Toad For Oracle User Guide Beginners

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Toad®for Oracle 11.5
Beginner's Guide to Using Toad
© 2012 Quest Software, Inc.
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Toad for Oracle 11.5
Beginner's Guide to Using Toad
March 30, 2012
Table of Contents
Welcome 8
About This Guide 8
Shortcut Keys 8
Popular Shortcut Keys 8
Toad Insight Pick List Shortcuts 11
Print List of Shortcut Keys 12
Help and Resources 12
Toad Advisor 12
Quick Search Bar 13
Additional Toad Resources 14
Create and Manage Connections 15
About Database Connections 15
Oracle Clients and Database Servers 15
Connection Files 15
Create New Connections 16
Basic Connection Contols 19
Automatically Connect on Startup 19
Use Previous Connections 19
Change Active Connection in Window 19
Save Connection Passwords 20
Commit or Rollback Changes 20
End Connections 21
Test Connections 21
Manage Multiple Connections 21
About Managing Multiple Connections 21
Display Connection and Window Bars 22
Beginner's Guide to Using Toad
Table of Contents
4
Organize the Database Connections Grid 24
Color Code the User Interface per Connection 27
Manage Oracle Homes 28
Select an Oracle Home 28
Edit the Oracle Home 29
Edit Oracle Connection Files 29
Edit SQLNET Files 29
Edit LDAP Files 30
Edit TNSNames Files 30
Create a Variable for the TNSNames.ora File 32
Limitations of the TNSNames Editor 32
Troubleshoot Connections 34
General Connection Issues 34
Database Login Window 35
Execute and Manage Code 36
About the Editor 36
Important Editor Settings 37
Customize the Editor Layout 38
Split the Editor Layout 38
Execute Statements and Scripts 40
Execute Single Statements 41
Execute Scripts in the Editor 41
Execute Scripts with Quest Script Runner 42
Work with Code 43
Change Current Schema 43
Save and Reuse SQL Statements 44
View Recently Executed SQL Statements 45
Format Code 45
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Display Pick List (Automatically Complete Code) 47
Extract Procedures 47
Comment Out Code Block 48
Find Unused Variables 48
Rename Identifiers 49
Debug PL/SQL 49
About Debugging 49
Start Debugging 50
View DBMS Output 51
Work with Database Objects 52
About the Schema Browser 52
Schema Browser Panes 52
Customize the Schema Browser 53
Customize the Schema Browser 53
Select the Left-Hand Side Display Style 53
Customize Schema Browser Tabs 55
Group Favorite Objects 56
Create Objects 57
Copy Objects to Another Schema 58
Use Existing Object as Template for New Objects 59
Helpful Features 59
Describe Objects 59
Jump to Objects in the Schema Browser 60
View Schema Browser Icon Legend 60
View Parent/Child Datasets in the Schema Browser 60
Filter Schema Browser Content 62
About Schema Browser Filters 62
Create Schema Browser Filters 63
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Filter Data in the Schema Browser 63
Quickly Filter the Schema Browser Left-Hand Side 64
Clear Schema Browser Filters 65
Work with Data Grids 66
About Working with Data Grids 66
Edit Data 67
Understand Editable Resultsets 67
Post/Revert Edited Data 67
Insert and Delete Rows 67
Edit Data in Popup Editor 68
Use an External Editor 68
Access the Calculator 68
Customize Data Grid Display 69
Perform Calculations on Grid Cells 69
Sort and Group Data 69
Anchor Column in Data Grid 70
View a Single Record 70
Preview Selected Column 71
Hide Columns 71
Filter Results 71
Filter Data 71
Use Excel-Style Filtering 72
Export Data 72
Export Dataset 72
Export Data to Flat File 73
Customize Toad 75
About Customizing Toad 75
Customize the Editor 75
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Customize the Schema Browser 75
Customize Shortcut Keys 75
Menu Hot Keys 75
Shortcut Keys 76
Customize Schema Drop-Downs 76
Customize Toolbars and Menus 77
About Customizing Toolbars and Menus 77
Create New Toolbars and Menus 78
Customize Toolbars and Menus 78
Display Additional Menus 80
Display/Hide Toolbars 80
Reset Default Toolbars and Menus 80
Search for Options 81
Appendix: Contact Quest 82
Contact Quest Support 82
Contact Quest Software 82
About Quest Software, Inc 82
Index 83
Welcome
Toad for Oracle provides an efficient and accurate way for database professionals of all skill and
experience levels to perform their jobs with an overall improvement in workflow and
productivity. With Toad for Oracle you can:
lUnderstand your database environment through visual representations
lMeet deadlines easily through automation and smooth workflows
lPerform essential development and administration tasks from a single tool
lDeploy high-quality applications that meet user requirements and perform reliably
in production
lValidate database code to ensure the best-possible performance
lManage and share projects, templates, scripts, and more with ease
The Toad for Oracle solutions are built for you, by you. Over 10 years of development and
feedback from various communities like Toad World have made it the most powerful and
functional tool available. With an installed-base of over one million, Toad for Oracle continues
to be the standard tool for development and administration.
About This Guide
The purpose of this guide is to help you quickly start using Toad by learning basic features and
tasks. Toad is a very diverse and powerful tool, and there are many features that this guide does
not cover. Refer to the online help for additional information about Toad, which you can access
at any time by pressing F1.
In addition to the online help, Toad also has a variety of other resources to help you. See
"Additional Toad Resources" (page 14) for more information.
