
VST effects aren’t installed in a standard location, so it may sometimes be necessary to add a
newly installed directory of VST plug-ins that you’ve just installed on your system. To help you
deal with this, the Audio Plugins panel of the System Preferences window has a list that lets you
manually add and remove VST plug-in directories, if necessary.
Once you’ve added one or more VST directories to the list, a second list underneath shows all
audio plug-ins that are available within these directories. Each plug-in on the list has a
checkbox that shows whether or not it’s currently enabled. Any VST plug-ins that cause DaVinci
Resolve to crash while loading them during startup will be automatically disabled. You can use
this list to see which plug-ins have been disabled, for troubleshooting purposes, and to
reenable such “blacklisted” plug-ins, by turning their checkboxes back on.

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493

The audio controls of the Edit page are geared more towards simple mixing to have sensible
levels as you work putting a program together. For comprehensive audio sweetening, mixing,
automation, and mastering controls, the Fairlight page is only one click away.

Part 3 – 25

494

Pro Tools Export

Working with Audio in the Edit Page

The Fairlight Page

It bears mentioning that, if the audio editing, mixing, and effects capabilities of DaVinci Resolve
aren’t enough for you to take care of the audio in your program, you can export an AAF with
audio and a reference movie to Pro Tools using the Deliver page. The resulting media can be
handed off to a Pro Tools-based audio facility to be worked on by a dedicated team of audio
specialists, who will most likely output a stereo or 5.1 mix file that you can then reinsert in the
Timeline you’re using to master the final output of your program.
For more information on exporting in the Deliver page, see Chapter 73, “Using the
Deliver Page.”

Part 3 – 26

Media
Management

495

Media Management

Chapter 26

Media Management

What is Media Management in DaVinci Resolve?

497

File Formats Compatible with Media Management

497

Using Media Management

498

Options in the Media Management Window

501

Options for Transcode Only

502

File Naming When You Consolidate Media

502

Media Management

Media Management in DaVinci Resolve refers to operations that let you copy, move, or
transcode the media that’s linked to clips in your timeline, with the option to eliminate unused
media in the process. Even though Media Management is only available in the Media page, it’s
very typical that it be used to consolidate media from an edited timeline, or from a project
nearing completion, so it’s presented here in the editing section.

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‚‚ Moving all clips used in a project to a specific storage location.
‚‚ Creating a duplicate of your project’s clips that eliminates unused media in preparation
for handing the media off to another facility.
‚‚ Transcoding all clips in a timeline to another format while eliminating unused heads and
tails.
For example, if you’re preparing to export a project to hand off to another DaVinci Resolve user
somewhere else, or even an XML or AAF to give to someone using a completely different NLE
or finishing application, you can use Media Management in DaVinci Resolve to consolidate and
relink the media used by the timeline you’re handing off, so the exported project or timeline
references a smaller set of media.
Even if you’re not handing a project off, if you’ve ingested an enormous amount of source media
into a project, and after the majority of the editing decide that you want to create a consolidated
set of the media you’re using in order to lighten the project’s load in the Media Pool, you can
create a duplicate of the media to reconform to, omitting unused clips and trimming the unused
heads and tails of the clips you are using in the process.
But Media Management isn’t just useful for projects you’ve edited in DaVinci Resolve.
For example, if you’re importing a project from another application and you’ve been given an
enormous amount of source media to conform to, you may be hesitant to copy all of it to your
accelerated storage volume, since (a) most of it is probably unused by the project file you’ve
been given, (b) it’ll take forever to copy from the cheap USB 2 hard drive they’ve given you, and
(c) it will clog up your local storage, taking valuable space away from other projects. In this case,
you can use the Media Management to copy a reduced set of media files consisting of only the
clips used in the current timeline of the Edit page.

