WinSpec/32 Software User's Manual Win Spec 2.6 Spectroscopy User

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4411-0048
Version 2.6B
December 11, 2012
*4411-0048*
Copyright 2001-2012 Princeton Instruments, a division of Roper Scientific, Inc.
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All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the written
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of Roper Scientific, Inc.
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Revision of this publication may be issued to incorporate such change.
iii
Table of Contents
Part 1 Getting Started .................................................... 17
Introduction ....................................................................................................... 19
Summary of Chapter Information ..................................................................................... 19
Part 1, Getting Started ................................................................................................ 19
Part 2, Advanced Topics ............................................................................................ 20
Part 3, Reference ........................................................................................................ 21
Online Help ....................................................................................................................... 21
Tool Tips and Status Bar Messages .................................................................................. 22
Additional Documentation ................................................................................................ 22
Chapter 1 Installing and Starting WinSpec/32 ............................................... 23
System Requirements ........................................................................................................ 23
Hardware Requirements ............................................................................................. 23
Operating System Requirements ................................................................................ 25
Your System Components ................................................................................................ 25
Installing the PCI Card Driver .......................................................................................... 27
Installing the USB 2.0 Card Driver ................................................................................... 27
WinSpec Version 2.5.25 and later .............................................................................. 28
Installing the FireWire Card Driver .................................................................................. 28
Installing the GigE Ethernet Card Driver ......................................................................... 28
Installing WinSpec/32 ....................................................................................................... 29
Installing from the CD ................................................................................................ 30
Installing from the FTP Site ....................................................................................... 30
Custom Installation Choices ....................................................................................... 31
Changing Installed Components, Repairing, or Uninstalling/Reinstalling
WinSpec/32 ................................................................................................................ 31
Starting WinSpec/32 ......................................................................................................... 32
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup ..................................................................... 35
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 35
Basic Hardware Overview ................................................................................................ 35
Entering the Default System Parameters into WinSpec .................................................... 37
Camera Detection Wizard .......................................................................................... 37
Editing Controller and Detector Characteristics ............................................................... 41
Entering the Data Orientation ........................................................................................... 45
Entering the Interface Communication Parameters .......................................................... 46
Entering the Cleans/Skips Characteristics ........................................................................ 47
Setting up a Spectrograph ................................................................................................. 50
Specifying the Active Spectrograph ................................................................................. 52
Entering Grating Information ........................................................................................... 52
Grating Parameters ..................................................................................................... 52
Selecting and Moving the Grating .................................................................................... 53
Entering Information for Software-Controlled Slits and/or Mirrors ................................. 54
iv WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Entering Laser Excitation Information ............................................................................. 55
Chapter 3 Initial Spectroscopic Data Collection ............................................ 57
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 57
Temperature Control ......................................................................................................... 58
Cleans and Skips ............................................................................................................... 59
Spectrograph ..................................................................................................................... 59
Experiment Setup Procedure (All Controllers and Unintensified Cameras) ..................... 59
Experiment Setup Procedures (Intensified Cameras) ....................................................... 63
Data Collection Procedures (Intensified Cameras) ........................................................... 63
Data Collection (Unintensified Cameras) ......................................................................... 63
Chapter 4 Initial Imaging Data Collection ....................................................... 65
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 65
Temperature Control ......................................................................................................... 66
Cleans and Skips ............................................................................................................... 67
Experiment Setup Procedure (All Controllers and Unintensified Cameras) ..................... 67
Experiment Setup Procedures (Intensified Cameras) ....................................................... 70
Data Collection Procedures (Intensified Cameras) ........................................................... 71
Data Collection Procedures (Controller-Specific) ............................................................ 71
ST-133-Controller ...................................................................................................... 71
Focusing ............................................................................................................... 71
Data Collection .................................................................................................... 72
PentaMAX Controller ................................................................................................ 73
Focusing ............................................................................................................... 73
Data Collection .................................................................................................... 74
Data Collection (Unintensified Cameras) ......................................................................... 75
Chapter 5 Opening, Closing, and Saving Data Files ..................................... 77
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 77
Opening Data Files ........................................................................................................... 77
Saving Data Files .............................................................................................................. 80
Saving Temporary Data Files ..................................................................................... 80
Data File tab ............................................................................................................... 81
Closing a Data File ........................................................................................................... 81
Deleting Data Files ........................................................................................................... 82
Chapter 6 Wavelength Calibration ................................................................... 83
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 83
Changing the WinSpec/32 Calibration Method ................................................................ 83
Changing the Calibration Method ..................................................................................... 83
Calibration Menu .............................................................................................................. 84
Wavelength Calibration Procedure ................................................................................... 84
Save as Default ................................................................................................................. 87
No Data ...................................................................................................................... 87
Not Live Data ............................................................................................................. 87
Live Data .................................................................................................................... 87
Calibration, Display, and User Units ................................................................................ 87
Calibration Method ........................................................................................................... 88
Chapter 7 Spectrograph Calibration ............................................................... 89
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 89
Preparation ........................................................................................................................ 89
Table of Contents v
Calibration Parameters ...................................................................................................... 90
Offset ................................................................................................................................ 92
Adjust ................................................................................................................................ 94
Dispersion ......................................................................................................................... 96
Chapter 8 Displaying the Data ......................................................................... 99
Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 99
Screen Refresh Rate ........................................................................................................ 100
Data Displayed as a 3D Graph ........................................................................................ 101
Displaying Hid-lamp.spe .......................................................................................... 101
5%-95% Display Range ........................................................................................... 104
Selecting a Region of Interest .................................................................................. 104
Information box ........................................................................................................ 105
Displaying a Single Strip .......................................................................................... 106
Cursor ....................................................................................................................... 107
Strip Selection .......................................................................................................... 107
Cursor Curve and Marker Curves ............................................................................ 108
Hidden Surfaces ....................................................................................................... 109
Data Window Context menu ........................................................................................... 110
Labeling Graphs and Images .......................................................................................... 111
Data Displayed as an Image ............................................................................................ 114
Displaying circuit.spe ............................................................................................... 114
Changing the Brightness Range ............................................................................... 115
Brightness/Contrast Control ..................................................................................... 116
Selecting a Region of Interest .................................................................................. 116
Opening the Display Layout dialog ......................................................................... 117
Viewing Axes and Cross Sections ............................................................................ 117
Information box ........................................................................................................ 118
Autoranging the Intensity in a ROI .......................................................................... 119
Relabeling the Axes.................................................................................................. 119
Changing the Color of the Axes and Labels ............................................................. 120
Specifying a New ROI and Intensity Range ............................................................ 120
Displaying a Z-Slice ................................................................................................. 121
Part 2 Advanced Topics .............................................. 123
Chapter 9 On-Line Data Acquisition Processes .......................................... 125
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 125
On-Line Thresholding ..................................................................................................... 125
Description ............................................................................................................... 125
Parameters ................................................................................................................ 126
On-Line Absorbance ....................................................................................................... 126
Description ............................................................................................................... 126
On-Line YT ..................................................................................................................... 127
Description ............................................................................................................... 127
YT Area and Equation Setup Procedure .................................................................. 128
Baseline Correction .................................................................................................. 129
Changing/Deleting Areas and Equations ................................................................. 129
YT Analysis Acquisition Modes .............................................................................. 130
Focus .................................................................................................................. 130
vi WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Snapshot ............................................................................................................. 131
Average .............................................................................................................. 132
YT Analysis Setup Procedure .................................................................................. 132
ASCII Output File ........................................................................................................... 134
Description ............................................................................................................... 134
Procedure .................................................................................................................. 134
Chapter 10 Cleaning ....................................................................................... 135
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 135
Clean Cycles ................................................................................................................... 135
Continuous Cleans .......................................................................................................... 136
Continuous Cleans Instruction ........................................................................................ 138
ROIs and Cleaning .......................................................................................................... 138
Kinetics and Cleaning ..................................................................................................... 138
Chapter 11 ROI Definition & Binning ............................................................. 139
Overview ......................................................................................................................... 139
General ..................................................................................................................... 139
Spectroscopy Mode .................................................................................................. 140
Imaging Mode .......................................................................................................... 140
Binning (Group and Height parameters) ......................................................................... 140
Overview .................................................................................................................. 140
Hardware Binning .............................................................................................. 140
Software Binning ............................................................................................... 141
Spectroscopy Mode .................................................................................................. 141
Imaging Mode .......................................................................................................... 141
Defining ROIs ................................................................................................................. 142
Examples of Spectroscopy and Imaging ROIs ......................................................... 142
Constraints on Defining Multiple Regions of Interest (ROIs) ................................. 143
Methods of Defining and Storing ROIs ................................................................... 143
Chapter 12 Correction Techniques ............................................................... 147
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 147
Background Subtraction ................................................................................................. 147
Background Subtraction with Intensified Detectors ................................................. 148
Flatfield Correction ......................................................................................................... 149
CCD Blemishes ............................................................................................................... 150
Cosmic Ray Removal ..................................................................................................... 151
Chapter 13 Spectra Math ................................................................................ 153
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 153
Source Data and Destination Selection ........................................................................... 153
Operations ....................................................................................................................... 154
Operation Descriptions ................................................................................................... 155
Linear Operations ..................................................................................................... 155
Non-Linear Operations ............................................................................................. 155
Bitwise Operations ................................................................................................... 156
Binary Operations .................................................................................................... 156
Chapter 14 Gluing Spectra ............................................................................. 159
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 159
Gluing Existing Spectra .................................................................................................. 159
Step and Glue .................................................................................................................. 160
Table of Contents vii
Theory ............................................................................................................................. 162
Calibration and ROI Offsets ........................................................................................... 164
Chapter 15 Post-Acquisition Mask Processes ............................................. 165
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 165
Input tab.................................................................................................................... 165
Output tab ................................................................................................................. 165
Edge Enhancement ......................................................................................................... 166
Parameters tab .......................................................................................................... 166
Laplacian Masks ....................................................................................................... 167
Sobel Edge Detection ............................................................................................... 167
Edge Enhancement Procedure .................................................................................. 167
Sharpening Functions ..................................................................................................... 168
Parameters tab .......................................................................................................... 168
Sharpening Procedure .............................................................................................. 168
Smoothing Functions ...................................................................................................... 169
Parameters tab .......................................................................................................... 169
Smoothing Procedure ............................................................................................... 169
Morphological Functions ................................................................................................ 170
Parameters tab .......................................................................................................... 170
Morphological Procedure ......................................................................................... 171
Custom Filter .................................................................................................................. 172
Filter Matrix tab ....................................................................................................... 172
Custom Filter Procedure ........................................................................................... 172
Look Up Table ................................................................................................................ 173
Look Up Table tab .................................................................................................... 173
Look Up Table Procedure ........................................................................................ 173
Look Up Table Formats ........................................................................................... 174
Format 1 ............................................................................................................. 174
Format 2 ............................................................................................................. 175
References ....................................................................................................................... 175
Chapter 16 Additional Post-Acquisition Processes .................................... 177
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 177
Input tab.................................................................................................................... 177
Output tab ................................................................................................................. 177
Threshold and Clipping .................................................................................................. 178
Procedure .................................................................................................................. 178
Cross Section .................................................................................................................. 179
Introduction .............................................................................................................. 179
Procedure .................................................................................................................. 179
Binning and Skipping ..................................................................................................... 180
Introduction .............................................................................................................. 180
Procedure .................................................................................................................. 180
Binning and Skipping Restrictions and Limitations ................................................. 181
Histogram Calculation .................................................................................................... 182
Introduction .............................................................................................................. 182
Procedure .................................................................................................................. 182
Chapter 17 Printing ......................................................................................... 183
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 183
Setting up the Printer ...................................................................................................... 183
Printing Directly from WinSpec/32 ................................................................................ 184
viii WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Print Preview ................................................................................................................... 184
Printing a Screen Capture ............................................................................................... 185
Saving as TIF and Printing ............................................................................................. 186
Chapter 18 Pulser Operation .......................................................................... 187
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 187
PG200 Programmable Pulse Generator .......................................................................... 187
DG535 Digital Delay/Pulse Generator ........................................................................... 191
Programmable Timing Generator (PTG) ........................................................................ 194
SuperSYNCHRO Timing Generator .............................................................................. 198
Repetitive Mode Parameters ........................................................................................... 202
Sequential Mode Parameters ........................................................................................... 203
Timing Generator Interactive Trigger Setup ................................................................... 206
Timing Generator Interactive Gate Width and Delay ..................................................... 207
Chapter 19 Custom Toolbar Settings ............................................................ 209
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 209
Displaying the Custom Toolbar ...................................................................................... 209
Customizing the Toolbar ................................................................................................ 209
Individual Dialog Item Descriptions ............................................................................... 210
Chapter 20 Software Options ......................................................................... 213
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 213
Custom Chip (WXCstChp.opt) ....................................................................................... 213
Introduction .............................................................................................................. 213
Custom Timing (WXCstTim.opt) ................................................................................... 214
Introduction .............................................................................................................. 214
FITS (FITS.exe) .............................................................................................................. 214
Macro Record (WXmacrec.opt) ...................................................................................... 215
Spex Spectrograph Control (WSSpex.opt) ..................................................................... 216
Virtual Chip (WXvchip.opt) ........................................................................................... 216
Introduction .............................................................................................................. 216
Virtual Chip Setup .................................................................................................... 217
Experimental Timing ................................................................................................ 220
Tips ........................................................................................................................... 220
Part 3 Reference........................................................... 221
Appendix A System and Camera Nomenclature .......................................... 223
System, Controller Type, and Camera Type Cross-Reference ....................................... 223
System and System Component Descriptions ................................................................ 226
Systems: ................................................................................................................... 226
Controllers: ............................................................................................................... 228
Cameras/Detectors: .................................................................................................. 228
Pulsers: ..................................................................................................................... 229
High-Voltage Power Supplies: ................................................................................. 229
Miscellaneous Components: ..................................................................................... 229
Array Designators ........................................................................................................... 230
Appendix B WinSpec/32 First Light Instructions ......................................... 233
Imaging ........................................................................................................................... 233
Table of Contents ix
Assumptions ............................................................................................................. 233
Getting Started .......................................................................................................... 233
Setting the Parameters .............................................................................................. 233
Confirming the Setup ............................................................................................... 235
Spectroscopy ................................................................................................................... 236