Shortcut Keys
Popular Shortcut Keys
This topic covers some of the most popular shortcut keys in Toad. Toad provides dozens of
standard shortcut keys, and you can assign new ones or customize the standard ones. Toad also
allows you to print out your current list of shortcut keys. Review the following for additional
information:
lPrint List of Shortcut Keys (page 12)
lCustomize Shortcut Keys (page 75)
1
Beginner's Guide to Using Toad
Welcome
9
Note: If you have customized your shortcut keys, you will not automatically be able to use new
shortcuts added in Toad upgrades. However, you can reset your shortcut keys to the default to
gain access to all new shortcuts. See "Shortcut Keys Options" in the online help for more
information.
General Description
CTRL+D Open Quick Describe window. See "Describe Objects"
(page 59) for more information.
CTRL+TAB Cycle through a collection of "child windows" or tabs in a
window
F1 Open the Toad documentation
F4 Immediately describe object in popup window. See
"Describe Objects" (page 59) for more information.
F10 Display right-click menu
Debugger Description
CTRL+F5 Add watch at cursor
CTRL+ALT+B Display the PL/SQL Debugger Breakpoints window
CTRL+ALT+D Display the PL/SQL Debugger DBMS Output window
CTRL+ALT+E Display the PL/SQL Debugger Evaluate/Modify window
CTRL+ALT+C Display the PL/SQL Debugger Call Stack window
CTRL+ALT+W Display the PL/SQL Debugger Watches window
F11 Run (continue execution)
F12 Run to cursor
SHIFT+F5 Set or delete a breakpoint on the current line
SHIFT+F7 Trace into
SHIFT+F8 Step over
SHIFT+F10 Trace out
SHIFT+CTRL+F9 Set parameters
Editor Description
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Welcome
10
ALT+UP Display previous statement
ALT+DOWN Display next statement (after ALT+UP)
CTRL+B Comment block
CTRL+E Execute Explain Plan on the current statement
CTRL+M Make code statement.
CTRL+N Find sum of the selected fields. You can also include
additional calculations, such as the average or count. See
"Perform Calculations on Grid Cells" (page 69) for more
information.
CTRL+P Strip code statement.
CTRL+T Display pick list drop-down
There are a variety of shortcut keys to use with the pick
list. See "Toad Insight Pick List Shortcuts" (page 11) for
more information.
CTRL+F9 Verify statement without execution (parse) in the Editor
CTRL+F12 Pass the SQL or Editor contents to the specified external
editor.
CTRL+PERIOD Display code completion list
CTRL+ENTER Execute current SQL (same as SHIFT+F9)
CTRL+ALT+PAGEUP Navigate to the previous results panel tab
CTRL+ALT+PAGEDOWN Navigate to the next results panel tab
F2 Toggle full screen Editor
F5 Execute as script. See "Execute Scripts in the Editor" (page
41) for more information.
F6 Toggle between Editor and Results panel
F7 Clear all text, trace into the Editor
F8 Recall previous SQL statement in the Editor
F9 Execute statement in the Editor
SHIFT+F2 Toggle full screen grid
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11
Find and Replace Description
CTRL+F Find text
CTRL+G Go to line number
CTRL+R Find and replace
F3 Find next occurrence
SHIFT+F3 Find previous occurrence
Toad Insight Pick List Shortcuts
There are a variety of shortcuts you can use to display the pick list and make a selection. Toad
also provides options for you to customize the pick list behavior. See "Code Assist Options" in
the online help for more information.
General Description
CTRL+T Display pick list for object (name) at caret. If a stored alias
exists by that name, then that alias' object is shown in the pick
list.
CTRL+SHIFT+T Display pick list for object (name) at caret. This option ignores
aliases with the same name.
LEFT ARROW Move the caret left while filtering the pick list.
RIGHT ARROW Move the caret right while filtering the pick list.
Make Selection Description
Double-click the
selection
Insert the selection and close the pick list.
ENTER Insert the selection and close the pick list.
PERIOD Insert the selection and a period after it. The pick list remains
open and displays child objects, if there are any.
SPACE Insert the selection and a space after it.
TAB Insert the a partial selection if possible and leave the pick list
open; if a partial selection is not possible, insert the selection
and close the pick list.
TAB accepts as much as possible without changing the list of
displayed objects. For example, if the pick list displays a list of
columns that all start with MY_COL, Toad would insert MY_
Beginner's Guide to Using Toad
Welcome
12
COL when you press TABand leave the picklist open. If the
columns did not have a common preface, Toad would insert the
selected column and close the pick list.
(
OPENPARENTHESIS
Insert the selection and "(" after it.
Close Pick List Description
Click outside the pick
list
Close the pick list without making a selection.
ESC Close the pick list without making a selection.
Print List of Shortcut Keys
You can print your list of shortcut keys to use as a reference.
To print the list of shortcut keys
1. Click on the standard toolbar.
Tip: You can also select View | Toad Options.
2. Select Toolbars/Menus |Shortcuts.
3. Click the Category or Shortcut column to sort the list.
4. Click Print.
Help and Resources
Toad Advisor
Toad is self-diagnosing. If you are having difficulties with Toad that you cannot fix, the Toad
Advisor may be able to help you. It offers warnings, alerts, and hints concerning the current state
of your Toad installation. If you are in a managed environment, it specifies which features in
Toad are managed, and to what extent.
