TFT EAS911D Emergency Alert System Decoder User Manual TFT Manual

TFT Inc Emergency Alert System Decoder TFT Manual

Manual

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To whom it may concern: June 4, 2002
TFT, Inc. is a manufacturer of EAS Encoders/Decoders, who now seeks Type Certification of an
EAS Decoder (only) under FCC Rule Part 11.
On January 31, 1996, TFT, Inc. was granted Type Certification on an Emergency Alert System
Encoder/Decoder, FCC Identifier BIOEAS911, File No. 31010/EQU 4-3-4. The Decoder (only) for
which TFT now seeks Type Certification is part of the original Certification Application made on
November 10, 1995. Several of the Part 11 Compliance Tests for that application are incorporated
in this new application for an EAS Decoder (only) device, which does not function as an Encoder
as well.
In order to accomplish this, TFT has removed several circuits and components from the original
Encoder/Decoder in order to disable and defeat its functionality as an EAS Encoder. Because the
overall construction of the unit is not materially changed, all Decoder tests conducted for the
original application remains at no change and may apply to this application as well.
Best regards,
Edmund Fong
Executive Vice President- TFT Inc.
EAS 911D Decoder
Preliminary Data Sheet
Features
Decodes and forwards EAS emergency messages
Two self-contained receivers
RS-232 Output for character generator interface
Built-in impact printer
Digital audio recorder
Front panel mounted speaker
LCD display
Password protected
Automatic or manual operation
FCC Type Notification Pending
General
Until now a decoder-only for broadcast and cable applications of the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Emergency
Alert System (EAS) has not existed. The EAS 911D is a decoder only, based on the proven performance of the TFT EAS 911
line of EAS Encoder/Decoders, that permits a broadcaster or cable operator to receive and forward EAS messages. These
operations may be handled either automatically for unmanned situations or manually with the assistance of an operator.
The EAS 911D has many of the features of the EAS 911 Encoder/Decoders, including a built-in impact printer, character
generator interfaces, a lighted numeric keypad, practice operation, and many visual indicators. The EAS 911D also features easy
set-up and operation with a combination of LCD and lighted key displays that guide an operator or installer through each step.
Decoder Section
The decoder section of the EAS 911D is programmed in the same fashion as the EAS 911 encoder/decoders. Password protection
allows an operator to set up all parameters associated with decoding EAS messages, including setting the current date and time,
setting the station time zone, automatic observance of daylight savings time, and the station’s FIPS (Federal Information
Processing System) code.
The decoder can be programmed for automatic forwarding of EAS messages when user-selected criteria of event selection and
location are met. The event code and location codes of an incoming EAS message are compared electronically to lists stored in
setup of the EAS 911D to decide whether a message should automatically forwarded. If there is a match of both the event field
and at least one of the location fields, the message will be automatically forwarded.
Also in setting up the EAS 911D several interfaces are available for video character generators. These character generators are
available in both analog and digital versions. Some interfaces even permit setting of character generator parameters from the EAS
911D. The user can also select whether text for the Required Weekly Test (RWT) is sent to the character generator or not.
In Setup Mode, the EAS 911D can also record a short voice announcement (used for cable television system compliance), set the
alert time-out, and enable a one-button method of manually forwarding a message.
Receiver Section
Built into the EAS 911D are two receiver modules for receiving the two FCC mandated monitoring assignments. These receivers
are frequency agile for both AM and FM broadcast and can be configured in any combination if specified at time of order.
The frequency for each receiver is set with rotary DIP switches behind an access panel on the front of the unit. All standard
broadcast frequencies can be digitally set.
Front Panel
The EAS 911D front panel is laid out to guide the installer or operator through all the functions necessary to program and operate
the unit. In addition to the lighted numeric keypad, the front panel also has other pushbuttons for password, cancel, practice,
header send, EOM send, message waiting acknowledgment, manual forwarding, mode switching, and review of both the header
and audio portions of an EAS message. Indicators for receiver signal levels, an alert relay closure, an on-air relay closure, and
auto/man functions clearly show status of the decoder at a single glance.
A speaker key permits audio monitoring of the two built-in receivers and the digital audio recorder. The speaker key also changes
the function of the LCD to a bargraph to provide a visual indication of receiver operation.
Rear Panel
Connectors for RF inputs to the receivers, speaker/printer inhibit, balanced audio output, on-air relay, message alert relay, and
digital ports are located on the rear. A professional 120 VAC/60 Hz power and fuse receptacle are also provided.
Note: This device has not been authorized as required by the rules of the Federal Communications Commission. This device is not, and may not be offered for sale or lease, or sold or leased,
until authorization is obtained.
Contents subject to change without notice.
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P/N 5004-EAS911D REV. A
June 2002
EQUIPMENT SERIAL NO. __________
SHIPMENT DATE _________________
MODEL EAS911D
EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM
EAS DECODER
USER’S GUIDE
TFT, INC.
2243 RINGWOOD AVENUE,
SAN JOSE, CA 95131
TEL: (408) 943-9323
Service Department Ext. 300
FAX: (408) 432-9218
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EAS 911D
EAS DECODER
The EAS DECODER is a combined Emergency Alert System (EAS) Decoder and Receivers in single unit that permits
broadcasters, cablecasters and emergency managers to receive, store, forward Emergency Alert Messages prescribed by the FCC's
EAS Rules. By using the EAS digital protocol, the Decoder responds only to the user pre-selected messages and forwards only
certain messages automatically with no operator intervention.
FEATURES:
MODEL 911D
Low Cost, Easy EAS Decoder with AM/FM Receiver in Single Unit
Fully Compliant with FCC Part 11, Emergency Alert System Rules
Fully Compliant with FCC Part 15 Rules
Fully Compatible with NOAA Weather Radio SAME Code
Scans 2 Required Audio Inputs
Two RS-232 Interfaces
Full Features for Unattended Operation.
Front Panel Logging Printer
Built-in Two-Minute Digital Voice Storage
Interface for Video Character Generator
FCC ID No. BIOEAS911D
The COM2 port exchanges serial data to and from an external video character generator using an RS-232 interface.
Protocols for several major suppliers of character generators are supported.
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CONTENTS
SECTION I - GENERAL INFORMATION
Paragraph Title Page
1.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................................ 1-1
1.2EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION ................................................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.3 SPECIFICATIONS................................................................................................................................................................... 1-2
1.4 FCC Designator ............................................................................................................................................................................. 1-3
1.5 Warranty Information ................................................................................................................................................................... 1-3
1.6 Claims for Damage in Shipment ................................................................................................................................................ 1-4
1.7TECHNICAL SUPPORT ............................................................................................................................................................. 1-4
SECTION II - GETTING TO KNOW YOUR EAS DECODER AND RELATED EQUIPMENT
2.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................................ 2-1
2.2 Unpacking and Inspection ........................................................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.3 THE FRONT PANEL .................................................................................................................................................................. 2-1
2.3.1 Left Section................................................................................................................................................................ 2-1
2.3.2 Right Section ............................................................................................................................................................ 2-3
2.4 THE REAR PANEL ..................................................................................................................................................................... 2-5
2.5 Printer............................................................................................................................................................................................... 2-5
2.6 RELATED Equipment ................................................................................................................................................................. 2-6
2.6.1 TFT EAS Receiver Modules .................................................................................................................................. 2-6
2.6.2 TFT Program/Transmitter Interrupt unit............................................................................................................... 2-6
2.7PRE-INSTALLATION INFORMATION ................................................................................................................................. 2-6
2.7.1 Obtaining a Copy of Operational Area/State Plan ............................................................................................. 2-6
2.7.2 Obtaining Two FCC Assigned Stations to Monitor ........................................................................................... 2-6
2.7.3 Optional/Additional Monitoring ........................................................................................................................... 2-6
2.8INSTALLATION SUMMARY FORM ..................................................................................................................................... 2-6
SECTION III - PRE-INSTALLATION CHECKOUT
3.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................................ 3-1
3.2PRIMARY POWER APPLICATION ........................................................................................................................................ 3-1
3.3 Not available ................................................................................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.4 TEST WITH ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT ............................................................................................................................. 3-1
3.4.1 Test with EAS Receiver Modules.......................................................................................................................... 3-1
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CONTENTS (Continued)
SECTION III - PRE-INSTALLATION CHECKOUT (Continued)
Paragraph Title Page
3.4.2 Test with EAS 940A Program / Transmitter Interrupt Unit ............................................................................. 3-1
3.5 TESTING THE PRINTER........................................................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.6TESTING THE DIGITAL VOICE RECORDER..................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.7TESTING WITH A VIDEO CHARACTER GENERATOR ................................................................................................ 3-2
SECTION IV - PROGRAMMING THE EAS DECODER
4.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................................ 4-1
4.2 EAS MESSAGE OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................................................... 4-1
4.2.1 The EAS Header ...................................................................................................................................................... 4-2
4.2.2 Two-Tone Attention Signal..................................................................................................................................... 4-2
4.2.3 Getting Started........................................................................................................................................................... 4-2
4.3 SET STATION TIME ZONE...................................................................................................................................................... 4-2
4.4SET CURRENT DATE/TIME..................................................................................................................................................... 4-4
4.5DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENABLE .................................................................................................................................... 4-4
4.6NOT AVAILABLE ........................................................................................................................................................................ 4-4
4.7SET STATION FIPS CODE......................................................................................................................................................... 4-5
4.8SET STATION IDENTIFICATION CODE.............................................................................................................................. 4-5
4.9NOT AVAILABLE ........................................................................................................................................................................ 4-5
4.10CHANGE PRIMARY PASSWORD ........................................................................................................................................ 4-6
4.11CHANGE SETUP PASSWORD .............................................................................................................................................. 4-6
4.12RECOVER LOST PASSWORD ............................................................................................................................................... 4-6
4.13SELECT EVENTS TO AUTO FORWARD ........................................................................................................................... 4-6
4.14ADD LOCATIONS TO AUTO FORWARD ......................................................................................................................... 4-7
4.15VERIFY OR DELETE LOCATIONS TO AUTO FORWARD ......................................................................................... 4-7
4.16NOT AVAILABLE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 4-7
4.17NOT AVAILABLE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 4-7
4.18VOICE RECORDER INSTALLED? ........................................................................................................................................ 4-7
4.19NOT AVAILABLE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 4-7
4.20NOT AVAILABLE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 4-7
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CONTENTS (Continued)
SECTION IV - PROGRAMMING THE EAS DECODER (Continued)
Paragraph Title Page
4.21ENABLE CHAR GEN INTERFACE ....................................................................................................................................... 4-8
4.22NOT AVAILABLE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 4-9
4.23SET LCD SCREEN CONTRAST ............................................................................................................................................ 4-9
4.24RECORD VOICE ANNOUNCEMENT ................................................................................................................................. 4-9
4.25VERIFY VOICE ANNOUNCEMENT ................................................................................................................................... 4-9
4.26NOT AVAILABLE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 4-9
4.27 NOT AVAILABLE …...…………………………………………………………………………………………..4-9
4.28SET ALERT TIMEOUT.............................................................................................................................................................. 4-9
4.29SET ONE-BUTTON MANUAL FORWARD ........................................................................................................................ 4-9
4.30 ENABLE CG TEXT FOR RWT…………………………………………………………………………………..4-9
4.31 SET AUTO MODE TIMER………………………………………………………………………………………4-9
4.32 RECORD ALERT VOICE MESSAGE…………………………………………………………………………..4-9
4.33 VERIFY ALERT VOICE MESSAGE……………………………………………………………………………4-9
SECTION V - INSTALLATION
5.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................................ 5-1
5.2 AUDIO OUTPUT LEVEL ADJUSTMENT ........................................................................................................................... 5-1
5.3 DECODER AUDIO INPUT LEVEL ADJUSTMENT .......................................................................................................... 5-2
5.4 DIGITAL INTERFACE J103 (RS-232) ................................................................................................................................... 5-2
5.5 DIGITAL INTERFACE J104 (RS-232) ................................................................................................................................... 5-2
5.6THE ON-AIR RELAY .................................................................................................................................................................. 5-2
5.7 THE ALERT RELAY .................................................................................................................................................................. 5-3
5.8 PRINTER/SPEAKER INHIBIT (J109)................................................................................................................................ 5-3
5.9-5.12 NOT AVAILABLE…………………………………………………………………………………………….5-3
5.13 Comm INPUT EXPANDER, FIELD INSTALLATION .................................................................................................... 5-3
5.14FRONT PANEL PRINTER, FIELD INSTALLATION ....................................................................................................... 5-3
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SECTION VI - OPERATION
Paragraph Title Page
6.1 INTRODUCTION ..... ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6-1
6.2 FRONT PANEL LEFT SECTION ..........................................................................................................................………….6-1
6.2.1 Use of the HELP Key and HELP Menu ............................................................................................................... 6-1
6.2.2-5 NOT A VAILABLE.................................................................................................................................................. 6-2
6.2.6 Use of the CANCEL Key....................................................................................................................................... 6-3
6.2.7 Use of the PRACTICE Key for Off-Air Testing and Training......................................................................... 6-3
6.2.8 The EAN/EAT Operations...................................................................................................................................... 6-3
6.3 LCD SCREEN, PRINTER, SPEAKER AND CONTROL KEYS ....................................................................................... 6-3
6.3.1 General Discussion .................................................................................................................................................. 6-3
6.3.2 Use of the Up () and Down () Arrow Keys ................................................................................................... 6-3
6.3.3 Use of the EXIT Key ............................................................................................................................................... 6-3
6.3.4 Speaker Volume Adjustment ................................................................................................................................. 6-3
6.3.5 Print Message from the LCD Screen .................................................................................................................... 6-3
6.4 FRONT PANEL RIGHT SECTION……………………………… .................................................................... ……….6-4
6.4.1 LED Indicators ......................................................................................................................................................... 6-4
6.4.2 Manual and Auto Forward Mode Selection ........................................................................................................ 6-4
6.4.3 Reviewing Previous EAS Messages ..................................................................................................................... 6-5
6.4.4 Acknowledging the Last EAS Message and Resetting the Alert Relay ......................................................... 6-5
6.4.5 Manually Forwarding an EAS Message After Review...................................................................................... 6-5
6.4.6 Message Priority…………………………………………………………………………………………6-5
6.5 FUNCTIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE OPERATION MENU ...................................................................................... 6-6
6.5.1 The Operation Menu ................................................................................................................................................ 6-6
6.5.2 Review Received Messages .................................................................................................................................... 6-6
6.5.3 Review Transmitted Messages ............................................................................................................................... 6-6
6.5.4 Test On-Air Relay..................................................................................................................................................... 6-6
6.5.5 Test Alert Relay ........................................................................................................................................................ 6-6
6.5.6 Set Output Level: On-Air Relay Open.................................................................................................................. 6-6
6.5.7 Set Output Level: On-Air Relay Closed............................................................................................................... 6-6
6.5.8 Set Printer Operation……………………………………………………………………………………..6-6
6.5.9 Set Message Hold………………………………………………………………………………………..6-7
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SECTION VII NOT AVAILABLE FOR MODEL 911D
SECTION VIII - AM/FM RECEIVER
Paragraph Title Page
8.1 SPECIFICATIONS .................................................................................................................................................................. 8-1
8.2 AM RECEIVER MODULE BLOCK DIAGRAM DESCRIPTION .............................................................................. 8-1
8.3 FM RECEIVER MODULE BLOCK DIAGRAM DES CRIPTION................................................................................ 8-3
8.4 REAR PANEL CONTROLS AND CONNECTORS ........................................................................................................ 8-5
8.5 FM RADIO ANTENNA INSTALLATION........................................................................................................................ 8-5
8.6 AM ANTENNA INSTA LLATION ...................................................................................................................................... 8-5
8.7 RECEIVED SIGNAL STRENGTH INDICATION (RSSI) ............................................................................................. 8-5
SECTION XI - THEORY OF OPERATION
9.1 THE EAS INFORMATION SUPER HIGHWAY............................................................................................................. 9-1
9.2 THE EAS DECODER: AN OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................................... 9-1
9.3 A CLOSER LOOK: SYSTEM BLOCK DIAGRAM ....................................................................................................... 9-2
9.4 MAIN BOARD ........................................................................................................................................................................ 9-2
9.4.1 Audio Loop Through and Switching..................................................................................................................... 9-3
9.4.2 Digital Signal Processor/CPU................................................................................................................................. 9-3
9.4.3 Input/Output Control................................................................................................................................................ 9-3
9.5 LEFT SECTION KEYPAD.................................................................................................................................................... 9-3
9.6 RIGHT SECTION KEYPAD................................................................................................................................................ 9-3
9.7 LIQUID CRYSTAL (LCD) DISPLAY ............................................................................................................................... 9-3
9.8 DIGITAL VOICE RECORDER ........................................................................................................................................... 9-3
9.9 PRINTER .................................................................................................................................................................................. 9-3
9.10 COM EXPANDER .................................................................................................................................................................. 9-3
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SECTION X - MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR
Paragraph Title Page
10.1 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................................................... 10-1
10.2 TOOL AND TEST EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS ..................................................................................................... 10-1
10.3 ROUTINE MAINTENANCE ................................................................................................................................................ 10-1
10.3.1 Calibration................................................................................................................................................................ 10-1
10.3.2 Audio Levels .......................................................................................................................................................... 10-1
10.3.2.1 Audio Output Level Adjustment.......................................................................................................................... 10-1
10.3.2.2 Decoder Audio Input Level Adjustment ............................................................................................................ 10-1
10.3.3 Lithium Battery Replacement ............................................................................................................................. 10-2
10.4 PRINTER .............................................................................................................................................................................…..10-2
10.4.1 Operator Information ............................................................................................................................................ 10-2
10.4.2 Paper Roll Replacement ....................................................................................................................................... 10-3
10.4.3 Ribbon Cartridge Replacement............................................................................................................................................ 10-4
10.4.4 Printer Supply Ordering Information.................................................................................................................................. 10-4
10.5 DIAGNOSTICS AND REPAIR ............................................................................................................................................ 10-5
10.6 TROUBLESHOOTING .......................................................................................................................................................... 10-6
10.7 TFT CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT .................................................................................................................. 10-6
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A - ENGINEERING DRAWINGS
APPENDIX B - PARTS LISTS
APPENDIX C - FIPS CODE LISTINGS
APPENDIX D - MENU LISTINGS
APPENDIX E - VIDEO CHARACTER GENERATOR INTERFACE
APPENDIX F - ORIGINATOR AND EVENT CODE TRANSLATIONS
APPENDIX G - GLOSSARY OF EAS DECODER TERMS
1-1
SECTION I
GENERAL INFORMATION
1.1 INTRODUCTION
This EAS DECODER User’s Guide is arranged in TEN sections, as follows:
Section I: General Information
A general description of the EAS DECODER, its specifications, general information on the FCC designator,
warranty and damage claim procedures, and technical support information.
Section II Getting To Know Your EAS DECODER and Related Equipment
Overview of the various system components of the EAS DECODER and related equipment. Control and
Indicator functions, basic component functions, and their interconnection.
Section III: Pre-Installation Checkout
Some basic test methodology on the EAS DECODER and its related equipment. The user should find it useful
to perform the tests in this section with all the EAS DECODER equipment on a lab bench.
Section IV: Programming The EAS DECODER
Detailed description of setup procedures of various EAS DECODER system parameters, e.g. system date
and time, station FIPS codes, Auto Forward events and locations selection.
Section V: Installation
Instruction for installing and adjusting various system components of the EAS DECODER.
Section VI: Operation
Describes operational details of the system, including procedures to decode an EAS message.
Section VI: Not Used
This section has been intentionally deleted.
Section VIII: AM/FM Receiver
Detailed description of the AM/FM receiver modules parameters, e.g. specifications, block diagrams, front and
rear panels control and indicators, as well as antenna installations.
Section XI: Theory of operation
A general description of the EAS Information Super Highway network, overview of the EAS DECODER and
brief Circuit description of each module.
Section X: Maintenance and Repair
Describes routine maintenance procedures and tools and equipment requirements.
1.2 EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION
The EAS DECODER is a combined Emergency Alert System (EAS) Decoder and Receivers that enables broadcasters and
cablecasters to receive, store, forward Emergency Alert Messages as required by the FCC’s EAS Rules. By using the
EAS digital protocol prescribed by the FCC, the EAS DECODER can function as a sentinel to alert operators to the
receipt of emergency messages. Forwarding of only certain messages with a minimum of operator intervention can be
achieved selectively, simply, and automatically.
Although the EAS DECODER stores all received messages, it only forwards and interrupts programming for those
messages that meet broadcasters’ or cablecasters’ specific instructions. These instructions, protected by two levels of
security, relieve the operator of needing to make crucial decisions at critical times. Emergency messages can then travel
quickly and efficiently through the Emergency Alert System.
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The EAS DECODER has two operating modes: automatic and manual. In automatic mo de, only those messages which meet
specific criteria are forwarded to the transmitter. With the exception of the required national level events, only messages
“tagged” by management are allowed to interrupt programming. For minimal or unattended operation, the EAS DECODER
can perform all the critical emergency alert functions in automatic mode with the voice recorder without operator assistance.
For manual mode, no messages are forwarded, except for required national level messages, unless sent by an operator. All
incoming messages are recorded, and their header information is stored and available for review or subsequent manual
forwarding.
An digital voice message recording unit makes an incoming audio message of up to two minutes always available for the
operator’s immediate review. The operator can then decide whether to forward the last message received after review of the
complete header and voice announcement. With the EAS DECODER voice recorder it is not necessary for the operator to
transcribe or remember text. An LCD display gives the operator instant access to the last ten messages either received or
sent. The digital voice message recorder allows automatic forwarding.
Two audio inputs and one RS-232 data input are standard on the EAS DECODER to connect to receivers for the two required
monitoring assignments of the new EAS. A single audio output connects to external audio switching and distribution
systems or to a TFT transmitter/program interrupt unit. This interrupt unit provides four balanced, isolated input and output
channels that are switched to a combined common signal during an emergency message transmission. The common audio
output provided by the EAS DECODER contains all the header, Attention Signal and EOM codes in proper EAS format for
emergency alerting.
1.3 SPECIFICATIONS
The EAS DECODER performance and physical specifications are listed in Table 1.3-1.
Table 1.3-1. EAS DECODER Specifications
Front Panel
Protocol ……………………………………FCC EAS codes, 520.83 bits per second. 2083.3 Hz mark and 1562.5 Hz space
frequency, ASCII 8 bit characters.