Assumptions ............................................................................................................. 236
Getting Started .......................................................................................................... 236
Setting the Camera Parameters ................................................................................. 237
Setting the Spectrograph Parameters ........................................................................ 238
Confirming the Setup ............................................................................................... 238
Rotational Alignment and Focusing ......................................................................... 240
Acton Series Spectrograph ................................................................................. 240
IsoPlane SCT-320 Spectrograph ........................................................................ 242
Acquiring Data ......................................................................................................... 243
Shutdown .................................................................................................................. 243
Appendix C Calibration Lines ........................................................................ 245
Appendix D Data Structure ............................................................................ 247
Version 1.43 Header ....................................................................................................... 247
Version 1.6 Header ......................................................................................................... 248
Version 2.5 Header (3/23/04) ......................................................................................... 251
Start of Data (4100 - ) .............................................................................................. 255
Definition of Array Sizes ................................................................................................ 255
Custom Data Types Used In the Structure ...................................................................... 255
Reading Data ................................................................................................................... 256
Appendix E Auto-Spectro Wavelength Calibration ..................................... 257
Equations used in WinSpec Wavelength Calibration ..................................................... 257
WinSpec X Axis Auto Calibration ................................................................................. 259
Appendix F CD ROM Failure Work-Arounds ................................................ 261
Appendix G WinSpec/32 Repair and Maintenance ...................................... 263
Install/Uninstall WinSpec/32 Components at a Later Time ........................................... 263
Installing More than One Version of WinSpec/32 ......................................................... 265
PIHWDEF.INI & SESSION.DAT .................................................................................. 266
Uninstalling and Reinstalling .......................................................................................... 266
Appendix H USB 2.0 Limitations ................................................................... 267
Appendix I Troubleshooting .......................................................................... 269
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 269
Camera1 (or similar name) on Hardware Setup dialog ................................................... 269
Controller Is Not Responding ......................................................................................... 270
Data Loss or Serial Violation .......................................................................................... 270
Data Overrun Due to Hardware Conflict message .......................................................... 270
Data Overrun Has Occurred message ............................................................................. 271
Error Creating Controller message ................................................................................. 272
Ethernet Network is not accessible ................................................................................. 272
OrangeUSB USB 2.0 Driver Update .............................................................................. 273
Program Error message ................................................................................................... 274
Serial violations have occurred. Check interface cable. ................................................. 275
x WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Appendix J Glossary ...................................................................................... 277
Warranty & Service ......................................................................................... 279
Limited Warranty: ........................................................................................................... 279
Basic Limited One (1) Year Warranty ..................................................................... 279
Limited One (1) Year Warranty on Refurbished or Discontinued Products ............ 279
XP Vacuum Chamber Limited Lifetime Warranty .................................................. 279
Sealed Chamber Integrity Limited 12 Month Warranty ........................................... 280
Vacuum Integrity Limited 12 Month Warranty ....................................................... 280
Image Intensifier Detector Limited One Year Warranty .......................................... 280
X-Ray Detector Limited One Year Warranty .......................................................... 280
Software Limited Warranty ...................................................................................... 280
Owner's Manual and Troubleshooting ..................................................................... 281
Your Responsibility .................................................................................................. 281
Contact Information ........................................................................................................ 282
Index ................................................................................................................. 283
Figures
Figure 1. Opening WinSpec/32 via the Windows Start button ........................................ 32
Figure 2. Splash screen .................................................................................................... 33
Figure 3. Main WinSpec/32 window ............................................................................... 33
Figure 4. Setup menu ....................................................................................................... 35
Figure 5. Possible System Configurations ....................................................................... 36
Figure 6. Air-Cooled System (with Internal Controller) Diagram ................................... 36
Figure 7. Liquid- or Air-Cooled System (with External Controller) Diagram ................ 37
Figure 8. Cryo-Cooled System (with External Controller) Diagram ............................... 37
Figure 9. Camera Detection Wizard - Welcome dialog ................................................... 38
Figure 10. Camera Detection Wizard - Detected Hardware dialog ................................. 38
Figure 11. Camera Detection Wizard - Welcome (Manual selected) dialog ................... 39
Figure 12. Camera Detection Wizard - Optional Configuration Disk dialog .................. 39
Figure 13. Camera Detection Wizard - Test Image dialog .............................................. 40
Figure 14. Camera Detection Wizard - Finished dialog .................................................. 40
Figure 15. Hardware Setup|Controller/Camera tab .......................................................... 41
Figure 16. Display tab; left graphic applies to all controllers except ST-121; right graphic
applies to ST-121 only .............................................................................................. 45
Figure 17. Interface tab .................................................................................................... 46
Figure 18. Cleans/Skips tab ............................................................................................. 47
Figure 19. Vertical Skips ................................................................................................. 49
Figure 20. Spectrograph menu ......................................................................................... 50
Figure 21. Define Spectrograph dialog ............................................................................ 50
Figure 22. Install/Remove Spectrographs ........................................................................ 51
Figure 23. Gratings tab Setting the grating parameters .................................................. 52
Figure 24. Move Spectrograph Gratings tab .................................................................... 53
Figure 25. Define Spectrograph Slits/Mirrors tab ............................................................ 54
Figure 26. Slit width and Mirror selection tabs - Move Spectrograph dialog ................. 54
Figure 27. Entering the Laser Line Define Spectrograph Main tab ................................ 55
Figure 28. Temperature dialog ......................................................................................... 58
Figure 29. Experiment Setup: Main tab ........................................................................... 59
Figure 30. Experiment Setup dialog Timing tab .............................................................. 60
Figure 31. Data Corrections tab ....................................................................................... 60
Table of Contents xi
Figure 32. Generic ADC tab ............................................................................................ 61
Figure 33. ROI dialog ...................................................................................................... 61
Figure 34. Data File tab ................................................................................................... 62
Figure 35. File Browse dialog .......................................................................................... 62
Figure 36. Acquisition menu ........................................................................................... 63
Figure 37. Typical Mercury-Argon Spectrum ................................................................. 64
Figure 38. Temperature dialog ......................................................................................... 66
Figure 39. Experiment Setup|Main tab ............................................................................ 67
Figure 40. Timing tab ...................................................................................................... 68
Figure 41. Data Corrections tab ....................................................................................... 68
Figure 42. Generic ADC tab ............................................................................................ 69
Figure 43. ROI tab - imaging selected ............................................................................. 69
Figure 44. Data File tab ................................................................................................... 70
Figure 45. File Browse dialog .......................................................................................... 70
Figure 46. ST-133 Interactive Camera dialog ................................................................. 72
Figure 47. PentaMAX Interactive Operation dialog ........................................................ 73
Figure 48. Typical Data Acquisition Image ..................................................................... 75
Figure 49. Open dialog .................................................................................................... 77
Figure 50. High Intensity Lamp Spectrum ...................................................................... 78
Figure 51. Data File Save As dialog ................................................................................ 80
Figure 52. Save As Data Types........................................................................................ 80
Figure 53. Data File tab ................................................................................................... 81
Figure 54. Right-click File Operations menu .................................................................. 82
Figure 55. Calibration Usage dialog ................................................................................ 83
Figure 56. Calibration menu ............................................................................................ 84
Figure 57. Hg-Argon spectrum ........................................................................................ 85
Figure 58. Calibration Setup dialog after running Find Peaks routine on Hg-Argon
spectrum .................................................................................................................... 85
Figure 59. Spectrum after running Find Peaks routine .................................................... 86
Figure 60. Setup Calibration screen after selecting peaks and entering calibration
wavelengths .............................................................................................................. 86
Figure 61. Spectrum after Calibration ............................................................................. 87
Figure 62. Spectrograph Calibration dialog .................................................................... 91
Figure 63. Offset dialog ................................................................................................... 92
Figure 64. Peak Finder Examples .................................................................................... 93
Figure 65. Offset Spectrum for Zero-order Measurement ............................................... 94
Figure 66. Adjust dialog .................................................................................................. 95
Figure 67. Calibration Adjust Spectrum .......................................................................... 95
Figure 68. Dispersion dialog ............................................................................................ 96
Figure 69. Image display of 256 data strips ..................................................................... 99
Figure 70. 3D Image display of eight data strips ............................................................. 99
Figure 71. 3D graph with two data strips ....................................................................... 100
Figure 72. 3D graph with five data strips ...................................................................... 101
Figure 73. Open dialog .................................................................................................. 101
Figure 74. Display Layout dialog .................................................................................. 102
Figure 75. Hid-lamp.spe 3-D Graph .............................................................................. 103
Figure 76. Hid-lamp.spe 3D graph with region selected for viewing ............................ 104
Figure 77. Hide-lamp.spe 3D graph expanded to show defined region ......................... 105
Figure 78. Graphical Display with Information box ...................................................... 105
Figure 79. Single Strip displayed graphically ................................................................ 106
Figure 80. 3D Display with Cursor curve and Marker Curves ...................................... 108
Figure 81. 3D Plot with Hidden Surfaces ...................................................................... 110
xii WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Figure 82. Data Window Context menu ....................................................................... 110
Figure 83. Normal Context menu .................................................................................. 111
Figure 84. ROI Context menu ........................................................................................ 111
Figure 85. Label Display action ..................................................................................... 112
Figure 86. Label Options subdialog ............................................................................... 112
Figure 87. Label text entry box ...................................................................................... 112
Figure 88. Data with Finished Label .............................................................................. 113
Figure 89. Edit box with line-wrapped label and finished label with same line wraps . 113
Figure 90. ROI resized to correct Line-wrapping .......................................................... 114
Figure 91. Display after changing Font Selection ......................................................... 114
Figure 92. Open dialog .................................................................................................. 115
Figure 93. Circuit.spe Image .......................................................................................... 115
Figure 94. Brightness/Contrast dialog ........................................................................... 116
Figure 95. Circuit.spe with Region Selected for Viewing ............................................. 116
Figure 96. Circuit.spe Expanded to show Defined Region ............................................ 117
Figure 97. Display Layout dialog .................................................................................. 117
Figure 98. Display Layout|Range tab ............................................................................ 117
Figure 99. Selecting the Large Cursor ........................................................................... 118
Figure 100. Circuit.spe with Axes and Cross-sections .................................................. 118
Figure 101. Information box .......................................................................................... 118
Figure 102. Display Layout|Axes tab ............................................................................ 119
Figure 103. Fonts dialog ................................................................................................ 119
Figure 104. Display Layout|Color tab ........................................................................... 120
Figure 105. Display Layout|Color dialog ...................................................................... 120
Figure 106. Multi-frame Data and a Z-Slice of that Data .............................................. 121
Figure 107. Experiment Setup|Processes tab ................................................................. 125
Figure 108. Online Thresholding Setup dialog .............................................................. 125
Figure 109. Absorbance Setup dialog ............................................................................ 126
Figure 110. YT Area & Equation Setup dialog ............................................................. 128
Figure 111. Equation Calculator dialog ......................................................................... 129
Figure 112. Experiment Setup|Process tab .................................................................... 132
Figure 113. YT Setup dialog .......................................................................................... 133
Figure 114. ASCII Output Setup dialog ........................................................................ 134
Figure 115. Clean Cycles in Freerun Operation ............................................................ 135
Figure 116. Cleans/Skips tab ......................................................................................... 136
Figure 117. Timing Tab: External Sync with Continuous Cleans Selected ................... 136
Figure 118. External Sync Timing Diagram .................................................................. 137
Figure 119. External Sync with Continuous Cleans Timing Diagram .......................... 137
Figure 120. Cleans/Skips tab: Continuous Cleans Instruction ....................................... 138
Figure 121. Assumed Array Orientation ........................................................................ 139
Figure 122. Single Full-width ROI ................................................................................ 142
Figure 123. Single Partial-width ROI ............................................................................ 142
Figure 124. Multiple Full-width ROIs ........................................................................... 142
Figure 125. Spectroscopy Mode Multiple Partial-width ROIs ...................................... 142
Figure 126. Imaging Mode Multiple ROIs with Different Widths ................................ 142
Figure 127. Multiple Imaging ROIs and Resulting Data ............................................... 143
Figure 128. Easy Bin dialog .......................................................................................... 144
Figure 129. ROI Setup tab (Spectroscopy Mode) .......................................................... 145
Figure 130. ROI Setup tab (Imaging Mode) .................................................................. 146
Figure 131. Data Corrections tab ................................................................................... 148
Figure 132. Blemish Files: CSV format and Tab Delimited format .............................. 150
Figure 133. Math dialog ................................................................................................. 153
Table of Contents xiii
Figure 134. Operation tab .............................................................................................. 155
Figure 135. Post-Process Glue dialog ............................................................................ 159
Figure 136. Step and Glue Setup dialog ........................................................................ 161
Figure 137. Input tab ...................................................................................................... 165
Figure 138. Output tab ................................................................................................... 165
Figure 139. Edge Enhancement| Parameters tab ............................................................ 166
Figure 140. Original Image (left) and Edge-detected Image (right) .............................. 167
Figure 141. Sharpening|Parameters tab ......................................................................... 168
Figure 142. Original Image (left) and Smoothed Image (right) ..................................... 169
Figure 143. Smoothing|Parameters tab .......................................................................... 169
Figure 144. Morphological|Parameters tab .................................................................... 170
Figure 145. Original Image (left) and Dilated Image (right) ......................................... 170
Figure 146. Original Image (left) and Eroded Image (right) ......................................... 170
Figure 147. Original Image (left) and Opened Image with Three Iterations (right) ...... 171
Figure 148. Filter Matrix tab .......................................................................................... 172
Figure 149. Look-Up Table ........................................................................................... 173
Figure 150. Input tab ...................................................................................................... 177
Figure 151. Output tab ................................................................................................... 177
Figure 152. Threshold and Clipping|Parameters tab ...................................................... 178
Figure 153. Example Cross Sections of an ROI ............................................................ 179
Figure 154. Cross Section|Parameters tab ...................................................................... 179
Figure 155. Post-processing Binning and Skipping|Parameters tab .............................. 180
Figure 156. Post-processing Histogram|Parameters tab ................................................. 182
Figure 157. Print Setup dialog ....................................................................................... 183
Figure 158. Print dialog ................................................................................................. 184
Figure 159. Print Preview window ................................................................................ 184
Figure 160. Pulsers dialog ............................................................................................. 187
Figure 161. PG200|Comm Port tab ................................................................................ 188
Figure 162. PG200|Triggers tab ..................................................................................... 188
Figure 163. PG200|Gating tab ....................................................................................... 189
Figure 164. PG200|Repetitive Gating Setup dialog ....................................................... 189
Figure 165. PG200|Sequential Gating Setup dialog ...................................................... 190
Figure 166. Camera State dialog .................................................................................... 191
Figure 167. DG535 dialog ............................................................................................. 191
Figure 168. DG535|Comm Port tab ............................................................................... 192
Figure 169. DG535|Triggers tab .................................................................................... 192
Figure 170. DG535|Gating tab ....................................................................................... 193
Figure 171. DG535|Repetitive Gating Setup ................................................................. 193
Figure 172. DG535|Sequential Gating Setup dialog ...................................................... 193
Figure 173. Camera State dialog .................................................................................... 194
Figure 174. Pulsers dialog ............................................................................................. 194
Figure 175. PTG|Triggers tab ........................................................................................ 195
Figure 176. PTG|Gating tab ........................................................................................... 195
Figure 177. PTG|Repetitive Gating Setup ..................................................................... 195
Figure 178. PTG|Sequential Gating Setup dialog .......................................................... 196
Figure 179. PTG|Aux. Trig. Out tab ............................................................................. 198
Figure 180. Camera State dialog ..................................................................................... 198
Figure 181. Pulsers dialog .............................................................................................. 199
Figure 182. SuperSYNCHRO dialog .............................................................................. 199
Figure 183. SuperSYNCHRO\Gating tab ...................................................................... 200
Figure 184. SuperSYNCHRO|Repetitive Gating dialog (Internal Trigger on left;
External Trigger on right) ....................................................................................... 200
xiv WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Figure 185. SuperSYNCHRO|Sequential Gating dialog (Internal Trigger) .................. 201
Figure 186. SuperSYNCHRO|Sequential Gating dialog (External Trigger) ................. 201
Figure 187. SuperSYNCHRO|Trigger Out tab .............................................................. 202
Figure 188. Range Limits Exceeded Warning ............................................................... 204
Figure 189. Gate Width/Delay Sequence dialog ............................................................ 205
Figure 190. Sequence Values File dialog ...................................................................... 206
Figure 191. Timing Generator Interactive Trigger Setup dialog ................................... 206
Figure 192. Timing Generator Interactive Gate Width and Delay dialog ...................... 207
Figure 193. Default Custom Toolbar ............................................................................. 209
Figure 194. Customize Toolbar dialog .......................................................................... 209
Figure 195. Custom Chip tab ......................................................................................... 213
Figure 196. Custom Timing tab ..................................................................................... 214
Figure 197. FITS dialog ................................................................................................ 215
Figure 198. Macro Record dialog .................................................................................. 216
Figure 199. Install/Remove Spectrographs dialog ......................................................... 216
Figure 200. Virtual Chip Functional diagram ................................................................ 217
Figure 201. Virtual Chip dialog ..................................................................................... 217
Figure 202. Wavelength Calibration Spectrum ............................................................. 246
Figure 203. Relationships of and in terms of and ............................................. 258
Figure 204. Relationship between and the focal length, detector angle, and the distance
of - from image plane ............................................................................................ 259
Figure 205. WinSpec, WinView, or WinXTest Selection dialogs ................................. 263
Figure 206. Media Password dialog............................................................................... 264
Figure 207. Application Maintenance dialog ................................................................. 264
Figure 208. Select Features dialog ................................................................................. 264
Figure 209. WinSpec/32 has been successfully installed dialog ................................... 265
Figure 210. Exit or Install Another Program dialog ...................................................... 265
Figure 211. Camera1 in Camera Name Field................................................................. 269
Figure 212. Data Overrun Due to Hardware Conflict dialog ......................................... 270
Figure 213. Error Creating Controller dialog ................................................................ 272
Figure 214. Ebus Driver Installation Tool dialog .......................................................... 273
Figure 215. Program Error dialog .................................................................................. 274
Figure 216. Serial Violations Have Occurred dialog ..................................................... 275
Table of Contents xv
Tables
Table 1. PCI Driver Files and Locations ......................................................................... 27
Table 2. USB Driver Files and Locations ........................................................................ 28
Table 3. Cursor Appearance and Behavior for Images and Graphs ............................... 107
Table 4. Wavelength Calibration Lines (in nanometers) ............................................... 245
Table 5. Features Supported under USB 2.0 ................................................................. 267
xvi WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
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17
Part 1
Getting Started
Introduction ............................................................................................................ 19
Chapter 1, Installing and Starting WinSpec/32 ............................................. 23
Chapter 2, Basic Hardware Setup .................................................................... 35
Chapter 3, Initial Spectroscopic Data Collection ........................................ 57
Chapter 4, Initial Imaging Data Collection ..................................................... 65
Chapter 5, Opening, Closing, and Saving Data Files .................................. 77
Chapter 6, Wavelength Calibration ................................................................... 83
Chapter 7, Spectrograph Calibration ............................................................... 89
Chapter 8, Displaying the Data ......................................................................... 99
18 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
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19
Introduction
The WinSpec manual has been written to give new users of Princeton Instruments
detector/camera systems step-by-step guides to basic data collection, storage, and
processing operations. The most up-to-date version of this software manual and other
Princeton Instruments manuals can be found and downloaded from
ftp://ftp.princetoninstruments.com/public/Manuals/Princeton Instruments/.