File Formats Compatible
with Media Management
No matter what you use if for, Media Management is designed to work with all video formats
that are have decode support within DaVinci Resolve, and is capable of outputting a few more
formats than the Deliver page can. Compatible formats include but are not limited to:
‚‚ QuickTime
‚‚ MXF
‚‚ R3D
‚‚ Image-based raw media formats including CinemaDNG raw and Alexa raw
‚‚ DPX, EXR, JPEG 2000, TIFF, Cineon, and other compatible image sequence formats
‚‚ AVI
The “trim unused media” options of the Copy or Move operations are not compatible with clips
that use codecs employing temporal compression, such as H.264, or for any format for which
DaVinci Resolve lacks encoding support. If you’re trying to trim media in a Media Management
operation for a project containing untrimmable media formats, the full media files will be moved
or copied, instead.

Part 3 – 26

If you’ve edited a program within DaVinci Resolve, you can use the Media Management
command to take care of a variety of tasks, including but not limited to:

497

Media Management

What is Media Management
in DaVinci Resolve?

To media manage clips and timelines in a project you’ve created:
1

Select the items you want to media manage, either clips or one or more Timelines.

2

Choose File > Media Management, and the Media Management window appears.

Media Management Window

3

Choose the scope of the Media Management operation, shown at the top of the
window. You can choose to affect the Entire Project, only one or more Timelines, or
only Clips. What you had selected prior to opening the Media Management window
affects the scope that is selected when you open this window, but it doesn’t limit to
operation to only the selected items. So, if nothing was selected in the Media Pool,
then “Entire Project” is automatically highlighted. If any clips were selected, then
“Clips” is highlighted automatically. If any Timelines were selected, then “Timelines” is
highlighted. However, if for whatever reason the wrong option is highlighted, you need
only click the option you want to select it instead.

Media Management scope options

Part 3 – 26

Using Media Management is simple.

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Media Management

Using Media Management

‚‚ Copy: Creates duplicates of all media associated with clips or timelines at
the destination.
‚‚ Move: Relocates all media associated with clips or timelines to the destination,
removing it from the original locations.
‚‚ Transcode: Creates duplicates of all media associated with clips or timelines in a
new format that you specify; all transcoded clips are written to the same destination.

Media Management operations

5

Click the Browse button and use the File Destination dialog to choose a location for
the managed media to be written. The file path of this location appears in the Media
Destination field.

6

Choose the options associated with the operation you selected. If you choose to
media manage Timelines, then a Timeline Selection option lets you choose which
Timelines you want to include in this operation. Additional options for advanced users
can be revealed by clicking “More options.” The current size of the selected media is
listed below, alongside an estimate of the size of the media after the operation you’ve
selected. Depending on which options you select, the estimate may be larger or
smaller, but this will show you if you need to change the selected options to achieve a
more desirable final size.

Media Management options shown for copying trimmed
media from a specific timeline

7

When you’ve finished choosing options, click Start. A progress bar appears
showing you how long the operation will take.

The following workflow illustrates how you can use Media Management to cut down the amount
of media you need to deal with when you’re conforming a project imported from elsewhere, and
you’ve been given far more media then you actually need, because you only need what’s
actually in the timeline you’re importing.
To use Media Management to create a consolidated duplicate of
media for a project you’re conforming:
1

Connect the portable drive containing the media to be conformed to your workstation.

2

Import the AAF or XML project file you were given into the Edit page, and conform it to
the media on the portable drive you connected in step 1. You’re only doing this to identify
what clips you need to Media Manage, not because you’ll be working off that volume.

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Next, choose which operation you want to perform:

Media Management

4

4

Choose Timelines at the top of the window, and then open the Timeline selection
section and turn on the checkbox of the timeline you want to consolidate the media for.

5

Click the Browse button and choose the volume you want to write the
consolidated media to.