Attention Signal ………………………… 853 and 960 Hz +5 Hz. User programmable duration
PASSWORD Key …………………………Enables 3-digit password entry for operator level. Additional 3-digit
Password required for program changes.
CANCEL Key …………………………… Interrupts operation in progress and returns system to Banner mode.
HELP Key …………………………………Prints out operational help and program menus.
PRACTICE Key ...……………………… Allows closed-loop test for training and unit performance verification.
SEND HEADER Key …………………… Activates transmit relay and sends pre-constructed header message
SEND EOM Key ………………………… Activates transmit relay and sends End Of Message code
LOCATION(S) Keys …………………… 14 key for user-assigned locations
ON-AIR RELAY LED ……………………. Indicates that the On-Air relay is closed
REVIEW Key ...................…………….. Allows review of last message received
LED Indicators ………………………… Three yellow LEDs to indicate incoming EAS channel, two analog and one
digital.
Two yellow LEDs to indicate AUTO or MANNUAL mode of operation and one
red LED to show status of the Alert relay
1-3
SPEAKER Key …………………………Turns speaker ON and OFF; monitors inputs
PRINT Key ………..…………………….Commands the front panel printer to print the item shown on the LCD
Screen
ENTER, EXIT, UP
& DOWN Keys …………………..…….. Assist initial setup and programming of the equipment
REAR PANEL
Audio Inputs …………………………….Two audio inputs from receivers. Balanced or unbalanced, 10 k-ohms,
0.35 Vp -p to 2 Vp -p, expandable to 6 channels.
Data Channels ………………………….RS-232, 1200 baud ASCII, one for input, and one for output
Audio Output ……………………………-10 to +10 dBm, 600-ohm balanced, XLR connector
On-Air Relay …………………………….Relay contact closure, energized when a selected message is decoded for
automatic forwarding or when the Encoder is activated
Message/Alert Relay………………………Relay contact closure, energized when an EAS message is decoded
Printer/Speaker Inhibit ............................. Connects to external switch or relay contacts. Normal operation on contact open.
Printing and Speaker operation inhibited (muted) on contact closure COM2......................……………..COM Port Expander
MECHANICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL
Input Power.................................................................................................................... …117 VAC ±10%, 60Hz, 50 watts maximum.
Operating Temperature ………………………………………………………………………………0 °C to 50 °C
Size .......................................................................................................................................................................5.25" H x19" W x10" D
Net Weight............................................................................................................................................................. Approximately 14 lbs
Shipping Weight ................................................................................................................................................. Approximately 16 lbs.
1.4 FCC DESIGNATOR
The EAS DECODER Emergency Alert System Decoder is Type-Certified under FCC Part 15, and Type-Certified
under Part 11. The FCC designator is BIOEAS911D.
1.5 WARRANTY INFORMATION
The following warranty policy and limitations are applicable to the Model 911D EAS DECODER.
TFT, Inc. warrants each manufactured Model 911D EAS DECODER to meet published specifications and to be free
from defects in material and workmanship. TFT will repair or replace, at its expense, for a period of one (1) year
from the date of shipment of equipment, all parts which are defective from faulty material or workmanship. This
Warranty does not cover equipment which has been misused and/or altered by the user. Units found to be defective
during the warranty period shall be returned to TFT with transportation charges prepaid by the BUYER. It is
expressly agreed that replacement and repair shall be the sole remedy of the SELLER with respect to any
non-conforming equipment and parts thereof, and shall be in lieu of any other remedy available by applicable law.
All returns to the factory must be authorized in advance by TFT. Upon examination by the factory, if any Model
911D EAS DECODER Equipment is found to be defective, the unit will be repaired and returned to the BUYER
with transportation charges prepaid by TFT during the warranty period. Transportation charges for the Model 911D
EAS DECODER units found to be defective within the first 30 days of the warranty period will be paid both ways
by TFT. Transportation charges for warranty returns wherein failure is found not to be the fault of
1-4
TFT or one year after the delivery of the equipment shall be paid both ways by the BUYER. This warranty does not
apply to equipment which, in the opinion of the SELLER, has been altered or misused.
1.5 WARRANTY INFORMATION (Continued)
NO OTHER WARRANTY IS EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED. TFT IS NOT LIABLE FOR ANY
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES.
1.6 CLAIMS FOR DAMAGE IN SHIPMENT
Your instrument should be inspected and tested by the method given in Section II of this manual as soon as it is
received. If the instrument is damaged in any way or fails to operate properly due to transportation damage, file a
claim with the carrier or, if insured separately, with the insurance company.
1.7 TECHNICAL SUPPORT
OUR CUSTOMER SERVICE FOR EAS PRODUCTS IS AVAILABLE FROM 8:00AM TO 5:00PM PACIFIC
TIME MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY. PLEASE CONTACT US IF YOU NEED ASSISTANCE
TFT, Inc.
2243 Ringwood Avenue
San Jose, CA 95131
Tel: (408) 943-9323 Ext. 300 Fax: (408) 432-9218
2-1
SECTION II
GETTING TO KNOW YOUR EAS DECODER AND RELATED EQUIPMENT
2.1 INTRODUCTION
This section provides an overview description of the EAS DECODER equipment including Front Panel controls and
indicators, Rear Panel connectors, options and other related peripheral equipment.
2.2 UNPACKING & INSPECTION
Upon receiving the equipment, inspect its shipping container and contents for shipping damage. Keep all packing
material until equipment performance is confirmed.
If any of the equipment is damaged or fails to operate properly due to transportation damage, file a claim with the
transportation company or, if insured separately, with the insurance company.
The following items should come with the equipment. Please notify TFT if any items are missing.
Description Part No Qty
Model 911D User’s Guide 5004-911D 1
Power Cord 1950-7742 1
Warranty Notice 3002-0002 1
2-PIN Female Terminal Block Connector 1700-1203 4
3-PIN Female Terminal Block Connector 1700-1205 2
6-PIN Female Terminal Block Connector 1700-5007 1
AM Loop Antenna 2140-7215 1
Rack Mount Screws 2110-0013 4
Rack Mount Washers 2115-0001 4
2.3 THE FRONT PANEL
The EAS DECODER Front Panel is a collection of input switches and output LEDs, LCD screen, and Printer.
Functionally they are grouped into two categories as illustrated in Figure 2.3.1 and 2.3.2 and described in paragraphs
2.3.1 and 2.3.2.
2.3.1 Left Section
The left section includes all the command keys as well as the 10 numeric keys. Detailed description on the usage and
operation of the keys can be found in this Section.
2-2
Figure 2.3-1. Decoder Front Panel Left Section Controls and Indicators
Table 2.3-1. Decoder Front Panel Left Section Controls and Indicators
ITEM TITLE FUNCTION
Note:
All EAS DECODER switches are momentary action pushbutton type, and are
referred to as keys. All keys have built-in yellow LED illuminators. Some keys
are electronically aided to function as toggles or latches.
1 LEFT SECTION A group of keys and indicators used for control of left section of the EAS
DECODER.
PASSWORD
Key. Used to access the Operational Mode and the Setup Menu.
CANCEL
THIS THIS THIS THIS
Key. May be used to clear inputs or return to a previous entry mode. During
manually forwarded messages, pressing CANCEL deactivates the ON-AIR
relay and aborts message transmission.
HELP Key. Provides access to help menus in Ready, Operation and Setup modes.
PRACTICE Key. Prevents the ON-AIR relay from being activated so that message
decoding operations may be practiced without on-air program interruption.
ON-AIR RELAY LED Indicator. illuminated whenever the ON-AIR relay is activated.
SEND HDR
(Send Header)
Key. When flashing, activates the ON-AIR relay and sends the programmed
or repeated EAS header information.
SEND EOM Key. When flashing, SEND EOM activates the ON-AIR relay and sends the
EAS End Of Message code.
2 Not used
3 1 to 0 Numeric Keys Used for setup, programming and entering passwords
4 LCD Screen 16-character by 1-line LCD display screen. Displays date, time, header, setup,
and help information.
5 Speaker Speaker. Outputs the inputs and Header, Message, and End of Message
(EOM) audio and CH1, CH2 Receivers output
2-3
2.3.2 Right Section
The right section of the front panel includes the command keys/LEDs, the LCD Display Screen and the Printer.
Detailed descriptions of the usage and operation of the keys are contained in Table 2.3-2.
Figure 2.3-2. Decoder Controls and Indicators
Table 2.3-2. Decoder Controls and Indicators
ITEM TITLE FUNCTION
1 LCD 16-character by 1-line LCD display screen. Displays date, time,
header, setup, and help information. Displayed data scrolls right to
left to accommodate messages longer than 16 characters.
2 A group of six keys with functions as marked
ENTER Selects menu items displayed on the LCD screen, and is used in
Encoder and Decoder operations.
EXIT Exits the current menu and returns to the previous menu or Ready
mode. If pressed while in Banner Mode (Time/Date Display), displays
software version. If pressed and held for several seconds, causes the
software to execute a POWER UP RESET sequence.
PRINT Causes the item displayed on the LCD Screen to print out on the
optional front panel printer.
Arrow or Increment/Decrement keys. The Increment key () scrolls
upward through menus, or when the SPEAKER key is pressed,
increases the speaker volume.
The decrement key (∇) scrolls downward through menus, or when the
SPEAKER key is pressed, decreases the speaker volume.
2-4
SPKR
When pressed, activates the speaker on Channel 1. Each time the
key is pressed, it advances the speaker to the next channel.
3 Printer Optional 24-column printer. Produces hard copy of EAS messages
and Program and Help menus.
4 AM RECEIVER Receiver module for AM broadcast band (540 - 1720 kHz)
Figure 2-2. AM Receiver Module Edge-Mounted Controls and Indicators
RF & AUDIO Yellow LED. Flashes when an RF signal is detected which is above the
minimum level of 20 µV and has audio modulation.
TP1 Test point for RF Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) monitoring
1 MHz, 100 kHz, 10 kHz Rotary switches for setting receive frequency
DX/LO Local/Distant switch for setting receiver sensitivity
5 FM RECEIVER Receiver module for FM broadcast band (88 - 108 MHz)
Figure 2-3. FM Receiver Module Edge-Mounted Controls and Indicators
RF & AUDIO Yellow LED. Flashes when an RF signal is detected which is above the
minimum level of 10 µV and has audio modulation.
TP1 Test point for RF Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) monitoring
1 MHz, 100 kHz, 10 kHz Rotary switches for setting received frequency
DX/LO Local/Distant switch for setting receiver sensitivity
6 A group of four keys and six LEDs which function as marked:
MSG WAITING Key. This key begins flashing when a valid EAS message has been
received. The message will scroll on the LCD Screen and remote
electronic signs.
MODE Key. Each time key is pressed, the EAS DECODER operating mode
toggles between Manual and Auto. (with password protection)
MANUAL FWD Pressing this key in conjunction with the PASSWORD key, forwards
the last EAS messages received when in Ready mode.
CH 1, 2, 3, 4, D A group of five LED indicators. Channel 1 to 4 audio activity LEDs
turn on if the channel input level exceeds -10 dBm.
The D LED indicates receipt of data on the RS-232 channels.
ALERT RELAY LED indicator. Lights, and the rear panel Alert Relay contacts close
when a valid EAS message is received.
MAN , AUTO Two LED indicators which light to show the current operating mode
(Manual or Automatic). When the AUTO LED is lit, the unit will
automatically forward messages for events and locations specified in
the Setup Menu.
2-5
2.4 THE REAR PANEL
The EAS DECODER Rear Panel has Input/Output connectors for EAS related equipment. Figure 2.3-3 shows the
Rear Panel Configuration.
Figure 2.3-3. Rear Panel Connectors
Table 2.3-3. Rear Panel Connectors
ITEM TITLE FUNCTION
1 J101 AUDIO OUTPUT XLR connector. Provides balanced audio output for transmission of
EAS messages.
2 J102 CH 1, 2 AUDIO INPUT 6-pin connector on the Audio Input. Provides two balanced inputs for
audio from EAS sources.
3 COM 2 RS-232 9-pin D-connector on the COM Port Expander Board. Provides an
RS-232 port for use as a character generator interface.
4 120VAC/60 Hz
FUSE: 2A Recessed IEC connector with built-in fuse holder for a standard U.S.
120 VAC, 60 Hz line cord.
5 J107 MSG/ALERT RELAY 2-wire relay contact. Relay is normally open. Relay contacts close
when a valid EAS message header is decoded.
6 ON-AIR RELAY 2-wire relay contact. Relay is normally open. Relay contacts close
when an EAS message is transmitted.
7 J104 RS-232 9-pin D-connector. Provides a bi-directional RS-232 port for data
output at 1200 baud.
8 J103 RS-232 9-pin D-connector. Provides a bi-directional RS-232 port for data input
at 1200 baud.
9 J109 PRINTER/SPEAKER INHIBIT 2-pin connector. Provided to inhibit the printer and mute the speaker.
10 RF INPUT RECEIVER 2 Type “F” connector for RF input to FM receiver
11 RF INPUT RECEIVER 1 2-pin connector for RF input to AM receiver
12 AUDIO OUT ADJ RECEIVER 1 Audio output level adjustment pot for Receiver 1
13 AUDIO OUT RECEIVER 1 Audio output connector for Receiver 1
14 AUDIO OUT ADJ RECEIVER 2 Audio output level adjustment pot for Receiver 2
15 AUDIO OUT RECEIVER 2 Audio output connector for Receiver 2
2-6
2.5 Printer
A 24-column printer is provided to record EAS messages received and transmitted. In addition, it is useful for
printing HELP menus.
2.6 RELATED EQUIPMENT
The EAS DECODER can accommodate various external equipment to comprise a complete Emergency Alert
System. Some of this equipment is described in the following paragraphs.
2.6.1 TFT EAS 930A Multi-Module Receiver
The TFT Model 930 Receiver System is a separate, 1-3/4" rack-mount chassis. It can accommodate up to four
different plug-in receiver types:
AM
FM
NOAA Weather Radio
(Spare)
These receivers can be used as sources for the EAS DECODER audio inputs. This allows a user to plug up to four
different receivers into the chassis, then connect them to the EAS DECODER. There is one output per receiver. A
separate data sheet is available for the TFT EAS 930 receiver.
2.6.2 TFT EAS 940A Program/Transmitter Interrupt Unit
The TFT Model EAS 940 Program transmitter Interrupt unit interrupts a station's audio program to insert an EAS
Header and voice message. Normal program audio is resumed at the conclusion of the message.
The EAS 940 has four program inputs, an EAS audio input and four program outputs. During an EAS alert, the
EAS audio is routed to all four program outputs. It uses internal audio relays, and it connects to ON-AIR relay
contacts J106 and audio output J4 on the EAS DECODER rear panel. The EAS 940 can be located up to 2,000 feet
from the EAS DECODER.
2.7 PRE-INSTALLATION INFORMATION
Before installing your TFT EAS DECODER, you should be familiar with the requirements of Part 11 of the FCC
rules. The TFT EAS Handbook includes a complete set of these rules along with helpful diagrams.
2.7.1 Obtaining A Copy of the Operational Area/State Plan
The TFT EAS DECODER is very flexible and can be adapted to your Operational Area/State Plan. To obtain a copy
of the plan, contact your State’s Emergency Coordinator or the broadcast representative for your operational area.
Names of State and local contacts are available from the FCC EAS office in Washington, D.C.
2.7.2 Obtaining Two FCC-Assigned Stations to Monitor
The EAS requires monitoring two stations in your area. These stations are listed in the operational Area/State Plan
and in the FCC Mapbook, which is also available from the FCC EAS office in Washington, D.C. In most, but not all
cases, the FCC assigned stations will be AM or FM broadcast stations.
2.7.3 Optional/Additional Monitoring
In addition to the FCC assigned stations it may be desirable to monitor other sources and originators of emergency
information who may transmit EAS protocol messages, such as NOAA Weather Radio and local government
authorities.
2.8 INSTALLATION SUMMARY FORM
Completing the information on the following work sheets before programming the EAS DECODER will greatly
reduce the time required to program the Decoder during the initial setup.
2-7
INSTALLATION SUMMARY SHEET
2.8.1 FCC Monitoring Assignment, CH 1 ________ ____________
(Station) (Frequency)
2.8.2 FCC Monitoring Assignment, CH 2 ________ ____________
(Station) (Frequency)
2.8.3 FCC Monitoring Assignment, CH 3 ________ ____________
(Station) (Frequency)
2.8.4 FCC Monitoring Assignment, CH 4 ________ ____________
(Station) (Frequency)
2.8.5 Not applicable
2.8.6 My Station's FIPS Code: __ __ __ __ __
2.8.7 My Station's ID: __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
2.8.8 Time Zone of my station ____________ _______________________
Zone Hours to UTC - GMT
2.8.9 Not applicable
2.8.10 Events to Auto Forward:
_________________________ _________________________
(Event) (Event)
_________________________ _________________________
(Event) (Event)
_________________________ _________________________
(Event) (Event)
2.8.11 Not applicable
2.8.12 Locations to Auto Forward:
__________________________________________________ _______________
(Name) (FIPS)
__________________________________________________ _______________
(Name) (FIPS)
__________________________________________________ _______________
(Name) (FIPS)
__________________________________________________ _______________
(Your State) (0SS000)
USA 000000
__________________________________________________ _______________
3-1
SECTION III
PRE-INSTALLATION CHECKOUT
3.1 INTRODUCTION
This section describes a functional bench test to be performed before installing and programming the EAS
DECODER according to the procedures given in Section IV. By completing the pre-installation checkout, the user
can be certain that the equipment is operating properly.
3.2 PRIMARY POWER APPLICATION
When power is applied to the EAS DECODER, the front panel LEDs may blink momentarily, the LEDs will
extinguish, and the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) Screen will show the date and time. The EAS DECODER will be
in the Ready Mode, monitoring the audio inputs for incoming EAS messages.
3.3 Not Available
3.4 TEST WITH ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT
3.4.1 Test with EAS Decoder Receiver Module
Connect the Audio Output of the EAS DECODER Receiver to the EAS DECODER Channel 1 Audio Input at J102
of the EAS DECODER Rear Panel. Press the SPKR key and listen to the EAS DECODER broadcast Audio Output
through the EAS DECODER speaker.
At this time it may be convenient to set the audio input levels to the EAS DECODER Receiver. Use an oscilloscope
or audio voltmeter to set the input voltages to approximately 1.5 Volt peak-to- peak.
3.4.2 Test with EAS 940A Program/Transmitter Interrupt Unit
Refer to the instructions for the EAS 940 Program/Transmitter Interrupt Unit.
3.5 TESTING THE PRINTER
The printer can be tested by pressing the PRINT key on the EAS DECODER front panel. The 24-column printer
will print out the text displayed on the LCD.
3.6 TESTING THE DIGITAL VOICE RECORDER
Enter the primary and setup passwords by pressing the following Front Panel keys: PASSWORD, 9, 1, 1,
PASSWORD, 9, 1, 2. Press the Arrow keys until the LCD Screen displays "21 RECORD". Press ENTER twice to
start the Digital Voice Recorder recording.
Press EXIT after recording is completed. The Digital Voice Recorder immediately plays back the announcement
that was just recorded. Press EXIT to exit.
3.7 TESTING WITH A VIDEO CHARACTER GENERATOR
Refer to the Character Generator operation manual.
4-1
SECTION IV
PROGRAMMING THE EAS DECODER
4.1 INTRODUCTION
The EAS DECODER can be programmed to customize its configuration and to automate its operation. EAS
DECODER programming techniques are described in this section.
4.2 EAS MESSAGE OVERVIEW
A four-part message is used to activate the Emergency Alert System:
1. Preamble and EAS Header Codes
2. Two-tone audio Attention Signal*
3. Voice or text message*
4. Preamble and EAS End Of Message (EOM) Codes.
* Not used in the required weekly tests.
The message is shown pictorially in Figure 4.2-1.
THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THI
Figure 4.2-1 EAS Message Timing Diagram
4-2
The Preamble and EAS Header Codes are transmitted using Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) at a rate of 520.83 bits
per second. Mark frequency is 2083.3 Hz, and Space frequency is 1562.5 Hz. Mark and Space times are 1.92
milliseconds. Characters are ASCII 7-bit as defined in ANSI X3.4-1977.
The Attention Signal is transmitted after the EAS header codes and is made up of two simultaneously transmitted
tones. The fundamental frequencies of these tones are 853 and 960 Hz.
4.2.1 The EAS Header
The EAS header consists of seven segments:
Preamble Sync Code
Originator ID*
Event Code*
Location code (including county subdivision code)*
Event Duration
Time Stamp *
Station ID*
* Requires user programming before installation.
Details of these codes are described in the FCC Rules and Regulations Part 11 Section 11.3/EAS Protocol and in
Appendix C of this guide.
The following paragraphs provide a user guide for setting the programmable segments of the EAS Header.
4.2.2 Two-Tone Attention Signal
The two-tone attention signal is the same as the old EBS: 853 Hz and 960 Hz tones. It is used only in the required
monthly tests and activation of the EAS. It is not used in the required weekly test.
The duration of the two-tone signal is factory programmed at 8 seconds, however its duration is user programmable
up to 25 seconds. See Section 4.9 for details.
4.2.3 Getting Started
Programming the EAS DECODER requires entry of a Primary Password and a Setup Password to allow access to
the Setup Menu. The default passwords are 911 and 912, respectively. See Section 4.10 and 4.11 for information on
changing the default passwords. Proceed as follows:
1. Enter the Primary password by pressing PASSWORD and entering 911, the 3-digit password, using the
0-9 numeric keys under LOCATION(S).
2. Press PASSWORD and enter 912, the Setup password. The LCD Screen will display SETUP MENU
briefly.
Once the correct passwords have been entered, the LCD Screen will display SETUP MENU briefly then
display the first menu item: 1. SET CURRENT DATE/TIME
Use the Arrow keys (∆ ∇) to scroll through the Setup Menu items. The Setup Menu items are listed in Table 4.3-1.
When a desired menu item is displayed, press ENTER to select it.
4.3 SET STATION TIME ZONE
This command permits setting the number of hours that must be added to local Standard Time to reach Universal
Coordinated Time (UTC), also known as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Proceed as follows:
1. Use the Arrow keys to change to menu item 2.
2. Press the ENTER key while 2. SET STATION TIME ZONE is displayed on the LCD Screen. The
Arrow keys can be used to adjust the offset from -12 to +12 hours.