The WinSpec manual is divided into the following three parts:
Part 1, Getting Started, is primarily intended for the first time user who is familiar
with Windows-based applications or for the experienced user who wants to review.
These chapters lead you through hardware setup, experiment setup, data collection,
file handling, wavelength calibration, spectrograph setup and calibration and data
display procedures.
Part 2, Advanced Topics, goes on to discuss ancillary topics such as cleaning,
ROIs, binning, data correction techniques, printing, gluing spectra, Y:T analysis,
processing options, pulser operation and customizing the toolbar. These chapters are
more informational and less procedural than those in Part 1.
Part 3, Reference, contains appendices that provide additional useful information,
such as
commonly used system, controller type and camera type terminology provided in
Appendix A,
Hg, Ar, Ne calibration spectrum data and graph provided in Appendix C, and
data structure information provided in Appendix D.
Also included are appendices that address repair and maintenance of the WinSpec/32
software and installation work-arounds for situations where the CD ROM does not
support long file names.
A software hardware setup wizard guides you through the critical hardware selections the
first time you select Setup Hardware. To properly respond to the wizard’s queries, you
may have to refer to your ordering information, such as exact detector model, A/D
converters, etc. Keep this information handy.
Even though the wizard will assist you in getting started, it will still be necessary to read
through this manual to familiarize yourself with the many data-collection and analysis
options available.
Note: Throughout the manual references are made to the PI-MAX camera/detector. This
camera/detector was previously called the I-MAX and the ICCD-MAX.
Summary of Chapter Information
Part 1, Getting Started
Introduction describes the contents of this manual as well as other information sources
including online Help and other documentation files.
Chapter 1 Installing and Starting WinSpec/32 lists system requirements and
describes how to install the WinSpec/32 software.
20 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup provides detailed instructions on how to
configure WinSpec/32 for operation with the hardware (detector,
controller, and spectrograph) in your particular system. Pulser
configuration is discussed in Chapter 18.
Chapter 3 Initial Spectroscopic Data Collection provides a procedure for
initial spectroscopic data collection, allowing users to gain some
operating familiarity before going on to more complex measurements.
Chapter 4 Initial Imaging Data Collection provides a procedure for initial
imaging data collection, allowing users to gain some operating
familiarity before going on to more complex measurements.
Chapter 5 Opening, Closing, and Saving Data Files describes how to open,
close and save data files in WinSpec/32.
Chapter 6 Wavelength Calibration describes how to calibrate the WinSpec/32
software for one position of the spectrograph grating.
Chapter 7 Spectrograph Calibration discusses how to calibrate the WinSpec/32
software for any position of the spectrograph gratings.
Chapter 8 Displaying the Data describes the data file display options.
Part 2, Advanced Topics
Chapter 9 On-Line Data Acquisition Processes describes data acquisition
processes that can be activated to occur during data acquisition. These
processes include on-line thresholding, on-line absorbance, on-line Y:T,
and ASCII output.
Chapter 10 Cleaning describes the cleaning features that are used while data
acquisition is idle to prevent the buildup of unwanted charge on the
array.
Chapter 11 ROI Definition & Binning describes how to set a region of interest (ROI),
so that data is only collected from the specified portion of the CCD array. It
also describes binning, the summing together of charge from several pixels,
on the array or in software during data acquisition. Simple or more
advanced binning options can be configured easily with WinSpec/32.
Chapter 12 Correction Techniques explains correction options such as
background subtraction and flatfield correction.
Chapter 13 Spectra Math covers WinSpec/32’s mathematical processing features.
Chapter 14 Gluing Spectra discusses gluing existing files or combining the data
acquisition and gluing operations under spectrograph control.
Chapter 15 Post-Acquisition Mask Processes describes digital mask-
operations that can be performed on the acquired data. Discussed are
Edge Enhancement, Sharpening, Smoothing, Custom Filter and
Morphological functions.
Chapter 16 Additional Post-Acquisition Processes describes additional
operations that can be performed on an acquired data set. Functions
covered include Threshold and Clipping, Cross Section, Binning and
Skipping, and Histogram.
Introduction 21
Chapter 17 Printing describes printing features of WinSpec/32. WinSpec/32 can
print directly to almost any Windows printer driver.
Chapter 18 Pulser Operation describes the operation of the Pulsers that can be
used with WinSpec/32.
Chapter 19 Custom Toolbar Settings describes the Custom Toolbar and explains
how to add/remove the available buttons.
Chapter 20 Software Options describes WinSpec/32 options that can also be
purchased from Princeton Instruments.
Part 3, Reference
Appendix A System and Camera Nomenclature provides a cross-reference table
for systems, controllers, and cameras/CCD arrays. It also provides brief
descriptions of systems and system components. CCD array related
abbreviations are also included.
Appendix B WinSpec/32 First Light Instructions provides procedures for
setting up and focusing a system while in Imaging mode and for setting
up, aligning, and focusing a system while in Spectroscopy mode.
Appendix C Calibration Lines contains wavelength tables and a detailed spectrum
for Mercury-Argon.
Appendix D Data Structure contains descriptions of the data structure for both
WinView/WinSpec 1.43 and for 1.6. The data structure for WinView/32
and WinSpec/32 is the same as that for WinView/WinSpec 1.6.
Appendix E Auto-Spectro Wavelength Calibration discusses the WinSpec/32
wavelength calibration algorithm.
Appendix F CD Failure Work-Arounds provides advice on how to successfully
complete the installation in situations where the CD ROM doesn’t
support long file names.
Appendix G WinSpec/32 Repair and Maintenance provides information on how
to repair, reinstall and uninstall WinSpec/32 components.
Appendix H USB 2.0 Limitations covers the currently known limitations
associated with operating under the USB 2.0 interface.
Appendix I Troubleshooting USB 2.0 provides solutions to communication
problems that may occur when operating under the USB 2.0 interface.
Appendix J Glossary includes brief definitions of terms used in relation to
WinSpec/32 and the system hardware.
Online Help
The WINSPEC.CHM online documentation contains:
information that is in this manual,
step-by-step instructions on how to use WinSpec functions,
reference information about WinSpec and its functions, and
context-sensitive help, which describes a screen or menu item that is being
pointed to or that is active when a Help button is clicked on.
22 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Tool Tips and Status Bar Messages
Placing the mouse cursor on a button and resting it there for a few seconds causes a brief
tool-tip message to appear that describes the button’s function. Tool tips are also
provided for the individual panes of the Status Bar (at the bottom of the WinSpec/32
window). Note that tool tips only appear at the desktop level. Tool tips are not provided
for the buttons on the individual dialogs and tabs.
More detailed descriptions for each button at the desktop level are provided at the left
side of the Status Bar. Status Bar help messages are also provided for the menu
selections.
Additional Documentation
Additional documentation can be found in the \WinSpec32\Documentation directory on
the hard drive where WinSpec/32 was installed. Among the files that may be in this
directory are:
WINHEAD.TXT This file contains documentation on the header structure for
WinSpec/32 or WinView/32 Data Files. TXT files can be opened
with any ASCII text editor.
WinX_readme.doc This is a read-me file that contains the latest information on new
features, fixed problems, and work-arounds for issues not yet solved.
WinX32 Automation 3.X for Visual Basic.pdf This file is stored in the directory
when the Visual Basic User Interface component is selected during
installation. It describes how to create your own Snap-Ins by using
Visual Basic Professional Edition and the WinX32 Automation files.
Requires Adobe® Acrobat® Reader®.
WinX32 Programming for Macro Record.pdf This file is stored in the directory
when the Macro option is installed. It provides detailed information
on how to create and edit macro programs for WinSpec/32. Requires
Adobe Acrobat Reader. The Macro option is not supplied with the
standard WinSpec/32 program.
23
Chapter 1
Installing and Starting WinSpec/32
To ensure that the computer you have can operate the Princeton Instruments equipment,
please first read the system requirements below carefully. WinSpec/32’s requirements
differ from those of previous versions of WinSpec.
After confirming that your computer meets all hardware and software requirements,
install WinSpec/32 according to the instructions in this chapter. Do not attempt to run the
software until you have read Chapters 2, 3 and 4, which discuss important hardware-
setup and data acquisition issues. Also, it is recommended that you install the Princeton
Instruments interface board in your computer before running the software. Instructions
for installing the interface board are provided in your Princeton Instruments hardware
manuals.
Note: If your computer and system were purchased together from Princeton Instruments,
the Interface card will have been installed at the factory.
System Requirements
The following information lists the system hardware and software requirements.
Hardware Requirements
Princeton Instruments camera and, if required by the camera, a Princeton Instruments
ST series controller with either a TAXI or USB 2.0 Interface Control module for
communication between controller and host computer.
Host Computer (TAXI Protocol):
Minimum is AT-compatible computer with 80486 (or higher) processor (50 MHz
or faster): Pentium® or better recommended.
Princeton Instruments (RSPI) high speed PCI or Photometrics high speed PCI
serial card. Computers purchased from Princeton Instruments are shipped with
the card installed.
Minimum of 32 Mbyte total RAM for CCDs up to 1.4 million pixels. Collecting larger
images at full frame or at high speed may require 128 Mbytes or more of RAM.
Hard disk with a minimum of 80 Mbytes available. A complete installation of the
program files takes about 17 Mbytes, and the remainder is required for data
storage. Collection of large images may require additional hard disk storage,
depending on the number of spectra collected and their size. Disk level
compression programs are not recommended.
ATTENTION
Not all computers are able to satisfy the software and data-transfer performance
requirements of Princeton Instruments systems. If you purchased a computer
through Princeton Instruments, it will have already been tested for proper operation
with a Princeton Instruments system and will have the Interface card installed.
Super VGA monitor and graphics card supporting at least 256 colors with at least
1 Mbyte of memory. Memory required will depend on desired display resolution.
24 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Two-button Microsoft-compatible serial mouse or Logitech three-button
serial/bus mouse.
Host Computer (USB 2.0 Protocol):
AT-compatible computer with Pentium 3 or better processor that runs at 1 GHz or
better.
Native USB 2.0 support on the motherboard or USB Interface Card (Orange
Micro 70USB90011 USB2.0 PCI is recommended for desktop computers and the
SIIG, Inc. USB 2.0 PC Card, Model US2246 is recommended for laptop
computers).
Minimum of 256 Mb of RAM.
CD-ROM drive.
Hard disk with a minimum of 80 Mbytes available. A complete installation of the
program files takes about 17 Mbytes and the remainder is required for data
storage, depending on the number and size of spectra collected. Disk level
compression programs are not recommended.
Super VGA monitor and graphics card supporting at least 256 colors with at least
1 Mbyte of memory. Memory requirement is dependent on desired display
resolution.
Two-button Microsoft compatible serial mouse or Logitech three-button
serial/bus mouse.
Host Computer (FireWire Protocol):
Pentium 3 or better processor running at 1 GHz or better.
Native FireWire (IEEE 1394a) support on the mother board or plug-in interface
card.
Minimum of 512 Mbytes of RAM.
CD-ROM drive.
Hard disk with a minimum of 1-2 Gbytes available. A complete installation of
the program files takes about 25 Mbytes and the remainder is required for data
Chapter 1 Installing and Starting WinSpec/32 25
Host Computer (GigE Protocol):
2 GHz Pentium 4 (or greater)
1 GB RAM (or greater)
CD-ROM drive
At least one unused PCI card slot (32-bit) (PCI 2.3 compliant 32-bit 33/66 MHz bus)
Super VGA monitor and graphics card supporting at least 65535 colors with at
least 128 Mbyte of memory. Memory requirement is dependent on desired
display resolution.
Hard disk with a minimum of 1 Gbyte available. A complete installation of the
program files takes about 50 Mbytes and the remainder is required for data
storage, depending on the number and size of images/spectra collected. Disk
level compression programs are not recommended. Drive speed of 10,000 RPM
recommended.
Mouse or other pointing device.
Operating System Requirements
TAXI Protocol: Windows® XP or Windows Vista® (32-bit) operating system.
USB 2 Protocol: Windows XP (with Service Pack 1) or Vista (32-bit).
FireWire Protocol: Windows XP (with Service Pack 2) or Vista (32-bit).
GigE Protocol: Windows XP (32-bit with SP3 or later) or Vista (32-bit).
Your System Components
Take a few minutes and enter the information in the table below. Various pieces of this
information will be required when you install WinSpec/32, when the Setup Wizard (see
Camera Detection wizard, page 37) runs, and when you begin entering component
information on the dialogs and tabs associated with Hardware Setup, Spectrograph Setup,
and Pulser Setup. Other information such as software version and hardware serial
numbers may be useful if you ever need to contact Customer Support.
System Component
Your System
Notes
Application Software
and Version
WinSpec Version 2.6.____
Found on the installation
CD or via the WinSpec
Help menu.
Software Options
Options (purchased
separately from
WinSpec) such as Macro
Record or Virtual Chip.
PVCAM® Driver
Yes / No
PVCAM driver is used to
run Photometrics
cameras, PhotonMAX,
Princeton Instruments
cameras with USB 2, and
the Acton InSpectrum.
26 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
System Component
Your System
Notes
Interface Card
Princeton Instruments PCI,
Tucson PCI, USB 2.0,
FireWire, GigE
Older systems use the
Princeton Instruments PCI.
Tucson PCI is required for
Photometrics cameras and
PhotonMAX. Newer
Princeton Instruments
systems use USB 2,
FireWire or GigE.
System Name
Refer to your order and
Appendix A
Controller
PentaMAX, ST-121, ST-133,
ST-133-2MHz, ST-133-5MHz,
ST-138, __________________
Refer to your order and
Appendix A
Controller Serial
Number
Refer to the serial label.
Typically, this is located
on the bottom of the unit.
Detector/Camera and
CCD Array
Refer to your order and
Appendix A
Detector/Camera Serial
Number
Refer to the serial label.
Typically, this is located
on the back of the unit.
Shutter Type
Small (25 mm), Large
( 35mm), None
Spectrograph Type
Acton, Spex, or
____________________
Pulser Type
DG535, PG200, PTG, or
SuperSYNCHRO
PTG is associated with
the PI-MAX and
PI-MAX2 cameras.
SuperSYNCHRO is
associated with PI-MAX3
and PI-MAX4 cameras.
Pulser Serial Number
Refer to serial label,
typically located on the
back of the unit and in the
lower left corner.
Chapter 1 Installing and Starting WinSpec/32 27
Installing the PCI Card Driver
Administrator privileges are required under Windows X, Vista (32-bit), and Windows 7
(32-bit) to install software and hardware.
Before installing the PCI card in your computer, install WinSpec. Then, turn the
computer off. Follow the instructions supplied with your computer for installing an
internal card and install the PCI card. After you have secured the card in the computer
and replaced the cover, turn the computer on. When Windows boots, it will try to install
the new hardware. If it cannot locate the driver, you will be prompted to enter the
directory path, either by keyboard entry or by using the browse function.
When WinSpec was installed, the required INF file was put into the Windows/INF
directory and PCI card driver file is put in the Windows/System32/ Drivers directory.
Windows
Version
PCI INF Filename
Located in "Windows"/INF
directory*
PCI Device Driver Name
Located in "Windows"/System32/Drivers
directory
Windows XP,
Vista (32-bit)
rspi.inf (in WINDOWS/INF,
for example)
rspipci.sys (in WINDOWS/System32/
Drivers, for example)
* The INF directory may be hidden.
Table 1. PCI Driver Files and Locations
Installing the USB 2.0 Card Driver
Administrator privileges are required under Windows XP, Vista (32-bit), and
Windows 7 (32-bit) to install software and hardware.
Before installing the Princeton Instruments USB2 Interface, install WinSpec. Then, we
recommend that you defragment the host computer's hard disk. This operation reduces
the time the computer spends locating files. Typically, the "defrag" utility "Disk
Defragmenter" can be accessed from the Windows® Start menu and can usually accessed
from the Programs/Accessories/System Tools subdirectory.
After defragmenting the hard disk, turn off the computer and make the USB cable
connections between the host computer and the ST-133. Then, turn the ST-133 on before
turning on the host computer.
At bootup, Windows will detect the Princeton Instruments USB2 Interface hardware (i.e.,
the USB 2.0 Interface Control module). You may be prompted to enter the directory
path(s) for the apausbprop.dll and/or the apausb.sys file(s), either by keyboard entry or by
using the browse function. When WinSpec was installed, the required INF, DLL, and
USB driver files were automatically put in the "Windows" directories shown in Table 2.
28 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Windows Version
USB INF Filename
Located in
"Windows"/INF
directory*
USB Properties DLL
Located in "Windows"/
System32 directory
USB Device Driver
Name
Located in "Windows"/
System32/Drivers
directory
Windows XP,
Vista (32-bit)
rsusb2k.inf (in
WINNT/INF, for
example)
apausbprop.dll (in
WINDOWS/System32, for
example)
apausb.sys (in
WINDOWS/
System32/Drivers, for
example)
* The INF directory may be hidden.