6

Choose the following options for consolidating the media. For this operation, you’ll want
to enable:
‚‚ Click the Browse button, and choose the accelerated storage volume you’re using for
all media you’re using with DaVinci Resolve.
‚‚ Choose the “Timelines” Media Management scope, if it’s not selected already, to
manage all media from the selected timeline.
‚‚ Choose “Copy” to make a duplicate of the media from the portable storage volume to
your accelerated storage.
‚‚ Choose “Copy and trim used media keeping 12 frame handles” if you’re comfortable
with 12 frame handles.
‚‚ Open More Options and turn on “Consolidate multiple edit segments into one media
file” if you don’t mind having larger media files that preserve the relationship of what
clips come from which single media files. This can make grading simpler later on.
‚‚ Turn on “Relink to new files” to automatically relink the timeline you’ve selected to the
new media that’s being generated.

The Consolidate dialog lets you choose how and where to copy the
trimmed media (the Timeline Selection options are scrolled offscreen)

7

When you’re done choosing these settings, click Start. A progress bar appears showing
you how long the operation will take.
A subset of media used by that timeline is copied to the specified directory, and is
automatically relinked to the timeline and clips in the Media Pool. You are now ready to
continue working on the project.

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Part 3 – 26

Choose File > Media Management. The Media Management window appears.

Media Management

3

‚‚ Copy/Move/Transcode all media: (Not available for Timelines) Choosing this option
copies the full amount of source media for every single clip in the project.
‚‚ Media Destination: Click the Browse button to choose a destination to which to copy
the managed media. To create a new directory, right-click a Volume icon in the File
Browser list, choose New Folder, type a name into the resulting dialog, and click OK.
‚‚ Timeline selections: If you’ve selected the Timelines mode of media management, you
can open the Timeline Selection controls and turn on the checkbox by each timeline
with media you want to include.
‚‚ Copy/Move/Transcode all media: Copies all media available to that operation.
‚‚ Copy/Move/Transcode only used media files: Only copies media files for clips that are
used in a timeline, and copies them in their entirety.
‚‚ Copy/Move/Transcode and Trim used media keeping x frame handles: Only copies
media files that are used in a timeline, but eliminates unused heads and tails except for
user-specified handles.
‚‚ Consolidate multiple edit segments into one media file: (found by opening more
options) This option only becomes available if you’ve selected “Copy and trim used
media…” If multiple clips in a timeline come from the same media file, then a single
consolidated media file will be generated that contains all frames from all of these
clips, along with whatever additional frames lie between them. Even though this
option results in more media being copied or moved, it’s extremely useful if you’re
consolidating media that you want to grade using the automatic grade linking of remote
versions, as this preserves the original relationship between each Timeline clip and the
source media file it’s from.
‚‚ Preserve folder hierarchy after x levels deep: (more options) Retains a user-specified
depth of the original directory structure used by a clip’s corresponding source
media file, recreating it when rendering new files for output. The number you select
determines how many levels of subdirectories DaVinci Resolve will automatically create
within the currently specified “Render job to” directory to match the path used by the
source files. Defaults to 0, which creates no matching subdirectories. The number of
path levels is defined relative to the head of each media file path.
‚‚ Relink to new files: (Appears for the Copy operation only) Relinks the selected clips
and/or timelines to the new media you’ve created by copying, wherever you’ve copied
it to.
‚‚ Delete unused media: (Appears for the Move operation only) Moves all unused media
to your file system’s trash when you perform a Move operation. It’s up to you to do the
final deletion of the media being discarded, so proceed with caution.

Part 3 – 26

The different Media Management operations offer different options.