To use Toad Advisor
1. Select Help | Toad Advisor.
2. Review the results, which are divided into the following categories:
Warnings Describe things that should be fixed immediately
Alerts Describe things that may have an impact upon Toad's functionality
Beginner's Guide to Using Toad
Welcome
13
Hints Provide information about your Toad installation that may affect
how Toad works
Performance
suggestions
Describe settings that could be changed to improve speed of
performance
Tip: Select a result for additional information in the bottom pane. You can double
click the performance suggestions to navigate direction to the relevant Toad option.
Quick Search Bar
You can find help about Toad quickly from various locations in Quest using the Quick Search
bar on the main toolbar. Each resource provides a different focus, such as Oracle technical
references, videos, frequently asked questions, and more. See "Additional Toad Resources" (page
14) for more information.
To search for Toad resources
1. Click the drop down arrow and select the locations you want to search.
2. Enter a search term in the box.
3. Press Enter or click to search.
Beginner's Guide to Using Toad
Welcome
14
Additional Toad Resources
There are many resources for you to learn more about Toad, and many of them can be searched
directly in the Quick Search bar. See "Quick Search Bar" (page 13) for more information.
Resource Description
Helpfile Provides step-by-step directions on how to use Toad. Press F1 in any
Toad window to open the helpfile to the relevant topic.
Knowledge Xpert
for Oracle
An extensive Oracle technical resource with thousands of insightful
topics and working examples.
Oracle
documentation
Oracle's database documentation.Since Toad is a tool to help you
manage Oracle databases, the more you understand Oracle the more
intuitive Toad becomes.
ToadForOracle.com The main website for all things Toad for Oracle, including:
lForumsConnect with thousands of other Toad users to get
help.
Tip: Customers often use common Toad acronyms in the
forums.
lDocumentation—Download the latest product documentation,
including the Install Guide, Release Notes, and other
documents.
lDownloads—Download the latest update, beta, or trial
version.
lIdea Pond—Submit ideas to improve Toad and vote on other
customer's ideas.
ToadWorld.com The parent site for all Toad family products, providing videos, tech
briefs, white papers, expert blogs, podcasts, user forums, and tech
tips.
Create and Manage Connections
About Database Connections
This topic provides a very general overview of how Toad connects to Oracle databases. Please
refer to Oracle's documentation for more information on Oracle connections.
Troubleshooting: If your previous connections do not display in the Database Login window,
ensure that the Show favorites only and Show selected home only fields in the bottom of the
Database Login window are not selected. See "Troubleshoot Connections" (page 34) for more
information.
Oracle Clients and Database Servers
To connect to a database server (referred to as "database"), Toad requires that you have a
database client ("client") installed on your computer. A client is simply software that accesses the
database through a network.
You can have multiple Oracle clients installed on your computer. The client location is also
referred to as the Oracle home, and you can select which one Toad uses on the Database Login
window. See "Select an Oracle Home" (page 28) for more information.
See the Release Notes for a complete list of the client and database versions that Toad supports.
Important: It is recommended that your client version be of the same release (or later) as your
database server. This is an Oracle recommendation to prevent performance issues.
Connection Files
The client installation generally includes connection files that are used to communicate between
your computer and the database. Toad uses the following connection files, depending on the
connection type you select:
2
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16
Connection
File
Description
SQLNET.ora Specifies configuration details for Oracle's networking software, such as
trace levels, the default domain, session characteristics, and the
connection methods that can be used to connect to a database (for
example, LDAP and TNSNAMES). If a method is not listed, you cannot
use it.
Toad uses the SQLNET.ora file for all connection methods, and
consequently you must be able to access this file for any connection
method.
TNSNames.ora Defines database addresses to establish connections to them. Toad must
be able to access the TNSNames.ora file for TNS connections.
Note: If you have multiple Oracle clients installed or want to use a
TNSNames.ora file on a network, you may want to use the TNS_NAMES
environment variable to simplify managing TNS connections. See
"Create a Variable for the TNSNames.ora File" (page 32) for more
information.
LDAP.ora Defines directory access information using Lightweight Directory Access
Protocol (LDAP). Toad must be able to access the LDAP.ora file for
LDAP connections.
Create New Connections
There are a few prerequisites you must have to connect to an Oracle database. See "About
Database Connections" (page 15) for more information.
Troubleshooting: There are some common issues and solutions for database connections. See
"Troubleshoot Connections" (page 34) for more information.
Notes:
lTo edit a login record, click on the Database Login window toolbar.
lYou can import and export connection settings. See "Import/Export Connection Settings"
in the online help for more information.
To create a new connection
1. Click in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window.
Note: You can also select Session | New Connection.
2. Click on the Database Login toolbar. The Add Login Record window displays.
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17
Note: Instead of creating the connection in the Add Login Record window, you can
directly enter the connection information in the Database Login window. However, this
method forces you to connect to the database, and you cannot enter some of the
additional connection information until after you connect.
3. Complete the User/Schema and Password fields.
4. Select a connection method:
TNS Select a database in the Database field. Toad uses the listings in
your TNSNames.ora file to populate the list.
You can edit the TNSNames.ora file directly in Toad. See "Edit
TNSNames Files" (page 30) for more information.
Note: If you have multiple Oracle clients installed or want to use a
TNSNames.ora file on a network, you may want to use the TNS_
NAMES environment variable to simplify managing TNS
connections. See "Create a Variable for the TNSNames.ora File"
(page 32) for more information.
Direct Enter the Host,Port, and either the Service Name or SID of the
database to which you want to connect.
LDAP Select the LDAP descriptor in the LDAP Descriptor field. You can
edit the LDAP.ora file directly in Toad. See "Edit LDAP Files"
(page 30) for more information.