3. Press ENTER to accept the correct displayed UTC offset.
4-3
Table 4.3-1. Setup Menu Items
Menu Item Refer to Manual Section
1. SET CURRENT DATE/TIME 4.4
2. SET STATION TIME ZONE 4.3
3. DAYLIGHT SAVING? 4.5
4. NOT AVAILABLE 4.6
5. SET STATION FIPS CODE 4.7
6. SET STATION IDENTIFICATION CODE 4.8
7. NOT AVAILABLE 4.9
8. CHANGE PRIMARY PASSWORD 4.10
9. CHANGE SETUP PASSWORD 4.11
10. SELECT EVENTS TO AUTO FORWARD 4.13
11. ADD LOCATIONS TO AUTO FORWARD 4.14
12. VERIFY OR DELETE LOCATIONS TO AUTO FORWARD 4.15
13. NOT AVAILABLE 4.15
14. NOT AVAILABLE 4.16
15. NOT AVAILABLE 4.17
16. VOICE RECORDER INSTALLED? 4.18
17. NOT AVAILABLE 4.19
18. ENABLE CHAR GEN INTERFACE 4.20
19. NOT AVAILABLE 4.21
20. SET LCD CONTRAST 4.22
21. RECORD VOICE ANNOUNCEMENT 4.23
22. VERIFY VOICE ANNOUNCEMENT 4.24
23. NOT AVAILABLE 4.25
24. NOT AVAILABLE 4.26
25. SET ALERT TIMEOUT 4.27
26. SET ONE-BUTTON MANUAL FORWARD 4.28
27. ENABLE CG TEXT FOR RWT 4.29
28. SET AUTO MODE TIMER 4.30
29. NOT AVAILABLE 4.31
30. NOT AVAILABLE 4.32
31. NOT AVAILABLE 4.32
32. NOT AVAILABLE 4.32
4-4
UTC offsets for the U.S. are listed in Table 4.3-2.
Table 4.3-2. UTC Offsets for the U.S.
TIME ZONE UTC OFFSET
Eastern Standard Time + 05 Hours
Central Standard Time + 06 Hours
Mountain Standard Time + 07 Hours
Pacific Standard Time + 08 Hours
Alaskan Standard Time + 09 Hours
Hawaiian Standard Time + 10 Hours
Note
The UTC offset is always calculated with respect to standard time, not daylight
saving time.
4.4 SET CURRENT DATE/TIME
This menu sets the current date and local time.
Press the ENTER key while 1. SET CURRENT DATE/TIME is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The LCD Screen will display the current date and time in 24-hour format.
EXAMPLE:
JAN 01 95 18:00
JAN will flash, indicating that it may be changed using the Arrow (∆ ∇) keys.
After finding the correct month with the Arrow keys, press ENTER to accept the displayed month. The Day, Year,
Hour and Minute are set in the same manner.
Clock seconds are not shown, but are zeroed when ENTER is pressed for selecting the desired minute.
4.5 DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENABLE
Daylight saving time starts at 2 a.m. standard time on the first Sunday in April and ends on the last Sunday in
October at 2 a.m. daylight time. The EAS DECODER automatically adjusts the local time for daylight saving time if
enabled. Proceed as follows:
1. Press the ENTER key while 3. DAYLIGHT SAVING? is displayed on the LCD Screen. The LCD
Screen will then display DST: ENABLE or DST: DISABLE.
2. When the desired condition is displayed on the LCD Screen, press ENTER to accept it.
EXAMPLE:
DST: ENABLE appears on the LCD Screen. If necessary, press Arrow key or to toggle to DST: DISABLE.
When the desired condition is displayed on the LCD Screen, press ENTER to accept it.
Recommended: Set for daylight saving time ENABLE.
4.6 NOT AVAILABLE
4.7 SET STATION FIPS CODE
The Federal Information Processing System (FIPS) code (See Appendix C of this Guide) consists of six digits:
4-5
PSSCCC.
P Defines a subdivision, and must be 0 for station FIPS identification.
SS Is a 2-digit State code.
CCC Is a 3-digit County code.
Stimulus: Press the ENTER key while 5. SET STATION FIPS CODE is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The LCD Screen will display the currently selected station FIPS code.
EXAMPLE:
STATION: 006085
Flashing digits will prompt for entry of the 2-digit state code followed by the 3-digit county code. Use
numeric keys 0-9 to enter FIPS code digits. The key will backspace; the key will forward space. After
the last digit is entered, the selected location will be displayed to prompt the operator to accept it. Press
ENTER to accept the displayed FIPS code. Press EXIT to cancel an entry.
EXAMPLE:
006085 SANTA CLARA CA
The 006085 will be stationary and flashing; SANTA CLARA CA will scroll from right to left.
For the Cable Version of the EAS 911:
Press the SUBDIVISION key.
ZONE: code appears on the LCD, when code is ALL or 1 to 16.
Use the arrow keys () to scroll through the list of 16 zones.
Select a zone for encoding by pressing the ENTER key. The presence of the indicates that the zone is
selected. Pressing the ENTER key will toggle the diamond () to change the status of each zone.
Press EXIT to confirm and end.
4.8 SET STATION IDENTIFICATION CODE
This is the call sign of a broadcast station or other identification of a cable station, or NWS office transmitting or
forwarding the message. This code is automatically affixed to all outgoing messages by the EAS encoder. It is
limited to 8 characters.
1. Press the ENTER key while 6. SET STATION IDENTIFICATION CODE is displayed on the LCD
Screen.
The LCD Screen will display the currently selected identification code.
EXAMPLE:
WAAA/FM is displayed on the LCD Screen.
W will begin flashing, indicating that it may be changed using the Arrow keys.
After finding the correct alphanumeric character with the Arrow keys, press ENTER to accept.
A will begin flashing, indicating that it may now be changed in the same way using the Arrow keys and the
ENTER key to accept.
This procedure is repeated until all the characters have been updated.
4.9 NOT AVAILABLE
4.10 CHANGE PRIMARY PASSWORD
The primary password is used for Encoder access and consists of 3 digits. It is set to 911 at the factory and is
configurable from 000 to 999.
Press the ENTER key while 8. CHANGE PRIMARY PASSWORD is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The LCD Screen will display the current primary password.
EXAMPLE:
4-6
911 PRIMARY is displayed on the LCD Screen. The first digit, 9, will begin flashing, indicating that it
may be changed by pressing one of the numeric entry keys 0-9. After a digit is entered, the next digit will
begin flashing. After all three digits have been entered, the entire password will flash, prompting for
verification.
EXAMPLE:
911 VERIFY will be displayed, with 911 flashing. Press ENTER to accept; press EXIT to leave the
password unchanged.
4.11 CHANGE SETUP PASSWORD
The Setup Password is used for Setup Menu access and consists of 3 digits. It is set to 912 at the factory and is
configurable from 000 to 999.
Press the ENTER key while 9. CHANGE SETUP PASSWORD is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The LCD Screen will display the current Setup password.
EXAMPLE:
912 SETUP is displayed on the LCD Screen, with 9 flashing. The Setup password may be changed in the
same manner as the Primary password.
4.12 Recover Lost Password
If a password is lost or forgotten, the default passwords can be restored by entering the following key sequence
when in Ready mode:
Press CANCEL, EVENT CONFIRM. The LCD will display PRESS PASSWORD. Do NOT press
PASSWORD, but wait for the date and time to return to the LCD.
Each of the following key entries will cause PRESS PASSWORD to appear in the LCD. Do NOT press
PASSWORD, but WAIT FOR THE DATE AND TIME TO RETURN before pressing the next key:
Press 4, 0, 8, 7, 2, 7, 7, 2, 7, 2, LOCATION CONFIRM. (Do This SLOWLY)
You will hear a beep indicating that the default passwords have been restored. The default Primary password
is 911; the default Setup password is 912. A 2 kHz tone will acknowledge restoration of the default
passwords.
4.13 SELECT EVENTS TO AUTO FORWARD (See Appendix F for Listing)
EAS events may be selected for auto forwarding. When in Auto Mode, the event code contained in a header will be
compared with the event codes selected for automatic forwarding to decide if the message should be forwarded.
In Auto Mode, priority EAN and EAT events will be forwarded automatically without
delay. In Manual Mode, EAN and EAT events must be manually forwarded without delay.
Press ENTER while 10. SELECT EVENTS TO AUTO FORWARD is displayed on the LCD Screen. The
first EAS event will be displayed. The event will appear in a static display, the description will scroll.
EXAMPLE:
ADR Administrative Message
The character indicates that the event has been selected for automatic forwarding. If the diamond is absent,
the event has not been selected. The ENTER key selects or deselects an event.
The Arrow keys select the next event in alphabetical order. The ENTER key is again used to choose to
forward the next displayed event. The process continues until all events have been defined. Press EXIT to
end.
4.14 ADD LOCATIONS TO AUTO FORWARD (See Appendix C for Listing)
A list of locations to Auto Forward may be specified. When in Auto Mode, the location code contained in a
header will be compared with the location codes selected for automatic forwarding to decide if the message
should be forwarded. A maximum of 256 locations may be forwarded.
Press ENTER while 11. ADD LOCATIONS TO AUTO FORWARD is displayed on the LCD Screen. The
LCD Screen will display a location of 000000.
4-7
EXAMPLE:
FORWARD: 000000 appears on the LCD Screen.
Flashing digits prompt for entry of the 2-digit state and 3-digit county code. Use the numeric 0-9 keys to enter
FIPS code digits. the key will backspace; the key will forward space. When the last digit is entered, the
selected location will be displayed for acceptance.
EXAMPLE:
006085 SANTA CLARA CA
The FIPS code will flash in a static display; a description of that location will scroll. Press ENTER to add the
location displayed; press EXIT to reject it.
More locations may be added in the same manner. Duplicate locations are not permitted.
Model 911 (Cable versions of the EAS 911) have the capability of addressing additional zones through an RF
modulator when used with the TFT cable in-home alerting device. Zone programming is described in Section 4.15
below.
4.15 VERIFY OR DELETE LOCATIONS TO AUTO FORWARD
This menu item permits verification or deletion of location codes previously selected for automatic forwarding.
Press ENTER while 12. VERIFY OR DELETE LOCATIONS TO AUTO FORWARD is displayed on the
LCD Screen.
The first of the locations selected for automatic forwarding is displayed on the LCD Screen. The FIPS code is
shown in a static display, and a description of that location scrolls.
EXAMPLE:
006085 SANTA CLARA, CA appears on the LCD Screen.
The indicates that this location has been selected for automatic forwarding. The ENTER key will toggle the
diamond off/on, changing the status of each location. The and keys can be used to scroll through the list.
Press EXIT after deleting locations to forward.
Press ENTER to accept changes to the list of locations to forward. If EXIT is pressed, no changes will be
made. Duplicate locations are allowed.
For the Cable Version of the EAS 911:
Press the SUBDIVISION key.
ZONE: code appears on the LCD, when code is ALL or 1 to 16.
Use the arrow keys (∆ ∇) to scroll through the list of 16 zones.
Select a zone for auto forward by pressing the ENTER key. The presence of the indicates that the zone is
selected. Pressing the ENTER key will toggle the diamond () to change the status of each zone
Press EXIT to confirm and end.
4.16 NOT AVAILABLE
4.17 NOT AVAILABLE
4.18 VOICE RECORDER INSTALLED?
Verify the presence of the internal voice recorder.
Press ENTER while 16. VOICE RECORDER INSTALLED? is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The LCD Screen will dis play VOICE RECORDER YES (NO).
YES indicates that the voice recorder is installed and enabled. NO indicates that the voice recorder is not
installed or it is not enabled. Hardware will detect the presence of the voice recorder and automatically enable
it if installed. This function can be used to enable or disable the voice recorder via software.
4.19 NOT AVAILABLE
4.20 NOT AVAILABLE
4-8
4.21 ENABLE CHAR GEN INTERFACE
This command enables or disables the character generator interface.
The COM2 port on the Four Port Communications Expander Option Module sends serial data to remote character
generators using RS-232 levels. The TFT Standard Interface protocol specifications are found in Appendix C.
Press ENTER while 18. ENABLE CHAR GEN INTERFACE is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The LCD Screen will display STD. It will then scroll the following: Standard TFT I/F for BSS, Frontline, and D
Co. EAS Systems
The following six submenus are available:
CHAR_GEN_I/F:OFF
STD Standard TFT I/F for BSS, Frontline, and D Co. EAS Systems
CODI Direct Interface to CHYRON CODI
VDS Direct Interface to VDS 840
ALT1 Alternate TFT I/F for Trilithic EAS Systems
ALT2 Alternate TFT I/F for Next Level EAS Systems
Use the Arrow keys to select the desired submenu, then press ENTER to select the displayed setting.
ALTERNATE 1 commands are described in Appendix E.
If the TFT standard interface is enabled, a character generator must communicate properly in the TFT protocol in
order for the EAS 911 to forward EAS alerts automatically. If the TFT interface is enabled and a character
generator is not connected or communicating, all auto-forwarded messages will be aborted. A message can always
be manually forwarded to allow the audio to be transmitted even if the character generator is not connected. If the
CODI interface is enabled, messages will not be aborted if the CODI is not connected.
If the CODI interface is selected by pressing ENTER when CHYRON CODI I/F is displayed, you may use the
arrow keys and ENTER to select the sub menus listed below. Again use the arrow keys to select the desired
value and press ENTER to store the value. Press the EXIT key to move one level up in the menu selection
process. The factory set default parameters are shown first in the menu listing below.
Note:
Horizontal Phase, Subcarrier Phase and Key Delay should only be adjusted
using the alignment procedures described in the Chyron CODI Operator
Manual.
SET CHAR HEIGHT Height = 5 (range is 1-7)
SET COLOR Color:White (also Magenta, Blue, Cyan, Yellow, Green, Red, Black)
SET CRAWL SPEED Speed = 2 (range is 1-6)
SET CRAWL COUNT Crawl Count = 2 (range is 1-8)
SET DISPLAY LINE Line = 50 (range is 30-160)
SET HORIZ PHASE H Phase = 0 (range exceeds ± 90)
SET SUBCA PHASE SubC Phase = 0 (range exceeds ± 90)
SET KEY DELAY Key Delay = 0 (range is ± 10)
If the VDS interface is selected by pressing ENTER when VDS I/F is displayed, you may use the arrow keys and
ENTER to select the submenus listed below. Again use the arrow keys to select the desired value and press
ENTER to store the value. Press the EXIT key to move one level up in the menu selection process. The factory
set default parameters are shown first in the menu listing below.
SET CHAR HEIGHT Height = 3 (range is 1 to 4)
SET COLOR Color:White (also Yellow Cyan, ,Green, Magenta, Red, Blue or Black)
4-9
SET CRAWL SPEED Speed = 2 (range is 1-3)
SET CRAWL TIME Time = 1 (range is 1-9 min)
SET DISPLAY LINE Line = 50 (range is 40-100)
SET VDS EDITOR ON or OFF When ON, the ALERT RELAY will close during EAS
transmission to control VDSs second COM port. The relay will stay closed
until the VD’s timeout. If it is OFF, all operation is normal.
4.22 NOT AVAILABLE
4.23 SET LCD SCREEN CONTRAST
This menu item is used to set the LCD Screen contrast. There are 4 contrast levels (0 to 3), with 0 giving the least,
and 3 giving the most contrast.
Press ENTER while 20. SET LCD CONTRAST is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The LCD Screen displays the current LCD Screen contrast setting.
EXAMPLE:
LCD CONTRAST: 2 is displayed on the LCD Screen.
Press the Arrow keys to select other contrast settings. The LCD Screen will reflect the new contrast setting.
Press ENTER to accept the displayed setting. Press EXIT for no change.
4.24 RECORD VOICE ANNOUNCEMENT
An announcement may be prerecorded for later playback. To record the announcement, the Voice Recorder must be
enabled. The maximum announcement duration is 25 seconds.
Press ENTER while 21. RECORD VOICE ANNOUNCEMENT is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The LCD Screen will display a bar graph of the signal level on CH1. The audio from CH1 will be heard
through the speaker. Use the bar graph to adjust the input signal level. Press ENTER to begin recording. The
LCD Screen will display the elapsed duration as the announcement is recorded.
EXAMPLE:
RECORDING 01
Press EXIT to terminate recording. After the announcement has been recorded, it will automatically be
replayed. Press EXIT to end.
4.25 VERIFY VOICE ANNOUNCEMENT
The prerecorded voice announcement can be played back from the Voice Recorder. The Voice Recorder must be
enabled and the announcement must have been recorded previously.
Press ENTER while 22. VERIFY VOICE ANNOUNCEMENT is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The SPKR LED lights to allow adjustment of speaker volume.
The LCD Screen will display: ANNOUNCEMENT: 25 (or the length of the recorded announcement in
seconds).
The speaker will play back the prerecorded announcement.
The LCD Screen will count down as the announcement is replayed. Press EXIT to interrupt playback and
return to the Setup Menu.
4.26 NOT AVAILABLE
4.27 NOT AVAILABLE
4.28 SET ALERT TIMEOUT
Press ENTER while 25. SET ALERT TIMEOUT is displayed on the LCD. The LCD will display 2
MINUTES. Use the arrow keys to select the desired Alert Timeout from 2 to 15 minutes, then press ENTER to
accept. The Alert Timeout is used to artificially terminate an alert sequence that did not conclude with a proper
EOM (End of Message).
4.29 SET ONE-BUTTON MANUAL FORWARD
4-10
Press ENTER while 26. SET ONE-BUTTON MANUAL FORWARD is diplayed on the LCD. The LCD will display
FAST FWD: YES (NO). Use the arrow keys to select YES or NO, then press ENTER to accept. See section 6.4.5 for
details on manually forwarding messages. CAUTION: One-Button Manual Forward bypasses password protection. This
menu item also enables a One-Button Manual Forward from EAS 941A Remote Control/Status Modules connected to the
EAS 911.
4.30 ENABLE CG TEXT FOR RWT
This menu item allows the user to enable or disable the text output to an external character generator for the Required
Weekly Test.
Press ENTER while 27. ENABLE C.G. TEXT FOR RWT is displayed on the LCD Screen. RWT CG: NO will
be displayed. Use the or key to select RWT CG:YES if desired. Press ENTER when the desired setting is
displayed.
4.31 SET AUTO MODE TIMER
This menu item allows the user to program the EAS 911 to automatically switch between AUTO and MANUAL mode at
selected times.
Press ENTER while 28. SET AUTO MODE TIMER is displayed on the LCD Screen. AUTO MODE: OFF will be
displayed. Use the or key to select AUTO MODE: ON if desired. Press ENTER when the desired setting is
displayed.
If AUTO MODE: ON is selected, SET AUTO ON will be displayed next. Press ENTER to allow entry of time to
switch AUTO mode ON. AUTO ON: 00:00 will be displayed. Use the and keys to select the hour, then press
ENTER. Use the and keys again to select the minute, then press ENTER. SET AUTO ON will now be
displayed. Use the and keys to display SET AUTO OFF and press ENTER to enter the time to switch AUTO
mode OFF. AUTO OFF: 00:00 will be displayed. Use the and keys to select the hour, then press ENTER. Use
the and keys again to select the minute, then press ENTER. SET AUTO OFF will now be displayed. Press
EXIT to return to the Setup Menu.
The AUTO/MANUAL mode can still be set manually from the front panel. However, if the Auto Mode Timer is
enabled, it will override the mode at the first occurrence of the ON or OFF time. If the ON time is set equal to the OFF
time, the Auto Mode Timer will have no effect on the mode.
4.32 RECORD ALERT VOICE MESSAGE
An alert voice message may be prerecorded for later playback with the next manually encoded or manually forwarded
message. To record the announcement, the Voice Recorder must be installed and enabled. Connect the audio source to
the Channel 1 (CH1) audio input of J102 on the EAS 911 rear panel. The maximum announcement duration is 2 minutes.
This recording will be superceeded by the next EAS voice message.
Press ENTER while 29. RECORD ALERT VOICE MESSAGE is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The LCD Screen will display a bar graph of the signal level on CH1. The audio from CH1 will be heard through the
speaker. Use the bar graph to adjust the input signal level. Press ENTER to begin recording. The LCD Screen will
display the elapsed duration as the announcement is recorded.
EXAMPLE:
RECORDING 01
Press EXIT to terminate recording. After the message has been recorded, it will automatically be replayed. Press
EXIT to end.
4.33 VERIFY ALERT VOICE MESSAGE
The prerecorded alert voice message can be played back from the Voice Recorder. The Voice Recorder must be installed
and enabled, and the message must have been recorded previously.
Press ENTER while 30. VERIFY ALERT VOICE MESSAGE is displayed on the LCD Screen.
The SPKR LED will light to allow adjustment of speaker volume.
The LCD Screen will display: ANNOUNCEMENT: 120 (or the length of the recorded announcement in seconds.
The speaker will play back the prerecorded message.
4-11
The LCD Screen will count down as the message is replayed. Press EXIT to interrupt playback and return to the Setup
Menu.
4.34 NOT AVAILABLE
4.35 NOT AVAILABLE
5-1
SECTION V
INSTALLATION
5.1 INTRODUCTION
This section describes the installation of the EAS DECODER and its related options and equipment after it has been
programmed according to methods described in Section IV. The EAS DECODER installation requires the Encoder
output and Decoder input level adjustment, as well as connecting the various optional and related equipment onto
the EAS DECODER Rear Panel.
Electrical ground for the EAS DECODER is established through the AC power cord. If a mo re substantial technical
ground is available, it may be connected to the chassis box directly, using a short piece of braid. Proper grounding,
good engineering practice, and safety depend on the knowledge and care of the installing engineer.
The EAS DECODER is designed to mount in a 19” rack or cabinet using (4) 12-24 pan head machine screws.
Mounting requirements: Size: 5.25”H x 19”W x 10”D Maximum. Weight: Approximately 14 lbs.
Power requirements: Input power: 117 VAC @ 60 Hz, 50 watts maximum, 3 Prong Power Cord - UL style SVT
Environmental requirements: 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F).
General Hazards:
a. Elevated Operating Ambient Temperature - If installed in a closed or multi-unit rack assembly, the
operating ambient temperature of the rack environment may be greater than room ambient.