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Media Management

Options in the Media
Management Window

‚‚ Video format: Choose the video format to which you want to transcode. The format you
select determines which codecs and other options will be available to choose from.
‚‚ Codec: A pop-up menu listing every codec that’s available for the currently selected
Video Format.
‚‚ Compression quality: Disabled for certain formats. Lets you choose the level of
compression quality that’s used, if available.
‚‚ Render at source resolution: A checkbox that lets you transcode each clip at the frame
size of the original media file, rather than at the shared resolution selected below.
‚‚ Resolution: A pop-up menu lets you choose a specific resolution to transcode to.
‚‚ Frame rate: Depending on the frame rate of the original media files, this pop-up menu
lets you choose a compatible frame rate that you can transcode to. For example,
if the source media frame rate is 24 fps, you can choose between 23.98 and 24 in
this pop‑up.
‚‚ Audio format: Choose the audio format you want to transcode all audio channels to.
‚‚ Render: Choose how many audio channels you want to transcode. You can also
choose “Same as source” if you want to transcode each clip with the same number of
channels as its source media file.
‚‚ Audio bit depth: Choose the bit depth that you want to transcode the audio to.

File Naming When You
Consolidate Media
When you’re media managing clip-based formats like QuickTime or MXF, if the “Trim Used
Media” option is on, and the “Consolidate Multiple Edit Segments Into One Media File”
checkbox is off, then timelines that use multiple clips derived from the same media file will
generate multiple trimmed media files. To prevent these files from overwriting one another,
additional characters are appended to each trimmed media file coming from the same source;
which characters are used depends on the video format.
‚‚ For DPX files, _0, _1
‚‚ For R3D files, _S000.RDC, _S001.RDC
‚‚ For QuickTime files: _S000.mov, _S001.mov

Part 3 – 26

The following options appear in the “More Options” area only when Transcode is the selected
Media Management operation.

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Media Management

Options for Transcode Only

PART 4

Part 4 – 27

Editing, Adding,
and Copying
Effects and Filters

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Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

Chapter 27

Editing, Adding, and
Copying Effects and Filters

This chapter covers the following topics:

Using the Effects Library

506

The Toolbox

506

OpenFX

507

AudioFX

507

Effects Library Favorites

507

Using the Inspector

508

Opening Effects Using Selection Follows Playhead

509

Inspector Controls

509

Adding Filters to Video Clips

510

Adjusting Multiple Clips at the Same Time

512

Paste Attributes

513

Remove Attributes

514

Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

DaVinci Resolve 14 added the ability to apply ResolveFX and OFX effects as filters in the Edit
page. This chapter covers how to browse for and apply effects to clips in the Timeline, how to
copy them from clip to clip, how to remove them, and how to edit them in the Inspector once
they’ve been added. For more information about the specific ResolveFX that are available, see
Chapter 57, “ResolveFX.”

Part 4 – 27

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The Effects Library

Similar to the Media Pool, the Effects Library’s Bin list can be opened or closed using a button
at the top left, while a menu just to the right of this button lets you sort the list into different
categories.

The Toolbox
All of the video and audio transitions, titles, and generators that that ship along with
DaVinci Resolve
‚‚ Toolbox: Exposes all Transitions, Titles, Generators, and Effects at once.
Video Transitions: Contains all of the built-in transitions that are available from DaVinci.
You can drag any video transition to any edit point in the Timeline that has overlapping
clip handles to add it to your edit; you have the option to drag the transition so that it
ends on, is centered on, or starts on the edit point. For more information, see Chapter
24, “Using Transitions.”
Audio Transitions: Contains audio transitions for creating crossfades.
Titles: Titles can be edited into the Timeline like any other clip. Once edited into the
Timeline, you can edit the title text and position directly in the Timeline Viewer, or you
can access its controls in the Inspector for further customization.
Generators: Generators can also be edited into the Timeline like any other clip.
Selecting a generator and opening the Inspector lets you access its controls for further
customization. You can also choose a standard duration for generators to appear within
the Editing panel of the User Preferences.

Part 4 – 27

All effects that you can add to your edit, including filters, transitions, titles, and generators, are
found in the Effects Library, which is split into two parts. To the left is a Bin list that shows a
hierarchical list of all of the different Transitions, Title Effects, Generators, and Filters that are
available, sorted by category. To the right is a browsing area in which you can see the contents
of whichever bins are selected.