Table 2. USB Driver Files and Locations
WinSpec Version 2.5.25 and later
The PVCAM.INI file required by a PVCAM-supported camera (i.e., Princeton
Instruments camera with USB 2.0 interface, a PhotonMAX, a Photometrics camera, or an
Acton InSpectrum) will automatically be created when the Camera Detection Wizard
runs. One of the things this file contains is the default name for the camera (typically
"Camera1") that is displayed on the Hardware Setup|Controller/Camera tab. Because
this name is not particularly descriptive, you may want to change it by editing the
PVCAM.INI file: editing instructions are provided in "Camera1 (or similar name) on
Hardware Setup dialog", on page 269.
Installing the FireWire Card Driver
Administrator privileges are required under Windows XP, Vista (32-bit), and
Windows 7 (32-bit) to install software and hardware.
Quad-RO camera systems use FireWire (IEEE1394a) to communicate between the
camera and the host computer.
1. Check the connectors at the front or back of your computer for an existing
FireWire (IEEE1394a) port that matches the 1394a port on your camera.
2. If your PC does not have a functioning FireWire (1394a) port, you must install a
FireWire (IEEE 1394a) interface card. Refer to the interface card and computer
manufacturer's documentation for instructions.
Installing the GigE Ethernet Card Driver
Administrator privileges are required under Windows XP, Vista (32-bit), and
Windows 7 (32-bit) to install software and hardware.
NIRvana, PI-MAX®3, ProEM®, and PyLoN® camera systems use the GigE Ethernet to
communicate between the camera and the host computer. For best performance,
Princeton Instruments recommends the Intel Pro/1000 GigE card.
1. Before installing WinSpec, install the interface card into the host computer.
When WinSpec is installed, it will replace the driver supplied with the card with
a high performance driver.
2. After you have finished installing WinSpec, make the cable connections between
the camera and computer, power on the camera, and then start up WinSpec.
Chapter 1 Installing and Starting WinSpec/32 29
Installing WinSpec/32
Caution
Because WinSpec/32 and WinView/32 contain files with the same name but different
content, do not install WinSpec/32 and WinView/32 software in the same directory.
Before installing WinSpec/32:
Verify that your computer meets the requirements listed on pages 23-24.
Check to see if the interface card has been installed. Note that the interface card
is not necessary if the computer will only be used for post-processing data. If you
plan to collect data and the card is not installed in your computer, you will need
to install it and add the hardware after WinSpec/32 is installed.
If installing under Windows XP, Vista (32-bit), Windows 7 (32-bit), make sure
that you are logged on as administrator of the computer. Otherwise, the
installation will fail because changes cannot be made to the Windows Registry.
Check to see if WinView/32 has been installed on your system.
Determine how you will be installing the software. WinSpec/32 is provided on a CD
shipped with the system or it can be installed from the Princeton Instruments FTP site.
During the installation process, you will be given the choice of Typical, Complete, or
Custom installation.
Click on Complete or Custom if you are using a SPEX spectrograph.
Typical: The most common application features will be installed. This choice is
recommended for most users. If you find out later that you need features that were
not installed, you can load the CD, enter the password, and install them via the
Application Maintenance dialog. See Appendix G, page 263, for more
information.
Complete: All application features will be installed. This choice is recommended
for best performance.
Custom: Allows you to choose which features to install and where they will be
installed. This choice is recommended for advanced users.
30 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Installing from the CD
1. Exit any software currently running. This will speed the installation of WinSpec/32.
2. Insert the WinSpec/32 CD into your CD drive. Windows will detect the CD and the
installation will begin automatically.
Note: If the auto-start feature has been disabled on your computer, click the desktop
Start button, select Run, key x:\Setup (where “x” is the letter designating your CD
drive) and press the Enter key on your keyboard. The install sequence will begin.
Caution
If your CD drive doesn't support the Windows long filenames, attempting the installation
causes the filenames to be truncated and the installation fails, generating an error
message like:
An error occurred during the move data process: -113
Component: Application\WinXSystem
File Group: WinXSystem
If this should happen, see Appendix F for workarounds.
3. Click on the program that you want to install. If you have clicked on "Install WinSpec/32
or WinView/32" you will be given additional choices on the next dialog.
4. After selecting the program, follow the instructions provided on the dialogs and
continue with the installation process. You can abort the installation at any time by
clicking on Cancel and following the instructions.
Installing from the FTP Site
If you are not sure how to access the FTP site, contact Princeton Instruments' Customer
Support Department for assistance. Contact information follows.
Princeton Instruments
3660 Quakerbridge Road
Trenton, NJ 08619 (USA)
Tel: 800-874-9789/609-587-9797
Fax: 609-587-1970
Customer Support E-mail: techsupport@princetoninstruments.com
For customer support and service outside the United States, see our web page at
www.princetoninstruments.com. An up-to-date list of addresses, telephone numbers, and
e-mail addresses of Roper Scientific's overseas offices and representatives is maintained
on the web page.
1. Log onto the FTP site and go to the Software/Official/Current directory.
2. Execute the program WinSpec.exe and follow the instructions on your screen. You can
abort the installation at any time by clicking on Cancel and following the instructions.
Chapter 1 Installing and Starting WinSpec/32 31
Custom Installation Choices
Help File: Loads the WinSpec Help System files (*.chm), both general and context-
sensitive Help.
Documentation: WinSpec manual
Sample Data: Creates a directory Data containing sample *.SPE files. This
directory is located beneath the one containing the WinSpec/32 files.
Diagnostic Programs: Loads diagnostics programs for specific cameras.
Spectrograph Support: Loads drivers for Acton spectrographs.
Pulser Support: Loads the pulser drivers, if required. Currently supported pulsers
include the SuperSYNCHRO, PTG, PG200, and the DG535 Timing Generator
(drives the PI-MAX pulsing circuits).
SnapIns: Loads the selected Snap-In files. When a Snap-In is installed, its button
will be added to the Snap-In toolbar.
PI Screen Saver: Loads the PI Screen Saver.
Visual Basic Interface: Allows DLLs programmed using Visual Basic 5 or higher
to be executed from WinSpec/32. Documentation is provided in the WinX32
Automation 3.X for Visual Basic manual.
Options: Allows you to install or uninstall WinSpec/32 options such as Imaging,
Macro Record, Spex, Custom Timing, and Custom Chip. Some options may require a
password.
Changing Installed Components, Repairing, or
Uninstalling/Reinstalling WinSpec/32
Refer to Appendix G.
32 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Starting WinSpec/32
Before starting WinSpec/32, follow the hardware interconnection and power up
instructions in the hardware manuals supplied with your system. Then, click on the Start
button, select All Programs, and start WinSpec/32 by clicking on WinSpec32 in the
Princeton Instruments folder (see Figure 1).
Note: You can start WinSpec/32 even if you have not installed the interface card or if you
have not turned on the controller. If there is no interface card, WinSpec/32 will run in
"Demo" mode. This mode allows you to look at and post-process previously stored data
(such as the sample data installed with the software) and to become familiar with experiment
setup and data acquisition. Some features will not be available because the program looks for
information from the controller and camera while WinSpec/32 is loading and initializing.
Figure 1. Opening WinSpec/32 via the Windows Start button
While the software is booting, a splash screen such as the one shown in Figure 2 is
displayed until the software has finished loading and initializing. Then, the Main Menu
appears as shown in Figure 3. From there, you can access the program’s functions through
menu selection.
Note: If this is the first time you have installed and launched WinSpec/32, the Camera
Detection Wizard will pop up. This wizard allows you to specify the camera system and
load the default hardware settings before you can access the menu. See Chapter 2,
page 37 for more information about the Camera Detection Wizard.
Chapter 1 Installing and Starting WinSpec/32 33
Figure 2. Splash screen
Figure 3. Main WinSpec/32 window
Values, labels, and alphanumeric data are usually entered from the keyboard. Selections and
screen control operations are usually done using a mouse or other graphical I/O device,
although keyboard selection shortcuts are provided. Mouse selection is typically done by
positioning the mouse cursor on the selection item and clicking the left mouse button. In
some case, clicking the right mouse button will bring up a dialog with additional information
or a special menu that allows additional operations to be performed.
34 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
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35
Chapter 2
Basic Hardware Setup
Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of the relationships
between the camera, the controller, and the host computer.
This overview is followed by a discussion of the Setup
Wizard that runs the first time you select Hardware from
the Setup menu (Figure 4). The remainder of the chapter
presents the Hardware Setup tabs so you will be able to
make the appropriate selections and entries for your system.
The chapters that follow describe how to configure a
spectrograph, set up a pulser, set up experiment parameters,
and control array temperature. Initial data acquisition is
discussed in Chapters 3 and 4.
Advanced functions such as Post-Processing, Custom Chip,
and Custom Timing are discussed in Part 2 of this manual.
Figure 4. Setup menu
Basic Hardware Overview
The basic components of a Princeton Instruments
system are: a camera (or detector), a controller
(external or internal), interconnecting cables, a
computer interface card, and the application
software (in this case WinSpec/32).
Note that other components such
as a computer, coolant
circulator, and pulser can also
be ordered.
The interface card, installed in
the host computer, permits
communication between the
host computer and the
controller (in some cases an
external controller such as an
ST-133).
The controller accepts input from the host
computer and WinSpec/32 and converts it to the appropriate control signals for the
camera. These signals allow you to specify the readout rate, binning parameters, regions
of interest, gain, and array temperature. After data is acquired in the camera, it is
transmitted to the controller where it is processed, transmitted to the host computer,
displayed in the WinSpec/32 window, and can be stored to disk.
Figure 5 illustrates possible system configurations (spectrometers and pulsers are not
shown). Figure 6 shows the interconnections for an air-cooled Princeton Instruments
36 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
camera with an internal controller, as well as interconnections to an optional external
shutter and spectrometer. Figure 7 and Figure 8 show the interconnections for a Princeton
Instruments system with an external controller, as well as interconnections to an optional
coolant circulator, an optional external shutter, and spectrometers.
Figure 5. Possible System Configurations
Figure 6. Air-Cooled System (with Internal Controller) Diagram
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 37
Figure 7. Liquid- or Air-Cooled System (with External Controller) Diagram
Figure 8. Cryo-Cooled System (with External Controller) Diagram
Entering the Default System Parameters into WinSpec
Camera Detection Wizard
The Camera Detection Wizard is used to load the WinSpec hardware setup parameter
fields with default values for a WinSpec-compatible camera system. The Camera
Detection Wizard runs automatically the first time you install WinSpec and can be
launched at a later date if you decide to control a different WinSpec-compatible camera.
The autodetection function can be used for Gigabit Ethernet-base camera systems
(PI-MAX3, PI-MAX4, NIRvana, ProEM, and PyLoN), FireWire-based camera systems
(Quad-RO), PVCAM-based camera systems (USB 1 interface, USB 2 interface,
Photometrics PCI, Acton InSpectrum, and PhotonMAX) and Princeton Instruments PCI
(TAXI) interface-based systems.
To Use the Autodetection Function:
1. Make sure the camera system is connected to the host computer and that it is
turned on.
2. Start WinSpec. The Camera Detection Wizard will automatically run if this is the
first time you have installed a Princeton Instruments WinX application
(WinView/32, WinSpec/32, or WinXTest/32) and a supported camera. Otherwise, if
you installing a new camera type, click on the Launch Camera Detection
Wizard… button on the Controller/CCD tab to start the wizard.
38 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
3. On the Welcome dialog (Figure 9), leave the checkbox unselected and click on
Next.
Figure 9. Camera Detection Wizard - Welcome dialog
4. Select the system that you want to install.
If there are two camera systems connected to the host computer and turned on,
the wizard table should contain two listings.
If there are no systems listed, click on Back, check the cable connections and/or
turn on the camera system, and then click on Next.
Figure 10. Camera Detection Wizard - Detected Hardware dialog
If there are still no systems listed and the camera uses the GigE interface, click
on Cancel and contact your Information Technology specialist. UDP ports
20200-20202 (often closed by computer security functions such as an anti-
virus program or a firewall) must be open for WinX to detect a Princeton
Instruments camera using GigE.
5. Follow the instructions on the dialogs to perform the initial hardware setup: this
wizard enters default parameters on the Hardware Setup dialog tabs and gives you an
opportunity to acquire a test image to confirm the system is working.
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 39
To Use the Manual Function:
Note: This function can only be used to install Princeton Instruments PCI (TAXI)
interface-based systems (both Princeton Instruments PCI (TAXI) and PVCAM-supported
systems can be installed by using the autodetection function previously described.). The
manual function is very similar to the Hardware Detection Wizard, but you are not given
the opportunity to install a PVCAM-based camera. In addition, unless you want to acquire
the optional test image, this function does not require that the system be turned on.
1. Start WinSpec. The Camera Detection Wizard will automatically run if this is the
first time you have installed a Princeton Instruments WinX application
(WinView/32, WinSpec/32, or WinXTest/32) and a supported camera. Otherwise, if
you installing a new camera type, click on the Launch Camera Detection
Wizard… button on the Controller/CCD tab to start the wizard.
2. On the Welcome dialog (Figure 11), select the checkbox and click on Next.
Figure 11. Camera Detection Wizard - Welcome (Manual selected) dialog
3. In most cases you will not be getting a New System Configuration Disk with
your system. Therefore, the default selection is "NO". If you do have such a disk,
you would select "YES" and follow the directions for loading the information
from that disk. Click on NEXT and follow the directions on the subsequent
dialogs for selecting the interface, controller, and detector/camera.
Figure 12. Camera Detection Wizard - Optional Configuration Disk dialog
40 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
4. When you have finished with these selections, you will see the Test Image
dialog (Figure 13). The default selection is "No". If you select "Yes", you must
make sure that the system is connected to the host computer and that the camera
system is turned ON before you click on the Next button.
Figure 13. Camera Detection Wizard - Test Image dialog
5. Depending on your radio button selection, the following will happen
"No": Clicking on the Next button will load the camera/controller default
parameters into WinSpec and pop up the Finished dialog.
"Yes": Assuming that the camera system is connected to the host computer
and turned on, clicking on the Next button will acquire a single frame of data
(using a 100 msec exposure time), load the camera/controller default parameters
into WinSpec, and pop up the Finished dialog.
6. Click on Finish to complete the camera installation.
Figure 14. Camera Detection Wizard - Finished dialog
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 41
Editing Controller and Detector Characteristics
The Hardware Setup|Controller/Detector tab (may also be named Controller/Camera
or Controller/CCD depending on the hardware selections) is used to enter and update
Controller Type, Detector (Camera or CCD, depending on the system) Type and some of
the Controller/ Detector type parameters, such as Shutter Type and Readout Mode. The
Controller and Detector Type selections are perhaps the most fundamental and important
of all hardware selection decisions and directly influence the appearance of many other
WinSpec/32 screens and the selections provided on them. As a result, setting up the
software for use in any system should always begin with the Controller selection.
Figure 15. Hardware Setup|Controller/Camera tab
Figure 15 shows the fields and checkboxes that may be present on the Controller/Detector
tab. WinSpec/32 displays or hides features based on the selected controller, detector, and
readout mode. All of the features are described in the text that follows.
Controller Type (Camera Name): The currently selected Controller Type (Camera
Name) is displayed in this field. If you change the controller that is being used in the
system, choose the correct name from the selection list (displayed by clicking on the
button at the end of the field). Appendix A provides a cross-reference table for
systems, controllers, and CCD arrays.
Note: After you have selected the Controller Type, you can load the default
settings for your controller, camera, and array by clicking on Load Defaults
From Controller, if this button is present.
Controller Version: In the case of the ST-133 and PentaMAX controllers, different
versions have been released having different capabilities. The available software
selections will correctly reflect these differences when the proper version number
is specified in this box.
Camera Type: The selected Camera (Detector/CCD) Type is displayed in this field.
Clicking on the button at the end of the box drops the selection list so that the
selected type can be changed if necessary. Note that the listed camera types depend
on the controller selection, requiring that the controller type be specified first.
Shutter Type: There are six selections.
42 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
None: If the camera has no shutter (frame-transfer or interline CCD array) and
is not an Intensified camera, select None.
Small: A small shutter is one that is typically 25 mm or smaller in diameter.
This setting represents a shutter compensation time of approximately 8 msec.
Large: A large shutter is one that is typically 35 mm and larger. In the case of a
camera having a very large CCD, such as the Kodak 2k × 2k, a large shutter
may have been installed. This setting represents a shutter compensation time
of approximately 28 msec.
Remote: Remote is primarily intended for spectroscopy applications where an
external shutter would be placed ahead of the entrance slit.
Electronic: Electronic only applies to operation with an intensified camera,
which would normally not be equipped with a mechanical shutter. This
selection would apply to both the Gate and Shutter/CW modes of the
IIC-100, IIC-200, IIC-300, MCP-100, and PI-MAX.
Custom: This shutter type is automatically selected if you are using a PVCAM-
supported camera. When Custom is the shutter type, you will be able to
enter the shutter close compensation time in the field below the shutter type.
Shutter close compensation time delays readout to allow time for the shutter
to fully close. The close value will vary depending on the camera and the
shutter used.