Notes:
lToad must be able to access the SQLNET.ora file to use any of the connection
methods. Toad must also be able to access the LDAP.ora file for LDAP
connections and the TNSNames.ora file for TNS connections.
lIf Toad cannot connect to one of these files, a red X displays beside the editor
button for that file. For example, the following image indicates that Toad
cannot access the LDAP.ora file. You would have to resolve the issue before
you could make an LDAP connection.
5. Complete the remaining fields as necessary. Review the following for additional
information:
Connect as Select the connection privilege level field.
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Color Select a color to border windows that use the active connection.
Note: The color displays in all Toad user interface elements that use
the connection, which is very helpful when you have multiple active
connections. See "Color Code the User Interface per Connection"
(page 27) for more information.
Connect
Using
Select the Oracle home.
Note: You can only connect to one Oracle home at a time. This field
is disabled if you are already connected to a database. See "Select an
Oracle Home" (page 28) for more information.
Alias Enter a description or nickname for the connection.
By default the alias only displays in the connections grid, but you
can have Toad display the alias instead of the database name. To
enable this option, select View | Toad Options | Windows and select
the Use alias instead of database checkbox.
Execute
Action
upon
Connection
Select to execute an action whenever Toad connects to the database.
Then, click by the Action field to select the action. See
"Automation Designer Overview" in the online help for more
information.
You can also select a parameter file. See "Action Parameter Files" in
the online help for more information.
Note: Toad only executes actions upon connection when you execute
through the user interface. Toad does not execute actions when it is
executed through command line.
Custom
Columns
Complete the custom fields, if you have defined any. See "Add
Custom Columns" (page 25) for more information.
Save
Password
Select to have Toad remember the password for only this connection.
If Save passwords is selected in the Database Login window, then
this field is selected by default. See "Save Connection Passwords"
(page 20) for more information.
Auto
Connect
Select to have Toad automatically make the selected connection on
startup.
Favorite Select this checkbox to mark the connection as one of your favorites.
You can have the Database Login window only display your
favorites by selecting Show favorites only at the bottom of the
window.
Read Only Select this checkbox to make the connection read only, meaning that
you cannot make any changes to the database. This option is
especially helpful when you want to access data for a production
database but you do not want to accidentally make any changes.
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19
6. Save the login record. Review the following for additional information:
lTo save the record without connecting to the database, click OK
lTo save the record and connect to the database, select the Connect checkbox
and click OK.
lTo save the record and reuse the field values to quickly enter new connections,
click Post.
7. Optional: Manage multiple connections. See "About Managing Multiple Connections"
(page 21) for more information.
Basic Connection Contols
Automatically Connect on Startup
To select connections to automatically make when Toad starts
1. Click in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window.
Note: You can also select Session | New Connection.
2. In the connections grid, select the checkbox in the Auto Connect column.
Use Previous Connections
Toad saves your previous connections so you can easily connect to them again. You can also
change the active connection in open windows. See "Change Active Connection in Window"
(page 19) for more information.
To open a previous connection
» Select one of the following:
lClick in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window, and
then double-click the previous connection from the grid.
lClick the arrow beside in the standard toolbar, and then select a
connection from the list.
Change Active Connection in Window
You can easily change the connection in an open window to a connection you currently have
open or a connection that you have recently used.
Tip: Toad provides a variety of features and options to help you manage multiple open
connections. See "About Managing Multiple Connections" (page 21) for more information.
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20
To change the active connection in a window
» Click the arrow beside in the window toolbar and select an open or recent connection
from the drop-down.
Save Connection Passwords
You can have Toad save all passwords automatically or individually save passwords for selected
connections. Passwords are saved in an encrypted file called connectionpwds.ini. The encryption
is tied to the currently logged in user profile, and it supports roaming profiles and Citrix
installations.
Important: To save a connection password, you must connect to the database first, and then you
can save the password in the connections grid.
Note: If the Save Password field is disabled, your ability to save passwords may have been
removed during installation. See the Toad for Oracle Installation Guide for more information.
To automatically save all passwords
1. Click in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window.
Note: You can also select Session | New Connection.
2. Select the Save passwords checkbox in the bottom of the window.
To save passwords for individual connections
1. Click in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window.
Note: You can also select Session | New Connection.
2. Clear the Save passwords checkbox in the bottom of the window, if it is selected.
3. Select the Save Pwd checkbox for the connection in the connection grid.
Note: If the connection is not listed in the connection grid, ensure that the Show
favorites only and Show selected home only fields are cleared. If it still does not display,
connect to the database again.
4. Enter the password in the Password field on the right.
5. Click Connect.
Commit or Rollback Changes
You can commit or rollback recent changes to the database from the Session menu at any time
while working with Toad.
Note: You can configure Toad to either automatically commit changes or prompt to commit on
exit. See "Oracle Transaction Options" in the online help for more information.
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21
To commit or rollback your changes
» Select Session | Commit or Session | Rollback.
Tip: You can also right-click the connection in the Connection Bar, and select
Commit or Rollback.
End Connections
To end one connection
» Select Session | End Connection.
Or
Click in the standard toolbar to end the currently active session. You can also
click the arrow by the button to select a different open connection to end.
To end all connections
» Select Session | End All Connections.
Test Connections
To test connections if the session has dropped
» Select Session | Test Connections (Reconnect).
To test connections in the Database Login window
» Select connections in the grid and click . Toad opens a new session to test the
connection and lists any errors that occur.