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Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

Using the Effects Library

‚‚ OpenFX: Exposes all ResolveFX and third-party OpenFX installed on your
workstation at once.
Filters: Contains the ResolveFX filters that ship with DaVinci Resolve, as well as any
third-party OFX plug-ins you’ve installed on your workstation. Filters can be dragged
onto video clips to apply an effect to that clip. Once applied, filters can be edited and
customized by opening the OpenFX panel of the Inspector.
Transitions: Contains any third party OFX transitions you have installed on your
workstation. OFX transitions can be used similarly to any other transition, but they also
expose an OpenFX panel next to the Transition panel in the Inspector, where you can
customize settings that are unique to that transition.
Generators: Contains any third party OFX generators you have installed on your
workstation. Can be edited into the Timeline just like the native Generators that ship with
DaVinci Resolve, but they also expose an OpenFX panel next to the Transition panel in
the Inspector, where you can customize settings that are unique to that transition.

AudioFX
On macOS and Windows, DaVinci Resolve supports the use of third-party VST audio plug-ins.
On macOS, DaVinci Resolve supports Audio Unit (AU) audio plug-ins. Once you install these
effects on your workstation, they appear in this panel of the Effects Library. Audio plug-ins let
you apply effects to audio clips or entire tracks’ worth of audio, to add creative qualities such as
echo or reverb, or to take care of mastering issues using noise reduction, compression, or EQ.

Effects Library Favorites
You can click on the far right of any transition, title, or generator flag that effect with a star as a
favorite effect. When you do so, the favorited effects appear in a separate Favorites area at the
bottom of the Effects Library Bin list.

Stars indicate a flagged favorite effect, all favorites are currently filtered

Part 4 – 27

DaVinci Resolve supports the use of third-party OpenFX filters, transitions, and generators in
the Edit page. Once you install these effects on your workstation, they appear in this section of
the Effects Library, organized by type and group depending on the metadata within each effect.

507

Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

OpenFX

The Inspector displays different parameters depending on what you’ve selected in the Timeline;
(left) parameters of a clip, (right) parameters of a title

The parameters displayed in the Inspector are those of the currently selected item in the
Timeline. Changing the selection changes which parameters are displayed, and the parameters
you edit in the Inspector only alter the currently selected clip. If multiple clips are selected, the
Inspector displays and edits only the leftmost clip within the selection.

Part 4 – 27

Once you’ve added effects to a timeline, the Edit page Inspector is where you can edit their
parameters. Closed by default, the Inspector is the central area for editing all of the settings
relating to filters, compositing, sizing, titling, transitions, generators, and effects of all kinds.
Many of the instructions in this section require the use of the Inspector, which can be opened or
closed by clicking the Inspector button at the far right of the Edit page toolbar, or by doubleclicking a transition or generator in the Timeline.

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Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

Using the Inspector

The result is that the Inspector always displays the parameters of the clip at the playhead,
without you needing to do anything other than moving the playhead back and forth in
the Timeline.
If there are multiple superimposed clips intersecting the playhead all at once, the top-most
video clip with an enabled auto-select control will be selected, thus exposing its parameters in
the Inspector, and all other clips will be ignored.

Inspector Controls
Different clips in the Timeline expose different controls. For example, ordinary video clips
expose Video and Audio panels, while text generators expose Title and Video panels.
Whichever panels are exposed, parameters within each panel are organized into groups, with a
title bar providing the name of that group, along with other controls that let you control all
parameters within that group at the same time.