Therefore, consideration should be given to installing the equipment in an environment compatible with the
maximum rated ambient temperature.
b. Reduced Air Flow - Installation of the equipment in a rack should be such that the amount of air flow
required for safe operation of the equipment is not compromised.
c. Mechanical Loading - Mounting of the equipment in a rack should be such that a hazardous condition is not
achieved due to uneven mechanical loading.
d. Circuit Overloading - Consideration should be given to the connection of the equipment to the supply
circuit and the effect that overloading of the circuit might have on overcurrent protection and supply
wiring.
e. Reliable Earthing - Reliable earthing of rack-mo unted equipment should be maintained. Particular attention
should be given to supply connections other than direct connections to the branch circuit (e.g., use of power
strips)
5.2 AUDIO OUTPUT LEVEL ADJUSTMENT
FCC regulations state that Broadcast stations are responsible for ensuring that the equipment for generating the EAS
codes and the Attention Signal can modulate a broadcast station transmitter at no less than 80% of main channel
modulation. Measured at peak modulation levels, each of the Attention Signal tones should modulate the transmitter
at not less than 40%. These two calibrated modulation levels should have values that are within 1 dB of each other.
This procedure sets the proper signal level at the audio output of the EAS DECODER Connections are made to the
AUDIO OUTPUT, J4, with a standard XLR connector.
1. Enter the primary password. the LCD Screen will display SELECT EVENT.
2. Press the ENTER key in the Decoder section of the front panel. The LCD Screen will display
OPERATION MENU briefly and then display REVIEW RECEIVED MESSAGES .
3. Use the Arrow (∆ ∇) keys to scroll through the Operations Menu to SET OUTPUT LEVEL: ON-AIR
RELAY OPEN.
5-2
4 Press the ENTER key to select. The LCD Screen will display LEVEL: 2. 2 Vp-p
5 Adjust the audio output level by using the Arrow keys while reading the level indication on the LCD
Screen. As the Arrow keys are pressed, the output level will be incremented or decremented in 0.1 Volt
steps Press ENTER to accept an indicated output. Set the output to comply with the modulation
percentage stated above.
5.3 DECODER AUDIO INPUT LEVEL ADJUSTMENT
This procedure adjusts the signal level to the EAS DECODER Decoder at J102. Connections are made with the
supplied mating connectors for J102. The pins are numbered from left to right when viewing the back panel.
Pinouts are defined as:
Pin Description
1 CH3 + AUDIO INPUT
2 CH3 SHIELD GROUND
3 CH3 - AUDIO INPUT
4 CH4 + AUDIO INPUT
5 CH4 SHIELD GROUND
6 CH4- AUDIO INPUT
Note:
The Decoder input can accommodate signals at levels of 0.5 Vp-p to 2 Vp-p. It is
desirable to keep the Decoder input level at 1.5 Vp-p to utilize its full dynamic
range.
1. Connect the received audio source to J102, Channel 3.
2. Press the SPKR key to activate the speaker on Channel 3. The LCD Screen will show the channel
number followed by the audio signal level in bar chart form.
3. Observe the incoming level of the source.
4. If necessary, adjust the monitoring source output level for proper indication. Do not allow audio level
to exceed 2 V on peaks.
5. Each time the SPKR key is pressed, it advances to the next channel in sequence. The speaker mutes
after the last channel is exited. The SPKR LED illuminates when the speaker is active.
6. Repeat Steps 1 through 4 for J102, Channel 4, 5, 6 .
5.4 DIGITAL INTERFACE J103 (RS-232)
The Digital Interface J103 RS-232 Port is the digital data input required by 11.33(a)(1) of the FCC Rules. It is
mandated to be RS-232C with standard protocol and 1200 baud rate. Although it could be used, as described by the
FCC, for Radio Broadcast Data System (RBDS), NWR, satellite, public switched telephone network, or other
sources that may in future applications use EAS protocol, no specific standard is defined. Therefore, this interface
connector is reserved for future expansion.
5.5 DIGITAL INTERFACE J104 (RS-232)
The Digital Interface J104 RS-232 Port is the digital data output required by 11.32(a)(3) of the FCC Rules. It is
mandated to be for data messages (RS-232C with standard protocol and 1200 baud rate) for future applications.
5.6 THE ON-AIR RELAY
The On-Air Relay operates (closes) when the EAS Decoder is in Auto mode and a valid and "tagged" EAS message
is received, or when a message is manually forwarded. The relay provides a single set of dry contacts, rated 60DVC,
3A. Contacts are Normally Open. The relay can be used to control the TFT Model 940 Program/Transmitter
Interrupt unit.
The On-Air Relay closes only when the 911D transmits a header, attention signal, voice recording, or EOM.
5-3
5.7 THE ALERT RELAY
The Alert Relay operates (closes) when a valid EAS header is detected by the Decoder. The relay provides a single
set of dry contacts, rated 3 A 250 VAC. Contacts are Normally Open. When the relay operates, it remains closed
until reset either locally or by remote control, or upon detection of an EOM. If no EOM is detected the relay will
reset after 2 minutes except during an EAN or EAT alert.
Note:
Receipt of an EAN or EAT alert defeats the manual reset capability of the Alert
Relay. When an EAN or EAT alert is received, the relay will reset only upon
detection of an EOM.
The Alert Relay contacts are available at rear panel connector J107.
5.8 PRINTER/SPEAKER INHIBIT (J109)
This 2 pin connector is provided to inhibit (mute) the printer and speaker when desired. A normally open switch or
relay can be connected to J109. When the contacts are open, the EAS DECODER printer and speaker will operate
normally. When the contacts are closed, the speaker will be muted and the printer will be disabled. Incoming
messages will continue to be logged and can be printed at the operator's convenience.
5.9 NOT AVAILABLE
5.10 NOT AVAILABLE
5.11 NOT AVAILABLE
5.12 NOT AVAILABLE
5.13 COMM EXPANDER, FIELD INSTALLATION
The optional COMM Expander can be plugged into the EAS Decoder Main PCB J113 Connector . It provides
communication links to the following EAS 911D related equipment.
COM 2
This 9 pin J302 connector is provided on the 4-Port Communications Expander Option Module. It is an RS-232C interface
intended for the character generator interface and is configured for the TFT protocol.
5.14 FRONT PANEL PRINTER, FIELD INSTALLATION
The Printer can be installed into the right Front Panel opening of the EAS 911D (See Figure 5.11-1). Ribbon cable is then
installed to connect the Printer into J122 connector of the EAS 911D Main Board. See Section 8.4.1 to change paper and
paper specifications.
5.15 NOT AVAILABLE
6-1
SECTION VI
OPERATION
6.1 INTRODUCTION
This section describes EAS DECODER operating procedures.
A Primary, or Operator password must be entered into the EAS DECODER. A Secondary, or Setup Password is
required, in addition, to set or make changes in operating parameters. As shipped from the factory, the EAS
DECODER has Primary and Secondary passwords programmed to default values of 911 and 912, respectively.
6.2 LEFT SECTION
Figure 6-1. Front Panal Left Section Controls and Indicators
6.2.1 Use of the HELP Key and HELP Menu
The HELP key provides two types of help: a comprehensive menu of topics and an On-Line help system that
provides specific information about a mode or operation. Both types of Help messages can be printed by the front
panel printer.
The comprehensive list of topics can be accessed in Ready mode by pressing the HELP key. A list of Help topics
will be printed and and will be displayed on the LCD screen. For further information on any topic, enter the topic's
two-digit number using the 0-9 numeric keys and press the HELP key. Sub-topics will be printed and will be
displayed on the LCD screen. Enter the desired sub-topic's three digit number and press HELP. Help information for
the sub-topic will be displayed and printed.
Example: 404. To print screen: Press the PRINT key to print what is shown on the LCD screen.
On-Line Help is available when modes or operations have been selected in the Operation and Setup Menus. Press
HELP to obtain specific information about a mode or operation.
All Help topics are listed in Table 6.2.1.
6-2
Table 6.2.1 EAS DECODER Help Menus
10. Password Help 50. Encoder Setup Help
101 Access to Encoder 501 To Set Current Date/Time
102 Access to Setup Menu 502 To Set Station Time Zone
103 To Change Passwords 503 Daylight Saving?
104 Password Lost 504 To Set Station Originator Code
20. Encoder Operation Help 505 To Set Station FIPS Code
201 NOT AVAILABLE 506 To Set Station Identification Code
202 NOT AVAILABLE 507 To Set Attention Signal Duration
203 NOT AVAILABLE 508 NOT AVAILABLE
204 NOT AVAILABLE 509 NOT AVAILABLE
205 NOT AVAILABLE 510 NOT AVAILABLE
206 NOT AVAILABLE 60. Decoder Setup Help
207 NOT AVAILABLE 601 To Select Events to Auto Forward
208 NOT AVAILABLE 602 To Add Locations to Auto Forward
209 NOT AVAILABLE 603 To Verify or Delete Locations to Auto Forward
210 NOT AVAILABLE 70. Accessory Setup Help
30. Decoder Operation Help 701 To Enable Character Generator Interface
301 To Acknowledge a New Message 702 Voice Recorder Status
302 To Change Between Automatic and
Manual Mode 703 NOT AVAILABLE
303 To Manual Forward a Message 704 To Record Voice Announcement
304 To Review Received Message Log 705 To Verify Voice Announcement
40. Audio/Printer Operation Help 706 To Enable CPU Interface
401 To Set Output Level On-Air 707 To Install Program Interrupt Unit
402 To Set Output Level Off-Air 708 To Enable Remote Control Status Modules
403 Speaker Volume Adjustment 80. Maintenance and Technical Support Help
404 To Print Screen 801 To Replace Printer Paper
803 TFT Customer Service
6.2.2 Not available
6.2.3 Not available
6.2.4 Not available
6.2.5 Not available
6-3
6.2.6 Use of the CANCEL Key
The CANCEL key may be used to return to a previous entry mode. During transmission of manually forwarded messages,
CANCEL may be pressed to deactivate the ON-AIR relay and abort message transmission.
THE cancel key may be used to extinguish the flashing MSG WAITING LED when a message is not to be forwarded.
Press the flashing MSG button once to advance to MANUAL FWD, then press the CANCEL button to cancel the flashing
MSG WAITING LED.
6.2.7 Use of the PRACTICE Key for Off-Air Testing and Training
The Practice mode permits use of the EAS DECODER for test and training without activating the On-Air relay or an
external Video Character Generator.
Press the PRACTICE key in Ready mode to enter the Practice mode. The PRACTICE key will illuminate. The
On-Air relay will be deactivated, and no data will be transmitted to a video character generator. All functions of the
EAS DECODER will be available in Practice mode.
Practice transmissions will not be entered into the transmit log. Printouts of practice transmissions will include the
designation "PRACTICE." The unit will exit Practice mode before automatically forwarding an EAS message.
6.2.8 The EAN/EAT Operations
The EAN event code (Emergency Action Notification) is reserved to notify broadcast stations, cable systems,
industry and the general public that the EAS has been activated by the President for a national emergency.
The EAT event code (Emergency Action Termination) is similarly reserved to give notice that the EAN has been
terminated.
In the event of a national emergency, the EAN header will be transmitted, followed by a Presidential message and
concluded with an EAT when appropriate.
Neither the EAN nor the EAT codes can be initiated by the EAS DECODER, but EAN and EAT will be forwarded
in either manual or automatic mode.
6.3 LCD SCREEN, PRINTER, SPEAKER AND CONTROL KEYS
6.3.1 General Discussion
The Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) Screen, Speaker, and Printer are used to: 1.) Program the encoder and review
messages; 2.) Monitor audio inputs and messages, and 3.) Print the transmit and receive logs, displayed messages
and menus, respectively.
6.3.2 Use of the Up and Down Arrow Keys
The Up and Down Arrow Keys (or Increment and Decrement keys) are used to scroll up and down menus and
to increment and decrement alphanumeric characters in certain menus. They are also used to set the speaker volume.
6.3.3 Use of the EXIT Key
The EXIT key is used to exit the current menu or mode and return to the previous menu or Ready mode. During
manual or automatic forwading of an EAS message, EXIT aborts message transmission. Pressing EXIT
momentarily in Ready mode will cause the current software revision to appear in the LCD. Pressing EXIT for three
or more seconds will act as a system reset causing the unit to return to Ready mode.
6.3.4 Speaker Volume Adjustment
The speaker volume can be adjusted with the SPEAKER and Arrow keys.
In the Ready mode and during transmit, press the SPEAKER key. The SPEAKER key will illuminate, and the
volume can be increased or decreased with the Arrow keys. Press ENTER to accept.
In Setup mode and in 21. Record Voice Announcement or 22. Verify Voice Announcement, press SPEAKER.
The speaker key will illuminate, and the volume can be increased or decreased with the Arrow keys. Press ENTER
to accept.
In Operation mode and in SET OUTPUT LEVEL: ON-AIR RELAY OPEN (or CLOSED) press SPEAKER. The
speaker key will illuminate and the volume can be increased or decreased with the Arrow keys. Press ENTER to
accept.
6.3.5 Print Message from the LCD Screen
Pressing the PRINT key causes the item displayed on the LCD screen to be printed. A time stamp is appended to all
printer output.
6-4
6.4 Front Panel Right Section
The front panel right section manages all functions associated with incoming EAS signals. Those functions include:
Monitoring and decoding incoming EAS headers
Providing alert signals upon receipt of valid headers
Monitoring incoming audio signals through the speaker and with LED indicators
Setting Manual and Auto Forward modes
Reviewing Transmit and Receive message logs
Decoder Front Panel Right Section are shown in Figure 6.3-1.
Figure 6.3-1 Decoder Controls and Indicators
THIS THIS THIS
6.4.1 LED Indicators
The LED Indicators monitor audio activity on Channels 1 and 2. When the input signal level to a Channel exceeds
-10 dBm, its LED will illuminate.
The Channel D LED monitors the RS-232 Channels and illuminates upon receipt of data.
6.4.2 Manual and Auto Forward Mode Selection
Incoming EAS messages can be forwarded Automatically or Manually with operator intervention. In Automatic
mode, messages are forwarded immediately upon receipt. In Manual mode, messages can be reviewed by an
operator before being forwarded. The MODE key toggles between the Manual and Automatic operating modes.
1. Press the MODE key. The LCD screen will display PASSWORD?, and the PASSWORD key will begin
flashing.
2. Enter the primary password. The Mode will toggle from Manual to Auto, or vice-versa. The current
Mode will be indicated by a yellow LED.
6-5
6.4.3 Reviewing Previous EAS Messages
The last EAS message can be reviewed from Ready mode by pressing the REVIEW key. The last message will scroll
on the LCD screen, and the voice message will be heard through the speaker.
As many as ten messages can be buffered in the Received Message Log. To view the messages in the log:
1. Enter the Primary Password. The LCD screen will display SELECT EVENT.
2. Press the ENTER key. The LCD screen will display OPERATION MENU briefly, then REVIEW
RECEIVED MESSAGES.
3. Press ENTER.
4. The LCD screen will display 01 and the last received message. If a diamond character () follows the 01,
it indicates that the message has not yet been printed.
5. Use the Arrow keys to scroll through the messages.
6. Press the PRINT key to print any of the messages.
6.4.4 Acknowledging the Last EAS Message and Resetting the Alert Relay
When an EA S message is received, The MSG WAITING key will begin flashing, the Alert Relay LED will
illuminate, and the alert relay contacts will close. After reading the message scrolling on the LCD screen,
acknowledge receipt of the message by pressing the MSG WAITING key. The Alert Relay contacts will open, its
LED will extinguish and the MSG WAITING LED will extinguish.
6.4.5 Manually Forwarding An EAS Message After Review
After reviewing an EAS message, it can be forwarded as follows:
1. Press the MANUAL FWD key. The LCD will display PASSWORD?
2. Enter the Primary password. The message will be displayed on the LCD, and the SEND HDR key will
flash. Press the SEND HDR key. The LCD will display SENDING HEADER, and the Header will be
forwarded. The LCD will then display SEND VOICE/EOM, and SEND HEADER and SEND EOM
keys will flash
3. Press the SEND HEADER key to send the recorded alert voice message. If the recorded message is not
desired, studio personnel can insert a local message from your audio console without pressing the SEND
HEADER key.
4. Press the SEND EOM key. The LCD will display SENDING EOM.
5. The EAS DECODER will return to Ready mode.
If One-Button Manual Forward is enabled, a message can be forwarded by pressing the MANUAL FORWARD key.
The header, two-tone attention signal, voice message and EOM will be transmitted automatically. Before
forwarding, the recorded voice may be reviewed by pressing MSG WAITING, then REVW. CAUTION: One-
Button Manual Forward bypasses password protection.
6.4.6 Message Priority
The Decoder uses an internal priority scheme to determine how to process multiple messages. The four levels of priority
are:
a. National events (EAN/EAT):
National events have the highest priority and will interrupt all other events that are in progress, regardless of
whether they have been queued through the Message Hold feature (see 6.5.9).
b. Normal events (Flood, Blizzard, etc.):
Normal events will be interrupted by new (different) events, unless the original event is in the process of being
auto-forwarded. In Manual mode, the original event may be queued by the operator to prevent a new event from
interrupting the manual forward process until it is completed.
c. Test messages (RWT and DMO):
Test messages can be forwarded (manually or automatically) if another event is not in progress, but will not
interrupt a Normal or National evene for 15 minutes after it is received, or until that event has been forwarded.
d. Duplicate and Expired messages:
6-6
Duplicate (identical to a previously received messasge, except for Station ID) and Expired ( duration of the event
has expired) messages have the lowest priority, and are placed in the Receive Log and printed. They canot be
forwarded and will not interrupt another message.
6.5 FUNCTIONS AVAILABLE FROM THE OPERATION MENU
6.5.1 The Operation Menu
The Operation Menu: 1.) Provides access to the transmit and receive logs; 2.) Permits testing of the On-Air and Alert
relays; 3.) Permits adjustment of the output audio signal level; 4.) Provides options for Printer and Message handling; and
5) Permits testing of cable RF Modulator.
To access the Operation Menu, enter the Primary Password, then press ENTER. The LCD screen will display
OPERATION MENU briefly, then 1. REVIEW RECEIVED MESSAGES .
6.5.2 Review Received Messages
Use the Arrow keys to scroll to 1. Review Received Messages. Press ENTER to review the messages. Messages will
be numbered from 1 to 10 and will be in the order from most recent (1) to the earliest (10) Use the Arrow keys to
move from one message to another; press ENTER to review the message. A diamond () next to the message
number indicates that the message has not yet been printed on the front panel printer.
6.5.3 Review Transmitted Messages
Use the Arrow keys to scroll to 2. Review Transmitted Messages. Press ENTER to review the messages. Messages
will be numbered from 1 to 10 and will be in the order from most recent (1) to the earliest (10) Use the Arrow keys
to move from one message to another; press ENTER to review the message. A diamond () next to the message
number indicates that the message has not yet been printed on the front panel printer.
6.5.4 Test On-Air Relay
Use the Arrow keys to scroll to 3. Test On-Air Relay. Press ENTER to close the On-Air relay contacts. The red
ON-AIR LED will illuminate and the relay contacts will close for two seconds. After two seconds, the relay will
open, and the LED will turn off.
6.5.5 Test Alert Relay
Use the Arrow keys to scroll to 4. Test Alert Relay. Press ENTER to close the Alert relay contacts. The red ON-AIR
LED will illuminate and the relay contacts will close for two seconds. After two seconds, the relay will open , and
the LED will turn off.
6.5.6 Set Output Level: On-Air Relay Open
This menu item permits adjustment of the audio output level from 0.5 to 6.0 volts peak-to-peak while the EAS
Attention signal is transmitted. The On-Air relay will not close.
Use the Arrow keys to scroll to 5. Set Output Level: On-Air Relay Open. Press ENTER. The LCD Screen will
display the output audio level. Use the Arrow keys to increment or decrement the audio level in 0.1 volt steps. The
XLR audio output (J101) will reflect the new level. Press ENTER to halt transmission and set the output level to the
value displayed. Press EXIT to return to the Operation Menu.
To adjust the speaker volume while setting the output level, press the SPEAKER key, then use the Arrow keys to
adjust the volume. The Arrow keys will not affect the XLR output level when the SPEAKER key is illuminated.
6.5.7 Set Output Level: On-Air Relay Closed
This menu item permits adjustment of the audio output level with the On-Air relay closed.
Use the Arrow keys to scroll to 6. Set Output Level: On-Air Relay Closed. Proceed as in 6.5.6, Set Output Level:
On-Air Relay Open, above.
6.5.8 Set Printer Operation
This menu item selects which messages will be printed. Use the arrow keys to scroll to 7 SET PRINTER OPERATION.
Press ENTER. Use the arrow keys to select ALL, SELECTIVE, or HOLD. ALL (default) will print all messages;
SELECTIVE prints all outgoing messages, but only those incoming messages with Events/Locations selected for auto
6-7
forwarding. HOLD disables the printer. When HOLD is deselected, messages stored in the transmit and receive logs will
resume printing.
6.5.9 Set Message Hold
This menu item permits the most recently decoded forwardable message to be queued manually for output, locking out all
other messages except a national emergency.
Use the Arrow keys to scroll to 8. SET MESSAGE HOLD, and press ENTER. MESSAGE HOLD: NO will be
displayed. Use the or key to display MESSAGE HOLD:YES if desired. Press ENTER when the desired setting is
displayed to return to the Operation Menu.
If YES is selected and the EAS 911 is in MANUAL mode, the Message Hold mode is activated by pressing MESSAGE
WAITING after a message has been decoded and the MESSAGE WAITING key is flashing. At this point, the display
will indicate Message Queued, and other messages will be locked out until the message is manually forwarded or 15
minutes has passed. When the message is queued, it can be reviewed with the REVIEW key. Once activated, the
Message Queued mode can be deactivated by press the MESSAGE WAITING key again.
6.5.10 Mark/Space Calibration
This Operation Menu item appears only in the EAS 911. It allows the user to set the RF output level of the Cable RF
modulator.
Press the ENTER key when 9. MARK/SPACE CALIBRATION appears on the LCD screen. The EAS 911 will
transmit alternating Marks and Spaces, and MARK/SPACE will appear on the LCD screen. The output level can be
adjusted with the modulation Attenuator on the rear panel. Press ENTER or EXIT to terminate the Mark/Space
transmission.
7-1
SECTION VII
This section has been intentionally deleted.
8-1
SECTION VIII
AM/FM RECEIVER
8.1 Specifications
The EAS DECODER Receivers performance and physical specifications are listed in Table 8-1.