Phosphor Decay Time: Used by the PI-MAX3 and PI-MAX4 when running in
single trigger DIF mode to delay the shift behind mask for the first image.
Shutter Open Compensation Time: Delays the exposure until the shutter is
fully open. The open delay value will vary depending on the camera and the
shutter used.
Readout Mode: The readout mode is determined by the characteristics of the CCD
array and the controller. The possible choices are:
Full Frame: The entire chip can be read out.
Frame Transfer: Only the unmasked area of the chip can be read out. Frame
transfer is only available if the camera has a frame-transfer chip such as the
EEV 512 × 1024.
Interline: Provides 100% duty cycle operation. Interline is only available with a
camera having an interline chip such as the PI 1300 × 1030.
Kinetics: Kinetics is a special type of operation in which most of the CCD is
mechanically or optically masked, leaving a small section open to light. This
section is then read out very quickly. See the System or Controller manual
for more details on the CCD aspects of this readout mode.
DIF or Dual Image Feature: (MicroMAX, PI-MAX2, PI-MAX3, and
PI-MAX4 Interline only) Dual Image Feature (DIF) is a special feature that
allows images to be taken in pairs with very short exposure times (as small as
1 µs). For MicroMAX this feature is only available for factory modified
MicroMAX controller/Interline camera systems. The three MicroMAX DIF
timing modes are IEC (Internal Exposure Control), EEC (External Exposure
Control) and ESABI (Electronic Shutter Active Between Images). These modes
are in addition to Free Run mode. The two DIF timing modes for PI-MAX2,
PI-MAX3 and PI-MAX4 are Single Trigger and Dual Trigger.
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 43
Vertical Shift Time: This information appears for the Frame Transfer and
Kinetics modes. Reports the speed (in microseconds) at which a single row
will be shifted vertically. This information is based on the value in the Vertical
Shift box. The higher the value in that box, the longer the vertical shift time.
Note: If you are using a PVCAM-supported camera, the Vertical Shift rate is
expressed in nsec/row. Use the up/down arrows to change the Vertical Shift rate.
Vertical Shift: Determines the speed of the image transfer from the exposed area
of a frame-transfer chip to the masked area. Also sets the speed of image
transfer when operating in the Kinetics mode. Setting a lower value increases
the shift speed. A higher value gives a slower shift. If the shift is too fast, not all
of the charge will be transferred. If too slow, image smearing will be increased
due to the exposure that takes place while the transfer is in progress. The default
value gives good results in most measurements.
Note: If you are using a PVCAM-supported camera, this parameter is hidden
because the shift time is being adjusted via the Vertical Shift (nsec/row)
up/down arrows.
Window Size: Determines the height of the window for Kinetics mode. The
window size must be at least 1 row and less than or equal to the maximum
number of rows for the array.
MPP: This checkbox may appear if the CCD array is designed for MPP (multi-
pinned-phase) operation. When this box is checked, the array will be run in MPP
mode. Some MPP-capable arrays can also be run in Non-MPP mode (MPP box is
unchecked). Running in Non-MPP mode may result in higher dark current in
addition to larger full well capacity.
Note: MPP capability reduces the rate of dark-current generation by a factor of
20 or more, and thus relaxes CCD cooling requirements to the level where a
thermoelectric cooler is sufficient for most applications.
LOGIC OUT Output: The choices for the signal provided at the controller's
Output connector vary based on the selected Controller. If the LOGIC OUT field
doesn’t appear on the tab, the choice of output may be done via an internal
jumper (for information on how to set the jumper, contact factory Tech Support).
Depending on your system, the following choices may appear in the drop down
list:
Cleaning: This signal is high when an array Clean cycle is in progress and
otherwise low.
Logic 0: Establishes a TTL logic 0 at the Logic Out connector.
Logic 1: Establishes a TTL logic 1 at the Logic Out connector.
Note: LOGIC 0 and LOGIC 1 can be used to control an external device using
the application software.
Not FT Image Shift: This signal is low when a frame-transfer shift is in
progress and otherwise high.
44 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Not Ready: After a Start Acquisition command, this output changes state on
completion of the array cleaning cycles that precede the first exposure.
Initially high, it goes low to mark the beginning of the first exposure. In free
run operation it remains low until the system is halted. If a specific number
of frames have been programmed, it remains low until all have been taken,
then returns high.
Not Scan: Reports when the controller is finished reading out the CCD array.
NOT SCAN is high when the CCD array is not being scanned, then drops
low when readout begins, returning to high when the process is finished.
Shutter: This signal is low when the shutter is closed and goes high when the
shutter is activated, dropping low again after the shutter closes. In Gated
operation, SHUTTER is the correct choice and the signal should be applied
to the inhibit input of the pulser to prevent pulsing during readout.
Shutter Comp Time Pre: Delays the acquisition until the shutter (if present) is
fully open. The setting range is 0 to 30 ms. For single-strip spectroscopic
measurements, a setting of “0” is recommended.
RS170 Type: Selections are NTSC (US video standard) and PAL (European).
Show Custom Chip: Advanced feature. See Custom Chip discussion on page 213.
Show Custom Timing: Advanced feature. See Custom Timing discussion on
page 214.
Anti-Blooming: (THM 1024x1024FT CCD array) Checking this box activates
this CCD array's anti-blooming feature.
Load Defaults From Controller: Pops up the Load Factory Defaults From
NVRAM dialog so you can repopulate the fields and selections with the values
stored in the controller's non-volatile RAM.
Launch Camera Detection Wizard: Pops up the Camera Detection Wizard -
Welcome dialog so you can set up a new camera system or switch the active
camera system to another camera system already connected to the host computer.
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 45
Entering the Data Orientation
Figure 16. Display tab; left graphic applies to all controllers except ST-121; right graphic
applies to ST-121 only
With the exception of the ST-121, the Display tab is the same for all controllers. Three
display options, Rotate, Reverse and Flip, are provided. This feature allows you to
compensate for CCD array or camera orientation. Before and after thumbnail illustrations
show the effect of each selection. If no option is selected, the thumbnails will be the
same. Any orientation can be achieved with the proper combination of Rotate, Reverse,
and Flip. In the case of the ST-121, only Reverse is provided.
Rotate: Rotates the image 90° counterclockwise.
Reverse: Reverses the image horizontally.
Flip: Flips the image vertically.
46 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Entering the Interface Communication Parameters
The Interface tab allows you to specify the
interface card installed in your computer and
to enter the I/O addresses (if required). This
functionality is particularly useful if you have
multiple PCI cards installed in the host
computer. Figure 17 shows all of the fields
and checkboxes that exist on the Interface
tab. WinSpec/32 will display and hide
features based on the interface card installed
in the host computer. All of the features are
described in the text that follows.
Type: Select the communications type
that will be used to transmit data
from the controller to the computer.
All communications types are not
available for all controllers and
computers. The "Demo" selection,
which allows the software to be
Figure 17. Interface tab
exercised but which does not support data transfer to the computer, would not
ordinarily be used in the field.
High Speed PCI: Select if a Princeton Instruments (RSPI) PCI high-speed
serial Interface card is installed in your computer and you want data transfer
to be interrupt driven. This choice would give the highest performance in
most situations.
PCI Timer: Allows data transfer to be controlled by a polling timer if using PCI
high-speed serial Interface card. Useful for troubleshooting possible interrupt
problems (computer crashes or system fails to return data). Note that data
transfer is slower in PCI Timer mode and data overrun more likely. Also PCI
Timer cannot be used to continuously acquire small Regions of Interest in
Safe Mode timing operation. PCI Timer is not compatible with Use
Interrupts operation, a timing mode available when using the ST-138
Controller.
Demo: Allows the software to be exercised without being connected to a
controller. This mode is used primarily for demonstration purposes or post-
processing of acquired data and cannot be used in an actual measurement.
Interrupt Level: The interrupt level for a PCI card is reported but cannot be
changed.
Card Number: This field only appears if more than one PCI card has been detected
in your computer. This field allows you to set up the communications parameters
so each card is uniquely addressed.
I/O Address: The I/O Address for a PCI card is reported but cannot be changed.
I/O Address 2 and 3: (High Speed PCI only) These addresses are reported but
cannot be changed; address selection is automatic and under computer control.
With other interfaces, these addresses are not displayed.
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 47
Entering the Cleans/Skips Characteristics
For most applications, the default settings
will give the best results. We advise
contacting the factory for guidance before
changing these parameters from their
default values. Exception: With a PI-MAX
camera, we suggest settings of Cleans 1 and
Strips per Clean 4, Minimum Block Size 16
and Number of Blocks 32.
Figure 18. Cleans/Skips tab
The Cleans/Skips tab allows you to
change the clean and skip parameters from
their default values or to reload the default
values. Figure 18 shows all of the fields
and checkboxes that exist on the
Cleans/Skips tab. WinSpec/32 will
display and hide features based on the
controller version. All of the features
shown are described in the text that
follows. Refer to Chapter 10, starting on
page 135, for additional information.
Load Default Values: Reloads the factory defaults from the NVRAM.
Cleans
Cleans are applied to the entire CCD array and remove charge that has accumulated on
the array while waiting for data acquisition to begin. The charge on the CCD chip is
transferred to the shift register and discarded to prevent charge buildup from occurring.
On completion of a setup, successive clean cycles occur normally. The Number of
Cleans and Number of Strips per Clean parameters allow you to program additional
clean cycles that will be performed after initiating the run but before any data are taken.
Number of Cleans: For most applications the default value should be used.
Clicking on the Load Default Values button and then selecting Yes will install
the default value. Values other than the default can be directly entered in the field
or selected via the spin buttons.
Number of Strips per Clean: Sets the number of CCD data strips to be
transferred and discarded during each clean. The maximum valid setting is
limited by the chip size. The default value will generally give good results.
Clean Mode: (Photometrics brand cameras) Sets when and how charge will be
cleared from the array while the camera is waiting to acquire data. Clearing
removes charge from the CCD by clocking the charge to the serial register then
directly to ground. This process is much faster than readout, because the charge
does not go through the readout node or the amplifier. Note that not all clearing
modes are available for all cameras. Be sure to check availability of a mode before
attempting to set it.
Clear Never: Never clear the CCD. Useful for performing readout after an
exposure has been aborted.
Caution
48 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Clear Pre-Exposure: Before each exposure, clears the CCD the number of
times specified by the Number of Cleans entry. This mode can be used in a
sequence. It is most useful when there is a considerable amount of time
between exposures.
Clear Pre-Sequence: Before each sequence, clears the CCD the number of
times specified by the Number of Cleans entry. If no sequence is set up, this
mode behaves as if the sequence has one exposure. The result is the same as
using Clear Pre-Exposure.
Clear Post-Sequence: Clears continuously after the sequence ends. The
camera continues clearing until a new exposure is set up or started, the abort
command is sent, the speed entry number is changed, or the camera is reset.
Clear Pre/Post-Sequence: Clears Number of Cleans times before each
sequence and clears continuously after the sequence ends. The camera
continues clearing until a new exposure is set up or started, the abort
command is sent, the speed entry number is changed, or the camera is reset.
Clear Pre-Exposure Post-Sequence: Clears Number of Cleans times before
each exposure and clears continuously after the sequence ends. The camera
continues clearing until a new exposure is set up or started, the abort
command is sent, the speed entry number is changed, or the camera is reset.
Use Continuous Cleans Instruction: This feature is supported by Version 5
(and higher) ST-133 controllers and will only appear if the detector/camera also
supports this feature. Continuous cleans instruction does horizontal shifts while
doing vertical shifts for a faster continuous clean. Check this box if you want to
apply the continuous cleans instruction to the continuous cleans function
available when External Sync timing mode (Experiment Setup|Timing tab) is
being used to acquire data. With this instruction, the delay between an External
Sync trigger and the start of exposure is minimized. Refer to Chapter 10,
starting on page 135, for more information about continuous cleans and
continuous cleans instruction.
Note: Older versions of the ST-133 controllers, as well as other controller types
and cameras, do not support this instruction.
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 49
Vertical Skips
Vertical skips are associated with regions of interest (ROIs) that are smaller than the full
chip. This feature allows you to bin and quickly traverse the rows that precede and follow
the ROI. The rows to be processed and discarded are binned into blocks, each containing
a number of rows, with the Number of Blocks parameter determining how many blocks
there will be before and after the ROI.
Figure 19. Vertical Skips
The block size determines how quickly the region preceding and following the ROI will
be traversed. If the blocks are large, the region will be traversed quickly but there is the
possibility of overloading the shift register and causing blooming. With small blocks, the
risk of blooming will be minimized but the time to traverse will be large. WinSpec/32
uses an exponential algorithm to simultaneously achieve rapid traversing with minimal
risk of blooming. The first block, specified in rows, is as large as possible. Each
successive block is a factor of two smaller than the one preceding until the minimum
block size is reached. All remaining blocks are the minimum block size. By making the
first block as large as possible and subsequent blocks increasingly smaller, the region
preceding and following the region of interest is traversed as rapidly as possible while
minimizing risk of the shift register saturation.
Minimum Block Size: Sets the size, in rows, of the skip blocks that immediately
precede the data. The default value will generally give good results.
Number of Blocks: Sets the number of binned “skip” blocks preceding and
following the region of interest. The default value will generally give good
results.
Note: The 2-D OMA array does not support vertical skips; and all of the rows on the
array are read out and converted before the non-ROI information is discarded. The
default Vertical Skips settings of Minimum Block Size: 2 and Number of Blocks: 5,
while appearing to work, will result in invalid data. Instead, you must change these
settings to 1 and 256, respectively, for the 2-D OMA array.
50 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Setting up a Spectrograph
WinSpec/32 allows you to control several types of spectrographs. More than one
spectrograph can be installed in the system at one time. The total number of
spectrographs is limited only by the number of free communication ports.
The following spectrograph operations can be performed after you define your
spectrograph:
moving a spectrograph grating,
automatic calibration of acquired data according to the spectrograph position,
changing to a different grating for some spectrographs, and
changing the entrance slit size and/or the selected mirror for some spectrographs.
The following steps explain how to set up a spectrograph. You must correctly install a
spectrograph before you can control any of its functions through WinSpec/32.
1. Make sure that the spectrograph is correctly connected to a host computer COM port.
2. Turn on the host computer and the spectrograph.
3. Wait for the spectrograph to finish initializing and then
boot WinSpec/32. If this is not done, although you will be
able to install the spectrograph, it will not be possible to
establish communications and an error message will result.
Figure 20. Spectrograph menu
4. Select Define on the
Spectrograph menu
(Figure 20). This will open the
Define Spectrograph dialog
(Figure 21).
5. On the Main tab, note the
Active Spectrograph text entry
box. If spectrographs have
previously been installed, the
active one will be indicated. If
no spectrograph has been
previously installed, the box
will be blank. Note there is a
checkbox that allows you to
designate a particular
spectrograph as the one that
will be used for doing an
Auto-Spectro Calibration.
Figure 21. Define Spectrograph dialog
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 51
6. Click on Install/ Remove Spectrograph. This
will open the Install/Remove Spectrographs
dialog (Figure 22). The lower window lists the
supported Spectrographs. The upper window
lists those installed. To install a spectrograph,
select it from the list in the lower window, select
the Communications Port (Auto, COM1-
COM8, or DEMO) and click on Install
Selected Spectrograph. The installed
spectrograph will then appear in the upper
window. In the case of the example shown in
Figure 22, the selected spectrograph is an Acton
SP300i. When selecting a communications port
during the installation, keep in mind the
characteristics of the choices.
Auto: When WinSpec is started, it will look for
the spectrograph and communicate via the
port (USB or COM) at which it is found.
COM1-8: If you select a specific COM port,
WinSpec will only look for the spectrograph
at that port.
Figure 22. Install/Remove Spectrographs
DEMO: If you select DEMO, you can view the spectrograph-related dialogs and
functions without having an actual spectrograph.
If the spectrograph is not found when you install it, an error message is displayed. Even
if communication is not established, the spectrograph and its assigned port will be
added to the list (for example, Acton SP300i on COM2).
Notes:
1. To install another spectrograph, repeat the installation procedure.
2. To remove a spectrograph, select it in the upper box and click on Remove
Selected Spectrograph. The spectrograph’s name will be removed from the
upper window.
3. Multiple spectrographs can be assigned to a port. However, only one spectrograph
can be active at a time. If you have multiple spectrographs assigned to a port, make
sure that the active spectrograph (refer to the Active Spectrograph field on the
Main tab) is the one that is (or will be) physically connected to the port.
4. If you plan to install more than one spectrograph for a COM port, it would be a
good idea to make sure that the connection preferences are the same for all of the
spectrographs assigned to that port.
7. Click on OK to close the Install/Remove Spectrographs dialog.
8. If the newly installed spectrograph is the only installed spectrograph, the Use for
Auto-Spectro Calibration box will be checked by default. If more than one
spectrograph is installed, you need to check in the box for the spectrograph that is
attached to the active detector. The checked status indicates which spectrograph can
be automatically calibrated using the Spectrograph Calibration function, which
requires that the controller take data (see Chapter 7 for more information).