Manage Multiple Connections
About Managing Multiple Connections
When working with Toad you may have multiple connections open at once. Trying to keep
track of which open window is related to which connection can be difficult. Toad provides a
variety of features and options to help you manage multiple open connections.
Method Description
Organize the
Database
Connections Grid
(page 24)
The Database Login window displays all of your previous
connections in the connections grid. You can reduce the number of
connections that display and organize how they display in a variety
of ways.
Color Code the You can use connection colors to help you distinguish between
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22
Method Description
User Interface per
Connection (page
27)
open connections. The color coding displays prominently
throughout Toad's user interface. For example, you may use red for
all production databases and yellow for all test databases.
Display Connection
and Window Bars
(page 22)
You can use the Window and Connection bars to help you keep
track of your open windows and connections. The active window
and connection are selected in the bars (they display with a lighter
color), which is helpful so you can always tell which connection
you are using.
You may also find the following general connection management features helpful:
lAutomatically Connect on Startup (page 19)
lChange Active Connection in Window (page 19)
lCommit or Rollback Changes (page 20)
lCustomize Schema Drop-Downs (page 76)
lUse Previous Connections (page 19)
Display Connection and Window Bars
You can use the Window and Connection bars to help you keep track of your open windows
and connections. The active window and connection are selected in the bars (they display with a
lighter color), which is helpful so you can always tell which connection you are using.
1) Connection Bar 2) Window Bar
Notes:
lToad provides a variety of features and options to help you manage multiple open
connections. See "About Managing Multiple Connections" (page 21) for more
information.
lYou can rearrange the order of items in the Connection and Window bars. Right-click the
bar and select Connection/Window Bar Button Order. Then, use the arrows to determine
the order for items to display. Toad remembers these settings. For example, if you list
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Create and Manage Connections
23
Editor first, then Editor windows always display in front of other windows (even if the
Editor was opened last).
lYou can customize the display settings, such as displaying connection strings or allowing
the bars to span multiple lines. See "Toolbar Options" in the online help for more
information.
Connection Bar
The Connection bar lists all of the connections that you have open. Right-clicking one of the
connections in the Connections bar gives you helpful options, including:
lOpening a new Editor or Schema Browser window for the connection
lEnding the connection, which closes all windows that use the connection
lRearranging the order of connections in the Connection bar
Tip: Select Show All to display connections that are not currently open.
lCommitting or rolling back changes
lViewing a list of all of the windows that use the connection, which you can click to
bring the window to the front
To display the Connection bar
» Right-click the file menu area and select Connection Bar.
Window Bar
The Window bar lists all of the windows that you currently have open. Right-clicking one of the
windows in the Windows bar gives you helpful options, including:
lRearranging the order of windows in the Window bar
Tip: Select Show All to display windows that are not currently open.
lOnly displaying windows for the active connection, which can be very helpful when you
have numerous windows open for one connection
Note: To use this feature, right-click a blank area in the Window bar and select Show
Buttons for Current Connection.
lClosing all open windows
To display the Window bar
» Right-click the file menu area and select Window Bar.
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Organize the Database Connections Grid
The Database Login window displays all of your previous connections in the connections grid.
You can reduce the number of connections that display and organize how they display in a
variety of ways:
lDisplay Only Favorite Connections (page 24)
lAdd Custom Columns (page 25)
lGroup Connections (Create Tree View) (page 25)
lHide/Display Columns (page 26)
lDisplay Only Connections for Selected Oracle Home (page 26)
lDisplay Tabs for Each Server or User (page 26)
lDelete Previous Connections (page 27)
Tips:
lToad provides a variety of features and options to help you manage multiple open
connections. See "About Managing Multiple Connections" (page 21) for more
information.
lClick at the top of the Database Login window to refresh the connections grid.
Access the Database Login Window
All of the organization options are configured from the Database Login window.
To access the Database Login window
Click in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window.
Note: You can also select Session | New Connection.
Display Only Favorite Connections
If you have a long list of connections but only use a few of them regularly, you can mark the
connections that you use frequently as favorites and hide the other connections. You can still
view the other connections by displaying all connections instead of just favorites.
To select favorite connections
» In the connections grid, select the Favorite check box of the connection you want to
make a favorite.
To view only favorites in the connections grid
» Below the connections grid, select the Show favorites only checkbox.
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To view all connections in the connections grid
» Below the connections grid, clear the Show favorites only checkbox.
Add Custom Columns
You can add columns to the connections grid. For example, you may want to add a Locations
column if you manage databases in multiple physical locations, or you may want to add an
Environment column to distinguish between Test and Production databases.
Tip: You can also group the connections grid by custom fields. See "Group Connections (Create
Tree View)" (page 25) for more information.
To add a custom column
1. Click in the Database Login window toolbar.
2. Click Add.
3. Enter the name for your custom field.
Group Connections (Create Tree View)
You can group connections by column header to create a tree view. You can add multiple
column headers to add grouping levels.
To group connections in the data grid
1. Drag a column header into the grey area above the grid.
2. Drag additional column headers to add grouping levels.
Tip: The image above is grouped by a custom column. See "Add Custom Columns" (page
25) for more information.
To remove grouping
» Drag the column header into the connections grid.
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Hide/Display Columns
If you have a small screen area, you can hide some of the columns that display in the
connections grid.
To hide or show columns
1. Click in the left-hand side of the grid headers.
2. Select the columns you want to display, or clear the checkbox for columns you
want to hide.