Table 8-1
SPECIFICATIONS
FM RECEIVER MODULE
Frequency Range 88-108 MHz, digitally tunable in 100 kHz steps
Antenna Input 75?, Type F connector
Sensitivity 2 µV for 20 dB quieting
Audio Output -10 dBm to +3 dBm
(adjustable from rear panel) 600? balanced, 3-pin terminal block
T.H.D. Less than 3% at 66.6% modulation
AM RECEIVER MODULE
Frequency Range 540 kHz to 1720 kHz, digitally tunable in 10 kHz steps
Antenna Input Terminal block connector; external AM loop antenna supplied
Sensitivity 20 µV for 20 dB S/N
AGC 45 dB
Audio Output -10 dBm to +3 dBm
(adjustable from rear panel) 600? balanced, 3-pin terminal block
T.H.D. Less than 3% at 66.6% modulation
8.2 AM Receiver Module Block Diagram Description
The AM Receiver module is tunable from 540 to 1720 kHz in 10 kHz steps. Audio output for
external use is balanced 600 ohms at up to +3 dBm. Tuning is via three rotary DIP switches
which are accessible by removing the associated front panel cover plate. An LED lights to show
RF signal presence and audio output.
Figure 8-1 is a block diagram of the AM Receiver module. (See Figure A-3 in Appendix A for
the schematic diagram.) The following is a summary of the operating principles of this module.
a. The AM Receiver module receives 540 to 1720 kHz AM program signals at its rear
panel RF INPUT connector. The RF signal is routed to U1, the front end block
consisting of a mixer, a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), a 450 kHz IF filter, and an
AM Detector.
b. The selected audio signal is amplified by U2 and sent to the BALANCED AUDIO
OUTPUT terminal block connector on the rear panel. The audio output level of U2 is
preset by manufacturer.
8-2
c. Frequency selection in 10 kHz steps is performed by a 3-digit BCD rotary DIP switch
together with microprocessor U6 and a PLL frequency synthesizer consisting of U4,
U5, Q1 and other components.
d. The output at pin 5 of U1 is a DC voltage analog of the RSSI (RF level) of the input
signal. This output can be measured at TP1 using a DC voltmeter.
e. A DC sample of the RF signal level is routed to one input of comparator U3A; the
other input is supplied from reference voltage VREF2 . A sample of the audio output
level is routed to one input of comparator U3B; the other input is supplied from
reference voltage VREF1 . When the RF signal level exceeds the reference voltage and
the audio signal level exceeds the minimum requirements, the LED lights.
Figure 8-1. AM Receiver Module - Block Diagram
8-3
8.3 FM Receiver Block Diagram Description
The FM Receiver module is tunable from 88 to 108 MHz in 100 kHz steps. Audio output for
external use is balanced 600 ohms at up to +3 dBm. Tuning is via three rotary switches which
are accessible by removing the associated front panel cover plate. An LED lights to show
adequate RF signal level and the presence of audio modulation.
Figure 8-2 is a block diagram of the FM Receiver module. (See Figure A-5 in Appendix A for
the schematic diagram.) The following is a summary of the operating principles of this module.
a. The FM Receiver module receives 88 to 108 MHz FM program signals at its rear panel
RF INPUT connector. The RF signal is routed to front end block U1 consisting of a
mixer, a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), a 10.7 MHz IF filter, and an FM Detector
and other components.
b. The selected audio signal from U1 is amplified by U3 and sent to a BALANCED AUDIO
OUTPUT terminal block connector on the rear panel. The audio output level from the
Receiver board is preset by manufacture.
c. Frequency selection is performed by a 3-digit rotary DIP switch along with
microprocessor U7 and a PLL synthesizer consisting of U5, U6, Q1, Q2, and other
components.
d. The output at pin 10 of U1 is a DC voltage analog of the RSSI (RF level) of the input
signal. This output can be measured by using a DC voltmeter at TP1 which is
accessible by removing the associated front panel cover plate.
Figure 8-2. FM Receiver Module - Block Diagram
8-4
Table 8-2. Receiver Front Panel Controls and Indicators
ITEM TITLE FUNCTION
4
AM RECEIVER
RF & AUDIO
TP1
1 MHz, 100 kHz, 10 kHz
DX/LO
Note:
Individual Receiver controls are accessible by removing the associated
push-on cover (shown below) from the front panel. To remove the cover,
push it upward to disengage its rear hooks, then pull gently forward to
remove it from the front panel.
Receiver module for AM broadcast band (540 - 1720 kHz)
Figure 8-3. AM Receiver Module Edge-Mounted Controls and Indicators
Yellow LED. Flashes when an RF signal is detected which is above the
minimum level of 20 µV and has audio modulation.
Test point for RF Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) monitoring
Rotary switches for setting receive frequency
Local/Distant switch for setting receiver sensitivity
5
FM RECEIVER
RF & AUDIO
TP1
10 MHz, 1 MHz, 100 kHz
DX/LO
Receiver module for FM broadcast band (88 - 108 MHz)
Figure 8-4. FM Receiver Module Edge-Mounted Controls and Indicators
Yellow LED. Flashes when an RF signal is detected which is above the
minimum level of 10 µV and has audio modulation.
Test point for RF Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) monitoring
Rotary switches for setting received frequency
Local/Distant switch for setting receiver sensitivity
8-5
8.4 Rear Panel Controls and Connectors
Receiver rear panel controls and connectors are shown in Figure 8-5. Numbered items in this
figure are explained in Table 2.3-3 item 10 to 15.
Figure 8-5. Receiver Section Rear Panel Controls and Connectors
8.5 FM Radio Antenna Installation
The FM Receivers can typically share an outdoor VHF antenna. The antenna output is applied to
an FM/TV 2-way signal splitter which is supplied with the EAS DECODER. The type of VHF
antenna can be a Radio Shack VHF/FM Stereo antenna, Part No. 15-2158 or Part No. 15-2164
for shorter receiving distances.
The splitter outputs are fed to the EAS DECODER FM Receiver inputs.
8.6 AM Antenna Installation
In high or moderate signal strength areas, the AM Receiver may operate satisfactorily using the
indoor loop antenna supplied with the EAS DECODER. In weaker signal strength areas, an
outdoor antenna may be required. An end-fed long-wire antenna (approximately 250 ft.) can be
used with good results. One end of the long wire should be connected at the rear panel AM
Receiver module’s RF INPUT.
8.7 Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI)
Test Point TP1 located next to the frequency selection switches on each receiver module is the
RSSI voltage of the receiver. The characteristics of the RSSI vs. the RF signal level at the input
of the receiver is shown in Figures 8-6 and 8-7 for the FM, and AM Receiver, respectively.
8-6
2 µV 10 µV 50 µV
RF INPUT AT J1
1.5 V
2.0 V
2.5 V
3.0 V
TYPICAL RSSI AT TP1
1.0 V
3.5V
4.0V
100 µV 200 µV 20 µV 100 µV 500 µV
RF INPUT AT J1
1.5 V
2.0 V
2.5 V
3.0 V
TYPICAL RSSI AT TP1
10 µV
1.0 V
3.5V
4.0 V
1 mV
Figure 8-6
FM Receiver RSSI vs. RF Input Figure 8-7
AM Receiver RSSI vs. RF Input
For reliable reception, the signal level from the antenna feed line must be high enough to provide
an RSSI voltage greater than the values given below.
FM Receiver > 1.9 VDC
AM Receiver > 2.1 VDC
The LOCAL/DISTANT switch should be set to the DX (Distant) position unless the RSSI
exceeds the values given below:
FM Receiver > 3.8 VDC
AM Receiver > 3.2 VDC
9-1
SECTION IX
THEORY OF OPERATION
9.1 The EAS Information Super Highway
The Emergency Alert System (EAS) is a nationwide network of radio and television broadcast and cable facilities
that can originate or receive and forward (re-transmit) event- and location-specific Emergency Alert messages.
Alert messages can originate from the White House, state and local safety agencies, Emergency Operation Centers
(EOC), and the National Weather Service (85% of alerts are weather related).
When an agency is sues an Alert, it transmits an EAS header and message to local AM, FM, and TV stations and
cable systems which, in turn, broadcast the message to the general public if the message matches the local
requirements. The public can receive alert messages in a matter of seconds and can react quickly to impending
emergencies.
The EAS message contains digitally encoded event and location information in addition to a normal voice or text
announcement. The encoded information permits the network of broadcast and cable stations to decode messages
and forward them automatically or manually to a specific area affected by the emergency alert.
9.2 The EAS DECODER: An Overview
The EAS DECODER is similar to a smart telephone answering machine. It receives and screens messages on one or
two, records and stores them, and forwards selected messages manually or automatically.
The digital header in the incoming message is decoded and translated, then displayed on the Liquid Crystal Display
(LCD) and logged on the printer. The event and location data is compared with the data stored in the Setup memory
to determine if it should be forwarded.
If the alert message is to be forwarded, the EAS DECODER inserts a new I.D. code and re-transmits it, along with a
two-tone Attention Signal, the recorded voice message and an End Of Message signal. Forwarding can occur
automatically or after operator intervention.
Refer to Figure 9.2 for a simplified block diagram of the EAS DECODER.
D
i
g
i
t
a
l
Voice Recorder
E
A
S
Encoder
E
A
S
M
e
s
s
a
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Memory
C
o
m
p
a
r
e
U
s
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P
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o
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a
m
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d
Memory
F
S
K
Decoder
A
u
d
i
o
Channel
A
u
d
i
o
O
u
t
B
r
o
a
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Transmitter
Y
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A
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F
o
r
w
a
r
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N
o
:
I
g
n
o
r
e
E
A
S
CASTER
Figure 9.2, EAS DECODER Block Diagram
9-2
9.3 A Closer Look: Detailed System Block Diagram
The EAS DECODER system consists of the Main Board, the Encoder and Decoder keyboards, the LCD Display
Assembly, the Digital Voice Recorder, the Comm Expander and the Printer. Figure 1 in Appendix A illustrates the
EAS DECODER system blocks in detail.
9.4 Main Board (Figure 2, Appendix A)
The EAS DECODER Main Board consists of three major system blocks: Audio Loop-Through and Switching,
Digital Signal Processor/CPU, and Input/Output Control.
9.4.1 Audio Loop Through and Switching (Figure 2, Appendix A)
The audio buffering, switching and control section is illustrated on sheet 1 of the Main Board schematic drawing
(6601-4060).
U1 and U2 provide two balanced input amplifiers for the Channel 1 and 2 audio inputs. Analog switches U3, U8 and
U10 route audio signals to and from the inputs, outputs and voice recorder. U4 and U5 are Coders/Decoders
(CODECs) that convert the audio signals to digital data, and vice-versa. U7 provides two buffer amplifiers at the
outputs of the CODECs. U11 is the internal speaker amplifier; U12 provides a balanced audio EAS message output.
9.4.2 Digital Signal Processor/CPU (Figure 2, Appendix A)
The Digital Signal Processor (DSP) section and its related logic is illustrated on sheet 2 of the schematic drawing
(6601-4060).
U14 is a Texas Instruments TMS320C26 digital signal processor that performs all encoding and decoding functions,
and controls all I/O activity. U13 is a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). It generates all internal timing
signals and performs all internal digital signal routing. U15 is a real-time clock and provides battery backed-up
memory for long term storage of setup information. U16 and U18 are the system random access memory (RAM);
U17 and U19 are the system read-only program memory. U21 is a reset circuit and watchdog timer.
9.4.3 Input/Output Control (Figure 2, Appendix A)
Input/Output buffering and control for system peripherals and related equipment, is illustrated on sheet 3 of the
schematic drawing (6601-4060).
U25 through U29 are latches that control the printer, liquid crystal display (LCD), four port communication
expander, audio multiplexers and relays. U23 controls the On-Air and Alert relays. U22 and U30 provide RS-232
inputs and outputs.
9.5 Left Section Key Pad (Figure 4, Appendix A)
U501, U505. U509, U503, U507 and U511 in series form a 48-bit serial-to-parallel shift register that is used to
illuminate the 40 encoder board LEDs. The bits of LED data are shifted in to the keyboard by the I/O control
section, above, and then enabled to illuminate or flash the LEDs.
U512, U510, U508, U506, U504 and U502 in series form a 48-bit parallel-to-serial shift register that is used to sense
the 41 encoder key switches. The bits of switch data are shifted out of the encoder keyboard by the I/O control
section, above, and are then interpreted by the DSP/CPU.
9-3
9.6 Right Section Key Pad (Figure 6, Appendix A)
U601 and U603 in series form a 16-bit serial-to-parallel shift register that is used to illuminate the 12 decoder board
LEDs. The bits of LED data are shifted in to the keyboard by the I/O control section, and then enabled to illuminate
or flash the LEDs.
U604 and U602 in series form a 16-bit parallel-to-serial shift register that is used to sense the ten decoder key
switches. The bits of switch data are shifted out of the decoder keyboard by the I/O control section, above, and are
then interpreted by the DSP/CPU.
9.7 LCD Display Assembly
The LCD Display Assembly is a 16-character back-lit display with contrast controlled by setup software. The LCD
assembly is controlled by the FPGA through an 8-bit parallel data interface at U26 on the main board.
9.8 Digital Voice Recorder (Figure 8, Appendix A)
U3 is a sampling analog-to-digital (A-D) and digital-to-analog (D-A) converter that converts incoming voice
messages to digital data and stores the data in memories U5, U6, U7, U8 and U9. U10 and U11 select memory
locations for voice storage. To play back a message, U3 retrieves digital data from the memories and converts it
back into its original analog form.
U4 and U12 provide audio signal buffering, gain, and Automatic Level Control (ALC).
U2 controls the routing of the audio input and output signals. The FPGA on the main board controls U3 and U2
through an 8-bit parallel data interface at U1.
9.9 Printer
An 24-column ASCII impact printer is controlled by the FPGA through an 8-bit parallel data interface.
9.10 COM Port Expander (Figure 12, Appendix A)
An COM Port Expander provides communication links to external EAS DECODER related equipment such as a
character generator or PC controller.
U302 and U303 are Dual Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitters (DUARTs) that convert parallel data to serial data,
and vice-versa. They transmit data to and from the main board through an 8-bit parallel interface at U301. They
transmit data to COM2 outputs through EIA quad line driver U306. They receive data from COM2 from EIA quad
line receiver U305. The DUARTs are controlled by the FPGA on the main board.
10-1
SECTION X
MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR
10.1 INTRODUCTION
The EAS DECODER has no moving parts or components that require routine replacement. It requires only minor
audio adjustment, which will be described later in this section. In addition, the printer paper and ribbon may need to
be replaced.
10.2 TOOL AND TEST EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS
The following tools and equipment are required for EAS DECODER maintenance:
• Hand Tools
• Digital Voltmeter
• Oscilloscope
• Audio generator
• XLR out to 3-pin audio input cable
10.3 ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
The EAS DECODER should require no routine maintenance other than printer paper and ribbon replacement. As
equipment and systems external to the EAS DECODER change, audio level adjustments may be necessary. In
addition, the real time clock contains a lithium battery that will require replacement after a number of years. Refer
to Paragraph 10.3.3 for battery replacement procedure.
10.3.1 Calibration
The EAS DECODER requires no routine calibration.
10.3.2 Audio Levels
The EAS DECODER Output Audio Level and the Decoder Input Audio Level can be adjusted periodically as
described below.
10.3.2.1 Audio Output Level Adjustment
This procedure sets the proper signal level at the audio output of the EAS DECODER (J101). Proceed as follows:
1. To access the Operation Menu, enter the Primary Password, then press ENTER.
The LCD will display OPERATION MENU briefly, then 1. REVIEW RECEIVED MESSAGES .
2. Use the up/down arrow keys () to scroll to 6. Set Output Level: On-Air Relay Open. Press the ENTER
key to activate the displayed menu selection. The LCD will respond by scrolling: LEVEL: 2.2 V pep. The
LCD will display the output audio level.
3. Adjust the audio output level by using the up/down arrow keys while reading the level indication on the
LCD display. As keys are pressed, the audio output level will be incremented or decremented in 0.1
volt steps. Press ENTER to accept an indicated output. The output should be set to comply with the
modulation percentage stated above. A level of 2.2 V p-p corresponds to 0 dBm.
4. The two tones can be accessed individually by using the TIME ↑↓ arrows. The 960 Hz tone, both, or the
853 Hz tone can be selected.
5. Press EXIT to return to the Ready mode.
10.3.2.2 Decoder Audio Input Level Adjustment
1. Connect the monitoring source to J102, Channel 1.
10-2
2. Press the SPKR key to activate the speaker on Channel 1. The LCD display shows the channel number
followed by the audio signal level in bar chart form.
Note:
The Decoder input can accommodate signals at levels of 0.7 Vp-p to 2 Vp-p. It is desirable to keep the
Decoder input at 1.5 Vp-p to utilize its full dynamic range.
Observe the incoming level of the source.
4. If necessary, adjust the monitoring source output level for proper indication. Do not allow audio level to
exceed 2 Vp -p on peaks.
5. Each time the SPKR key is pressed it advances to the next channel in sequence. The speaker mutes after the
last channel is exited. The SPKR LED illuminates when the speaker is active.
6. Repeat Steps 1 through 4 for J102, Channel 2.
10.3.3 Lithium Battery Replacement
The real time clock, U15, uses a lithium battery. It will require replacement after a number of years. Replace
only with a standard CR2032 lithium coin cell. In early versions of the EAS DECODER, the battery is contained
within U15. Contact TFT for replacement information
CAUTION
Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace only with
the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer.
Dispose of used batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
10.4 PRINTER
10.4.1 Operator Information
Door Latch Button
To open the front door of the printer, twist the door latch button (1) counterclockwise using the thumb and
forefinger. This will release the latch, and the door can be pulled outwards to expose the paper roll.
Paper Feed Button
To activate the paper feed, press the lower part of the paper feed button (2). This will continue for as long as the
button is held down.
Figure 10.4-1. Printer Controls
10-3
10.4.2 Paper Roll Replacement
Proceed as follows to replace the printer paper:
1. Twist the door latch counterclockwise to release and open the door.
2. Depress the retention button to allow the paper roll to slide across the bar.
3. If paper does not remain in the feed slot from the old roll, cut or fold the end of the new roll into a V-shape as
shown. Insert the point into the paper feed slot (See Method A). If paper does remain from the old roll, simply
insert the blunt edge of the new roll on top of the old paper in the feed slot (See Method B).
4. Push the paper feed actuator arm to advance the paper. Hold it until the feed mechanism pulls the paper
through to the front of the printer. Turn the paper roll so that any loose turns are wound snugly against the roll
and close the door.
5. More paper may now be fed through by pressing the paper feed button.
Method A
Method B
Figure 10.4-2. Paper Roll Replacement
10-4
10.4.3 Ribbon Cartridge Replacement
Tear off any paper emerging from the printer. To open the printer door, refer to paragraph 8.4. 1.
Carefully press the door and bracket in vertically opposite directions until the latch is released. Do not pull the door
and bracket apart without first releasing the catch. See figure 10.2 item (3). Swing the chassis back leaving the door
fully open. This will expose the printer mechanism and ink ribbon cartridge. Refer to figure 10.4-3.
(1) Press in on the end of the ink ribbon cartridge marked “PUSH”, and carefully remove the used cartridge.
Push replacement cartridge in place, ensuring that the paper lies between the ribbon and the steel printer
plate, and the ribbon cartridge spindle is correctly seated over the printer ribbon drive shaft. Ensure that the
ribbon is taut and parallel to the paper. If necessary, tighten the ribbon by turning the faceted disk (2)
clockwise using your fingernail or small blade screwdriver. Make sure the paper protrudes through the
front of the printer mechanism. Ensure that the paper will pass clearly through the guide channel and past
the tear bar before snapping the bracket shut against the back of the door.
Turn the paper roll by hand so any loose turns are wound snugly against the roll. Close the door and check
that the paper flows freely, using the paper feed button.
Figure 10.4-3. Ribbon Cartridge Replacement
10.4.4 Printer Supply Ordering Information
Paper Roll Size:
Paper width is 2.25 inches
The inside diameter of the spool hole is either .50 inch or .438 inch
Paper roll outside diameter is 1.90 inches
Note: Remove paper from a roll with diameter greater than 2.00 inches until the diameter is less than 2.00
inches. Paper roll supplies are listed in Table 10.4.4-1, while ribbon cartridge supplies are listed in
Table 10.4.4-2.
10-5
Table 10.4.4-1 Paper Roll Suppliers
Item Paper Roll Distributors Catalog/Stock No. Manufacturer and Part No.
1 McWhorter’s
1-800-426-1368 SPR 01121 Sparco 01121
2 Office Depot
1-800-519-7222 523-423 Offic Depot OD225150AD
3 TFT, Inc.
408-727-7272 Ext. 300/205
408-988-3988 FAX
1130-0103 EAS Able Systems A160-PR
The paper width is 2-1/4”
The inside diameter of the spool hole is .438” or .500”
The TFT/Able paper roll outside diameter is 1.9”
If the paper roll diameter is greater than 2”, remove paper until the diameter is less than 2”.
Table 8.4.4-2 Ribbon Cartridge Suppliers
Item Ribbon Cartridge Distributors Catalog/Stock No. Manufacturer and Part No.
1 McWhorter’s
Tel. 1-800-426-1368 ESP H00CR-BB NU-KOTE
Part No. NUKPM 267
2 Office Depot
Tel. 1-800-519-7222 506-501 NU-KOTE
Part No. NUKPM 267
3 Weigh-Tronix
Tel. 707-527-5555 223320029 EPSON
Part No. ERC-09
4 Omni Print
Tel. 714-457-0229 ERC-09 EPSON
Part No. ERC-09
5 TFT, Inc.
Tel. 408-727-7272 Ext. 300
Fax 408-988-3988
1130-0102 EAS EPSON
Part No. ERC-09
10.5 DIAGNOSTICS AND REPAIR
Since most EAS DECODER users have limited diagnostic and repair facilities, the most practical maintenance
philosophy is repair by circuit card replacement. It is recommended that spare circuit cards be on hand, together with
an alternative plan for operation while repairs are being made.
Some general (and very important) observations on repair:
1. The EAS DECODER series of equipment uses static sensitive components. ESD (Electrostatic Discharge)
precautions must therefore be observed during repairs. This is extremely important.
2. The EAS DECODER breaks down into subassemblies located on individual circuit cards and, in general,
card level replacement is best maintenance philosophy.
3. The Theory Of Operation Section (Section VIX) is helpful in understanding how the EAS DECODER
equipment functions and will help you with diagnostics, as it covers the jobs performed by each major
component and subsystem.
10-6
10.6 TROUBLESHOOTING
Most of the EAS DECODER functions can be troubleshot by performing an Encoder (TFT Model 911) to Decoder
(TFT Model 911D) test as described below.