52 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Specifying the Active Spectrograph
If you have installed more than one spectrograph, you need to define the Active
(controlled) Spectrograph. If there is only one spectrograph, that one is the active one. If
there is more than one, than you must designate the active one. This can be done via the
Define Spectrograph|Main tab, the Move Gratings tab (to access, click on Move in
the Spectrograph menu) and via the Calibrate Spectrograph dialog (to access click
on Calibrate in the Spectrograph menu). On the Define Spectrograph|Main page the
selection is called Active Spectrograph, on the Move Gratings tab it is called
Spectrograph to Move, and in the Calibrate dialog it is called Spectrograph to
Calibrate. In all three locations the function is simply to specify the active spectrograph,
and changing the selection in one location is equivalent to changing it in all three. If only
one spectrograph has been installed, the box will not appear in the Move or Calibrate
dialogs, but the spectrograph model will be reported.
Entering Grating Information
Once you have installed a spectrograph, you may need to enter the grating information
for the spectrograph if the spectrograph cannot supply them automatically. This is
information that WinSpec/32 needs to move and calibrate the spectrograph correctly.
Grating information is supplied automatically for automated Acton spectrographs, as
stored in the spectrograph’s electronics.
Grating Parameters
The grating values are required
for the dispersion calculation
and for the selection of the
active grating. Some
spectrographs have
interchangeable grating turrets,
each able to mount up to 3
gratings. Where this is the
case, the grating information
may have to be separately
specified for each turret that
may be installed. These
parameters are specified on the
Gratings tab (Figure 23) of
the Define Spectrograph
dialog. In the case of
automated Acton
spectrographs, the grating
information is automatically
supplied.
Figure 23. Gratings tab
Setting the grating parameters
1. If there are two or more turrets, enter the number of the turrets.
2. Then from the Current Turret field, select the turret whose grating parameters will
be defined.
3. If entries are missing or incorrect, select the correct grooves/mm value for each
grating. Make sure that the gratings are listed in the proper order, Grating 1 listed
first, etc.
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 53
4. You can also enter a Name for each grating. This option is required if you are using
two gratings with the same groove density. If, for example, you have two gratings
with 300 grooves/mm, one blazed at 300 and one blazed at 500, you could enter
BLZ300 and BLZ500 in the Name boxes as identifiers. These are the Acton default
names. Then, when you subsequently go to the Move Spectrograph dialog to select
the active grating, they would then be listed as 300/BLZ300 and 300/BLZ500 and
there would be no possibility of confusing them.
5. If significant backlash occurs when moving the selected grating, check in the
Required box and then enter the number of steps required to correct for the
backlash.
6. If your spectrograph has more than one turret, replace the turret, change the Current
Turret value and enter the new grating information. WinSpec/32 will store and recall
the different sets of grating information for each turret.
7. Note that there is a checkbox for displaying a warning during a grating change. Since
the time to change a grating can vary widely, depending on the spectrograph, this
message could be very helpful.
8. If two rates are available for your spectrograph, you can also choose the rate, either
faster (slew) or slower (scan). The actual rate will depend on the spectrograph.
Depending on the spectrograph manufacturer and model, there may be a difference in
wavelength setting accuracy for the two speeds.
Selecting and Moving the Grating
Once the required groove and turret information
has been entered on the Define Spectrograph
Gratings tab, the next step is to select and move
the grating. These operations are performed using
the Gratings tab (Figure 24) of the Move
Spectrograph dialog. The procedure follows.
1. Open the Move Spectrograph dialog by
selecting Move from the Spectrograph menu.
2. On the Gratings tab, verify that the indicated
active spectrograph is the correct one.
3. Select the grating to be moved. The available
gratings were previously entered on the
Define Spectrograph Gratings tab.
4. Enter the new position (in nm) in the Move
to field.
Figure 24. Move Spectrograph Gratings
tab
5. Enter any speed settings and click on OK to execute the selections. The grating will
come to rest with the selected wavelength at the center of the CCD array.
Note: There may well be some finite error in the final position. This error can be
measured and compensated for using the Spectrograph Calibrate procedure.
54 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Entering Information for Software-Controlled Slits and/or Mirrors
Some spectrometers allow you
to control the slit width and/or
do mirror selection under
software control. Where this is
the case, the Slits/Mirrors tab
(Figure 25) in the Define
Spectrograph dialog is used
to specify the controllable slits
and selectable mirrors. Actually
setting the slit width and
specifying which mirror to move
is accomplished via additional
tabs provided in the Move
Spectrograph dialog as shown
in Figure 26. Once the selections
are made, simply press OK to
execute them.
Figure 25. Define Spectrograph Slits/Mirrors tab
Figure 26. Slit width and Mirror selection tabs - Move Spectrograph dialog
Chapter 2 Basic Hardware Setup 55
Entering Laser Excitation Information
If you want to be warned if the laser
will shine directly on the CCD, you
need to enter the Laser Wavelength.
This is done via the Main tab in the
Define Spectrograph dialog as
shown in Figure 27. The Warn
When Crossing Laser Line
selection tells WinSpec/32 to display
a message whenever the grating is
moved to where the laser light would
be visible to the detector. This is
critical for detectors that could be
damaged if exposed to high light
levels. Also, it will be necessary to
enter the laser wavelength if you
plan to work with units of relative
wavenumbers.
To allow WinSpec/32 to
display in units of relative
Figure 27. Entering the Laser Line
Define Spectrograph Main tab
wavenumbers, enter a Laser Wavelength in nanometers, to as many significant
digits as desired.
If you have a bright laser line, check the Warn when Crossing Laser Line box
and enter the Laser Wavelength in nm. WinSpec/32 will display a warning
message whenever the wavelength range viewable by the detector might fall on
or pass through the laser line.
The Warn When Crossing Laser Line is no guarantee that the detector will not be
damaged by overexposure. The correct display of the warning depends on all calibration
parameters being set correctly. Changing or moving gratings may cause the laser to
shine on the detector. Always block the source when moving or changing the grating to
avoid damage.
WARNING
56 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
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57
Chapter 3
Initial Spectroscopic Data Collection
Introduction
The procedure in this chapter will enable you to begin collecting real data promptly.
Minimum requirements are assumed. If your system is more complex, e.g., requiring
consideration of complex timing and synchronization issues, you will have to carefully
study the other chapters of this manual as well as the manuals provided for the system
hardware components before data acquisition that addresses those needs will be possible.
Nevertheless, it is a good idea to begin with the simplest possible operating mode. This
approach will give you operating experience and familiarity that will prove very valuable
when you go to make more complex measurements. For additional information about the
various menus and dialogs, refer to the online Help topics. Note that controllers and
cameras ordinarily used for imaging are not discussed in this chapter, but rather in the
next chapter, Initial Imaging Data Collection.
Underlying assumptions for the following procedure are that the hardware installation,
including mounting the camera to the spectrograph, has been completed. A further
assumption is that the hardware and spectrograph setups as discussed in Chapter 2 have
been completed. The last assumption is that a suitable spectrographic source is available.
The mercury lines produced by ordinary fluorescent lights can be used. However, it will
be better to begin with a low-pressure gas-discharge lamp such as neon, mercury, or
mercury-argon, if one is available.
There are two data collection modes, Focus and Acquire:
In Focus mode operation, no frames of data are stored until Start Storage is
selected. This mode is particularly convenient for familiarization and setting up.
For ease in focusing, the screen refresh rate should be as rapid as possible,
achieved by operating with axes and cross-sections off.
In Acquire mode, every frame of data collected is stored. This mode would
ordinarily be selected during actual data collection. One limitation of Acquire
mode operation is that if data acquisition continues at too fast a rate for it to be
stored, data overflow will eventually occur. This could only happen in Fast Mode
operation.
Note: The following data collection procedures are done in the Focus mode but do not
cover rotational alignment and focusing of a camera to a spectrograph’s optics. Refer to
your camera system manual, your spectrograph manual, and/or Appendix B (page 236
and subsequent pages) of this manual for that information.
58 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
1. If using a PI-MAX or PI-MAX2 intensified camera, initial data collection will be done in
the Shutter mode (Gate mode for PI-MAX3 and PI-MAX4). In both cases (Shutter and
Gate mode), the camera can be damaged if exposed to light overload. Before powering
the controller and camera, reduce the room light to reduce the risk of damage. Note that
intensifiers are particularly at risk in pulsed laser operation, where overload spot damage
can occur without raising the average current to where the overload detection circuits
will be activated. It is far better to be careful than sorry. Before proceeding, take the time
to carefully read the manual for your intensified camera.
2. Also, take particular care that your intensified camera is connected properly for shutter or
gate mode operation. Cabling and peripheral considerations for intensified cameras are
more complex than for unintensified cameras. Again, read your manual.
Temperature Control
Before continuing, the array temperature should be set to some easily achieved value in
the operating range and Temperature lock should be established. The way this is done
depends on the controller.
Temperature Control for a System using an ST-133 Controller or for a PVCAM-based
System
1. Open the WinSpec/32 Setup menu and click on
Detector Temperature. This will cause the
Temperature dialog to appear as shown in
Figure 28.
2. Set the Target Temperature to the desired
value (the default temperature is suggested for
initial data acquisition).
3. Click on the Set Temp. button. When the
Current Temperature: Unlocked message
Figure 28. Temperature dialog
changes to Current Temperature: Locked, temperature lock will have been
established.
Notes:
1. The ST-133 additionally has a Temp Lock LED on the Analog/Control module
(at the rear of the controller) that visually indicates when temperature lock
occurs.
2. If you are using the USB 2.0 interface or have a PVCAM-based system with
internal controller, the Detector Temperature dialog will not display current
temperature information while you are acquiring data.
Temperature Control for Other Systems
ST-121, ST-130 or ST-138 Controller: Change the dial setting on the front panel of
the Controller.
PentaMAX: Set the temperature on the front panel of the Temperature/Power Supply
unit.
MicroView: Not user-settable. Temperature is solely under software control.
WARNINGS!
Chapter 3 Initial Spectroscopic Data Collection 59
Cleans and Skips
With some controllers, specifically the PentaMAX, ST-130, ST-133, ST-138, and
internal controllers, there is a Cleans/Skips tab in the Hardware Setup dialog. Cleans
are used to reduce charge buildup on the CCD array while waiting to begin data
acquisition (refer to Chapter 10 for more information). Skips are used when the Region of
Interest (ROI) is smaller than the full chip; they allow binning and quick traversing of the
rows that precede and follow the ROI. For the procedures that follow, load the default
values for these parameters by bringing the Cleans/Skips tab to the front, and then
clicking on Load Defaults followed by Yes.
Exception: With a PI-MAX camera, Cleans should be set to 1 and Strips per Clean to 4.
Spectrograph
Before a spectrum can be acquired, it is necessary that the spectrograph be powered and
properly installed as described in Chapter 2. It is not necessary to calibrate the
spectrograph. The default settings will be close enough for initial familiarization purposes.
However, it will be necessary to install the spectrograph. This is the procedure whereby the
WinSpec/32 software is informed of the spectrograph model, communications port, selected
gratings, slit-width and mirror selections if applicable. It is also necessary to establish
successful communications between the host computer and the spectrograph. These
considerations are all discussed in Chapter 2. Additional information for the individual
spectrometer setup and dialogs is provided in the online Help.
Experiment Setup Procedure (All Controllers and Unintensified
Cameras)
1. Open the Experiment Setup dialog (Figure
29) from the Acquisition menu or by
clicking on the button on the Custom
Toolbar.
2. On the Main tab, set the following
parameters.
Exposure time: 0.1 second.
Number of Spectra: 1
Use Full Chip: selected
Accumulations: 1
Amplifier (if available): High Capacity. If
this is a reported-only parameter, set it by
selecting FAST on the ADC tab.
Avalanche Gain (Cameras with
electron-multiplying CCDs): Set to 0
initially and disabled. Enable and increase
the gain for low-light level spectra.
Figure 29. Experiment Setup: Main tab
60 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
3. On the Timing tab (Figure 30) set
the following parameters.
Note: Not all of these parameters
are provided for every controller
model. Ignore parameters that do
not apply to your system.
Timing Mode: Free Run
Triggered Mode: Not checked
Continuous Cleans: Not
checked
Shutter Control: Normal
Pre Open: Not checked
Safe Mode: Selected
External Trigger: Not checked
Edge Trigger: + edge
Delay time: 0
Use Interrupts: (ST-138 only)
Not checked
Figure 30. Experiment Setup dialog
Timing tab
4. On the Data Corrections tab
(Figure 31) all of the correction
functions should be OFF.
5. On the ADC tab (Figure 32), set
the parameters as they apply to
your particular system.
Note: Not all of these
parameters are provided for
every controller model. Ignore
parameters that do not apply to
your system.
Rate: ADC rate. Only those rates
available for your A/D
converter will be displayed,
making it necessary to
designate the A/D type first.
Select the maximum speed
allowed by the converter. If
Figure 31. Data Corrections tab
the camera is a PI-MAX with Thomson 512 CCD, select FAST. ST-130 owners
must confirm that their controller’s internal hardware jumpers are properly set for
the desired speed. See the ST-130 manual for details.
Chapter 3 Initial Spectroscopic Data Collection 61
Type: For systems having more
than one A/D converter, both
FAST and SLOW will be
available. Make this selection
before selecting the rate or
resolution.
Controller Gain (PentaMAX
only): Set to Gain 3
Resolution: Number of bits.
Choices limited by A/D type
selection.
Bit Adjust (ST-138 only): Set to
No Clip
ADC Offset (ST-133-5MHz
only): Use the default setting.
Analog Gain (ST-133): Medium
Readout Port: Normal
Figure 32. Generic ADC tab
6. On the ROI tab select
Spectroscopy Mode as shown in
Figure 33. The Use Full Chip
selection on the Main tab overrides
any ROI settings that may be
present.
Note: The choice of
Spectroscopy or Imaging is
only provided if the WinSpec/32
Imaging option has been installed.
If this choice is not present, the
default state is Spectroscopy.
7. No Processes tab functions
should be selected. For more
information about these functions,
see Chapter 9, page 125.
Figure 33. ROI dialog
62 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
8. On the Data File tab, make the
following selections.
Auto Increment File Name
Enable: should be OFF.
Overwrite/Append Existing
Files: Select Overwrite (data
file will overwrite an existing
file having the same name).
Overwrite Confirmation: Check
this box so that you will be
warned that the specified file
name is already in use. If not
checked, the old data file will
be overwritten by the new one.
No warning is provided.
Data Type AutoSelect: Should
be selected.
Auto-save and prompts: Select
Don't auto-save or ask to
save. With this selection, you
will not receive a prompt when
Figure 34. Data File tab
a file is closed as a result of starting a data collection. A prompt will still be
issued if you close the file explicitly and it has not been saved since being
collected.
Use a New Window for each run: Leave unchecked.
9. Click on the button to
the right of the Name
field. This will open a
browse box. Select the
directory where you
want the stored file to
go. In the example
illustrated, the file name
is Testfile and it will be
stored in a directory
named Data. If the
filename doesn’t
automatically appear in
the browse box, type it
in. The file type should
be WinX Data (*.spe).
Figure 35. File Browse dialog
10. Click on the Save button to save the entered information and return to the
Experiment Setup dialog.
11. Click on OK. This will close the Experiment Setup dialog.
Chapter 3 Initial Spectroscopic Data Collection 63
Experiment Setup Procedures (Intensified Cameras)
Refer to your PI-MAX, PI-MAX3, or PI-MAX4 system manual for experiment setup
instructions. Cabling and peripheral considerations for intensified cameras are more complex
than for unintensified cameras.
Data Collection Procedures (Intensified Cameras)
Refer to your camera system manual for data collection instructions.
PI-MAX and PI-MAX2 Intensified Cameras: If working with an intensified camera,
the room light should be subdued so as to allow safe Shutter mode operation of the
camera. Intensified cameras are quite susceptible to damage from light overload in
Shutter mode operation and particularly subject to damage from light overload in Gate
mode operation with high-intensity pulsed light sources. See your PI-MAX manual for
detailed information.
PI-MAX3 and PI-MAX4 Intensified Cameras: If working with an intensified
camera, the room light should be subdued so as to allow safe Gate mode operation of
the camera. Intensified cameras are particularly subject to damage from light overload
in Gated mode operation with high-intensity pulsed light sources. See your PI-MAX3 or
PI-MAX4 manual for detailed information.
Data Collection (Unintensified Cameras)
The following data collection procedure works for all
controllers. However, it does not exercise some of the special
features, such as video monitor support, available on certain
controller models.
An underlying assumption is that a suitable light source is
available. Although fluorescent room lighting may be
adequate, it will probably prove more instructive to use a
standard lamp, such as a mercury-argon lamp that provided
the spectrum illustrated in Figure 37.