Closed and open Inspector group controls

These controls include:
‚‚ Enable button: A toggle control to the left of the parameter group’s name lets you
disable and re-enable every parameter within that group at once. Orange means that
track’s enabled. Gray is disabled.
‚‚ Parameter group title bar: Double-clicking the title bar of any group of parameters
collapses or opens them. Even more exciting than that, Option-clicking the title bar of
one parameter group collapses or opens all parameter groups at once.
‚‚ Keyframe button: This button lets you add or remove keyframes at the position of
the playhead to or from every single parameter within the group. When the button is
highlighted orange, a keyframe is at the current position of the playhead. When it’s dark
gray, there is no keyframe.
‚‚ Reset button: Lets you reset all parameters within that group to their default settings.

Part 4 – 27

Ordinarily, it’s possible for the Inspector to show the parameters of a selected clip even when
the playhead is over another clip. You can change this behavior by choosing Timeline >
Selection Follows Playhead, which sets DaVinci Resolve to always select whichever clip
intersects the playhead in the Timeline. The result is that the Inspector always displays the
parameters of the clip at the playhead, without you needing to do anything other than moving
the playhead back and forth in the Timeline.

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Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

Opening Effects Using Selection Follows Playhead

For a detailed explanation of each of the ResolveFX plug-ins that accompany DaVinci Resolve,
see Chapter 57, “ResolveFX.”
Methods of applying Video Filters in the Edit Page:
‚‚ To apply a video filter to a clip: Drag any filter from the OpenFX category of the Effects
Library onto the clip in the Timeline you want to apply it to.
‚‚ To apply a video filter to multiple clips: Select all of the clips you want to apply a filter
to in the Timeline, and then drag any filter from the OpenFX category of the Effects
Library onto any of the selected clips. This is undoable.

Applying a video filter to a single clip in the Timeline

To edit a clip’s video filters:
Select that clip and open the Inspector. All video filters applied to that clip appear
within the OpenFX panel.

ResolveFX controls appear in the OpenFX panel of the Inspector

Part 4 – 27

DaVinci Resolve supports both built-in ResolveFX and third-party OFX plug-ins to create
various effects. These effects can be applied both to clips in the Edit page, and to nodes in the
Color page. This section shows how to apply, edit, and remove these filters in the Edit page. For
more information about using video effects in the Color page, see Chapter 56, “Using OFX and
ResolveFX.”

510

Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

Adding Filters to Video Clips

511

Turning on the on-screen controls for ResolveFX
in the Edit Page Timeline Viewer

Once enabled, the OFX on-screen controls appear in the Viewer.

Modifying on-screen controls for ResolveFX in the Edit Page Timeline Viewer

Many audio filters expose custom controls that appear in a floating window.
To expose a filter’s custom controls:
Open the parameters if they’re not open already by double-clicking that filter’s title bar.
A button should appear at the top of the parameters for filters that have custom UI.
Clicking this button opens a floating window with all the custom controls. When you’re
finished adjusting the custom controls, close the window.

The custom audio filter interface for Izotope RX4

Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

Part 4 – 27

Some video filters have custom on-screen controls that can be modified in the Viewer. These
can be exposed in the Edit page using the OFX mode of the Viewer.

‚‚ To disable or re-enable a filter: Click the toggle control at the far left of each filter’s title
bar. Orange means that track’s enabled. Gray is disabled.
‚‚ To remove a filter: Click the Trash Can button.
‚‚ To reset a filter: Click the Reset button at the far right of the filter’s title bar.
‚‚ To open or collapse a filter’s parameters: Double-click the title bar.
‚‚ To open or collapse the parameters of all filters: Option-click the title bar.
Once applied to a clip, video filters can also be keyframed or automated just like any other
Inspector setting, to create dynamic effects that change over time.