Press the following keys from TFT Model 911: PASSWORD, 9, 1, 1, WEEKLY TEST, READY, SEND HDR. The On-Air
Relay LED will light and the LCD will display "SENDING HEADER" first, then "SEND EOM". The Printer will
print the EAS message if it is installed.
Press the SEND EOM key. The LCD will display "SENDING EOM" first, then the EAS message. Press the MSG
WAITING key then CANCEL. The EAS DECODER will return to the Ready Banner (Banner) Mode.
10.7 TFT CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT
TFT emergency service is available 24 hours a day. Please call us if you need assistance with any TFT products.
TFT, Inc.
2243 Ringwood Avenue
San Jose, CA 95131
Telephone: (408) 943-9323, Fax: (408) 432-9218
APPENDIX A
ENGINEERING DRAWINGS
FIG. TITLE DWG NO. REV.
1. EAS Decoder System Block Diagram...................... 6600-2840 A
2. Main Board Schematic......................................... 6601-4060 A
3. Main Board Assembly ......................................... 6608-4060 A
4. Encoder Key Board Schematic ............................ 6601-4027 C
5. Encoder Key Board Assembly............................. 6608-4027 C
6. Decoder Key Board Schematic............................ 6601-4028 C
7. Decoder Key Board Assembly............................. 6608-4028 C
8. Digital Voice Recorder Board Schematic ............ 6601-4016 E
9. Digital Voice Recorder Board Assembly ............ 6608-4016 E
Audio
I/F
Audio
I/F
J102
J102
CH. 1
Audio
CH. 2
Audio
Audio
Switch
Audio
Switch
Audio
Switch Codec
(X2)
VOL
CNTL
Audio
Driver
Speaker
Driver
CNTL
J101
SPKRJ100
XLR
Audio
Output
Voice
Recorder
Not
Used EPROM
(256KB)
SRAM
(64KB)
R. Time
Clock
FPGA
DSP
W.D.
Timer
Output
Ports
RS232
I/F
RS232 J103
J108
J109
60Hz Clock
Reference
Printer/Speaker
Inhibit
Sheet 3 of
Schematics
(6601-4030)
Encoder
KeyBd
Decoder
Common
KeyBd
J128
J126
Relay
Driver
Relay
Driver
RS485
I/F
Printer
I/F
J106 On-Air
Relay
J107 Alert
Relay
J105 Remote
S/C
Board
Printer
4-port
COM
Expdr
LCD
Displays
J121
J113
J127
CNT
L
J112
8
Sheet 2 of
Schematics
(6601-4030)
Sheet 1 of
Schematics
(6601-4030)
J111
MAIN BOARD
EASDecoder SYSTEM BLOCK DIAGRAM
D S P B U S
4
CNTL
3
CNTL
4
CNTL
4
CNTL
File: 1000-00193 Doc # 6600 -2841 Rev. A
APPENDIX B
PARTS LISTS
TITLE DWG NO. REV.
Main PCB...................................................................... 6608-4060 A
Encoder PCB................................................................. 6608-4027 C
Decoder PCB................................................................. 6608-4028 C
Voice Recorder PCB..................................................... 6608-4016 E
COM Port Expander PCB............................................. 6608-4061 A
C-1
APPENDIX C
FIPS CODE LISTINGS
How to Use the FIPS Code Listings
The Header of an EAS Alert Message contains a location code which designates the geographical area affected by
the alert. The location code contains 6-digits formatted PSSCCC, where:
P indicates the county subdivision.
SS indicates the state.
CCC indicates the county.
The P digit of the location code has a range of 0 to 9 and specifies a portion of a county:
1 = Northwest, 6 = East
2 = North 7 = Southwest
3 = Northeast, 8 = South
4 = West 9 = Southeast
5 = Central 0 = all or an unspecified portion of a county
The SSCCC portion of the location code designates the State and County affected by the Alert message. It uses the
Federal Information Processing System (FIPS) code as described by the U.S. Department of Commerce in National
Institute of Standards and Technology publication 772. Each state is assigned a 2-digit code (SS). Each county is
assigned a 3-digit code (CCC). A CCC code of 000 refers to an entire State or Territory.
State FIPS codes (SS) are 2-digit ascending numbers 01 to 56 assigned to an alphabetically ordered list of states as
shown in Table C-1. Table C-1. State FIPS Codes
State FIPS State FIPS State FIPS State FIPS State FIPS
AL 01 HI 15 MA 25 NM 35 SD 46
AK 02 ID 16 MI 26 NY 36 TN 47
AZ 04 IL 17 MN 27 NC 37 TX 48
AR 05 IN 18 MS 28 ND 38 UT 49
CA 06 IA 19 MO 29 OH 39 VT 50
CO 08 KS 20 MT 30 OK 40 VA 51
CT 09 KY 21 NE 31 OR 41 WA 53
DE 10 LA 22 NV 32 PA 42 WV 54
FL 12 ME 23 NH 33 RI 44 WS 55
GA 13 MD 24 NJ 34 SC 45 WY 56
District of Columbia - 11
C-2
County FIPS codes are 3-digit ascending numbers 000 to 999 assigned to an alphabetically ordered lis t of counties
within a designated state as shown in Part A.
U.S. Territories FIPS codes are 2-digit ascending numbers from 60 to 78 assigned to an alphabetically ordered list of
Territories as shown in Table C-2.
Table C-2. U.S. Territories FIPS Codes
Territory FIPS Code Territory FIPS Code Territory FIPS Code
American Samoa 60 Marshall Islands 68 Puerto Rico 72
Federated States
of Micronesia
64 Northern Mariana
Islands
69 U.S. Minor
Outlying Islands
74
Guam 66 Palau 70 Virgin Islands 78
FIPS CODE LISTINGS
CONTENTS
Part A - U. S. State/County FIPS Codes
State Page
Alabama .................................................................................................................................................................................................C-4
Alaska C-4
Arizona C-4
Arkansas ................................................................................................................................................................................................C-4
California ................................................................................................................................................................................................C-5
Colorado .................................................................................................................................................................................................C-5
Connecticut ...........................................................................................................................................................................................C-5
Delaware .................................................................................................................................................................................................C-5
District of Columbia .............................................................................................................................................................................C-5
FloridaC-6
Georgia C-6
HawaiiC-7
IdahoC-7
Illinois C-7
IndianaC-8
Iowa .C-8
KansasC-9
Kentucky ................................................................................................................................................................................................C-9
Louisiana .............................................................................................................................................................................................C-10
Maine C-10
Maryland .............................................................................................................................................................................................C-10
Massachusetts ................................................................
................................
Michigan ................................................................................................
................................
Minnesota ................................................................................................
................................
Mississippi ................................................................................................
................................
Missouri ................................................................................................
................................
State Page
Montana ................................................................................................
................................
Nebraska ................................................................................................
................................
Nevada C-13
New Hampshire ................................................................
................................
New Jersey ................................................................................................
................................
New Mexico ................................................................
................................
New York ................................................................................................
................................
North Carolina ................................................................
................................
North Dakota ................................................................
................................
Ohio C-15
Oklahoma ................................................................................................
................................
Oregon C-15
Pennsylvania ................................................................
................................
Rhode Island ................................................................
................................
South Carolina ................................................................
................................
C-5
South Dakota ......................................................................................................................................................................................C-16
Tennessee ............................................................................................................................................................................................C-17
Texas C-17
Utah C-18
Vermont ...............................................................................................................................................................................................C-18
Virginia C-19
Washington ................................................................................................
................................
West Virginia ................................................................
................................
Wisconsin ................................................................................................
................................
Wyoming ................................................................................................
................................
Part B - U. S. Territories FIPS Codes
Territory Page
American Samoa .................................................................................................................................................................................C-23
Federated States of Micronesia ........................................................................................................................................................C-23
GuamC-23
Marshall Islands..................................................................................................................................................................................C-23
North Mariana Islands .......................................................................................................................................................................C-23
Territory Page
PalauC-23
Puerto Rico................................................................................................
................................
U.S. Minor Outlying Islands................................................................
................................
Virgin Islands................................................................
................................
Part C Offshore (Marine Area) FIPS Codes
Territory Page
Offshore (Marine Area )………………………….C23
C-4
ALABAMA
AUTAUGA 01001 CONECUH 01035 HOUSTON 01069 MORGAN 01103
BALDWIN 01003 COOSA 01037 JACKSON 01071 PERRY 01105
BARBOUR 01005 COVINGTON 01039 JEFFERSON 01073 PICKENS 01107
BIBB 01007 CRENSHAW 01041 LAMAR 01075 PIKE 01109
BLOUNT 01009 CULLMAN 01043 LAUDERDALE 01077 RANDOLPH 01111
BULLOCK 01011 DALE 01045 LAWRENCE 01079 RUSSELL 01113
BUTLER 01013 DALLAS 01047 LEE 01081 SAINT CLAIR 01115
CALHOUN 01015 DE KALB 01049 LIMESTONE 01083 SHELBY 01117
CHAMBERS 01017 ELMORE 01051 LOWNDES 01085 SUMTER 01119
CHEROKEE 01019 ESCAMBIA 01053 MACON 01087 TALLADEGA 01121
CHILTON 01021 ETOWAH 01055 MADISON 01089 TALLAPOOSA 01123
CHOCTAW 01023 FAYETTE 01057 MARENGO 01091 TUSCALOOSA 01125
CLARKE 01025 FRANKLIN 01059 MARION 01093 WALKER 01127
CLAY 01027 GENEVA 01061 MARSHALL 01095 WASHINGTON 01129
CLEBURNE 01029 GREENE 01063 MOBILE 01097 WILCOX 01131
COFFEE 01031 HALE 01065 MONROE 01099 WINSTON 01133
COLBERT 01033 HENRY 01067 MONTGOMERY 01101
ALASKA
ALEUTIANS EAST
02013 FAIRBANKS NORTH
STAR
02090 MATANUSKA-
SUSITNA
02170 SOUTHEAST
FAIRBANKS
02240
ALEUTIANS WEST
02016 HAINES 02100 NOME 02180 VALDEZ-
CORDOVA
02261
ANCHORAGE 02020 JUNEAU 02110 NORTH SLOPE 02185 WADE HAMPTON 02270
BETHEL
02050 KENAI PENINSULA 02122 NORTHWEST
ARCTIC
02188 WRANGELL-
PETERSBURG
02280
BRISTOL BAY 02060 KETCHIKAN
GATEWAY
02130 PRINCE OF WALES-
OUTER KETCHIKAN
02201 YAKUTAT 02282
DENALI 02068 KODIAK ISLAND 02150 SITKA 02220 YUKON-KOYUKUK
02290
DILLINGHAM 02070 LAKE AND
PENINSULA
02164 SKAGWAY-
HOONAH-ANGOON
02232
ARIZONA
APACHE 04001 GRAHAM 04009 MOHAVE 04015 SANTA CRUZ 04023
COCHISE 04003 GREENLEE 04011 NAVAJO 04017 YAVAPAI 04025
COCONINO 04005 LA PAZ 04012 PIMA 04019 YUMA 04027
GILA 04007 MARICOPA 04013 PINAL 04021
ARKANSAS
ARKANSAS 05001 DALLAS 05039 LEE 05077 POPE 05115
ASHLEY 05003 DESHA 05041 LINCOLN 05079 PRAIRIE 05117
BAXTER 05005 DREW 05043 LITTLE RIVER 05081 PULASKI 05119
BENTON 05007 FAULKNER 05045 LOGAN 05083 RANDOLPH 05121
BOONE 05009 FRANKLIN 05047 LONOKE 05085 SAINT FRANCIS 05123
BRADLEY 05011 FULTON 05049 MADISON 05087 SALINE 05125
CALHOUN 05013 GARLAND 05051 MARION 05089 SCOTT 05127
CARROLL 05015 GRANT 05053 MILLER 05091 SEARCY 05129
CHICOT 05017 GREENE 05055 MISSISSIPPI 05093 SEBASTIAN 05131
CLARK 05019 HEMPSTEAD 05057 MONROE 05095 SEVIER 05133
CLAY 05021 HOT SPRING 05059 MONTGOMERY 05097 SHARP 05135
CLEBURNE 05023 HOWARD 05061 NEVADA 05099 STONE 05137
CLEVELAND 05025 INDEPENDENCE 05063 NEWTON 05101 UNION 05139
COLUMBIA 05027 IZARD 05065 OUACHITA 05103 VAN BUREN 05141
CONWAY 05029 JACKSON 05067 PERRY 05105 WASHINGTON 05143
CRAIGHEAD 05031 JEFFERSON 05069 PHILLIPS 05107 WHITE 05145
CRAWFORD 05033 JOHNSON 05071 PIKE 05109 WOODRUFF 05147
CRITTENDEN 05035 LAFAYETTE 05073 POINSETT 05111 YELL 05149
CROSS 05037 LAWRENCE 05075 POLK 05113
C-5
CALIFORNIA
ALAMEDA 06001 KINGS 06031 PLACER 06061 SIERRA 06091
ALPINE 06003 LAKE 06033 PLUMAS 06063 SISKIYOU 06093
AMADOR 06005 LASSEN 06035 RIVERSIDE 06065 SOLANO 06095
BUTTE 06007 LOS ANGELES 06037 SACRAMENTO 06067 SONOMA 06097
CALAVERAS 06009 MADERA 06039 SAN BENITO 06069 STANISLAUS 06099
COLUSA 06011 MARIN 06041 SAN BERNARDINO 06071 SUTTER 06101
CONTRA COSTA 06013 MARIPOSA 06043 SAN DIEGO 06073 TEHAMA 06103
DEL NORTE 06015 MENDOCINO 06045 SAN FRANCISCO 06075 TRINITY 06105
EL DORADO 06017 MERCED 06047 SAN JOAQUIN 06077 TULARE 06107
FRESNO 06019 MODOC 06049 SAN LUIS OBISPO 06079 TUOLUMNE 06109
GLENN 06021 MONO 06051 SAN MATEO 06081 VENTURA 06111
HUMBOLDT 06023 MONTEREY 06053 SANTA BARBARA 06083 YOLO 06113
IMPERIAL 06025 NAPA 06055 SANTA CLARA 06085 YUBA 061l5
INYO 06027 NEVADA 06057 SANTA CRUZ 06087
KERN 06029 ORANGE 06059 SHASTA 06089
COLORADO
ADAMS 08001 DOLORES 08033 LA PLATA 08067 PUEBLO 08101
ALAMOSA 08003 DOUGLAS 08035 LARIMER 08069 RIO BLANCO 08103
ARAPAHOE 08005 EAGLE 08037 LAS ANIMAS 08071 RIO GRANDE 08105
ARCHULETA 08007 ELBERT 08039 LINCOLN 08073 ROUTT 08107
BACA 08009 EL PASO 08041 LOGAN 08075 SAGUACHE 08109