1. Select Focus from the Acquisition menu (Figure 36) to
begin collecting data. An acquisition can also be started
by clicking on the Focus button in the Experiment Setup
dialog or by clicking on the Focus button on the
Custom Toolbar. Data will be continuously acquired
and displayed.
2. While observing the displayed data, adjust the system
optics for the best possible spectrum (lines as high and
narrow as possible). Figure 37 shows a typical mercury-
argon spectrum. Your results could appear different
depending on the spectrograph grating used.
Figure 36. Acquisition
menu
WARNING
64 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Figure 37. Typical Mercury-Argon Spectrum
3. To store the most recent image, click Stop Acquisition on the Acquisition menu or
click on the Stop button on the Custom Toolbar.
4. Data acquisition will halt and the most recent image will be displayed. You can now
use the Save function on the File menu to save the data to a file having the name
specified on the Data File tab.
This completes the initial spectroscopy data acquisition routine that should work with any
Princeton Instruments brand Controller.
65
Chapter 4
Initial Imaging Data Collection
Introduction
Imaging is only possible if the WinSpec/32 software you are using has the Imaging
Option installed.
The procedure in this chapter will enable you to begin collecting real image data
promptly. Minimum requirements are assumed. If your system is more complex, e.g.,
requiring consideration of complex timing and synchronization issues, you will have to
carefully study the other chapters of this manual as well as the manuals provided for the
system hardware components before data acquisition that addresses those needs will be
possible. Nevertheless, it is a good idea to begin with the simplest possible operating
mode. This approach will give you operating experience and familiarity that will prove
very valuable when you go to make more complex measurements. For additional
information about the various menus and dialogs, refer to the online Help topics.
Underlying assumptions for the following procedure are that the hardware has been
installed per the instructions in the hardware manual(s) and that the hardware setup as
discussed in Chapter 2 has been completed. A further assumption is that a good imaging
subject is available. Often, a picture or optical target mounted on a wall or lab bench will
give good results. If initial data collection is to be done using a microscope, be sure to
read the chapter on microscopy in your system manual before attempting data collection.
There are two data collection modes, Focus and Acquire:
In Focus mode operation, no frames of data are stored until Start Storage is
selected. This mode is particularly convenient for familiarization and setting up. For
ease in focusing, the screen refresh rate should be as rapid as possible, achieved by
operating with axes and cross-sections off, and with Zoom 1:1 selected.
In Acquire mode, every frame of data collected is stored. This mode would
ordinarily be selected during actual data collection. One limitation of Acquire mode
operation is that if data acquisition continues at too fast a rate for it to be stored, data
overflow will eventually occur. This could only happen in Fast Mode operation.
Note: The following data collection procedures are done in the Focus mode but do not
cover the actual focusing of a camera. Refer to your camera system manual, your
spectrograph manual, and/or Appendix B (page 233 and subsequent pages) of this manual
for that information.
ATTENTION
66 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
1. If using a PI-MAX or PI-MAX2 intensified camera, initial data collection will be done in
the Shutter mode (Gate mode for PI-MAX3 and PI-MAX4). In both cases (Shutter and
Gate mode), the camera can be damaged if exposed to light overload. Before powering
the controller and camera, reduce the room light to reduce the risk of damage. Note that
intensifiers are particularly at risk in pulsed laser operation, where overload spot damage
can occur without raising the average current to where the overload detection circuits
will be activated. It is far better to be careful than sorry. Before proceeding, take the time
to carefully read the manual for your intensified camera.
2. Also, take particular care that your intensified camera is connected properly for shutter or
gate mode operation. Cabling and peripheral considerations for intensified cameras are
more complex than for unintensified cameras. Again, read your manual.
Temperature Control
Before continuing, the array temperature should be set to some easily achieved value in
the operating range and Temperature lock should be established. The way this is done
depends on the controller.
Temperature Control for a System using an ST-133 Controller or for a PVCAM-based
System
1. Open the WinSpec/32 Setup menu and click on
Detector Temperature. This will cause the
Temperature dialog to appear as shown in
Figure 38.
2. Set the Target Temperature to the desired
value (the default temperature is suggested for
initial data acquisition).
3. Click on the Set Temp. button. When the
Current Temperature: Unlocked message
Figure 38. Temperature dialog
changes to Current Temperature: Locked, temperature lock will have been
established.
Notes:
1. The ST-133 additionally has a Temp Lock LED on the Analog/Control module (at
the rear of the controller) that visually indicates when temperature lock occurs.
2. If you are using the USB 2.0 interface or have a PVCAM-based system with
internal controller, the Detector Temperature dialog will not display current
temperature information while you are acquiring data.
Temperature Control for Other Systems
ST-121, ST-130 or ST-138 Controller: Change the dial setting on the front panel of
the Controller.
PentaMAX: Set the temperature on the front panel of the Temperature/Power Supply
unit.
MicroView: Not user-settable. Temperature is solely under software control.
WARNINGS!
Chapter 4 Initial Image Data Collection 67
Cleans and Skips
With some controllers, specifically the PentaMAX, ST-130, ST-133, ST-138, and internal
controllers, there is a Cleans/Skips tab in the Hardware Setup dialog. Cleans are used to
reduce charge buildup on the CCD array while waiting to begin data acquisition. Skips are
used when the Region of Interest (ROI) is smaller than the full chip; they allow binning and
quick traversing of the rows that precede and follow the ROI. For the procedures that follow,
load the default values for these parameters by bringing the Cleans/Skips tab to the front,
and then clicking on Load Defaults followed by Yes.
Exception: With a PI-MAX camera, Cleans should be set to 1 and Strips per Clean to 4.
Experiment Setup Procedure (All Controllers and Unintensified
Cameras)
1. Open the Experiment Setup dialog
(Figure 39) from the Acquisition menu or
by clicking on the button on the
Custom Toolbar.
2. On the Main tab, set the following
parameters.
Exposure time: 0.1 second
Number of Spectra/Images: 1
Use Full Chip: selected
Accumulations: 1
Amplifier (if available): High Capacity.
If this is a reported-only parameter, set
it by selecting FAST on the ADC tab.
Avalanche Gain (Cameras with electron-
multiplying CCDs): Set to 0 initially
and disabled. Enable and increase the
gain for low-light level images.
Figure 39. Experiment Setup|Main tab
68 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
3. On the Timing tab (Figure 40) set the following parameters.
Note: Not all of these parameters are provided for every controller model. Ignore
parameters that do not apply to your system.
Timing Mode: Free Run
Triggered Mode: Not checked
Continuous Cleans: Not checked
Shutter Control: Normal
Pre Open: Not checked
Safe Mode: selected
External Trigger: Not checked
Edge Trigger: + edge
Delay time: 0
Use Interrupts: (ST-138 only) Not
checked
Figure 40. Timing tab
4. On the Data Corrections tab (Figure 41) all
of the correction functions should be OFF.
5. On the ADC tab (Figure 42), set the
parameters as they apply to your particular
system.
Note: Not all of these parameters are
provided for every controller model.
Ignore parameters that do not apply to
your system.
Rate: ADC rate. Only those rates available
for your A/D converter will be displayed,
making it necessary to designate the A/D
type first. Select the maximum speed
allowed by the converter. ST-130 owners
must confirm that the internal hardware
jumpers of their controller are properly
set for the desired speed. See the ST-130
manual for details.
Figure 41. Data Corrections tab
Chapter 4 Initial Image Data Collection 69
Type: For systems having more than one
A/D converter, both FAST and SLOW
will be available. Make this selection
before selecting the rate or resolution.
Controller Gain (PentaMAX only): Set
to Gain 3
Resolution: Number of bits. Choices
limited by A/D type selection.
Bit Adjust (ST-138 only): Set to No
Clip
ADC Offset (ST-133-5MHz only): Use
the default setting.
Analog Gain (ST-133): Medium
Readout Port: Normal
Figure 42. Generic ADC tab
6. On the ROI tab (Figure 43), select Imaging
Mode. WinSpec/32 operated in Imaging
Mode always uses the full chip area and
ROI considerations do not apply.
7. No Processes tab functions should be
selected. For more information about these
functions, see Chapter 9, page 125.
8. On the Data File tab (Figure 44), make the
following selections.
Auto Increment File Name Enable:
should be OFF.
Overwrite/Append Existing Files:
Select Overwrite (data file will
overwrite an existing file having the
same name).
Overwrite Confirmation: Check this
box so that you will be warned that the
specified file name is already in use. If
Figure 43. ROI tab - imaging selected
70 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
not checked, the old data file will be
overwritten by the new one. No
warning is provided.
Data Type AutoSelect: Should be
selected.
Auto-save and prompts: Select Don't
auto-save or ask to save. With this
selection, you will not receive a prompt
when a file is closed as a result of
starting a data collection. A prompt
will still be issued if you close the file
explicitly and it has not been saved
since being collected.
Use a New Window for each run:
Leave unchecked.
Figure 44. Data File tab
9. Click on the button to the
right of the Name field. This
will open a browse box.
Select the directory where
you want the stored file to
go. In the example
illustrated, the file name is
TESTFILE1 and it will be
stored in a directory named
Data. If the file name doesn’t
automatically appear in the
browse box, type it in. The
file type should be WinX
Data (*.spe).
Figure 45. File Browse dialog
10. Click on the Save button to save the entered information and return to the
Experiment Setup dialog.
11. Click on OK. This will close the Experiment Setup dialog.
Experiment Setup Procedures (Intensified Cameras)
Refer to your PI-MAX, PI-MAX3, or PI-MAX4 system manual for experiment setup
instructions. Cabling and peripheral considerations for intensified cameras are more complex
than for unintensified cameras.
Chapter 4 Initial Image Data Collection 71
Data Collection Procedures (Intensified Cameras)
Refer to your camera system manual for data collection instructions.
PI-MAX and PI-MAX2 Intensified Cameras: If working with an intensified camera,
the room light should be subdued so as to allow safe Shutter mode operation of the
camera. Intensified cameras are quite susceptible to damage from light overload in
Shutter mode operation and particularly subject to damage from light overload in Gate
mode operation with high-intensity pulsed light sources. See your PI-MAX manual for
detailed information.
PI-MAX3 and PI-MAX4 Intensified Cameras: If working with an intensified
camera, the room light should be subdued so as to allow safe Gate mode operation of
the camera. Intensified cameras are particularly subject to damage from light overload
in Gated mode operation with high-intensity pulsed light sources. See your PI-MAX3 or
PI-MAX4 manual for detailed information.
Data Collection Procedures (Controller-Specific)
ST-133-Controller
The procedure that follows for these controllers is in two parts, Video Focusing and
Data Collection. In focusing, images are displayed on the video monitor (not the
computer monitor) and no data is collected. This allows rapid and easy adjustment of the
system optics. Once the settings have been optimized, data collection begun can begin.
If acquiring data with a PI-MAX, PI-MAX2, PI-MAX3, or PI-MAX4 intensified camera,
make sure the ambient light levels are low. Intensified cameras are quite susceptible to
damage from light overload in Shutter mode operation and particularly subject to
damage from light overload in Gate mode operation with high-intensity pulsed light
sources. Refer to your camera system manual for detailed information specific to
experiment setup and data acquisition for intensified cameras.
Focusing
This procedure applies for a system that includes an ST-133 Controller and a video
monitor connected to the Video port (BNC connector) on the controller. If your system
doesn’t include a video monitor, go to the Data Collection - All Controllers section,
which begins on page 75.
1. Select Video from the Acquisition menu. This will allow live data to be displayed
on your video monitor.
WARNING
WARNING
72 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
2. Select Video Focus from the Acquisition
menu. The Interactive Camera dialog
(Figure 46) will open.
3. Click on the RUN button in the Interactive
Camera dialog. The camera will begin
acquiring pictures at the fastest possible rate will
and the image will be displayed on the video
monitor. Note that the image will not be
displayed on the computer monitor while the
Interactive Camera dialog is open.
4. Focus the system optics and set the
Interactive Camera dialog Exposure Time,
RS170 Scaling and Offset adjustments for
the best-viewed image. In addition to the
Exposure Time, Intensity Scaling and Offset
Figure 46. ST-133
Interactive Camera dialog
parameters, the Pattern parameters determine which CCD pixels will be displayed on
the video monitor. Note that, in Focus mode, the images will not appear at the
computer but only at the video monitor. If the number of pixels on the CCD is very
much larger than the number of video pixels, you can use the Pan function to select
any one of nine different subsets to display. The Zoom function gives additional
control. One-to-one mapping from the selected region to the screen occurs with 2×
selected. You may additionally have the option of selecting Binning, in which a
wider view is achieved by combining adjacent pixels, or Decimation, in which pixels
are discarded according to an algorithm.
The exposure time will be the same as that set via the Experiment Setup|Main tab.
The two exposure settings track. Changing it at either location should update the
other setting automatically. The Intensity Scaling, together with the Offset,
determines how the image data is mapped to the 256 gray-scale levels. Begin with the
Intensity Scaling set to “1 to 4096” (slider all the way to the right). Similarly, the
Offset setting should initially be set to 2 (slider all the way to left).
5. When no further improvement in the observed image can be obtained, click on Stop
in the Interactive Camera Operation dialog to halt focus-mode operation.
6. Click on Close to close the Interactive Camera Operation dialog and return to the
Experiment Setup dialog.
Data Collection
1. Click on Focus to begin collecting data. An acquisition can also be started by
clicking on Focus on the Acquisition menu or by clicking on the Focus button on
the Custom Toolbar. Images will be continuously acquired and displayed on the
computer screen and on the video monitor.
2. To store the most recent image, click Stop Acquisition on the Acquisition menu
or click on the Stop button on the Custom Toolbar. Data acquisition will halt and
the most recent image will be displayed. You can now use the Save function on the
File menu to save the data to a file having the name specified on the Data File tab.
3. If you want to initiate data acquisition, select Focus again. To store the new data to
disk, repeat Step 2.
This completes initial data acquisition with an ST-133 Controller.
Chapter 4 Initial Image Data Collection 73
PentaMAX Controller
The procedure that follows for the PentaMAX Controller is in two parts, Focusing and
Data Collection. In focusing, images are displayed on the video monitor and no data is
collected. This allows rapid and easy adjustment of the system optics. Once the settings
have been optimized, focus mode operation should be ended and data collection
performed.
Focusing
This procedure applies for a PentaMAX system that includes a video monitor connected to
the Video port (BNC) of the PentaMAX. If your system does not include a video monitor, go
to the Data Collection - All Controllers section, which begins on page 75.
1. Select Video from the
Acquisition menu.
This will allow live
data to be displayed on
your video monitor.
2. Select Video Focus
from the Acquisition
menu. The Interactive
Operation dialog that
will be displayed
depends on the
PentaMAX version.
Version 5 and higher
will display the
righthand dialog
Figure 47. PentaMAX Interactive Operation dialog
shown in Figure 47. Earlier versions display the lefthand dialog.
3. Note the Hardware LUT field. This selection sets the scaling of the video display
only. Unless the signal is very weak, the best LUT choice will be Gamma.
4. Click on the RUN button in the Interactive Operation dialog. Data acquisition at
the fastest possible rate will commence immediately and the image will be displayed
on the video monitor. Note that the image will not be displayed on the computer
monitor while the Interactive Operation dialog is open.
5. Focus the system optics and, if necessary, adjust the Exposure Time in the
Interactive Camera dialog for the best-viewed image. The exposure time will be the
same as that set via the Experiment Setup|Main tab. The two exposure settings
track. Changing it at either location should update the other setting automatically.
6. When no further improvement in the observed image can be obtained, click on Stop
in the Interactive Operation dialog to halt focus mode operation.
7. Click on Close to close the Interactive Operation dialog and return to the
Experiment Setup dialog.
74 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Data Collection
1. Click on Focus to begin collecting data. Data collection can be initiated by means of the
Focus button in the Experiment Setup dialog, by selecting Focus from the
Acquisition menu, or by clicking on the Focus button of the Custom Toolbar.
Images will be continuously acquired and displayed on the computer screen.
2. To store the most recent image, click Stop Acquisition on the Acquisition menu
or click on the Stop button on the Custom Toolbar. Data acquisition will halt and
the most recent image will be displayed. You can now use the Save function on the
File menu to save the data to a file having the name specified on the Data File tab.
3. If you want to initiate data acquisition, select Focus again. To store the new data to
disk, again click Stop Acquisition on the Acquisition menu or click on the Stop
button.
This completes initial data acquisition with a PentaMAX Controller.
Chapter 4 Initial Image Data Collection 75
Data Collection (Unintensified Cameras)
The following data collection procedure works for all controllers. However, it doesn’t
exercise some of the special features, such as video monitor support, available on certain
controller models.
1. Click on Focus to begin collecting
data. Data collection can be
initiated by means of the Focus
button in the Experiment Setup
dialog, by clicking on Focus on the
Acquisition menu, or by clicking
on the Focus button of the
Custom Toolbar. Images will be
continuously acquired and
displayed.