Display Only Connections for Selected Oracle Home
If you have many connections using different Oracle homes, you may want to display only those
using a particular home in the grid.
To limit connections to one Oracle home
1. Select the Oracle home you want to display in the Connect using field on the right side
of the Database Login window.
Note: You can only connect to one Oracle home at a time. This field is disabled if you
are already connected to a database. See "Select an Oracle Home" (page 28) for more
information.
2. Click the Show selected home only checkbox at the bottom of the window.
Display Tabs for Each Server or User
By default, the connections grid does not contain tabs; it is a unified grid that displays all
connections. You can change the grid to display separate tabs for each server or user. Each tab
contains a grid of its database connections.
To display tabs for each server or user
» Click at the top of the Database Login window and select Tabbed by Server or
Tabbed by User.
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Delete Previous Connections
To permanently remove connections from the Database Login window
» Select the connection and press the DELETE key.
Color Code the User Interface per Connection
You can use connection colors to help you distinguish between open connections. The color
coding displays prominently throughout Toad's user interface. For example, you may use red
for all production databases and yellow for all test databases. The color coding would
display as follows:
lAny open window related to that connection
lWindow and Connection bar buttons
1) Connection Bar 2) Window Bar
lStatus bars
Tip: Toad provides a variety of features and options to help you manage multiple open
connections. See "About Managing Multiple Connections" (page 21) for more information.
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To select a connection color
1. Click in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window.
Note: You can also select Session | New Connection.
2. Select a color in the Color column in the connection grid.
Manage Oracle Homes
Select an Oracle Home
Only one Oracle home can be in use at one time. This means that once a connection is made, all
future connections use the same Oracle home, regardless of default home. If you want to use a
different Oracle home, you must close all open connections first.
Default homes can be assigned for a connection or for Toad. When a default Oracle home is
assigned to a particular connection, any time you make that connection from the connection grid,
Toad automatically uses that Oracle home. When a default Oracle home is assigned to Toad,
Toad automatically uses that Oracle home any time you create a connection to a new database.
Toad searches for Oracle homes in several different ways. See "How Toad Finds Oracle Homes"
in the online help for more information.
Notes:
lIf you have multiple Oracle clients installed or want to use a TNSNames.ora file on a
network, you may want to use the TNS_NAMES environment variable to simplify
managing TNS connections. See "Create a Variable for the TNSNames.ora File" (page 32)
for more information.
lThis topic focuses on information that may be unfamiliar to you. It does not include all
step and field descriptions.
To select an Oracle home
1. Click in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window.
Note: You can also select Session | New Connection.
2. With no open connections, select an Oracle home in the Connect using field.
Note: To see more information about the home you have selected or change the SID,
NLS_LANG, or SQLPATH, click to open the Oracle Home Editor. See "Edit the
Oracle Home" (page 29) for more information.
3. To set this as the default Oracle home for all connections, select Make this the Toad
default home.
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Edit the Oracle Home
You must restart Toad to have changes made here take effect.
Note: This topic focuses on information that may be unfamiliar to you. It does not include all
step and field descriptions.
To edit the Oracle home
1. Click beside the Connect using box on the Database Login window.
2. Select an Oracle home by clicking on its node. You can then:
lClick Clipboard. This will copy the selected information to the clipboard so you
can past it into an email, or another document.
lClick Advice. This will tell you if you have a proper Net8 installation for this
home, or suggest changes to your installation.
lRight-click and choose to edit one of the following:
lSID for the selected home
lNLS_LANG for the selected home
lSQLPATH for the selected home
Edit Oracle Connection Files
Edit SQLNET Files
From the SQLNET editor you can easily edit your SQLNET.ora parameters. The parameters on
this window are standard Oracle parameters. See Oracle's documentation for more information.
To edit your SQLNET.ora file
1. Click in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window.
Note: You can also select Session | New Connection.
2. Click SQLNET Editor.
3. To back up your file before editing it, click Create Backup File.
Note: It is recommended that you create a backup file before you make any changes. This
assures that if something goes wrong you can restore the original settings.
4. Make any necessary changes.
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Note: If you are using a multi-threaded server and plan to use the PL/SQL Debugger,
make sure you check the USE_DEDICATED_SERVER checkbox. This allows the
PL/SQL Debugger to work.
5. To view the SQLNET.ora file after you update parameters, click View File as Modified.
Edit LDAP Files
You can use the LDAP editor to edit your LDAP parameters. Toad supports both Oracle LDAP
and Windows LDAP servers.
The parameters on this window are standard Oracle parameters. See Oracle's documentation for
more information.
To edit your LDAP.ora file
1. Click in the standard toolbar to open the Database Login window.
Note: You can also select Session | New Connection.
2. Click LDAP Editor.
3. To back up your file before editing it, click Create Backup File.
Note: It is recommended that you create a backup file before you make any changes. This
assures that if something goes wrong you can restore the original settings.
4. Make any necessary changes.
Note: The directory server types apply to all servers listed in the Directory Servers area.
5. To view the file after you update parameters, click View File.
Edit TNSNames Files
From the TNSNames Editor, you can easily edit your TNSNames files. You can add a new
service, edit a service, delete a service, or work with two files and transfer services back and forth
between the two.
Notes:
lThe TNSNames Editor supports much of the standard Oracle syntax, but there are certain
old or advanced features that it does not support. See "Limitations of the TNSNames
Editor" (page 32) for more information.
lAn incorrect TNSNames.ora entry may block all valid entries after it. You can copy
names to the top of the list until you find the incorrect entry.
lThis topic focuses on information that may be unfamiliar to you. It does not include all
step and field descriptions.