BENT 08011 FREMONT 08043 MESA 08077 SAN JUAN 08111
BOULDER 08013 GARFIELD 08045 MINERAL 08079 SAN MIGUEL 08113
BROOMFIELD 008014 GILPIN 08047 MOFFAT 08081 SEDGWICK 08115
CHAFFEE 08015 GRAND 08049 MONTEZUMA 08083 SUMMIT 08117
CHEYENNE 08017 GUNNISON 08051 MONTROSE 08085 TELLER 08119
CLEAR CREEK 08019 HINSDALE 08053 MORGAN 08087 WASHINGTON 08121
CONEJOS 08021 HUERFANO 08055 OTERO 08089 WELD 08123
COSTILLA 08023 JACKSON 08057 OURAY 08091 YUMA 08125
CROWLEY 08025 JEFFERSON 08059 PARK 08093
CUSTER 08027 KIOWA 08061 PHILLIPS 08095
DELTA 08029 KIT CARSON 08063 PITKIN 08097
DENVER 08031 LAKE 08065 PROWERS 08099
CONNECTICUT
FAIRFIELD 09001 LITCHFIELD 09005 NEW HAVEN 09009 TOLLAND 09013
HARTFORD 09003 MIDDLESEX 09007 NEW LONDON 09011 WINDHAM 09015
DELAWARE
KENT 10001 NEW CASTLE 10003 SUSSEX 10005
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 11001
FLORIDA
ALACHUA 12001 FLAGLER 12035 LAKE 12069 PINELLAS 12103
BAKER 12003 FRANKLIN 12037 LEE 12071 POLK 12105
BAY 12005 GADSDEN 12039 LEON 12073 PUTNAM 12107
BRADFORD 12007 GILCHRIST 12041 LEW 12075 SAINT JOHNS 12109
BREVARD 12009 GLADES 12043 LIBERTY 12077 SAINT LUCIE 12111
BROWARD 12011 GULF 12045 MADISON 12079 SANTA ROSA 12113
CALHOUN 12013 HAMILTON 12047 MANATEE 12081 SARASOTA 12115
CHARLOTTE 12015 HARDEE 12049 MARION 12083 SEMINOLE 12117
C-19
CITRUS 12017 HENDRY 12051 MARTIN 12085 SUMTER 12119
CLAY 12019 HERNANDO 12053 MIAMI-DADE 012086 SUWANNEE 12121
COLLIER 12021 HIGHLANDS 12055 MONROE 12087 TAYLOR 12123
COLUMBIA 12023 HILLSBOROUGH 12057 NASSAU 12089 UNION 12125
DADE 12025 HOLMES 12059 OKALOOSA 12091 VOLUSIA 12127
DE SOTO 12027 INDIAN RIVER 12061 OKEECHOBEE 12093 WAKULLA 12129
DIXIE 12029 JACKSON 12063 ORANGE 12095 WALTON 12131
DWAL 12031 JEFFERSON 12065 OSCEOLA 12097 WASHINGTON 12133
ESCAMBIA 12033 LAFAYETTE 12067 PALM BEACH 12099
PASCO 12101
GEORGIA
APPLING 13001 DADE 13083 JEFFERSON 13163 RICHMOND 13245
ATKINSON 13003 DAWSON 13085 JENKINS 13165 ROCKDALE 13247
BACON 13005 DECATUR 13087 JOHNSON 13167 SCHLEY 13249
BAKER 13007 DE KALB 13089 JONES 13169 SCREVEN 13251
BALDWIN 13009 DODGE 13091 LAMAR 13171 SEMINOLE 13253
BANKS 13011 DOOLY 13093 LANIER 13173 SPALDING 13255
BARROW 13013 DOUGHERTY 13095 LAURENS 13175 STEPHENS 13257
BARTOW 13015 DOUGLAS 13097 LEE 13177 STEWART 13259
BEN HILL 13017 EARLY 13099 LIBERTY 13179 SUMTER 13261
BERRIEN 13019 ECHOLS 13101 LINCOLN 13181 TALBOT 13263
BIBB 13021 EFFINGHAM 13103 LONG 13183 TALIAFERRO 13265
BLECKLEY 13023 ELBERT 13105 LOWNDES 13185 TATTNALL 13267
BRANTLEY 13025 EMANUEL 13107 LUMPKIN 13187 TAYLOR 13269
BROOKS 13027 EVANS 13109 MCDUFFIE 13189 TELFAIR 13271
BRYAN 13029 FANN1N 13111 MCINTOSH 13191 TERRELL 13273
BULLOCH 13031 FAYETTE 13113 MACON 13193 THOMAS 13275
BURKE 13033 FLOYD 13115 MADISON 13195 TIFT 13277
BUTTS 13035 FORSYTH 13117 MARION 13197 TOOMBS 13279
CALHOUN 13037 FRANKLIN 13119 MERIWETHER 13199 TOWNS 13281
CAMDEN 13039 FULTON 13121 MILLER 13201 TREUTLEN 13283
CANDLER 13043 GILMER 13123 MITCHELL 13205 TROUP 13285
CARROLL 13045 GLASCOCK 13125 MONROE 13207 TURNER 13287
CATOOSA 13047 GLYNN 13127 MONTGOMERY 13209 TWIGGS 13289
CHARLTON 13049 GORDON 13129 MORGAN 13211 UNION 13291
CHATHAM 13051 GRADY 13131 MURRAY 13213 UPSON 13293
CHATTAHOOCHEE 13053 GREENE 13133 MUSCOGEE 13215 WALKER 13295
C-7
GEORGIA (Continued)
CHATTOOGA 13055 GWINNETT 13135 NEWTON 13217 WALTON 13297
CHEROKEE 13057 HABERSHAM 13137 OCONEE 13219 WARE 13299
CLARKE 13059 HALL 13139 OGLETHORPE 13221 WARREN 13301
CLAY 13061 HANCOCK 13141 PAULDING 13223 WASHINGTON 13303
CLAYTON 13063 HARALSON 13143 PEACH 13225 WAYNE 13305
CLINCH 13065 HARRIS 13145 PICKENS 13227 WEBSTER 13307
COBB 13067 HART 13147 PIERCE 13229 WHEELER 13309
COFFEE 13069 HEARD 13149 PIKE 13231 WHITE 13311
COLQUITT 13071 HENRY 13151 POLK 13233 WHITFIELD 13313
COLUMBUS 13073 HOUSTON 13153 PULASKI 13235 WILCOX 13315
COOK 13075 IRWIN 13155 PUTNAM 13237 WILKES 13317
COWETA 13077 JACKSON 13157 QUITMAN 13239 WlLKlNSON 13319
CRAWFORD 13079 JASPER 13159 RABUN 13241 WORTH 13321
CRISP 13081 JEFF DAVIS 13161 RANDOLPH 13243
HAWAII
HAWAII 15001 KALAWAO 15005 KAUAI 15007 MAUI 15009
HONOLULU 15003
IDAHO
ADA 16001 BUTTE 16023 GEM 16045 MINIDOKA 16067
ADAMS 16003 CAMAS 16025 GOODING 16047 NEZ PERCE 16069
BANNOCK 16005 CANYON 16027 IDAHO 16049 ONEIDA 16071
BEAR LAKE 16007 CARIBOU 16029 JEFFERSON 16051 OWYHEE 16073
BENEWAH 16009 CASSIA 16031 JEROME 16053 PAYETTE 16075
BINGHAM 16011 CLARK 16033 KOOTENAI 16055 POWER 16077
BLAINE 16013 CLEARWATER 16035 LATAH 16057 SHOSHONE 16079
BOISE 16015 CUSTER 16037 LEMHI 16059 TETON 16081
BONNER 16017 ELMORE 16039 LEWIS 16061 TWIN FALLS 16083
BONNEVILLE 16019 FRANKLIN 16041 LINCOLN 16063 VALLEY 16085
BOUNDARY 16021 FREMONT 16043 MADISON 16065 WASHINGTON 16087
ILLINOIS
ADAMS 17001 FORD 17053 LIVINGSTON 17105 RANDOLPH 17157
ALEXANDER 17003 FRANKLIN 17055 LOGAN 17107 RICHLAND 17159
BOND 17005 FULTON 17057 MCDONOUGH 17109 ROCK ISLAND 17161
BOONE 17007 GALLATIN 17059 MCHENRY 17111 SAINT CLAIR 17163
BROWN 17009 GREENE 17061 MCLEAN 17113 SALINE 17165
BUREAU 17011 GRUNDY 17063 MACON 17115 SANGAMON 17167
CALHOUN 17013 HAMILTON 17065 MACOUPIN 17117 SCHUYLER 17169
CARROLL 17015 HANCOCK 17067 MADISON 17119 SCOTT 17171
CASS 17017 HARDIN 17069 MARION 17121 SHELBY 17173
CHAMPAIGN 17019 HENDERSON 17071 MARSHALL 17123 STARK 17175
CHRISTIAN 17021 HENRY 17073 MASON 17125 STEPHENSON 17177
CLARK 17023 IROQUOIS 17075 MASSAC 17127 TAZEWELL 17179
CLAY 17025 JACKSON 17077 MENARD 17129 UNION 17181
CLINTON 17027 JASPER 17079 MERCER 17131 VERMILION 17183
COLES 17029 JEFFERSON 17081 MONROE 17133 WABASH 17185
COOK 17031 JERSEY 17083 MONTGOMERY 17135 WARREN 17187
CRAWFORD 17033 JO DAVIESS 17085 MORGAN 17137 WASHINGTON 17189
CUMBERLAND 17035 JOHNSON 17087 MOULTRIE 17139 WAYNE 17191
DE KALB 17037 KANE 17089 OGLE 17141 WHITE 17193
DE WITT 17039 KANKAKEE 17091 PEORIA 17143 WHITESIDE 17195
DOUGLAS 17041 KENDALL 17093 PERRY 17145 WILL 17197
DU PAGE 17043 KNOX 17095 PIATT 17147 WILLLEMSON 17199
ILLINOIS (Continued)
EDGAR 17045 LAKE 17097 PIKE 17149 WINNEBAGO 17201
EDWARDS 17047 LA SALLE 17099 POPE 17151 WOODFORD 17203
EFFINGHAM 17049 LAWRENCE 17101 PULASKI 17153
FAYETTE 17051 LEE 17103 PUTNAM 17155
C-8
INDIANA
ADAMS 18001 FRANKLIN 18047 LAWRENCE 18093 RUSH 18139
ALLEN 18003 FULTON 18049 MADISON 18095 SAINT JOSEPH 18141
BARTHOLOMEW 18005 GIBSON 18051 MARION 18097 SCOTT 18143
BENTON 18007 GRANT 18053 MARSHALL 18099 SHELBY 18145
BLACKFORD 18009 GREENE 18055 MARTIN 18101 SPENCER 18147
BOONE 18011 HAMILTON 18057 MIAMI 18103 STARKE 18149
BROWN 18013 HANCOCK 18059 MONROE 18105 STEUBEN 18151
CARROLL 18015 HARRISON 18061 MONTGOMERY 18107 SULLIVAN 18153
CASS 18017 HENDRICKS 18063 MORGAN 18109 SWITZERLAND 18155
CLARK 18019 HENRY 18065 NEWTON 18111 TIPPECANOE 18157
CLAY 18021 HOWARD 18067 NOBLE 18113 TIPTON 18159
CLINTON 18023 HUNTINGTON 18069 OHIO 18115 UNION 18161
CRAWFORD 18025 JACKSON 18071 ORANGE 18117 VANDERBURGH 18163
DAVIESS 18027 JASPER 18073 OWEN 18119 VERMILLION 18165
DEARBORN 18029 JAY 18075 PARKE 18121 VIGO 18167
DECATUR 18031 JEFFERSON 18077 PERRY 18123 WABASH 18169
DE KALB 18033 JENNINGS 18079 PIKE 18125 WARREN 18171
DELAWARE 18035 JOHNSON 18081 PORTER 18127 WARRICK 18173
DUBOIS 18037 KNOX 18083 POSEY 18129 WASHINGTON 18175
ELKHART 18039 KOSCIUSKO 18085 PULASKI 18131 WAYNE 18177
FAYETTE 18041 LAGRANGE 18087 PUTNAM 18133 WELLS 18179
FLOYD 18043 LAKE 18089 RANDOLPH 18135 WHITE 18181
FOUNTAIN 18045 LA PORTE 18091 RIPLEY 18137 WHITLEY 18183
IOWA
ADAIR 19001 DAVIS 19051 JEFFERSON 19101 POCAHONTAS 19151
ADAMS 19003 DECATUR 19053 JOHNSON 19103 POLK 19153
ALLAMAKEE 19005 DELAWARE 19055 JONES 19105 POTTAWATTAMIE 19155
APPANOOSE 19007 DES MOINES 19057 KEOKUK 19107 POWESHIEK 19157
AUDUBON 19009 DICKINSON 19059 KOSSUTH 19109 RINGGOLD 19159
BENTON 19011 DUBUQUE 19061 LEE 19111 SAC 19161
BLACK HAWK 19013 EMMET 19063 LINN 19113 SCOTT 19163
BOONE 19015 FAYETTE 19065 LOUISA 19115 SHELBY 19165
BREMER 19017 FLOYD 19067 LUCAS 19117 SIOUX 19167
BUCHANAN 19019 FRANKLIN 19069 LYON 19119 STORY 19169
BUENA VISTA 19021 FREMONT 19071 MADISON 19121 TAMA 19171
BUTLER 19023 GREENE 19073 MAHASKA 19123 TAYLOR 19173
CALHOUN 19025 GRUNDY 19075 MARION 19125 UNION 19175
CARROLL 19027 GUTHRIE 19077 MARSHALL 19127 VAN BUREN 19177
CASS 19029 HAMILTON 19079 MILLS 19129 WAPELLO 19179
CEDAR 19031 HANCOCK 19081 MITCHELL 19131 WARREN 19181
CERRO GORDO 19033 HARDIN 19083 MONONA 19133 WASHINGTON 19183
CHEROKEE 19035 HARRISON 19085 MONROE 19135 WAYNE 19185
CHICKASAW 19037 HENRY 19087 MONTGOMERY 19137 WEBSTER 19187
CLARKE 19039 HOWARD 19089 MUSCATINE 19139 WINNEBAGO 19189
CLAY 19041 HUMBOLDT 19091 O'BRIEN 19141 WINNESHIEK 19191
CLAYTON 19043 IDA 19093 OSCEOLA 19143 WOODBURY 19193
CLINTON 19045 IOWA 19095 PAGE 19145 WORTH 19195
CRAWFORD 19047 JACKSON 19097 PALO ALTO 19147 WRIGHT 19197
DALLAS 19049 JASPER 19099 PLYMOUTH 19149
KANSAS
ALLEN 20001 FINNEY 20055 LOGAN 20109 ROOKS 20163
ANDERSON 20003 FORD 20057 LYON 20111 RUSH 20165
ATCHISON 20005 FRANKLIN 20059 MCPHERSON 20113 RUSSELL 20167
BARBER 20007 GEARY 20061 MARION 20115 SALINE 20169
BARTON 20009 GOVE 20063 MARSHALL 20117 SCOTT 20171
BOURBON 20011 GRAHAM 20065 MEADE 20119 SEDGWICK 20173
C-9
BROWN 20013 GRANT 20067 MlAMI 20121 SEWARD 20175
BUTLER 20015 GRAY 20069 MITCHELL 20123 SHAWNEE 20177
CHASE 20017 GREELEY 20071 MONTGOMERY 20125 SHERIDAN 20179
CHAUTAUQUA 20019 GREENWOOD 20073 MORRIS 20127 SHERMAN 20181
CHEROKEE 20021 HAMILTON 20075 MORTON 20129 SMITH 20183
CHEYENNE 20023 HARPER 20077 NEMAHA 20131 STAFFORD 20185
CLARK 20025 HARVEY 20079 NEOSHO 20133 STANTON 20187
CLAY 20027 HASKELL 20081 NESS 20135 STEVENS 20189
CLOUD 20029 HOWEMAN 20083 NORTON 20137 SUMNER 20191
COFFEY 20031 JACKSON 20085 OSAGE 20139 THOMAS 20193
COMANCHE 20033 JEFFERSON 20087 OSBORNE 20141 TREGO 20195
COWLEY 20035 JEWELL 20089 OTTAWA 20143 WABAUNSEE 20197
CRAWFORD 20037 JOHNSON 20091 PAWNEE 20145 WALLACE 20199
DECATUR 20039 KEARNY 20093 PHILLIPS 20147 WASHINGTON 20201
DICKINSON 20041 KINGMAN 20095 POTTAWATOMIE 20149 WICHITA 20203
DONIPHAN 20043 KIOWA 20097 PRATT 20151 WILSON 20205
DOUGLAS 20045 LABETTE 20099 RAWLINS 20153 WOODSON 20207
EDWARDS 20047 LANE 20101 RENO 20155 WYANDOTTE 20209
ELK 20049 LEAVENWORTH 20103 REPUBLIC 20157
ELLIS 20051 LINCOLN 20105 RICE 20159
ELLSWORTH 20053 LINN 20107 RILEY 20161
KENTUCKY
ADAIR 21001 EDMONSON 21061 KNOX 21121 NICHOLAS 21181
ALLEN 21003 ELLIOTT 21063 LARVE 21123 OHIO 21183
ANDERSON 21005 ESTILL 21065 LAUREL 21125 OLDHAM 21185
BALLARD 21007 FAYETTE 21067 LAWRENCE 21127 OWEN 21187
BARREN 21009 FLEMING 21069 LEE 21129 OWSLEY 21189
BATH 21011 FLOYD 21071 LESLIE 21131 PENDLETON 21191
BELL 21013 FRANKLIN 21073 LETCHER 21133 PERRY 21193
BOONE 21015 FULTON 21075 LEWIS 21135 PIKE 21195
BOURBON 21017 GALLATIN 21077 LINCOLN 21137 POWELL 21197
BOYD 21019 GARRARD 21079 LIVINGSTON 21139 PULASKI 21199
BOYLE 21021 GRANT 21081 LOGAN 21141 ROBERTSON 21201
BRACKEN 21023 GRAVES 21083 LYON 21143 ROCKCASTLE 21203
BREATHITT 21025 GRAYSON 21085 MCCRACKEN 21145 ROWAN 21205
BRECKINRIDGE 21027 GREEN 21087 MCCREARY 21147 RUSSELL 21207
BULLITT 21029 GREENUP 21089 MCLEAN 21149 SCOTT 21209
BUTLER 21031 HANCOCK 21091 MADISON 21151 SHELBY 21211
CALDWELL 21033 HARDIN 21093 MAGOFFIN 21153 SIMPSON 21213
CALLOWAY 21035 HARLAN 21095 MARION 21155 SPENCER 21215
CAMPBELL 21037 HARRISON 21097 MARSHALL 21157 TAYLOR 21217
CARLISLE 21039 HART 21099 MARTIN 21159 TODD 21219
CARROLL 21041 HENDERSON 21101 MASON 21161 TRIGG 21221
CARTER 21043 HENRY 21103 MEADE 21163 TRIMBLE 21223
CASEY 21045 HICKMAN 21105 MENIFEE 21165 UNION 21225
CHRISTIAN 21047 HOPKINS 21107 MERCER 21167 WARREN 21227
CLARK 21049 JACKSON 21109 METCALFE 21169 WASHINGTON 21229
CLAY 21051 JEFFERSON 21111 MONROE 21171 WAYNE 21231
KENTUCKY (Continued)
CLINTON 21053 JESSAMINE 21113 MONTGOMERY 21173 WEBSTER 21233
CRITTENDEN 21055 JOHNSON 21115 MORGAN 21175 WHITLEY 21235
CUMBERLAND 21057 KENTON 21117 MUHLENBERG 21177 WOLFE 21237
DAVIESS 21059 KNOTT 21119 NELSON 21179 WOODFORD 21239
LOUISIANA
ACADIA 22001 EAST BATON ROUGE 22033 MADISON 22065 SAINT LANDRY 22097
ALLEN 22003 EAST CARROLL 22035 MOREHOUSE 22067 SAINT MARTIN 22099
ASCENSION 22005 EAST FELICIANA 22037 NATCHITOCHES 22069 SAINT MARY 22101
ASSUMPTION 22007 EVANGELINE 22039 ORLEANS 22071 SAINT TAMMANY 22103
AVOYELLES 22009 FRANKLIN 22041 OUACHITA 22073 TANGIPAHOA 22105
BEAUREGARD 22011 GRANT 22043 PLAQUEMINES 22075 TENSAS 22107
BIENVILLE 22013 IBERIA 22045 POINTE COUPEE 22077 TERREBONNE 22109
C-9
BOSSER 22015 IBERVILLE 22047 RAPIDES 22079 UNION 22111
CADDO 22017 JACKSON 22049 RED RIVER 22081 VERMILION 22113
CALCASIEU 22019 JEFFERSON 22051 RICHLAND 22083 VERNON 22115
CALDWELL 22021 JEFFERSON DAVIS 22053 SABINE 22085 WASHINGTON 22117
CAMERON 22023 LAFAYETTE 22055 SAINT BERNARD 22087 WEBSTER 22119
CATAHOULA 22025 LAFOURCHE 22057 SAINT CHARLES 22089 WEST BATON ROUGE 22121
CLAIBORNE 22027 LA SALLE 22059 SA1NT HELENA 22091 WEST CARROLL 22123
CONCORDIA 22029 LINCOLN 22061 SA1NT JAMES 22093 WEST FELICIANA 22125
DE SOTO 22031 LIVINGSTON 22063 ST JOHN THE BAPTIST 22095 WINN 22127
MAINE
ANDROSCOGGIN 23001 HANCOCK 23009 OXFORD 23017 SOMERSET 23025
AROOSTOOK 23003 KENNEBEC 23011 PENOBSCOT 23019 WALDO 23027
CUMBERLAND 23005 KNOX 23013 PISCATAQUIS 23021 WASHINGTON 23029
FRANKLIN 23007 LINCOLN 23015 SAGADAHOC 23023 YORK 23031
MARYLAND
ALLEGANY 24001 CARROLL 24013 HARFORD 24025 SAINT MARY'S 24037
ANNE ARUNDEL 24003 CECIL 24015 HOWARD 24027 SOMERSET 24039
BALTIMORE 24005 CHARLES 24017 KENT 24029 TALBOT 24041
BALTIMORE CITY 24510 DORCHESTER 24019 MONTGOMERY 24031 WASHINGTON 24043
CALVERT 24009 FREDERICK 24021 PRINCE GEORGE'S 24033 WICOMICO 24045
CAROLINE 24011 GARRETT 24023 QUEEN ANNE'S 24035 WORCESTER 24047
MASSACHUSETTS
BARNSTABLE 25001 ESSEX 25009 MIDDLESEX 25017 SUFFOLK 25025
BERKSHIRE 25003 FRANKLIN 25011 NANTUCKET 25019 WORCESTER 25027
BRISTOL 25005 HAMPDEN 25013 NORFOLK 25021
DUKES 25007 HAMPSHIRE 25015 PLYMOUTH 25023
MICHIGAN
ALCONA 26001 DICKINSON 26043 LAKE 26085 OCEANA 26127
ALGER 26003 EATON 26045 LAPEER 26087 OGEMAW 26129
ALLEGAN 26005 EMMET 26047 LEELANAU 26089 ONTONAGON 26131
ALPENA 26007 GENESEE 26049 LENAWEE 26091 OSCEOLA 26133
ANTItIM 26009 GLADWIN 26051 LIVINGSTON 26093 OSCODA 26135
ARENAC 26011 GOGEBIC 26053 LUCE 26095 OTSEGO 26137
BARAGA 26013 GRAND TRAVERSE 26055 MACKINAC 26097 OTTAWA 26139
BARRY 26015 GRATIOT 26057 MACOMB 26099 PRESQUE ISLE 26141
BAY 26017 HILLSDALE 26059 MANISTEE 26101 ROSCOMMON 26143
BENZIE 26019 HOUGHTON 26061 MARQUETTE 26103 SAGINAW 26145
MICHIGAN (Continued)
BERRIEN 26021 HURON 26063 MASON 26105 SAINT CLAIR 26147
BRANCH 26023 INGHAM 26065 MECOSTA 26107 SAINT JOSEPH 26149
CALHOUN 26025 IONIA 26067 MENOMINEE 26109 SANILAC 26151
CASS 26027 IOSCO 26069 MIDLAND 26111 SCHOOLCRAFT 26153
CHARLEVOIX 26029 IRON 26071 MISSAUKEE 26113 SHIAWASSEE 26155
CHEBOYGAN 26031 ISABELLA 26073 MONROE 26115 TUSCOLA 26157
CHIPPEWA 26033 JACKSON 26075 MONTCALM 26117 VAN BUREN 26159
CLARE 26035 KALAMAZOO 26077 MONTMORENCY 26119 WASHTENAW 26161
CLINTON 26037 KALKASKA 26079 MUSKEGON 26121 WAYNE 26163
CRAWFORD 26039 KENT 26081 NEWAYGO 26123 WEXFORD 26165
DELTA 26041 KEEWEENAW 26083 OAKLAND 26125
MINNESOTA
AITKIN 27001 FILLMORE 27045 MARSHALL 27089 ROCK 27133
ANOKA 27003 FREEBORN 27047 MARTIN 27091 ROSEAU 27135
BECKER 27005 GOODHUE 27049 MEEKER 27093 SAINT LOUIS 27137
BELTRAMI 27007 GRANT 27051 MILLE LACS 27095 SCOTT 27139
BENTON 27009 HENNEPIN 27053 MORRISON 27097 SHERBURNE 27141
BIG STONE 27011 HOUSTON 27055 MOWER 27099 SIBLEY 27143
BLUE EARTH 27013 HUBBARD 27057 MURRAY 27101 STEARNS 27145
C-9
BROWN 27015 ISANTI 27059 NICOLLET 27103 STEELE 27147
CARLTON 27017 ITASCA 27061 NOBLES 27105 STEVENS 27149
CARVER 27019 JACKSON 27063 NORMAN 27107 SWIFT 27151
CASS 27021 KANABEC 27065 OLMSTED 27109 TODD 27153
CHIPPEWA 27023 KANDIYOHI 27067 OTTER TAIL 27111 TRAVERSE 27155
CHISAGO 27025 KITTSON 27069 PENNINGTON 27113 WABASHA 27157