2. Observe the displayed data and
adjust the system optics for the best
possible image. It may be necessary
to readjust the Exposure Time
(Experiment Setup|Main tab).
3. To store the most recent image,
click Stop Acquisition on the
Acquisition menu or click on the
Stop button on the Custom
Figure 48. Typical Data Acquisition Image
Toolbar.
4. Data acquisition will halt and the most recent image will be displayed. You can now
use the Save function on the File menu to save the data to a file having the name
specified on the Experiment Setup|Data File tab.
This completes the initial data acquisition routine, which should work with any Princeton
Instruments controller.
76 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
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77
Chapter 5
Opening, Closing, and Saving Data Files
Introduction
This chapter discusses how to open, close, and save existing data files to disk. Options
for saving and deleting files will be explained. Data files created with temporary file
names should be saved to disk periodically. Files should be closed completely to
conserve RAM for data collection.
Data files can be deleted directly from WinSpec/32, without using the File Manager or
any other file utility.
Note: WinSpec/32 can read data files acquired with earlier versions of WinSpec.
Versions of WinSpec prior to 1.6 cannot read WinSpec/32 data files. Neither can versions
prior to 1.6 read data files that were collected with earlier versions and then opened,
modified and saved using WinSpec/32. This should be considered carefully before
modifying and saving old data files with WinSpec/32.
Opening Data Files
In WinSpec/32 files are opened
according to Win 95 conventions, as
follows.
1. Select Open from the File menu.
The File Open dialog will appear
(Figure 49).
2. Open the directory containing the
data files. Clicking on the button
at the right of the Look In field
opens a browser function,
allowing you to quickly and easily
access the correct folder. As
shown in Figure 49, the data files
will be listed below.
3. If you want the software to control
Figure 49. Open dialog
how the data will be displayed when the file is opened, check Auto Select. Leave
Auto Select unchecked if you want to retain control over whether the data will be
displayed as an Image, Graph or 3D Graph.
Auto Select is the factory default selection.* In addition, one of the three radio
buttons, Image, Graph or 3D Graph, will be selected but grayed out if Auto Select
* The open/display default selection can be changed and saved from the Display Layout
window.
78 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
is checked. If Auto Select is unchecked, the grayed out selection will become active
and govern how the file is opened.
When Auto Select is checked, the way the data is displayed depends on the
number of data strips it contains.
If there are eleven or more strips of data, they will be displayed as a normal
image, such as that shown in Figure 93 (page 115).
If there are at least three data strips but less than eleven, the data will be
plotted as a 3D Graph as shown in Figure 72 (page 101).
If there are only two strips of data, they will be displayed as graphs stacked
in a two-dimensional plot, the same as for a 3D Graph of two strips as shown
in Figure 71 (page 100).
A single strip will always be plotted as a simple X vs. Y plot. Note that from
two to ten strips, the intensity (Y axis) scale shifts position as required to
read true for the selected strip.
If Image is selected, all data points will be plotted as a function of the strip and
pixel number.
If 3D Graph is selected, multiple data strips will be plotted as a function of
intensity versus pixel number, the actual number of data strips plotted depending
on the 3D Layout display parameter settings. All of the strips could come from
the same frame, or, in the case of a file containing multiple frames, the same
numbered strip could come from each frame.
If Graph is selected, the selected data strip only will be plotted as a function of
intensity versus pixel number.
4. Note the Files of Type field, which allows you to select files for listing according to
their type. If WinXData (*.spe) is selected, only files of type *.spe will be listed.
This is the native WinSpec/32 format. If TIFF or 8-bit TIFF File (*.tif) is selected,
only files of the type *.tif will be listed. If All Files (*.*) is selected, all files in the
folder will be listed. WinSpec/32 can open either *.spe files or *.tif files (8-bit or
16-bit). Select type 8-bit TIFF File to open an 8-bit TIFF file. Select type TIFF File
to open a 16-bit TIFF file.
5. Either double-click on
the name of the file you
want to open or single-
click on the name and
then click on the Open
button. For example,
with 3D Graph selected,
double-clicking on
Hid-lamp.spe would
open that file, producing
the display shown in
Figure 50. Note that there
are many different ways
of controlling how the
image will be displayed,
as described in
Figure 50. High Intensity Lamp Spectrum
Chapter 5 Opening, Closing, and Saving Data Files 79
Chapter 8.
Multiple Files: It is also possible to open multiple files at the same time by using the
Win95 Shift + Click and Control + Click selection features.
To select a range of contiguously listed files for opening:
a. Hold the Shift key down and click on the first file in the range. The file will be
selected.
b. Then hold the Shift key down again and click on the last file in the range. That
file and all the files between the two designated files will be selected.
To select multiple files which are not listed contiguously:
a. Hold down the Ctrl key and then click on the first file. That file will be selected.
b. Then hold down the Ctrl key again and click on the second file. That file will
also be selected.
c. Proceed in similar fashion to select each file to be opened.
Once all files to be opened have been selected, click on Open (or double-click on a
selected file) and all of the selected files will be opened.
There are a number of additional options and operations that can be performed from the
Open dialog. For example, clicking the Display Layout button will directly open the
Display Layout dialog, described in Chapter 8. In addition, options for the organization
of the Open dialog itself can be selected by means of the icons to the right of the Look
In field, or by right-clicking the mouse anywhere in the file listing area of the box (but
not on a file name).
Right-clicking on a file name opens a Windows shortcut menu that provides a number of
additional operations, including open, delete, rename, print, properties, and edit
operations such as copy and cut.
80 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Saving Data Files
Data files must be saved to disk before exiting the software. It is also recommended that
you save periodically when making measurements to minimize the overall risk of data
loss. If you exit and there are unsaved data files, you will be prompted to save them. The
File menu provides three Save commands, as follows.
Save: Saves the active data file using the original file name and type and in the
original directory (folder).
Save As: The Save As dialog is used to save the active data file to a user-specified
file name and directory. The file type can be changed.
Save All: Saves all open data files using the original file names and directories
(folders).
Sometimes during data collection or processing, windows will be opened and display
data with an <untitled #> title. These are temporary files, and they must be saved to disk
if you want to keep them. The Save As dialog performs this function. The Save As
dialog also allows you to open a file and save it with a different name.
Saving Temporary Data Files
The WinSpec/32 software allows you to work with temporary files, files with names like
<untitled 1>. To save these files, or to save any file to a new filename, perform the
following steps.
1. Select Save As from the File
menu. The Data File Save As
dialog (Figure 51) appears.
2. Open the directory where you
want the file saved. Clicking on
the button at the right of the
Save In field opens a browser
function that will allow you to
quickly and easily select the
target directory.
3. Type in a name for the file.
Windows 95 long file-name
convention applies. It is not
necessary to add the extension
since it will be added
automatically according to the
specified file type.
Figure 51. Data File Save As dialog
Save as type: Indicates the file type. The
data types currently supported are listed in
Figure 52. If All Files (*.*) is selected, you
will be able to save the file with any
extension. The file, however, will be saved
Figure 52. Save As Data Types
in the *.SPE file type format. Only the data is saved. This could have some
unexpected effects. For example, if you save a graph as a *.tif file, and then open
the file with an image editor, you will see the data presented as a single strip
image, not as a graph.
4. Click on OK to save the file or Cancel to close the Data File Save As dialog
without saving the file.
Chapter 5 Opening, Closing, and Saving Data Files 81
Data File tab
The Data File tab provides you with additional
control and flexibility in naming and saving
newly collected data. Because the settings on
this tab are applied to data acquisition, not post-
processing, make your entries before acquiring
data. The auto-save, auto-name, and auto-
increment features allow you to acquire data and
save it according to the filename template you
define. Also, you can take advantage of the
multiple open windows functionality and
specify that each new data run opens a new
window on the display window.
Figure 53. Data File tab
Closing a Data File
An open data window can be closed by clicking on the box at the upper right of the
window or by clicking on Close in the File menu. An open data window can be removed
from view by clicking on the box at the upper right of the window. The file will be
reduced to an icon on the task bar but the data will remain loaded in RAM. There may be
situations where you would want to do this to reduce desktop clutter. Unless you intend to
expand the file for display again, it is ordinarily better to actually close the file so that the
RAM it is using will be freed for other use. If the file has not been saved, you will be
prompted.
There are several ways of closing an open data window. Each is described below:
The box at the upper right of the data window will close that window only.
The box at the upper right of the window will also remove the data window from
view by reducing it to an icon on the task bar. There may be situations where you
would want to do this to reduce desktop clutter. However, the data will remain loaded
in RAM, reducing the memory available for data collection. Unless you intend to
expand the file for display again, it is ordinarily better to actually close the file so that
the RAM it is using will be freed for other use.
Close in the File menu closes all windows using the data set displayed in the active
data window. This may be important if New in the Window menu or in the Data
Window Context menu has been used to open additional windows with the same
data. Simply clicking on Close in the File menu will close all windows containing
the same data, regardless of how it is displayed.
Close in the Control menu, accessed by clicking on the WinSpec/32 icon at the left
end of the Title bar, closes WinSpec/32, as does double-clicking on the WinSpec/32
icon. Similarly, the key combination Alt+F4 also closes WinSpec/32.
Close All in the Window menu closes all open data files.
The key combination Ctrl+F4 closes the active window only.
82 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Deleting Data Files
You can delete data files directly from within WinSpec/32, without having to close
WinSpec/32, and without having to use the Windows 95 Explorer or another file utility.
This is achieved using the File Operations menu, accessed by right-clicking on the file
name in the Open dialog, as explained below.
1. Select Open from the File menu.
Only files with the selected data type,
*.spe or *.tif, will be listed.
2. Position the mouse cursor on the name
of the file you want to delete and click
the right mouse button. This will open
the “right-click” File Operations
menu, as shown in Figure 54.
3. Click on Delete. Then answer yes to
the query asking whether you wish to
send the file to the recycling bin. The
file will be deleted and the File
Operations menu will close.
Figure 54. Right-click File Operations menu
Note: Click on the Open dialog Cancel button to exit the dialog without deleting any
files.
Multiple Files: It is also possible to delete multiple files at the same time by using the
Shift + Click and Control + Click selection features.
To select a range of contiguously listed files for deleting:
1. Hold the Shift key down and click on the first file in the range. The file will be
selected.
2. Then hold the Shift key down again and click on the last file in the range. That
file and all the files between the two designated files will be selected.
To select multiple files which are not listed contiguously:
1. Hold down the Ctrl key and then click on the first file. That file will be selected.
2. Then hold down the Ctrl key again and click on the second file. That file will
also be selected.
3. Proceed in similar fashion to select each file to be deleted.
Once all files to be deleted have been selected, right-click on a selected file to open the
File Operations menu. Then click on Delete to delete all of the selected files.
83
Chapter 6
Wavelength Calibration
Introduction
You can calibrate the WinSpec/32 software either by using the spectrograph stepper
motor position (spectrograph calibration) or by performing a wavelength calibration.
Spectrograph calibration, described in Chapter 7, precisely calibrates the movement of
the spectrograph gratings. Wavelength Calibration is good for one position of the grating
only. Once you move the grating (by hand or by controlling the stepper motor) a different
wavelength calibration must be performed for that spectrograph position.
Note: Even after the spectrograph setting is fixed, moving the sample, refocusing, or
almost any adjustment of the input optics can have an effect on the wavelength
calibration. For the most accurate calibration possible, Princeton Instruments
recommends recalibrating the system after any optical adjustment.
Changing the WinSpec/32 Calibration Method
Switching between Wavelength Calibration and Spectrograph Calibration is controlled
using the Usage dialog. This dialog determines whether calibration is turned on or off,
and which type of calibration is used. The display can be calibrated by controlling the
stepper motor of the spectrograph, called Spectrograph Calibration (discussed in
Chapter 7), or the display can be calibrated for a fixed spectrograph position by entering
the position of known peaks from a known source such as a mercury or neon lamp. The
calibration of the spectrograph for a fixed position is called Wavelength Calibration and
is described in this chapter.
Changing the Calibration Method
1. Select Usage from the Calibration
menu. The dialog in Figure 55 will be
displayed.
2. Select the desired method of calibration.
Auto Spectro selects Spectrograph
Calibration as described in
Chapter 7. A spectrograph
supported by WinSpec/32 must be
installed for this selection to be
available.
Manual applies the wavelength
Figure 55. Calibration Usage dialog
calibration to the active data. The calibration is performed using the Default
Calibration Setup dialog, accessed by selecting Setup on the Calibration
menu.
Off selects uncalibrated operation.
84 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
3. Select the desired X Axis units. This option is only available if the data set is
calibrated. If relative wave numbers are selected, it will additionally be necessary
to enter the wavelength of the laser line.
4. Click on OK.
See the discussion of the Calibration Usage dialog in the online Help for details
concerning the Calibration Usage dialog selections.
Calibration Menu
The Calibration menu, which can be called by clicking on
Calibration in the menu bar, is shown in Figure 56. The
Calibration menu contains two items, Setup and Usage,
which call the Calibration Setup and Calibration Usage
dialogs. Brief descriptions follow.
Figure 56. Calibration menu
Setup: Once a single spectrum has been acquired or loaded, the menu item Setup
opens the Calibration Setup dialog. A calibration session consists of finding the
peaks, marking the known peaks to be used for calibration, and saving the
calibration data as the default or applying it to the active data set only.
Usage: Selects the Calibration mode and Units. Once the wavelength calibration has
been performed, it can be applied by selecting Manual or turned off by selecting
Off. Selections can either be saved as default power-up parameters or be applied
to the active data set only. For more information, see the online Help discussion
of the Calibration Usage dialog.
Wavelength Calibration Procedure
Before a wavelength calibration can be performed, it is necessary to either load a
spectrum or acquire one. For good calibration results, the spectrum should have well
defined peaks for which you know the wavelength. A calibration requires at least two
points defined by pixel and by units. Naturally the more points used, the more accurate
the calibration. The ideal calibration spectrum would have one peak at the start of the
array (or region of interest), one at the end of the array or region of interest, and one
midway between the end peaks. In real life, the ideal spectrum is seldom available, but
the closer you can come to this ideal the better the calibration results will be.
Figure 57 shows a mercury-argon spectrum that could serve as the basis for a good
calibration in many situations. Appendix C contains wavelength tables for Argon, Neon
and Mercury, together with a detailed spectrum for Hg-Argon.
Chapter 6 Wavelength Calibration 85
Figure 57. Hg-Argon spectrum
Once you have the calibration spectrum displayed on the screen as the active data set,
proceed as follows.
1. Click on Setup in the Calibration
menu to open the Calibration Setup
dialog box. If a previous calibration
had been saved, the calibration values
would be listed. If no previous
calibration had been saved as the
default, no values would be listed. For
more information, see the online Help
for this dialog.
2. Click on Find Peaks. An automatic
peak finding routine will be
performed. The maximum number of
peaks is equal to one quarter the
number of displayed pixels. The pixel
values for the 10 highest peaks will be
shown in the Pixel boxes in the
Calibration Setup dialog as shown in
Figure 58. Note that the Find Peaks
routine causes a small red arrow to be
Figure 58. Calibration Setup dialog after running
Find Peaks routine on Hg-Argon spectrum
displayed above each peak found in the spectrum together with a notation indicating
the peak location in pixels (Figure 59).
Note: Each time the Find Peaks routine is initiated the displayed peak heights will
decrease. Clicking on the data window Autoscale button will restore their original
displayed height.
86 WinSpec/32 Manual Version 2.6B
Figure 59. Spectrum after running Find Peaks routine
3. Select the calibration points. For the example being considered, the peaks at 182.90,
301.00, 485.27 and 931.20 would be good choices. The decimal point locations are
based on the calculated center of peak, and not necessarily the largest intensity position.
4. Select the Calibration Units (if not nanometers) and select the Display Units. Both
the Calibration Units and the Display Units are nm (the default) in the example.
5. Manually enter the wavelength of the selected peaks. Appendix C contains
wavelength tables and a detailed spectrum for Hg-Argon. In our example, the
wavelengths for the selected peaks would be:
Peak Location
(Pixels)
Peak Location
(Wavelength in nm)
182.90
365.02
301.00
435.83
485.27
546.07
931.20
811.53
6. Once the wavelengths have been
entered for the selected peaks, check
the selection box to the left of the
Pixel box for each peak selected.
(Figure 60). A checkmark in the box
indicates that the peak is selected.
Note that wavelength values must be
entered for these peaks before the
selection box can be checked.
7. Click on OK. This completes the
wavelength calibration and the dialog
will close. At the same time, the
Calibration Mode selected in the
Usage dialog will automatically
change from Off to Manual.
Figure 60. Setup Calibration screen after selecting
peaks and entering calibration wavelengths
Chapter 6 Wavelength Calibration 87
The peak find routine display data (arrows and pixel number of each peak found) does
not change. The x-axis units will however change to reflect the display units.
Figure 61. Spectrum after Calibration
Save as Default
The Save as Default button in the Calibration Setup dialog determines whether a
calibration is temporary or permanent (until changed). Once a calibration has been saved