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To edit TNSNames files
1. Select Utilities | TNSNames Editor to open the TNSNames Editor.
2. Open a TNSNames file in one or both sides of the window.
Note: If you are working with two TNSNames files at the same time, the TNSNames
Editor does not prevent duplicate entries in the tnsnames.ora file. This allows you to copy
a service and then edit it. Use the arrows in the middle of the screen to copy entries
between the two files.
3. Make changes as necessary. Review the following for additional information:
Add new
service Click and complete the required fields.
Clone a
service
To clone a service:
a. Right-click the service and select Clone Service.
Note: When you clone a service, the new service entry will
have a blank Net Service Name and displays at the top of
the service list.
b. Select the new service and click to make necessary
modifications.
Copy and
paste entries
You can paste entries directly into either side of the TNSNames
Editor from either the Project Manager or from a text file. To copy
connections to the TNS Names Editor:
a. Copy the text of the connection information from the email,
file, or Project Manager.
Note: To copy from the Project Manager, right-click the
connection in the Connections tab and select TNSNames
information to clipboard.
b. Click in the pane containing the TNSNames.ora where
you want the information.
Test a
connection
To test a connection:
a. Save the file to the location where your TNSping
executable reads files.
b. Select the connection and click .
Tip: Click to check the syntax of your TNSNames file from the editor. If there are
errors, Toad lists them in the Message tab and suggest ways to fix them.
Note: You can add a UR tag to a CONNECT_DATA tag of a TNS entry. This is
available ONLY through the text edit area of the editor, not the Edit Service
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window. This tag is supported as a patch to Oracle 10g and is no longer necessary in
Oracle 11 and later.
Create a Variable for the TNSNames.ora File
If you have multiple Oracle clients installed or want to use a TNSNames.ora file on a network,
you may want to use the TNS_NAMES environment variable to simplify managing TNS
connections. This variable specifies the location of your TNSNames.ora file, and all installed
Oracle clients use this file for connections. If the TNS_ADMIN variable is not defined, then each
Oracle client must have its own TNSNames.ora file. Consequently, using the TNS_NAMES
variable allows you to maintain one TNSNames.ora file instead of maintaining multiple copies
for the clients.
To create an environment variable for the TNSNames.ora file
1. Access the Environment Variables window:
Windows 7
Windows Vista
Select Start | Computer | System Properties | Advanced
system settings | Environment Variables.
Windows XP Select Start |My Computer |View system information |
Advanced | Environment Variables.
2. Click New beneath the System variables field.
3. Enter TNS_ADMIN in Variable name the field. This must be an exact match.
4. Enter the TNSNames.ora file location in the Variable value field.
Note: This file is generally located in the following directory: ORACLE_
HOME\NETWORK\ADMIN.
Limitations of the TNSNames Editor
The TNSNames Editor supports much of the standard Oracle syntax. There are, however, certain
old or advanced features that it does not support:
lMultiple Description Lists
Note: Multiple Description entries are supported, and a DESCRIPTION_LIST will be
created automatically to encompass them.
lMultiple Address Lists
lNo ADDRESS_LIST keyword (The editor parses it correctly, but it adds the ADDRESS_
LIST parameter back in to the entry, which produces a completely equivalent
configuration. Existing entries with multiple ADDRESS_LIST tags are preserved, even if
edited in the Editor window. )
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In all of these cases, the TNSNames Editor will not change the entry unless the user chooses to
edit that particular entry. If you do not try to change a non-supported entry, the file will remain
useable.
If you do try to edit a service name with one of these unsupported features, the editor does its
best to parse the entry into the Edit Service dialog box. It will write the entry into a structure it
does support, if you click OK in the Edit Service dialog box and then save the file.
Whenever the TNSNames Editor overwrites a file, it first makes a backup of that file in the same
directory. So if you do accidentally cause problems to your file, you can revert to the backup.
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Troubleshoot Connections
General Connection Issues
Problem Description and Possible Solution
Cannot connect to
Oracle
You must have a full install of a 32-bit version of Net8.
Connecting by SQL*Plus is not verification that Net8 is
installed.
Confirm that the registry setting specifies the correct folder
where your TNSNames.ora file lives:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Oracle\TNS_ADMIN
If you cannot connect to Oracle using Toad, your Oracle client
software may not be installed correctly. Re-install the Net8
client from the Oracle setup disks. Or, if you have installed
OEM, NetAssist, Oracle Lite, or any other Oracle software
recently, remove that software and see if you can connect using
Toad.
This issue can also be caused by an error in the TNSNames file.
See "Edit TNSNames Files" (page 30) for more information.
Toad is connecting with
the wrong Oracle Home
The default home that Toad uses matches the one you have
chosen in the Oracle Home Selector, unless you have
previously selected the checkbox: Make this the Toad default
home.
Only one Oracle home can be in use at one time. This means
that once a connection is made, all future connections use the
same Oracle home, regardless of default home. If you want to
use a different Oracle home, you must close all open
connections first.
OCI/DLL Not Found
(Cannot load OCI DLL:
<path to OCI.DLL>)
This problem commonly occurs when customers use a 64-bit
Oracle client, which is not supported. Toad requires a 32-bit
client. See the Toad for Oracle Installation Guide for more
information.
If you have a 32-bit client, make sure that the Oracle BIN
directory is in your system path. This directory will be
ORAWIN\BIN, or ORANT\BIN, or something similar.