Adjusting Multiple Clips
at the Same Time
There’s an easy way to make adjustments to the Inspector parameters of multiple clips at the
same time, without needing to use Paste Attributes (described later in this chapter). All you
need to do is simultaneously select every clip you want to alter, and then modify the parameter
in the Inspector that you want to change. As a result, every selected clip will be adjusted by the
same amount. This works for compositing effects, transforms, text parameters, filters, and audio
settings, just about anything that can be simultaneously exposed in the Inspector for multiple
selected clips.
When you select multiple clips, the Inspector will display “Multiple Clips” as the title. If each of
the selected clips have different values in the parameter you’re adjusting, that parameter will
have two dashes in the value field. There are two ways you can make adjustments to
multiple clips:
‚‚ If you want to make a relative adjustment to all selected clips while keeping their
original offsets from one another, then drag the virtual slider in the parameter field
which will display a + or – before however many units your adjustment is.
‚‚ However, if you want to set all selected clips to the same value, you can double-click in
the number field, type the value, and press Return.

Making a relative adjustment of plus 4.9 in the
Rotation Angle of all selected clips

512

Part 4 – 27

‚‚ To rearrange the order of multiple video filters applied to a clip: Click the move up or
move down buttons in any filter’s title bar, to the left of each filter’s Trash Can button.

Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

Methods of working with audio filters in the Inspector:

To copy attributes:
1

Select a clip with attributes you want to apply to other clips, and press Command-C.

2

Select one or more other clips to paste to.

3

Choose Edit > Paste Attributes (Option-V), or right-click one of the selected clips and
choose Paste Attributes from the contextual menu.

4

When the Paste Attributes window appears, click the checkboxes of each of the
attributes you want to paste, and click Apply when you’re done.

The Paste Attributes window

Part 4 – 27

You can copy and paste attributes from one clip to multiple clips using the Paste Attributes
command. This is a fast way to apply video and audio adjustments and effects from one clip to
many others in the Timeline.

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Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

Paste Attributes

You can also eliminate specific attributes from one or more clips, using a window that’s the
opposite of the Paste Attributes window.
To remove attributes:
1

Select one or more other clips that have effects you want to remove.

2

Choose Edit > Remove Attributes, or Right-click one of the selected clips and choose
Remove Attributes from the contextual menu.

3

When the Remove Attributes window appears, the checkboxes of effects that can be
removed are automatically turned on, so turn off any attributes you want to keep, and
click Apply when you’re done.

Part 4 – 27

Remove Attributes

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Editing, Adding, and Copying Effects and Filters

The Paste Attributes window shows you the clip you’re copying from and the clip(s) you’re
pasting to at the top, and provides checkboxes you can use to select which attributes you’d like
to paste. A pop-up menu below lets you choose how you’d like to apply any keyframes that are
part of the attributes being pasted; the options are Maintain Timing or Stretch-to-Fit.

Part 4 – 28

Titles, Generators,
and Stills

515

Titles, Generators, and Stills

Chapter 28

Titles, Generators, and Stills
This chapter covers the following topics:

Adding Titles

517

Using Safe Area Overlays

518

Types of Title Generators

518

Title Generator Panels

519

Shared Title Generator Parameters

519

Title Generator Video Parameters

521

Saving Titles in the Media Pool for Future Use

521

Using Generators

521

Using Stills

522

Photoshop File Support

522

Titles, Generators, and Stills

Using the Edit page, you can add titles, effects generators, and stills to your timelines. You can
also save customized titles, generators, and stills back to the Media Pool for future use.

Part 4 – 28

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Titles, Generators, and Stills

There’s a collection of titles and generators in the Toolbox that you can use to create leader
when outputting to tape, add slates, create subtitles, and otherwise fulfill any textual needs your
program has.

517

Part 4 – 28

Adding Titles

The available titles in the toolbox

Titles and generators can be edited much like any other clip. Furthermore, when selected, both
titles and generators expose the same Composite, Transform, and Cropping parameter groups
as any other clip; these parameters can be used to composite titles and fly them around in
order to create different text effects.
Methods of adding and editing generators and titles:
‚‚ To drag and drop a generator directly into the Timeline: If you simply drag and
drop titles or generators into the Timeline, the default duration of the resulting clip is
5 seconds. This duration can be cust