CLAY 27027 KOOCHICHING 27071 PINE 27115 WADENA 27159
CLEARWATER 27029 LAC QUI PARLE 27073 PIPESTONE 27117 WASECA 27161
COOK 27031 LAKE 27075 POLK 27119 WASHINGTON 27163
COTTONWOOD 27033 LAKE OF THE WOODS 27077 POPE 27121 WATONWAN 27165
CROW WING 27035 LE SUEUR 27079 RAMSEY 27123 WILKIN 27167
DAKOTA 27037 LINCOLN 27081 RED LAKE 27125 WINONA 27169
DODGE 27039 LYON 27083 REDWOOD 27127 WRIGHT 27171
DOUGLAS 27041 MCLEOD 27085 RENVILLE 27129 YELLOW MEDICINE 27173
FARIBAULT 27043 MAHNOMEN 27087 RICE 27131
MISSISSIPPI
ADAMS 28001 GRENADA 28043 LINCOLN 28085 SIMPSON 28127
ALCORN 28003 HANCOCK 28045 LOWNDES 28087 SMITH 28129
AMITE 28005 HARRISON 28047 MADISON 28089 STONE 28131
ATTALA 28007 HINDS 28049 MARION 28091 SUNFLOWER 28133
BENTON 28009 HOLMES 28051 MARSHALL 28093 TALLAHATCHIE 28135
BOLIVAR 28011 HUMPHREYS 28053 MONROE 28095 TATE 28137
CALHOUN 28013 ISSAQUENA 28055 MONTGOMERY 28097 TIPPAH 28139
CARROLL 28015 ITAWAMBA 28057 NESHOBA 28099 TISHOMINGO 28141
CHICKASAW 28017 JACKSON 28059 NEWTON 28101 TUNICA 28143
CHOCTAW 28019 JASPER 28061 NOXUBEE 28103 UNION 28145
CLAIBORNE 28021 JEFFERSON 28063 OKTIBBEHA 28105 WALTHALL 28147
CLARKE 28023 JEFFERSON DAVIS 28065 PANOLA 28107 WARREN 28149
CLAY 28025 JONES 28067 PEARL RIVER 28109 WASHINGTON 28151
COAHOMA 28027 KEMPER 28069 PERRY 28111 WAYNE 28153
COPIAH 28029 LAFAYETTE 28071 PIKE 28113 WEBSTER 28155
COVINGTON 28031 LAMAR 28073 PONTOTOC 28115 WILKINSON 28157
DE SOTO 28033 LAUDERDALE 28075 PRENTISS 28117 WINSTON 28159
FORREST 28035 LAWRENCE 28077 QUITMAN 28119 YALOBUSHA 28161
FRANKLIN 28037 LEAKE 28079 RANKIN 28121 YAZOO 28163
MISSISSIPPI (Continued)
GEORGE 28039 LEE 28081 SCOTT 28123
GREENE 28041 LEFLORE 28083 SHARKEY 28125
MISSOURI
ADAIR 29001 DALLAS 29059 LIVINGSTON 29117 RANDOLPH 29175
ANDREW 29003 DAVIESS 29061 MCDONALD 29119 RAY 29177
ATCHISON 29005 DE KALB 29063 MACON 29121 REYNOLDS 29179
AUDRAIN 29007 DENT 29065 MADISON 29123 RIPLEY 29181
BARRY 29009 DOUGLAS 29067 MARIES 29125 SAINT CHARLES 29183
BARTON 29011 DUNKLIN 29069 MARION 29127 SAINT CLAIR 29185
BATES 29013 FRANKLIN 29071 MERCER 29129 SAINT GENEVIEVE 29186
BENTON 29015 GASCONADE 29073 MILLER 29131 SAINT FRANCOIS 29187
BOLLINGER 29017 GENTRY 29075 MISSISSIPPI 29133 SAINT LOUIS 29189
BOONE 29019 GREENE 29077 MONITEAU 29135 SALINE 29195
BUCHANAN 29021 GRUNDY 29079 MONROE 29137 SCHUYLER 29197
BUTLER 29023 HARRISON 29081 MONTGOMERY 29139 SCOTLAND 29199
CALDWELL 29025 HENRY 29083 MORGAN 29141 SCOTT 29201
CALLAWAY 29027 HICKORY 29085 NEW MADRID 29143 SHANNON 29203
CAMDEN 29029 HOLT 29087 NEWTON 29145 SHELBY 29205
CAPE GIRARDEAU 29031 HOWARD 29089 NODAWAY 29147 STODDARD 29207
CARROLL 29033 HOWELL 29091 OREGON 29149 STONE 29209
CARTER 29035 IRON 29093 OSAGE 29151 SULLIVAN 29211
CASS 29037 JACKSON 29095 OZARK 29153 TANEY 29213
CEDAR 29039 JASPER 29097 PEMISCOT 29155 TEXAS 29215
CHARITON 29041 JEFFERSON 29099 PERRY 29157 VERNON 29217
CHRISTIAN 29043 JOHNSON 29101 PETTIS 29159 WARREN 29219
CLARK 29045 KNOX 29103 PHELPS 29161 WASHINGTON 29221
C-9
CLAY 29047 LACLEDE 29105 PIKE 29163 WAYNE 29223
CLINTON 29049 LAFAYETTE 29107 PLATTE 29165 WEBSTER 29225
COLE 290S1 LAWRENCE 29109 POLK 29167 WORTH 29227
COOPER 29053 LEWIS 29111 PULASKI 29169 WRIGHT 29229
CRAWFORD 29055 LINCOLN 29113 PUTNAM 29171 SAINT LOUIS CITY 29510
DADE 29057 LINN 29115 RALLS 29173
MONTANA
BEAVERHEAD 30001 GALLATIN 30031 MINERAL 30061 SHERIDAN 30091
BIG HORN 30003 GARFELD 30033 MISSOULA 30063 SILVER BOW 30093
BLAINE 30005 GLACIER 30035 MUSSELSHELL 30065 STILLWATER 30095
BROADWATER 30007 GOLDEN VALLEY 30037 PARK 30067 SWEET GRASS 30097
CARBON 30009 GRANITE 30039 PETROLEUM 30069 TETON 30099
CARTER 30011 HILL 30041 PHILLIPS 30071 TOOLE 30101
CASCADE 30013 JEFFERSON 30043 PONDERA 30073 TREASURE 30103
CHOUTEAU 30015 JUDITH BASIN 30045 POWDER RIVER 30075 VALLEY 30105
CUSTER 30017 LAKE 30047 POWELL 30077 WHEATLAND 30107
DANIELS 30019 LEWIS AND CLARK 30049 PRAIRIE 30079 WIBAUX 30109
DAWSON 30021 LIBERTY 30051 RAVALLI 30081 YELLOWSTONE 30111
DEER LODGE 30023 LINCOLN 30053 RICHLAND 30083 Y’STONE NAT’L PARK 30113
FALLON 30025 MCCONE 30055 ROOSEVELT 30085
FERGUS 30027 MADISON 30057 ROSEBUD 30087
FLATHEAD 30029 MEAGHER 30059 SANDERS 30089
C-9
NEBRASKA
ADAMS 31001 DEUEL 31049 JOHNSON 31097 RED WILLOW 31145
ANTELOPE 31003 DIXON 31051 KEARNEY 31099 RICHARDSON 31147
ARTHUR 31005 DODGE 31053 KEITH 31101 ROCK 31149
BANNER 31007 DOUGLAS 31055 KEYA PAHA 31103 SALINE 31151
BLAINE 31009 DUNDY 31057 KIMBALL 31105 SARPY 31153
BOONE 31011 FILLMORE 31059 KNOX 31107 SAUNDERS 31155
BOX BUTTE 31013 FRANKLIN 31061 LANCASTER 31109 SCOTTS BLUFF 31157
BOYD 31015 FRONTIER 31063 LINCOLN 31111 SEWARD 31159
BROWN 31017 FURNAS 31065 LOGAN 31113 SHERIDAN 31161
BUFFALO 31019 GAGE 31067 LOUP 31115 SHERMAN 31163
BURT 31021 GARDEN 31069 MCPHERSON 31117 SIOUX 31165
BUTLER 31023 GARFIELD 31071 MADISON 31119 STANTON 31167
CASS 31025 GOSPER 31073 MERRICK 31121 THAYER 31169
CEDAR 31027 GRANT 31075 MORRILL 31123 THOMAS 31171
CHASE 31029 GREELEY 31077 NANCE 31125 THURSTON 31173
CHERRY 31031 HALL 31079 NEMAHA 31127 VALLEY 31175
CHEYENNE 31033 HAMILTON 31081 NUCKOLLS 31129 WASHINGTON 31177
CLAY 31035 HARLAN 31083 OTOE 31131 WAYNE 31179
COLFAX 31037 HAYES 31085 PAWNEE 31133 WEBSTER 31181
CUMING 31039 HITCHCOCK 31087 PERKINS 31135 WHEELER 31183
CUSTER 31041 HOLT 31089 PHELPS 31137 YORK 31185
DAKOTA 31043 HOOKER 31091 PIERCE 31139
DAWES 31045 HOWARD 31093 PLATTE 31141
DAWSON 31047 JEFFERSON 31095 POLK 31143
NEVADA
CHURCHILL 32001 EUREKA 32011 MINERAL 32021 WHITE PINE 32033
CLARK 32003 HUMBOLDT 32013 NYE 32023 CARSON CITY 32510
DOUGLAS 32005 LANDER 32015 PERSHING 32027
ELKO 32007 LINCOLN 32017 STOREY 32029
ESMERALDA 32009 LYON 32019 WASHOE 32031
NEW HAMPSHIRE
BELKNAP 33001 COOS 33007 MERRIMACK 33013 SULLIVAN 33019
CARROLL 33003 GRAFTON 33009 ROCKINGHAM 33015
CHESHIRE 33005 HILLSBOROUGH 33011 STRAFFORD 33017
NEW JERSEY
ATLANTIC 34001 ESSEX 34013 MONMOUTH 34025 SUSSEX 34037
BERGEN 34003 GLOUCESTER 34015 MORRIS 34027 UNION 34039
BURLINGTON 34005 HUDSON 34017 OCEAN 34029 WARREN 34041
CAMDEN 34007 HUNTERDON 34019 PASSAIC 34031
CAPE MAY 34009 MERCER 34021 SALEM 34033
CUMBERLAND 34011 MIDDLESEX 34023 SOMERSET 34035
NEW MEXICO
BERNALILLO 35001 EDDY 35015 LUNA 35029 SAN JUAN 35045
CATRON 35003 GRANT 35017 MCKINLEY 35031 SAN MIGUEL 35047
CHAVES 35005 GUADALUPE 35019 MORA 35033 SANTA FE 35049
CIBOLA 35006 HARDING 35021 OTERO 35035 SIERRA 35051
COLFAX 35007 HIDALGO 35023 QUAY 35037 SOCORRO 35053
CURRY 35009 LEA 35025 RIO ARRIBA 35039 TAOS 35055
DE BACA 35011 LINCOLN 35027 ROOSEVELT 35041 TORRANCE 35057
DONA ANA 35013 LOS ALAMOS 35028 SANDOVAL 35043 UNION 35059
NEW MEXICO (Continued)
VALENCIA 35061
C-9
NEW YORK
ALBANY 36001 FRANKLIN 36033 ONEIDA 36065 SCHUYLER 36097
ALLEGANY 36003 FULTON 36035 ONONDAGA 36067 SENECA 36099
BRONX 36005 GENESEE 36037 ONTARIO 36069 STEUBEN 36101
BROOME 36007 GREENE 36039 ORANGE 36071 SUFFOLK 36103
CATTARAUGUS 36009 HAMILTON 36041 ORLEANS 36073 SULLIVAN 36105
CAYUGA 36011 HERKIMER 36043 OSWEGO 36075 TIOGA 36107
CHAUTAQUA 36013 JEFFERSON 36045 OTSEGO 36077 TOMPKINS 36109
CHEMUNG 36015 KINGS 36047 PUTNAM 36079 ULSTER 36111
CHENANGO 36017 LEWIS 36049 QUEENS 36081 WARREN 36113
CLINTON 36019 LlVINGSTON 36051 RENSSELAER 36083 WASHINGTON 36115
COLUMBIA 36021 MADISON 36053 RICHMOND 36085 WAYNE 36117
CORTLAND 36023 MONROE 36055 ROCKLAND 36087 WESTCHESTER 36119
DELAWARE 36025 MONTGOMERY 36057 ST. LAWRENCE 36089 WYOMING 36121
DUTCHESS 36027 NASSAU 36059 SARATOGA 36091 YATES 36123
ERIE 36029 NEW YORK 36061 SCHENECTADY 36093
ESSEX 36031 NIAGARA 36063 SCHOHARIE 36095
NORTH CAROLINA
ALAMANCE 37001 CUMBERLAND 37051 JOHNSTON 37101 RANDOLPH 37151
ALEXANDER 37003 CURRITUCK 37053 JONES 37103 RICHMOND 37153
ALLEGHANY 37005 DARE 37055 LEE 37105 ROBESON 37155
ANSON 37007 DAVIDSON 37057 LENOIR 37107 ROCKINGHAM 37157
ASHE 37009 DAVIE 37059 LINCOLN 37109 ROWAN 37159
AVERY 37011 DUPLIN 37061 MCDOWELL 37111 RUTHERFORD 37161
BEAUFORT 37013 DURHAM 37063 MACON 37113 SAMPSON 37163
BERTE 37015 EDGECOMBE 37065 MADISON 37115 SCOTLAND 37165
BLADEN 37017 FORSYTH 37067 MARTIN 37117 STANLY 37167
BRUNSWICK 37019 FRANKLIN 37069 MECKLENBURG 37119 STOKES 37169
BUNCOMBE 37021 GASTON 37071 MITCHELL 37121 SURRY 37171
BURKE 37023 GATES 37073 MONTGOMERY 37123 SWAIN 37173
CABARRUS 37025 GRAHAM 37075 MOORE 37125 TRANSYLVANIA 37175
CALDWELL 37027 GRANVILLE 37077 NASH 37127 TYRRELL 37177
CAMDEN 37029 GREENE 37079 NEW HANOVER 37129 UNION 37179
CARTERET 37031 GUILFORD 37081 NORTHAMPTON 37131 VANCE 37181
CASWELL 37033 HALIFAX 37083 ONSLOW 37133 WAKE 37183
CATAWBA 37035 HARNETT 37085 ORANGE 37135 WARREN 37185
CHATHAM 37037 HAYWOOD 37087 PAMLICO 37137 WASHINGTON 37187
CHEROKEE 37039 HENDERSON 37089 PASQUOTANK 37139 WATAUGA 37189
CHOWAN 37041 HERTFORD 37091 PENDER 37141 WAYNE 37191
CLAY 37043 HOKE 37093 PERQUIMANS 37143 WILKES 37193
CLEVELAND 37045 HYDE 37095 PERSON 37145 WILSON 37195
COLUMBUS 37047 IREDELL 37097 PITT 37147 YADKIN 37197
CRAVEN 37049 JACKSON 37099 POLK 37149 YANCEY 37199
NORTH DAKOTA
ADAMS 38001 CASS 38017 GOLDEN VALLEY 38033 MCHENRY 38049
BARNES 38003 CAVALIER 38019 GRAND FORKS 38035 MCINTOSH 38051
BENSON 38005 DICKEY 38021 GRANT 38037 MCKENZIE 38053
BILLINGS 38007 DIVIDE 38023 GRIGGS 38039 MCLEAN 38055
BOTTINEAU 38009 DUNN 38025 HETTINGER 38041 MERCER 38057
BOWMAN 38011 EDDY 38027 KIDDER 38043 MORTON 38059
BURKE 38013 EMMONS 38029 LA MOURE 38045 MOUNTRAIL 38061
BURLEIGH 38015 FOSTER 38031 LOGAN 38047 NELSON 38063
NORTH DAKOTA (Continued)
OLIVER 38065 RICHLAND 38077 STARK 38089 WARD 38101
PEMBINA 38067 ROLETTE 38079 STEELE 38091 WELLS 38103
PIERCE 38069 SARGENT 38081 STUTSMAN 38093 WILLIAMS 38105
RAMSEY 38071 SHERIDAN 38083 TOWNER 38095
RANSOM 38073 SIOUX 38085 TRAILL 38097
RENVILLE 38075 SLOPE 38087 WALSH 38099
C-9
OHIO
ADAMS 39001 FAIRFIELD 39045 LICKING 39089 PORTAGE 39133
ALLEN 39003 FAYETTE 39047 LOGAN 39091 PREBLE 39135
ASHLAND 39005 FRANKLIN 39049 LORAIN 39093 PUTNAM 39137
ASHTABULA 39007 FULTON 39051 LUCAS 39095 RICHLAND 39139
ATHENS 39009 GALLIA 39053 MADISON 39097 ROSS 39141
AUGLAIZE 39011 GEAUGA 39055 MAHONING 39099 SANDUSKY 39143
BELMONT 39013 GREENE 39057 MARION 39101 SCIOTO 39145
BROWN 39015 GUERNSEY 39059 MEDINA 39103 SENECA 39147
BUTLER 39017 HAMILTON 39061 MEIGS 39105 SHELBY 39149
CARROLL 39019 HANCOCK 39063 MERCER 39107 STARK 39151
CHAMPAIGN 39021 HARDIN 39065 MIAMI 39109 SUMMIT 39153
CLARK 39023 HARRISON 39067 MONROE 39111 TRUMBULL 39155
CLERMONT 39025 HENRY 39069 MONTGOMERY 39113 TUSCARAWAS 39157
CLINTON 39027 HIGHLAND 39071 MORGAN 39115 UN1ON 39159
COLUMBIANA 39029 HOCKING 39073 MORROW 39117 VAN WERT 39161
COSHOCTON 39031 HOLMES 39075 MUSKINGUM 39119 VINTON 39163
CRAWFORD 39033 HURON 39077 NOBLE 39121 WARREN 39165
CUYAHOGA 39035 JACKSON 39079 OTTAWA 39123 WASHINGTON 39167
DARKE 39037 JEFFERSON 39081 PAULDING 39125 WAYNE 39169
DEFIANCE 39039 KNOX 39083 PERRY 39127 WILLIAMS 39171
DELAWARE 39041 LAKE 39085 PICKAWAY 39129 WOOD 39173
ERIE 39043 LAWRENCE 39087 PIKE 39131 WYANDOT 39175
OKLAHOMA
ADAIR 40001 DELAWARE 40041 LINCOLN 40081 PITTSBURG 40121
ALFALFA 40003 DEWEY 40043 LOGAN 40083 PONTOTOC 40123
ATOKA 40005 ELLIS 40045 LOVE 40085 POTTAWATOMIE 40125
BEAVER 40007 GARFIELD 40047 MCCLAIN 40087 PUSHMATAHA 40127
BECKHAM 40009 GARVIN 40049 MCCURTAIN 40089 ROGER MILLS 40129
BLAINE 40011 GRADY 40051 MCINTOSH 40091 ROGERS 40131
BRYAN 40013 GRANT 40053 MAJOR 40093 SEMINOLE 40133
CADDO 40015 GREER 40055 MARSHALL 40095 SEQUOYAH 40135
CANADIAN 40017 HARMON 40057 MAYES 40097 STEPHENS 40137
CARTER 40019 HARPER 40059 MURRAY 40099 TEXAS 40139
CHEROKEE 40021 HASKELL 40061 MUSKOGEE 40101 TILLMAN 40141
CHOCTAW 40023 HUGHES 40063 NOBLE 40103 TULSA 40143
CIMARRON 40025 JACKSON 40065 NOWATA 40105 WAGONER 40145
CLEVELAND 40027 JEFFERSON 40067 OKFUSKEE 40107 WASHINGTON 40147
COAL 40029 JOHNSTON 40069 OKLAHOMA 40109 WASHITA 40149
COMANCHE 40031 KAY 40071 OKMULGEE 40111 WOODS 40151
COTTON 40033 KINGFISHER 40073 OSAGE 40113 WOODWARD 40153
CRAIG 40035 KIOWA 40075 OTTAWA 40115
CREEK 40037 LATIMER 40077 PAWNEE 40117
CUSTER 40039 LE FLORE 40079 PAYNE 40119
OREGON
BAKER 41001 CLACKAMAS 41005 COLUMBIA 41009 CROOK 41013
BENTON 41003 CLATSOP 41007 COOS 41011 CURRY 41015
OREGON (Continued)
DESCHUTES 41017 JEFFERSON 41031 MALHEUR 41045 UMATILLA 41059
DOUGLAS 41019 JOSEPHINE 41033 MARION 41047 UNION 41061
GILLIAM 41021 KLAMATH 41035 MORROW 41049 WALLOWA 41063
GRANT 41023 LAKE 41037 MULTNOMAH 41051 WASCO 41065
HARNEY 41025 LANE 41039 POLK 41053 WASHINGTON 41067
HOOD RIVER 41027 LINCOLN 41041 SHERMAN 41055 WHEELER 41069
JACKSON 41029 LINN 41043 TILLAMOOK 41057 YAMHILL 41071
PENNSYLVANIA
ADAMS 42001 CLINTON 42035 LACKAWANNA 42069 PIKE 42103
ALLEGHENY 42003 COLUMBIA 42037 LANCASTER 42071 POTTER 42105
C-9
ARMSTRONG 42005 CRAWFORD 42039 LAWRENCE 42073 SCHUYLKILL 42107
BEAVER 42007 CUMBERLAND 42041 LEBANON 42075 SNYDER 42109
BEDFORD 42009 DAUPHIN 42043 LEHIGH 42077 SOMERSET 42111
BERKS 42011 DELAWARE 42045 LUZERNE 42079 SULLIVAN 42113
BLAIR 42013 ELK 42047 LYCOMING 42081 SUSQUEHANNA 42115
BRADFORD 42015 ERIE 42049 MCKEAN 42083 TIOGA 42117
BUCKS 42017 FAYETTE 42051 MERCER 42085 UNION 42119
BUTLER 42019 FOREST 42053 MIFFLIN 42087 VENANGO 42121
CAMBRIA 42021 FRANKLIN 42055 MONROE 42089 WARREN 42123
CAMERON 42023 FULTON 42057 MONTGOMERY 42091 WASHINGTON 42125
CARBON 42025 GREENE 42059 MONTOUR 42093 WAYNE 42127
CENTRE 42027 HUNTINGDON 42061 NORTHAMPTON 42095 WESTMORELAND 42129
CHESTER 42029 INDIANA 42063 NORTHUMBERLAND 42097 WYOMING 42131
CLARION 42031 JEFFERSON 42065 PERRY 42099 YORK 42133
CLEARFELD 42033 JUNIATA 42067 PHILADELPHIA 42101
RHODE ISLAND
BRISTOL 44001 NEWPORT 44005 WASHlNGTON 44009
KENT 44003 PROVIDENCE 44007
SOUTH CAROLINA
ABBEVILLE 45001 CHESTERFELD 45025 HAMPTON 45049 OCONEE 45073
AIKEN 45003 CLARENDON 45027 HORRY 45051 ORANGEBURG 45075
ALLENDALE 45005 COLLETON 45029 JASPER 45053 PICKENS 45077
ANDERSON 45007 DARLINGTON 45031 KERSHAW 45055 RICHLAND 45079
BAMBERG 45009 DILLON 45033 LANCASTER 45057 SALUDA 45081
BARNWELL 45011 DORCHESTER 45035 LAURENS 45059 SPARTANBURG 45083
BEAUFORT 45013 EDGEFIELD 45037 LEE 45061 SUMTER 45085
BERKELEY 45015 FAIRFELD 45039 LEXINGTON 45063 UNION 45087
CALHOUN 45017 FLORENCE 45041 MCCORMICK 45065 WILLIAMSBURG 45089
CHARLESTON 45019 GEORGETOWN 45043 MARION 45067 YORK 45091
CHEROKEE 45021 GREENVILLE 45045 MARLBORO 45069
CHESTER 45023 GREENWOOD 45047 NEWBERRY 45071
SOUTH DAKOTA
AURORA 46003 CHARLES MIX 46023 EDMUNDS 46045 HUGHES 46065
BEADLE 46005 CLARK 46025 FALL RIVER 46047 HUTCHINSON 46067
BENNETT 46007 CLAY 46027 FAULK 46049 HYDE 46069
BON HOMME 46009 CORSON 46031 GRANT 46051 JACKSON 46071
BROOKINGS 46011 CUSTER 46033 GREGORY 46053 IERAULD 46073
BROWN 46013 DAVISON 46035 HAAKON 46055 JONES 46075
BRULE 46015 DAY 46037 HAMLIN 46057 KINGSBURY 46077
BUFFALO 46017 DEUEL 46039 HAND 46059 LAKE 46079
BUTTE 46019 DEWEY 46041 HANSON 46061 LAWRENCE 46081
CAMPBELL 46021 DOUGLAS 46043 HARDING 46063 LINCOLN 46083
SOUTH DAKOTA (Continued)
LYMAN 46085 MINNEHAHA 46099 SHANNON 46113 UNION 46127
MCCOOK 46087 MOODY 46101 SPINK 46115 WALWORTH 46129
MCPHERSON 46089 PENNINGTON 46103 STANLEY 46117 YANKTON 46135
MARSHALL 46091 PERKINS 46105 SULLY 46119 ZIEBACH 46137
MEADE 46093 POTTER 46107 TODD 46121
MELLETTE 46095 ROBERTS 46109 TRIPP 46123
MINER 46097 SANBORN 46111 TURNER 46125
TENNESSEE
ANDERSON 47001 FENTRESS 47049 LAUDERDALE 47097 ROANE 47145
BEDFORD 47003 FRANKLIN 47051 LAWRENCE 47099 ROBERTSON 47147
BENTON 47005 GIBSON 47053 LEWIS 47101 RUTHERFORD 47149
BLEDSOE 47007 GILES 47055 LINCOLN 47103 SCOTT 47151
BLOUNT 47009 GRAINGER 47057 LOUDON 47105 SEQUATCHIE 47153
BRADLEY 47011 GREENE 47059 MCMINN 47107 SEVIER 47155
C-9
CAMPBELL 47013 GRUNDY 47061 MCNAIRY 47109 SHELBY 47157
CANNON 47015 HAMBLEN 47063 MACON 47111 SMITH 47159
CARROLL 47017 HAMILTON 47065 MADISON 47113 STEWART 47161
CARTER 47019 HANCOCK 47067 MARION 47115 SULLIVAN 47163
CHEATHAM 47021 <