To check your path, Open a command line window, type
PATH, and then press Enter.
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Database Login Window
Problem Description and Possible Solution
There's an X beside
TNSNames Editor or
SQLNet Editor.
Toad can't find the TNSNames.ora file or the appropriate
SQLNet file. Make sure they are in the appropriate directory,
and that your path points to them.
All of my past
connections are not
visible in the grid.
Clear the Show favorites only and Show selected home only
fields in the bottom of the Database Login window.
Toad is/is not saving the
password for a
connection.
Make sure the Save Password column is selected or cleared as
appropriate in the row for that connection. If Toad is saving all
passwords and you do not want them saved, make sure the
Save passwords checkbox beneath the grid is cleared.
Note: If the Save Password field is disabled, your ability to
save passwords may have been removed during installation. See
the Toad for Oracle Installation Guide for more information.
Execute and Manage Code
About the Editor
The Toad Editor lets you edit many types of statements and code, and Toad provides many
options to customize the Editor's behavior. See "Important Editor Settings" (page 37) for more
information.
The Editor attaches itself to the active connection in Toad, but if you do not have a connection
you can still use it as a text editor. You can also change the schema to execute against from the
Current Schema toolbar. See "Change Current Schema" (page 43) for more information.
Tips:
lThe Editor's right-click menu contains many options to help you work with code. When
you are trying to figure out how to do something, try right-clicking the Editor to see if it
is available in the menu.
lSelect an object and press F4 to display the object's properties. See "Describe Objects"
(page 59) for more information.
lIf you press CTRL and click a PL/SQL object, the object opens in a new Editor tab. If
you press CTRL and click a non-PL/SQL object, the object opens in the Describe
Objects window.
Editor Panels
The Editor is organized into the following areas:
Area Description
Navigator
Panel
The Navigator Panel is a desktop panel that displays an outline of the Editor
contents in the active tab. You can click on the items listed to navigate to that
statement in the Editor. The Navigator Panel is displayed on the left-hand side
by default, but you can change where it is docked.
Editor The main Editor window displays code in separate tabs. You can create tabs
for different bits of code, or different types of code. SQL and PL/SQL can go
in the same tab. Toad can tell where the cursor is located and compile PL/SQL
or run SQL as required.
Note: If you have multiple statements in the Editor, you must trail them with a
valid statement terminator such as a semi-colon.
Desktop
Panels
The desktop panels contain many options for tab display, depending on what
kind of code you are working with and what you want to do with it. In
3
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Area Description
addition, you can configure how these panels display to make Toad work for
you. See "Customize the Editor Layout" (page 38) for more information.
Important Editor Settings
Toad provides many options to let you customize the Editor's behavior. The following table
describes some of the most popular or important Editor options:
Option Description Navigate
Code
templates
Select code template settings. Code templates use a manual
keystroke (CTRL+SPACE) to perform substitutions. See
"Code Completion Templates" in the online help for more
information.
View | Toad
Options |
Editor |
Behavior
Commit
after every
statement
Commit every time a statement is run, after any posted edits
are made in the grid, and after a row is deleted in the grid.
Enabling this option makes it very easy to accidentally
change or delete data. It is recommended that you do not
select this option, and you should never have it enabled
when you are working on a production database.
View | Toad
Options |
Oracle |
Transactions
Font Select the Editor display font. View | Toad
Options |
Editor |
Display
Syntax
highlighting
Select syntax highlighting settings. See "Syntax
Highlighting" in the online help for more information.
View | Toad
Options |
Editor |
Behavior
Tab stops Enter the number of spaces entered when you press TAB. View | Toad
Options |
Editor |
Behavior
When
closing
connections
Commit, rollback, or prompt when closing connections. This
field is disabled if you select Commit after every
statement.
Selecting Commit makes it very easy to accidentally
change or delete data. It is recommended that you select
Prompt.
View | Toad
Options |
Oracle |
Transactions
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Customize the Editor Layout
You can easily configure which panels display on your Editor desktop and where they
display. You can select panels to display one at a time or in groups. When you have
configured it, you can save the desktop with its own name, returning to it whenever the need
arises. In addition, you can turn on Auto-save current desktop, and however you have the
desktop set when you change tabs or close Toad will be how your desktop is defined the next
time you open the Editor.
You can split the Editor to easily compare code revisions. See "Split the Editor Layout" (page
38) for more information.
Note: This topic focuses on information that may be unfamiliar to you. It does not include all
step and field descriptions.
To display panels one at a time
1. Right-click the Editor and select Desktop.
2. Select the panel you want to display or hide.
To configure your desktop
1. Right-click the panel area near the bottom of the window.
2. Select Desktop | Configure Desktop Layout.
3. Select the panels you want to display in the Show column, and click the drop down
menus in the Dock Site column to change where the panel is docked. By default, all
except the Navigator will be docked below the Editor.
To save your desktop
1. Click on the Desktops toolbar.
2. Enter the name you want to use for this desktop.
To use a saved desktop
» From the drop-down desktop menu, select the desktop you want to use.
To restore a desktop
» Click the drop-down arrow on and select Revert to Last Saved Desktop or Restore
Default Desktop.
Split the Editor Layout
You can split the Editor to easily compare code revisions.
Tip: To remove the split layout, right-click in the Editor and select Split Editor Layout
| Not Split.
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To split the Editor
1. Right-click the Editor and select Split Editor Layout.
2. Select one of the following options:
lLeft-Right
lTop-Bottom
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Execute Statem